Podcasts about Northern New Mexico

Geographic region in the state of New Mexico, United States

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Northern New Mexico

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Best podcasts about Northern New Mexico

Latest podcast episodes about Northern New Mexico

PEPPER FOR YOUR STEAK
P6E004 - "To Experiment Within The Vastness of the Platitudes" - Maverick Matthews

PEPPER FOR YOUR STEAK

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 63:03


     Recently, while cleaning out my phone, I found several voice messages from two people who are no longer with us.  On this episode I share my experience of listening to these messages for the first time as a kind of catharsis and release from the past.      The first comes from Michael Johnstone, who's interview you can hear in a previous episode of PFYS and who co-hosted my first podcasting experience over a decade ago from his snowboard shop in Northern New Mexico.  The second is from my mother, Dana West Carvalho.       This indulgence into High Strangeness ends up with me pontificating on the meaning of life, the nature of beauty and exploring my ideas about the true nature of spirituality and religion.      At least you can't fault this show for reaching for low hanging fruit, eh?  However somber and melancholy it may seem, however pretentious and far reaching, I promise you will leave feeling inspired, renewed and perhaps even invigorated in your searching for meaning and gratitude.  Thank you for your indulgence.   Opening Music: New Constellations - Hot Blooded Mid Music:  Player - Baby Come Back Outro Music: Dazy Park - Heartbeat City   Please visit MaverickMatthews.com and consider contributing by purchasing my new art book, CAMPFIRE.    

Where We Meet: Conversations from New Mexico and Beyond
Olivia Romo - On storytelling, the land, and the Manito experience.

Where We Meet: Conversations from New Mexico and Beyond

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 27:15


An American poet, spoken word artist, subsistence farmer, and water rights activist from Taos, New Mexico, Olivia Romo addresses the deep and rich history of Northern New Mexico.

The Destination Angler Podcast
Man vs Fish: stories from Northern New Mexico and the Chama River with Taylor Streit

The Destination Angler Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 74:47


Today our destination is the Rio Chama in Northern New Mexico with author, guide, and fly shop owner, Taylor Streit, Taos Fly Shop.  Wild and remote, the Chama is a great summer hike-in fishery with freestone and tailwater sections where anglers can get away from the crowds.   Taylor gives a stem-to-stern rundown of the Chama and regales us with tales of commune living in the 1960s, eating jackrabbits, the last grizzly bear, tame elk, getting lost, catching “old Walter” the 26” Brown Trout, Taos Pueblo and the Northern New Mexico vibe.  With host, Steve Haigh Pictures of the Chama and Taylor's top fly picks: @DestinationAnglerPodcast on Instagram and Facebook About Taylor Streit and Taos Fly Shop Taos Fly Shop:   https://taosflyshop.com/flyguide/main Email:  taylor@taosflyshop.com Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube @taosflyshop Please check out our Sponsors: Angler's Coffee - elevating the coffee experience for the fly-fishing community & anglers everywhere with small-batch coffee delivered to your doorstep.  https://anglerscoffee.com/   | Facebook & Instagram @anglerscoffeeco    Trout Routes - the #1 Trout Fishing app, helping you find new trout water so you spend less time on the road and more time fishing.  https://troutinsights.com/ | Facebook @troutinsights Instagram @TroutRoutes  Destination Angler: The Destination Angler Website and Show Notes:   http://destinationangler.libsyn.com/ Get updates and pictures of destinations covered on each podcast: @DestinationAnglerPodcast on Instagram and Facebook Join in the conversation with the @DestinationAnglerConnection group on Facebook. Comments & Suggestions:  host, Steve Haigh, email shaigh50@gmail.com Available on Apple, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts Recorded June 23, 2022.  Episode 70 Music on the show by A Brother's Fountain, “Hitch Hike-Man”.    Podcast edited by Podcast Volume  https://www.podcastvolume.com/

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - ZACK VAN EYCK - Skinwalker Ranch

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 60:14


Zack Van Eyck is a film and television writer, director and producer with more than 50 professional credits in a Hollywood career that began only after a 20-year career as an investigative news journalist. In the field of paranormal research, Zack is best known for his articles on the 1993-94 Northern New Mexico cattle mutilations and as the reporter who broke the “Skinwalker Ranch” story for the Deseret News and Associated Press worldwide in 1996.

Running New Mexico Podcast
Episode 116 - Bruce Gomez; Head Coach Taos Cross Country, Runner, Teacher

Running New Mexico Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 69:22


This week I had the pleasure to talk with Coach Bruce Gomez. He is the head cross country coach at Taos High School in Northern New Mexico. He's been at it for over 35 years and has coached some of the best runners in the state, with multiple state champions and championships. We talk about his own running, getting started as a kid and how it was just part of the culture for him. We talk about his start in junior high with more organized running and continuing into college. We talked a little about coaching and teaching, including a little about a Native American Studies class he taught. He also talked about participating in the1980 Tricentennial run to commemorate the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. Runners retraced the path of the original runners, starting from Taos Pueblo. The book, Indian Running, discusses it and gives some history as well. Bruce is a New Mexico Track and Cross Country Coaches Association Hall of Fame Member and I just can't speak enough about how much respect I have for him and the program he has built over the past 35 years. I'm honored to have been able to share some of his story and I hope you enjoy it. The heat just keeps coming. Take care to get your runs done early and be smart with your fitness. Stay hydrated, be kind, and keep running, New Mexico.

Paso A Paso Podcast - New Mexico Early Childhood Education
Aspen Mirabal - Breastfeeding and Resiliency

Paso A Paso Podcast - New Mexico Early Childhood Education

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 14:47


Ep 85 - Aspen Mirabal joins us to discuss breastfeeding as well as aspects of her relationship with Northern New Mexico and Taos Pueblo. A person of many skills and talents, we are so thankful that she joined us to share her insights and encourage you to follow her work. - https://www.facebook.com/IndigenousMilkMedicineWeek/ https://www.instagram.com/indigenousmilkmedicineweek/ https://thousanddays.org/updates/indigenous-milk-medicine-week-nourishing-our-futures/ www.PasoTaos.org --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/paso-a-paso/message

Interviews by Brainard Carey

The various types of images in Aschely Cone's work are unified insofar as they all share a meditation on the idea of ground—as something that underpins or is beneath something else, something that we notice persisting in the face of, or even because of, change, something as simple as the ground we stand on, or something a bit more intangible like what grounds us metaphorically. Her current project, "The Ground Beneath the Ground", thinks about ground as earth or dirt. In these small panels the image is often situated within a low-relief, sculptural niche on the ground of the support itself. Images of the land are depicted—often images of volcanoes, or images gathered from a long-distance solo hike in Northern New Mexico. Her upcoming work will bring this meditation to the forests of Gabon, Africa. Aschely Vaughan Cone (b. 1985, San Antonio, TX) received an MFA from the LeRoy E. Hoffberger School of Painting at the Maryland Institute College of Art (2016), an MA in Art History from Tulane University (2014) and BA in Liberal Arts from St. John's College (2007), where she studied classics, philosophy and the history of math and science. Her awards include a matching scholarship for study at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, the SMCM-MICA Artist House Teaching Fellowship, the Hamiltonian Fellowship and The Henry Walters Traveling Fellowship. The book mentioned in the interview was The Peregrine by J.A. Baker. We also discussed Gabon, learn more here with a free download. The French Institute of Gabon was also mentioned, the likely location of her upcoming show. The Ground Beneath the Ground (installation shot) All works 10"x8"x1" Oil on panel with hard gesso ground 2020-2022 Capulin Volcano, #6 10"x8"x1" Oil on panel with hard gesso ground, oil paint made from New Mexican dirt 2021

Soulful Streaming
Journey to the Fifth World: Shamanic Healing with Michele 'Ama Wehali' Rozbitzsky

Soulful Streaming

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 56:43


Today, we're taking a journey to the fifth world with the globally known and respected Shaman Michele ‘Ama Wehali' Rozbitzky. Michele is a psychotherapist, shamanic practitioner, teacher and ceremonialist based in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Michele has a wide range of experience from working at The Eight Northern Pueblos Council in Northern New Mexico and developing and managing a Family Violence Program called 'Peace Keepers.' She's also the author of the book, “Journey to the Fifth World Through 2012, Coming Full Circle in Healing and Transformation.  Themes We're Hitting on Today's Episode: What is shamanism and the responsibility that comes with being a shaman  Soul Lineage: Tina takes us through her own healing journey with Michele  Power Animals: What they are, how the change from childhood to adulthood and the best way to honor your own power animal. The Great Awakening: Why we're moving form learning from suffering to learning from inspiration  The benefits from spiritual practices and how to clear yourself from toxicity and manage your own energetic field  ***If you loved listening to our podcast as much as we loved creating it, please give us five stars and leave us a review. *** Stream with Michele “Ama Wehali” Rozbitsky Website: https://my.captivate.fm/www.journeytothefifthworld.com/index.html (http://www.journeytothefifthworld.com)  Watch OWN's “Miracle Detective” episode featuring Michele: https://my.captivate.fm/www.youtube.com/watch?v=9wY0PFhRGqs (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9wY0PFhRGqs) E-mail for Bookings: earthstar3@earthlink.net  Stream with Ali + Tina: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/soulfulstreaming/ (@soulfulstreaming) Website: http://www.soulfulstreaming.com/ (www.soulfulstreaming.com ) Email: Have a topic you want us to dive into or want to be a guest, email us at, Ali@soulfulstreaming.com and Tina@soulfulstreaming.com. 

THE WONDER: Science-Based Paganism
How Did We Get Into Paganism

THE WONDER: Science-Based Paganism

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 41:10


Remember, we welcome comments, questions and suggested topics at thewonderpodcastQs@gmail.com   S3E20 TRANSCRIPT:----more---- Mark: Welcome back to the wonder science-based paganism. I'm your host Mark.  Yucca: And I'm Yucca  Mark: And today we are going to ask one, another questions about our practices. What have they been like in the past? What are they like now? What are they likely or how would we like for them to evolve in the future? Basically just do sort of a Q and a back and forth between one another, to learn more about the details of how our spiritual practices go.  Yucca: Right. And how there can be very different approaches. I think that you and I share a lot, but we also come at things from, from pretty different perspectives as well. Mark: We do we do. I mean, particularly in the way that we envisioned the wheel of the year, I think is, is, you know, markedly different  Yucca: And also just one of the things I love about our conversations is that there's a, there's a pretty big age gap between us is a pretty big just family style, lifestyle gap, you know, gender differences. So I've really valued these conversations. Thank you. And I, I hope that that is interesting to, to all of you listeners as well. Mark: yeah. I hope it is. And I hope that it's worthy of spending the next half an hour, 40 minutes of your time. And I really value these conversations too. This is a, this is something I look forward to every year.  Yucca: Yeah, likewise. So, I mean, I think this is a really interesting chance to see how practices can kind of change and evolve over time with the person. So we've, we've talked about it a little bit before, but how did you get into this pagan thing?  Mark: Oh,  Yucca: went from, from an atheist to a pagan, right? Well, you're still atheist, but you know, to an atheopagan  Mark: Right, right. yeah. I was raised in a household that Just didn't have any religion and it was never discussed. So it's not like we decided that we were atheists. It's just that we were never anything else? Yucca: Just we're okay. Mark: my father was a scientist. My mother was a nurse. Science was the way you, you learned things. The universe was interesting and full of stuff that was knowable and discoverable and and it was really prized to learn stuff and know stuff. So. In relation to all matters, kind of spiritual and religious. I became one of those sort of snotty atheists because I thought that, I mean, every religion that I encountered was filled with nonsense, utter nonsense, talking burning bushes and resurrected people and parted oceans and. You know, 11,000 virgins in heaven and just crazy, crazy, crazy stuff to my mind. And excuse me So I dismissed that entire aspect of human behavior and culture out of hand and had nothing to do with it. My only encounter with it was when I sang in a church choir when I was in high school, which was basically because all of my music. Gang friends also saying in the same choir and the, the brilliant director of music at my high school was also the director of that choir at the church. So I just went there on Sundays and sang and that, and then a subsequent experience with seeing early music taught me a lot about. Christianity and Christian theology because of the words of all the songs and particularly translations from the Latin of medieval and Renaissance music, you learn a great deal about kind of the mentality and all that. As well as the study of history, because this, the study of Christianity the study of European history is in large part, the study of Christianity and its various fractions. Competitions and all that sort of thing. So really wasn't interested in any of that. And out of the blue, a friend of mine who had been, he'd been a roommate when I was in college and we'd stayed in touch. He was considerably older than I still is considerably older than I am. Invited me to a, an autumnal Equinox circle. That was being held by his coven  Yucca: Yeah. Mark: and. I don't know why he invited me to this thing. I honestly, I don't have to this day, I have no idea why he invited it to me. I guess he just thought that I might get something out of it. And I don't know why I went, but I did. And it was really weird in the one hand. I mean, with people standing in a circle, holding hands and drumming and chanting. You know, speaking to invisible presences and, you know, like gods and elements and directions and things like that. And that part was all pretty weird. But there was also something that was very compelling about it. I realized it's the autumnal Equinox. That's a really important milestone in the year. I'm a deep environmentalist. I am really, really committed to. To nature and to the biosphere and to the health of the biosphere. Why don't, why am I not aware that that's happening? Why don't I know what phase the moon is in all the time. And I realized how disconnected I was in many ways, and this was a valuable way of observing these things that would. Bring me into a closer alignment with the cycles of nature and that's how it started. And from there I went to I was invited to go to the reclaiming, the big reclaiming spiral dance in San Francisco which I've attended several times, but this was the first time it was a long time ago. It was in the eighties when it was still held at the women's building in San Francisco. And so I had an experience of a ritual of hundreds of people as well as experiences of smaller group rituals, I went to a UL ritual and there was kind of a vigil all night to wait until the sun came up and watched the sun come up. And by that time I was kind of hooked and set up an alternate. Started doing observances on my own. And within a couple of years, I was leading rituals and writing chants and being a leader in my local community. To some degree I think because that's the sort of a natural trajectory. And also, cause I have some leadership capacity and  Yucca: Sure. That's part of your personality. Mark: Yeah. it's just kind of how I'm built. And that, that's how I got. That, that honestly is how I got here. And I, it never crossed my mind to actually believe in the invisible presences that they were talking to in the circles. And I didn't really discover until much later that people were literally believing that those were invisible intelligence self-aware beings out there in the universe. Well, how about you? Why don't you talk about your. Rival into paganism, which was very different.  Yucca: Yeah. So I, I grew up this way pretty much my, and I'll be a little bit vague for the privacy of the people who are alive today. But it, my family, my parents were different. Deeply loved each other got along great, but you know, had different religious beliefs there. My mother was a Christian and that her, her faith was really important to her. And that was something that she definitely gave to the older siblings. So my family has a pair of older siblings, a big gap, and then younger sibling. But she ended up dying when I was fairly young. So the younger siblings, we were raised more by our dad, whereas the older ones had been raised, by, by both of them. But my dad had arrived at paganism. From Catholicism with a little bounce into Quakerism you know, kind of stepping stone there. And we just, I also I grew up in Santa Fe, which is kind of a new age Mecca. There was just grew up around lots of lots of everything, right? A lot of the kind of traditional Wu stuff. But there's a lot of different people there and just an interest in that kind of stuff. So that was just normal. That was around me. There were pagans around me. There were there were all the Tibetans stuff and then way G shops and and then also. Heavily very, very old Catholic communities as well. And the, the Catholicism of Northern New Mexico and the rural Southwest is very different than the rest of the world. Because if you just, it's a really interesting history to get into. But the church was kicked out. For awhile. And the people continue to practice and kind of developed their own just continue to practice. And so there, there are little non church legs in this big church, sanctioned little sun patios and things like that. So I know this will be kind of offensive to some. People, but the Catholicism here is very pagan and a lot of ways, very, very earth centered and very kind of into the land. But we. Rural and paying a lot of attention to what's going on with our land that we were living with. My father was really careful about the types of words that got, you know, we don't live off the land. We live with the land and paying attention to th the solstice is we're having a lot of the words whenever really used. Right. We weren't calling it Yule. We weren't calling it the Equinox, but, but we'd joke about, okay, well, if you know, the, the light, the sun is going in the right direction now, right. As it starts to get sunny again and, and all of that. And it was really important to him that we be raised also with tools with mental tools and emotional tools that could help with. In the world. So being able to meditate, that was just something that we were taught grounding. I remember doing like the visualization, practicing, breathing, and practicing the, the bubble or the egg protection and, and those sorts of things. W just were really important that they'd be passed on to us kids. And at some point, I don't know where I picked the words up, but we're talking early teens. I just started using the word pagan. I don't know. I just, that, wherever that came from was how I, I mean, there were other people who were pagan, but that was just, I started to use it. If I was ever filling out a form of. Wicked down. I never really considered myself wicked, but that was the thing that I thought would get closest to what I was on a, on a list. So it's like, okay, that'll kind of represent what I am, cause I don't want to put down other, right. I guess it could put down other, but, or, none of the above. So I put that down. And. The same with, for you? I, it never, it never occurred to me that people literally believed in like the God stuff. Like I was kind of into, like, I liked some of like the goddess stuff. I thought that was really cool. I liked like the image, you know, some of those like old, like, Like figurines, like the Venus figurine and those sorts of things. I thought that was really like interesting. And I had read the all like the mist of Avalon series and, and all of that stuff. And it was just an enjoy that, that quite a bit. And again, it really wasn't until. In my, probably early twenties when I had been doing the pagan perspective for years and just reading people's comments, that it just dawned on me that wow, these people are literally taking these. It was like actual beings. Like I thought that's just like, Like the Christians did. And like I thought that was, I thought that pretty much the only people who did that, and I know this is quite naive, but I thought that was really the Abrahamic religions and that nobody else really took it literal. And then of course being educated more, I found it. Oh, okay. So actually there are other religions too, that, that think of their gods as literal beings. But for instance, the Hindus that I had been exposed to. Talk to me about it being metaphors. They hadn't talked about them as being literal beings. And I also grew up around permaculture and all of that sort of thing. And so I actually ended up as a teen six, I think I was 17. Probably. I went out to your part of the world and did some. Permaculture stuff with star Hawk that was of course blended in with the paganism and activism stuff and and came back home. And there's a lot of that happening here in Northern New Mexico as well. And it just was this really good fit, this natural fit. And then I went into the life sciences and just kind of hung out in there and Continue to just have that as being part of my, yeah, this is my identity. This is, who I am or what I like to do, how I view the world, but it's always been very interesting because there is kind of that split in the family where there's like the half that is definitely quite Christian within the like immediate family. And then the half of my, my closest sibling and father and stepmother and like that side. That's sort of pagan and we just don't ever talk about it at family meetings when we're all together, just don't say anything. So that's since it's very, it's evolved very organically, I've never have really seen a separation between where there was a moment where I'm like, yes, I'm pagan. Now just kind of always was. Mark: Well, so let me see would you describe. How would you describe the evolution of, well, actually it's your turn to ask me a question that just occurred to me.  Yucca: Hmm, I think I'm going to steal your question. So, mark, how would you describe the evolution of your practice from when you. Entered into it to today because you've got quite a bit of big journey between there and here. Mark: Yeah. Okay. I should have thought more about my answer to this question before figuring it out for you. The, I was always a kid who wanted to live in a museum. I made my rooms like museums with displays of minerals and seashells and feathers. And. Other natural objects. Right. And as I got older, that turned more into kind of the museum of ethnography and natural history where I have various kinds of ethnic art that I find just so alive and so compelling. As well as the natural objects and artifacts and all that kind of stuff. And so it became very natural for me to put together an altar with precious objects that had meaning to me, the idea of objects that tell stories. When I look at them was just something that I got very instinctually. And so. that that's my understanding of what a magical item is. Right. A magical item is one that has a sentimental value to you because it has a story behind it. So it kind of started there and with going to these rituals, which were all group rituals, it, it bears saying, because. Paganism has fragmented a lot, even as it's grown a lot in the time that I've been involved with it, most of the practitioners are solitary and there are reasons for that, that we can get into. But at the time that I got into it, it was a group activity and You know, I, I went to this belt teen festival on this sacred land, up in Mendocino county, and we ran around naked and raised a maypole and danced around it and danced around a fire and had all these wonderful experiences. There were, there were problems with that community that came to the full. After a while, but my early experiences with them were transcendently freeing and beautiful. So that is kind of where my experience started from. So after I took on more leadership responsibilities, I started to settle into more of a sense of myself as a, as an active exponent in a community rather than. You know, somebody that just got invited to events and was a participant. I, I participated more in organizing events and just started to see myself in a somewhat different context that way. And my circle of friends grew and grew and grew because one of the things that I saw in the local pagan community any way was that they were some of the most amazing and interesting people I had ever met. They were creative and thoughtful and growth-oriented, and generally speaking had really you know, progressive and kind politics. Were just lots of reasons to, to, to way deeper into this, the subculture. And my practice began to change around the time that that climate began to change in the, in the mid to late nineties, was a big influx of folks into paganism that were former Christian. And it changed the culture. They brought a lot of their frameworks with them. I, they didn't intend to,  Yucca: but like the idea of.  Mark: yes. The idea that,  Yucca: like practice versus faith.  Mark: right, right. The idea that you had to have faith in the, in literal gods was something that I had never been confronted with in the whole time that I had been practicing and. Suddenly there it was. And there were these debates about, you know, the nature of the gods, whether the gods existed at all, all this kind of stuff. And I withdrew from attending so many group activities. And particularly, even though I went to Penn via con the big convention every year, I worked there as a volunteer. So most of my time was taken up with my volunteer duties and that was okay because I was there to visit with my friends and go to parties after hours and all that kind of stuff. The workshops themselves were almost entirely just stuff that I didn't believe.  Yucca: Right. Mark: Just things I didn't believe in. And it became increasingly clear to me that a lot of what people were doing in the pagan community was stuff that I just didn't think was real. It didn't seem reality grounded to me. And so, and I've told this story before, so I'll kind of skip over it. I, there were some unethical things that happened that were excused as the will of the gods in around 2005. And I quit the community and that's when I, about six months later when I was missing it and really seeing that there was a lot of value that I was getting out of religious practice, even though. I wasn't a believer that got me onto this whole investigation about what is religion? What does it do? What's it function for us as humans? How can we get that function without having to believe in a bunch of stuff for which there's no evidence. And that led eventually to my writing, the essay that became the book. Atheopagan so much. Practice has been much more solitary in recent years, but it's starting to turn again with the advent of the Northern California affinity group for atheopagan ism. We're, we're having in-person rituals and we're planning another one for the summer solstice. And it's exciting. It's a really cool thing. They're wonderful group of people and. It's feeling like a really exciting new chapter.  Yucca: Have well, and you have had your ritual circle many years as well.  Mark: Yes. That's true. Yes. I've been a part of dark sun for 31 years. This this coming sewing Hallows and  Yucca: And y'all usually do the, the wheel of the year, right? You aren't getting together, every weekend, but you get together typically eight times a year. Mark: About eight times a year. Yeah. And they, they generally focus around the time of the wheel of the year holidays. The most significant rituals That we do though, are for Hallows and annual. And it's a lot more free form around the rest of the year, which I've always wanted to change, but I never have changed. Yucca: Yeah. Mark: Yeah. Yucca: That does sound very similar to many other picking groups as well, but it kind of seems to be the most excitement around those two particular holidays. Mark: Yeah. Yeah, I think so. So. So that's how my practice has evolved up until now. And there's some glimmers of things. Th there are things that I really miss about the paganism that I first encountered in the eighties that I want to say. There were things that were really screwed up about that paganism that I wasn't really aware of at the time. There were real problems with with lack of consent. Yucca: Yeah. Mark: Particularly in behavior of men, towards women there were, there were problems like the ethical one that I encountered that caused me to leave the, the community. There were people who had set themselves up as a high muckety muck of some pagan church or organization. And then. Be charismatic narcissists who are shitty to other people and there'd be financial mismanagement, and there'd be no preferential treatment for people who are young and pretty and just, just  Yucca: All that. Mark: stuff. But that. said there was a beautiful freedom in being able to go out into the woods and. Maybe take some mushrooms and just be free and alive in nature and celebrating these rituals with other people of like mind. It was very beautiful. And I, I miss that and I, I hope to go back to it maybe without the mushrooms. But but I hope to go back to more of that kind of practice because that's really what got me into it in the first place. It's not an intellectual exercise. It's something that feeds something much deeper in me. And those beautiful experiences are what I treasure from my memories of my pagan life.  Yucca: It's beautiful.  Mark: Thank you.  Yucca: Yeah. Mark: So how about you? How, how have things evolved since, say since, since you were out on your own.  Yucca: Yeah. It's interesting to think about because a lot of it, I mean, has. Just changed with me as my particular needs have changed. Right. What's and I think that's this, everybody's doing that to a certain extent. It wasn't a lot of it. Wasn't me sitting down and saying, I have a practice. What can I do for my practice? It was what's going on in my life. And what are the tools that I have to try and be living the life that I want. And so that's, at various times certain things would be more or less important. And I definitely experimented a lot with things like. We actually were chatting a little bit before the recording about things like elements. Right. I think we both said that, we had both kind of tried using the classical elements at some point in our practice and kind of moved away from that. And, had sort of tried out using, you know, the goddess or the triple goddess, things like that in practice. And just been like this, this isn't really working sort of moved away from that. I've had something very interesting over the last, I guess, about more than 15 years now, I made my first YouTube channel. I guess it was 17 years ago at this point and started sharing things. And I'm a very, a lot of my practice has been very solitary and telephone. Having my family and then it's become more of a family practicing for awhile. It was a little partnership practice and then adding in, the kids. But because I did get online and start sharing, I had originally started sharing on YouTube is just kind of a. There was a very different YouTube community at the time. It was its own company. Actually, it didn't even belong to Google or any of those things. And there was like this interesting little pagan community there where like, we would just kind of share things back and forth. And then, I started building the channel and then eventually I got onto the pagan perspective. And then I was on that for about. Well, until it shut down, like, I guess it was 10 or 11 years. And Th that was, it was kind of in the way that we, you know, we, you and I talk about different topics every week. It gave me a nice like point to come back to every week and think about this new topic. But almost every week was just a challenge because they were like, so what do you think about ghosts? What do you think about this? God, and heck a tie in that. And, and, I'd want to try and come up with like a very diplomatic way of, of saying. And like, I don't buy that, but, but still have something of value to say. And it was, it was definitely challenging to be on the, the channel. I had a lot of conflict in the background and kind of felt, kind of picked on and attacked by a couple of the, you know, the more strong, like vegan fronts and stuff. But I felt it was really important to be on there because I mean, that's actually how we met. You made a comment on one of the. Videos that just, said, no, you don't have to believe in God. That's cool. He can be a pagan and I don't believe in gods. But I just had so many people make comments. They're like, I'm so glad you made this video. Like, I, I felt so alone. I didn't know that that was a thing I'm so glad that like there's other pagans like me. I kind of felt, although I enjoyed that, I felt like a little bit of an obligation. Right. And I had like this one wanting to serve to be like, I want to provide. And get this word out here. Even though. You know, it might not be the best kind of emotional thing. But there was that really wonderful, the value of the thinking and the connecting with people which is another reason I'm just so grateful for what we do here, because there's no like secret tension. no like mark and I are not arguing and fighting in the background. Right. That's not happening. And, but still get to feel like. Contributing to a community and, and offering to a community and sharing to this kind of wide world. That's, that's been really important in that in the last, I guess, decade and a half is to be able to contribute that way. I'm not sure exactly where I'm going with this, but it's just been very interesting to be a very kind of private person with a very. Kind of solitary practice and yet be talking about it to the world all the time.  Mark: Yeah, that is, that is interesting. Yeah, so your, your practice has been solitary, but there's been this kind of public window into it, but by your own descriptions of how you practice and what you think, and those kinds of things.  Yucca: Yeah. And I think that helps. Well, I understand that I really want to be part of a larger community and that's, I guess, kind of what we could maybe go into is, where do we think we're wanting to go from here, but as my own kids grow and as I'm in a very different life stage than I was before just feeling like. More community. Right. I want to open up to the world and, and be not just, I haven't felt like my twenties, right. I'm 33 now my, my twenties were about. Oh, goodness. Get some feet under me, survive, get through this, just kind of this scramble and now I'm feeling like, okay, no, and I, you know, put some roots down. I want to start to grow and flourish and of course the, my practice is part of that. Cause that's just the, the practices is how do I live my life?  Mark: Sure. Sure. Yeah, that absolutely makes sense. So what's your next question for me?  Yucca: Well, you started to touch on it a little bit. But you know, what, what do you think right now that, that you're. Maybe missing and working towards, you know, where do you see? What, what are the things that the places for growth that you see. Mark: there are a lot of different dimensions to that because the atheopagan community is a growing community. And as, as the founder of the path that presents challenges and opportunities to me. A lot of which at this stage have to do with finding ways to get out of the way, finding ways to let go and let other people take on. Significant pieces of, of what needs to be done. I'm in communication with a woman who is interested in taking over the editing of the atheopagan voice newsletter, for example, which would be wonderful. I mean, I would still contribute content and stuff, but I wouldn't have to do all the work of pulling it together every month. Yucca: You put, I want to interrupt you for just a second. Mark does a tremendous amount. Of work for the community. It's really, I'm really grateful. There's just so much you worked on putting, helping with the retreat. You're on the council, you do the atheopagan voice. You've been on multiple different subcommittees and getting the Facebook group going and this podcast and everything. So it's just really, really amazing.  Mark: Well, it's a, it's a labor of love and I, I appreciate your recognition. And at the same time, it's like, When I first created this path that I called atheopagan ism, it was just for me. And I didn't really expect that it was gonna take off, but it turns out there's So. many people out there who are, you know, science grounded, and they don't want to believe in a bunch of superstitious stuff. What they still want to celebrate living. They still want to celebrate the magnificence of the cosmos and the world. They still want to have community and meaning, and to live a good life, according to some virtuous values. And I just kind of came along at the right place at the right time, I guess. But the community is growing and, and we're doing more. So part of what my hope is to do is to. Divest myself of some of those responsibilities so that they can kind of, you know, fly on their own. And then to sort of rededicate myself to my personal practice a little bit more Without falling into the fallacy of the good old days. There is a lot that I miss about the sense of wonder and beauty that I had when I first arrived in paganism. Because it was beautiful. It was a beautiful vision for the world. It was a beautiful way of interacting with one another. There was an openness of heart that the people that were attracted to it generally speaking, really brought and all of that was. Back for me by the century retreat, because I saw it once again, you know, people being vulnerable people being courageous and, you know, doing the work to grow people just generally being really good. Good, amazing, interesting, fantastic people. So I would like to continue building this community by finding new ways to connect people. And, you know, so that's fostering the affinity group program. That's, you know, we're, we're talking about the possibility of maybe doing a, an online conference at some point so that more people could access it, that weren't able to come to the century retreat. And of course, we'll do another century retreat in 2024. Community building and then turning back and taking a look at myself and saying, okay, well, who am I now? How has this changed me over the last, what, 12 years now? Something like that, that Ethiopianism is benefiting. And where do I want to grow next? Where, where do I. What what's the next piece for me. And if some of that ends up pointing back to running around naked in the woods, I wouldn't mind observers might mind, but I wouldn't mind. So. How about you? What, what do you see happening in the future?  Yucca: Yeah. Mark: And I should also say Yucca also does a lot for our community. She chairs the atheopagan society council. She's our media cleric. So she's directing the The revitalization of our YouTube channel and our Instagram account. There's, there's a lot going on for a mother of two young children. So I'm super, and of course this podcast, so I am super appreciative of everything that you do. And I so value our relationship.  Yucca: Thank you. Yeah, well, this is definitely, this is a big component. It feels really good to have that, that community piece. Right. A lot of my focus is there. I know with my practice, another component is bringing. Back in, we talk about this one a lot, but the self care component, I know that that's one that, I talk a good talk, but you know, I'll get into it for a while and then it'll kind of slip out of it, and, and being better about there's some things that I'm really, really, you could say religious about right. Getting outside every day by. Taking time to myself and doing a little meditation, you know, that that doesn't always happen. And when it does, I feel just so much better and I'm just like a better person, a better, I work better. I'm a better parent, all of those things. So. I'm looking, looking towards growth and looking towards towards the balancing in that area and more effectively. Right. And so, being able to. Let myself not just be the care giver because that's a role that I've really been in my whole life. Really, even as a kid, I was always the, the person in the background who was, doing, taking care of everybody else and I'm comfortable there. Right. I prefer again. Do this weird thing where like I talk to people on a podcast on YouTube, like I actually prefer to be in the background. I actually prefer to be doing that background work. And just taking care of everybody else, but working on, Hey, maybe I could be one of those people I take care of. And, so that's, really the, the directions that I see that kind of growing out and the growing down into the ground to that, that rooting. Mark: Yeah. Yeah. That makes sense. I can, I can see that for you. Yeah, that's good. So do you have another question for me?  Yucca: I do have a question for our listeners.  Which is what topics all of you would like to hear? Because we, before we know it, we're, we're coming up on solstice already. So we're going to be talking about the solstice soon, and we've got topics that we want to be discussing, but we also really love hearing from you. What topics that maybe even if we've covered it before, I mean, we're in three years now of topics of what are the things that are really meaningful to you that you want to. So we'd really invite that. Any of your comments or questions on that, that area? Mark: Yeah, that would be great. You need to understand that from our standpoint, we've been doing this for more than two years now on a weekly basis. That's a lot of subjects. That's a whole lot of subjects, even though eight of them every year are taken up by the wheel of the year holidays. And we always do an episode on each of those holidays. Yucca: There's another 47. Mark: Yes exactly. That's, that's just so many different topics. And we are creative people, but we are not infinitely creative people. So there are times when we, you know, arrive at the time to record the podcast and it's like, Hmm, what are we going to talk about? So your help with this and letting us know what you would like to hear our thoughts and input about would be really helpful. And you can of course reach us@thewonderpodcastqueuesatgmail.com. That's the wonder podcast, Q s@gmail.com. And we hope to hear from you soon. It only takes a second to shoot us an email. And so please do that.  Yucca: Yeah. And do we, do you know, really appreciate you being here? This is, it's been, it's just amazing to see. And, the downloads and listens and the emails that we get from all of you. So you're a real big part of our lives. So we appreciate that. Mark: Absolutely. I'm, I'm always, I'm always So thrilled when I, when someone says to me, oh, I heard you on the podcast. And it's like, oh yes, they heard me on the podcast. Yucca: So thank you all.  Mark: Yeah, thanks everyone. And thank you, Yucca. Great conversation.  

The Strology Show
Emerging Astrologers

The Strology Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 43:40


On today's episode, we've featured the Five up-and-coming astrologers who are presenting lectures at The Eleventh House's Emerging Astrologers Summit. Their lectures are on highly-anticipated topics such as queerness, indigeneity, neurodivergence, fatness, and devotion, all through the lens of astrology! Sarah Rubio Amaya (she/her) is a psychic medium, healer, astrologer, and human design reader. Through her practice, Shadow Femme, she provides her clients with channeled insight and healing, in way that's conversational, low-key, and approachable. As a queer and neurodivergent person of mixed ancestry (Filipino and European), Sarah especially enjoys working with others who think differently and who grapple with complex identities. It is her mission to assist intuitive and curious souls in healing their emotional and energetic blockages, understanding themselves more deeply, and connecting to the support and guidance of their benevolent spirits. http://shadowfemme.com/ (SHADOWFEMME.COM)https://www.instagram.com/shadow.femme (@SHADOW.FEMME) ON INSTAGRAMRose Blakelock is a queer astrologer currently based in so-called Northern New Mexico who seeks to use astrology as a liberatory tool of connection and contemplation. She is also the cohost of Big Dyke Energy, a monthly podcast that explores pop culture and astrology through a queer lens. http://www.roseblakelock.com/ (ROSEBLAKELOCK.COM)https://www.instagram.com/mutable_cross/ (@MUTABLE_CROSS) ON INSTAGRAM Adina (she/her) is a lesbian jewish astrologer currently based in NYC. She holds a BA in Folklore and Mythology and Women, Gender, and Sexuality studies and is currently earning an MA in clinical psychology with a focus on Spirituality, Mind, and Body. Adina's astrological practice explores the relationship of self to the personal, interpersonal, structural, and cosmic in a way that fosters self-compassion and deep exploration. When not astrologizing, Adina loves binge-watching television, drinking copious amounts of coffee, and doing fiber arts. http://adinahertzel.space/ (ADINAHERTZEL.SPACE)http://instagram.com/adinarising (@ADINARISING) ON INSTAGRAMhttp://twitter.com/adinarising (@ADINARISING) ON TWITTER Jalen is a Black Queer Astrologer living in Metro Detroit. Jalen is a Traditional Astrologer, who focuses on understanding how our knowledge of astrology and the planets is inhibited by capitalism and white supremacy. Their astrological practice, “The Chalk of the Sky” seeks to use the language of the stars to help black people re-contextualize our place in the cosmos and lead us towards healing and liberation. http://chalkofthesky.com/ (CHALKOFTHESKY.COM)http://instagram.com/chalkofthesky (@CHALKOFTHESKY) ON INSTAGRAMhttp://twitter.com/chalkofthesky (@CHALKOFTHESKY) ON TWITTER Kenny the Astrologer is a non-binary, puerto rican psychic astrologer, tarot reader, & lunar witch who has been studying the craft since 2017. They are magickal, easy to talk to, & are a walking safe space. Kenny strives to inspire people to live unapologetically, & show people how to tap into the energy of the cosmos. They want to help those who feel isolated & lonely begin to tap into their magick & harness their true power. If you want to learn more about their practice or work with Kenny, visit their website linked below. http://www.kennytheastrologer.com/ (KENNYTHEASTROLOGER.COM)http://www.instagram.com/kennytheastrologer (@KENNYTHEASTROLOGER) ON INSTAGRAMhttp://www.twitter.com/astrologerkenny (@ASTROLOGERKENNY) ON TWITTER Emerging Astrologers Summit: https://www.thestrology.com/emerging-astrologers-summit (https://www.thestrology.com/emerging-astrologers-summit ) Looking to learn astrology? Check out The Strology shop:https://www.thestrology.com/shop (https://www.thestrology.com/shop) Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thestrologyshow/ (https://www.instagram.com/thestrologyshow/) Join our mailing...

The Leadership Mind
How Leaders Can Understand Complex Human Systems & Create Psychological Safety

The Leadership Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 30:56


In today's episode, Massimo is joined by Martha Acosta, a sought after speaker, facilitator, and expert in Human and Organizational Learning who helps high-reliability organizations navigate the complexity of human systems in their operations. Martha is a member of the HOP HUB Consortium with other thought leaders in the Human and Organizational Performance movement. Martha also represents Harvard Business Publishing (a subsidiary of Harvard Business School) as Senior Moderator who designs and facilitates leadership development programs based on Harvard scholarship. Before joining Harvard, Martha led the Human Performance Improvement Team for the nuclear facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), where she helped develop a national safety initiative for the Department of Energy and won LANL's Director's Achievement Award. Martha began her career in Silicon Valley helping fast-growing technology companies build the sales and support capacity needed to commercialize their innovative solutions. Later, she led the design and delivery of global leadership programs for a division of News International in the United Kingdom. For 25 years, as a consultant and educator, Martha has helped countless leaders in high-reliability industries to manage volatility, uncertainty and ambiguity for improved safety, strategy-implementation, innovation, learning and problem-solving. Martha writes, speaks and conducts research on the cognitive and emotional aspects of safety and leadership. Martha earned a Doctorate in Human and Organizational Learning from The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. She earned both a MBA and MA from Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. She studied math, science, philosophy and literature at St. John's College, graduating with a BA from the Annapolis, Maryland campus. She also completed a graduate credential in training systems development from San Francisco State University. As a woman of color, Martha serves her community by working as a Director on non-profit boards. She serves on the Governance Committee of the LANL Foundation, which supports underserved students in Northern New Mexico. She is also a member of the Board of Visitors and Governors of St. John's College in Annapolis, Maryland and Santa Fe, New Mexico, for which she serves on the Diversity and Inclusion Task Force as well as the Audit, Enrollment and Trustee Committees. She previously sat on the Board of Homewise, a non-profit affordable housing developer and mortgage bank. Martha lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA, where she enjoys the arts and the outdoors. Highlights from today's podcast include: How to build capacity to be error-tolerant and respond to failure effectively How leaders can create an environment of physiological safety and the misconceptions that come with it The common knowledge effect and how leaders hide their expertise to feel safe in a group How to change your relationship to your ego Taking an appreciative approach to your dissatisfaction to understand the gap of where you are and where you want to be Connect with Martha: martica.com To download my Conscious Communication Workbook to support you in turning toxic conflict into collaborative gold, please visit Massimobackus.com/workbook

World of Empowerment
397: Chaco Canyon - Part 1 - The Beginning

World of Empowerment

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2022 12:58


Welcome to the 1st of this quick series about our visit to Chaco Canyon in Northern New Mexico. Ever since Aingeal Rose began this quest, which began a couple of months ago, where she had this unquenching desire to visit Chaco Canyon, and we honored it and followed it. So, you'll find in this series our unfolding understanding of what Chaco Canyon is all about, and what it was trying to tell us. In this recording, we are at the beginning phases and you'll find us entering it with some expectations. As the series progresses, you'll find those expectations get changed and squashed and turned around. I won't spoil it for you, but you'll find that the outcome at the end of the series is very different for us than what it was when we set out on this amazing journey. Enjoy.

Sportsmen's Nation - Big Game | Western Hunting
Western Rookie - Chasing September Bugles

Sportsmen's Nation - Big Game | Western Hunting

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 69:34


On this episode of The Western Rookie Dan talks with Jake Trujillo, a fly fishing and big game guide from New Mexico. Jake shares tips and tricks that he uses every September as he chases after bull elk during the rut. Jake grew up hunting and learning the craft from his dad Patrick. Not only did Jake learn to hunt from his dad, he also followed in his footsteps when he started competing in professional rodeo as a steer wrestler. After graduating Odessa College he took on a job as a guide for Chama Land and Cattle Co. Jake spends his summers guiding fly fishing trips and his fall and winter guiding elk and mule deer hunts Chama Land and Southwest Outfitters. He is from a small town in  Northern New Mexico called Abiquiu which is in the heart of some of the best mule deer and elk hunting New Mexico has to offer. 

Backcountry Rookies - Big Game Hunting Podcast

On this episode of The Western Rookie Dan talks with Jake Trujillo, a fly fishing and big game guide from New Mexico. Jake shares tips and tricks that he uses every September as he chases after bull elk during the rut. Jake grew up hunting and learning the craft from his dad Patrick. Not only did Jake learn to hunt from his dad, he also followed in his footsteps when he started competing in professional rodeo as a steer wrestler. After graduating Odessa College he took on a job as a guide for Chama Land and Cattle Co. Jake spends his summers guiding fly fishing trips and his fall and winter guiding elk and mule deer hunts Chama Land and Southwest Outfitters. He is from a small town in  Northern New Mexico called Abiquiu which is in the heart of some of the best mule deer and elk hunting New Mexico has to offer. 

Chase Wild Hearts Podcast: Conversations with women who have created dream businesses and redefining success
Episode 165: Surviving & Thriving With Plants, Breath, and Words With Jennifer Patterson

Chase Wild Hearts Podcast: Conversations with women who have created dream businesses and redefining success

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 69:48


Jennifer Patterson is a grief worker who uses plants, breath, and words to explore survivorhood, body(ies) and healing. A queer and trans affirming and centering, trauma-experienced herbalist and breathwork facilitator, Jennifer offers sliding scale care as a practitioner through her private practice Corpus Ritual and is a member of The Breathe Network. She has facilitated workshops at healing centers, LGBTQ centers, a needle exchange and harm reduction clinic, online with the Transformative Language Arts Network, sexual violence resource centers, at colleges and universities, veterans hospitals, the collective What Would an HIV Doula Do? and a Hasidic and Orthodox Jewish healing center. She is also a teacher in training programs with The Breathe Network and Breath Liberation Society. She is the author of The Power of Breathwork: Simple Practices to Promote Wellbeing (Quarto). Editor of the anthology Queering Sexual Violence: Radical Voices from Within the Anti-Violence Movement (2016), Jennifer speaks across the country, and has had writing published in places like VIDA: Women in Literary Arts, 580 Split, OCHO: A Journal of Queer Arts, Nat. Brut, The Establishment, HandJob, and The Feminist Wire. She was also the creative nonfiction editor of Hematopoiesis Press. A graduate of Goddard College's MA program, Jennifer is finishing a book project focused on translating embodied traumatic experience through somatic practices and critical and creative nonfiction. You can find more at corpusritual.com.   In This Episode:  Jennifer shares her origins story and how she came into trauma and sexual violence counseling and healing.  What prompted Jennifer to start studying herbalism, healing from mainstream spaces, and psychedelics.   How she started creating safe spaces for survivors and centering queer, trans, and non-binary people.  What led Jennifer to leave New York City and move to Northern New Mexico.  Her thoughts on how trauma has now become a mainstream word.  Jennifer's approach to healing to mitigate trauma and harm reduction.  How plant medicines helped Jennifer to understand the trauma in her body.  Rewriting the narrative around dissociation and the protective tools that we use as children and adults that are not necessarily negative.  How Jennifer incorporates writing and breathwork into her healing practice.  Jennifer's experiences in unwellness spaces and navigating these spaces.  Jennifer's current favorite plants.   Full Show Notes: Corpus Ritual Website Corpus Ritual Instagram Virtual Breathwork Groups Breathwork Book Queering Sexual Violence Anthology "Wellness WIthout Community Care Won't Make Us Truly Well" by Sara Weinreb for Well + Good  Laura Chung Instagram Laura Chung Tik Tok Laura Chung's Website YouTube Channel Ceremonial Cacao for 15% off use code: AWAKEN  Try The Class For One Month Free Awaken and Align Instagram Awaken and Align Website Bi-Monthly Moon Circles via Patreon  Connect with Awaken and Align: If you enjoyed the podcast and you feel called, please share it and tag me! Subscribe, rate, and review the show wherever you get your podcasts. Your rating and review help more people discover it! Follow on Instagram @awakenandalign Let me know your favorite guests, lessons, or any topic requests.

Twice 5 Miles Radio
Writing While Walking with PEN/Faulkner award winning novelist Kate Christensen

Twice 5 Miles Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 57:39


Twice 5 Miles Radio, hosted by James Navé (www.jamesnave.com), welcomes PEN/Faulkner Award novelist Kate Christensen (www.katechristensen.com) to the microphone. The title of this show is Writing While Walking. I first met Kate while I was participating in a fiction writing workshop she was facilitating at a writer's conference in Taos, New Mexico. I liked Kate from the start because she had a lighthearted approach to teaching, while still respecting the serious attention one must bring to the writing process. As Kate facilitated our workshop, I enjoyed more and more her skill as a seasoned writer who taught with a smile and a humorous glint you sometimes see in curious eyes. A few years later, I got to know Kate better when she and her husband Brendan to moved to Taos. That was when I discovered that not only had Kate published numerous novels, memoirs, and articles in journals, she was in love with food. Along with her novels and memoirs, I learned Kate was a food journalist interested in the nuances of how food reflects the identity of every culture in the world. Then, when I read her novel, “The Last Cruise” about an old luxury liner sailing towards its final horizon, I was delighted to discover how food pushed the entire narrative along to its unexpected ending. Fortunately, Kate agreed when I suggested she join me on Twice 5 Miles Radio for the conversation you're about to enjoy. Why the title Writing While Walking? Well, soon after Kate and I started our Twice 5 Miles conversation, she mentioned that she was dictating her current novel into her phone on her long walks through the rugged Northern New Mexico mountains. So, I thought what better title than Writing While Walking. In this conversation, Kate also talks about story structure, the joys of simple cooking, environmental issues, and why the rough lands of New Mexico give her the vision she needs to expand the limits of her stories. Enjoy the show.

Where We Meet: Conversations from New Mexico and Beyond
Dr. Lillian Gorman - On language and identity in northern New Mexico.

Where We Meet: Conversations from New Mexico and Beyond

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 26:29


Dr. Lillian Gorman is a researcher, Spanish heritage language learner and teacher, and a proud Chicana and Nuevomexicana from Albuquerque. In this conversation, we speak with her about language, pride within Spanish heritage language learning, language and identity in northern New Mexican families, and the dialogue between nuevomexicanos and other Latino communities in the US.

Learning Unboxed
140. Helping Kids Make Healthy Food Choices with Rachel Shreve of Cooking with Kids

Learning Unboxed

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 34:16 Transcription Available


Rachel Shreve has been involved in Cooking with Kids, a nationally recognized nonprofit organization based in Northern New Mexico, since 2006. It is dedicated to educating and empowering children and families to make healthy food choices through hands-on learning with fresh, affordable ingredients. We talk about nutrition, healthy foods, and the lifelong learning experiences that can take place between kids and their families as they learn how to cook, eat, and be in a happy and joyous relationship with food. To learn more, visit: http://pastfoundation.org/ (pastfoundation.org) Resources: https://cookingwithkids.org/ (cookingwithkids.org) Learning Unboxed is produced in part by http://crate.media (Crate Media)

Silver On the Sage
Shelly Quartieri - Cold Beer aka Colfax Tavern

Silver On the Sage

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 43:24


Cold Beer, NM "Where not much happens but you better be here when it does." Cold Beer, also known as Colfax Tavern & Diner is a community hub where Philmont staff and participants find comradery and conversation among the hills we call HOmE. In 2016, Shelly and Danny Quartieri became the fourth owners of the infamous Cold Beer.  Shelly discusses familial ties to Northern New Mexico, the story of how Colfax Tavern got named Cold Beer, and her love and respect for all the Philmont "kids" that have become like family to her.   Cold Beer offers more than spirits and libations, they also host a variety of events including their annual Honky Tonk Hodgepodge, cornhole tournaments, and more.Today Shelly and Danny live at their Vermajo River Ranch in Maxwell, NM where in 2008 they founded Riding On Faith, a Christian based bull riding camp.  They are grateful and humbled to be "Parents away from home" to the many seasonal staff members who frequent their beloved bar.  Cold Beer, NM "It's in the middle of no where, but has people from everywhere." Notable Mentions:Roger SmithCharlie Montoya - second owner of Cold BeerDorothy"Dot" PompeoMayaVirginiaPete BergeneMike CrockettSarah BurgessLela and Sean MurphyGay AnnTim DohertyJack and MiraRyan Bailey and LindseySupport the show (https://pod.fan/silveronthesagepodcast)

Uncomfortable Conversations Podcast The Untold Stories of the 3HO Kundalini Yoga Community
Episode 44: Vandee Crane (formerly Pavandeep Kaur Khalsa; 2009)

Uncomfortable Conversations Podcast The Untold Stories of the 3HO Kundalini Yoga Community

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2022 107:51


Vandee Crane is the author of My Body, My Soul: One Woman's Journey to Reclaim Both, as well as Founder and Director of Rise In Love Foundation, a grassroots nonprofit, whose mission is to support individuals, families, communities and companies in understanding and healing the individual and collective Mother Wound by bringing Women of all Nations together to heal through connection, culture and conversation. A process known in Indigenous Cultures around the World as ReMatriation. Vandee, formerly Pavandeep Kaur Khalsa initially came to learn about KY/3HO in 2009 through a series of serendipitous spiritual experiences, after an early life of child trafficking and addiction. She's here today to offer her unique perspective and share her own experiences in the community as an Indigenous Woman, a Survivor Leader, and Professional Disruptor. Vandee lives in Northern New Mexico, on Ancestral Apache and Pueblo Territory. She herself is of Wazhazhe, Tsalagi, and European American descent. Her partner John SwiftBird and their Daughter TatankaSkaWin "Tata" SwiftBird are enrolled members of the Oglala Lakota Nation. She and her Family are passionate about Cultural Preservation and keeping their Traditional Values alive through their grassroots nonprofit work. Vandee and their Daughter are also featured in the up and coming documentary Women of the White Buffalo, to be released in 7 languages internationally this coming month. Vandee's professional and academic background include addictions counseling, trauma informed care, and Integrative studies. She is also an outspoken CSET (child trafficking Survivor Leader) who has brought a lot of awareness and impactful change to the communities and cases she has been involved with. You can donate to her profound work at www.riseinlovefoundation.org   Music Credit: Lyla June - Mamwlad https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TeGLDwfrvb8 Link to purchase her book: (It's also on Amazon where reviews are awesome...I just really don't like raising money for Jeff Bezos to play space cowboy ) https://www.target.com/p/my-body-my-soul-one-woman-s-journey-to-reclaim-both-by-vandee-crane-paperback/-/A-83270172 Donations for mutual aid and other grassroots work can be made at: PayPal vandee@riseinlovefoundation.org Cash App https://cash.app/$riseinlovenow Or made out to Rise in Love Foundation & mailed to: PO Box 425 Tesuque, NM 87574 You can DONATE to this broadcast at: http://www.gurunischan.com/uncomfortableconversations Uncomfortable Conversations Spotify Playlist: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/2lEfcoaDgbCCmztPZ4XIuN?si=vH-cH7HzRs-qFxzEuogOqg  

This Is Not Church Podcast
Walking the Camino with Alexander John Shaia

This Is Not Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2022 59:15


We are honored to have back with us - Alexander John Shaia. Born and raised in Birmingham, Alabama, Alexander John was part of a large extended family that had emigrated from Lebanon a generation previously. He grew up immersed in the ancient traditions of Middle Eastern Christianity (Maronite Catholicism) and was expected to become a priest, a family tradition since the year 1300. He was led otherwise. Alexander John attended the University of Notre Dame and received a degree in Cultural Anthropology. Next came a brief time in seminary followed by a Master's in Counseling Education, a Master's in Religious Education, a graduate certificate in Pastoral Psychotherapy, and a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology. His extensive psychological training across many modalities finally led him to Switzerland where he studied with the Jungian Analyst and founder of Sandplay Psychotherapy, Dora Maria Kalff. Alexander John became the first US man admitted to the International Society for Sandplay Therapy and continues to serve as a senior Certified Teaching Member of the organization. Returning to the United States, he undertook years of private practice, teaching, parish and retreat ministry and further study. Integrating his life-long practice of prayer with many cross-disciplines—anthropology, psychology, spirituality, and ritual work—has shaped him into a unique thought-leader and a widely sought consultant, trainer, and inspiring keynote speaker. Then in 2000, Alexander John's professional life expanded from being primarily a speaker to also that of an author, now with some eight books and more in the works. He lives in the high Rocky Mountains in Northern New Mexico and the wild Atlantic coast of Northwest Spain. A perfect day finds him in the presence of ancient trees, massive stones, his dog and a book of poetry. You can Follow Alexander John Shaia on: Facebook     Twitter     Instagram Check out his website Check out his online classes on The Shift Network You can purchase his book on Amazon.com You can check out his partnership with Quoir Publishing here You can connect with us on    Facebook     Instagram      Twitter Want to help us with our future episodes of This Is Not Church Podcast? Join us on Patreon where you will get access to exclusive patron content such as early access to episode, videos of upcoming episodes, and live Q&A sessions. Also check out our Linktree for all things This Is Not Church related. Each episode of This Is Not Church Podcast is expertly engineered by our producer The Podcast Doctor Eric Howell. If you're thinking of starting a podcast you need to connect with Eric!

THE WONDER: Science-Based Paganism
Interview: Sarah the Skeptical Witch on Naturalistic Witchcraft and Religion

THE WONDER: Science-Based Paganism

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2022 55:43


The Skeptical Witch Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWYaJlQZ7zGSfJv-INEgo1A www.obscureclouds.com   S3E6 TRANSCRIPT:----more---- Mark: Welcome back to the Wonder: Science-based Paganism. I'm your host Mark. Yucca: and I'm Yucca. Mark: And today we have a really exciting episode. We are interviewing Sarah, the skeptical witch who has the skeptical, which channel on YouTube. And it's just a super interesting, fascinating person for us to introduce to our listeners. So welcome, Sarah. Sarah: It's really great to be here. Thank you guys for having me on.  Yucca: And thank you for joining us. So we were trying to narrow down all of the things we could talk about before we started too, before we pressed record, because it sounds like we could spend about five hours just going over everything, but why don't we start, Sarah? Will you, will you introduce yourself? Let us know a little bit about you, about your channel and about who you are and what you're doing. Sarah: Yeah, sure. So I'm yeah, Sarah, the skeptical, which on YouTube I also have a blog of scare clouds and that was kind of like my, my beginning of like kind of putting my, my practices with like witchcraft and paganism online. It started with that blog and both that, and my channel kind of came out of a synthesis of my own spiritual practice and kind of what my academic interests are. So, I first came to like witchcraft and paganism through academia actually through like a school project that I was doing. and kind of fell into it that way and started to craft my own practice. Out of that, out of what I was learning out of the kind of communities that I was engaging with. And I was a student in anthropology for my undergrad and my masters. And within that, I started to engage with like various peg in witchcraft community is, and a lot of, a lot of, kind of like what I was experiencing. There was a very, I guess, Wu or like, You know, SU superstitious or like magical these kinds of things that we, that we might say about it. And didn't really necessarily find that there had to be that kind of connection there. So I kind of began to craft my own kind of like skeptical witchcraft practice and a more like naturalistic kind of paganism or like non-theistic paganism as well. And that just kind of grew into to what I put online now. And I just kind of documented my journey through that and try to combine my, what I'm learning with my, my own practice and Yeah.  Yucca: And was there something that really drew you to the pagan stuff when you were doing your master's and undergrad? Sarah: Yeah, I think well, first of all, the kind of the nature aspect of it was what really, really drew me in. I didn't start studying paganism intentionally. I kind of went into studying alternative, like spirituality with a focus on like new age practices. And from there kind of discussed. Paganism and Neo paganism and these things. And I found that to be really, really fascinating and, and just something about it really clicked with me. So in a kind of an anthropological sense in doing ethnography you'll, you'll often, you know, join in with various community rituals and things. So it was joining in all these rituals. I was talking to all these people. I was learning all about the religion and that, yeah. It just, I felt like the nature part, especially really just clicked with me as well as the kind of like self-improvement aspect of it and the kind of like inner exploration and transformation and things like this. So that was what really drew me in and kind of, got me hooked, I guess.  Mark: you know, it's interesting as you say this, because it seems as though naturalistic paganism is something that just gets invented over and over and over. You know, so many of us have kind of created our own and then discovered that there were other people out there who are also doing it. So it's it's kind of wonderful that way. It apparently there is, there's something out there to be found in the wedding of a naturalistic worldview and a scientifically skeptical mindset with a nature earth worshiping or revering kind of practice. So tell us a little bit about your approach to your witchcraft, to the sorts of ritual. And I don't know if you call it spell work or not, or. That's tough. So the practical kind of implementation stuff.  Sarah: Yeah. So, yeah, I guess I do like what I call like skeptical witchcraft and it has a lot of overlap with like atheistic or like secular witchcraft as well. So like you said, there, there were a lot of people like doing this at the same time that I just didn't really like realize we're doing it and it, it kind of took me a while to find that. So it's cool that like, so many of us have kind of been like crafting our own practices. And there's a lot of like similarities there. So, so yeah, my like my particular approach to it is yeah. Using things like spells or like divination or ritual things that would be kind of in a more mainstream witchcraft practice and kind of taking the. I guess the more like supernatural magical elements out of it. So for me, it's largely psychological the way that I approach my witchcraft. So it's, it's largely about you know, setting intentions and like manifesting these intentions, not through transforming like actual physical reality, like out there in the world, but through kind of changing my own mindset, the way that I think about things improving my confidence in a lot of circumstances, you know, changing the way that I see things so that I can then change my own reality. Right. So it's Yeah. less about kind of changing the external world. And a lot of it has to do with like the placebo effect as well as kind of like a suspension of disbelief. And then I also kind of, I don't practice, like what's called chaos, magic and witchcraft necessarily, but like I do like the kind of idea coming out of chaos magic that belief can be used as a tool. And it's not so much necessarily like explanations that matter, but experiences that do. So sometimes I will use that like suspension of disbelief to kind of like allow myself in the moment to like believe in the reality of magic, believe in like the reality of stereotypes or, or something. And, and use that to, to benefit me, even if I like rationally know, like, like that kind of underlying level, that it's not actually true. It's, I'm using belief in the moment as a tool to, to kind of create these experiences and allow myself to to have those really like transformative moments.  Mark: Yeah, that's, you're, you're really singing our tune here. there's, there's so much power in that suspension of disbelief and the acting as if, you know, we, we all talk about the imposter syndrome, how we find ourselves in these roles where there's this voice in us going, I don't really know how to do this. How did they give me this job? Right. And that, that acting as if makes us able to do the job and to grow into the ability to do what we were, you know, what what's expected of us. I, I just think that all of that stuff is so fascinating and it's very similar to the way that I do my own ritual practices at my, at my focus or alter and in rituals, out in the world, Yucca: Can we, can we come back around to, to the too skeptical? Right? So you've got the skeptical, which, and what does that part mean to you? Right. So what is it to be a skeptic or skeptical? Because that has some strong connotations, that word in our, in our culture. So how are you using that? Sarah: Yeah, for Sure I guess that's just like where I was coming from it with with the skeptical idea was kind of just always questioning things. Never, just kind of accepting things like at face value, always having that like kind of inquisitive mind. And I think that that's important when it comes to like, you know, anything really. So like whether it's the supernatural or whether it's, you know, mainstream science, like, I think it's always important to be kind of asking questions and, and having like a skeptical outlook and not necessarily in like a negative way, but I think that that can be a positive. But then, yeah. But on the flip side, I also do kind of. I think that embracing mystery and sometimes knowing when to stop asking questions can also be a good thing as well. And I do try to find that balance too.  Yucca: Nice. Mark: skeptical, but not cynical. Sarah: Yeah. exactly. I like.  Mark: Yeah. So, you, the, the other part of, of introducing you is that you are a PhD camp. And religious studies and you're doing your work on naturalistic, paganism and naturalistic religious paths, which is so fascinating. I mean, if, if I had, if I were in grad school again, if it were 30 years ago or whatever it was that is a direction that I almost certainly would have gone. So I'm really interested in what you're learning and what those experiences are and what, how that's changing your perspective on the world. And what's important. All that kind of thing.  Sarah: Yeah,  Mark: There. Wasn't a question in there. I'm sorry. I. Sarah: No, no. Yeah. Yeah. And I'm, I'm very happy that like, yeah, I guess the state of. Yeah, academia right now is such that I. can kind of study these more like obscure topics, things that probably would have been like laughed at like 15 years ago. So it's cool that this is becoming more and more acceptable. And actually one of the one of my committee members has actually studied atheopagan in the past as  well. So it's really interesting to know that it's kind of, spreading within the academic world as well. Yeah. So yeah, I'm, I'm really interested in my own personal research is probably going to be focusing on the connection between like religion and science and the environment. And these are topics that are sometimes discussed in relation to one another, but never like all three of them usually, like there isn't much kind of discussion around the intersection of all three of those. So that's kind of where I'm hoping to fill a bit of a gap. And I guess I'm really interested in like the question of secularization and like how that's transforming religion and religious meaning and spirituality and how. How people find transcendence and kind of, meaning beyond the individual ego within the modern secular world. And one of the ways that people are finding that is, is through nature now. And that's kind of replacing more traditional, like organized religion or like church structures nowadays. So that's yeah, that's the one kind of aspect of it. And also just how, like, even scientists are reporting feelings of like transcendence kind of just in the lab, looking at, you know, natural phenomena or astronauts kind of looking at it, or having these moments of awe and like, really like spiritually profound moments. So I'm really interested in, in how transcendence and like that experience is shifting and changing today. And Yeah. Also considering contested relationships that exist between like religion and the environment, and also like science and the environment. And so, and, and also religion and science, like for a lot of people, religion and science seem to be like polar opposites and that's not necessarily the case and religions like atheopagan ism and other forms of religious naturalism are really like challenging that binary. And it's just kind of interesting to explore how things are really shifting today.  Mark: Yeah. I, I find it fascinating, you know, kind of, you know, Yucca and I are both kind of in the middle of it because we're kind of working to get, put this out into the world. And to me, it just seems so natural now. I mean, I think when I was first exploring these ideas, religion and science were kind of bashing against one another, but when I stopped. Looking at it that way they seem to dovetail very well. And that, that sense, I don't really like the word transcendence very much except for sort of transcending the individual into some, you know, larger state of some consciousness of, of connection and place in the universe. It seems to me that what's happening is we're moving into an era of spiritual agency where people are able to choose their own paths rather than having them kind of force fed to them. And what they're going back to is what is most inspiring and nature is what is most inspiring and space. I mean, space is very, very inspiring. It's part of Yucca: nature, right? Nature. Yeah. It's all connected. Right? We liked it as humans. We like to separate. Okay. This is chemistry. This is physics. This is space. This is neat, but no, like it's all connected, right? Yeah. Sarah: Yeah, exactly. Yeah. Mark: So I think this is a very exciting time to be getting involved with these questions. And there are a lot of people out there who are hungry for this. Have so many experiences of it on the atheopagan doesn't Facebook group of people coming in and saying, you know, I had no idea that anybody else felt this way. And I thought I was the only one and I found my people and this is just the most wonderful thing. And it, it makes, it makes me imagine a world. Where people could be taught from a young age that their spirituality is their own and they could be taught ritual skills so that they can sort of discover for themselves what's meaningful. I find that the further I go down this path, the more my vision of the world is veering away from the way it actually there's a lot of change that needs to happen. Sarah: Yeah. Yeah, no, that's an interesting point though. And I think that that's like a really wonderful vision for the future too. And I do wonder, like, as someone who studies like alternative spirituality, like I do see things kind of going in that direction in some sense. So like a lot of like American spirituality today is, is very individualistic and it's criticized for that in some ways, but it can also be a good thing and that it's, you know, it's more about discovering what works for you and you know yeah, exactly. Like kind of giving you the, the, the tools for ritual and then kind of letting you discover what you will with that.  Yucca: Hmm. So Sarah, how does one go about studying and researching these topics? Because these are amazing questions, but w where does one even start? Right? This is such a huge, huge field, right? Sarah: Yeah. Yeah, exactly. Yeah. So, I'm actually in the midst of doing my my comprehensive exams right? now. And I just did my general comprehensive exams and I'll be moving into my field comprehensive exams. And so I'm going to be studying kind of my committee is just going to put together a large list of books for me, like on these topics to kind of give you that, that foundation for, for actually going and then doing the research. And then the research that I'm hoping to do is going to be a mostly online ethnography, I think. So I'll be hopefully like engaging in various like religious naturalist kind of communities online and learning about it from the people who actually practice it. Like the, the secondary research is important. But it's, it's really that primary research. Define what we learned from this, what I learned from it, I guess.  Yucca: Right. So, so for our listeners, the secondary would be what you're talking about, digging into the existing research, right? Like you're going to learn, read all the books that you can find everything that's out there. And then you're going to do your primary research, which is the unique. Nobody has done this before. You're going to be, go into communities, ask questions, observe, be recording. What you, what you see and hear is that, am I understanding correctly?  Sarah: Yeah. yeah, exactly. Yeah.  Mark: Well, we have a golden opportunity for you coming up in may. If you want to do some field research, we're doing the century retreat in Colorado Springs in may. We would be delighted to have you come and join. A bunch of atheopagan is doing atheopagan things, rituals, fellowship, and all that. Sarah: Yeah, that. sounds fantastic. Yeah,  Mark: I'll send you some information about it. Yeah. Sarah: perfect. Yeah. that'd be great. Thank you.  Mark: You're welcome. Be great to have you there. Yucca: So after, after your, your kind of literature review set part of your studies, then you're going to be coming up with a specific question you're looking for an answer to, that, is that how it works?  Sarah: yeah. Yeah, exactly. So after these exams, they kind of, the literature review. I'm gonna create my, my proposal basically. That will then allow me to go and actually figure out what the answer to that question is. So  Yucca: then you create a lot of literature of your own to add to that body, right? That's part of the process, Sarah: hopefully that's the goal. Yeah.  Mark: and so, and I realized that this is a really dirty question to ask a PhD candidate. What is your vision for what you'll do with this is your plan to go into academia and teach in religious studies or to be a chaplain or to be a naturalistic clergy member of some kind or. Sarah: Yeah. I mean, I, I'm hoping to go into academia further, but unfortunately right now it's, it's it's not looking good for new  Yucca: the changing world. Sarah: Yeah.  So unfortunately, you know, we'll see if that's actually a reality, but I, I do hope to, to write a lot on kind of what I've discovered, like that's kind of my number one passion. And I think that got me into academics in the first place was just a love for writing. So hopefully that's something that I'll be able to do, regardless of whether I actually get hired in a university or not.  Mark: great. Great. You could write the the naturalistic paganism drawing down the moon for the 21st century. It'd be great.  Sarah: Yeah.  Mark: Yeah. I was listening to one of your or watching one of your YouTube videos recently, and you were talking about post humanism and I'm really interested in that because I feel that. a lot of, a lot of how our spiritual orientations are trying to sort of steer the ship of history is in a more nature revering ecosystem, respecting direction. And of course it's very slow, but that perspective of getting beyond humanism, beyond the focus, simply on the human and the benefit to the human and that's, that's not discounting the human as I, at least as I understand it, it's encompassing of the human, but it expands to be so much more. What, tell us about that. That would be.  Sarah: Yeah. Yeah. So, yeah post humanism is kind of like a philosophy worldview or just kind of a an approach to kind of thinking about things. That's very much a reaction against like enlightenment humanism, so that focus on human beings as these like bounded rational subjects that exists in kind of like this isolated world of their own. They're kind of separate from the rest of the world. They're separate from other people. There's an emphasis on dualisms and humanism. So kind of creating that separation between self and other self and world human and, or like nature and culture and postmodernism is just reacting against that and really trying to deconstruct those dualisms. And there's a lot of like that enlightenment humanist kind of thinking, that's still within a lot of our modern systems and like a lot of our modern ways of thinking about things. So, that's, that's kind of where post-feminism is coming from. And it especially plays a role in how I approach, like thinking about the environment and ecology, and also spirituality is like part of that. So, I guess one of the Major kind of criticisms of, of like environmentalism or like conservation ism today. And this is something that you guys can maybe enlightened me about a little bit as well, is that there's a very like subject object. Dichotomous way of thinking about things. So the researcher or like science in general, like this kind of scientific body of knowledge will often be positioned as having this like neutral kind of God's eye view. That's like separate from the actual natural world, separate from things as they are. And, and it's like a very disembodied kind of way of thinking about things that doesn't think about human beings necessarily as, as part of that like natural world. And I guess we see this a lot in kind of like resource management kind of based ways of thinking about ecology and Ways of thinking about it that are very focused on like the economy and things. So I, the post-human approach and like new materialism, which is a part of that. And all of this is kind of part of a of a critique of that and a critique of like, this is a barrier that's really constructed between like nature and culture. And I know that that's like also something that like atheopagan ism is, is concerned with and the, you guys have kind of discussed on the podcast as well. And so. There have been arguments within like science and technology studies or like environmentalism that say we need kind of like a, a spiritual perspective almost to kind of combat that, that divide and to kind of be thinking about forming more like ethical reciprocal relationships with the non-human world in ways that are like actually helpful to both us ans and the non-human world. So, yeah, so I think like a post-human perspective and a spiritual perspective can go hand in hand in that sense. And I, that's kind of how I connect them in my own thinking. So yeah. I wonder what you guys think of other thought as well.  Yucca: Oh so much. Mark: Yes, Yucca: so much in that. Yeah. Sarah: Yeah.  Mark: have no dispute here. Yucca: Yeah. I mean, there was, there was just so, like, I love everything that you were saying and just, you know, my mind just went full of things to comment upon that. My, my original background is in resource management, so, range, ecology and management, and then agricultural ecology before I went into planetary science. So I still actually work as an ecologist and a restoration ecologist specifically for range land. And one of the, the things that I've seen in the field is that a lot of science we're coming from this reductionist point of view and reductionism is really, really helpful and useful way of thinking. It's a tool. And in ecology, we've been starting to move away from that into a more systems thinking emergence, sort of. That starts to see the connections, but there's, there's still more right? There's that the ethics piece that you were talking about, which is what I think things like permaculture tries to address that's guided with the like, oh, let's have, you know, people care and fair share and are sharing all of that. But there's this tricky place where we get into where we run into things like our confirmation bias that we talk about a lot on this podcast that we haven't figured out a way to do really good science and also bring in the, the systems thinking enough, I think because we, we get into this place where we were humans. We're not very good at telling the difference between what we think and what we feel. And we confused my, my emotional response to what this land looks like or what, you know, I believe about this particular animal or that animal. And we kind of let that in. And so I think there's a lot of resistance with scientists of not wanting the, all of that bias to come in. And that's part of, what's like trying to hold back. The let's not think about that side of it because we, we don't want to be doing bad science, but we haven't gotten to the point of where we need to bring more, to expand our understanding of what these systems are kind of rambling here, but yeah, Mark: No, I, I, I, I think what you're saying is absolutely true. And part of the problem is that in the scientific frame, we discount the experiential and subjective Yucca: right. Mark: and the experiential, we discounted to the point that we throw it away entirely. Yucca: Yeah. So we're putting the baby out with the bath water because it's important, but we also don't want it to take over the objective part, right? Mark: Yeah. You don't want to romanticize the, the natural system that you're looking at to the degree that you can't make any decisions anymore about how to relate to it. Yucca: yeah. Sarah: Yeah. Yeah. And I guess kind of like adding to that, like another aspect of post-feminism is giving voice to people's who have been previously silenced by who have not necessarily been considered human because they have not been considered, you know, rational. Communities people. So like indigenous peoples for example and post-feminism kind of is trying to center those voices a little more. And I think that that's also like something in ecology as well, that we're seeing too, like taking these more kind of like spiritual, not necessarily like Western science-based kind of perspectives and applying that to how we understand our relationships with the environment and how they can be improved and things. So, is that something that you've noticed as well? Like maybe more so  Mark: Some  Sarah: ecology today? A little bit.  Mark: it, the challenge that I've experienced, because most of my involvement has been well, there've been kind of two buckets of what I've done. I've done a lot of advocacy, a lot of public organizing and advocacy on behalf of, of nature. And then I've also worked in the restoration field. Basically generating the funding to pay for restoration projects. I'm not designing those projects. That's not my area, but what I've seen, especially on the advocacy side is that there is such complete contempt for the experiential on the part of economic interests. Then it becomes very difficult to even get them in the room. You know, there's the whole NIMBY thing, right? Not in my backyard is an accusation that gets made by everybody who wants to do some God awful earth ribbing project. And their, their response is, well, this is my land. And I want to maximize the economic value that I can get out of it. And it doesn't matter, you know, if it doesn't matter what a complete. Blight on the land. It's going to be, as long as they can quantify that there, they won't have polluted runoff or air quality impacts or any of those kinds of things. You know, the simple fact that something is an abomination, doesn't get into the discussion. Yucca: My, my situation we live in, in very different areas. I'm in Northern New Mexico, which is very interesting cultural area. And there's a lot of, of tensions that are, are, you know, centuries old tensions around land use and management. Because we have, we, we talk about it as being three different main groups, but it's it's much, much more complex than that. So we have the pueblos here, so we've got the tribes and then we have the old Spanish families and then we have the newer Anglos. And then a lot of that land is managed now by forest service and BLM and from almost everyone's perspective, it was stolen from them. So there's a whole. Going on with that. But what I have been often involved with, because again, my area is actually in range. Ecology is dealing with public lands where there will be people with very, very strong ideas about what animals are good and what aren't and what things should look like and what things shouldn't look like. And I think a lot of it is also like they would never admit it, but I think a lot of it is, is racially motivated because the people who are. Ranchers. Aren't Anglo. And so there's a, there's a lot of like people who come in, especially from, other states and Northern, sorry, Northern California can come in with very strong ideas about how the land should be managed and about what's environmentally right. And not, and have a really hard time listening to what the people are saying. And to, to even be able to see that something like a cow could be good, right. If the people have these really strong ideas, they come in with the, like the super vegan bias and all of that. And like, oh, you can't don't touch the land. And it's pristine wilderness and forgetting, but people have been here for thousands of years and people have been here for hundreds of years and that there, that there's there's. There's the science, there's also the way that people manage culturally. And we have to consider all of those things, not just, and also that some of the signs that they're bringing in might not be good science that they're claiming, right.  That they don't understand how ranges work and how these systems work. And so where I live, it's, it's there's just a lot of, of tension and there's a lot of, people trying to work this out and different, cultural groups clashing and not really being able to talk about what's really going on. And it's a lot of, it's very emotional and old trauma and people totally oblivious. And I mean, that's, this could be a whole, it is many, many podcasts. Lots of people do this. But it's a very interesting area. So I know that you, you kind of coming back to your question about do we see that in our fields. That the, there being a, a growing awareness. And I think that there, there is a growing awareness. I see a lot of places where we need the work. Right. It's a very where I live. It's, it's very raw. It's very, very real. And it's right. Like I, you know, I, I don't know if you can hear it, but I, you know, have very strong feelings about it because I look at as a range of colleges, I look at the land and I, and I see that it's, that it's very, very damaged land. But then, you know, it's hard to say that because there'll be people who, who go, but it's so beautiful. Right. You know, leave it alone. Don't do anything. Don't touch it. And then ecologists like myself going, if we don't touch it, we're losing it. Mark: It it'll get covered with star thistle and nothing else. Yucca: or nothing. We're talking about land that has, that is we do not have soil in these areas and they're going, oh no, this is natural. And I'm like, this does not look that this erosion here, like we have to do something and they say, no, no, no humans have messed it up. Humans can't go in and touch it. You know, we we've messed everything up, but it's like, well, okay. But if the broken bone is broken, you need to set that bone. You've got to get involved. Or else, I guess we could let nature take its path in that. And just as in, let it degrade even further and lose even more biodiversity where we can take some steps. Right. so Mark: the big piece that I hear missing from your description of the situation, and it's the same one that I experienced up here is the concept of reciprocity that we have. Responsibilities to land and animals and water and air and trees and all that kind of thing. And that, that w what we take has to be balanced by what we give. And that's just such an alien concept in the west that it, it almost never even gets voiced. Yucca: Well, and, and at least for this half of the continent, I think it it's, we're not at a point of balance. We're at a point of, we need to be giving more because we have such degraded lands and, and being that humans have such short lifespans, we may not recognize that at first, right. We might look out at the west or we might look out at the planes and go, oh, this is beautiful. And it is beautiful, but it's also hurt and sick and we can, we can see that it needs to be that. That it is degrading and that it's going to keep degrading unless we do something. So, Mark: Okay. Yucca: Yeah,  Sarah: yeah, no, for sure. Yeah. And I think that that's also, I guess, I guess like a perspective that could tie into post you as, as well just like kind of going back to that like the, the idea of like pure nature is, is just an illusion and to have that human intervention is not a bad thing. And yeah. And I guess there have been some like, oh, sorry, go ahead.  Yucca: part of nature, right? Like that's showing this idea that like, human shouldn't intervene. Well, no, but, but we're here and at least where I'm sitting right now, we've been here for about 20,000 years, right. Or more, but at least 20,000 years, we know that, right. Like humans, we talk about us as if we're oh, humans intervening, but, but no matter what we do, we're influencing. The system so we can choose what we're like, we're making choices either way. So, and I'm sorry, Sarah. I jumped, I was very excited and  Sarah: Oh no, Yeah. no, no. Yeah. exactly. No, that's a great point. And yeah, it was just going to say, like, this is also something that like, you know, indigenous people, like who have been on this land for thousands of years, like they've, they've known that for, for millennia. And you know, that's kind of where I think listening to these voices can be really important and then kind of learning from that. Yucca: Yeah. Mark: Yeah. And indigenous people, some, some indigenous people have in their history, the experience of the disaster of mismanagement of land, right. There are, you know, abandoned civilizations where, you know, soil got so depleted that it just couldn't produce food anymore. And people had to move out and go somewhere else. The end. That's very powerful lesson, you know, I would think you would learn a lot from having to disrupt your culture that seriously. So I've been thinking a lot lately about vision for the future. I mean, I, I think of atheopagan ism is as having a definite political component to it and and it, and a visionary component for how humans can live with one another and with the earth with the rest of the earth, because we are of course the earth. And I wonder. wonder whether your research is going to move, it will include any like speculation about where naturalistic spirituality is going. Or if you have thoughts about that or, you know, what the trends are that you see happening,  Sarah: Yeah. Yeah, for sure. I think that that's, I mean, like, that's honestly, probably like one of the big questions that my research is going to be asking, because I think that is like a really important question. And I think, you know, what, what I've seen so far is that. What's really important is this shift in mindset that we've been talking about, like kind of moving away from like that, that divide between like peer nature and like human and nature and culture, and like, you know, breaking down those barriers and entering into like more reciprocal relationships with the non-human and kind of seeing it in more of a kinship sense. And I guess, yeah, like one of the big questions that I do want to ask is like, how can religions help us in this? Like it beyond the context of those specific religions, right? Like how can this become more of a, a political or global kind of thing that we're thinking about? And You know, I don't necessarily like have an answer for that yet, but that is something that I do hope to answer. And I think that it's, it's really going to be the people that I talk to or who are going to be answering that. And like, it's going to come out of, you know, seeing, seeing the work that they're doing and the kind of mindsets that they have and the approaches that they take to engaging with the environment and considering how, how we can learn from that in, in a, in a more broad kind of sense. So, yeah, it's definitely an important question.  Yucca: One of the things that you talked about being really interested in was how, how people find meaning and importance and talking about how in, in some of these forms of paganism, like an atheopagan ism and other alternative religions that are more nature-based and science-based how people are, are looking for that meaning. Is that something that, I mean, can you speak to that a little bit?  Sarah: Yeah. Do you mean like from a personal  Yucca: no. Oh, either way, like from a personal sense or things or trends that you've been seeing, I know you're just getting started with your research, but are there particular trends that you're seeing. Sarah: yeah. Yeah, so I think that like in general they're often like when thinking about like modern, secular society from, from kind of a mainstream perspective, there's often been this idea that like, you know, rationalization and like this kind of. The more scientifically become the less and chanted the world becomes. And the less like, meaningful the world becomes an kind of like an ethical or like sacred sense. And I think from what I've been studying, this isn't the case at all, like secularization may cause like, a decline in more organized forms of religion. But I think it also increases religious pluralism and it increases like more kind of individual approaches to, to finding spiritual meaning. And I think that we're also really seeing like a blurring of the sacred and the secular and that's, that's also something I'm really interested in is how you know, things that would have once been considered secular, like nature are becoming very spiritual and people are finding kind of their own version of the divine in that, whatever that may be. Or the transcendent and I don't mean that in like a God way necessarily. I just mean it in, I think kind of what you said, mark, like, something that's bigger than, than you kind of sense or like a, a sense of yeah, just, just meaning that, that goes beyond that, like ego or, or kind of our, our everyday lives that we're caught up in and things like that. So, yeah, so nature is kind of one area even science, sports, you know, also like popular culture and materialism, like even, even that can be like a place where people are finding like maybe not spiritual experiences, but like different kinds of, like, of meaning and, and yeah, if that kinda makes sense.  Mark: Sure. Well, I mean, under, under capitalism, what you accumulate is who you are. So, you know, the, your identity gets all bound up in the meaning of your life. It's all bound up in, you know, your wealth and your possessions. Oh, that kind of stuff. So, I mean, I'm, I really hope we can move away from that because it's incredibly destructive, but there's no doubt that acquisition is something that many people find gives them meaning in their life. And I think that's why we have a lot of people who have kind of a hole in the middle of them. Sarah: Yeah. Yeah, sure, sure.  Yucca: So Sarah, when you, when you speak of secular or secularization, what do you, what do you mean by that? Right. Because a lot of the, cause you're talking about religion, but secular this, it could be a little bit like I'm a little bit confused sometimes on what does that really mean? Right? Is it just not organized religion or is it no religion at all? Is that word changing? Its meaning over time. Sarah: Yeah, for sure. I mean, yeah, that's a good question. I should have addressed that kind of going into it, but it is like a really complex question too. So like secularization, as we generally think about it kind of comes out of like the 1960s sociology and like that general idea was just like a decline in religion in modern society. So that's like, that's the typical way of thinking about secularization is that like, you know, as you know, we learn more about the world and we have kind of more scientific knowledge about the world around us religious religions they were thought anyway to that they would be declining. And, and we're not necessarily seeing that. So. The secular in general is more just like this idea that we live now in a society where, well, the way that I see it anyway, there's many different ways of approaching it, but like it's more than we just, we live in a society where we, where religion is, is an option. Now it's one option among many kind of, so, You know, whereas like 200 years ago it would have been pretty like unthinkable that you weren't religious in some sense. Right. But now it's, it's, you know, it's just an option and belief isn't like the default anymore. And so that's kind of like the idea of the secular as I'm talking about it. And Yeah. So, secularization is also something that I'm going to be kind of looking at in my own research. And it's something that my supervisor is kind of looking at and just like this idea of, we need to redefine what secularization actually is, because we're not seeing this decline in religion. That was that was predicted in, in the way that it was predicted. Religion is changing, but it's not disappearing Yucca: So, was it referring in the beginning when, like not being religious to not being one of like the big three kind of,  Sarah: kind of,  Yucca: religion at all? Cause I know there's been over time, there's been back and forth about what people consider religion. That's one of the things that atheopagan get thrown at them a lot. So he can't possibly be a religion cause you're not, you don't believe in a God. Right. And people have said that about Buddhism and people have said that about, you know, a lot of the Eastern religions or things like that. Sarah: Yeah, no, for sure. It was definitely like thought that kind of yeah, like religion in general and like, just like a religious way of seeing things. So like, I guess in opposed to like a scientific way of seeing things. But also there's no necessarily no necessarily kind of like harsh divide between those things but, but yeah, I guess like secularization in the, in the 1960s, when it was first kind of theorized was, was very much of a, like um, yeah, these kind of main organized religious traditions and they are kind of declining. I think that. but in like an organized sense. more just they're changing, I guess.  Mark: Sure because I mean, the spiritual impulse is something that's baked into us. You know, many of us have kind of culturally headed hammered out of us. Particularly men. I mean, when I, when I look at mainstream men, I they're, they're permitted an effect is so narrow. They're allowed to be aggressive or angry. That's their emotional range. And they've got this work ethic about, you know, work yourself to death and, you know, don't, don't acknowledge when things are going wrong with your body and all that kind of stuff. But it seems as though. Given an opportunity given, given a culture that fosters it, the spiritual impulse is something that pretty much everybody has because it answers big questions about who am I and what does it mean to be alive and how should I live? And, you know, those are, those are important questions to get answered for yourself. So I think this idea from the sixties that we were going to become more and more rational actors in a sort of economic sense it just flies in the face of reality. I talk about this in my book a little bit. You know, the reason that Richard Dawkins is barking up the wrong tree is that he assumes that humans are these rational creatures. If they can just get all that damn religion out of their minds. And we are inherently biologically, not rational actors, the nature of our brains as they evolved, prevent us from being rational actors, which is why science is so valuable because it enables us to kind of filter out the subjectivity as best we can and draw conclusions. But I dunno, I'm ranting now, but I, I just feel like spirituality is something that's always going to be with us for as long as we're human.  Sarah: for sure. And I really like appreciated that part of your, your book was kind of discussing like, that aspect of human cognition that is just kind of inclined towards spirituality or religion, or like finding meaning in some way. And I think it's, it's very true and this kind of assumption that we would just become like overly rational and kind of let go of that spiritual impulse. I think it was kind of fundamentally flood and that's why we're not seeing it. And Yeah. Mark: Well, let me ask this. Is there anything you would like for our listeners to know about you're thinking about, you know, what you're learning that you're you find surprising or edifying or something that really people really need to know? Sarah: That's, that's a good question. One thing that I've just kind of experienced, I guess, just from like, Do we like having this YouTube channel and having a blog and everything and kind of putting what I'm learning online is that my thinking is constantly changing. And I'll go back like, and listen to like a video that I did a year ago. And I'll think like, you know, I still hold some of those beliefs, but a lot of them have changed and it's just kind of constantly changing. And I think that, I guess that's maybe something that I'd want people to know, like if they watched my content. But other than that I guess just the importance of finding your own path when it comes to spirituality and religion and witchcraft. I get like a lot of. Comments from viewers saying that, you know, they, they always felt like they couldn't practice witchcraft or they couldn't be religious because there's just this very, you know, they kind of see the mainstream dominant way of practicing witchcraft or being religious and, and they, they don't see themselves in that. But I think that, you know? having discussions like these and like your, your your podcast and like, your work and everything that kind of goes to show that there are different ways of, of being a Pegan today. And there are different ways of practicing witchcraft and, and being religious. And you don't have to kind of conform to. but what seems to be expected in that sense. And even if people find it weird, even if people find it confusing there is always going to be someone who thinks similarly to you. And it's just a matter of finding that, I think. Mark: But I saw a bumper sticker once it said something like there are others. Go find them.  Sarah: Yeah,  Mark: However alone you feel there are others go find them, Yucca: well, and that's how it always starts. Right? What's normal to us and expected today was weird and strange. And there were just only a few people doing it at one point, right. We, today we can sit here and talk about mainstream paganism. Right? Think about that for a moment. That was not that wasn't something we, that one used to be able to do. Everything was weird and confusing and kind of, you know, looked down the nose at, but now the whole movement is growing and, and it's going to be changing and. And, you know, you can fit into it or not. There's a way that works for you. Sarah: Yeah.  Mark: When WCA has been referenced, recognized by the U S government as a, as an official religion for purposes of the military, that's a, that's a pretty big step. Yucca: Yeah. Sarah: Yeah. Yeah. definitely. Yeah. It's not so fringe anymore.  Mark: Right? Right. Well, you know, do believe that a lot of what's happening with the, the, the rise of the nones, N O N E S in, certainly in the United States has to do with people flocking away from the hardcore right-wing ideologies of many of those religious entities and paganism by and large is not. It's generally something that's much more inclusive, much more tolerant, much more progressive. It's about people developing themselves and being the best people they can be. And it's about a better world. And I, you know, for the same reasons that people are attracted to star Trek, I think they get attracted to, you know, being part of a movement. That's about being better people and being part of a better world.  Sarah: Yeah, definitely.  Mark: Well, Sarah, this has been wonderful. It has really been enjoyable to talk with you about all this. And as Yucca said, we could go on for another three hours about all the, all the things. I really encourage people to check out your YouTube channel the skeptical, which Yucca: LinkedIn, the show notes. Mark: Good. Okay. Very thoughtful, very interesting engaging stuff. So, and we, we really appreciate your coming on the podcast. It's been great to have you here. Sarah: Yeah, it's been really great to be on here. So thank you guys so much.  Yucca: Thanks Sarah.  

See'rs, Be-ers, Knowers and Doers
How Intuition Can Be What Feels Like the Past and How Following It Can Bring Magic Into Your Life

See'rs, Be-ers, Knowers and Doers

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 7, 2022 30:46 Transcription Available


I spoke with Iris Scott on Jan 14, 2022. It was lovely to speak with another nature lover who gets the fact that everything and everyone is connected. The natural world has an advocate in Iris Scott. Her story of becoming the artist she is today is filled with just doing the next thing and following her passion. She shares some key aspects of her story and how not always doing what everyone else is doing is where you find the magic. BioIris Scott is an American contemporary painter working in the Instinctualist style. Instinctualism is 40,000 years old, making it the oldest school of human mark-making, with thematics founded in animal imagery and mystical experience. Iris grew up in Maple Valley, Washington on what she describes as a “one-family hippie commune”. Iris and her sister spent evenings listening to their mother, a writer, tell epic tales about the anthropomorphized lives of the family's pet parrots, lizards, cats, goats, and rabbits—with wild roaming coyotes appearing in the stories as special guest stars. As a result of this deep connection with animals during her upbringing, the agon of Iris's work is closing the distance between humans and nature. After studying in Florence, in the same centuries-old halls where Raphael, Michelangelo, and Da Vinci worked, Iris moved to a tiny apartment overlooking a rainforest outside of Kaohsiung, Taiwan; from there she launched her career. Her artistic journey took her from Taiwan, to Seattle, and then to Brooklyn, New York, where she lived and worked in a loft space of a former mattress factory. During the six-year-long NYC period, Iris began a relationship with the cutting-edge Filo Sofi Arts Gallery. Her 2019 solo show, Ritual in Pairing, held in Chelsea, was attended by Jerry Saltz and received coverage from outlets like New York Magazine, Smithsonian Magazine, and Artnet. On the West coast, Iris is represented by Adelman Contemporary. The successes of New York (and living on “the nosiest street in America”) led Iris, in 2020, to seek isolation and solitude in New Mexico, overlooking Ghost Ranch, Georgia O'Keeffe's old stomping grounds. She has built a house and studio adjacent to national wilderness and currently lives within walking distance of caves, dinosaur bones, native ruins, and petroglyphs. Here, Iris is connecting to the Instinctualist impulses of the earliest human artists. In Spring 2022, Iris will unveil a new body of work, and a new technique at Filo Sofi Arts. The fresh collection shall depict the desert otherworld of Northern New Mexico—the stark landscape, occupied by resilient plants that twist and claw their way around the rocks, adamant on survival. Her life's goal is to transcend Industrialism's cultish trend of separation from nature, and depict a new mythos of the oldest truth: we are all one.www.irisscottfineart.com

Paso A Paso Podcast - New Mexico Early Childhood Education
Kim - Tewa Women United - Doula Services in New Mexico

Paso A Paso Podcast - New Mexico Early Childhood Education

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 14:58


65 - Kim of Tewa Women United informs us of their Doula Project available to families in Northern New Mexico. Listen and enjoy Kim and their wonderful work. https://tewawomenunited.org --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/paso-a-paso/message

The Chou Hallegra Podcast
Let's Talk About Resilience for Women in Leadership with Dr. LeAnne Salazar Montaya

The Chou Hallegra Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 12:13


Get your copy of the book, Be Resilient: Stories, strategies, and tools to help you rise above your circumstances! Dr. LeAnne Salazar Montoya has been a public servant in Northern New Mexico for the past 20 years. She is a mother, wife, daughter, author, advocate, and educator. She is passionate about helping others and enjoys writing. Dr. Salazar-Montoya has experience as a leader, administrator, and small business owner. When she is not working, she enjoys international traveling and locally volunteering her time. Her background includes involvement in many professional organizations. She enjoys serving on the national education committee for Gamma Beta Phi National Honor Society and several other local and regional non-profit boards. Empowering, educating, and encouraging other women are top priorities for her. Despite her many successes, she has experienced setbacks throughout her life, but she is determined to leave behind a legacy for her children that leaves a tale of hard work, independence, and perseverance. She aspires to be a positive role model for her children and a helping hand for those in need. "And just as the Phoenix rose from the ashes, she too will rise. Returning from the flames, clothed in nothing but her strength, more beautiful than ever before." - Shannen Heartz Connect with Dr LeAnne on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/leanne87548/ #womenleaders #womeninleadership #womeninacademia --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/graceandhopeconsulting/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/graceandhopeconsulting/support

Indigenae Podcast
Guiding us through change: Indigenous Birthwork with Aspen Mirabal

Indigenae Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 45:39


Taos Pueblo Doula Aspen Mirabal joins us for a conversation about birth equity, decolonizing birthing spaces, and supporting our birthing relatives. She shares her journey in birth work and talks about the unique role of doulas in re-matriating cultural traditions and ancestral birthing practices.Aspen Mirabal is the eldest of three daughters from Taos Pueblo. Aspen currently resides in Taos, but spends most of her days on the Pueblo. Professionally, Aspen is a trained and certified birth keeper for Northern New Mexico, serving Native and non-Native families as a community-based doula. Aspen is a student midwife with the desire to provide access to Indigenous midwifery care while reintroducing the ritualistic customs of full-spectrum birth work to her community of Taos Pueblo. You may find Aspen working as a Family Support Specialist with Tiwa Babies Home Visiting Program, serving all of Taos County Monday through Friday, or after hours representing the New Mexico Doula Association— or of course, at a birth.Resources:Tewa Women United: https://tewawomenunited.org/Yiya-vi-kagingdi Doula-Project: https://tewawomenunited.org/yiya-vi-kagingdi-doula-projectChanging Woman Initiative: http://www.changingwomaninitiative.com/ Center for Indigenous Midwifery: https://www.indigenous-midwifery.org/ Tiwa Babies Home Visiting Program: https://www.taosnews.com/news/tiwa-babies-home-visiting-program-empowers-young-taos-families/article_f1348ca9-9cda-5b71-ba1e-409ef0e30b23.html Indigenous Milk Medicine Collective Live with Indigenous Lactation Consultants Camie Jae Goldhammer and Kim Moore-Salas: https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=227110242524474&id=104293154Taos Chapter of the New Mexico Breastfeeding Task Force: https://breastfeedingnm.org/taos/National Native Children's Trauma Center: https://www.nnctc.org/contactInterested in Midwifery and Birthwork? Reach out to Aspen: milk.earth.blood@gmail.comInstagram: @milk.earth.blood--Indigenae theme song: “Nothing Can Kill My Love For You” by Semiah Instagram: @semiah.smithFind her on Youtube, Spotify, Amazon Music, and Apple Music. 

Friends of Build Magazine
David Rentfrow of The Firebird in Santa Fe, New Mexico

Friends of Build Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 60:04


With his forward-thinking “what if?” approach to business, in a short span of time David's leadership at The Fireplace resulted in a remodel of the company's showroom (that had never been touched since being built in 1966) and the reevaluation and expansion of its classic product line.This approach also shaped the company's culture into what it is today. David explains how he has cultivated a customer-centric environment within The Fireplace of today. For example, he invites builders in the Northern New Mexico market to stop by their new showroom not only to see the products, but to feel their new attitude.Listen in as David shares his journey from corporate America to entrepreneurship in an industry he previously had known nothing about, what it's like to do business with his only son, his biggest takeaways from his mentors, and why he believes that the American Dream is a reality for everyone as it is for him and his family.Topics Discussed: [02:57] David's corporate background and what brought him to Santa Fe[11:41] Lessons that David brought from corporate America into The Fireplace[17:08] Working around supply chain issues and communicating these to clients[19:35] How the market in Santa Fe has evolved over 25 years[24:12] The old Firebird versus the new Firebird[26:35] Training the Firebird staff to look beyond price[31:14] David on mentorship[38:12] David's vision for The Firebrand[43:39] How David learned the ins-and-outs of the hearth and irrigation industries[45:57] The moment David realized that life and business is going great[51:43] Lessons around taking risks that David intends to pass on to his son[58:24] The American Dream according to DavidConnect with Guest:Website Facebook Instagram Connect with Build Magazine:Website Instagram Facebook Key Quotes by David:My approach to pretty much everything is to ask, “What if…?”The universal truth is, it doesn't matter what the business is. If you treat customers the way you would want to be treated as a customer, you're going to win the day.When you're working with individuals and you're not sure that they should be part of your team or are capable of being part of your team, your first approach should be to rehabilitate versus terminate. So, really give people a chance.You can be a small company anywhere in the United States, but geography no longer limits you in any way, shape, or form.One of the things that I've seen very successful people do throughout my life and certainly my career in corporate America, is having the courage to take chances when others would not.

Big Blend Radio
Fiber Artist Nancy Hershberger in Fort Union

Big Blend Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 37:00


This episode of Big Blend Radio's 1st Friday "Toast to The Arts & Parks" Show features fiber artist Nancy Hershberger, who talks about her experience as the National Parks Arts Foundation (NPAF) artist-in-residence in Fort Union National Monument in Northern New Mexico. Nancy's art quilts have been shown in exhibitions in the US and internationally and she has been accepted and served as artist in residence for five residencies in units within the national park service, the most recent one being Fort Union. Follow Nancy's art at https://www.facebook.com/NancyHershberger Artist Fort Union was the largest frontier military post and supply center of the southwest. It also was the hub of commerce, national defense, and migration at the final stretch of the Santa Fe Trail. More: https://nationalparktraveling.com/listing/fort-union-national-monument/ The National Parks Arts Foundation is a 501(c)3 non-profit dedicated to the promotion of the National Parks through creating dynamic opportunities for artworks that are based in our natural and historic heritage. All NPAF artist-in-residence programs are made possible through the philanthropic support of donors of all sorts ranging from corporate sponsors, small businesses, and art patrons and citizen-lovers of the parks. More: https://www.nationalparksartsfoundation.org/

A Toast to the Arts
Fiber Artist Nancy Hershberger in Fort Union

A Toast to the Arts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 36:53


This episode of Big Blend Radio's 1st Friday "Toast to The Arts & Parks" Show features fiber artist Nancy Hershberger, who talks about her experience as the National Parks Arts Foundation (NPAF) artist-in-residence in Fort Union National Monument in Northern New Mexico. Nancy's art quilts have been shown in exhibitions in the US and internationally and she has been accepted and served as artist in residence for five residencies in units within the national park service, the most recent one being Fort Union. Follow Nancy's art at https://www.facebook.com/NancyHershbergerArtist Fort Union was the largest frontier military post and supply center of the southwest. It also was the hub of commerce, national defense, and migration at the final stretch of the Santa Fe Trail. More: https://nationalparktraveling.com/listing/fort-union-national-monument/The National Parks Arts Foundation is a 501(c)3 non-profit dedicated to the promotion of the National Parks through creating dynamic opportunities for artworks that are based in our natural and historic heritage. All NPAF artist-in-residence programs are made possible through the philanthropic support of donors of all sorts ranging from corporate sponsors, small businesses, and art patrons and citizen-lovers of the parks. More: https://www.nationalparksartsfoundation.org/

Indie Writer Podcast
NaNoWriMo Final Stretch with Myrth Killingsworth and Micaela Green

Indie Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 47:37


Welcome to the Indie Writer Podcast where we talk about all things writing and indie publishing. Today we are excited to be checking in about NaNoWriMo with Myrth Killingsworth and Micaela Green.    Micaela Green is a writer and artist curious about the stories that can be found in the relationships around us. She has had artwork previously exhibited at The Hermitage Museum in Norfolk, Virginia. When not working on an MFA in Fiction at Vermont College of Fine Arts, she is hanging out with her dog Milo in Charleston, South Carolina.   Myrth Killingsworth is a wild co-creator in an ecosystem of language. Her stories have been featured by the University of New Mexico-Taos's literary magazine Howl, and she was a finalist for the New Millennium Writing Awards. In the past, she has worked as a wilderness ranger in the High Sierra, a massage therapist, a fine arts carpenter, and an assistant arborist. She currently writes and lives in Northern New Mexico with her family.   Keep up with guests: Myrth Killingsworth: https://nanowrimo.org/participants/myrth-killingsworth   Micaela Green:  @micaelagreens on Instagram https://nanowrimo.org/participants/micaela-green   _______________________________________ Check out the following books by our Patrons!  Proliferation by Erik Otto Mission 51 by Fernando Crôtte Want to see your book listed? Become a Patron! 

MinerTalk
MinerTalk: UTEP Trounces Northern New Mexico College 88-53

MinerTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 62:43


MinerTalk: UTEP Trounces Northern New Mexico College 88-53

The DotCom Magazine Entrepreneur Spotlight
John R. (Grizz) Deal, CEO, IX Power Clean Water & Deborah Deal, V.P. Marketing & PR, IX Power Clean Water, A DotCom Magazine Exclusive Interview

The DotCom Magazine Entrepreneur Spotlight

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 33:21


About John R. (Grizz) Deal and IX Power Clean Water: John R. (Grizz) Deal has nearly thirty years of experience in technology commercialization, tech-based startups, fast-growing ventures, and product development. Grizz was CEO and a co-founder of Hyperion Power Generation, a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) spinout developing a Small Modular Reactor (SMR). He has also served as the chief marketing officer for Space Imaging and was the founder and CEO of LizardTech, one of the more successful LANL spinouts. Additionally, Grizz has served as Entrepreneur in Residence for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) at Technology Ventures Corporation and as Visiting entrepreneur at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Grizz founded seven firms based on U.S. DOE technologies and holds graduate and undergraduate science degrees in geography from Texas A&M University. Grizz is on the Board of the Riga Innovation Centre (RIC) in Latvia, the former Product Development Sensei for GVA Launch Gurus in Russia and Kazakhstan, a former adjunct faculty member at the Moscow School of Management Skolkovo, a member of the Texas A&M University College of Geosciences Advisory Council, a Mentor at the University of Northern Colorado BizHub Collaborative, and a Steering Committee member of the JeffCo Energy Action Project. An Eagle Scout, Grizz spent nine summers working at Philmont Scout Ranch in Northern New Mexico. Grizz is a frequent speaker and writer on energy technology and policy, product development, starting and growing advanced technology-based ventures, and issues in raising capital for such ventures. Experienced Executive Chairman with a demonstrated history of working in the oil & energy industry and many InfoTech industries. Skilled in Negotiation, Business Planning, Management, Research and Development (R&D), and Renewable Energy. Strong business development professional with a MS focused in Geography: systems and economics from Texas A&M University. IX Power Clean Water is proud of our involvement in the industry and community. We are members and supporters of: New Mexico Oil & Gas Association WateReuse Association Water Environment Federation Denver Area Metro Manufacturing Partnership Through our nonprofit, the IX Power Foundation, we support the: Clean Water for Bangladesh campaign Golden Chamber of Commerce The West Chamber Friends of the Jefferson County Public Library Leadership Golden Leadership Jefferson County Additionally, the IX Power Foundation founded and runs the: JeffCo International Women's Day Celebration every March 8th JeffCo Innovators' Workshop and the JeffCo Innovation Faire.

This Is Not Church Podcast
Theosis And The Four Paths With Alexander John Shaia

This Is Not Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 59:30


In this episode we talk with Alexander John Shaia. Born and raised in Birmingham, Alabama, Alexander John was part of a large extended family that had emigrated from Lebanon a generation previously. He grew up immersed in the ancient traditions of Middle Eastern Christianity (Maronite Catholicism) and was expected to become a priest, a family tradition since the year 1300. He was led otherwise. Alexander John attended the University of Notre Dame and received a degree in Cultural Anthropology. Next came a brief time in seminary followed by a Master's in Counseling Education, a Master's in Religious Education, a graduate certificate in Pastoral Psychotherapy, and a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology. His extensive psychological training across many modalities finally led him to Switzerland where he studied with the Jungian Analyst and founder of Sandplay Psychotherapy, Dora Maria Kalff. Alexander John became the first US man admitted to the International Society for Sandplay Therapy and continues to serve as a senior Certified Teaching Member of the organization. Returning to the United States, he undertook years of private practice, teaching, parish and retreat ministry and further study. Integrating his life-long practice of prayer with many cross-disciplines—anthropology, psychology, spirituality, and ritual work—has shaped him into a unique thought-leader and a widely sought consultant, trainer, and inspiring keynote speaker. Then in 2000, Alexander John's professional life expanded from being primarily a speaker to also that of an author, now with some eight books and more in the works. He lives in the high Rocky Mountains in Northern New Mexico and the wild Atlantic coast of Northwest Spain. A perfect day finds him in the presence of ancient trees, massive stones, his dog and a book of poetry. You can Follow Alexander John Shaia on: Facebook     Twitter     Instagram Check out his website You can purchase his book on Amazon.com You can check out his partnership with Quoir Publishing here You can connect with us on    Facebook     Instagram      Twitter Want to help us with our future episodes of This Is Not Church Podcast? Join us on Patreon where you will get access to exclusive patron content such as early access to episode, videos of upcoming episodes, and live Q&A sessions. Also check out our website for upcoming interviews and blog posts Each episode of This Is Not Church Podcast is expertly engineered by our producer The Podcast Doctor Eric Howell. If you're thinking of starting a podcast you need to connect with Eric!

Building a Furniture Brand with Ethan Abramson
A Life In Furniture with Ramon Valdez of Ramon Valdez Fine Furniture

Building a Furniture Brand with Ethan Abramson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 50:00


On this episode, host Ethan Abramson sits down with Ramon Valdez, owner of the Northern New Mexico based furniture company Ramon Valdez Fine Furniture. This episode is brought to you by Jobber - getjobber.com/ethan Ramon has been in the furniture business for over 40 years, and in that time he has worked in every aspect of the industry. From running a 30 person cabinet company to being a one person boutique furniture shop. With such an extensive breath of the industry, Ramon's interview is an honest reflection of someone who has walked the walk. He has spent his whole career in the world of furniture and this episode is a true look at the path he has taken and all the different ins and outs of the furniture business that he has seen. Following along as we talk about how the industry has changed over the years, what makes a furniture maker a furniture maker, when passion should play a role in your business, and more.

CCNS Update
Northern New Mexico Activists Hold Events Remembering Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

CCNS Update

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 4:22


On August 6th and 9th, 1945 the U.S. Government dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. Commemoration events were held in Los Alamos and Taos. To listen to the panel discussion, courtesy of KCEI-FM go to - https://culturalenergy.org/listenlinks.htm#aug2021 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ccnsupdate/support

New Books in Literature
Martín Prechtel, "Rescuing the Light: Quotes from the Oral Teachings of Martín Prechtel" (North Atlantic Books, 2021)

New Books in Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 60:16


Today I interview Martín Prechtel, who's an author and so much more than an author. He's a teacher, a musician, a farmer, a cook, a silversmith, a horseman, and...and...and... so much more, including a guiding light for many of us hoping to live as true human beings. He's got a new book called Rescuing the Light: Quotes from the Oral Teachings of Martín Prechtel (North Atlantic Books, 2021). His teaching now happens at his school in Northern New Mexico. It's called Boland's Kitchen, and that name in itself is a riddle that, over the course of our interview, lights the way to wisdom. I deeply admire and love Martín and all the work he does and I'm delighted to share our conversation with you. One note before we start: Martín doesn't use computers and doesn't really like using phones, for reasons you'll hear about. Toward the end of our conversation, our connection cut out, and I didn't have the chance to thank him on the air. I'm happy to do so now. Thank you, Martín, for your words and your wisdom. Jump up and live! Eric LeMay is on the creative writing faculty at Ohio University. He is the author of five books, most recently Remember Me. He can be reached at eric@ericlemay.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literature

New Books in Spiritual Practice and Mindfulness
Martín Prechtel, "Rescuing the Light: Quotes from the Oral Teachings of Martín Prechtel" (North Atlantic Books, 2021)

New Books in Spiritual Practice and Mindfulness

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 60:16


Today I interview Martín Prechtel, who's an author and so much more than an author. He's a teacher, a musician, a farmer, a cook, a silversmith, a horseman, and...and...and... so much more, including a guiding light for many of us hoping to live as true human beings. He's got a new book called Rescuing the Light: Quotes from the Oral Teachings of Martín Prechtel (North Atlantic Books, 2021). His teaching now happens at his school in Northern New Mexico. It's called Boland's Kitchen, and that name in itself is a riddle that, over the course of our interview, lights the way to wisdom. I deeply admire and love Martín and all the work he does and I'm delighted to share our conversation with you. One note before we start: Martín doesn't use computers and doesn't really like using phones, for reasons you'll hear about. Toward the end of our conversation, our connection cut out, and I didn't have the chance to thank him on the air. I'm happy to do so now. Thank you, Martín, for your words and your wisdom. Jump up and live! Eric LeMay is on the creative writing faculty at Ohio University. He is the author of five books, most recently Remember Me. He can be reached at eric@ericlemay.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/spiritual-practice-and-mindfulness

THE WONDER: Science-Based Paganism
Summer's Waning - Dimming - Lammas - Lughnasadh

THE WONDER: Science-Based Paganism

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 27:00


Remember, we welcome comments, questions and suggested topics at thewonderpodcastQs@gmail.com   S2E28 TRANSCRIPT: ----more---- Mark: Welcome back to the Wonder Science-based Paganism. My name's Mark.  Yucca: and I'm Yucca. Mark: And today we're going to talk about the August Sabbath, the midpoint between the summer solstice and the autumnal Equinox, which is celebrated by many pagans as one of the eight stations on the wheel of the year.  Yucca: It's also one of those tricky ones in terms of what is it called?  Mark: Right. That's the first thing we need to talk about. What do you call this thing? How do you pronounce that? And so forth and so on from there.  Yucca: Yeah. Well, I often use Lamas because it's the one I can spell of the ones that other people might know what, what I'm talking about. I also think of it as the Second Summer and It's just that, that beautiful, wonderful holiday, which we'll get into the meaning for it later. But I almost don't even think of it having a name. I just associate it with what's happening during the season for us. So it's our monsoon holiday. Mark: Right, right. Yeah. Llamas comes from the middle English meaning loaf mass.  So in Europe it's very associated with bread and the green harvest, which happened right about now in the course of the year in the countries that had that kind of agricultural cycle. And so it's also associated with all of the products of green, like beer and bread and you know, all the associated things that you can make with grain. Another word that is commonly used in the pagan community is Luna SSA, which is spelled with a variety of extra consonants.  Yucca: Pronounced Luna, Luna, Luna said neither of which. Correct pronunciations for Irish. Mark: Right. And I choose not to use that name because when I was naming the Sabbaths around the course of the wheel of the year and just generally conceptualizing atheopagan ism generally I didn't want to be drawing from any particular culture. I want it to be very clear that this was a modern interpretation of paganism that didn't stem from Celtic culture or Norse culture or Germanic culture or Greek culture or Egypt culture. You know, for, for a number of reasons, one of which is that I feel strongly. My spirituality being a forward-looking spirituality about living in the world today and our vision for the future. And also because I wanted to avoid a cultural appropriation. So  Yucca: name also is in reference to a God. Is it not? Mark: yes, yes, Lugh, who is a God that I don't know anything about.  Yucca: Yeah. Mark: So what I have been calling this, I, I, for a while, and in the book I call it Summer's End, but. Really, it just isn't the end of summer here. If that doesn't work very well. So I've moved from that to Summer's Waning. And also just to the term Dimming, because this is the time of year when it begins to become clear that the days are getting shorter again. It's been long enough since the summer solstice that you can really tell. You're not getting those very little. Nights anymore. It's the days are still long. They're just not as long.  Yucca: yeah, that's getting noticeable. Hmm. I love the waning that connects it back to some of the. The lunar term terminology that we use as well, even though it's a solar holiday, it's, it's connecting those two just with the language.  Mark: Right, right.  Yucca: Although in my, my climate, the sun is, the days are getting shorter, but the summer itself, definitely not coming to an end, but this is the height of summer for us. You know, summer solstice is.  Mark: Yeah.  Yucca: Still it's summer, but it's still spring ish. It's really the end of spring, but this is truly summer for us at this point.  Mark: What'd you say it was high summer where you are.  Yucca: really sure. How to, what that word would really mean to be high summer.  Mark: okay. Okay.  Yucca: Because I would associate high summer with being like the very middle of summer. And I suppose it is, but the way seasons transition is not nice and smooth the way that it looks in the picture books. Right. It's just us often. It's okay. Boom. Sees it as changed. Whether it's changed, it's all different or it just kind of like. Slogs along, just like, okay. Not making up its mind, which season it is.  Mark: right.  Yucca: Yeah. Mark: Where I am in California. We have the buffering effect of the ocean and that tends to sort of smooth things out. I've I've lived in places and been places where. The changing of the season is like the slamming of a door.  Yucca: Yeah. Mark: you have these relatively warm, but kind of wan days in October and then bang and it snows and it's winter time and it stays wintertime for months.  Yucca: Yeah. Mark: So it really just depends on where you are. And as we've so often said, paganism is. At its heart. At least we think a spirituality of place. It's a bit being aware of where we are in the course of the year and where we are on the planet and in the cosmos and paying attention to that and incorporating that into what we celebrate spiritually. So What we're describing in terms of what we practice and what we choose to do and so forth you know, can all be thrown out the window if that's not what is going on, where you live. You know, the, the, the paganism of where you live should be the spirituality of that place.  Yucca: I suspect someone listening from Samoa is going to be in a completely different situation than either of us.  Mark: Yes.  Yucca: So, yeah. Well, before we go too much, further, and mark, there was a poem that you wanted to share.  Mark: Oh, yes. Yes. I, I completely forgot that. And now I'm remembering, Yucca: Hmm. Mark: so I have a cycle of eight poems about the wheel of the year. And this is the one for this season which is called Gifts of a Problem Sabbath which is for Dimming or Summer's Waning: Hidden, you spring upon us from the calendar: ah! The Marblemouthed Holiday is upon us again! What shall we call it? Lammas, or Lughnasadh how on Earth Do you pronounce that, but worse, what does it mean?   Behold the midpoint, the blazing furnace of August. Ritual? Indoors, perhaps, but not under that Sun.   Rather, let us go to the places of water to bask, To where berries hang heavy among the thorns, Knowing it all starts now the cascade of food pouring From the good Earth. Break A stalk of barley, saying this is my heritage this Is emmer wheat is einkorn is the tough grass of the Fertile Crescent Bred to bake my loaves. And bake one then, a crusty yeasty rosemary Dome for tearing with the hands. Eat warm with butter or oil, Feel the Life milling in your teeth, and swallow: This good life sprung abundant from the collision of Earth's magic, Time and art and science. We are a making people. Our hoes and lore Midwife the coming of apples and squash, peppers, tomatoes. The Great Gathering begins now.   Yucca: It's beautiful. Thank you for sharing that.  Mark: Thank you.  Yucca: Yeah. Mark: Yeah this is traditionally the time of the first harvest and where I am. We've been having stone fruit and and garden vegetables and so forth, kind of pouring out for a period of months now. But. In many places where it's colder and further to the north and the angle of the sun is not quite as strong on the, on the leaves right about now is when you start being able to get some food other than like butchered lambs and eggs and things like that. And so it's kind of an exciting time, but it's also a time that's really associated with work. I talked about the summer solstice as Conceptualized as I see it as kind of a holiday of leisure because all the, all the plants are in the ground and all the work to foster them has happened. And other than keeping critters for meeting it, you just basically have to wait until it's ready to harvest. Well, now it's time. And so I associate. This holiday also with work and vocation, and also with technology with tools because You know, there there's a, a real charming quality to the aesthetic that's associated with modern paganism, the sort of medieval Europe, Renaissance, medieval Europe kind of aesthetic. But if you route all of your. You're framing in that you miss out on the many benefits of modernity and technology is amazing. It's done incredible things for us. It has, it has caused our quality of life nearly universally throughout the world to rise at least to some degree.  Yucca: Not equally,  Mark: no, not at all. Not at all, but, but still it has enabled us to create a great deal, more food than we were able to otherwise, and to communicate over vast distances and to explore space and to process information in, in such rapid, incredible ways and to develop medical technology, to expand our lifespans and  Yucca: Go to the bottom of the ocean and all kinds of things. Yeah.  Mark: Right. All kinds of  Yucca: Do this. We, we pointed out a lot, but just how amazing this is. So as we record, we're looking at each other's faces from, we should actually figure out how many miles apart we are, but  Mark: we should.  Yucca: far yeah.  Mark: yeah. pretty far.  Yucca: Recording this and then putting it on the internet and then you, the listener are downloading it and you might be listening to it in your car or your pocket or wherever it is that you are just so boggling. Right? Mark: My, my partner in the was saying this morning, the 21st century is amazing. We're old enough to remember when the 21st century was really going to be the future. And that was, you  Yucca: cars  Mark: in 2001, a space Odyssey and all that kind of stuff. So It didn't quite work out that way, but there's still a lot. That's really remarkable about where we have arrived as humanity. And so I think about technology at this time and technological advance and, you know, I do stuff like defragment my heart drive and, you know, make sure that everything is backed up to the cloud and just some sort of maintenance things that this gives me a point in the calendar to focus.  Yucca: Yeah. just good to have those scheduled in there or else they just don't happen until your hard drive crashes. And then you're panicking. Mark: And then, then you're crying and you're sending your hard drive off to Texas to have the data pulled off it and buy some very expensive service, which I had to do once. And it was no fun.  Yucca: Hmm. Yeah. Well, I, I love that. Take that you have bringing the, bringing a recognition and celebration. Yeah. To our practices on things that aren't thought of as traditionally pagan and yet are so important to our lives. And when our paganism is about our lives and our experience with the world, it's really important to include all of it. Not just the pretty romantic stuff, but you know, the whole picture, that whole cycle. Mark: Exactly. Exactly. So, and we can do that while not glossing over the many negative impacts that the advance of technology have caused. You know, we can certainly, I mean, it's not exactly the time of year for grieving, but we can certainly, you know, mark. Those impacts in our recognition, but that doesn't mean that we should ignore those accomplishments. You know, very much like this was the traditional time of the Olympic games in ancient Greece. And so many people associate athletic contests and sort of feats of athleticism with this holiday as well. And there's, there's sort of a mod modern equivalent to that because it's, this is the time when people go to the beach and play volleyball, and there's a lot of sort of outdoor recreation happening,  Yucca: Yeah. Mark: but I feel like the sorts of. Achievements that we can most celebrate in this time are much more cerebral achievements than they are athletic achievements. I mean, athletes do amazing things and that's wonderful and records continue to be broken over and over for how fast people can be and how strong people can be and all that kind of stuff. But the transformative nature of some of these technologies, can't be under spoken. There, they simply have been game changers for humanity. And it's, it's important for us to, you know, raise a glass door, scientists and engineers who have who have brought these things to us.  Yucca: Yeah, definitely. Mark: So how are you planning on celebrating this, this season, your monsoon season?  Yucca: Well, first of all, this is the first real monsoon we've had in probably near a decade. I haven't.  Mark: Well,  Yucca: Yeah, so we're still, so I'm in the Southwest. I'm in Northern New Mexico high desert that's 7,000 feet. Not sure what that is and meters, I can look that up, but we're in a very dry, somewhat extreme environment. And this is the time of year that we get rain. And the whole region, I think pretty much the whole half of the continent has been experiencing drought recently. But we've gotten some rain and traditionally what happened will be dry. All your dry, dry, dry. We might get a little bit of moisture, snow storms in the, in the winter, need that for the, the mountains to get that snow pack in there, but then months of dry and then the monsoons come and there's storms that come in the afternoons, the, the mornings are clear and cool. And then we'll start to creep up, get hot. And then the monsoons come and they rain down. And this is the only time of year that things are green and they haven't been green in years. So it's amazing right now I'm looking out the window and there's little. There's new grass. There's grass, seedlings, grass has sprouted up in just the past few weeks and there, most of that grass is not going to make it. Unfortunately we can, you know, as land managers do what we can to try and, you know, put a little bit of mulch down and try and imitate the biology that was lost that this land needs. But this is the time of. This is the time of the, of the grass, the grasslands, the Rangers just blooming back, popping up. So we see this as our monsoon season, but it's, it's the celebration of the grassland. our, our approach for the wheel of the year is, well, there's, what's going on in terms of the Earth's position with the sun and the temperatures and all of that. But we also associate each season with some part of the biosphere that humans are intimately connected with and dependent upon. So. You'll or winter solstice is the time that we celebrate the forests. But this is the time of year that we celebrate the grasslands, the brittle environments. So a brittle environment is one like this, where you might get moisture, but it's not uniformly distributed throughout the year. And so different types of life have to exist in systems like this are our recovery processes are different than the non brittle environments that. moisture, whether it's a lot or a little, they get regular, so they can have very different decomposition processes than us. So we celebrate that grass. And for me, it's very special as my first degree was okay. Range ecology and management and working in restoration. So that's something that's just an eye that I have for anyways. I just love it and I'm fascinated by it and work in it. But it's the celebration of the grasses.  Mark: Yeah.  Yucca: we're doing lots of playing outside, mostly in the mornings in the evenings because the middle of the day is rough. When the storms are coming, running out and playing in the storms And we get it. So seldomly that it's like, oh, kids go get muddy to get as muddy as he possibly can. And as the adults, we will be cheering with with some beer, which we aren't big drinkers. We might have maybe a bottle or two a month of either beer or cider, but it's the celebration of the grasses. And that's, you know, that's where it comes from. So that's, what's going on on our side.  Mark: Great. That's great. I honestly don't know what I'm going to be doing this year. Sometimes I have invited people out to the coast because we're, we're like 25 miles from the Pacific ocean. Maybe 30 and the Pacific ocean is pretty impressive. I mean, I've been living relatively near it all my life. That's an awful lot of water. And and it's very fierce. It's it's misnamed. The Pacific ocean is, is definitely misnamed. The Atlantic coast doesn't get nearly the kind of ferocity in terms of waves and so forth if the Pacific coast does. But this time of year, it's a nice time to go to the beach and barbecue something. And. Play around and just be outside because we've been moving. And because of all the tumult that's been happening in my life right now, I haven't been able to put anything like that together yet, but I I'm still considering putting out feelers to some friends and seeing if they'd like to go out to the coast for for a little gathering and ritual next Saturday or Sunday. So that would be, and, and I should say that the actual midpoint between the solstice and the Equinox is around the 7th of August. So you've got, you've got a while in there to find a time that works for you and do something that feels appropriate to the season. Obviously. In a modern context, weekends tend to work out better for a lot of people. So that's what I tend to focus on. But Yeah. so that's, that's the sort of thing that I'm thinking. And also on the atheopagan isms, zoom mixer that we do on Saturday mornings, we're doing a ritual as well on zoom.  Yucca: Nice. Mark: Yeah. So I had something else also that I wanted to read that I had forgotten about, but now I remember which is that this is also the point in the season that the earliest of the gray it's tend to happen. And it may not be that may not be true this year because we've had so little in the way of water that everything is, is behind. But  Yucca: And intense heat and your area as well,  Mark: intense heat. Yes. We've. We've had a lot of reasoning and, and I mean last year, pretty much everybody's crop was lost because of smoke taint because of the smoke from the wildfires. Now this year, the question is, is there going to be anything that isn't turned into raisins to harvest? So pretty rough on the, on the grape industry right? now. But anyway because the, the traditional song, John Barleycorn must die is associated with this holiday. And it's also frequently the time when the harvest of the grapes, which we call the crush happens around here. I rewrote John Barleycorn Must Die as Joan Zinfandel Must Die. Zinfandel is a variety of grapes. That's grown around here quite a lot. It's a rich red wine and it's, it's very delicious. So I will read this redone version of John Barleycorn must die called Joan Zinfandel Must Die. There were three menne of the West County, their fortunes for to trye And these three menne swore upon an Oaken Tree Joan Zinfandel must dye   They've planted, trellised, and shorne her limbs And left her bare abed And these three menne swore a solemn vow Joan Zinfandel was ded.   They let her lye for a very long time, 'til the rains from heaven did fall And little Dame Joan sprowted out bright buds, and so amazed them all They've let her stand 'til Harvest Day 'til her arms were greene as grass And little Dame Joan's borne some full round fruit: a fulsome, ripened lass   They've hired menne with their knives so sharp to cut her fruit from her arms They threwe her into a wagon then, and rolled her unto the barn They brought her to the crushing floor where they crushed her to a mash, Squeezed her blood into fermenters, and added yeast: a dash.   They racked her to a barrel of oak, where dark and coolness dwell And there they made a solemn oath on poor Joan Zinfandel They've hired men to load her high with mighty lifts of forke And the bottler he has served her worse than that For he's bound her behind a cork.   And little Dame Joan in the crystal cup and she's brandy in the glass And little Dame Joan and the crystal cup proved the bravest lass at last The good folk they can't cook nor serve, nor live this life so well And the merchant he can't seal deal nor debt without a little Zinfandel   Yucca: great. I love your reference to the forklifts in  Mark: Yeah. The mighty lifts of forke...  Yucca: Well, yeah, there's something just charming about taking the kind of old timey language and tunes and applying it to the modern world.  Mark: Yeah. I agree. I agree. Yeah. So. As always, we hope you really enjoy this holiday that you, you take time to celebrate this moment in the year and look around and see what's happening in your local environment and with your local your local, agricultural and, and biotic cycles. And And as always seek happiness, seek joy because this, this is all too short Yucca: Yeah. Mark: we need to celebrate it as we go.  Yucca: Yes. Mark:  Thank you for this Yucca. It's been really a great time to have a conversation.  Yucca: Likewise, Mark. 

Radio Free Galisteo
Lucy Lippard Discusses Her Life in Galisteo, NM and How The Village and She Have Changed Over the Years

Radio Free Galisteo

Play Episode Play 21 sec Highlight Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 32:12


Writer, activist and Galisteo resident Lucy Lippard discusses how she came to live in the small, but much lauded, village in Northern New Mexico and reflects on her life there and the changes she has witnessed.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/radiofreegalisteo?fan_landing=true)

Making Contact
Symbols of Resistance Part Two: A Tribute to the Martyrs of the Chican@ Movement (Encore)

Making Contact

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 28:57


Our radio adaptation of the film Symbols of Resistance: A Tribute to the Martyrs of the Chican@ Movement, offers a reflection on the untold stories of the Chicano Movement with a focus on Colorado and Northern New Mexico. Produced by Freedom Archives, the film delves into issues of cultural identity, student activism; land rights and social justice, in the face of police oppression.  

Making Contact
Symbols of Resistance Part Two: A Tribute to the Martyrs of the Chican@ Movement (Encore)

Making Contact

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 28:57


Our radio adaptation of the film Symbols of Resistance: A Tribute to the Martyrs of the Chican@ Movement, offers a reflection on the untold stories of the Chicano Movement with a focus on Colorado and Northern New Mexico. Produced by Freedom Archives, the film delves into issues of cultural identity, student activism; land rights and social justice, in the face of police oppression.  

Building Resilience AIA Utah BEC | COTE
High Performance Homes - Klima Architecture

Building Resilience AIA Utah BEC | COTE

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 63:22


AIA Utah has launched the second podcast on Building Resilience! Join the Building Enclosure Council and the Committee on the Environment (BEC | COTE) for engaging conversations about:ArchitectureBuilding technologyMaterialsMethodologies specific to this building's regionAn open conversation about how buildings can make the built and global environment betterThe second episode is now live and takes a look at High-Performance Residential Buildings in Harsh Mountain Environments. The BEC | COTE hosts Dijana Alickovic, Bryan Markkanen, and Jörg Rügemer sit down with Chris Price, founder of Klima Architecture, to discuss his design strategies when it comes to high-performance residential buildings at elevations above 7,000'  Listen in to this latest episode to learn about his buildings and the building technology behind it.Chris Price AIA, CPHC, LEED APThe founder and principal of Klima Architecture. Originally from Northern New Mexico, Chris has always had a deep connection with this wild, fragile planet we call home. He spends his time between the harsh deserts and the lush mountains in and around Utah. Upon receiving his bachelor of arts in Architecture from the University of New Mexico and moving to Utah in 2009, he established Park City Design + Build where he embarked on designing and building more eco-conscious homes in Park City. During his early years of PCD+B, he earned his Masters of Architecture from the University of Utah. Chris is a Licensed Architect, General Contractor, and Passive House Consultant through PHIUS. https://klimaarchitecture.com/Presented by The Building Enclosure Council and the Committee on the Environment

Making Contact
Symbols of Resistance: A Tribute to the Martyrs of the Chicano Movement, Part One - Encore

Making Contact

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 28:57


Our radio adaptation of the film Symbols of Resistance: A Tribute to the Martyrs of the Chicano Movement, offers a reflection on the untold stories of the Chicano Movement with a focus on Colorado and Northern New Mexico. Produced by Freedom Archives, the film delves into issues of cultural identity, student activism; land rights and social justice, in the face of police oppression.  

What's Not Going On?
Interview with Precious D. Benally

What's Not Going On?

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2021 22:44


In this episode, I discuss Indigenous rights, the legal systems of Native communities and the background of Precious Benally, a Tribal Healing to Wellness Court Specialist with the Tribal Law and Policy Institute. She is currently a law lecturer at Columbia Law School and a member of the Diné Nation from Northern New Mexico. *image rights belong to Ryan Red Corn

Transcending Stuttering with Uri Schneider
#41 The Little Things with John Gomez

Transcending Stuttering with Uri Schneider

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2021 63:30


GUEST BIO John Gomez was born and raised in Northern New Mexico.  He attended Colorado College where he earned a degree in Philosophy and American Ethnic Studies.   He graduated from California State Los Angeles University with a Master's degree in Communication Disorders in 2009.  Presently, he works as a Speech Pathologist for the Los Angeles Unified School District.  He is also part-time faculty at Cal State LA where he teaches a graduate-level course on stuttering and a course on psychosocial considerations. In 2017, CSULA honored John with the Lois V. Douglass Distinguished Alumnus Award.  John also moonlights as a filmmaker.  In 2012 he established Keen Eye Productions, LLC.   His first feature film, WHEN I STUTTER had its world premiere at the Cleveland International Film Festival on April, 2nd 2017.  The film recently won the "Supporter of People with Fluency Disorders Award" from the International Fluency Association. WHEN I STUTTER has been lauded by many organizations and associations for its ability to effectively raise awareness about people who stutter and their challenges in life. The film has won 7 awards, been an official selection in over 15 film festivals, and has been translated into over 11 languages.   TOPICS INCLUDE - Keeping busy during 2020 - CAMP Shout Out & When I Stutter - Best filmmakers and inspiration for When I Stutter - Growth and change - Making little changes and improvements in life - Giving your self permission to make mistakes - Life as a school based speech-language pathologists - Teaser for new movie about stuttering that will help with communication success   RESOURCES AND LINKS When I Stutter Camp Shout Out Upcoming events   HOST BIO Uri Schneider, M.A. CCC -SLP passionately explores and develops practical ways for us to create our own success story. Delivering personalized experiences of communication care informed by leading professionals and influencers, Uri is re-imagining the next-level of speech-language therapy for people to benefit in real life. Uri Schneider, M.A. CCC -SLP is co-founder and leader at Schneider Speech Pathology and faculty at the University of California, Riverside School of Medicine. For more, visit www.schneiderspeech.com

Caregiver Wellness Podcast For Alzheimer's And Other Dementias
#6 - Stress Relief for Caregivers Through Art with Liz Brindley

Caregiver Wellness Podcast For Alzheimer's And Other Dementias

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2020 28:43


Discover how Liz has used drawing as a tool to find peace in the present moment. Liz walks us through a beautiful mediation on an everyday object. We chat about how to find reverence in the ordinary and how that reflects our own nature. Liz Brindley is a Food Illustrator in Northern New Mexico. She spends her days illustrating, teaching online classes for creatives, and designing products to make your house feel like home. She creates her art, which is inspired by farming and nature, to give people moments of pause to find joy in the present moment. Her work has been exhibited in galleries across the United States, and she is the recipient of a National Scholastic Art & Writing Gold Key Award. You can learn more at www.printsandplantspress.com For the full transcript of this podcast, go to https://www.caregiverwellnessretreat.com/reverance-in-the-ordinary Please show your support for our Podcast and host more conversations about Caregiving by donating or signing up to join the conversation today at this link: https://www.caregiverwellnessretreat.com/donate-caregivers-retreats Links: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/prints_and_plants/ Website: www.printsandplantspress.com Coloring Pages: Free Pack: https://printsandplants.com/collections/coloring-pages/products/free-printable-coloring-pages Full, Printable Coloring Book ($10): https://printsandplants.com/collections/coloring-pages/products/printable-coloring-book-download --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/caregiver-wellness15/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/caregiver-wellness15/support

Paso A Paso Podcast - New Mexico Early Childhood Education
Dreamtree Project - Youth and Family Housing Services in Northern New Mexico

Paso A Paso Podcast - New Mexico Early Childhood Education

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2020 14:59


Housing & compassionate support services to youth in crisis. DreamTree Project offers emergency teen shelter, a transitional home and resources for youth throughout northern New Mexico, including Colfax, Mora, Rio Arriba, Taos and Union counties. The emergency teen homeless shelter is open 24/7, to youth ages 12 to 17. You can come in anytime, or you can take a tour - just stop by, call them at 575-758-9595, or text us at 575-770-7704. https://www.dreamtreeproject.org --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/paso-a-paso/message

Transcending Stuttering with Uri Schneider
#6 When I Stutter (Film) with John Gomez

Transcending Stuttering with Uri Schneider

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2020 61:42


Guest bio: John Gomez moonlights as a filmmaker. His days are spent as a Speech Pathologist for the Los Angeles Unified School District and as part-time faculty at California State University teaching a graduate-level course on stuttering. Born and raised in Northern New Mexico, John attended Colorado College where he earned a degree in Philosophy and American Ethnic Studies. He originally moved to Los Angeles to become an actor but disillusionment with the industry-led John to a career in Speech Pathology. In 2009, he graduated from California State Los Angeles University with a master's degree in Communication Disorders. John's first feature film, WHEN I STUTTER, premiered at the Cleveland International Film Festival in April of 2017. WHEN I STUTTER has been admired for its ability to effectively raise awareness about people who stutter and their challenges in life. The film has won 7 awards, been an official selection in over 15 film festivals with over 100 screenings worldwide. In 2017, John was honored with the Emerging Filmmaker Award from the prestigious Chagrin Documentary Film Festival. In this episode John and Uri discuss: John's next film Filmmaking and film as a process of art and communication Ways to use film to touch lives and change the social fabric of society Normalizing differences like stuttering and much more. We mention many organizations and colleagues doing incredible things across the country. John talks about Dr. Phil Schneider and his impact on John's career and filmmaking John talks about Transcending Stuttering and Going with the Flow. Resources and Links: https://whenistutter.org/ www.schneiderspeech.com/tsa   Host Bio: Uri Schneider, M.A. CCC -SLP passionately explores and develops practical ways for us to create our own success story.  Delivering personalized experiences of communication care informed by leading professionals and influencers, Uri is re-imagining the next-level of speech-language therapy for people to benefit in real life.   Uri Schneider, M.A. CCC -SLP is co-founder and leader at Schneider Speech Pathology and faculty at the University of California, Riverside School of Medicine. www.schneiderspeech.com

91.5 KRCC Local News + Stories
In Rural Southern Colorado And Northern New Mexico, Protesters Come Out For Police Reform

91.5 KRCC Local News + Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2020 3:03


Protesters across Colorado and the country continue to call for police reforms in the wake of the killing of George Floyd. In recent days, people in smaller communities have also joined in, including in La Junta and Westcliffe.

The Inspire Cafe
094: Aaron Martinez: Breaking the Cycle of Drug Addiction in his Family

The Inspire Cafe

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2019 38:38


Twenty-three-year-old Aaron Martinez grew up going to school in Espanola, New Mexico, a city with a population of about 10,000.  You'll pass through it if you're driving between Santa Fe and Taos, two tourist towns known for its art scene, winter skiing and opera. Unfortunately, it also sits in a Northern New Mexico region where it's known for having one of the highest rates of drug overdose deaths.  For Aaron, he can speak about it first hand.  Within a space of a couple of years, he lost both his oldest sister and father from overdoses.  He says growing up both his parents were addicted and family members kept telling him he was going to grow up to be an addict too. But for Aaron, miraculously he didn't follow the same path. Where his only role models were heroes in action movies, he made a choice to stay away from drugs in spite of being raised in an environment where it'd be easy to see why anyone would.  Today, Aaron is a youth mentor and gymnastics instructor in the same town he grew up. He also speaks to kids about his experience and how it is possible to choose a different and positive path. Mentioned in this episode: Moving Arts Espanola Plus, videos that include Aaron Martinez mentoring youth at work: CNN Heroes Meow Wolf Community Voices re Moving Arts Española If you enjoy the episode, please subscribe for free, rate & review, and share with your friends. Thanks for listening!  If you'd like to see a list of previously mentioned books or products from former episodes, go to our Resources Page! And if you're looking for inspirational books that I've personally read and recommend, go to our Motivational Tools page! Check out more episodes on our website, TheInspireCafe.com! Like us on Facebook here! Follow us on Instagram here!