Podcasts about separately

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Best podcasts about separately

Latest podcast episodes about separately

Stripper Stories
This is CUM

Stripper Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 30:26


This week we go on an adventure talking about our favourite lube.... Cum. Why is it that people are scared of their own.. how do we really feel about this? We cum dump a tonne of good shit on JOI, CEI and solo wanks, plus Mother and Father Hole tell their own stories on when their own personal lube hit them in the face!!! ..... Separately.

Breakdown
S9 Ep 12: Breakdown Bonus: What happened in Coffee County, Georgia

Breakdown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 41:11


The latest episode of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution's “Breakdown” podcast takes a close look at the data breach at the Coffee County elections office which occurred one day after the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. Podcast hosts Bill Rankin and Tamar Hallerman interview Mark Niesse, the AJC's elections and voting rights expert. Niesse has covered the wild developments surrounding the Coffee County data breach on Jan. 7, 2021, since news of it first surfaced. He explains how it happened, why news of it first came to light this past May and why state elections officials should be alarmed. The Fulton County special purpose grand jury, which is investigating former President Donald Trump and his allies, has issued subpoenas to Sidney Powell and the data firm SullivanStrickler. Powell, who was once a lawyer for the Trump campaign, oversaw the breach and hired the data firm. Niesse, who was at the Cobb County audit of absentee ballots, also recalls the unusual and sudden visit by former White House chief of staff Mark Meadows. Meadows was told he could not go inside to see what was going on. And Niesse also discusses the state legislative hearings he covered in December 2020 when Trump attorney Rudy Giuliani testified and presented now-debunked evidence of voter fraud. Separately, the 12th episode of “The Trump Grand Jury” also explains why the Fulton special grand jury may be interested in hearing from former Georgia congressman and House Speaker Newt Gingrich. You can download the Breakdown podcast from Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher or your favorite podcasting platform. You can also stream it on your computer above. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Culture Journalist
Is A.I. good or bad for art?

The Culture Journalist

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 74:11


Hey friends. You've probably noticed that the art for this Substack has been a bit… surreal lately. For the past few months, we've been experimenting with Midjourney, an AI image generation tool and Discord bot that pulls visual data from all over the internet to generate original art images from random combinations of words. If you're so inclined, you can even choose to render these images in the style of one of the artists whose paintings you had to memorize in Art History 101.  For our episode with Mark Redito, one of the musicians behind a 77-person “headless” band called Chaos, we gave Midjourney the prompt: “Headless chaos in the style of Giorgio de Chirico.” After some trial and error, it spat out an image of a caped, headless figure that looked, well, kind of like it had been painted by Giorgio de Chirico. For Emilie's recent essay about the decline of scene culture during the pandemic, we used the prompt: “Post-pandemic hipsters in the style of Salvador Dalí” — with predictably ridiculous results. If you spend just a few minutes in the Midjourney Discord, it's not hard to see why hundreds of thousands of people have fallen down the same rabbit hole we have since the project moved into open beta in July. Especially if you aren't a trained artist, the ability to use words to give life to an image or idea in your head — or create a delightfully strange approximation of it — is nothing short of magical.Midjourney isn't the only research laboratory making tools with the potential to democratize visual image generation in this way: Unless you've been living under a rock this year, you've probably heard of DALL-E 2, a machine-learning model from AI research giant Open AI that takes a slightly different, more photorealistic approach to summoning novel images from the internet ether. DALL-E 2 has an amazing feature that allows you to explore what an image would look like — and even a famous painting like A Girl with a Pearl Earring — if you extended it beyond the frame. Separately, it's already responsible for some of this year's dumbest memes, like the “pugachu”: a combination of a pug and a Pikachu. But, like all technological and creative disruptions, these tools raise big existential questions and concerns. We just told you about how we used Midjourney to create images in the style of de Chirico and Dalí, then used said images as artwork on our Substack, a project that makes its money from paid subscriptions. Those artists are no longer living. But these machine learning models source training data from all over the internet — what if we started making art in the style of a living artist, without compensating them for their work or even asking for their consent? It's no surprise that tools like DALL-E 2, Midjourney, and open-source text-to-image model Stable Diffusion are creating something of a moral panic in the worlds of art, media, and design. Graphic designers and other commercial artists are worried that AI will spur companies to replace human labor with machines while exacerbating the scourge of intellectual property theft that they've already been dealing with on the internet for years. A photo director at New York magazine recently penned an essay asking whether DALL-E 2 was going to put her out of a job. Which all raises the question: Is AI the beginning of a more egalitarian artistic future, or the terrifying final stage of a trajectory where corporations and developers find increasingly insidious ways to extract value from the creative class? To begin to make sense of the economic, ethical, and artistic implications of these tools, we brought on the artist, technologist, and Interdependence co-host Mat Dryhurst. You might remember him from our episode last year on NFTs and their implications for the future of independent music. Mat and his partner, the composer Holly Herndon, have been diving headfirst into the possibilities and pitfalls posed by AI for several years now. Most recently, they launched Spawning, an organization building tools by and for artists working with AI. The idea is to give artists greater control over their AI training data by allowing them to opt in or out of these data sets, set permissions on how their style and likeness is used, and even offer their own models to the public. The goal, Mat says, is to establish a standard of consent honored by AI research companies as the tech — whether we like it or not — barrels into the future. Mat joins us from Berlin to give a crash course in the history of text-based image generation and the specific technological developments that led to this moment — from grassroots Discord groups, to Amazon, Microsoft, and Elon Musk-funded behemoths like Open AI, to the nation-states incentivizing this growing research field on the geopolitical stage. We discuss the possibilities and limitations of these tools as a medium for creative expression, the parallels between this moment and the advent of photography, and the changing nature of art, and perceptions of artistic value, in a world where people can create striking images at the push of a button. Finally, we get into the steps we can take now to avoid this becoming a nightmare scenario for artists — or, for the rest of us, the start of an era of really terrible art. We pour hours and hours of work into every episode of this podcast. If you like what we do, please consider becoming a paid subscriber.Read Holly and Mat's essay, “Infinite images and the latest camera”Follow Mat on TwitterLearn more about SpawningUse Spawning's new tool, Have I Been Trained?, to see if your work or likeness is being used as AI training dataSubscribe to Mat and Holly's podcast, Interdependence This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit theculturejournalist.substack.com/subscribe

Flipping Genius - THE Car Flipping podcast #CarFlipping #FlippingCars
EP 137: Reaching Out to Ask for Your Input (This is the video version. Video is available on Spotify and YouTube. Audio version uploaded separately.)

Flipping Genius - THE Car Flipping podcast #CarFlipping #FlippingCars

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 11:00


In the 137th episode of the Flipping Genius podcast, we examine all that has been done so far - with the goal of "HELPING OUR LISTENERS MAKE MORE MONEY" - and then we ASK for your input. As we move forward with Flipping Genius, we want to be in tune with the needs of our listeners and viewers. With that in mind, we ask that you reach out to us via email at FlippingQuestions@gmail.com and/or at the Car Flipping Forum. Tell us what information you would like covered in the future. Share your stories and experiences. Request that you be a guest on a future episode. Suggest others that you would like us to interview. Please send us your comments and suggestions. We are anxious to make this the most meaningful tool available to Flippers at becoming more than they are and chasing their dreams. Be sure to visit www.FlippinGenius.com and see all that we offer, including all of out past episodes, videos and the Resources Page that will save you money and time as you build your Flipping business! Please SAVE us as a Favorite, SUBSCRIBE wherever you can so you are always alerted of new content and SHARE Flipping Genius with all of your friends REAL and VIRTUAL! Thank you for watching and listening. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/flippinggenius/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/flippinggenius/support

Myths of Myria: A Live-Play D&D Podcast

On Today's Episode: Six heroes. Two Parties. Separately on the cusp of escaping their respective penitentiaries. How hard could it be? From the mind of Alan Way comes Myths of Myria, a brand new fantasy podcast featuring an incredible world brought to life using live-play sessions of Dungeons & Dragons. New episodes every Tuesday on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and wherever else you find your podcasts. L.A.S.+ subscribers receive early access to all episodes from a recording session every three weeks! Myths of Myria is produced and distributed by the L.A.S. Podcast Network in Cedar Rapids, IA. For more, visit LASPodcastNetwork.com. Subscribe to L.A.S.+ for just $10/month and get bonus episodes of this show, ad-free versions of every L.A.S. Podcast, pre-sale access to live events, early access to special podcasts and projects, and more benefits, all while support local Iowa creators and businesses. For more information and to get started, head to LASPodcastNetwork.com/plus.

WashingTECH Tech Policy Podcast with Joe Miller
Feds have massive trove of Americans' data; CA legislature passes nation's first children's privacy law -- Tech Law & Policy This Week -- 09.16.2022

WashingTECH Tech Policy Podcast with Joe Miller

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 5:08


Hey everybody, I'm Joe Miller and here's what's going on in the world of online safety and free speech this week.   Sen. Wyden: CBP has massive trove of American's cellphone data   Senator Ron Wyden sent a letter to Customs and Border Protection Commissioner Chris Magnus on Thursday revealing that CBP has a massive amount of Americans'    data from millions of drivers' license photos, license plate readers, mobile devices, and who knows what else. Some 3,000 CBP operations employees apparently have access to the data, and CBP doesn't need probable cause to obtain warrants to search the data – they only need reasonable suspicion. Brennan Center scholar Faiza Patel told the Washington Post that the database goes far beyond reasonableness. Patel joined me on this podcast back in 2017 to discuss how the government's surveillance of Muslims negatively impacts innocent civilians.   New York City's Metro Transit Authority's switch to tap-to-enter system raises surveillance alarms   The City of New York will be moving away from Metro Cards and towards a new tap-to-enter system called OMNY. Surveillance and privacy experts are concerned that the new system will be able to track anyone wherever they go within the nation's largest public transportation system. The system will also be a public-private partnership between the City and a company called Cubic Corp. even though the State of New York has not yet updated its 1984 privacy law. No one knows what the government will do with that data, much less what Cubic Corp will do with it, since nondisclosure agreements often govern these types of partnerships. California becomes first state to pass Children's Online Privacy law   The California legislature has passed a landmark Children's Online Privacy law that directs tech companies to follow age-appropriate design principles to protect children online. The bill, modeled after a bill in the UK, passed the California Senate unanimously and is the first in the US to address children's online safety directly, beyond the weaker standards imposed by the Children's Online Privacy and Protection Act, which Congress passed back in 1998 before it had any idea what the internet would become.  California Governor Gavin Newsom hasn't yet indicated whether he plans to sign the new legislation.   California enacts new social media moderation disclosure law   The state of California is also leading the way when it comes to state-based efforts to establish content moderation standards. California governor Gavin Newsom signed into law on Tuesday a new bill requiring social media companies to file semiannual reports on how they moderate hate speech, disinformation, and extremism. The California law differs from Republican-led efforts, particularly in Texas and Florida, to tamp down on social media companies' content moderation in general, and instead requires social media companies to report on what they're actually doing. The new law is expected to face resistance from the tech industry.   Separately, the Wall Street Journal's editorial board seems to believe that the federal government and Facebook collude on content moderation.   Color of Change launches ‘Black Tech Agenda'   Color of Change has launched a Black Tech Agenda that centers racial justice in technology policymaking. The agenda includes a vision for robust antitrust policy, better privacy protections and an end to surveillance, preventing algorithmic discrimination, expanding broadband access, protecting net neutrality, and addressing misinformation and disinformation. The agenda is supported by Senators Cory Booker and Elizabeth Warren, as well as Representatives Robin Kelly and Pramila Jayapal. Facebook reverses ban on Holocaust film   Facebook reversed a ban on an holocaust film starring Roy Schneider, who played the police chief in Jaws. The filmmaker, Joshua Newton, based the movie on his father's life after he survived the holocaust. Facebook pulled the movie because its name is Beautiful Blue Eyes, which Facebook's moderators found contained a racist connotation that violated its community standards.   The movie Newton wants to advertise on Facebook is actually a re-release of a 2009 version of the film which now includes previously lost footage. It was Schneider's final film. White House issues new digital assets development framework   Following President Biden's March Executive Order to streamline regulation of digital assets, the White House on Friday released a fact sheet laying out a framework for interagency coordination to protect consumers and larger stakeholders, make financial services safe and affordable, encourage responsible innovation, ensure financial stability and protect America's financial competitiveness globally, fight illicit financial activities, and develop a Central Bank Digital Currency (CBDC). Part of the list of to-dos is a call for federal agencies to consider the environmental implications of digital finances. To go deeper, you can find links to all of these stories in the show notes. Stay safe, stay informed, have a great week. Ciao.

The Bert Show
Tom Brady and Gisele Bundchen Are "Living Separately"

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 7:56 Very Popular


Print Tom Brady and Gisele Bundchen Are "Living Separately" Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The 260 Journey
Don’t Be Deceived by the Packaging

The 260 Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 5:30


Day 185 Today's Reading: 1 Thessalonians 3 No one seems to wrap gifts anymore in boxes and wrapping paper. We use a gift bag and some colored tissue paper on top. If we forgot the occasion, whether it's a birthday or an anniversary, usually a gift card (which means I forgot to shop) lies beneath the tissue paper. Here in 1 Thessalonians 3, the apostle Paul shows us a special gift that we can easily miss because of the packaging and its wrapping. At times I have prayed for things and never realized that the answer came in wrapping I never expected. We know Paul spent some months with this Thessalonian church and preached in their city. After being gone a few months, Paul sent Timothy to check on the church there. He wrote this letter to encourage them, because they faced false teachers, whom he did not want infiltrating the young church, as well as some difficult persecution. He knew that in the midst of those difficult times, they needed strength and encouragement “so that no one would be disturbed by these afflictions; for you yourselves know that we have been destined for this” (verse 3). Those words, disturbed by these afflictions, are revealing. In fact, the actual word is deceived [by these afflictions]. I have learned that hard times can deceive people. Hard times can deceive us about God, deceive us about ourselves, and deceive us about life. We begin to believe the lies that say, God doesn't love me. That's why I am going through this and These hard times are punishments for the bad things I have done. I'm the only one who goes through stuff like this. I am all alone. It's the deception of hard times. When people go through difficulty, so does their faith. So Paul sent to these young Thessalonian believers much-needed gifts: encouragement and strength. But the packaging was different. Listen to verse 2: “We sent Timothy, our brother and God's fellow worker in the gospel of Christ, to strengthen and encourage you as to your faith.” God packaged strength and encouragement in a person—Timothy. The movie The Blind Side chronicles a Christian family, the Tuohys, who took in a homeless young man, Michael Oher, and gave him the chance to reach his God-given potential. That homeless boy became the first-round NFL draft pick for the Baltimore Ravens in 2009. At a recent fundraiser, Sean Tuohy noted that the transformation of his family and Michael all started with two words. When they spotted Michael walking along the road on a cold November morning, Leigh Ann Tuohy uttered two words that changed their world. She told Sean, “Turn around.” They turned the car around, put Michael in their warm vehicle, and ultimately adopted him into their family. Hope was packaged for Michael Oher in the Tuohy family. Sometimes we don't recognize the packaging. The Thessalonian church was about to discover their friend in their adversity. They just needed to be aware of God's packaging for this gift who was coming. Sometimes we ask for things and miss God's answer because of the packaging. We all need strength and encouragement every day. What does that answer look like? Paul told the church of Thessalonica that they needed strength and encouragement so “we sent Timothy.” Timothy was to be their strength and encouragement. That is why God places a high value on making sure we stay right with brothers and sisters. That person you are fighting with may contain your answer to prayer. Locked up in them may be your strength and encouragement for today. God's packaging of His answers is usually wrapped up in flesh and blood. How about the greatest “flesh and blood” packaging? Jesus. Is there a friendship that needs to be repaired with an apology? You may be missing more than a friend, you may be missing your answer to your prayer. Make it a priority not only to call today but to understand that friendships are too valuable to let a hurt close them off. John Maxwell tells about a Midwestern fair in which “spectators gathered for an old-fashioned horse pull (an event where various weights are put on a horse-drawn sled and pulled along the ground). The grand-champion horse pulled a sled with 4,500 pounds on it. The runner-up was close, with a 4,400-pound pull if hitched together. Separately they totaled nearly 9,000 pounds, but when hitched and working together as a team, they pulled more than 12,000 pounds.” As the strength of the horse pull shows, there is more power being part of the body of Christ than just being some loner Christian. Your effectiveness multiplies when you are joined with the right people. Paul knew that he needed to put Timothy next to the Thessalonians so they would be able to pull a lot more; that Timothy would give them the encouragement and the strength they needed to pull the weight. The saying is true “that the quality of your life is determined by the quality of your relationships.” There is another saying, a Zambian proverb, that is equally true: “When you run alone, you run fast. But when you run together, you run far.” In their gift of Timothy, the young church in Thessalonica received help to run far. Ecclesiastes 4:12 says, “By yourself you're unprotected. With a friend you can face the worst” (MSG). That's a good gift.

Game on!
Tom Brady and Gisele split up! Sources say couple is "living separately"

Game on!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 6:32


According to sources at CNN, Tom Brady and Gisele are going through tough times and currently are living separately. Let's break down whether or not these rumors are true or just gossip. #tombrady #gisele #cnn #nflnews Here's how to support the show and follow me on social media: ?? Locals: https://gameon.locals.com/ ??Youtube Main Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdw1... ?? Youtube Live Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZCN... ?? Twitter: https://twitter.com/gameon_picks ?? PayPal: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/gameo... ?? Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/gameonpodcast/ ?? Rumble: https://rumble.com/c/GameOnShow ?? Odysee: https://odysee.com/@gameon:50 ?? Gettr: https://gettr.com/user/gameon ?? Cash App: $williamyordy15 ?? Venmo: @William-Yordy Want to join a new bookie? Here's some referrals: ?? Betonline.ag: https://www.betonline.ag/?RAF=7BE5IAB... ?? MyBookie.ag: https://mybookie.ag/signup/?reff=MB85...

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
Windows Weekly 794: The Faffinator

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 137:22 Very Popular


Windows 11 Last week, Build 25197 came to the Dev channel and brings back the tablet-optimized Taskbar This week, we got build 25201 with an expanded widgets view that's almost full-screen and ISOs.   Separately, Dev channel Insiders got two updates: the Calculator app is now ARM64 native, and the Media Player app got a new shortcut so you can edit the current video in Clipchamp.  Builds 22621.598 and 22622.598 headed to the Beta channel earlier this week, removing the ability to uninstall apps with dependencies. Surface  Google kills Pixelbook as part of a cost-cutting measure. Should Microsoft kill Surface? Consider: Google needed to establish Chromebook as a viable laptop alternative. Microsoft did not.  Microsoft Ignite You can now register for Microsoft Ignite, which is happening October 12-14. Dev You can now install .NET runtimes and SDKs using the Windows Package Manager Xbox The head of 343 Industries abruptly steps down. Coincidence? Sony chief: Microsoft lied about Activision Blizzard and Call of Duty Microsoft is experimenting with the Xbox Dashboard Discord voice chat is now available on Xbox consoles Goldeneye 007, the original console first-person shooter, is coming to Xbox Game Pass Tips and picks Tip of the week: Remix your Teams ringtone App pick of the week: Voxel Doom Enterprise pick of the week: Azure Space: The family is expanding Enterprise pick No. 2 of the week: PatchTuesday.com Beer pick of the week: Grimm Festooning Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin. Sponsors: infrascale.com/TWIT CDW.com/LenovoClient ClickUp.com use code WINDOWS

Radio Leo (Video HD)
Windows Weekly 794: The Faffinator

Radio Leo (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 138:01


Windows 11 Last week, Build 25197 came to the Dev channel and brings back the tablet-optimized Taskbar This week, we got build 25201 with an expanded widgets view that's almost full-screen and ISOs.   Separately, Dev channel Insiders got two updates: the Calculator app is now ARM64 native, and the Media Player app got a new shortcut so you can edit the current video in Clipchamp.  Builds 22621.598 and 22622.598 headed to the Beta channel earlier this week, removing the ability to uninstall apps with dependencies. Surface  Google kills Pixelbook as part of a cost-cutting measure. Should Microsoft kill Surface? Consider: Google needed to establish Chromebook as a viable laptop alternative. Microsoft did not.  Microsoft Ignite You can now register for Microsoft Ignite, which is happening October 12-14. Dev You can now install .NET runtimes and SDKs using the Windows Package Manager Xbox The head of 343 Industries abruptly steps down. Coincidence? Sony chief: Microsoft lied about Activision Blizzard and Call of Duty Microsoft is experimenting with the Xbox Dashboard Discord voice chat is now available on Xbox consoles Goldeneye 007, the original console first-person shooter, is coming to Xbox Game Pass Tips and picks Tip of the week: Remix your Teams ringtone App pick of the week: Voxel Doom Enterprise pick of the week: Azure Space: The family is expanding Enterprise pick No. 2 of the week: PatchTuesday.com Beer pick of the week: Grimm Festooning Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin. Sponsors: infrascale.com/TWIT CDW.com/LenovoClient ClickUp.com use code WINDOWS

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
Windows Weekly 794: The Faffinator

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 138:01


Windows 11 Last week, Build 25197 came to the Dev channel and brings back the tablet-optimized Taskbar This week, we got build 25201 with an expanded widgets view that's almost full-screen and ISOs.   Separately, Dev channel Insiders got two updates: the Calculator app is now ARM64 native, and the Media Player app got a new shortcut so you can edit the current video in Clipchamp.  Builds 22621.598 and 22622.598 headed to the Beta channel earlier this week, removing the ability to uninstall apps with dependencies. Surface  Google kills Pixelbook as part of a cost-cutting measure. Should Microsoft kill Surface? Consider: Google needed to establish Chromebook as a viable laptop alternative. Microsoft did not.  Microsoft Ignite You can now register for Microsoft Ignite, which is happening October 12-14. Dev You can now install .NET runtimes and SDKs using the Windows Package Manager Xbox The head of 343 Industries abruptly steps down. Coincidence? Sony chief: Microsoft lied about Activision Blizzard and Call of Duty Microsoft is experimenting with the Xbox Dashboard Discord voice chat is now available on Xbox consoles Goldeneye 007, the original console first-person shooter, is coming to Xbox Game Pass Tips and picks Tip of the week: Remix your Teams ringtone App pick of the week: Voxel Doom Enterprise pick of the week: Azure Space: The family is expanding Enterprise pick No. 2 of the week: PatchTuesday.com Beer pick of the week: Grimm Festooning Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin. Sponsors: infrascale.com/TWIT CDW.com/LenovoClient ClickUp.com use code WINDOWS

Radio Leo (Audio)
Windows Weekly 794: The Faffinator

Radio Leo (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 137:22


Windows 11 Last week, Build 25197 came to the Dev channel and brings back the tablet-optimized Taskbar This week, we got build 25201 with an expanded widgets view that's almost full-screen and ISOs.   Separately, Dev channel Insiders got two updates: the Calculator app is now ARM64 native, and the Media Player app got a new shortcut so you can edit the current video in Clipchamp.  Builds 22621.598 and 22622.598 headed to the Beta channel earlier this week, removing the ability to uninstall apps with dependencies. Surface  Google kills Pixelbook as part of a cost-cutting measure. Should Microsoft kill Surface? Consider: Google needed to establish Chromebook as a viable laptop alternative. Microsoft did not.  Microsoft Ignite You can now register for Microsoft Ignite, which is happening October 12-14. Dev You can now install .NET runtimes and SDKs using the Windows Package Manager Xbox The head of 343 Industries abruptly steps down. Coincidence? Sony chief: Microsoft lied about Activision Blizzard and Call of Duty Microsoft is experimenting with the Xbox Dashboard Discord voice chat is now available on Xbox consoles Goldeneye 007, the original console first-person shooter, is coming to Xbox Game Pass Tips and picks Tip of the week: Remix your Teams ringtone App pick of the week: Voxel Doom Enterprise pick of the week: Azure Space: The family is expanding Enterprise pick No. 2 of the week: PatchTuesday.com Beer pick of the week: Grimm Festooning Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin. Sponsors: infrascale.com/TWIT CDW.com/LenovoClient ClickUp.com use code WINDOWS

Tony Katz + The Morning News
Visa plans to start separately categorizing sales at gun shops

Tony Katz + The Morning News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 5:25


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

We Will Not Comply
CREDIT CARD COMPANIES WILL LIST GUN SALES SEPARATELY - We Will Not Comply e137

We Will Not Comply

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 51:36


SHOW NOTES Credit Card Companies will List Gun Sales Separately: https://www.theepochtimes.com/credit-card-giants-to-categorize-gun-related-sales-separately-nra-condemns-erosion-of-rights_4723721.html?utm_source=partner&utm_campaign=BonginoReport   Airline Chaos will Persist into 2024: https://www.theepochtimes.com/airline-chaos-could-persist-until-2024-despite-efforts-to-cure-woes_4721804.html?utm_source=partner&utm_campaign=BonginoReport   Mother beheaded by Illegal Immigrant with expired Visa: https://pjmedia.com/news-and-politics/kevindowneyjr/2022/09/11/update-beheaded-mom-identified-and-guess-what-the-killer-is-an-illegal-immigrant-with-an-expired-visa-n1628474   Harmeet Dillon - More FBI Raids are coming: https://www.theepochtimes.com/gop-leader-says-homes-of-trump-supporters-may-soon-be-raided-by-fbi_4723578.html?utm_source=partner&utm_campaign=BonginoReport   Intro Music: https://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music/rock 

The Anna & Raven Show
Monday September 12, 2022: Unconventionally Attractive; Pet Psychic; Sleeping Separately

The Anna & Raven Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 46:43


Have you ever called 911 before?  Anna had to call it for the first time ever this morning!  (:30) Would you and your spouse consider sleeping in separate beds?  Raven and his wife tried it over the weekend!  (3:57) Being lazy on the weekend is nice, but if you're wearing the same clothes that you did the day before, that's all I need to know about you!  (7:23) School lunches can be tough to put together for anyone, but what if you're a professional chef?  Anna and Raven spoke to the Food Network's Chef Plum about how he puts a lunch together for his kids!  (10:26) Do you use dental floss picks?  Lots of people are addicted to them and after talking to a caller last week, Anna and Raven have started seeing them everywhere…  (13:54) Are you up to date on this week's biggest news stories?  Anna and Raven will get you caught up on what's trending, including the reason that Queen Elizabeth's dogs are in the news!  (17:20) Does your child have what it takes to beat Raven in a trivia contest?  If they can succeed they'll win a $100 Target gift card!  But don't expect Raven to go easy on them…  (20:54) Have you ever wondered what your pet is thinking?  Anna and Raven spoke to animal psychic Laura Stinchfield to get some insights on the inner thoughts of our pets!  (24:05) What do you find attractive in a partner?  Producer Jon is dating, but he has one odd trait that he looks for in a prospective date!  (28:05) Fred has purposely started slacking off at work and is actively trying to get fired so he can collect a severance. He can't stand his job. His wife, Brooke, is horrified and thinks he should just look for another job, not "quiet quit" the one he currently has. It's unprofessional. He says it's how corporate America works. What do you think? (35:14) Samantha thinks she has what it takes to beat Raven in pop culture trivia!  Can she succeed and win the $1600 jackpot?  (43:39)

Astro arXiv | all categories
Intrinsic Alignment as an RSD Contaminant in the DESI Survey

Astro arXiv | all categories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 0:24


Intrinsic Alignment as an RSD Contaminant in the DESI Survey by Claire Lamman et al. on Sunday 11 September We measure the tidal alignment of the major axes of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) from the Legacy Imaging Survey and use it to infer the artificial redshift-space distortion signature that will arise from an orientation-dependent, surface-brightness selection in the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) survey. Using photometric redshifts to down-weight the shape-density correlations due to weak lensing, we measure the intrinsic tidal alignment of LRGs. Separately, we estimate the net polarization of LRG orientations from DESI's fiber-magnitude target selection to be of order 10^-2 along the line of sight. Using these measurements and a linear tidal model, we forecast a 0.5% fractional decrease on the quadrupole of the 2-point correlation function for projected separations of 40-80 Mpc/h. We also use a halo catalog from the Abacus Summit cosmological simulation suite to reproduce this false quadrupole. arXiv: http://arxiv.org/abs/http://arxiv.org/abs/2209.03949v1

Astro arXiv | all categories
Intrinsic Alignment as an RSD Contaminant in the DESI Survey

Astro arXiv | all categories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 0:24


Intrinsic Alignment as an RSD Contaminant in the DESI Survey by Claire Lamman et al. on Sunday 11 September We measure the tidal alignment of the major axes of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) from the Legacy Imaging Survey and use it to infer the artificial redshift-space distortion signature that will arise from an orientation-dependent, surface-brightness selection in the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) survey. Using photometric redshifts to down-weight the shape-density correlations due to weak lensing, we measure the intrinsic tidal alignment of LRGs. Separately, we estimate the net polarization of LRG orientations from DESI's fiber-magnitude target selection to be of order 10^-2 along the line of sight. Using these measurements and a linear tidal model, we forecast a 0.5% fractional decrease on the quadrupole of the 2-point correlation function for projected separations of 40-80 Mpc/h. We also use a halo catalog from the Abacus Summit cosmological simulation suite to reproduce this false quadrupole. arXiv: http://arxiv.org/abs/http://arxiv.org/abs/2209.03949v1

Maccessibility
MRTP 242: Hole Sold Separately

Maccessibility

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 80:58


In Episode 242 of The Maccessibility Roundtable Podcast, our knights Recap Apple’s September press event. Knights on this episode: Darcy Burnard Holly Anderson Eric Troup Robin Christopherson Links For This Episode Watch the Keynote

Economy Watch
Bond prices take a hammering

Economy Watch

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 5:46


Kia ora,Welcome to Wednesday's Economy Watch where we follow the economic events and trends that affect Aotearoa/New Zealand.I'm David Chaston and this is the International edition from Interest.co.nz.Today we lead with news bond prices are taking a hammering today, with losses mounting quickly now.But first, the latest dairy auction has delivered higher prices. Overall they were up +4.9% in USD terms, and with our currency weakening, the rise in NZD was a stellar +10.2%. These rises were led by WMP which delivered a bit of a surprise. WMP was up +5.1% from the last auction. But in between there was a GDT Pulse event for WMP a week ago and that did not signal such a big rise today. Today's WMP result is +5.7% higher than the GDP Pulse event. Buyers are realising that future supply is going to be lower than they were planning so demand is returning to shore up that supply shortfall.This the US, they have returned from their long Labor Day weekend to face sharply rising yields as bond losses pile up. The USD is surging too especially against commodity currencies which are in full retreat.However, the US service sector is firing on all cylinders (if that is a valid phrase these days as the car industry turns electric?). The ISM services PMI expanded at a faster pace from its already healthy level. It was led by activity and new orders. Labour markets remained tight, they said.The ISM services PMI is the widely-watched services survey in the US, but it isn't the only one. The internationally benchmarked Markit one told a quite different story. Usually these surveys see quite similar conditions, but not this month. The Markit services PMI is in contraction and reporting its sharpest fall since May 2020 with new orders retreating. One of them is wrong, its just not clear which one at this time.Separately the US logistics LMI reports a fifth month of easing in August, the lowest expansion since May 2020. Mostly it is falling demand. Although the index shows the overall logistics industry continues to expand, the rate of growth is now the all-time high/tightness in March. Warehousing Capacity is down again, transportation prices fell for a second month while transportation capacity continued to increase and inventory levels grew. This logistics LMI suggests the Markit PMI might be closer to the mark rather than the ISM one.Despite these risks, the bond market is back to pricing in another full +75 bps rate hike at the next US Fed review on Thursday, September 22 (NZT). Bond prices are taking a hammering.In China, economic news has gone very quiet. It is neither fashionable not wise to report news that their economy is struggling, especially ahead of the upcoming Party Congress. But it is clear that house prices in their resale markets are falling across a broad range of cities now. And the Chengdu lockdown is shaping up to be a make-or-break situation for their zero-Covid policies.In Japan, their currency is weakening fast. The Bank of Japan is holding on to its aggressive easing program to finally get inflation rising, and it might succeed. But the cost is a sharply falling yen as those easing policies are now in sharp contrast to the rest of the word. The very much wider yield gap between US Treasuries and Japanese government bonds has encouraged investors to dump the yen for the dollar.In Europe, almost countries are well into formulating extensive support programs for energy supply and household budgets as the winter season looms, one where there will be no Russian energy to cover the cold snap. The size of these programs in total could be epic, and the EU is stepping up itself with overarching support.In Australia late yesterday, their central bank raised its cash rate target by +50 bps to 2.35%. This was as expected. They said they aren't seeing any reason to expect CPI inflation lower than 7.¾% in 2022, so the pressure remains to get it back to 3% and within their policy range. In turn that means more outsized hikes can be expected, although they are clearly trying to avoid tipping them into a consumer-led spending recession.The UST 10yr yield starts today at 3.33% and up +13 bps after Wall Street's long weekend. The price of gold will open today at US$1702/oz and down -US$9 from this time yesterday.And oil prices start today -US$2 softer at just under US$86.50/bbl in the US while the international Brent price is now just under US$92.50/bbl.The Kiwi dollar will open today just under 60.5 USc and more than -½c lower on a surging greenback. Against the Australian dollar we are unchanged at 89.7 AUc. Against the euro we are a bit less than -½c softer at 61 euro cents. That all means our TWI-5 starts today at 70.3 and -30 bps lower this time yesterday.The bitcoin price is now at US$19,110 and a sharpish -3.6% lower than this time yesterday. Volatility over the past 24 hours has been high at just on +/- 3.2%.You can find links to the articles mentioned today in our show notes.And get more news affecting the economy in New Zealand from interest.co.nz.Kia ora. I'm David Chaston and we'll do this again tomorrow.

Marketplace All-in-One
A grain ship from Ukraine has docked in east Africa, where drought is widespread

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 8:23


From the BBC World Service: The MV Commander has docked in the Port of Djibouti and the wheat on board will be packaged and transported by road to neighboring Ethiopia, which is experiencing its worst drought in 40 years. Plus, Pakistan’s prime minister Shehbaz Sharif says a $1.1 billion IMF loan is a major step in efforts to put the country’s economy back on track. Separately, the government says early estimates suggest recent floods have caused at least $10 billion of damage. And, how drought is putting a squeeze on Spain’s olive oil production.

Marketplace Morning Report
A grain ship from Ukraine has docked in east Africa, where drought is widespread

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 8:23


From the BBC World Service: The MV Commander has docked in the Port of Djibouti and the wheat on board will be packaged and transported by road to neighboring Ethiopia, which is experiencing its worst drought in 40 years. Plus, Pakistan’s prime minister Shehbaz Sharif says a $1.1 billion IMF loan is a major step in efforts to put the country’s economy back on track. Separately, the government says early estimates suggest recent floods have caused at least $10 billion of damage. And, how drought is putting a squeeze on Spain’s olive oil production.

ClearBridge Investments
Jeff Schulze on WealthTrack: Growing Risk of Recession

ClearBridge Investments

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 23:50


Investment Strategist Jeff Schulze joins Consuelo Mack to discuss rising recession risks as measured by a yellow signal for the ClearBridge Recession Risk Dashboard and analyzes how a resilient labor market and peaking inflation could still allow the Federal Reserve to engineer a soft landing for the U.S. economy.

Government Coins
Season 3 | EP. 4 - Doing Business with the Department of Education with Calvin Mitchell

Government Coins

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 39:02


Calvin J. Mitchell Jr, Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBU) In 2020, Calvin J. Mitchell Jr. joined the U.S. Department of Education leadership team as the Director of the Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBU). As Director, implementing policies and initiatives throughout the Department to ensure that all socioeconomic categories of small businesses are afforded opportunities to compete for contracts. Prior to the OSDBU, Mr. Mitchell was the Deputy Director of Contracts and Acquisitions Management (CAM). As CAM Deputy Director, in the Office of the Chief Financial Officer, he was responsible for overseeing the work of four contracting divisions that provide operational procurement services to the Department of Education. Prior to joining the Department, Mitchell served as the Branch Chief of the Accounts Management Division at the General Services Administration. Mitchell led the organization toward meeting the Government-wide strategic goals to support all 24 CFO Act agency vision, mission, and strategic goals. Separately, Mr. Mitchell served as a Congressional Fellow for the U.S. House of Representatives Homeland Security Committee reporting to Chairman Bennie Thompson. In this position, he served as the Principal Procurement Advisor to Committee leadership and provided guidance and oversight to Members and Committee staff on procurement, small business programs, and related acquisition issues within the Department of Homeland Security. Mr. Mitchell has also held leadership positions at the U.S Army Corps of Engineers. Learn more about the Department of Education and the work they do: https://www.ed.gov/ LinkedIn Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/calvin-j-mitchell-jr-cfcm-a705348/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/governmentcoins/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/governmentcoins/support

Government Coins
Season 3 | EP. 4 - Doing Business with the Department of Education with Calvin Mitchell

Government Coins

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 39:02


Calvin J. Mitchell Jr, Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBU) In 2020, Calvin J. Mitchell Jr. joined the U.S. Department of Education leadership team as the Director of the Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBU). As Director, implementing policies and initiatives throughout the Department to ensure that all socioeconomic categories of small businesses are afforded opportunities to compete for contracts. Prior to the OSDBU, Mr. Mitchell was the Deputy Director of Contracts and Acquisitions Management (CAM). As CAM Deputy Director, in the Office of the Chief Financial Officer, he was responsible for overseeing the work of four contracting divisions that provide operational procurement services to the Department of Education. Prior to joining the Department, Mitchell served as the Branch Chief of the Accounts Management Division at the General Services Administration. Mitchell led the organization toward meeting the Government-wide strategic goals to support all 24 CFO Act agency vision, mission, and strategic goals. Separately, Mr. Mitchell served as a Congressional Fellow for the U.S. House of Representatives Homeland Security Committee reporting to Chairman Bennie Thompson. In this position, he served as the Principal Procurement Advisor to Committee leadership and provided guidance and oversight to Members and Committee staff on procurement, small business programs, and related acquisition issues within the Department of Homeland Security. Mr. Mitchell has also held leadership positions at the U.S Army Corps of Engineers. Learn more about the Department of Education and the work they do: https://www.ed.gov/ LinkedIn Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/calvin-j-mitchell-jr-cfcm-a705348/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/governmentcoins/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/governmentcoins/support

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
In the News... Misdiagnosed with type 2, Omnipod 5 approved for toddlers, Endocrinologist shortage and more!

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 6:38


It's in the news! The top stories and headlines around the diabetes community this week include a new attempt to have fewer misdiagnoses of type 2 (when it's really type 1) diabetes, a new approval for Omnipod 5 down to two years old, a look at the endocrinologist shortage in the US, a milestone for Tandem and more! Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Episode Transcription Below (or coming soon!) Please visit our Sponsors & Partners - they help make the show possible! *Click here to learn more about OMNIPOD* *Click here to learn more about AFREZZA* *Click here to learn more about DEXCOM* Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I'm Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days. XX In the news is brought to you by T1D Exchange! T1D Exchange is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving outcomes for the entire T1D population. https://t1dexchange.org/stacey/ XX New effort to avoid the very common misdiagnosis of type 2 when it's actually type 1. JDRF and a a company called IQVIA are seeing if artificial intelligence can be used here. IQVIA used machine learning to look at data from individuals diagnosed with T2D and then, later, diagnosed with T1D within a specific time frame. The big problem, the company says, is that medical records are often incomplete and are compiled using different standards and formats. They call it a good starting point though. Earlier studies have shown that possibly 40-percent of adults with new onset type 1 are first misdiagnosed with type 2. https://www.jdrf.org/blog/2022/08/11/iqvia-algorithm-for-misdiagnoses/ XX New UK study about COVID, diabetes and kids.. shows there was an increase in new cases and in DKA. This was from March 2020 to February of 2021, compared to same time the previous year. This was a large study, looking back at cases across 49 sites. There was a 17% increase in new-onset diabetes from Year 1 to Year 2, mostly of type 1 diabetes. ED visits for DKA dropped by 31.9% during the pandemic year among patients with existing diabetes. There was a 43% increase in severity of new-onset disease from Year 1 to Year 2, with severe DKA increasing by 79% (P < .001) and intensive care admissions by 89% (P < .05 There were limitations to this study, the biggest is that data was only captured for those who went to the emergency room. The question of whether SARS-CoV-2 can trigger new-onset diabetes remains unanswered. https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/979381#:~:text=There%20was%20a%2017%25%20increase,by%2079%25%20(P%20%3C%20. XX Omipod 5 is now FDA approved for kids as young as two. Omnipod 5, the first tubeless automated insulin delivery (AID) system in the U.S., was originally cleared for use in individuals aged six and older in January 2022. That makes Omnipod 5 the only AID approved for the toddler set. Tandem's Control IQ ia approved down to age 6 and Medtronic 780G down to age 7 https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220822005158/en/Insulet-Announces-FDA-Clearance-of-Omnipod%C2%AE-5-for-Children-Aged-Two-Years-and-Older-with-Type-1-Diabetes XX Milestone from Tandem they say that in the first month since the new mobile bolus feature was released, users have delivered more than 1 million insulin boluses. The company said in a news release that it is the first-ever FDA-cleared smartphone application capable of initiating insulin delivery on both iOS and Android operating systems. The company added that it is now available on approximately 30 different devices. https://www.drugdeliverybusiness.com/tandem-diabetes-app-insulin-bolus-million/ XX What looks like an editorial in a publication called Stability Health caught my eye. It's all about the shortage of endocrinologists in the US. Right now there are only 8-thousand in practice across the whole country. Endocrinologists receive the lowest compensation of all internal medicine (IM) specialties — lower even than practicing general internists — and 76–89% of medical students graduate with astronomical debt. Additionally, these clinicians often make themselves available outside of their office hours. But since this time may not be billable, it is often not supported in salaried compensation. Separately (but related), in 2016, 71% of entrants to the field of endocrinology were female. Due to America's long-standing gender wage gap, this may be a contributing factor in wage stagnation. Roughly 85% of Americans with diabetes rely on a general practitioner for their care. I'll link up the column so you can take a look. https://stabilityhealth.com/endocrinologist-shortage/?fbclid=IwAR0jx-nSiOL2UccmoJ9H74SnC6l3M5CCppecGcQ2t2M_zc7U-ydOj4JxfQ4#:~:text=Today%2C%2034.2%20million%20Americans%20are,currently%20practice%20in%20the%20U.S XX Update on one of the CGM smartwatches we've been keeping an eye on.. the K-Watch Glucose CGM watch is being tested by a French Company. They had their first clinical trials last year and got results this summer. the first run had a MARD of 29-percent.. brought down to a much better 16-percent. MARD is of course Mean Absolute Relative Difference to a calibrated meter and the gold standard right now is under 10 with Dexcom and Libre's next offerings closer to 8.. so a way to go here. https://www.notebookcheck.net/Painless-K-Watch-Glucose-blood-free-CGM-smartwatch-produces-positive-first-in-human-trial-results-as-PKvitality-targets-2024-for-availability.642380.0.html XX Back to the news in a moment but first.. The T1D Exchange Registry is a research study conducted online over time, designed to foster innovation and improve the lives of people with T1D. The platform is open to both adults and children with T1D living in the U.S. Personal information remains confidential and participation is fully voluntary. Once enrolled, participants will complete annual surveys and have the opportunity to sign up for other studies on specific topics related to T1D. The registry aims to improve knowledge of T1D, accelerate the discovery and development of new treatments and technologies, and generate evidence to support policy or insurance changes that help the T1D community. By sharing opinions, experiences and data, patients can help advance meaningful T1D treatment, care and policy. The registry is now available on the T1D Exchange website and is simple to navigate, mobile and user-friendly. For more information or to register, go to www.t1dregistry.org/stacey XX Association of Diabetes Care and Education Specialists gave their lifetime Achievement Award to Dr. Kenneth Moritsugu, former surgeon general of the United States. Many of you may know him as the Chairman of the Board of Children with Diabetes you see him at Friends for Life and other events. He's been involved with lot of national diabetes groups and effort – he was diagnosed with LADA at age 55. He's also been a guest of this show.. so congrats Dr. Moritsugu. https://www.healio.com/news/endocrinology/20220814/a-lifetime-of-service-a-conversation-with-kenneth-moritsugu-md-mph-facpm-faade?fbclid=IwAR2DyFSAyxCqeGMpmGHAi1FG1swihxFAPe-WveCaCP6NJrcUd0rFioBedQU XX Next week we're talking back to school! The wonderful diabetes educator Anna Sabino from Finding Smiles coaching will join me to talk 504, remote monitoring, supplies and lots more. The long format episode out right now is with Patients For Affordable Drugs about the bill that passed the Senate this week. The insulin copay cap was removed, but what does it really mean for medication prices? Listen wherever you get your podcasts That's In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

Advice From Hanna Podcast
SE3EP148-Game sold separately

Advice From Hanna Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 15:47


SE3EP148-Game sold separately by Hanna Salazar

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 151: “San Francisco” by Scott McKenzie

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022


We start season four of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs with an extra-long look at "San Francisco" by Scott McKenzie, and at the Monterey Pop Festival, and the careers of the Mamas and the Papas and P.F. Sloan. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "Up, Up, and Away" by the 5th Dimension. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources As usual, all the songs excerpted in the podcast can be heard in full at Mixcloud. Scott McKenzie's first album is available here. There are many compilations of the Mamas and the Papas' music, but sadly none that are in print in the UK have the original mono mixes. This set is about as good as you're going to find, though, for the stereo versions. Information on the Mamas and the Papas came from Go Where You Wanna Go: The Oral History of The Mamas and the Papas by Matthew Greenwald, California Dreamin': The True Story Of The Mamas and Papas by Michelle Phillips, and Papa John by John Phillips and Jim Jerome. Information on P.F. Sloan came from PF - TRAVELLING BAREFOOT ON A ROCKY ROAD by Stephen McParland and What's Exactly the Matter With Me? by P.F. Sloan and S.E. Feinberg. The film of the Monterey Pop Festival is available on this Criterion Blu-Ray set. Sadly the CD of the performances seems to be deleted. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Welcome to season four of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs. It's good to be back. Before we start this episode, I just want to say one thing. I get a lot of credit at times for the way I don't shy away from dealing with the more unsavoury elements of the people being covered in my podcast -- particularly the more awful men. But as I said very early on, I only cover those aspects of their life when they're relevant to the music, because this is a music podcast and not a true crime podcast. But also I worry that in some cases this might mean I'm giving a false impression of some people. In the case of this episode, one of the central figures is John Phillips of the Mamas and the Papas. Now, Phillips has posthumously been accused of some truly monstrous acts, the kind of thing that is truly unforgivable, and I believe those accusations. But those acts didn't take place during the time period covered by most of this episode, so I won't be covering them here -- but they're easily googlable if you want to know. I thought it best to get that out of the way at the start, so no-one's either anxiously waiting for the penny to drop or upset that I didn't acknowledge the elephant in the room. Separately, this episode will have some discussion of fatphobia and diet culture, and of a death that is at least in part attributable to those things. Those of you affected by that may want to skip this one or read the transcript. There are also some mentions of drug addiction and alcoholism. Anyway, on with the show. One of the things that causes problems with rock history is the tendency of people to have selective memories, and that's never more true than when it comes to the Summer of Love, summer of 1967. In the mythology that's built up around it, that was a golden time, the greatest time ever, a period of peace and love where everything was possible, and the world looked like it was going to just keep on getting better. But what that means, of course, is that the people remembering it that way do so because it was the best time of their lives. And what happens when the best time of your life is over in one summer? When you have one hit and never have a second, or when your band splits up after only eighteen months, and you have to cope with the reality that your best years are not only behind you, but they weren't even best years, but just best months? What stories would you tell about that time? Would you remember it as the eve of destruction, the last great moment before everything went to hell, or would you remember it as a golden summer, full of people with flowers in their hair? And would either really be true? [Excerpt: Scott McKenzie, "San Francisco"] Other than the city in which they worked, there are a few things that seem to characterise almost all the important figures on the LA music scene in the middle part of the 1960s. They almost all seem to be incredibly ambitious, as one might imagine. There seem to be a huge number of fantasists among them -- people who will not only choose the legend over reality when it suits them, but who will choose the legend over reality even when it doesn't suit them. And they almost all seem to have a story about being turned down in a rude and arrogant manner by Lou Adler, usually more or less the same story. To give an example, I'm going to read out a bit of Ray Manzarek's autobiography here. Now, Manzarek uses a few words that I can't use on this podcast and keep a clean rating, so I'm just going to do slight pauses when I get to them, but I'll leave the words in the transcript for those who aren't offended by them: "Sometimes Jim and Dorothy and I went alone. The three of us tried Dunhill Records. Lou Adler was the head man. He was shrewd and he was hip. He had the Mamas and the Papas and a big single with Barry McGuire's 'Eve of Destruction.' He was flush. We were ushered into his office. He looked cool. He was California casually disheveled and had the look of a stoner, but his eyes were as cold as a shark's. He took the twelve-inch acetate demo from me and we all sat down. He put the disc on his turntable and played each cut…for ten seconds. Ten seconds! You can't tell jack [shit] from ten seconds. At least listen to one of the songs all the way through. I wanted to rage at him. 'How dare you! We're the Doors! This is [fucking] Jim Morrison! He's going to be a [fucking] star! Can't you see that? Can't you see how [fucking] handsome he is? Can't you hear how groovy the music is? Don't you [fucking] get it? Listen to the words, man!' My brain was a boiling, lava-filled Jell-O mold of rage. I wanted to eviscerate that shark. The songs he so casually dismissed were 'Moonlight Drive,' 'Hello, I Love You,' 'Summer's Almost Gone,' 'End of the Night,' 'I Looked at You,' 'Go Insane.' He rejected the whole demo. Ten seconds on each song—maybe twenty seconds on 'Hello, I Love You' (I took that as an omen of potential airplay)—and we were dismissed out of hand. Just like that. He took the demo off the turntable and handed it back to me with an obsequious smile and said, 'Nothing here I can use.' We were shocked. We stood up, the three of us, and Jim, with a wry and knowing smile on his lips, cuttingly and coolly shot back at him, 'That's okay, man. We don't want to be *used*, anyway.'" Now, as you may have gathered from the episode on the Doors, Ray Manzarek was one of those print-the-legend types, and that's true of everyone who tells similar stories about Lou Alder. But... there are a *lot* of people who tell similar stories about Lou Adler. One of those was Phil Sloan. You can get an idea of Sloan's attitude to storytelling from a story he always used to tell. Shortly after he and his family moved to LA from New York, he got a job selling newspapers on a street corner on Hollywood Boulevard, just across from Schwab's Drug Store. One day James Dean drove up in his Porsche and made an unusual request. He wanted to buy every copy of the newspaper that Sloan had -- around a hundred and fifty copies in total. But he only wanted one article, something in the entertainment section. Sloan didn't remember what the article was, but he did remember that one of the headlines was on the final illness of Oliver Hardy, who died shortly afterwards, and thought it might have been something to do with that. Dean was going to just clip that article from every copy he bought, and then he was going to give all the newspapers back to Sloan to sell again, so Sloan ended up making a lot of extra money that day. There is one rather big problem with that story. Oliver Hardy died in August 1957, just after the Sloan family moved to LA. But James Dean died in September 1955, two years earlier. Sloan admitted that, and said he couldn't explain it, but he was insistent. He sold a hundred and fifty newspapers to James Dean two years after Dean's death. When not selling newspapers to dead celebrities, Sloan went to Fairfax High School, and developed an interest in music which was mostly oriented around the kind of white pop vocal groups that were popular at the time, groups like the Kingston Trio, the Four Lads, and the Four Aces. But the record that made Sloan decide he wanted to make music himself was "Just Goofed" by the Teen Queens: [Excerpt: The Teen Queens, "Just Goofed"] In 1959, when he was fourteen, he saw an advert for an open audition with Aladdin Records, a label he liked because of Thurston Harris. He went along to the audition, and was successful. His first single, released as by Flip Sloan -- Flip was a nickname, a corruption of "Philip" -- was produced by Bumps Blackwell and featured several of the musicians who played with Sam Cooke, plus Larry Knechtel on piano and Mike Deasey on guitar, but Aladdin shut down shortly after releasing it, and it may not even have had a general release, just promo copies. I've not been able to find a copy online anywhere. After that, he tried Arwin Records, the label that Jan and Arnie recorded for, which was owned by Marty Melcher (Doris Day's husband and Terry Melcher's stepfather). Melcher signed him, and put out a single, "She's My Girl", on Mart Records, a subsidiary of Arwin, on which Sloan was backed by a group of session players including Sandy Nelson and Bruce Johnston: [Excerpt: Philip Sloan, "She's My Girl"] That record didn't have any success, and Sloan was soon dropped by Mart Records. He went on to sign with Blue Bird Records, which was as far as can be ascertained essentially a scam organisation that would record demos for songwriters, but tell the performers that they were making a real record, so that they would record it for the royalties they would never get, rather than for a decent fee as a professional demo singer would get. But Steve Venet -- the brother of Nik Venet, and occasional songwriting collaborator with Tommy Boyce -- happened to come to Blue Bird one day, and hear one of Sloan's original songs. He thought Sloan would make a good songwriter, and took him to see Lou Adler at Columbia-Screen Gems music publishing. This was shortly after the merger between Columbia-Screen Gems and Aldon Music, and Adler was at this point the West Coast head of operations, subservient to Don Kirshner and Al Nevins, but largely left to do what he wanted. The way Sloan always told the story, Venet tried to get Adler to sign Sloan, but Adler said his songs stunk and had no commercial potential. But Sloan persisted in trying to get a contract there, and eventually Al Nevins happened to be in the office and overruled Adler, much to Adler's disgust. Sloan was signed to Columbia-Screen Gems as a songwriter, though he wasn't put on a salary like the Brill Building songwriters, just told that he could bring in songs and they would publish them. Shortly after this, Adler suggested to Sloan that he might want to form a writing team with another songwriter, Steve Barri, who had had a similar non-career non-trajectory, but was very slightly further ahead in his career, having done some work with Carol Connors, the former lead singer of the Teddy Bears. Barri had co-written a couple of flop singles for Connors, before the two of them had formed a vocal group, the Storytellers, with Connors' sister. The Storytellers had released a single, "When Two People (Are in Love)" , which was put out on a local independent label and which Adler had licensed to be released on Dimension Records, the label associated with Aldon Music: [Excerpt: The Storytellers "When Two People (Are in Love)"] That record didn't sell, but it was enough to get Barri into the Columbia-Screen Gems circle, and Adler set him and Sloan up as a songwriting team -- although the way Sloan told it, it wasn't so much a songwriting team as Sloan writing songs while Barri was also there. Sloan would later claim "it was mostly a collaboration of spirit, and it seemed that I was writing most of the music and the lyric, but it couldn't possibly have ever happened unless both of us were present at the same time". One suspects that Barri might have a different recollection of how it went... Sloan and Barri's first collaboration was a song that Sloan had half-written before they met, called "Kick That Little Foot Sally Ann", which was recorded by a West Coast Chubby Checker knockoff who went under the name Round Robin, and who had his own dance craze, the Slauson, which was much less successful than the Twist: [Excerpt: Round Robin, "Kick that Little Foot Sally Ann"] That track was produced and arranged by Jack Nitzsche, and Nitzsche asked Sloan to be one of the rhythm guitarists on the track, apparently liking Sloan's feel. Sloan would end up playing rhythm guitar or singing backing vocals on many of the records made of songs he and Barri wrote together. "Kick That Little Foot Sally Ann" only made number sixty-one nationally, but it was a regional hit, and it meant that Sloan and Barri soon became what Sloan later described as "the Goffin and King of the West Coast follow-ups." According to Sloan "We'd be given a list on Monday morning by Lou Adler with thirty names on it of the groups who needed follow-ups to their hit." They'd then write the songs to order, and they started to specialise in dance craze songs. For example, when the Swim looked like it might be the next big dance, they wrote "Swim Swim Swim", "She Only Wants to Swim", "Let's Swim Baby", "Big Boss Swimmer", "Swim Party" and "My Swimmin' Girl" (the last a collaboration with Jan Berry and Roger Christian). These songs were exactly as good as they needed to be, in order to provide album filler for mid-tier artists, and while Sloan and Barri weren't writing any massive hits, they were doing very well as mid-tier writers. According to Sloan's biographer Stephen McParland, there was a three-year period in the mid-sixties where at least one song written or co-written by Sloan was on the national charts at any given time. Most of these songs weren't for Columbia-Screen Gems though. In early 1964 Lou Adler had a falling out with Don Kirshner, and decided to start up his own company, Dunhill, which was equal parts production company, music publishers, and management -- doing for West Coast pop singers what Motown was doing for Detroit soul singers, and putting everything into one basket. Dunhill's early clients included Jan and Dean and the rockabilly singer Johnny Rivers, and Dunhill also signed Sloan and Barri as songwriters. Because of this connection, Sloan and Barri soon became an important part of Jan and Dean's hit-making process. The Matadors, the vocal group that had provided most of the backing vocals on the duo's hits, had started asking for more money than Jan Berry was willing to pay, and Jan and Dean couldn't do the vocals themselves -- as Bones Howe put it "As a singer, Dean is a wonderful graphic artist" -- and so Sloan and Barri stepped in, doing session vocals without payment in the hope that Jan and Dean would record a few of their songs. For example, on the big hit "The Little Old Lady From Pasadena", Dean Torrence is not present at all on the record -- Jan Berry sings the lead vocal, with Sloan doubling him for much of it, Sloan sings "Dean"'s falsetto, with the engineer Bones Howe helping out, and the rest of the backing vocals are sung by Sloan, Barri, and Howe: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "The Little Old Lady From Pasadena"] For these recordings, Sloan and Barri were known as The Fantastic Baggys, a name which came from the Rolling Stones' manager Andrew Oldham and Mick Jagger, when the two were visiting California. Oldham had been commenting on baggys, the kind of shorts worn by surfers, and had asked Jagger what he thought of The Baggys as a group name. Jagger had replied "Fantastic!" and so the Fantastic Baggys had been born. As part of this, Sloan and Barri moved hard into surf and hot-rod music from the dance songs they had been writing previously. The Fantastic Baggys recorded their own album, Tell 'Em I'm Surfin', as a quickie album suggested by Adler: [Excerpt: The Fantastic Baggys, "Tell 'Em I'm Surfin'"] And under the name The Rally Packs they recorded a version of Jan and Dean's "Move Out Little Mustang" which featured Berry's girlfriend Jill Gibson doing a spoken section: [Excerpt: The Rally Packs, "Move Out Little Mustang"] They also wrote several album tracks for Jan and Dean, and wrote "Summer Means Fun" for Bruce and Terry -- Bruce Johnston, later of the Beach Boys, and Terry Melcher: [Excerpt: Bruce and Terry, "Summer Means Fun"] And they wrote the very surf-flavoured "Secret Agent Man" for fellow Dunhill artist Johnny Rivers: [Excerpt: Johnny Rivers, "Secret Agent Man"] But of course, when you're chasing trends, you're chasing trends, and soon the craze for twangy guitars and falsetto harmonies had ended, replaced by a craze for jangly twelve-string guitars and closer harmonies. According to Sloan, he was in at the very beginning of the folk-rock trend -- the way he told the story, he was involved in the mastering of the Byrds' version of "Mr. Tambourine Man". He later talked about Terry Melcher getting him to help out, saying "He had produced a record called 'Mr. Tambourine Man', and had sent it into the head office, and it had been rejected. He called me up and said 'I've got three more hours in the studio before I'm being kicked out of Columbia. Can you come over and help me with this new record?' I did. I went over there. It was under lock and key. There were two guards outside the door. Terry asked me something about 'Summer Means Fun'. "He said 'Do you remember the guitar that we worked on with that? How we put in that double reverb?' "And I said 'yes' "And he said 'What do you think if we did something like that with the Byrds?' "And I said 'That sounds good. Let's see what it sounds like.' So we patched into all the reverb centres in Columbia Music, and mastered the record in three hours." Whether Sloan really was there at the birth of folk rock, he and Barri jumped on the folk-rock craze just as they had the surf and hot-rod craze, and wrote a string of jangly hits including "You Baby" for the Turtles: [Excerpt: The Turtles, "You Baby"] and "I Found a Girl" for Jan and Dean: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "I Found a Girl"] That song was later included on Jan and Dean's Folk 'n' Roll album, which also included... a song I'm not even going to name, but long-time listeners will know the one I mean. It was also notable in that "I Found a Girl" was the first song on which Sloan was credited not as Phil Sloan, but as P.F. Sloan -- he didn't have a middle name beginning with F, but rather the F stood for his nickname "Flip". Sloan would later talk of Phil Sloan and P.F. Sloan as almost being two different people, with P.F. being a far more serious, intense, songwriter. Folk 'n' Roll also contained another Sloan song, this one credited solely to Sloan. And that song is the one for which he became best known. There are two very different stories about how "Eve of Destruction" came to be written. To tell Sloan's version, I'm going to read a few paragraphs from his autobiography: "By late 1964, I had already written ‘Eve Of Destruction,' ‘The Sins Of A Family,' ‘This Mornin',' ‘Ain't No Way I'm Gonna Change My Mind,' and ‘What's Exactly The Matter With Me?' They all arrived on one cataclysmic evening, and nearly at the same time, as I worked on the lyrics almost simultaneously. ‘Eve Of Destruction' came about from hearing a voice, perhaps an angel's. The voice instructed me to place five pieces of paper and spread them out on my bed. I obeyed the voice. The voice told me that the first song would be called ‘Eve Of Destruction,' so I wrote the title at the top of the page. For the next few hours, the voice came and went as I was writing the lyric, as if this spirit—or whatever it was—stood over me like a teacher: ‘No, no … not think of all the hate there is in Red Russia … Red China!' I didn't understand. I thought the Soviet Union was the mortal threat to America, but the voice went on to reveal to me the future of the world until 2024. I was told the Soviet Union would fall, and that Red China would continue to be communist far into the future, but that communism was not going to be allowed to take over this Divine Planet—therefore, think of all the hate there is in Red China. I argued and wrestled with the voice for hours, until I was exhausted but satisfied inside with my plea to God to either take me out of the world, as I could not live in such a hypocritical society, or to show me a way to make things better. When I was writing ‘Eve,' I was on my hands and knees, pleading for an answer." Lou Adler's story is that he gave Phil Sloan a copy of Bob Dylan's Bringing it All Back Home album and told him to write a bunch of songs that sounded like that, and Sloan came back a week later as instructed with ten Dylan knock-offs. Adler said "It was a natural feel for him. He's a great mimic." As one other data point, both Steve Barri and Bones Howe, the engineer who worked on most of the sessions we're looking at today, have often talked in interviews about "Eve of Destruction" as being a Sloan/Barri collaboration, as if to them it's common knowledge that it wasn't written alone, although Sloan's is the only name on the credits. The song was given to a new signing to Dunhill Records, Barry McGuire. McGuire was someone who had been part of the folk scene for years, He'd been playing folk clubs in LA while also acting in a TV show from 1961. When the TV show had finished, he'd formed a duo, Barry and Barry, with Barry Kane, and they performed much the same repertoire as all the other early-sixties folkies: [Excerpt: Barry and Barry, "If I Had a Hammer"] After recording their one album, both Barrys joined the New Christy Minstrels. We've talked about the Christys before, but they were -- and are to this day -- an ultra-commercial folk group, led by Randy Sparks, with a revolving membership of usually eight or nine singers which included several other people who've come up in this podcast, like Gene Clark and Jerry Yester. McGuire became one of the principal lead singers of the Christys, singing lead on their version of the novelty cowboy song "Three Wheels on My Wagon", which was later released as a single in the UK and became a perennial children's favourite (though it has a problematic attitude towards Native Americans): [Excerpt: The New Christy Minstrels, "Three Wheels on My Wagon"] And he also sang lead on their big hit "Green Green", which he co-wrote with Randy Sparks: [Excerpt: The New Christy Minstrels, "Green Green"] But by 1965 McGuire had left the New Christy Minstrels. As he said later "I'd sung 'Green Green' a thousand times and I didn't want to sing it again. This is January of 1965. I went back to LA to meet some producers, and I was broke. Nobody had the time of day for me. I was walking down street one time to see Dr. Strangelove and I walked by the music store, and I heard "Green Green" comin' out of the store, ya know, on Hollywood Boulevard. And I heard my voice, and I thought, 'I got four dollars in my pocket!' I couldn't believe it, my voice is comin' out on Hollywood Boulevard, and I'm broke. And right at that moment, a car pulls up, and the radio is playing 'Chim Chim Cherie" also by the Minstrels. So I got my voice comin' at me in stereo, standin' on the sidewalk there, and I'm broke, and I can't get anyone to sign me!" But McGuire had a lot of friends who he'd met on the folk scene, some of whom were now in the new folk-rock scene that was just starting to spring up. One of them was Roger McGuinn, who told him that his band, the Byrds, were just about to put out a new single, "Mr. Tambourine Man", and that they were about to start a residency at Ciro's on Sunset Strip. McGuinn invited McGuire to the opening night of that residency, where a lot of other people from the scene were there to see the new group. Bob Dylan was there, as was Phil Sloan, and the actor Jack Nicholson, who was still at the time a minor bit-part player in low-budget films made by people like American International Pictures (the cinematographer on many of Nicholson's early films was Floyd Crosby, David Crosby's father, which may be why he was there). Someone else who was there was Lou Adler, who according to McGuire recognised him instantly. According to Adler, he actually asked Terry Melcher who the long-haired dancer wearing furs was, because "he looked like the leader of a movement", and Melcher told him that he was the former lead singer of the New Christy Minstrels. Either way, Adler approached McGuire and asked if he was currently signed -- Dunhill Records was just starting up, and getting someone like McGuire, who had a proven ability to sing lead on hit records, would be a good start for the label. As McGuire didn't have a contract, he was signed to Dunhill, and he was given some of Sloan's new songs to pick from, and chose "What's Exactly the Matter With Me?" as his single: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "What's Exactly the Matter With Me?"] McGuire described what happened next: "It was like, a three-hour session. We did two songs, and then the third one wasn't turning out. We only had about a half hour left in the session, so I said 'Let's do this tune', and I pulled 'Eve of Destruction' out of my pocket, and it just had Phil's words scrawled on a piece of paper, all wrinkled up. Phil worked the chords out with the musicians, who were Hal Blaine on drums and Larry Knechtel on bass." There were actually more musicians than that at the session -- apparently both Knechtel and Joe Osborn were there, so I'm not entirely sure who's playing bass -- Knechtel was a keyboard player as well as a bass player, but I don't hear any keyboards on the track. And Tommy Tedesco was playing lead guitar, and Steve Barri added percussion, along with Sloan on rhythm guitar and harmonica. The chords were apparently scribbled down for the musicians on bits of greasy paper that had been used to wrap some takeaway chicken, and they got through the track in a single take. According to McGuire "I'm reading the words off this piece of wrinkled paper, and I'm singing 'My blood's so mad, feels like coagulatin'", that part that goes 'Ahhh you can't twist the truth', and the reason I'm going 'Ahhh' is because I lost my place on the page. People said 'Man, you really sounded frustrated when you were singing.' I was. I couldn't see the words!" [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "Eve of Destruction"] With a few overdubs -- the female backing singers in the chorus, and possibly the kettledrums, which I've seen differing claims about, with some saying that Hal Blaine played them during the basic track and others saying that Lou Adler suggested them as an overdub, the track was complete. McGuire wasn't happy with his vocal, and a session was scheduled for him to redo it, but then a record promoter working with Adler was DJing a birthday party for the head of programming at KFWB, the big top forty radio station in LA at the time, and he played a few acetates he'd picked up from Adler. Most went down OK with the crowd, but when he played "Eve of Destruction", the crowd went wild and insisted he play it three times in a row. The head of programming called Adler up and told him that "Eve of Destruction" was going to be put into rotation on the station from Monday, so he'd better get the record out. As McGuire was away for the weekend, Adler just released the track as it was, and what had been intended to be a B-side became Barry McGuire's first and only number one record: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "Eve of Destruction"] Sloan would later claim that that song was a major reason why the twenty-sixth amendment to the US Constitution was passed six years later, because the line "you're old enough to kill but not for votin'" shamed Congress into changing the constitution to allow eighteen-year-olds to vote. If so, that would make "Eve of Destruction" arguably the single most impactful rock record in history, though Sloan is the only person I've ever seen saying that As well as going to number one in McGuire's version, the song was also covered by the other artists who regularly performed Sloan and Barri songs, like the Turtles: [Excerpt: The Turtles, "Eve of Destruction"] And Jan and Dean, whose version on Folk & Roll used the same backing track as McGuire, but had a few lyrical changes to make it fit with Jan Berry's right-wing politics, most notably changing "Selma, Alabama" to "Watts, California", thus changing a reference to peaceful civil rights protestors being brutally attacked and murdered by white supremacist state troopers to a reference to what was seen, in the popular imaginary, as Black people rioting for no reason: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "Eve of Destruction"] According to Sloan, he worked on the Folk & Roll album as a favour to Berry, even though he thought Berry was being cynical and exploitative in making the record, but those changes caused a rift in their friendship. Sloan said in his autobiography "Where I was completely wrong was in helping him capitalize on something in which he didn't believe. Jan wanted the public to perceive him as a person who was deeply concerned and who embraced the values of the progressive politics of the day. But he wasn't that person. That's how I was being pulled. It was when he recorded my actual song ‘Eve Of Destruction' and changed a number of lines to reflect his own ideals that my principles demanded that I leave Folk City and never return." It's true that Sloan gave no more songs to Jan and Dean after that point -- but it's also true that the duo would record only one more album, the comedy concept album Jan and Dean Meet Batman, before Jan's accident. Incidentally, the reference to Selma, Alabama in the lyric might help people decide on which story about the writing of "Eve of Destruction" they think is more plausible. Remember that Lou Adler said that it was written after Adler gave Sloan a copy of Bringing it All Back Home and told him to write a bunch of knock-offs, while Sloan said it was written after a supernatural force gave him access to all the events that would happen in the world for the next sixty years. Sloan claimed the song was written in late 1964. Selma, Alabama, became national news in late February and early March 1965. Bringing it All Back Home was released in late March 1965. So either Adler was telling the truth, or Sloan really *was* given a supernatural insight into the events of the future. Now, as it turned out, while "Eve of Destruction" went to number one, that would be McGuire's only hit as a solo artist. His next couple of singles would reach the very low end of the Hot One Hundred, and that would be it -- he'd release several more albums, before appearing in the Broadway musical Hair, most famous for its nude scenes, and getting a small part in the cinematic masterpiece Werewolves on Wheels: [Excerpt: Werewolves on Wheels trailer] P.F. Sloan would later tell various stories about why McGuire never had another hit. Sometimes he would say that Dunhill Records had received death threats because of "Eve of Destruction" and so deliberately tried to bury McGuire's career, other times he would say that Lou Adler had told him that Billboard had said they were never going to put McGuire's records on the charts no matter how well they sold, because "Eve of Destruction" had just been too powerful and upset the advertisers. But of course at this time Dunhill were still trying for a follow-up to "Eve of Destruction", and they thought they might have one when Barry McGuire brought in a few friends of his to sing backing vocals on his second album. Now, we've covered some of the history of the Mamas and the Papas already, because they were intimately tied up with other groups like the Byrds and the Lovin' Spoonful, and with the folk scene that led to songs like "Hey Joe", so some of this will be more like a recap than a totally new story, but I'm going to recap those parts of the story anyway, so it's fresh in everyone's heads. John Phillips, Scott McKenzie, and Cass Elliot all grew up in Alexandria, Virginia, just a few miles south of Washington DC. Elliot was a few years younger than Phillips and McKenzie, and so as is the way with young men they never really noticed her, and as McKenzie later said "She lived like a quarter of a mile from me and I never met her until New York". While they didn't know who Elliot was, though, she was aware who they were, as Phillips and McKenzie sang together in a vocal group called The Smoothies. The Smoothies were a modern jazz harmony group, influenced by groups like the Modernaires, the Hi-Los, and the Four Freshmen. John Phillips later said "We were drawn to jazz, because we were sort of beatniks, really, rather than hippies, or whatever, flower children. So we used to sing modern harmonies, like Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross. Dave Lambert did a lot of our arrangements for us as a matter of fact." Now, I've not seen any evidence other than Phillips' claim that Dave Lambert ever arranged for the Smoothies, but that does tell you a lot about the kind of music that they were doing. Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross were a vocalese trio whose main star was Annie Ross, who had a career worthy of an episode in itself -- she sang with Paul Whiteman, appeared in a Little Rascals film when she was seven, had an affair with Lenny Bruce, dubbed Britt Ekland's voice in The Wicker Man, played the villain's sister in Superman III, and much more. Vocalese, you'll remember, was a style of jazz vocal where a singer would take a jazz instrumental, often an improvised one, and add lyrics which they would sing, like Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross' version of "Cloudburst": [Excerpt: Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross, "Cloudburst"] Whether Dave Lambert ever really did arrange for the Smoothies or not, it's very clear that the trio had a huge influence on John Phillips' ideas about vocal arrangement, as you can hear on Mamas and Papas records like "Once Was a Time I Thought": [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "Once Was a Time I Thought"] While the Smoothies thought of themselves as a jazz group, when they signed to Decca they started out making the standard teen pop of the era, with songs like "Softly": [Excerpt, The Smoothies, "Softly"] When the folk boom started, Phillips realised that this was music that he could do easily, because the level of musicianship among the pop-folk musicians was so much lower than in the jazz world. The Smoothies made some recordings in the style of the Kingston Trio, like "Ride Ride Ride": [Excerpt: The Smoothies, "Ride Ride Ride"] Then when the Smoothies split, Phillips and McKenzie formed a trio with a banjo player, Dick Weissman, who they met through Izzy Young's Folklore Centre in Greenwich Village after Phillips asked Young to name some musicians who could make a folk record with him. Weissman was often considered the best banjo player on the scene, and was a friend of Pete Seeger's, to whom Seeger sometimes turned for banjo tips. The trio, who called themselves the Journeymen, quickly established themselves on the folk scene. Weissman later said "we had this interesting balance. John had all of this charisma -- they didn't know about the writing thing yet -- John had the personality, Scott had the voice, and I could play. If you think about it, all of those bands like the Kingston Trio, the Brothers Four, nobody could really *sing* and nobody could really *play*, relatively speaking." This is the take that most people seemed to have about John Phillips, in any band he was ever in. Nobody thought he was a particularly good singer or instrumentalist -- he could sing on key and play adequate rhythm guitar, but nobody would actually pay money to listen to him do those things. Mark Volman of the Turtles, for example, said of him "John wasn't the kind of guy who was going to be able to go up on stage and sing his songs as a singer-songwriter. He had to put himself in the context of a group." But he was charismatic, he had presence, and he also had a great musical mind. He would surround himself with the best players and best singers he could, and then he would organise and arrange them in ways that made the most of their talents. He would work out the arrangements, in a manner that was far more professional than the quick head arrangements that other folk groups used, and he instigated a level of professionalism in his groups that was not at all common on the scene. Phillips' friend Jim Mason talked about the first time he saw the Journeymen -- "They were warming up backstage, and John had all of them doing vocal exercises; one thing in particular that's pretty famous called 'Seiber Syllables' -- it's a series of vocal exercises where you enunciate different vowel and consonant sounds. It had the effect of clearing your head, and it's something that really good operetta singers do." The group were soon signed by Frank Werber, the manager of the Kingston Trio, who signed them as an insurance policy. Dave Guard, the Kingston Trio's banjo player, was increasingly having trouble with the other members, and Werber knew it was only a matter of time before he left the group. Werber wanted the Journeymen as a sort of farm team -- he had the idea that when Guard left, Phillips would join the Kingston Trio in his place as the third singer. Weissman would become the Trio's accompanist on banjo, and Scott McKenzie, who everyone agreed had a remarkable voice, would be spun off as a solo artist. But until that happened, they might as well make records by themselves. The Journeymen signed to MGM records, but were dropped before they recorded anything. They instead signed to Capitol, for whom they recorded their first album: [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "500 Miles"] After recording that album, the Journeymen moved out to California, with Phillips' wife and children. But soon Phillips' marriage was to collapse, as he met and fell in love with Michelle Gilliam. Gilliam was nine years younger than him -- he was twenty-six and she was seventeen -- and she had the kind of appearance which meant that in every interview with an older heterosexual man who knew her, that man will spend half the interview talking about how attractive he found her. Phillips soon left his wife and children, but before he did, the group had a turntable hit with "River Come Down", the B-side to "500 Miles": [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "River Come Down"] Around the same time, Dave Guard *did* leave the Kingston Trio, but the plan to split the Journeymen never happened. Instead Phillips' friend John Stewart replaced Guard -- and this soon became a new source of income for Phillips. Both Phillips and Stewart were aspiring songwriters, and they collaborated together on several songs for the Trio, including "Chilly Winds": [Excerpt: The Kingston Trio, "Chilly Winds"] Phillips became particularly good at writing songs that sounded like they could be old traditional folk songs, sometimes taking odd lines from older songs to jump-start new ones, as in "Oh Miss Mary", which he and Stewart wrote after hearing someone sing the first line of a song she couldn't remember the rest of: [Excerpt: The Kingston Trio, "Oh Miss Mary"] Phillips and Stewart became so close that Phillips actually suggested to Stewart that he quit the Kingston Trio and replace Dick Weissman in the Journeymen. Stewart did quit the Trio -- but then the next day Phillips suggested that maybe it was a bad idea and he should stay where he was. Stewart went back to the Trio, claimed he had only pretended to quit because he wanted a pay-rise, and got his raise, so everyone ended up happy. The Journeymen moved back to New York with Michelle in place of Phillips' first wife (and Michelle's sister Russell also coming along, as she was dating Scott McKenzie) and on New Year's Eve 1962 John and Michelle married -- so from this point on I will refer to them by their first names, because they both had the surname Phillips. The group continued having success through 1963, including making appearances on "Hootenanny": [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "Stack O'Lee (live on Hootenanny)"] By the time of the Journeymen's third album, though, John and Scott McKenzie were on bad terms. Weissman said "They had been the closest of friends and now they were the worst of enemies. They talked through me like I was a medium. It got to the point where we'd be standing in the dressing room and John would say to me 'Tell Scott that his right sock doesn't match his left sock...' Things like that, when they were standing five feet away from each other." Eventually, the group split up. Weissman was always going to be able to find employment given his banjo ability, and he was about to get married and didn't need the hassle of dealing with the other two. McKenzie was planning on a solo career -- everyone was agreed that he had the vocal ability. But John was another matter. He needed to be in a group. And not only that, the Journeymen had bookings they needed to complete. He quickly pulled together a group he called the New Journeymen. The core of the lineup was himself, Michelle on vocals, and banjo player Marshall Brickman. Brickman had previously been a member of a folk group called the Tarriers, who had had a revolving lineup, and had played on most of their early-sixties recordings: [Excerpt: The Tarriers, "Quinto (My Little Pony)"] We've met the Tarriers before in the podcast -- they had been formed by Erik Darling, who later replaced Pete Seeger in the Weavers after Seeger's socialist principles wouldn't let him do advertising, and Alan Arkin, later to go on to be a film star, and had had hits with "Cindy, O Cindy", with lead vocals from Vince Martin, who would later go on to be a major performer in the Greenwich Village scene, and with "The Banana Boat Song". By the time Brickman had joined, though, Darling, Arkin, and Martin had all left the group to go on to bigger things, and while he played with them for several years, it was after their commercial peak. Brickman would, though, also go on to a surprising amount of success, but as a writer rather than a musician -- he had a successful collaboration with Woody Allen in the 1970s, co-writing four of Allen's most highly regarded films -- Sleeper, Annie Hall, Manhattan, and Manhattan Murder Mystery -- and with another collaborator he later co-wrote the books for the stage musicals Jersey Boys and The Addams Family. Both John and Michelle were decent singers, and both have their admirers as vocalists -- P.F. Sloan always said that Michelle was the best singer in the group they eventually formed, and that it was her voice that gave the group its sound -- but for the most part they were not considered as particularly astonishing lead vocalists. Certainly, neither had a voice that stood out the way that Scott McKenzie's had. They needed a strong lead singer, and they found one in Denny Doherty. Now, we covered Denny Doherty's early career in the episode on the Lovin' Spoonful, because he was intimately involved in the formation of that group, so I won't go into too much detail here, but I'll give a very abbreviated version of what I said there. Doherty was a Canadian performer who had been a member of the Halifax Three with Zal Yanovsky: [Excerpt: The Halifax Three, "When I First Came to This Land"] After the Halifax Three had split up, Doherty and Yanovsky had performed as a duo for a while, before joining up with Cass Elliot and her husband Jim Hendricks, who both had previously been in the Big Three with Tim Rose: [Excerpt: Cass Elliot and the Big 3, "The Banjo Song"] Elliot, Hendricks, Yanovsky, and Doherty had formed The Mugwumps, sometimes joined by John Sebastian, and had tried to go in more of a rock direction after seeing the Beatles on Ed Sullivan. They recorded one album together before splitting up: [Excerpt: The Mugwumps, "Searchin'"] Part of the reason they split up was that interpersonal relationships within the group were put under some strain -- Elliot and Hendricks split up, though they would remain friends and remain married for several years even though they were living apart, and Elliot had an unrequited crush on Doherty. But since they'd split up, and Yanovsky and Sebastian had gone off to form the Lovin' Spoonful, that meant that Doherty was free, and he was regarded as possibly the best male lead vocalist on the circuit, so the group snapped him up. The only problem was that the Journeymen still had gigs booked that needed to be played, one of them was in just three days, and Doherty didn't know the repertoire. This was a problem with an easy solution for people in their twenties though -- they took a huge amount of amphetamines, and stayed awake for three days straight rehearsing. They made the gig, and Doherty was now the lead singer of the New Journeymen: [Excerpt: The New Journeymen, "The Last Thing on My Mind"] But the New Journeymen didn't last in that form for very long, because even before joining the group, Denny Doherty had been going in a more folk-rock direction with the Mugwumps. At the time, John Phillips thought rock and roll was kids' music, and he was far more interested in folk and jazz, but he was also very interested in making money, and he soon decided it was an idea to start listening to the Beatles. There's some dispute as to who first played the Beatles for John in early 1965 -- some claim it was Doherty, others claim it was Cass Elliot, but everyone agrees it was after Denny Doherty had introduced Phillips to something else -- he brought round some LSD for John and Michelle, and Michelle's sister Rusty, to try. And then he told them he'd invited round a friend. Michelle Phillips later remembered, "I remember saying to the guys "I don't know about you guys, but this drug does nothing for me." At that point there was a knock on the door, and as I opened the door and saw Cass, the acid hit me *over the head*. I saw her standing there in a pleated skirt, a pink Angora sweater with great big eyelashes on and her hair in a flip. And all of a sudden I thought 'This is really *quite* a drug!' It was an image I will have securely fixed in my brain for the rest of my life. I said 'Hi, I'm Michelle. We just took some LSD-25, do you wanna join us?' And she said 'Sure...'" Rusty Gilliam's description matches this -- "It was mind-boggling. She had on a white pleated skirt, false eyelashes. These were the kind of eyelashes that when you put them on you were supposed to trim them to an appropriate length, which she didn't, and when she blinked she looked like a cow, or those dolls you get when you're little and the eyes open and close. And we're on acid. Oh my God! It was a sight! And everything she was wearing were things that you weren't supposed to be wearing if you were heavy -- white pleated skirt, mohair sweater. You know, until she became famous, she suffered so much, and was poked fun at." This gets to an important point about Elliot, and one which sadly affected everything about her life. Elliot was *very* fat -- I've seen her weight listed at about three hundred pounds, and she was only five foot five tall -- and she also didn't have the kind of face that gets thought of as conventionally attractive. Her appearance would be cruelly mocked by pretty much everyone for the rest of her life, in ways that it's genuinely hurtful to read about, and which I will avoid discussing in detail in order to avoid hurting fat listeners. But the two *other* things that defined Elliot in the minds of those who knew her were her voice -- every single person who knew her talks about what a wonderful singer she was -- and her personality. I've read a lot of things about Cass Elliot, and I have never read a single negative word about her as a person, but have read many people going into raptures about what a charming, loving, friendly, understanding person she was. Michelle later said of her "From the time I left Los Angeles, I hadn't had a friend, a buddy. I was married, and John and I did not hang out with women, we just hung out with men, and especially not with women my age. John was nine years older than I was. And here was a fun-loving, intelligent woman. She captivated me. I was as close to in love with Cass as I could be to any woman in my life at that point. She also represented something to me: freedom. Everything she did was because she wanted to do it. She was completely independent and I admired her and was in awe of her. And later on, Cass would be the one to tell me not to let John run my life. And John hated her for that." Either Elliot had brought round Meet The Beatles, the Beatles' first Capitol album, for everyone to listen to, or Denny Doherty already had it, but either way Elliot and Doherty were by this time already Beatles fans. Michelle, being younger than the rest and not part of the folk scene until she met John, was much more interested in rock and roll than any of them, but because she'd been married to John for a couple of years and been part of his musical world she hadn't really encountered the Beatles music, though she had a vague memory that she might have heard a track or two on the radio. John was hesitant -- he didn't want to listen to any rock and roll, but eventually he was persuaded, and the record was put on while he was on his first acid trip: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Want to Hold Your Hand"] Within a month, John Phillips had written thirty songs that he thought of as inspired by the Beatles. The New Journeymen were going to go rock and roll. By this time Marshall Brickman was out of the band, and instead John, Michelle, and Denny recruited a new lead guitarist, Eric Hord. Denny started playing bass, with John on rhythm guitar, and a violinist friend of theirs, Peter Pilafian, knew a bit of drums and took on that role. The new lineup of the group used the Journeymen's credit card, which hadn't been stopped even though the Journeymen were no more, to go down to St. Thomas in the Caribbean, along with Michelle's sister, John's daughter Mackenzie (from whose name Scott McKenzie had taken his stage name, as he was born Philip Blondheim), a pet dog, and sundry band members' girlfriends. They stayed there for several months, living in tents on the beach, taking acid, and rehearsing. While they were there, Michelle and Denny started an affair which would have important ramifications for the group later. They got a gig playing at a club called Duffy's, whose address was on Creeque Alley, and soon after they started playing there Cass Elliot travelled down as well -- she was in love with Denny, and wanted to be around him. She wasn't in the group, but she got a job working at Duffy's as a waitress, and she would often sing harmony with the group while waiting at tables. Depending on who was telling the story, either she didn't want to be in the group because she didn't want her appearance to be compared to Michelle's, or John wouldn't *let* her be in the group because she was so fat. Later a story would be made up to cover for this, saying that she hadn't been in the group at first because she couldn't sing the highest notes that were needed, until she got hit on the head with a metal pipe and discovered that it had increased her range by three notes, but that seems to be a lie. One of the songs the New Journeymen were performing at this time was "Mr. Tambourine Man". They'd heard that their old friend Roger McGuinn had recorded it with his new band, but they hadn't yet heard his version, and they'd come up with their own arrangement: [Excerpt: The New Journeymen, "Mr. Tambourine Man"] Denny later said "We were doing three-part harmony on 'Mr Tambourine Man', but a lot slower... like a polka or something! And I tell John, 'No John, we gotta slow it down and give it a backbeat.' Finally we get the Byrds 45 down here, and we put it on and turn it up to ten, and John says 'Oh, like that?' Well, as you can tell, it had already been done. So John goes 'Oh, ah... that's it...' a light went on. So we started doing Beatles stuff. We dropped 'Mr Tambourine Man' after hearing the Byrds version, because there was no point." Eventually they had to leave the island -- they had completely run out of money, and were down to fifty dollars. The credit card had been cut up, and the governor of the island had a personal vendetta against them because they gave his son acid, and they were likely to get arrested if they didn't leave the island. Elliot and her then-partner had round-trip tickets, so they just left, but the rest of them were in trouble. By this point they were unwashed, they were homeless, and they'd spent their last money on stage costumes. They got to the airport, and John Phillips tried to write a cheque for eight air fares back to the mainland, which the person at the check-in desk just laughed at. So they took their last fifty dollars and went to a casino. There Michelle played craps, and she rolled seventeen straight passes, something which should be statistically impossible. She turned their fifty dollars into six thousand dollars, which they scooped up, took to the airport, and paid for their flights out in cash. The New Journeymen arrived back in New York, but quickly decided that they were going to try their luck in California. They rented a car, using Scott McKenzie's credit card, and drove out to LA. There they met up with Hoyt Axton, who you may remember as the son of Mae Axton, the writer of "Heartbreak Hotel", and as the performer who had inspired Michael Nesmith to go into folk music: [Excerpt: Hoyt Axton, "Greenback Dollar"] Axton knew the group, and fed them and put them up for a night, but they needed somewhere else to stay. They went to stay with one of Michelle's friends, but after one night their rented car was stolen, with all their possessions in it. They needed somewhere else to stay, so they went to ask Jim Hendricks if they could crash at his place -- and they were surprised to find that Cass Elliot was there already. Hendricks had another partner -- though he and Elliot wouldn't have their marriage annulled until 1968 and were still technically married -- but he'd happily invited her to stay with them. And now all her friends had turned up, he invited them to stay as well, taking apart the beds in his one-bedroom apartment so he could put down a load of mattresses in the space for everyone to sleep on. The next part becomes difficult, because pretty much everyone in the LA music scene of the sixties was a liar who liked to embellish their own roles in things, so it's quite difficult to unpick what actually happened. What seems to have happened though is that first this new rock-oriented version of the New Journeymen went to see Frank Werber, on the recommendation of John Stewart. Werber was the manager of the Kingston Trio, and had also managed the Journeymen. He, however, was not interested -- not because he didn't think they had talent, but because he had experience of working with John Phillips previously. When Phillips came into his office Werber picked up a tape that he'd been given of the group, and said "I have not had a chance to listen to this tape. I believe that you are a most talented individual, and that's why we took you on in the first place. But I also believe that you're also a drag to work with. A pain in the ass. So I'll tell you what, before whatever you have on here sways me, I'm gonna give it back to you and say that we're not interested." Meanwhile -- and this part of the story comes from Kim Fowley, who was never one to let the truth get in the way of him taking claim for everything, but parts of it at least are corroborated by other people -- Cass Elliot had called Fowley, and told him that her friends' new group sounded pretty good and he should sign them. Fowley was at that time working as a talent scout for a label, but according to him the label wouldn't give the group the money they wanted. So instead, Fowley got in touch with Nik Venet, who had just produced the Leaves' hit version of "Hey Joe" on Mira Records: [Excerpt: The Leaves, "Hey Joe"] Fowley suggested to Venet that Venet should sign the group to Mira Records, and Fowley would sign them to a publishing contract, and they could both get rich. The trio went to audition for Venet, and Elliot drove them over -- and Venet thought the group had a great look as a quartet. He wanted to sign them to a record contract, but only if Elliot was in the group as well. They agreed, he gave them a one hundred and fifty dollar advance, and told them to come back the next day to see his boss at Mira. But Barry McGuire was also hanging round with Elliot and Hendricks, and decided that he wanted to have Lou Adler hear the four of them. He thought they might be useful both as backing vocalists on his second album and as a source of new songs. He got them to go and see Lou Adler, and according to McGuire Phillips didn't want Elliot to go with them, but as Elliot was the one who was friends with McGuire, Phillips worried that they'd lose the chance with Adler if she didn't. Adler was amazed, and decided to sign the group right then and there -- both Bones Howe and P.F. Sloan claimed to have been there when the group auditioned for him and have said "if you won't sign them, I will", though exactly what Sloan would have signed them to I'm not sure. Adler paid them three thousand dollars in cash and told them not to bother with Nik Venet, so they just didn't turn up for the Mira Records audition the next day. Instead, they went into the studio with McGuire and cut backing vocals on about half of his new album: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire with the Mamas and the Papas, "Hide Your Love Away"] While the group were excellent vocalists, there were two main reasons that Adler wanted to sign them. The first was that he found Michelle Phillips extremely attractive, and the second is a song that John and Michelle had written which he thought might be very suitable for McGuire's album. Most people who knew John Phillips think of "California Dreamin'" as a solo composition, and he would later claim that he gave Michelle fifty percent just for transcribing his lyric, saying he got inspired in the middle of the night, woke her up, and got her to write the song down as he came up with it. But Michelle, who is a credited co-writer on the song, has been very insistent that she wrote the lyrics to the second verse, and that it's about her own real experiences, saying that she would often go into churches and light candles even though she was "at best an agnostic, and possibly an atheist" in her words, and this would annoy John, who had also been raised Catholic, but who had become aggressively opposed to expressions of religion, rather than still having nostalgia for the aesthetics of the church as Michelle did. They were out walking on a particularly cold winter's day in 1963, and Michelle wanted to go into St Patrick's Cathedral and John very much did not want to. A couple of nights later, John woke her up, having written the first verse of the song, starting "All the leaves are brown and the sky is grey/I went for a walk on a winter's day", and insisting she collaborate with him. She liked the song, and came up with the lines "Stopped into a church, I passed along the way/I got down on my knees and I pretend to pray/The preacher likes the cold, he knows I'm going to stay", which John would later apparently dislike, but which stayed in the song. Most sources I've seen for the recording of "California Dreamin'" say that the lineup of musicians was the standard set of players who had played on McGuire's other records, with the addition of John Phillips on twelve-string guitar -- P.F. Sloan on guitar and harmonica, Joe Osborn on bass, Larry Knechtel on keyboards, and Hal Blaine on drums, but for some reason Stephen McParland's book on Sloan has Bones Howe down as playing drums on the track while engineering -- a detail so weird, and from such a respectable researcher, that I have to wonder if it might be true. In his autobiography, Sloan claims to have rewritten the chord sequence to "California Dreamin'". He says "Barry Mann had unintentionally showed me a suspended chord back at Screen Gems. I was so impressed by this beautiful, simple chord that I called Brian Wilson and played it for him over the phone. The next thing I knew, Brian had written ‘Don't Worry Baby,' which had within it a number suspended chords. And then the chord heard 'round the world, two months later, was the opening suspended chord of ‘A Hard Day's Night.' I used these chords throughout ‘California Dreamin',' and more specifically as a bridge to get back and forth from the verse to the chorus." Now, nobody else corroborates this story, and both Brian Wilson and John Phillips had the kind of background in modern harmony that means they would have been very aware of suspended chords before either ever encountered Sloan, but I thought I should mention it. Rather more plausible is Sloan's other claim, that he came up with the intro to the song. According to Sloan, he was inspired by "Walk Don't Run" by the Ventures: [Excerpt: The Ventures, "Walk Don't Run"] And you can easily see how this: [plays "Walk Don't Run"] Can lead to this: [plays "California Dreamin'"] And I'm fairly certain that if that was the inspiration, it was Sloan who was the one who thought it up. John Phillips had been paying no attention to the world of surf music when "Walk Don't Run" had been a hit -- that had been at the point when he was very firmly in the folk world, while Sloan of course had been recording "Tell 'Em I'm Surfin'", and it had been his job to know surf music intimately. So Sloan's intro became the start of what was intended to be Barry McGuire's next single: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "California Dreamin'"] Sloan also provided the harmonica solo on the track: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "California Dreamin'"] The Mamas and the Papas -- the new name that was now given to the former New Journeymen, now they were a quartet -- were also signed to Dunhill as an act on their own, and recorded their own first single, "Go Where You Wanna Go", a song apparently written by John about Michelle, in late 1963, after she had briefly left him to have an affair with Russ Titelman, the record producer and songwriter, before coming back to him: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "Go Where You Wanna Go"] But while that was put out, they quickly decided to scrap it and go with another song. The "Go Where You Wanna Go" single was pulled after only selling a handful of copies, though its commercial potential was later proved when in 1967 a new vocal group, the 5th Dimension, released a soundalike version as their second single. The track was produced by Lou Adler's client Johnny Rivers, and used the exact same musicians as the Mamas and the Papas version, with the exception of Phillips. It became their first hit, reaching number sixteen on the charts: [Excerpt: The 5th Dimension, "Go Where You Wanna Go"] The reason the Mamas and the Papas version of "Go Where You Wanna Go" was pulled was because everyone became convinced that their first single should instead be their own version of "California Dreamin'". This is the exact same track as McGuire's track, with just two changes. The first is that McGuire's lead vocal was replaced with Denny Doherty: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] Though if you listen to the stereo mix of the song and isolate the left channel, you can hear McGuire singing the lead on the first line, and occasional leakage from him elsewhere on the backing vocal track: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] The other change made was to replace Sloan's harmonica solo with an alto flute solo by Bud Shank, a jazz musician who we heard about in the episode on "Light My Fire", when he collaborated with Ravi Shankar on "Improvisations on the Theme From Pather Panchali": [Excerpt: Ravi Shankar, "Improvisation on the Theme From Pather Panchali"] Shank was working on another session in Western Studios, where they were recording the Mamas and Papas track, and Bones Howe approached him while he was packing his instrument and asked if he'd be interested in doing another session. Shank agreed, though the track caused problems for him. According to Shank "What had happened was that whe

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The Ankler Hot Seat
Have We Reached Peak Anxiety?

The Ankler Hot Seat

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 48:28


The town may finally be acknowledging the undeniable pressures unique to this industry. This week, Jonah Hill, Tom Holland and Ezra Miller all said they are modifying their behavior to protect their mental health. Hill is stepping away from promoting his movies and making public appearances due to panic attacks; Holland announced he has abandoned social media to help stay emotionally balanced; and Ezra Miller is seeking treatment for a complex mental health issue. Hosts Janice Min, Richard Rushfield, Tatiana Siegel and Sean McNulty survey Hollywood's littered emotional landscape and how an industry whose very businesses are in current disarray adds another layer of stress onto its inhabitants. Separately, the hosts dive into new headlines ranging from Netflix's Scott Stuber interviewing at Amazon, and Brian Stelter's firing from CNN. This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit theankler.com/subscribe

Georgia Brown Faith & Friends
Let's talk about dating (part one) with Matt + MARICLR

Georgia Brown Faith & Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 39:32


Welcome back to another episode of FAITH & FRIENDS! From IDENTITY to IDOLS we talk about it ALLL in this convicting episode with our longtime friends--Matt Mitchell & MARICLR! Separately, these two fantastic God fearing humans have blessed us with such fruitful conversations, and now, they join us--TOGETHER! Matt & MARICLR are DATING, and what a journey the Lord is taking them on. In this episode we talk about...-hearing from the Lord a confirming word on BOTH PARTS (don't be weird if God tells ya "this is your spouse" just keep it to yourself & let God lead!!) -tearing down idols of what you think your significant other should be like-what it looks like to let God pick out your person -false princes & princesses (this blew my mind!! tune in to hear what MARICLR has to say on this!) -how lust and pornography kills love and true relationship with God and people -why it's important to lean on God and not a significant other I pray this episode sharpens, convicts, and comforts you today. STAY TUNED, we will have Matt & MARICLR back soon for PART TWO!! love ya, GB 

Ben & Liam
Guest: Ollie Wines Vs Tom Doedee In Our Own Showdown

Ben & Liam

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 9:38


Crows star Tom Doedee and Port star Ollie Wines join us SEPARATELY every week.... Until today.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

DFS Office Hours (Presented by SaberSim.com)
DFS Q&A: Should I build my lineups for different contests in one build or separately?

DFS Office Hours (Presented by SaberSim.com)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 61:10


Jordan walks through the process of how to build lineups for multiple contests.Head over to the #office-hours channel in our Slack group to get the link and catch these shows live. DFS Office Hours is hosted live by SaberSim Monday-Friday at 2pm ET to answer your questions on daily fantasy sports, sports betting, and more. We'll cover everything you need to know to improve your DFS process and build winning lineups fast on DraftKings, FanDuel, and Yahoo for NFL, NBA, MLB, PGA, MMA, and more. Watch on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3IOc__CyWxk&t=1129s 00:00 Intro04:01 Building process for multiple contests09:23 How to get the most out of SaberSim’s sliders16:21 Breakdown of last night’s MLB slate18:48 Key indicators of value and leverage in your build32:16 Adjusting team exposures vs player exposures35:01 Is it good to go against a high owned pitcher with low owned bats?38:48 Updates coming for the NFL season42:38 Effects of adjusting the ownership fade44:30 Using the DFS Profit Plan for the NFL season45:20 Updates for NFL season part 251:33 LoL player adjustments55:04 MMA lineup walkthrough Not in Slack? Sign-up here: https://bit.ly/3cGr2c4 Start Your Free 7-Day Trial of SaberSim Now: https://www.sabersim.com/Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/sabersim