Podcasts about Rage Against the Machine

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American rock band

  • 1,486PODCASTS
  • 2,322EPISODES
  • 1h 2mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 20, 2022LATEST
Rage Against the Machine

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Best podcasts about Rage Against the Machine

Show all podcasts related to rage against the machine

Latest podcast episodes about Rage Against the Machine

Dig Me Out - The 90's rock podcast
#577: Interview with Ben Osmundson and Ali Tabatabaee of Zebrahead

Dig Me Out - The 90's rock podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 39:00


With the success of acts like Rage Against the Machine, Limp Bizkit, 311, and Korn in the mid-90s, by the end of the decade, labels were jumping on the bandwagon and signing bands that incorporated rap and hip-hop into rock, metal, and punk. Zebrahead, from the pop-punk hotbed Orange County, were one of the bands to benefit from this trend and released their debut, Waste of Mind, on Columbia Records in 1998 featuring the singles “Get Back” and “The Real Me.” Though the music industry would shift to boy bands and teen starlets by the early 2000s, Zebrahead soldiered on, finding success in Europe and Japan. As two of the founding, and original members, of Zebrahead, Ben Osmundson and Ali Tabatabaee join us to discuss the band's longevity, why their sound clicked with listeners, and how they've managed to stay together for 25 years while continuously releasing new music.   Songs In This Episode: Intro - Check from Waste Of Mind 6:30 - Playmate of the Year from Playmate of the Year Outro - Falling Apart from MFZB   Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon. Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

Best of ESPN 1000
1/15: Song of the Night

Best of ESPN 1000

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 15:45


All of the songs from this week's Song of the Night segment. Artists include Ray Charles, Jimi Hendrix, Rage Against the Machine, Johnny Cash and Foo Fighters.

Roadie Free Radio
242: RFR Rewind: Austin Schroeder | How I Screwed Up My Interview At Clair Global

Roadie Free Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 8:49


Austin Schroeder is a Monitor Engineer based out of San Diego, California, who is currently in rehearsals for the highly anticipated Rage Against the Machine tour. An Iowa native, Austin started on piano at a young age, setting the groundwork for a deep and lifelong understanding and appreciation of music. His teenage years saw him develop more into a bassist, which he played in several jazz bands before ultimately ending up at Full Sail University, hoping for a degree in music recording. After moving to Nashville to work at the famed Blackbird studios, Austin tired of studio life and decided that perhaps he was better suited to life on the road and the more spontaneous feel of live music. A misunderstanding during his interview process at Clair Bros led to an opportunity at a smaller Pennsylania-based company, Allusions Lighting and Sound Production. It was here, that Austin's fate was set, and his career began to flourish. Among the artists that he has worked with are Iggy Azaelia, Foo Fighters, Audioslave, Tom Morello, and Lupe Fiasco. In 2019, Austin was awarded the Parnelli award for Monitor Mixer of the year. Full Episode Here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/7BHIXX87IunFWp8jAXkv80?si=AGaAKqVQTfSVT64RyGRpXg The Following links are affiliate links! Each sale helps our channel out at no additional cost to you. My VLOG & Streaming camera: https://amzn.to/3nEuIh2 The VLOG Lens: https://amzn.to/2y4Zrjd The ALL PURPOSE lens: http://amzn.to/2vPGayB My OTHER lens: https://amzn.to/38OVlfb My MAIN PODCAST mic: https://roswellproaudio.com/products/mini-k87 My OTHER podcast mic: https://amzn.to/3nK9oGQ Create ‘n Cast Bundle from SHURE & Focusrite: https://amzn.to/2LTUTTv The camera CAGE I use: http://amzn.to/2fWUwI2 My DESKTOP mixer: https://amzn.to/39yiSzZ My AUDIO interface: https://amzn.to/2LRF53W BEST FIELD recorder: http://amzn.to/2wfzCYI My FAVORITE mic stands: http://amzn.to/2xnBn6d Roadie Free Radio Merch: http://www.roadiefreeradio.com/merch/ RFR Website: http://www.roadiefreeradio.com

Rock Special
Rock vor 30 Jahren: 3 radikale Alben erobern den Mainstream

Rock Special

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 107:55


1992: Seattle ist dank Nirvana und Pearl Jam Musik-Weltmetropole. Während Trittbrettfahrer auf den Grunge-Zug aufspringen, erobern Rage Against the Machine und Faith No More mit ihrem Crossover aus Rap und Metal die Charts. Und Alice in Chains singen auf «Dirt» einen ergreifenden Grunge-Abgesang. Das Rockjahr 1992 wird von drei schwer verdaulichen Alternative-Alben geprägt. Das Debut von Rage Against the Machine trifft mit radikalen Botschaften und wütendem Rap-Metal den Nerv einer ganzen Generation. Fast gleichzeitig liefern Faith No More mit «Angel Dust» ihr verstörendes Glanzstück ab. Während diese beiden Alben den Peak von Crossover bilden, steht Grunge bereits am Abgrund: Ergreifender und gleichzeitig trauriger Höhepunkt: das Depro-Meisterwerk «Dirt» von Alice in Chains. Die Rock Special Zeitreise zurück in die 90er.

Dig Me Out - The 90's rock podcast
#575: Albums of 1992 Roundtable

Dig Me Out - The 90's rock podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 110:11


While 1991 is regarded as the true launch of the 1990s alternative explosion into the mainstream, the sheer volume and diversity of music that followed in 1992 might lay claim to the crown as the most interesting year of the decade. The mainstays of 80s college rock were alive and well, with albums by R.E.M., Bob Mould's new band Sugar, Faith No More, The Cure, The Lemonheads, Sonic Youth, Soul Asylum, and many more. The ubiquitous "grunge" sound was fully ensconced in radio and MTV with Stone Temple Pilots, Alice In Chains, and Screaming Trees added to playlists, while more aggressive sounds emerged from the likes of Rage Against the Machine, Helmet, Pantera, and White Zombie. Underground scenes cracked the mainstream as well, as industrial and electronic acts such as Ministry, Nine Inch Nails, The Orb, Curve, Aphex Twin, and others made significant noise, and the growing UK shoegaze scene produced records from Lush, Catherine Wheel, Ride, Moose, etc. And this barely scratches the surface, as hip-hop saw the release of the decade-defining albums The Chronic by Dr. Dre and Check Your Head by the Beastie Boys, as well as albums by Arrested Development, Ice Cube, Das EFX, Redman, The Pharcyde, and more. And that barely scratches the surface.   Songs In This Episode: Intro - 1992 Medley (Them Bones by Alice In Chains, Wish by Nine Inch Nails, Unsung by Helmet, Somebody To Shove by Soul Asylum) Outro - Miles Iz Dead by The Afghan Whigs   Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon. Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

Chapel Bell Curve
5.25 - The One With All of You - Natty Preview

Chapel Bell Curve

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 124:01


In this *very* special episode we called on all of you to help make it happen since Nathan has been sick all week. We had the chance to speak with some incredible CBC listeners and supporters, and some DGDs alike. Huge thank you to everyone that participated and helped out on such short notice. We literally could not have done this without you! It's the Natty Preview. Check the time stamps below to find specific interviews:11:47 - Ava21:07 - Andy30:32 - Abby37:46 - Ian45:08 - Ross @Dawgquant59:09 - Graham Coffey @DawgOutWest1:16:20 - Amanda Mull @AmandaMull1:33:49 - THE Dr. James Barefield (Yes, that one)1:42:58 - Yara's RAGE Against the Machine!

Wisconsin Music Podcast
Episode 061: Milwaukee Power Rock Trio - Diet Lite

Wisconsin Music Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 45:28


WISCONSIN MUSIC PODCAST Episode 061 DIET LITE     MILWAUKEE ROCK N ROLL COMPANY We're Diet Lite. We're alright. A powerful trio showcasing catchy riffs, creative songwriting, and a brand of energy that could be canned and sold at grungy, filth-caked 7/11's worldwide. Diet Lite is a refreshing, low calorie way to get your face melted. Starting as a collection of various recording projects between drummer Evan Marsalli and guitarist Kelson Kuzdas, the band later brought guitarist Max Niemann into the fold. Diet Lite paradoxically consists of two guitarists and zero bassists. With neither of them able to concede as the lesser guitarist, and a refusal to submit to the way of the axe, Max and Kelson instead trade the bass when playing live. In other words, Diet Lite is two bands for the cost of one! This indie-alternative-punk group showcases spicy hooks, pungent absurdity, and the spirit of drunken collaboration. The group takes pride in active bass lines, melodically forward verses, and familiar yet fresh material inspired by the acts the likes of Parquet Courts, Twin Peaks, Pavement, The White Stripes, Tame Impala, Nirvana, Velvet Underground, Courtney Barnett, Led Zeppelin, Oasis, Blink-182, Carseat Headrest, Wilco, Built to Spill, Rage Against the Machine, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Weezer, Arctic Monkeys, AC/DC, Beastie Boys, The Strokes, Sublime, Cymbals Eat Guitars, The Clash, Cage the Elephant, Vampire Weekend, and Bob Dylan. - Diet Lite - https://linktr.ee/dietlitemusic

Carrefour de la création
Sonic Youth, Yan Maresz, Monteverdi, Rage Against The Machine... Carte blanche au compositeur Fabien Cali

Carrefour de la création

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 60:08


durée : 01:00:08 - Carte Blanche au compositeur Fabien Cali - Compositeur pour le concert et pour le cinéma mais aussi guitariste, Fabien Cali intègre à son langage des idiomes et des gestes musicaux issus du rock et de la pop. Ce soir dans le Carrefour de la création, découvrons sa playlist musicale. - réalisé par : Claire Lagarde

¿Qué más?
207 It Takes.a Village

¿Qué más?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022


Rage Against The Machine, Juliana Peña, La mamá de Vicente, atrapado en el Hotel de los Pacientes, “Tribe” de Sebastian Junger, comunismo, liberalismo, Jericó, vivir el nacimiento de un hijo, el juicio de Ghislane Maxwell, La mejor pulpería de Santiago de Compostela. Música: Shoes and Socks Off, Emerald Park.

So You Want to Be a Better Ally
The Grasshopper and the Ant Episode

So You Want to Be a Better Ally

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 10:12


In which we update a classic fable and learn to be better allies for essential workers in the process. Because whether you work in the arts or not, whether you rage against the machine or are a slave to it, we all are victim to it and need to rally together.

180 grados
180 Grados - Varry Brava, The Black Crowes y Rage Against The Machine - 23/12/21

180 grados

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 59:51


En este podcast te ofrecemos una sesión pre-navideña con todxs estxs invitadxs. ZAHARA – Merichane LA LA LOVE YOU ft NENA DACONTE – Tenía Tanto Que Darte GRANDE AMORE – Esa Pena Que A Veces Teno FRANK CARTER ft JOE TALBOT – My Town IDLES – Anxiety RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE – Killing In The Name RIGOBERTA BANDINI –Ay, Mama VARRY BRAVA – Raffaella RAFFAELLA CARRÁ - Rumore CHLOE MORIONDO ft THOMAS HEADON & ALFIE TEMPLEMAN – Dizzy ALFIE TEMPLEMAN – 3D Feelings JOHNNY MARR – Hideaway Girl SAM FENDER – Aye THE BLACK CROWES – Hard To Handle THE BLACK CROWES – Remedy FRANCO BATTIATO – Centro Di Gravità Permanente Escuchar audio

24FPS
24FPS HS Matrix (Part. 2)

24FPS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 311:20


Et voici la seconde partie de notre analyse détaillée du premier film Matrix pour 24FPS, le podcast ciné avec ou sans spoiler ! Jérôme et Julien décortiquent (et donc spoilent) toutes les scènes du film fondateur de la saga avec leurs impressions, leurs souvenirs et quelques inévitables digressions ! Bonne écoute, et n'hésitez pas à partager vos souvenir du premier visionnage du film ! Crédits musicaux : Bullet-Time de Don Davis, issu de l'album Matrix - Original Motion Picture Score (1999), et Wake Up de Rage Against The Machine, issu de l'album Rage Against The Machine (1992) 24FPS est un podcast du label PodShows

We Only Do One Take Podcast
Episode 169 – The Music Special – We Only Do One Take Podcast

We Only Do One Take Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 82:05


Something we have never done; a music special! This week we have our long-time friend, the Librarian, on the show. Turch hates modern film scores. And the Librarian defends terrible albums by David Bowie, Rage Against the Machine and Weezer. And Kieran is both country and western. All this and more! Make sure you follow us on: • SoundCloud - https://soundcloud.com/weonlydoonetakepodcast • iTunes- https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/id1332596345?ct=podlink&mt=2&app=podcast&ls=1 • Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/weonlydoonetakepodcast/ • Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/weonlydoonetakepodcast/ • Spotify - https://open.spotify.com/show/6ywKEhfwsIXLesGyn0TPo1 • Twitter - @WeOnlyDoOneTake • Podlink - https://pod.link/1332596345

Shred Shack Podcast
Rising Mind

Shred Shack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 109:20


Ep. 166: In this installment, Chris and Dan Mac discuss new releases from various artists before discussing their selections for Album of the Day from the past two weeks. While moving on to various news bits regarding Marilyn Manson, Mettal Maffia, August Burns Red, Megadeth, AC/DC, Rage Against the Machine, Every Time I Die, Iron Maiden, Metallica, Hammerfall and more, Dan discusses his Black Friday CD haul and Chris discusses his Spotify rabbit hole. Dan adds a new segment to the show and discusses his viewing of Cannibal Corpse's set from Bloodstock 2018. After taking a look at the Billboard Top 200 for the week, the pair close the show on a bet.

Natural Ones
Episode 46: Rage Against the Machine

Natural Ones

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 141:57


Our heroes join the fray and begin the attack on the elder brain's army. Can 6 people take on and defeat an entire army? Only time will tell. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/naturalones/support

Muses
Ep 177: Underage Groupies & Rock n Roll: A Discussion with Lucretia Tye Jasmine

Muses

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 62:16


This week I am joined once again by Lucretia Tye Jasmine to discuss the history of teenage groupies in the rock n roll scene. This week Lucretia Tye Jasmine and I discuss the sexualization of teenage girls through music history as well as the underage groupie scenes of the past. Wild interests and an inclination to rage against the machine with a flair equaling the groupies and rock stars who fascinate her, vegan Lucretia Tye Jasmine from Kentucky earned her BFA with honors from NYU, and her MFA from CalArts. A Los Angeles–based artist, writer, and interviewer, Lucretia's current projects include the Groupie Feminism art series, and oral histories for two mixtape zines, The Groupie Gospels and riot grrrl Los Angeles 1992-1995. Artforum, Feminist Magazine radio, the GRAMMY Museum, MoPOP, The New York Times and the Punk Museum Los Angeles are a few places that have shown her work. She writes online for The Los Angeles Beat and Please Kill Me. Make sure to check out Lucretia's website for more on her writing and art, you don't wanna miss her incredible Groupie Feminist Art Series! https://www.lucretiatyejasmine.com/ You can also follow Lucretia on Instagram for more updates. What are your thoughts on this subject? Head over to our instagram to share your opinion! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rock Special
Gitarrenheld Tom Morello als Kurator: The Atlas Underground Flood

Rock Special

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 111:44


Der Gitarrist von Rage Against The Machine, Tom Morello, findet zusehends Gefallen daran, mit anderen, meist artfremden Musikern zu kooperieren, meist weit entfernt von Morellos Wurzeln. Und trotzdem schimmern auf Teil 3 seines Atlas Underground-Projektes die alten «Rage» immer wieder durch. Mit dabei auf Teil 3 seines Collab-Albums The Atlas Underground sind so unterschiedliche Künstler wie Alex Lifeson von Rush, Ben Harper, Nathaniel Rateliff, Kirk Hammett von Metallica, Manchester Orchestra und sogar die englischen Post-Punks The Idles. Wir hören uns im Rock Special an, was dabei funktioniert und was weniger. 

Metal Injection Podcasts
RIP a LIVECAST #649 - Specially Speaking

Metal Injection Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 92:34


It's a new era for the show, and we kick it off with a new voice. Sid explains all the different types of Drag Race there are. Rob explains poppers. We review the drama with Skillet and Rage Against the Machine, and spend some time talking about Yelp reviews, one of our favorite segments. Join our Patreon to watch the video version and get two bonus episodes each month, and other behind-the-scenes goodies. More info here. Follow us on: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Youtube and our Discord Chat We are bringing back an old favorite with a twist, the music break – now as a Spotify playlist to listen to whenever you want. Make sure to follow the playlist. This week's tracks are Cave In – Lost In Air Dan Cribb & Friends, David Novak – Union Strike Folk Song TV on the Radio – Happy Idiot See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Ten Laws with East Forest
Jens Kuross - Dreamy Musical Sublimity (#188)

Ten Laws with East Forest

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 75:34


Jens Kuross spent his teenage years thrashing his way through Rage Against The Machine and Beastie Boys covers in the dive bars of his native Idaho. By the time he'd reached his mid-twenties, however, he was a Berklee College of Music trained jazz drummer who'd studied under the likes of Victor Mendoza and Ralph Peterson. (And along the way becoming the only artist you're ever likely to meet who can cite Tom Waits and Bill Evans, Brad Wilk and Art Blakey as equal influences without missing a beat).Kuross found himself touring the world as the drummer for alternative artist RY X, club-smashing electronic duo Howling, and The Acid, a supergroup comprised of DJ/Producer Adam Freeland, Californian polymath Steve Nalepa, and RY X.Over the course of the next two years, Kuross received radio support from BBC Radio 1, BBC 6 Music, BBC Radio 2, Absolute Radio, and Radio X. He was invited to support GRAMMY-nominated electronic producer Bonobo, Polaris-nominated R&B artist Rhye, and Mercury-nominated alt-classical trio GoGo Penguin on their respective European tours. His songs, recorded in the garage of his Los Angeles home, were synced to Fox's Lucifer, NBC's Sharp Objects and most recently Netflix's 13 Reasons Why. He recorded a Mahogany session, signed with United Talent Agency, and his music amassed millions of streams.His long-awaited debut album, The Man Nobody Can Touch, is a body of work that's equal parts introspective and grandiose; a record that's unexpectedly maximalist and yet innately melancholy; and yet an album that manages to avoid all the traps of self-indulgent mellow- drama and tired, Americana sentimentality.Jens IGJens Kuross on Spotify Check out the new platform JourneySpace.com - offering online live facilitated journeys.  Join our East Forest COUNCIL on Patreon.  Monthly Zoom Council, podcast exclusives, live-streams, and more. Listen to East Forest music:  "IN" - the latest studio album  from East Forest - LISTEN NOW: Spotify / AppleListen to East Forest guided meditations on Spotify & AppleTour - Catch East Forest live.Order a vinyl, dad hats, sheet music, original perfume oils, and more: http://eastforest.orgPlease rate Ten Laws with East Forest in iTunes★★★★★Sign up to learn about new retreats, shows in your area, and to join the community.Stay in the flow:Mothership:  http://eastforest.org/IG:  https://www.instagram.com/eastforest/FB:  https://www.facebook.com/EastForestMusic/TW:  https://twitter.com/eastforestmusicJOIN THE COUNCIL - PATREON: http://patreon.com/eastforest

TotemTalks
Season 3 Episode 22: TotemTalks Eats Banana Pancakes!

TotemTalks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 94:45


Welcome in to another episode of TotemTalks! In today's episode, our intrepid explorers start by Sleeping on the Floor with The Lumineers, follow that up by getting Bubble Toes with Jack Johnson, and finally spot some Bulls on Parade with Rage Against the Machine! Enjoy! TotemTalks is a music podcast dedicated to breaking down a variety of musical artists in fun and educational ways. If that sounds interesting to you, please check it out! And if you enjoy listening, be sure to let us know by using #totemtalks, and following us on our Social Media! Peace and Love! Facebook: facebook.com/lowtotemband Instagram: low_totem Twitter: low_totem Website: lowtotemband.com Become a Member of Team Totem here: https://anchor.fm/lowtotem/support --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lowtotem/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lowtotem/support

The MetalSucks Podcast
#416: Code Orange's Jami Morgan

The MetalSucks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 81:54


Jami Morgan from Code Orange is back on the show! We discuss the recent standalone single "Out For Blood," his perspective on the growing importance of singles in rock and metal, the reality of having to create new music faster in the current landscape, how being a frontman is more exhausting than being a drummer, Max Portnoy becoming a full time member of the band, why he feels Code Orange are in it for the long game and how they are intentionally polarizing. Petar and Brandon tackle the police raid of Marilyn Manson's home and seizure of his hard drives, The Word Alive befriending the thieves who stole their gear, and John Cooper of Skillet calling Rage Against The Machine “government rock.” Songs: Code Orange - “Out For Blood," Daxma - “The Clouds Parted”

David Feldman Show
Chris & Andrew Cuomo AKA The Menendez Brothers, Episode 1296

David Feldman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 374:00


Topics: Alec Baldwin cries; Tom Morello's Rage Against The Machine is part of the machine; More U.S. Congressmen trading stocks off inside information; Ben Burgis teaches us about Orwell; Chris Cuomo was only suspended because he's an A-hole Guests With Time Stamps; (3:16) David Does the News (30:11) Pete Dominick (host of "StandUp! With Pete Dominick") (55:22) Jon Ross (comedy writer and gentleman farmer) (1:39:08) Professor Ben Burgis (his new book is "Cancelling Comedians While The World Burns") (2:02:12) "Pig For Love" written and performed by Professor Mike Steinel (2:05:28) The Herschenfelds: Dr. Philip Herschenfeld (Freudian psychoanalyst), and Ethan Herschenfeld (his new comedy special "Thug, Thug Jew" is streaming on YouTube) (2:32:49) Dan Frankenberger's Community Billboard (2:47:17) Emil Guillermo (host of the PETA Podcast, and columnist for The Asian American Legal Defense And Education Fund) (3:15:40) The Rev. Barry W. Lynn (Americans United for Separation of Church and State) (4:21:21) The Professors And Mary Anne: Professor Mary Anne Cummings, Professor Jonathan Bick and Professor Ann Li (5:13:33) Professor Harvey J. Kaye ("FDR on Democracy") and Alan Minsky (executive director of Progressive Democrats of America)

FratChat Podcast
Season 4 Ep#8: Things To Be Thankful For In 2021

FratChat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 65:28


It's Thanksgiving in America and the world is in chaos. But that doesn't mean this year hasn't brought plenty of great things to be thankful for! From legal weed to Zoom therapy, find out why 2021 is at least better than 2020, this week on the FratChat Podcast! Get 20% OFF + Free Shipping on all MANSCAPED products with promo code FRATCHAT at MANSCAPED.com! Follow us on all social media: Instagram: http://Instagram.com/FratChatPodcast Facebook: http://Facebook.com/FratChatPodcast Twitter: http://Twitter.com/FratChatPodcast Follow Carlos and CMO! Carlos on Instagram: http://Instagram.com/CarlosDoesTheWorld CMO on Instagram: http://Instagram.com/Chris.Moore.Comedy

Kiss My Boner Podcast
AMERICAN CURMUDGEON #11 " You're All Worthless and Weak "

Kiss My Boner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 5:21


Stupid, weak, and gullible people are everywhere, Rage Against The Machine are just a California rich-kid limousine wannabe commie rap-metal band, and Douglas C. Neidermeyer really knew how to handle those fucking annoying NERDS.Visit the KMBP website for new American Curmudgeon articles, KMBP news, and swag :http://www.kmbp.net

The Bronaissance Deep Dive
Rage Against The Machine

The Bronaissance Deep Dive

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 56:28


Renegades of Funk blasting anti-corporate riffs.

Whole Lotta Talk - Interviews that rock!
Tom Morello / TOM MORELLO

Whole Lotta Talk - Interviews that rock!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 19:18


Tom Morellos new record "The Atlas Underground Fire" is just a few weeks old - but the follow-up "The Atlas Underground Flood" is just around the corner. After more than 30 Years of Rock and Roll he's still not running out of ideas! We talked to him about his new records, collaborations with Bruce Springsteen or Bring Me The Horizon an about further plans. Enjoy!

B-Sides and Beers Podcast
Ep #43: Rage Against The Machine - Evil Empire.

B-Sides and Beers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 70:50


Tonight we're diggin into the second album from Rage Against The Machine - Evil Empire.

Supply Chain Revolution
Live from COP26 - Creating ESG Transparency and Raging Against the Machine for Systems Change not Climate Adaptation with James George of Pyxera Global (Day 2 of 3)

Supply Chain Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 18:27


Join host Sheri Hinish LIVE from the COP26 floor with returning guest James George (formerly of Ellen MacArthur Foundation and now with Pyxera Global). Supply chains came up ALL OVER THE PLACE TODAY! Amongst the walls and halls of pledges, panels, and provocative dialogue, this 3 part series will bring you the pulse of COP, the highlights and what doesn't make the headlines. In Part 2, we explore how reliable is data + if disclosures really create transparency, financing the gap in climate transition, the types of data and insights that create space to rage against the machine (systems change/stress testing we need). 30 year legacy data feeds won't model scenarios for the next 10 years. We discuss a real world example shared over lunch that nearly had us in tears. We need data to see where we should focus our efforts, but not let perfect get in the way of starting. IPCC report came out 3 months ago, and not much heard now. We all have to change and disrupt our quality of life and the types of choices we make. If we don't do it now, it will only get worse. Where are the grown ups? Consumerism is destroying our planet. COP26 aspirational goals and commitments to impact include: 1. Secure global net zero by mid-century and keep 1.5 degrees within reach Countries are being asked to come forward with ambitious 2030 emissions reductions targets that align with reaching net zero by the middle of the century. To deliver on these stretching targets, countries will need to: accelerate the phase-out of coalcurtail deforestationspeed up the switch to electric vehiclesencourage investment in renewables. 2. Adapt to protect communities and natural habitats The climate is already changing and it will continue to change even as we reduce emissions, with devastating effects. At COP26 we need to work together to enable and encourage countries affected by climate change to: protect and restore ecosystemsbuild defences, warning systems and resilient infrastructure and agriculture to avoid loss of homes, livelihoods and even lives 3. Mobilise finance To deliver on our first two goals, developed countries must make good on their promise to mobilize at least $100bn in climate finance per year by 2020.  International financial institutions must play their part and we need work towards unleashing the trillions in private and public sector finance required to secure global net zero. 4. Work together to deliver We can only rise to the challenges of the climate crisis by working together. At COP26 we must: finalize the Paris Rulebook (the detailed rules that make the Paris Agreement operational)accelerate action to tackle the climate crisis through collaboration between governments, businesses and civil society. To learn more about James, visit https://www.linkedin.com/in/james-george-20995b75/ and https://www.pyxeraglobal.org/ Learn more about the podcast at supplychainqueen.com

Radio Toilet ov Hell
Toilet Radio 339 – The Next Epissode

Radio Toilet ov Hell

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 70:32


This week we learned there's a Rage Against the Machine cover band that plays horns and pisses on dudes. Man. Only like one part of that sentence is in any way appealing.  ALSO: New music from Tim Lambesis - it sounds just like all the other shit! New music from Code Orange - it's Spawn soundtrack-tastic! Clown from Slipknot is getting too old for this shit - and by "this shit" I mean hitting a keg with a baseball bat! Anthrax's new guitar player doesn't get to do SHIT so we spend some time exploring the world of hired guns in heavy metal! BONUS: Randy Blythe and Dez from Coal Chamber are trying to sell you a pyramid scheme. Folks, it's a good one. Music featured on this ‘sode: Ilium - Quantum Evolution Event Don't forget to rate, review, and subscribe to Toilet Radio on iTunes so you'll get new episodes automatically. Or use Stitcher if you don't fuck with Apple

Every Album Ever with Mike Mansour & Alex Volz

This week we're discussing every album by Audioslave. If for some reason you haven't heard of these guys, it's Rage Against the Machine but with Soundgarden's Chris Cornell on vocals instead of Zack de la Rocha. Audioslave was a juggernaut of a supergroup and were one of the biggest rock bands in the early 00s. Musically, not the most innovative or original, but solid and fun. Plus, Tom Morello doing his wacky pedal stuff. Closing track: “Getaway Car” from Audioslave (2002)Check out our episode playlists on Spotify!https://open.spotify.com/user/motherpuncherincJoin our Patreon to jump the line when requesting an artist, as well as get bonus episodes, early access to shows, and more!https://www.patreon.com/everyalbumeverMerch available now!https://pandermonkey.creator-spring.com/Instagram:Follow Mike @pandermonkeyFollow Alex @motherpuncherMike's Picks:Audioslave (2002) — Best Album, Personal FavoriteOut of Exile (2005) — Worst Album, Least FavoriteAlex's Picks:Out of Exile (2005) — Best AlbumAudioslave (2002) — Personal FavoriteRevelations (2006) — Worst Album, Least FavoriteAlbums we discussed this episode…Audioslave (2002)Out of Exile (2005)Revelations (2006)

Ralph Nader Radio Hour
Tom Morello: Still Raging

Ralph Nader Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 59:27


Tom Morello, activist, and lead guitarist of “Rage Against the Machine,” joins us to discuss the uses of music in protest, his latest album “The Atlas Underground Fire,” and his new gig writing op-eds for The New York Times. Also, child advocate, Robert Fellmeth, stops by to shed light on a situation right out of a Charles Dickens novel: the state stealing social security checks from foster children. Plus, Ralph answers your questions.

Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Induction Vault
KISS & Tom Morello of Rage Against the Machine, 2014

Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Induction Vault

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 27:37


“Impact, influence, and awesomeness” – according to Tom Morello, these are the reasons KISS earned their induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2014. With heavy emotion and impeccable precision, he delivers a bombastic tribute perfect for the band he calls the “fearsome foursome."  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Supergirl's Attic
Objects of Affection [6x18]

Supergirl's Attic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 65:16


Episode 91: It's the last midnight! Join Supergirl's Attic for our penultimate companion episode as we examine Brainy's rage against the machine, the alien Othering that Alex misses with Esme and Kara, and the ways William is used as a tool by the characters and narrative. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Best of ESPN 1000
11/6: Song of the Night

Best of ESPN 1000

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 17:41


All of the songs from this week's Song of the Night segment! Artists include: Outkast, Rage Against the Machine, Roxette and Dead or Alive.

Tom Morello’s Maximum Firepower

Part two of Tom's conversation with his longtime friend and collaborator, Oscar-winning director, Michael Moore

The FADER Uncovered Host Mark Ronson

On the latest episode of The FADER Uncovered, host Mark Ronson is joined by legendary rap producer DJ Premier. Together they revisit Premier's 1999 FADER cover, a joint interview conducted alongside Rev. Run of Run DMC and Rage Against The Machine's Zack de la Rocha. Super fan Ronson then grills Premier on his legendary ‘90s period, when he was one half of Gang Starr and also producing grimy NY rap bangers for the likes of Biggie and Nas. They also chat about Premier's love of Duran Duran and the time he joined Ronson in the DJ booth among many other things. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Performance Anxiety: James Hall

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 160:50


This week we take a deep dive with James Hall. We hit on a lot of topics and a lot of bands like Mary My Hope, The James Hall Band, The Futura Bold, The Steady Wicked, and The Ladies Of. As always, we find out how he got his start in the music business. But we also find out a lot more. Like how the record labels had a hard time figuring out what to do with him and his band, placing them on tours with bands as diverse as Maria McKee followed immediately by Rage Against The Machine. But matches like those helped him look at music in a different way.  Both Hurricane Katrina and starting a family had profound effects on James and his music. He's grateful for everything that's happened; good, bad, and otherwise. He's discovered an interesting outlet for his music in yoga classes. And while James admits to never having sold insurance, he does do work for Books For Africa. Check out jameshall.com for music and links to his social accounts. Follow us @PerformanceAnx. You can support the show through ko-fi.com/performanceanxiety. Merch, like coffee mugs, are at performanceanx.threadless.com. I hope you get the same feeling of hope I did with this discussion with James Hall on Performance Anxiety, part of the Pantheon Podcast Network. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Performance Anxiety
James Hall

Performance Anxiety

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 161:20


This week we take a deep dive with James Hall. We hit on a lot of topics and a lot of bands like Mary My Hope, The James Hall Band, The Futura Bold, The Steady Wicked, and The Ladies Of. As always, we find out how he got his start in the music business. But we also find out a lot more. Like how the record labels had a hard time figuring out what to do with him and his band, placing them on tours with bands as diverse as Maria McKee followed immediately by Rage Against The Machine. But matches like those helped him look at music in a different way.  Both Hurricane Katrina and starting a family had profound effects on James and his music. He's grateful for everything that's happened; good, bad, and otherwise. He's discovered an interesting outlet for his music in yoga classes. And while James admits to never having sold insurance, he does do work for Books For Africa. Check out jameshall.com for music and links to his social accounts. Follow us @PerformanceAnx. You can support the show through ko-fi.com/performanceanxiety. Merch, like coffee mugs, are at performanceanx.threadless.com. I hope you get the same feeling of hope I did with this discussion with James Hall on Performance Anxiety, part of the Pantheon Podcast Network. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Tom Morello’s Maximum Firepower

Hear part one of Tom's conversation with his longtime friend and collaborator, Oscar-winning documentarian, Michael Moore

Signal To Noise Podcast
125. Sean "Sully" Sullivan, FOH Engineer

Signal To Noise Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 68:42


On Episode 125 the hosts are joined by Sean "Sully" Sullivan , who has over 26 years of  Touring and Television Mixing experience. They talk about the expectation of a "Record" quality mix coming out of our live consoles even when you are not a "studio engineer". Sully talks about some of his experiences with system engineers from one-offs to tours and how he handles those situations. They discuss one of Sully's first tours with Prince, and how Prince would mix FOH and Monitors from the stage while playing. Sully talks about micing techniques and balance when working with pianos on artists like Norah Jones, Alicia Keys, and Sarah McLachlan. Sully has a multiple-page resume of amazing artists some of which include Alanis Morisette, Red Hot Chili Peppers,  Beastie Boys, Norah Jones, Alicia Keys, Beck, Rihanna,  Rage Against the Machine, and many more as well as staff engineer for Eighth Day Sound and ATK.Sully mentioned mixing his brother's band "RADIAN" recent album  Michelle Pentanato has two courses "Mixing Music Live" and "Listen!" available on mixingmusiclive.com . We are giving away free tuition to one of her classes.  Send us an email or post on our social groups as to why you want the course and we will pick a winner.This episode is sponsored by Audix and Allen & Heath.Be sure to check out the Signal To Noise Facebook Group, & Discord Server It's a space for listeners to create to generate conversations around the people and topics covered in the podcast — we want your questions and comments! Let's build a great sound community with a place to learn, discuss, and reminisce about the “good old days.”Please check out and support The Roadie Clinic, Their mission is simple. "We exist to empower & heal roadies and their families by providing resources & services tailored to the struggles of the touring lifestyle."The Signal To Noise podcast series on ProSoundWeb is hosted by Live Sound/PSW technical editor Michael Lawrence and pro audio veterans Kyle Chirnside and Chris Leonard

Album | آلبوم
سانگل دوم: کشتن به نام امنیت

Album | آلبوم

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 91:32


داستان ساخت و انتشار شاخصترین و مهمترین آهنگ گروه ریج اگنست د ماشین، آهنگی که از آن به عنوان نماد اعتراض به خشونت پلیس یاد می‌شود، آهنگ: کشتن به نام Songle 02: The story of making “killing in the Name”, one of the best protest songs ever by Rage Against the Machine اسپانسر: شکلات گالاردو وبسایت    اینستاگرم    توییتر Intro Track: Acid Ghost – The Artist's High Original Track by: Rage Against the Machine All prepared by: Bardia Barj Logo and Cover by: Nima Jamali Covers: 00:11:01 Radio Cult 00:24:40 Richard Cheese 00:30:41 Prophets of Rage 01:09:11 Halocene 01:11:03 Leo 01:13:09 Crazy Eighy Eight 01:24:23 Machine Gun Kelly 01:29:02 La Maison Tellier 01:30:36 David Garrett Album Podcast Website وبسایت پادکست آلبوم Album Podcast Youtube Channel کانال یوتیوب پادکست آلبوم Telegram    Twitter    Instagram حمایت ریالی از پادکست آلبوم حمایت ارزی از پادکست آلبوم

Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Induction Vault
Patti Smith & Zack de la Rocha, 2007

Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Induction Vault

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 20:03


Rage Against the Machine's Zach de la Rocha inducted Patti Smith into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, perfectly encapsulating the punk-poet's contributions as musician and activist. The 2007 Rock Hall ceremony marked a victory for punks and revolutionaries the world over. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Pat Gray Unleashed
Foundersphobia | 10/20/21

Pat Gray Unleashed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 94:51


Biden's approval ratings continue to fall. Jon Gruden seems to have been judged harshly compared to other quotes from politicians, even from our own president. Jen Psaki decides to mock a reporter's question about the supply chain crisis instead of answering it. It looks as though the Left has a phobia of our founding fathers. Brad Meltzer joins the show to talk about his new book, "I Am Oprah Winfrey." Our nation now has its first transgender four-star admiral. Should the band Rage Against the Machine change its name now that the band supports the vaccine mandates? Zoos are now vaccinating skunks? A U.S. marine is now suing Walmart because the giant chain refused to fill a prescription for ivermectin. An In-N-Out Burger location was recently shut down because it refused to enforce vaccine mandates on customers. More workers across America are quitting their jobs in response to the vaccine mandates. OSHA will not require companies to report adverse reactions to vaccines. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

People's Party with Talib Kweli
Tom Morello Talks Blackness, Rage Against The Machine, Merging Rap and Rock, Wu-Tang, and ODB

People's Party with Talib Kweli

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 5:16


Stop what you're doing. If you ever wanted to hear an interview with one of the greatest guitarists ever to live; if you ever wanted to share an hour learning about the guitarist's guitarist—a man who is equally revered by Bruce Springsteen, Slash, and Chuck D—then you need to drop what you're doing and turn your eardrums to this interview with Tom Morello.   Over the course of 1.5 hours, Tom wrestles with his Blackness (and being perceived as white by rock fans), and getting famous for revolutionary music; unpacks his biggest hits; tells the story of his SNL ban, and so much more. The interview isn't all about big subjects, though. There's also lots of technique talk and plenty of laughs. Truly, if you're down for one Tom Morello interview this year (and you should be, he's amazing!), try this gem and tell us your thoughts!

Kyle Meredith With...
Tom Morello on Solo LP The Atlas Underground Fire: "This Is a Record About Survival"

Kyle Meredith With...

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 39:27


Tom Morello catches up with Kyle Meredith to dive into The Atlas Underground Fire, the continuation of his “sonic conspiracy” with artists that include Chris Stapleton, Phantogram, Damian Marley, and Mike Posner. In particular, the Rage Against the Machine guitarist talks about covering AC/DC's "Highway To Hell" with Eddie Vedder and Bruce Springsteen. He also discusses how the record was an emotional life raft during the darker days of the pandemic, searching for the future of the electric guitar, and his work getting women musicians out of Afghanistan through his Girls with Guitars foundation. Elsewhere, Morello speaks on rehearsing with Rage Against the Machine for their rescheduled reunion shows. (Editor's note: Get tickets to the upcoming shows at Ticketmaster.) Listen to this new episode of Kyle Meredith With and make sure to like and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. Follow the Consequence Podcast Network for information on all our shows. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

SuperFeast Podcast
#137 Love, Sex and Psychedelics with Dr. Molly Maloof

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 73:52


We have one of our favourite returning guests on the podcast today, entrepreneur and practicing MD Molly Maloof, who is back this time going straight to the heart of health and happiness; Love, sex, relationships, and the harmonious intersection of medicine and love. One of the many reasons we love the work of Dr. Molly is she's all about maximising potential and better function within the human body. Evolving in her practice and true to form with her ever-innovative mind, Dr. Molly's work has recently taken a more focused move into the space of relationships and how the quality of our close relationships significantly determines our long-term health. Healthy relationships help us cope better and defuse the external stresses of life; So why not focus on improving relationships? Inspired by years of experience and research in psychedelics, the neurobiology of love, and drug-assisted therapy, Dr. Molly is developing a company that aims to improve relationships and strengthen bonds through drug-assisted therapy. A complete paradigm shift in the way we view modern medicine and an upgrade to the human condition and relationships. As always with Mason and Dr. Molly, this episode is energised and thought-provoking. They explore the topics of psychedelic-assisted therapies, sexual dysfunction and the root causes of relationship problems, the history of MDMA and couples therapy, where modern medicine is falling short, and so much more. Tune in for good convo and sovereign health.   "I think technology is where we see these bonds decay. We're seeing people give up their marriages, we're seeing people walk away from long-term relationships, and we're seeing families and children affected. One of the most adverse childhood experiences a kid will have is a divorce. Why are we not looking at these fundamental facets of society and saying, gosh, why can't we do better?" And maybe there's a way we can do better that's ethical, honourable, that's scientifically sound, and will leave people better than we found them".   - Dr. Molly Maloof     Mason and Molly discuss:   Natural Aphrodisiacs. Entactogens (empathogens) The psychedelic movement. Psychedelic assisted therapy. Combatting stress through love. Relationships, community, and happiness. How relationships affect long-term health. Exploring root trauma and healing sexuality. Technology and the decay of relationships. Sexual dysfunction and relationship problems. Dopamine, Norepinephrine, Oxytocin, and Serotonin.   Who is Molly Maloof? Dr. Molly Maloof's goal is to maximise human potential by dramatically extending the human healthspan through medical technology, scientific wellness, and educational media. Her fascination with innovation has transformed her private medical practice, focused on providing health optimisation and personalised medicine to San Francisco & Silicon Valley investors, executives, and entrepreneurs. Molly's iterative programs take the quantified self to the extreme through comprehensive testing of clinical chemistry, metabolomics, microbiome, biometrics, and genomic markers.   CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: Cordyceps Deer Antler Molly's Twitter   Molly's Linkedin  Molly's Website Molly's Facebook Molly's Instagram  Psychedelic News Hour with Dr Molly Maloof Maximising Your Human Potential with Dr. Molly Maloof (EP#47) Spiritual Awakening and Biohacking with Dr. Molly Maloof (EP#108)   Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher, CastBox, iHeart RADIO:)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Mason: (00:03) Molly, how are you?   Molly Maloof: (00:05) I'm alive and well in the middle of a chaotic world. And somehow I feel like one of the more sane people in the room these days.   Mason: (00:14) You're the sane person. It's great because I like the fact that the sane person and one of the sane people on Instagram. I love your Instagram endlessly.   Molly Maloof: (00:23) Thanks.   Mason: (00:23) And I love you're the doctor whose drugs I want to take.   Molly Maloof: (00:28) Yeah, right. Like I kept on asking myself, "What if we made drugs that people wanted to take? What if we made drugs that actually improve the human condition?" What if we made drugs that actually improved resilience and improved our relationships? How come that's not medicine?   Mason: (00:46) Now, let me start with this little light question.   Molly Maloof: (00:48) Yeah.   Mason: (00:49) Where does the intersection of medicine and love begin and integrate?   Molly Maloof: (00:56) Yeah, right? Okay. Here's what occurred to me. And I haven't really even announced my company because I've been stalled, but I can talk about the big picture because I think it's really important. I spent my entire life trying to figure out how and ever since I was a child, and I was like, wanting to become a doctor at a young age, and then hit puberty in all sorts of hormonal disarray. And I was just like, "What is this happening to my body?" I remember thinking, someday I'm going to figure out my whole body, and I'm just going to understand all this weird shit that's happening to me. And so I spent a lot of my life trying and testing out things to see what would they would do. I would take supplements when I was in ninth grade. I was just constantly doing weird stuff to see what I could do to make my body function better.   Molly Maloof: (01:41) And then, left my residency, started my own medical practise, and really was like, "Fuck, I want to make a practise around optimising health, instead of just fixing sickness." So I want to understand health from first principles. So I spent all this time studying and practising . And fortunately, I had patients who would pay me a lot of money to like, be my lab rats. And they were willing, they were coming to me with experiments that they're like, "I want to do this, will you be help me?" And I'm like, "Sure." So I was one of those doctors that was just like, helping executives find greater performance. And then I had a bit of a come to Jesus moment.   Molly Maloof: (02:18) And I was just like, I did not go into medicine to be doctor just to rich people. That's not cool. And this is like been an interesting experiment. But I should probably be doing more with my life than just helping rich people stay healthy. So it really was that. That was really going through my head. I was at Esalen Institute, and I was just like, "Yeah. I'm pretty sure that there should be more to life than this."   Mason: (02:39) It's an elephant a lot of the time in the health sector.   Molly Maloof: (02:42) Yeah. But at the same time, I'm super grateful that I actually was able to do what I did because A, I could show I actually was part of like a massive trend movement, which was like, precision medicine for individuals was like, not a thing until, a few years after I started practising . So I've always been a bit ahead of the curve. But I've always also been one of those people who's just like, I can't settle for like surface level anything. So I have to get under the surface. So I got asked to teach at Stanford, a course. And she was like, "You seem to be this healthspan expert. So why don't you teach about it?" And I was like, well, of course, I got really insecure. And I was like, "Well, I know a lot. But I can't know enough to teach a second best school in the country." So I went and I started researching even deeper and started studying even more and started like coming up with this framework of what health was about.   Molly Maloof: (03:28) And in my process of studying everything, I was creating electron relationships. And I started figuring, I saw a couple TED Talks, and I started looking into the research of these two psychologists and this researcher from Stanford. And basically, the conclusion was that long term health and happiness is literally dependent on your relationships, like the number one factor in whether you're going to live long and healthy or not is your relationships. And why do you think that is? Well, usually they're the biggest source of stress or stress relief. And we know that stress is a huge source of disease, and yet everybody talks about stress, but nobody talks about what to do about it. Even like some of the best most famous doctors in America.   Molly Maloof: (04:11) Well, even doctors are on stress, like sit around talking about how they don't know what to do with stress. So I was like, "I wonder if we could actually create medicine, that improved relationships." And so I started figuring out through the psychedelic movement, that a lot of what entactogens do is they fundamentally reproduce the neurobiology of love. And so I started digging into the neurobiology of love and I was like, oh, so dopamine, norepinephrine, oxytocin, and serotonin are essentially like some of the bigger molecules involved with love and connection as well as hormones. So to me, it was like kind of a lightbulb moment happened when I was like, "Whoa, what if we actually were to create medicine that can reproduce the love that you had early in your relationship when you first got married, when you first started dating?" What would happen if you could actually reintroduce that feeling again, in your relationship, when you've been together for 10 years, and you're already annoyed by each other constantly. And there's all this resentment built up?   Molly Maloof: (05:17) And what if you could work on that resentment, work on your attachment issues, work on your relationship and your bond and strengthen that bond, through drug assisted therapy? And so that's kind of what I came up with as an idea. And so I'm in this process of investigating the possible ways to do this. But really, it's like a complete paradigm shift in modern medicine because A, it's not about individuals taking drugs, it's about two people taking a drug together. And B, it's not about doctors just handing people drugs, but it's drugs plus therapy. Drugs plus a therapeutic journey that you take, in order to achieve a certain outcome. So not only does medicine have to change in a few different ways, like A, we have to like see if the FDA will even let us give two people drugs. But B like, the payment system of medicine is about you go to a therapist, you go to a doctor, you get a drug, and the doctor is paid for that visit. And that psychologist is just paid for that visit.   Molly Maloof: (06:14) So I have friends that are in payments systems, and they're developing like bundled payment programmes because essentially you need to like create an entire outcome based experience that is paid for in a lump sum. And so there's a lot of things that need to change about in medicine. But I think that fundamentally the human bonds that we create, like are the hugest source of survival that we have. And a lot of people have overlooked this in this pandemic. We know now from isolation, that there's nothing healthy about people being by themselves in their homes, especially the elderly. Come on, and young people and children with families in one house, like we're meant to be in community, we're meant to be touching other people, we're meant to be around other people. And I think it's really a shame that we have ignored this factor for so long, and we're continuing to ignore it while people are killing themselves with alcohol and drugs and other substances.   Molly Maloof: (07:07) And it's just like, and even food, right? Like kids are gaining weight at record rates, people are gaining weight at record rates. And it's all because we're not supposed to be alone. We're not supposed to be indoors by ourselves isolated, like it's not productive, and it's the antithesis of health. So that's my shtick in my soapbox description. And I'm just going to say this, this is a really ambitious endeavour, there is a very good chance that it will not work because the government will stop me. That doesn't mean that people shouldn't be doing stuff like this because we actually need to change the way that people think about medicine. We actually need to change how medicine is delivered.   Mason: (07:42) You know what, like what brings up, I've been reading a lot of like management books because I'm at that stage by my business where I was like Peter Pan and I'm back in the real world a little bit where am I growing up and becoming a little bit adulty.   Molly Maloof: (07:56) We're both becoming adults, dude.   Mason: (07:57) We're both adulting the shit out of life right now.   Molly Maloof: (08:01) We're adulting the shit out of life.   Mason: (08:04) The one Tani got like the whole management team to raid was like a Patrick Lencioni one. I don't think that's how you pronounce his name, but he's got business fables, and it's the Five Dysfunctions of a Team and one of the dysfunctions, I can't remember if it's an exact dysfunction or just something I took out of the fable, but it's like you get an executive team and you go through all the different departments like what's our goalposts? Like what are we all agreeing on that we're looking at as like what we're all trying to get? Is it like customer acquisition? Is it customer happiness ratings? Is it revenue? It doesn't matter what the hell it is, we just focus on that and we go for it and then that unifies you. I think most people and including people that get into health and are entrepreneurs in the health same doctors what the thing that happens is they still they can't get over the hangover of getting dumped.   Mason: (08:53) The goalposts been put on you by a pretty old medical system that just like, just keep people alive. Just improve the condition somewhat. And I think why when you speak and when people listening, I know people like loving my team like listening to your last podcast in the community really excited is because the boldness that you have and it's screaming me, you're like, "No, I'm creating my own goalpost, not taking on that one, and I can see the bridge, and I'm going..." Like you actually can bridge it. It's not just, I'm defying you. It's like, "No," I'm just like, I can work with in that and I can see what you're focused on. And I'm very clear about what I'm focusing on. It's like relationship and then measure the markers to see that your relationships have improved and we know it because we have these markers. And that focus is really inspiring. It's really intimidating for people that have just allowed themselves to be handed what the goalpost is. So cheers you, I raise my hot chocolate to you.   Molly Maloof: (10:00) It's like I ask myself, "Okay, I've got this personal brand. If I like go and be Dr. Molly brand, Dr. Molly, how is that going to like..." Okay. So let's say there's Andrew Weil, there's Dr. Oz, there's all these, like leaders in the space. I could do that. And I can always fall back on that if this thing doesn't work, like I'll only be 40 by the time I fail at this, right? So I think I'm going to give myself like solid three years before I give up. Look, it's really hard to do this thing, but I'm going to give myself some significant time and commitment, like five to 10 years, then we'll see what happens. If I can get through past three years, I'll be fucking stoked. So point is, is like I can always fall back on like the Dr. Molly brand because it's like, that's cool. But that's just an evolution, right? That's just like, me becoming branded doctor 2.0. But the thing about this other thing is like, if we actually were to accomplish this, this just fundamentally changes medicine, and also could transform human relationships, which are falling apart.   Molly Maloof: (11:02) People are getting divorced after eight years, and kids are getting damaged by these relationships. Kids are missing their relationships with their parents, parents are not bonding, kids are feeling neglected. We've got to save the family unit and I think it starts with the primary relationship. And to me, this is something that is interesting to me that, I just don't think a lot of people work on their relationships, like I don't think it's something that a lot of people consider to be a thing that they should be doing every day. But it's actually so fundamental to survival, right? And yet, it's like when things are getting really bad, that's when they get to work. So we are looking at different indications. But fundamentally, the big picture, what I'm trying to do, it's kind of like bring what people have been doing underground above ground.   Molly Maloof: (11:49) The history of MDMA was like couples therapy, right? And Shulgin was giving it to psychologists to improve couples relationships. And it turns out, like underneath a lot of dysfunction, a lot of sexual dysfunction in men and women is relationship problems. So if you just keep on getting to the root cause of anything, it's like, "Oh, why don't we just like deal with the root cause? And go with that?" So it's pretty-   Mason: (12:15) I've definitely experienced with underground MDMA.   Molly Maloof: (12:17) Yeah.   Mason: (12:19) Therapy?   Molly Maloof: (12:19) Sure. Exactly.   Mason: (12:22) Yeah. With my wife. Can you just enlighten people about how you'd use it in like a clinical setting and why in particular it has been used there?   Molly Maloof: (12:37) So MDMA, we're not technically using MDMA, unless we can't use the substance we're going to work on toward developing which there's a lot of reasons why, like drug developments hard, right? But MDMA would be a good backup solution because of its history. MDMA is essentially an entactogen. So what it does is it means to touch with that it means to generate, it's also known as enpathogen. So it creates a deep sense of empathy and human connection. And that empathy reminds you of like, "Oh, there's this person next to me." And I can actually feel how they feel right now.I can actually, more noticeably understand their emotional experience. And I can be a part of that experience, rather than feeling so separate from someone else. And fundamentally, it also works on the neurobiology of love. So it's a love drug. So it creates a similar experience to what I call post coital bliss, which is kind of like right after you had sex, and you're feeling like really comfortable and really blissed out, it's like, that's kind of the MDMA experience.   Molly Maloof: (13:42) And the interesting thing is that through different types of combinations of different chemicals, we're going to be able to modulate consciousness in ways that we never thought we could do and it's fascinating, just this whole field of psychedelic medicine because it's just beginning like this whole revolution is just beginning. And it's like happening from a place of like deep interested in science and understanding the brain, but also from like a deep reference to the past. So like MDMA, for example, in the past was used in couples therapy. So two couples would come in and take the medicine with the therapist. And the therapist will help them work through their issues whether it be like attachment trauma, or deep seated resentment that's been carried or anger or betrayal or just trust issues. And therapist would use this medicine to help people come together again.   Molly Maloof: (14:32) And one of the rules interestingly, for couples therapy with when Ann Shulgin was doing it and was giving it to other therapists was no sex. So it's funny because I actually think that psychedelics go great with sex. And I think that like, you have to know what you're doing, you have to know the dose, but I do think that there will be a role in the future for psychedelic assisted therapy, and there should also be a role for psychedelic aphrodisiacs.   Mason: (15:00) Speak more about that.   Molly Maloof: (15:02) Well, okay, so I'm giving a talk at delic on this is actually quite kind of interesting. I'll give you a little preview of my talk. So it turns out that psychedelic aphrodisiacs have probably been used since like the beginning of human history.   Mason: (15:17) Cool thing. The two best things.   Molly Maloof: (15:21) Right? So people are fascinating, right? So turns out that there's like a whole bunch of categories of psychedelic aphrodisiacs. And they're so interesting. So there's the Acacia DMT, harmelin combo, there's an Alaska DMT harmelin combo, there's also the combination, that combo the drug. There's also MDMA, and MDA, which is the entactogen class of synthetic love drugs. There's LSD and psilocybin, which are the tryptamines. There's actually like a salamander that in Romania, they put into a vodka, and they use it as aphrodisiacs. There's also toads that people use as aphrodisiacs. There's Morning Glory, which is an LSD derivative, there's Hawaiian woodrose, there's all sorts of cool plants and animals that have been used since primitive times that are psychedelic, and that can turn you on.   Molly Maloof: (16:25) And there's also dangerous ones things like scopolamine, which is not technically a psychedelic, but it's a deliriant. And you don't really want to take like the tour up. But people in Brazil apparently, occasionally accidentally get dosed by like prostitutes, who are trying to take advantage of them. So there's actually a pretty good Vice episode on that. But turns out that it's not exactly a psychedelic, but you can't have psychosis and hallucinations. So I was like, "Wow, these are really interesting. There's all sorts of different mushrooms and fungi that people use, there's also like, what is it called? There's a type of fungus. Actually, let me look it up. I've got my computer right here. So why don't I come out and give you a little bit more detail on this because it's kind of getting good.   Molly Maloof: (17:14) So there's like this substance, there's actually a fruit in Southeast Asia called my Marula bean. And it has all sorts of weird ingredients in it, that can make you trippy. And then interestingly, alcohol has the effect of creating beta-carboline in the body, which I didn't know. So it's actually technically slightly psychedelic, which I never knew this. And then absinthe has wormwood which has thujone in it, which is mildly psychedelic as well. So it's essentially there's different doses of different ingredients that are kind of used for different reasons, right? And so there's basically like the medicinal dose, they said, which is the lowest dose, like the sort of the micro dose of medicine. And that's kind of like people taking things just for overall improvement of their health, mental health. And then there's the sort of aphrodisiac dose, which is a little bit higher than that. So it's enough to get you to start noticing a shift in your perception, but not so much to make the trip really hard.   Molly Maloof: (18:12) And then there's the shamanic dose, which is like what's being used in a lot of clinical studies, which is like people try to get to the root of really deep trauma. And oftentimes, getting to the root of trauma is actually what a woman or man needs to do in order to actually heal their sexuality. So I got particularly interested in this space because MDMA kind of accidentally helped heal my sexual dysfunction that I had in my 20s because of some trauma that I had in college, that I didn't even realise was causing sexual dysfunction because I didn't know I had sexual dysfunction. I just knew that I wasn't aroused. I was in pain every time I had sex, and it wasn't orgasming. And then I met a guy, we were using MDMA together and all these problems went away. And I was like, "What just happened"? And I had my first orgasm with a guy. I had orgasmed on my own, but never with a man before because of unfortunately, my history of sex was not positive.   Molly Maloof: (19:07) So I basically been trying to figure this out, "Wow, it seems like there's an opportunity for healing sexual dysfunction." Because a lot of the root causes of sexual dysfunction are relationship problems and trauma. And so then I started uncovering the whole trauma, Pandora's box, and I started discovering natural numbers on sexual trauma. And it became this whole holy shit moment, like fuck the world is so fucked up when it comes to sex. Talk about like, this Me Too movements, just the tip of the iceberg. Underneath all of it is like, clearly dysfunctional sexual upbringing that most people have because of our completely outdated religious culture, right? Basically really religiosity in a lot of ways really ruins sexuality for people because it makes it into this forbidden fruit and then in that you start wanting all sorts of things that are wrong because you're like, "Oh, I can't have it. So I want all these things that I can't have."   Mason: (20:05) Forbidden fruit. And the guys our snake tells us you want the fruit.   Molly Maloof: (20:09) Oh yeah, and women want it too, by the way. I was like, when I discovered masturbation was a sin in like fifth grade. I was like, "Oh, dear god, I've been masturbating my entire life." So funny, right? And there was just this moment I had growing up being like, really feeling like I went from like a really good Christian girl to like, a very bad child because I masturbated. And that's just not okay. So then I get into the history of psychedelics. And this talk and essentially, before Christianity, psychedelics were being used by medicine women and priestesses, and medicine men, and they were given to people as a tool for enhancing their virility and their fertility and their sexual function. And it was like, part of nature, sex was something beautiful, it was something acceptable, it is something that was part of life, right? It was celebrated. And then Christianity basically turned polytheism into this monotheistic culture, and basically started burning witches, and saying that these love potions are evil, and that anything related to sex was wrong.   Molly Maloof: (21:09) And now sex is the thing that you have to have in the bounds of marriage, which the church of course has to govern. And if you do anything outside of that, or let alone, you're homosexual, you're now a deeply evil person, and you deserve to be harmed. And you really think about this history. It's kind of epically fucked how much, no offence to men, but like patriarchy, took over religion, and basically made it all about men being in charge of the religious experience. Even though women were actually very much part of like polytheistic religious culture, and sexuality was part of that culture. And so it's like all this stuff is really went downhill from there.   Molly Maloof: (21:50) And now we live in this modern time where like, the Catholic Church has unending problems with brutalising children sexually. And we have not woken up to this reality that sex is not evil. It's part of life. It's a beautiful part of life. It's a part of life that is one of those magical mystical, if not psychedelic experiences. And it shouldn't be demonised, but I do think we need to return it back into a place of wholesomeness and respect and love and really treating people the way we would want to be treated and I don't think any woman or man wants to be raped.   Molly Maloof: (22:29) I don't think any woman or man wants to be assaulted, and I don't think if any child grows up thinking that, that's normal. And I don't know what changes in culture that makes it okay for kids and adults to like mistreat each other, but I really think that like part of my mission in life is actually to create a better culture around sex and love and really this company that I started called the Adamo Bioscience is basically a company that's dedicated to studying the science of love because I think that if we understood it better, we might be able to create more of it, and through multiple pathways and products and services. And yes, I have a commercial interest, but mostly because like it seems totally a better thing to be spending my life making money off of than anything else right now, which is like why not try to create more love in the world? I think there should be like 15 to 20 companies trying to do this.   Mason: (23:22) I think there will be once you show them the way. That's the that's the beautiful thing about being someone who's charging and leading the way. Something as a couple, I was just like thank you, epic download by the way and I saw... And I think it's nice openly talking about religion this way, we can see that it's gone far away from the natural and the original intentions. And I saw you like, I can just see you reshare the meme the other day. It tickled me the most of it was just like white Jesus cuddling someone going, "I'm sorry I made you a drug addict. Let me a book before I send you to hell." It just popped me in school I was like doing things that potentially was going down the way of being like condemned and told by teachers, "Well, your stepfather is going to go to hell because he believes in evolution."   Molly Maloof: (24:16) Oh my god, I remember being in sixth grade being like, "I think evolution is real and my school thinks I'm..." But they don't believe in it. Like, holy shit, that was our lives.   Mason: (24:28) Oh man, I got a few pop moments. I was like, "Hang on. So I'm going down this route. Where I'm sinning because I'm trying to think critically here and so now I'm going to go to hell, but you created me in your image and I'm doing? You set me off. You know all, you know I'm going to end up here. And then you're going to send me to hell?" I'm like, "You asshole. You sadist." Anyway, that was my pop.   Molly Maloof: (24:54) What got me to like what really challenged my beliefs when I was 18 was talking to a guy who went to Harvard and messenger, you're in messageboard you're talking to people smarter and older than you. And I remember talking to this guy and he asked me this question. He's like, "How can God be omnipotent, omniscient and omnipresent and how can there be a hell? If he's everywhere all the time all at once? How can it be ever a separation from God because hell is a separation from God?" And I was like, brain explode like oh that's impossible logical, total it felt like this doesn't work, right? Like does that work does not compute. And my brain just exploded I went into the bathroom and cried and cried in front of the mirror. I was like, "Oh my god, it means I'm all alone." I actually still believe in God now, but like my belief in God is much different than the patriarchal God that I grew up.   Molly Maloof: (25:50) I still pray to Jesus because I'm used to it's like a pattern, but I don't think Jesus is the only God. I think there's plenty of Gods you can pray to. But realistically I think that God is like infinite intelligence and beauty underneath everything that whether, and it's totally no gender or God can't have a gender.   Mason: (26:09) I'm going to send you my podcast with George Kavassilas. It's another mind blowing one. It's talking about the God matrix and the universe, the natural, the synthetic it's like really, really clear.   Molly Maloof: (26:25) Oh, cool.   Mason: (26:25) I'll send you because it's a very good one. And you know what, you were saying things that don't work and you know what I like that does work is aphrodisiac. So this is like telling before we move on from that point it's something that really jumped out at me that I really love and I might go a little bit of a tangent because I just wrote about it this kind of topic, this nuance. Yesterday we sent out a newsletter around lion's mane and I'm like I really love Lion's Mane because it's a bridge herb and for so often people are looking at, "I want a nootropic and so they go into a narrow," which is nice sometimes. It's nice to go reductionist. And you go, "I want something that's going to increase output and give me something now and I'm going to use this nootropic in order to get something. And then they eventually fall to Lion's Mane as like a nootropic and the word sits there very medical and very [inaudible 00:27:20], which is nice as well I use it.   Mason: (27:24) But then Lion's Mane is one if you get like a complete non grown on grain, you get one grown on wood, it's got elements of wild to it, all of a sudden you look past the textbook written black and white, in the tropic and you got the same intention here and then you look up at nature and you see, "Wow, my brain is so much more than what I thought it was and the output of my brain and the way the way that it operates in conjunction with my organs in my blood and my outlook in my life, it's connected to where I'm going to be. What I do now is connected to how I'm going to be when I'm 90 years old."   Molly Maloof: (27:59) Totally.   Mason: (28:00) it's not just take something get some output, it's like this pattern you can see the brain function connecting to the constant pattern of like, like the waves in never ending. Internally there are things that are like constantly happening that I can cultivate and work with and look at and ease into that are going to have my brain on the sea of marrow is the Daoists.   Molly Maloof: (28:21) I love that. The sea of marrow.   Mason: (28:26) And the aphrodisiacs are the same like that. And it's a fun one because people go, "Oh, aphrodisiacs great, it'll get your horny." And what you're talking about it's like a carrot that leads like you go and that's what I see. Like how I see Daoist aphrodisiacs as well, like deer antler in your pants.   Molly Maloof: (28:46) Yeah.   Mason: (28:48) Horny goat weed, like epimedium. These herbs cordycep, Eucommia, schisandra. People say the word aphrodisiac, and you go, "Great, okay, cool. I'm going to engage because I want to be horny." And you think there's more substance too, behind it. And then you get onto these aphrodisiacs and you start engaging with your sexuality, and all of a sudden it's an opportunity to connect to yourself and the word aphrodisiac falls away, and you start connecting to the sexuality. And I just heard it, then you're saying we're using aphrodisiacs to go and connect to the sexual trauma so we can connect to ourselves and our partner. And I think it's beautiful. I love it.   Molly Maloof: (29:32) Well, it's actually that the sexual trauma can damage your relationship to sex. So because it actually programmes your brain. There's this thing called the Garcia effect, and it's like when you eat something that makes you sick, you don't want it anymore because your brain associates that with feeling sick. Now not all women or men who have trauma end up with having sexual dysfunction, but a large percentage of women do that. In fact, like somewhere between 60 to 80% of women who had sexual trauma have some form of sexual dysfunction. And like in America, the numbers, which I think are underreported, are like one in five women are raped, one in four women are abused as children, one and three are assaulted in her lifetime. And so there's quite a lot of women who have sexual dysfunction because of the fact that their sexual experience was not pleasant. And it was, in fact, potentially scary and dangerous.   Molly Maloof: (30:26) So now their brain says, "Oh, that experience that's not good. I don't like that. And that's scary." And so it's kind of programmed as a traumatic memory. Now, only 30% of women with sexual trauma end up with PTSD, which is interesting. So there's actually more women with sexual dysfunction, than PTSD from sexual trauma, which is fascinating. So the theory is, is that with MDMA assisted therapy, that the medicine can actually help you revisit the trauma from a place of feeling safe and feeling okay and loved with a partner, preferably with a partner, if you're with someone that you feel safe with. And you can revisit that trauma, and then it gets reprogrammed in your brain, reconsolidated as, "Oh, this is not the worst thing in the world anymore." This is not something I need to like, fear or be afraid of anymore. That was just an event that happened. And in fact I think the real magic will come from when women can experience pleasure, again, through psychedelic medicine. As I did.   Mason: (31:32) How ironic that there's an aphrodisiac involved in that process.   Molly Maloof: (31:36) Well, you think, right? You think that like, that would make sense. It's just funny. I think we're just beginning to understand space. But I don't know if people even though this, but there's actually like three phases of neurobiology of love. The first is like the intense sex drive, which is like, our body is designed to get us to fuck a lot of people when you're young. Actually, the sex drive is like oestrogen and testosterone. And then like, you're horny, and you're young, and you want to have sex, and not everybody does. A lot of young people aren't these days, but the point is, is that it's designed to get you to be turned on and attracted to a lot of people. And then when you meet someone and you have sex with them, what happens is, is that you start activating other hormones. So dopamine starts getting released, oxytocin gets released after orgasm, and that can actually increase the attachment to this person.   Molly Maloof: (32:29) So especially in women particular. So then we start moving on to romantic love, which is actually an attachment device that's designed like we really evolved it in order to basically bond ourselves to someone, become obsessed and addicted to someone, so that we're more likely to have a baby with that person. And then keep that baby alive long enough that they will not die, right? And so the romantic love starts to switch over to pair bonding. And pair bonding is actually designed to keep that baby alive and family unit strong. Because pair bonding hormones are very similar to familial bonds. Like they think it's all mostly oxytocin vasopressin. So like, you actually look at the neurobiology of all this. It's highly adaptive, and it's a huge survival advantage to have love in your life, huge survival advantage to find someone to care about them. You're more likely to reproduce, you're more likely to make a child and a family and you're more likely to have a healthy family if there's healthy bonds.   Molly Maloof: (33:26) And so I think that we should be really looking at these things from the lens of science because a lot of what's happening in society today because I think technology is seeing these bonds decay, we're seeing people give up their marriages. We're seeing people walk away from long term relationships, and we're seeing families affected and children affected. And one of the main adverse childhood experiences a kid will have is divorce. So I'm just like, "Fuck, why are we not looking at these fundamental facets of society and saying, gosh, why can't we do better?" And maybe there's a way we can do better that's ethical, and that's honourable and that's scientifically sound and that will actually leave people better off and we found them. But again, this is like very much new territory. I don't think anybody has tried to do this or thought about doing this. And I'm actually giving you a lot of information that I like is going to keep kind of quiet but whatever you like might as well announce it to like your community first.   Mason: (34:20) Yeah. I think we're worth the drop. It's interesting, it's such a return to the natural. And I've been using that a lot because I feel like I'm saying for the matrix. I'm like nailing all over the bloody place at the moment like people.   Molly Maloof: (34:36) All the time.   Mason: (34:39) And it's so confronting for people which and I agree, as a system we haven't... What you're doing is going like, "Screw it, go to the core and think, multiple generations around leading to the core. Like, let's look at the divorce rates, let's look at the unhappiness and the lack of love in relationships and how that impacts ourselves and children." And I think about it a lot. And it gives me that raw, even talking about it now, there is tingling and there's a rawness and a raw excitement, when you know you're actually in the right place. But it's very confronting, looking at just how much healing there is to be done.   Molly Maloof: (35:18) Yeah. Well, someone told me when I was like, everyone was like, "No one's going to invest in this, and no one's going to do this. And this is crazy." I know, actually, I have a lead investor. So if investors are listening, I'm about to fundraise. So you should probably email me because it's going to be really good. It's going to be a really exciting time in the next few months because I'm actually going to be-   Mason: (35:37) I think I have like, probably $400 liquid at the moment.   Molly Maloof: (35:45) I'm not going to take your last $400. But maybe we could do something with-   Mason: (35:47) But that's not the last 400. We're being responsible in other areas.   Molly Maloof: (35:50) ... Lion's Mane. Yeah. No, but it's interesting. So like, I have a lot of people from biotech say, "This is absolutely never going to happen. It's impossible. Don't even try." And then I had a lot of people who are starting biotech companies say, "Fuck, if this problem is as big as you describe it is, then I'm pretty sure we should be throwing like a billion dollars at this." And I was like, "Fuck. Yeah, dude. Totally."   Mason: (36:16) Absolutely. Is there a market for this? If the people who would poohing it are probably the ones that just can't look in the mirror and be like, "I am the market." It's like, it's in your backyard. It's everywhere. Every time you go to a family reunion, every time you go to bed.   Molly Maloof: (36:40) I shouldn't say this out loud, but family members of mine-   Mason: (36:43) Just say it in a monologue.   Molly Maloof: (36:44) Yeah. I know my family story pretty well. I like deconstructed all of our problems at this point. I've plugged my computer in. And having deconstructed a lot of these problems, and really examined the people in my family who struggle with different problems. In my extended family, in particular, like my aunt and my grandmother, and just people I know. There's a lot to be said about early relationships, and about how important families are to the long term health of children. And when things go wrong in families, it can really, really hurt people long term. And I just looked at like, my great, great grandparents and their relationship with my grandmother. And I looked at my grandmother's relationship with her daughters, and I just looked at all this, and I was like, "Wow there's so many things that we don't realise that if we just fix that one thing, right, then it would have transformed the entire rest of a person's life."   Molly Maloof: (37:59) But there's a lot of things, we don't have solutions for. A lot of things we don't have pathways for, and a big one of those is healing trauma. And I recently did about 21 hours of deep, deep neuro somatic trauma healing from a friend of mine who's like a super gifted healer. And I can't explain in scientific terms what he did with me, but I do know one thing, and that's that we do not do a good job in our society, helping people who have trauma, heal, and express it immediately right over this happened. In fact, the medical system typically, when a girl has raped, she'll basically get a rape kit, and maybe sent to a psychologist. And if she's lucky, she'll get in, in a few months. And it's like, we don't actually have pathways for healing and caring for kids who've had major... I saw this, by the way, in health care system. I saw kids who were abused by their parents. And they go to social workers, and they kind of handed around the foster care system.   Molly Maloof: (39:00) And it's really crazy how much people experienced trauma in society. And there's really not a lot of good solutions besides talk therapy. And if talk therapy worked so well, we probably not be seeing so many problems. Like if talk therapy was like a really effective solution for all of our problems, we'd probably be seeing a lot of problems solved. Now I'm not saying talk therapy doesn't work.   Mason: (39:23) It doesn't pop the champagne. I think that's where I'm with you on that. I'm at the point in my journey where I'm like talk therapy with someone who's got a Jungian background is like perfect for me because I went so hard on psychedelics. And so I'm loving just the groundedness of it. But to get it going-   Molly Maloof: (39:36) Totally. I'm not saying it doesn't work. I think talk therapy is very much like working on your consciousness, right? Your conscious brain. Everyone actually need to talk therapy in order to fundamentally create sense, sense making around their life experience. Like that's the best thing it does. Is it creates a framework of understanding of like, "This happened to me, this happened to me, this happened to me and I understand why, and I understand how I dealt with it." And I'm trying to do a better job at it, right? But I think what's really more interesting about like, what's happening in psychedelic medicine is what's on a subconscious and the unconscious level, right? Like hypnotherapy does a pretty decent job at getting into the subconscious level.   Molly Maloof: (40:27) But what's fascinating is like all this stuff that's buried in the unconscious, right? That comes out in your dreams, that comes out in your... A lot of people have nightterors. That is most definitely a bunch of unconscious process trauma, like unprocessed trauma that needs to be like addressed. And I don't think people see it that way. They're just like, "Oh, it's a nightmare disorder." It's like, "No, you probably have like a major unresolved trauma from your childhood that you really should look at." And oftentimes, I know, multiple people who've taken psychedelics, and it just comes up to them. They're like, "Oh, my God, I was raped in high school by a few guys." And it just like comes up. Or they're like, "Oh, my God, I was sexually assaulted as a child." And this stuff comes up underneath because it's lifted out of the subconscious and unconscious.   Molly Maloof: (41:21) And that's what we don't talk enough about in like modern medicine. And even like psychology, I think, is this like, "Oh, wow," like everybody has deep trauma. But if you do have deep trauma, and it's like running in the background, it's like malware, it's just draining your energy. It's draining CPUs, it's actually playing a huge role in your behaviours and your triggers and how you interact with people. And if it's not looked at or addressed, and especially if they're things like internal family systems, like there's a lot of good forms of talk therapy that can really do a good job of bringing you back to your childhood or bringing you back these moments. And I don't even think drugs are completely necessary to get to these places. Meditation is also a phenomenal tool that a lot of people don't take advantage of. And there's a bunch of different types of meditation that are fairly obscure that can do a great job at helping people get underneath the surface of their pain.   Molly Maloof: (42:11) But a lot of this stuff is isn't mainstream. And it's a shame because a lot of people are still just like, "Where do I go to deal with all this stuff?" Most of the stuff that's worked really well for me has been very obscure stuff that I have had to find through word of mouth. And it's like not highly advertised experiences and therapies and meditation schools and it's like a lot more on the realm of like woo, but it works these things have worked. And it's like strange to me that they're not more well studied and in the mainstream.   Mason: (42:46) Yeah. We've got such a wide array of people with such a wide array of histories at different stages in their processes. And there's naturally going to be different therapies and different angles that are going to pierce the veil to whatever is sitting there behind the curtain in the subconscious and I definitely, like for me it was like personal development back in the day going like you know landmark forum was like one of the things to kind of like a bang. And I could see behind it and then okay that lost its relevance at some point. And then psychedelics became very relevant, got me probably went a little bit too hard into identifying with that community and the mannerisms around taking medicine and like that feeling like I finally belonged rather than doing the work. And then getting beautiful lessons and now it's like getting to the point where talk therapy for me 10 years ago just would have been like I think just sort of lapping up against a great wall.   Mason: (43:48) Whereas now I know how to scale that concrete wall, and I know what it looks like when I do connect to the subconscious. And I understand my processing bringing it out and what my process is, thanks to the work I did with psychedelics. I know how I'm going to bring that into awareness in my everyday and that's when personal practise comes in. That's where I know to the extent of like, with my exercise regime, I know keeping me strong enough and healthy enough to be able to handle staying in that space, where I can constantly acknowledge that part of me that wants to hide behind that veil and run everything. And I know someone like Tani she's like, there was a point where psychedelics were like, incredible. She goes, "I know I need that." And then she's like, "I don't need that anymore." And my meditation practise is exactly where I need to be and that's where I'm going to get the biggest bang.   Mason: (44:39) Not that it's about a bang, but she's going to get the rubber hitting the road. So I think that's like that integration because you see a lot of people in the psychedelic world, kind of pooh poohing therapy going like modern therapies like this domesticated little dog and psychedelics are this big dog in terms of what it can do. And it's like, true in one context, and in another context, if it's just integrated, you have an array of ways of approaching as you're talking about them. Then all of a sudden, the approach becomes multicoloured and multifaceted. And hopefully, it becomes more effective.   Molly Maloof: (45:16) I really think that we just maybe just need to marry them more. Even like MDMA assisted therapy today, is largely like, hands off. It's largely don't talk to the patient, let them do, they have their own experience, and let them do whatever they need to do to heal, it's not really guided at all. It's mostly kind of like, it's guided, but it's not really like lead. It's like, you're there. You're like going through this process, and you're having these experiences, but they're not actually trying to get you to go anywhere on your trip, they're trying to let you have your experience. Whereas like, I think that, in particular, it may be possible that like, we can give people medicine that gives them have the... I think that the idea is that you have the preparation. And then you have the creating the right set and setting. And then you take the medicine, and then you have this like deep integration experience. And that's typically what the experiences for psychedelic assisted therapy today. The question is, will the FDA let us give people drugs that turn them on unsupervised?   Molly Maloof: (46:26) Because you kind of need to be a little bit... You don't really want anyone watching you while you are with your partner. So I got a lot of questions, I need to figure out to make this thing, an actual proper model. But I think that it'll be really interesting to see how this thing evolves because I'm at the very beginning of this journey. I have an idea of what I think that this business model could look like. I have no idea what I think this therapy could be. But a lot of it is I'm like figuring it out, right? I'm like in this total creative mode of what will the future of medicine look like, if you could create it from scratch? And I've already done this once, and it turned out really great for me. And I could easily have just gone and scaled personalised medicine clinics for wealthy people. But now I'm like, "Let's see if we can create a democratised version of this medicine that actually is like it's going to start out expensive, but let's figure out how we can make this something that's eventually affordable for people." That's the goal.   Mason: (47:28) I think the other thing, that's why it feels like a safe bets. And interesting way to put it, but it makes sense, and has substance is because I think a lot of people approach this, and what we've always been taught how to do, lecture people on how they should be, and I'm going to create a product based on how I think you should act. Whereas what you're talking about, is going there's, let's say we're looking at, like morality around let's stay in our marriage, so that we don't destroy this family unit. There's a way that, that's been happened, we've been told what to do by the media. And therefore the part of us goes, if someone goes you have to stay on your marriage because it's the morally right thing to do. You're bad if you do that, there's no attraction there because it's an external like judgement , and we want to revolt against being told what to do, especially by society.   Mason: (48:31) It's why we get your rage against the machine, etc. And then, if you just understand the patterns that emerge when people do connect back to themselves, and do deal with their trauma within a relationship, what's natural for people and seems to be the pattern is people do naturally resonate with maintaining the relationship that they've chosen or maybe in some instance. Like a very conscientious uncoupling in a way that you're very connected and aware to the way that children are going to be affected by it and minimising that impact. Either way, there's an emergence of morality an emergence of ethics, rather than being told what to do.   Molly Maloof: (49:19) Yeah. There's emergence of just like, knowing what's right and wrong. Like, "Oh, yeah. We're not meant to be together. But we're also not meant to destroy each other's lives as we get divorced." I think if we were to be able to help people stay together, that would be ideal. But if we're also able to help people consciously uncouple in a way that doesn't destroy their lives. And I've heard this from multiple people, like one of my friends did MDMA with his ex wife when they were getting divorced and it completely transformed the divorce process because they were actually able to love each other through the process, and they're now really good friends. They're like super good friends. They just didn't want to be married. And it's like, that's appropriate, right? Like, it's also appropriate not to hate people for years. Just the number of people I know that have deep seated resentment for their exes. And it's like, that's not healthy for your nervous system, that's not healthy for your long term health. That's not going to keep you well.   Mason: (50:20) So we've both dived into exploring what health is, especially in the context of, and in this what we're talking about in this context of like synthetic morality, versus what emerges as right. I've just started in the last few months really feeling icky about the way I've used the word health and the way it's been used because it's natural, if you talk about healthy, then naturally, there's an opposition of unhealthy there. And so much of what's implied is basing yourself on, "I'm healthy because I'm not that." And so there's this intrinsic opposition, that... An opposition and kicking back against something in order to form identity around health. And we need the word because healthy, it's just a fun word that everyone knows. But kind of similar and synonymous with what we're talking about, and the emergence of morality and the emergence of ethics coming just through whether it's psychedelic therapy or whatever, how are you relating to health now?   Mason: (51:28) Because I definitely am finding, the more I move away from being wrapped in and around that world of being healthy versus unhealthy, and the more I kind of sit in that middle and see. What's emerging through the patterns of myself doing, I don't know, finding harmony for myself, delving into my shit, coming out the other side. Doing things that are maybe I've seen is unhealthy in one way, in one ideological circle. So I want to talk about dropping that coming back to what emerges within me. It makes the space, I don't know, I feel very roared and identified in terms of, even though we're leaders in the health space, I feel very, unidentified with anything that revolves around that word healthy. I'm curious as to where you're at, in your relationship to what is healthy.   Molly Maloof: (52:25) I used to think it was what the WHO said, which was like the complete absence of disease or infirmary. And then I was like, "No, it's not realistic." Health is actually a dynamic function of life. And to me, I have a very unique perspective on how I think, and it all stemmed from this other definition, that was the ability to adapt and self managed in the face of adversity. But I started digging under the surface, and I really started understanding things like biology, and fundamental human anatomy, and microbiology and physiology and molecular and cellular biology. And I was really thinking about it from like a mechanistic perspective as well. And I think that if you actually just look at any system, you can ask how healthy a system is based on its capacity. And whether it's able to perform its functions properly, basically, whether it's able to maintain its integrity of its structure. And that's usually a function of how much energy and how much work capacity is available.   Molly Maloof: (53:31) So, for example, the healthcare system, deeply unhealthy in America. Demands outspent capacity and it just completely started crumbling, right? Like just did not work, was not resilient, was not flexible, it was actually really struggling and breaking a lot and a lot of people have been broken through the experience of going to the healthcare system. So capacity and demands, if there's more capacity than demands, you're usually in a really good healthy state because you have enough energy to maintain the structure to do work. Now, when your demands are really high, and your capacity is really low, shit starts to break down. And so this is like the mitochondrial theory of ageing, which is fundamentally that when we lose about 50% of our functional capacity of organs, they start to malfunction, they actually start producing the ability to do the work functions that they had. And then we start to break down.   Molly Maloof: (54:27) And largely this is driven by metabolic dysfunction and stress. And like lack of exercise is really a big huge driver of disease because it's the number one signal for making more energy. So basically, I look at how we... If you actually think about like the biology of like metabolism, when we breathe air, we drink water, we eat food, it goes into our cells, it gets turned into substrates, those get put into the mitochondria, which are like little engines that could of our cells, and they have this called the electron transport chain which pulls off electrons kind of like power line. Like electrons are running through this electron transport chain. And they're powering this hydrogen turbine that creates an electrochemical gradient. And that gradient creates a battery and a capacitor. So a battery is like a differential charge between two, it's like a charge polarity. And then the capacitor is like a differential charge between two late membranes.   Molly Maloof: (55:22) And then so capacitors can deploy energy quickly. Batteries store energy as potential energy. So when you really look at it, like most people have broken their metabolisms in modern society, there's so many people with diabetes, so many people with heart disease, somebody with cancer, so many people with dementia. And those are really symptoms of broken metabolism, broken mitochondrial function. And it's funny because like, we look at all these things as separate diseases, but actually, they have the same root causes and like half of cancers are made up of metabolic in nature. So everyone's been kind of obsessed with this like, DNA and genetics theory of ageing. I'm just so unconvinced because it's kind of like, okay, that's like the architectural plans of the body. But in order to actually express those plans, you need energy. You actually need to make energy to take the plants and turn into a structure, which is proteins, right?   Molly Maloof: (56:15) So my perspective is that, like life is this interplay between energy matter and information. And essentially, like life itself, is negative entropy. So we're just constantly trying to fight against entropy, and the best way we know how to do that is like, maintain our functional capacity and be able to repair ourselves. And so this lack of being able to repair ourselves is often a function of the fact that a lot of people are just like, the biggest complaint in medicine is, "I'm tired," right? Being tired all the time is actually a reflection of energetic inefficient, insufficient energy production.   Mason: (56:56) Is that in particular with like the battery storage as you work-   Molly Maloof: (56:59) Yeah, exactly.   Mason: (57:00) Which is funnily used when you talk about, like his Yin and Yang.   Molly Maloof: (57:05) Yes. There you go. Right? We need time off to store energy. The most interesting thing about the Yin and Yang, is that there's this clear relationship between this toggling of switching between different states in biology to flourish. So you actually have to go from intense work to relaxation or rest. You have to go for ideally if you actually just look at all the best [inaudible 00:57:30] stressors, it's like, hyperoxia hypoxia breathwork. What is that? It's breathwork. Right? If you look at cold and heat, that's sauna and coal plant right? What are these things work so damn well, for making us feel healthy and feel good? Well, they're literally boosting mitochondrial biogenesis. And in some cases, like eating fasting is my toffee G, right? It's throwing-   Mason: (57:53) Being awake, being asleep.   Molly Maloof: (57:56) Being outside being indoors, like we actually need to spend way more time outdoors than we're doing. And like being in buildings and having your feet grounded into the earth, like being alone being with people, like life is this constant interplay, right? Yeah, there you go.   Mason: (58:14) That was earthing that I just mumbled.   Molly Maloof: (58:16) Yeah. So like today I've been experimenting with like different ways of movement throughout my day because I'm kind of sick of being in front of the computer constantly. And it makes me feel really unhappy. And there's this great meme you posted, feel dead inside, go outside. Fucking love that meme. And it's like, everybody loved that meme. I got it posted so many times. And it was like, actually, I spent two hours today on phone calls outside. And like, people get annoyed when you're not on a Zoom call. But I'm like, "Look, if I can walk, I will walk." And I got two separate workouts and that were like about 10 minutes each in the gym that were like broken up throughout the day. And it's like, holy shit, did I feel better today than I did for like many other previous days where I was just in front of a computer the whole time? Like, we're not meant to be in front of screens all day long. It's not healthy.   Molly Maloof: (59:06) It's not a healthy period. So the more that we can try to align our lives as much as possible with something with how we're actually like primitively programmed because our genes have not evolved since primitive times. We're the same genetically, there's been a few changes, but fundamentally, we're basically the same people as we were in hunting and gathering times. So it's no question that we've lost a lot of our health in the process of becoming more modern because we basically hijacked all of these different pathways that are actually ancient pathways of survival that are now being used to take advantage of people. Like the salt, sugar and fat in foods, the convenience of cars, right? Like humans are designed to conserve energy and to find food.   Molly Maloof: (59:53) So the society is now designed to like make everything ultra convenient, and eat too much. And it's like, okay. We don't move our bodies enough, we drive everywhere, we know what that's done to society. And so it's kind of like the real process of becoming a truly modern human is to actually try to like life according to your genetics, while also existing in a modern culture. It's a huge challenge.   Mason: (01:00:19) Can be a great thing. This is like the Daoist and the Yogi's would need to go outside of society to go and live in a cave so their life could revolve a

Tuna on Toast with Stryker
Tuna on Toast with Tom Morello

Tuna on Toast with Stryker

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 40:00


This episode starts with Stryker detailing his departure from KROQ and the circumstances that lead to his calling it quits after 22 years.  Tom Morello joins Stryker to discuss his new album, The Atlas Underground Fire. In this Tom Morello interview, they also discuss his time at Harvard, his job as a juggler in The Renaissance Fair, his first rock star sighting in Los Angeles, and, the time when Tom was in his band Lock Up, he dressed up as Dave Navarro from Janes Addiction and actually played as Janes to fool the crowd, In addition, Tom talks about the ONE game show he WOULD host! He also describes his van ride with Rick Rubin to see Chris Cornell and how many shows Rage Against the Machine played before they got their record deal. Tom also reveals how the DJ Protohype ended up on his radar, and how three generations of Morello's appear on his album along with Bring Me the Horizon and grandson.  Hope you enjoy!

KEXP Song of the Day
Tom Morello - Driving to Texas (feat. Phantogram)

KEXP Song of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 5:26


Tom Morello - "Driving To Texas (feat. Phantogram)" from the 2021 album The Atlas Underground Fire on Mom + Pop. Tom Morello has a lot of impressive guests on his forthcoming album, The Atlas Underground Fire, which will be out October 15th: Bruce Springsteen, Eddie Vedder, Damian Marley, Sama' Abdulhadi, and, on today's Song of the Day, Phantogram. “I'd worked with Josh from Phantogram on my first Atlas Underground album and I was thrilled when he and Sarah reached out about collaborating on this record," said the Rage Against the Machine guitarist. "This song is creepy as hell — a dark journey, a struggle for a tortured soul. The guitar solo needed to feel like a vengeful angel who has come down to decide the fate of the protagonist. Will they descend into the abyss or will they find redemption? 'Driving To Texas' really shows the breadth of the music you'll hear on this record. Sarah has one of the most haunting and beautiful voices of anyone singing today, and Josh's production is stylistically so fresh and eerie.” Read the full post on KEXP.org Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Tom Morello’s Maximum Firepower
The History Of The Ghost Of Tom Joad

Tom Morello’s Maximum Firepower

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 25:06


Jake Clemons of the E Street Band joins Tom to examine the history of the song "The Ghost of Tom Joad." From Steinbeck's The Grapes Of Wrath, to Springsteen's acoustic ballad, to Rage Against The Machine's cover, and beyond.