Podcasts about Tammany Hall

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New York Democratic political organization most influential in the 19th century

  • 87PODCASTS
  • 127EPISODES
  • 50mAVG DURATION
  • 1EPISODE EVERY OTHER WEEK
  • May 16, 2022LATEST
Tammany Hall

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Best podcasts about Tammany Hall

Latest podcast episodes about Tammany Hall

Life Matters
276: Crazy Politics in California & Throughout The United States

Life Matters

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 27:58


In this episode of Life Matters, Commissioner Johnston takes the opportunity to examine California's unique situation in the cultural battle now raging across the nation and the world. Few Californians fully realize that our form of government has been dramatically changed through extreme alteration of our method of voting and tallying votes.  But this is only one aspect of the very serious attack on our state's form of government and our nation's form of government. Justice Clarence Thomas explains the deeper significance of the Supreme Court leak in the midst of its deliberations. Justice Thomas is unequivocal; the very nature of America's legal system and form of government has been attacked, with the purpose of undermining and altering America. Brian further explains how California's open, ‘top two,' or “jungle primary” has given, not the individual voter, but those who control political groups the authority to determine election outcomes. This is not new in history nor even in American history. Brian explains the history of New York's Tammany Hall which for nearly 100 years had absolute and openly corrupt political power over the state and specifically the city of New York.  It was only the determined leader ship of Fiorello La Guardia and his allies who were able to both expose and ultimately undo the worst parts of the Tammany Hall political machine. Vestiges of it still remain in the state of New York and in many aspects of the Democrat, machine politics system.  Brian also explains how the American form of government, centered on the value of each and every life and the significance of the individual person, is in direct contrast to centralized authoritarian forms of government.  These governments often promise goodies and benefits to political groups, but in fact use these promises to maintain authoritarian control, even to the disregard of individual lives. From personal experience, Brian explains the nature of the European Union, the Maastricht Treaty which in many cases tricked individual European countries to surrender their sovereignty, and how it is a false and empty emulation of the principles of the United States of America. Further, Brian explains how failure to understand the civics of your community, and the methods of election, will result in failure for well-meaning, pro-life individuals who only vote based on their feelings and not on understanding. “Six Ways To Defeat a ProLife Candidate” outlines how many pro-abortion candidates gain office even though there are many pro-life voters in their district. Pro-life individuals must make an effort to understand the civic process if they wish to be successful in changing their laws whether locally, regionally, or on the state level and national level.  Knowledgeable voting is essential for good government, particularly when voting to protect life.  

The John Batchelor Show
#NYC: Governor Hochul, Buffalo, and the legacy of Tammany Hall. Harry Siegel NYDaily News

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 14:35


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow #NYC: Governor Hochul, Buffalo, and the legacy of Tammany Hall. Harry Siegel NYDaily News https://nypost.com/2022/03/31/ny-voters-oppose-hochul-giving-850m-for-buffalo-bills-stadium/

Dads on a Map
#62: Proxy and Print & Play

Dads on a Map

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 119:40


It's arts & crafts time with James & Sanchez! We talk Proxying games & components and dive into our successes and failures Print & Playing games, specifically our 18xx adventures. Also recent plays of Home Worlds, Die Macher, Nana, Tammany Hall, and Jekyll v Hyde. Enjoy the show! (5:43) Die Macher (12:47) Home Worlds (21:38) Tammany Hall (26:13) Tinners' Trail (29:08) Nana (37:06) Jekyll v Hyde (42:21) Haggis (50:30) Proxying Games & Components (65:50) 18xx Print & Play    http://www.dadsonamap.com Support the Show - Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/dadsonamap Twitter and Instagram - @dadsonamap BGG Guild - http://tiny.cc/DoaMGuild Merch Store - https://teespring.com/stores/dads-on-a-map Contact us at dadsonamap@gmail.com

We The Teachers
Saturday Webinar

We The Teachers

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 74:44


TAH.org's webinar from 5 March 2022, about the role and evolution of parties and candidate during the age of the Populists and Progressives. Panelists: Dr. Chris Burkett, Ashland University Dr. David Krugler, University of Wisconsin-Platteville Dr. Eric Sands, Berry College Suggested Readings: Wanted - A Party, Woodrow Wilson, 1 SEP 1886 Plunkitt of Tammany Hall, George Washington Plunkitt, 1905 "The Right of the People to Rule," Theodore Roosevelt, 20 March 1912 The Progressive Party Platform, 7 August 1912

TeachingAmericanHistory.org Podcast

TAH.org's webinar from 5 March 2022, about the role and evolution of parties and candidate during the age of the Populists and Progressives. Panelists: Dr. Chris Burkett, Ashland University Dr. David Krugler, University of Wisconsin-Platteville Dr. Eric Sands, Berry College Suggested Readings: Wanted - A Party, Woodrow Wilson, 1 SEP 1886 Plunkitt of Tammany Hall, George Washington Plunkitt, 1905 "The Right of the People to Rule," Theodore Roosevelt, 20 March 1912 The Progressive Party Platform, 7 August 1912

19 Nocturne Boulevard
19 Nocturne Boulevard - Lovecraft 5: FROM BEYOND - Reissue

19 Nocturne Boulevard

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 10, 2022 34:02


Adapted by Julie Hoverson from the story by H.P. Lovecraft Herbert finally has his turn and recounts a tale of mad science. Cast List Herbert - Carl Cubbedge Warren - Glen Hallstrom Charles - Michael Coleman (Tales of the Extraordinary) Richard - Philemon Vanderbeck Edward - Mathias Rebne-Morgan Tillinghast - Jack Kincaid (Edict Zero FIS) "Howard" - Russell Gold Music by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Editing and Sound:   Julie Hoverson Cover Design:  Julie Hoverson and Brett Coulstock "What kind of a place is it? Why it's the scene of a tragic event, can't you tell?" ***************************************************************** FROM BEYOND (Lovecraft 5, #5) Cast: Herbert, a scientist Edward, a writer Charles, a dilettante Richard, a painter Warren, a professor Tillinghast, professor "Howard", friend OLIVIA     [opening credits] Did you have any trouble finding it?  What do you mean, what kind of a place is it?  Why, it's the scene of a tragic event, can't you tell?  MUSIC 1_BnE AMB    OUTSIDE, NIGHT SOUND    FOOTSTEPS ON GRAVEL HERBERT    I'm sure you'll understand why I waited until after dinner to bring us all here.  CHARLES    That was dinner?  EDWARD    Even I can't say anything good about it. HERBERT    Food should be used as fuel, nothing more.  Nutritionally-- RICHARD     Next, he'll be giving us the chemical notations. WARREN    Buck up - we can't all be epicures like you, Charles.  And this little walking tour has piqued my interest.  I take it we have reached our destination, Herbert? HERBERT    Yes.  This is the house of the late Crawford Tillinghast. RICHARD    Late lamented? HERBERT    Hmph.  Doubtful.  We'd better get inside rather quickly, though.  Don't want the police to find us here. SOUND    FOOTSTEPS ON GRASS EDWARD    [interested] Really? HERBERT    A fortnight ago, Tillinghast died... under rather mysterious circumstances. RICHARD    A friend of yours? HERBERT    Vaguest of acquaintances.  I might have recognized him if I met him on the street.  Might not.  But he was a fellow scientist... [disapproving] of a sort. SOUND    FEET ON PORCH, LEATHER BAG SET DOWN HERBERT    There should be no danger, now. CHARLES    [not quite serious] Danger? HERBERT    But the power should probably remain off, so I've brought along a couple of electric torches. SOUND    RUMMAGING IN BAG HERBERT    Don't turn them on until we're inside. Just in case. EDWARD    You said danger? HERBERT    To be precise, I said "no danger".  The machine that caused all the trouble is supposed to have been disabled, according to the only witness, and people have been in and out of the place - I say people, but I mean police - for days, without event. WARREN    Ah - so there is a witness? SOUND    DOORKNOB RATTLES HERBERT    Another acquaintance.  Someone I know rather better.  Neither of them is really in my field - I work more in biology and chemistry - but we have spoken from time to time when mutual interests converged. CHARLES    Are we going to go inside or stand on the porch all day like milk bottles? SOUND    ANOTHER JIGGLE AT THE DOOR HERBERT    Most doors are fairly easy to-- aha! SOUND    HARD SMACK, DOOR CREAKS OPEN EDWARD    If science doesn't pay, Herbert, you can always turn to crime. RICHARD    Aren't the neighbors likely to notice? HERBERT    The yard is large and the hedges are overgrown. CHARLES    What's the worst that can happen, eh? EDWARD    Criminal prosecution? RICHARD    [amused] Adds spice to a reputation.  Go on, Herbert, we're right behind you. 2_inside SOUND    FLASHLIGHT CLICKS ON, SLOW FOOTSTEPS HERBERT    We need to go on through and up to the attic. SOUND    SECOND FLASHLIGHT CLICKS ON WARREN    There are likely stairs that go up from the kitchen.  Many old houses had them, depending on the prevalence of servants in the household.  CHARLES    Oh? WARREN     Servants, you see, would sleep in the attic, and the masters didn't want them traipsing up and down the main hallways at all hours of the night-- HERBERT    That's all very well, and Tillinghast did have servants, but I have a reason for wanting to go through the front hall.  Something the witness mentioned, that I wanted to observe for myself. SOUND    FOOTSTEPS STOP, DOOR SHUTS EDWARD    Does he have a name? HERBERT    He? Who? EDWARD    Your witness.  You can hardly call him "the witness" all night long - take my word, nameless characters are much more difficult to sympathize with. HERBERT    He asked that I not mention-- CHARLES    We'll give him a name then.  Something to call him - for convenience. EDWARD     And personalization. HERBERT    [exasperated] You expect me to come up with something? EDWARD    Oh, this is one of my areas.  How about Wilbur?  Philip?  Howard? HERBERT    Howard should be easy enough to remember.  Shall we continue? CHARLES    Do we get the grand tour? WARREN    You said there was a reason for us to go through the front hall? HERBERT    Yes.  As I said, "Howard" is a fellow scientist.  He was a friend - rather unfortunately - to the owner of this house, one Crawford Tillinghast. RICHARD    The "Late" one? EDWARD    And you said he was a scientist as well? HERBERT    [disparaging] Of a sort.  Some people really should never take up science.  Half the time you can't get anyone to pay attention to your work, and when they do, they can't offer a better opinion than to insist that you're mad. RICHARD    [taunting] Personal experience? HERBERT     [snappish] Of course.  [starting slow, but getting sort of rabid]  But just as often it has nothing to do with the validity of your theories - it's merely a mind game!  [almost furious] A well-placed blow to a scientist's ego can shatter him - send him completely to pieces, leaving the way clear for lesser men to step in and claim victory! EDWARD    Goodness!  HERBERT    [still mad] Or there's always the type of smear campaign that Edison waged against Tesla! CHARLES    Good for you, Herbert.  Never thought you had that kind of fire in you. RICHARD    [murmured] Remind me never to criticize anything scientific around him. WARREN    Does all this apply to the story somehow? HERBERT    [suddenly snapped back]  The story?  Oh, yes.  The story.  Well.  [clears his throat]  Crawford and Howard didn't work together - their expertise fell into very different categories. But they were friends.  [getting a little distant] At least they were until the day when Howard made the mistake - and I believe he had no ulterior motive, unlike some - of criticizing Crawford's theories. EDWARD    Oh, boy! HERBERT    Crawford threw him out, with a warning never to darken his door again. RICHARD    This door, or the one in front? HERBERT    [irritated] His metaphorical door.  CHARLES    Sorry to be an annoyance, since you're just starting to warm up, but isn't there a better place for this yarn than standing around a dark, musty old kitchen? HERBERT    Of course.  Come along. SOUND    FOOTSTEPS HERBERT    The parlor should be through here somewhere.  EDWARD    [a bit spooky] The very parlor where they sat and smoked and told their tales of science... until that fateful day! HERBERT    [dry] Very likely. EDWARD    [annoyed at not getting a rise] Hmph. WARREN     It's awfully dusty in here for a house left unoccupied a mere week.  Didn't you say this Tillinghast fellow had servants?  RICHARD    It is an awfully large house for one man. CHARLES    Thus speaketh the Pot. [calling the kettle black] HERBERT    He had servants.  They've been ... absent for a while - Howard wasn't very clear on that. SOUND    DOOR PUSHED OPEN, FOOTSTEPS 3_garments EDWARD    Hold up a minute.  What's this? CHARLES    If you weren't in the way, I might be able to answer you.  Too damn bad there's no proper lights. SOUND    SCUFFLE OF FEET RICHARD    It's a woman's dress.  Just lying there.  How ... odd? EDWARD    Confess, Herbert - does your story involve panderers?  White slavers? HERBERT    [disgusted]  No!  Such distractions have no place in a story of science. CHARLES    Is it damaged at all?  RICHARD    Not as far as I can see, but I'm hardly the expert.  [beat] Unless it's actually shredded and bloody, which this one most certainly is not, one dress looks much like another to me. WARREN    Move aside, you high-minded gentlemen.  I'm quite used to poking about in people's personal belongings. CHARLES    I can't help but feel there's a wee bit of difference between your ancient Mesopotamian and your modern old maid. SOUND    RUSTLING WARREN    How odd.  From a cursory examination, it appear that all the -ahem- internal garments are still arrayed -uh- within. EDWARD    I may be a mere tiro [novice], but even I know no woman removes her clothes that way. CHARLES    It'd be damn inconvenient.  [clears his throat]  For the woman, I mean.  Think of all the rebuttoning. HERBERT    [annoyed] I thought you all wanted to sit.  CHARLES    Of course.  EDWARD    We're easily distracted by oddities. RICHARD    [amused snort] and women's undergarments, apparently. SOUND    FEET, DOOR, SITTING 4_sitting HERBERT    You understand now why I couldn't provide any of the amenities we usually have on these story nights.  CHARLES    Of course.  [chuckling]  Someone would have had to carry the picnic hamper. EDWARD    [agreeing] Not the best accessory for breaking and entering. CHARLES    Does that heap of crinoline have something to do with your story? HERBERT    Well technically, it's evidence, but police have a tendency to ignore anything that they can't explain. EDWARD    Evidence?  Really?  HERBERT    Point of fact, one week ago, there was an unexplained death in this house. EDWARD    Presumably NOT "Howard", since he's the one who told you all about it? HERBERT    Of course not.  It was Tillinghast.  Howard was present.  That's one reason he doesn't want his name bandied about.  He doesn't want to get the police started up again. CHARLES    Did your friend... kill Tillinghast? HERBERT    You'll have to weigh the facts and decide for yourself. RICHARD    "All will become known", eh? HERBERT    Yes.  "Howard" had been persona non grata in the house for several weeks before the night of the death.  Tillinghast ran him out for daring to question his line of research.  EDWARD    Which was? CHARLES    You never did go into that. HERBERT    Tillinghast was experimenting with variations on light waves and their effects on perception.  Or something along those lines.  Howard wasn't entirely clear in his description.  RICHARD    [sarcastic] Unclear? After witnessing - if not causing - a death?  Small wonder. HERBERT    He arrived that night to find the house much as it is now.  Seemingly unoccupied, and without electricity. EDWARD    Even then?  How odd. HERBERT    It was kept "off" by logical decision, not due to any defect in the system.  Howard had spent the intervening weeks-- CHARLES    Since his fall into disfavor? HERBERT    --keeping tabs on his erstwhile friend, by way of the butler. WARREN    So there were servants. HERBERT    At least two.  Howard mentioned the butler and some sort of housekeeper, and his surprise that they were not present to greet him when he arrived. RICHARD    Why did he come back?  HERBERT    Tillinghast had specifically sent for him.  Howard assumed it was an attempt at reconciliation. EDWARD    [inviting] But...? HERBERT    He had been kept informed of Tillinghast's growing obsession with a machine in the attic, some apparatus he was perfecting, to the exclusion of all else - eating little and sleeping even less. CHARLES    Up in the attic?  Right up there? HERBERT    Of course. WARREN    Hmm... are we in any danger from this machine? HERBERT    [bland] I can't think why.  [back to the story]  Howard was shocked at the appearance of his friend.  How he had changed. RICHARD    It had been some time, hadn't it? HERBERT    A mere ten weeks.  But he had lost weight, grown rather sallow, and looked feverish. EDWARD    Classic signs of madness... at least in the better sort of stories. HERBERT    And his hair had gone white-- CHARLES    Really now Herbert, you of all people, as a scientist, must know that is an old wives' tale-- HERBERT    [overriding] White at the roots.  Of course it isn't empiracly possible for the current growth of hair to change color overnight-- RICHARD    A touch of indigo can send it in the other direction. HERBERT    But shock can alter the follicles and any growth from that point forward may be affected.  EDWARD    So he had had some sort of a shock, but some time back, to make the roots noticeable. HERBERT    Tillinghast was not the right type to be a scientist - he didn't have the mental fortitude necessary to face down the possible effects of his actions. CHARLES    Had he actually gone mad? HERBERT    Who can define madness?  But he had come to some penultimate discovery.  To this end, he had entreated Howard to pay him a visit, in order that he might share what he'd achieved. WARREN    A bit of "I told you so" RICHARD    Best served cold. [as in "revenge"] 5_tillinghast TILLINGHAST    What do we know of the world and the universe about us?  We see things only as we are constructed to see them, and can gain no idea of their absolute nature. RICHARD    Perception is a hotly debated concept in art as well - look at the work being done by the surrealists. CHARLES    Or, god forbid, dada. RICHARD    That's not art. TILLINGHAST    With five feeble senses we pretend to comprehend the boundlessly complex cosmos, yet other beings with wider, stronger, or different range of senses might not only see very differently the things we see, but might see and study whole worlds of matter, energy, and life which lie close at hand, yet can never be detected with the senses we have. EDWARD    I can't even imagine a sense I don't have.  It's like trying to imagine a colour you've never seen before.  Or trying to think around a corner. TILLINGHAST    I have always believed that such strange, inaccessible worlds exist at our very elbows, and now I believe I have found a way to break down the barriers! HERBERT    Howard says Tillinghast seemed absolutely assured of his conclusions, and he feared for his friend's sanity. WARREN    Why break down these barriers?  Shouldn't he have considered that they may be present for a very good reason? Always assuming he has any sort of method behind his madness? HERBERT    It is the duty of any scientist to go beyond and figure out what may lay outside the current realm of the probable. CHARLES    But what if such an exploration should do great harm?  Isn't it also the duty of any scientist to have a bit of accountability? HERBERT    [dismissive] Of course.  But some risks must be taken.  EDWARD    So if someone created a devastating bomb, for instance, in the name of science, it wouldn't matter how many people it killed- the very act of being able to make it would justify the science involved? HERBERT    Of course. WARREN    Just as well that we aren't here to discuss theoretical morality.  Besides, this is just a story, isn't it? HERBERT    No.  This really happened. WARREN    Sorry, what I mean is, for us, this is merely a night's entertainment.  HERBERT    Oh.  Of course.  Tillinghast went on, in that awful "croaking, wasted voice." EDWARD    Howard's words? TILLINGHAST    I am not joking. Within twenty-four hours that machine near the table will generate waves acting on unrecognized sense organs that exist in us as atrophied or rudimentary vestiges. 6_organs EDWARD    Science fiction.  Pure and simple. HERBERT    Not necessarily.  Many organs remain in the body despite centuries of evolution having rendered them obsolete for whatever purpose they may have once had in primitive man. CHARLES    The appendix? HERBERT    As a simplistic example, yes.  At some point in the distant past, it served a purpose.  Now, it is merely an accessory. RICHARD    Like footmen. CHARLES    Rather. HERBERT    Howard surmised that while Tillinghast had probably not forgiven him, he needed SOMEONE to talk to, and Howard was the most likely candidate, having been privy to some of his theories previously. EDWARD    And he arrived to find the place dark and empty? HERBERT    Well, he mentioned candles. EDWARD    More gothic yet! CHARLES    Why did Howard come anyway?  Wasn't he worried about some kind of remonstrances? HERBERT    [as if this explains]  Intellectual curiousity.  [dismissive] And wanting to see how his friend fared.  The handwriting in the summoning letter had been feeble and cramped. EDWARD    Even his ink had turned white! CHARLES    Hush. 7_machines HERBERT    Howard asked about the electricity and was told, in no uncertain terms, that it was off for a very definite reason, but was not informed what that reason might be.  Yet. TILLINGHAST    [muttered] It would be too much... I would not dare. HERBERT    He led Howard up through the house to the attic, which was lit with a sickly sinister violet light. WARREN    But not electric light? HERBERT    It came from the machine that was at the center of all the controversy.  Howard described it as "detestable," but machines should really not be regarded so subjectively. RICHARD    There are plenty of machines that are detestable. HERBERT    Name one? RICHARD    [very dry and sarcastic] Tammany Hall. [notorious "political machine" of the recent past] ALL    [general laughter] EDWARD    Now, now - we all use machines that would have been thought terrible in years gone by.  I would be lost without my typewriter, Richard takes the occasional photograph-- RICHARD    Backgrounds.  For my paintings.  Nothing I hate more than having to stand around on some windy heath - or god forbid, some tourist-laden beauty spot - just to capture a scene. CHARLES    I'm quite fond of my Victrola. WARREN    Most of these would have been considered magic by ancient man, and either embraced or reviled depending upon the climate of the times. HERBERT    Perception is subjective.  That's part of what makes science such a difficult field for men such as Tillinghast. EDWARD    Determined not to lose your thread, eh? HERBERT    The electrical system was out of the picture entirely.  And yet some kind of power seemed to be in operation, since the machine was lit. TILLINGHAST    The glow... ah yes, the glow.  It is not electrical - not in any sense you could understand.  But you will see soon enough. CHARLES    Curiousity or not, I don't know that I would choose to remain alone in a big, dark empty house with someone who sounded so ... ominous. HERBERT    That is the difference between the run of normal folk and the scientist.  The mind of the scientist puts knowledge even above...  above--- WARREN    Self-preservation? HERBERT    I was looking more for "subjective fear responses". EDWARD    I suspect that's why there are so many dead scientists. RICHARD    And so few old ones. 8_colors CHARLES    Now, now, this is a lovely tale.  Stop putting Herbert off.  HERBERT    Please.  Tillinghast seated Howard near the machine and turned it on.  Now the sound began, indicating that it was running.  And the light... changed.  EDWARD    From port to starboard? HERBERT    It had been a strange purplish color, but now it increased, then waned, and settled on a pale color or blend of colors that Howard was unable to adequately describe. EDWARD    What did I say?  Colors. WARREN    But isn't there a very definite and specific set of colors that exist in the spectrum? RICHARD    Any painter can tell you that, yet there are shades and blendings that are particularly difficult to achieve - or to reproduce.  It all depends on the purity of your pigments. HERBERT    What we think of as "normal light" is absolutely pure when it comes to color.  And yet, it is not the absence of hue.  Just look at it through a prism. TILLINGHAST    [whispered] Do you know what that is?  That is ultra-violet.  [creepy chuckle] You thought ultra-violet was invisible, and so it is - but you can see that and many other invisible things now. EDWARD    Isn't ultraviolet at the far end of the spectrum?  Our eyes aren't made for that. HERBERT    [ominous] Precisely. CHARLES    Oh-ho? HERBERT    Tillinghast claimed that the machine's function was to open up long-dormant senses, to widen the perceptions, and make visible that which is normally completely unseen. WARREN    So he claimed that, in a few moments, he could reverse aeons-- CHARLES    Theoretical aeons. WARREN    --of evolution-- EDWARD    Theoretical evolution. WARREN    --and waken senses that might only exist in his imagination? HERBERT    Yes. WARREN    Oh. RICHARD    It might equate, though only in an abstract way, with the change in art when perspective was discovered - or rather quantified.  HERBERT    What? RICHARD    If you look at ancient art, from cave paintings up through medieval tapestries, there is no standard for perspective - no logical depth.  With the renaissance, and daVinci, art began to develop systematically into the third dimension. EDWARD    What are you talking about? RICHARD    A revolutionary change in vision?  Never mind. TILLINGHAST    Listen to me! The waves from that thing are waking a thousand sleeping senses in us! I have seen the truth, and I intend to show it to you. 9_upstairs HERBERT    In fact, I think it well past time to show you. CHARLES    Show? HERBERT    The machine.  It's disabled, but you can see the room where everything occurred. RICHARD    [speculative] Get some ambiance. EDWARD    [avid] Background color. WARREN    Perspective. RICHARD    [laughs] SOUND    FOOTSTEPS, DOOR TILLINGHAST    You have heard of the pineal gland? I laugh at the shallow endocrinologist, fellow-dupe and fellow-parvenu of the Freudian. HERBERT    Come along. TILLINGHAST    That gland is the great sense organ of organs - I have found out!  It is like sight in the end, and transmits visual pictures to the brain. If you are normal, that is the way you ought to get most of it... I mean get most of the evidence... from beyond. SOUND    CREAKY DOOR OPENS CHARLES    Aha.  The scene of the crime? WARREN    Is there room for everyone? RICHARD    Just shove in. HERBERT    Go on.  It's bigger inside.  SOUND    SHUTS THE DOOR 10_the room HERBERT    Howard said that once the machine got up to speed, he began to "see" things.  HOWARD    I fancied myself in some vast incredible temple with innumerable black stone columns reaching up from a floor of damp slabs to a cloudy height beyond the range of vision. The picture was very vivid for a while, but gradually gave way to a more horrible conception; that of utter, absolute solitude in infinite, sightless, soundless space. EDWARD    Sounds like a bit of a poet. RICHARD    For a scientist. HOWARD    From the farthermost regions of remoteness, a sound softly glided into existence. It was infinitely faint, subtly vibrant, and unmistakably musical, but held a quality of surpassing wildness which made it feel like a delicate torture of my entire body. WARREN    There are certain note progressions which are determined to cause odd feelings.  Stravinsky's Rite of Spring incited a riot at its debut due to the effect of the wild discords upon its audience.   HERBERT    When Howard spoke, though, the "spell" - and I use the term to mean a period of hallucination, and not for any magical connotations - was broken.  SOUND     FOOTSTEPS, FIDDLING WITH MACHINE HERBERT    I should also mention that during this momentary lapse of concentration, Howard had drawn his revolver. CHARLES    Ayuh.  That might be a little important later.  I was looking over your machine here.  It appears to be damaged. HERBERT    I already told you it was disabled.  That is why we are in no danger.  Unlike Howard. TILLINGHAST    Don't move!    For in these rays we are able to be seen as well as to see.  I told you the servants left, but I didn't tell you how.  It was that thick-witted house-keeper - she turned on the lights downstairs after I had warned her not to, and the wires picked up sympathetic vibrations. CHARLES    Downstairs? Oh! TILLINGHAST    It must have been frightful - I could hear the screams all the way up here in spite of all I was seeing and hearing from another direction, and later it was rather ...awful... to find those empty heaps of clothes around the house.  EDWARD    Those clothes! TILLINGHAST    Mrs. Updike's clothes were close to the front hall switch - that's how I know she did it. WARREN    [awe] As if she was just taken out of them. TILLINGHAST    It got them all. But so long as we don't move we're fairly safe. Remember we're dealing with a hideous world in which we are practically helpless... [suddenly sharp] Keep still! HOWARD    In my terror my mind again opened to the impressions coming "from beyond."  I felt huge animate things brushing past me and walking or drifting through my supposedly solid body.  11_things HERBERT    Before you scoff, you have to understand that most of what we think of as "solid matter" is merely solid on a very crude level.  Individual molecules are only loosely bound together-- EDWARD    Is there going to be a test later? HOWARD    I thought I saw Tillinghast look at these things as though his better trained senses could catch them visually. TILLINGHAST    You see them? You see them? You see the things that float and flop about you and through you every moment of your life?  Have I not succeeded in breaking down the barrier?  Have I not shown you worlds that no other living men have seen? CHARLES    I don't think it's just barriers that were breakin' down. HERBERT    [smug] As I said.  Some people are not meant for the hard discipline of science. EDWARD    But he says these things could harm them?  Could have some effect just because they - the scientists - could now see them?  WARREN    That's ridiculous.  Like saying that if someone is blind, he won't get hit by a motorcar. RICHARD    [regretfully]  No.  If someone is blind, he gets hired as an art reviewer. TILLINGHAST    You think those floundering things wiped out the servants? Fool! They are harmless! But the servants are gone, aren't they? CHARLES    Maybe they took a new position in a house with the power laid on. EDWARD    The clothes, though. TILLINGHAST    You tried to stop me! You discouraged me when I needed every drop of encouragement I could get! you were afraid of the cosmic truth, you damned coward, but now I've got you! EDWARD    This room would be a little small for a confrontation with a raving lunatic. RICHARD    Particularly one who insisted that if you move a muscle, something terrible might grab you from behind. CHARLES    Rather like posing for one of your portraits. RICHARD    [dark] That's why I don't include people. TILLINGHAST    What swept up the servants? What made them scream so loud?... Don't know, eh! You'll know soon enough. WARREN    Isn't it a bit warm in here? HERBERT    We're almost finished.  I promised Howard I would look for something at the other end of the attic.  EDWARD    [worried] You're taking the torch? HERBERT    I can hardly search in the dark.  Besides, you have the other one. SOUND    HE WALKS AWAY HERBERT    [as he goes away, echoey] The oddest part is how Tillinghast somehow shifted his focus, from the things immediately surrounding us to things far beyond. 12_Herbert goes TILLINGHAST    I have seen beyond the bounds of infinity and drawn down demons from the stars... Space belongs to me, do you hear?  Things are hunting me now - the things that devour and dissolve - but I know how to elude them. It is you they will get, as they got the servants... [urgent] Stirring, dear sir? [relax] If you had moved, they would have been at you long ago. HOWARD    These things were never still, but seemed ever floating about with some malignant purpose. Sometimes they appeared to devour one another, the attacker launching itself at its victim and instantaneously obliterating the latter from sight. Shudderingly I felt that I knew what had obliterated the unfortunate servants. TILLINGHAST    Don't worry, they won't "hurt" you. They didn't "hurt" the servants - it was the seeing that made the poor devils scream so. My pets are not pretty, for they come out of places where aesthetic standards are - very different. RICHARD    [very weak joke, a bit nervous]  Hollywood? HERBERT    [from off] I'm going to check downstairs.  Be right back. SOUND    FEET GO DOWN STAIRS HOWARD    Foremost among the living objects were inky, jellyfish monstrosities which flabbily quivered in harmony with the vibrations from the machine. TILLINGHAST    I always knew you were no scientist. Trembling, eh? Trembling with anxiety to see the ultimate things I have discovered? HOWARD    I saw to my horror that they overlapped; that they were semi-fluid and capable of passing through one another and through what we know as solids. TILLINGHAST    Why don't you move, then?  Tired?  Well, don't worry, my friend, for they are coming... Look, look!  Curse you, look... it's just over your left shoulder... [moment of silence] SOUND    CLICK ALL    [gasp] CHARLES    [straining to sound calm and annoyed] Turn the torch back on, Edward. EDWARD    I didn't! RICHARD    [flat] Funny.  WARREN    [a bit odd] Do ... you see that? SOUND    SCUFFLE, FEET TURNING - they see it glowing RICHARD    Good god! EDWARD    I can't tell if it's actually-- WARREN    [whisper] Barely there.... CHARLES    [trying to stay calm] This might be a time to shut the eyes. SOUND    FEET COME UP STAIRS ALL    [GASP] 13_jump scare HERBERT    Why are you standing here in the dark? CHARLES    [crisp, overcompensating] Flashlight died.  RICHARD    Let's go downstairs.  SOUND    THEY GO DOWNSTAIRS CHARLES    Did you find what you were looking for? HERBERT    No.  Looks like the police confiscated everything of any interest. WARREN    Except - um - the machine. HERBERT    Ah.  I almost forgot the end of the story. Howard was arrested, and held on suspicion.  You see, there was a gunshot and the police were called. WARREN    I see.  That's how the police come to be a factor. HERBERT    Yes.  They burst in, and found Howard with a recently-fired gun standing over the prostrate body of his fellow scientist. CHARLES    As clear as a tableau in a wax museum. RICHARD    But he didn't shoot him? You said he's no longer under arrest. HERBERT    It wasn't until the police physician examined Tillinghast's body that they let him go.  EDWARD    Was it one of the creatures that killed him?  And maybe Howard shot IT? RICHARD    I feel a painting coming on. HERBERT    The physician determined that Tillnghast had perished-- [dragging it out] WARREN    Yes? HERBERT    Of apoplexy. CHARLES    Ah, the classics. WARREN    But the gun? HERBERT    You saw what happened.  Howard shot the machine.  That's why it's broken like that.  Too bad.  Would have been interesting to examine.  RICHARD    [wry hinting] But it's not COMPLETELY broken, is it? EDWARD    Yeah, that was a good one, Herbert.  [laughs, but a bit uneasy]  CHARLES    [fake laugh] ha-ha.  Ayup.  Good joke. WARREN    H-how did you get it to do that, anyway? SOUND    FEET STOP HERBERT    [not joking - really doesn't know what they're talking about] Do what? END

NewMercuryMedia
EJR with Jeanine Molloff--Voting rights are required to save the planet.

NewMercuryMedia

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 74:00


Days after the Martin Luther King holiday, I became keenly aware that in order for any honest environmental legislation to pass and be implemented, we must pass universal voting rights that no state legislature can rescind. Our nation has been overcome by 'corporate capture' and as a byproduct of that event, is characterized by wholesale corruption which would make Tammany Hall crooks look like rank amateurs.  Our right to vote and have our votes counted is paramount. In order to achieve this goal, the silent filibuster must be eradicated forever.  Come listen.  Jeanine

The Bowery Boys: New York City History
The Real Mrs. Astor: Ruler or Rebel?

The Bowery Boys: New York City History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 37:03


Believe it or not, we've got one more brand new Bowery Boys: New York City History podcast for 2021. Look for it on January 31. But for today we wanted to give you another sampling of our new spin-off podcast calledThe Gilded Gentleman, a look at America's Gilded Age period, hosted by social and culinary historian Carl Raymond.  In this new episode, Carl looks at one of the most legendary figures of the period – Caroline Astor, or the Mrs Astor, the ruler and creator of New York's Gilded Age high society in the early 1870s. In collaboration with Southern social climber Ward McAllister, Astor essentially created the rules for who was 'acceptable' in New York social circles. But she's also known for her battles with family members -- most notably with her nephew (and next door neighbor) William Waldorf Astor. What was behind her unusual motivations? And in what unusual way did she decide to cap her legacy at the end of her life? Carl is joined by Tom Miller, creator of the website Daytonian in Manhattan, documenting the history of New York City, one building at a time.  Subscribe to the Gilded Gentleman now and you'll get ANOTHER new episode on the life of Murray Hall, a Tammany Hall politician and operator of an employment agency for domestic help in the late 19th century. But Murray had a secret – one that he took to his grave. A remarkable story and one we think will move you.  Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/boweryboys See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Dice Tower
TDT # 741 - Sail Away

The Dice Tower

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 68:41


In this week's episode, Mandi and Suzanne talk about Tammany Hall, LAMA Dice, Bitoku, and Kids Chronicles. Concordia appears in Tap That App. And the Game Pie of the show is full of games from 2016. The Dice Tower is sponsored by TheOp.games and GameNerdz.com.  

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael
The Big Cheat: How Donald Trump Fleeced America and Enriched Himself and His Family w/ David Cay Johnston

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 75:07


On this edition of Parallax Views, Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter David Cay Johnston returns to the program to discuss his new book The Big Cheat: How Donald Trump Fleeced America and Enriched Himself and His Family. According to David's reporting the Trump Organization made a between a whopping 1.6 to 1.7 billion dollars during the Trump Presidency. Although Trump ledged to receive only a salary of $1 for his time as President (and, in fact, did donate his salary to charity), it appears Trump himself along with his daughter Ivanka Trump, Ivanka's husband Jared Kushner, and other associates of the 45th President of the United States of America profited greatly from the Trump Presidency. In this way Trump is arguably the embodiment of a form of gangster capitalism. And "gangster" may well be apropos as David argues that the Trump family is actually a generational crime family. Despite all this, figures like Trump and Steve Bannon have promoted themselves as heroically trying to remember the "forgotten man" of the working class. Nothing could be further from the truth according to David Cay Johnston, who, it should be added, reports on the ways in which Trump bilked supporters in hospice and retirement out of their money in a very devious manner. In this conversation we cover all that as well as the story of Brian Kolfage and the "We Build the Wall" charity, how corruption under Trump differs from corruption of yesteryear like that associated with the Pendergast Machine and Tammany Hall, Donald Trump's effect on foreign policy, the story of the curious Trump associate Tom Barrack, why David refers to Trump as a carny huckster like P.T. Barnum (with one major difference) and his supporters as marks, Super PACs and the need for reforms, white collar crime, the Trump family history, Trump and Christianity, the death of conservatism in the United States, Trump and the Atlantic City casino business, Trump stealing from a dog charity, and much, much more!

Board Game Barrage
#202: Your Fulfilled Potential

Board Game Barrage

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 61:26


Looking back on the past made us all reflective. For instance, remember 166 episodes ago when we promised to play all those games on our shelves of shame? I thought you might. We're revisiting our crimes of yesteryear, and checking in on how guilty we are. Before we audit our past selves, we talk about Warp's Edge, Carolus Magnus, and Unfathomable. 02:32 - Warp's Edge 08:09  - Carolus Magnus 16:20 - Unfathomable 27:00 - A Look Back at Our Unfulfilled Potential 27:18 - Fog of Love 28:56 - Spirit Island 30:10 - Dungeon Petz 31:55 - Mini Rails 33:19 - Pax Porfiriana 35:45  - Keyflower 36:41  - Dogs of War 37:13 - Clockwork Wars 38:38 - Anachrony 39:40 - Lisboa 40:19 - Three Kingdoms Redux 41:59 - Sid Meier's Civilization: The Board Game 42:51 - The Gallerist 43:40 - The Voyages of Marco Polo 44:35 - Diplomacy 45:40 - For-Ex 46:35 - Project: ELITE 47:31 - War of the Ring 49:50 - Roads & Boats 51:15 - Tammany Hall 51:28 - Fury of Dracula 51:50 - 1880: China 52:19 - Spartacus: A Game of Blood & Treachery 52:45 - Arkham Horror: The Card Game 53:07 - Crokinole 53:48 - An Infamous Traffic 54:15 - Chaos in the Old World 55:07 - Great Western Trail 55:52 - Dune 56:48 - Pandemic Legacy: Season 1 Check out our wiki at: https://boardgamebarrage.com/wiki Join the discussion at: https://boardgamebarrage.com/discord Join our Facebook group at: https://boardgamebarrage.com/facebook Get a Board Game Barrage T-shirt at: https://boardgamebarrage.com/store

Daddy Issues with Joe Buck and Oliver Hudson

From Cavalry Audio, iHeartRadio and executive producer Alec Baldwin, Island chronicles the first three hundred years of colonization of Manhattan Island and its resounding impact on our culture and our world. Hosted by actor, writer, and New Yorker Chance Kelly, the series illustrates how this place is an island unto itself, not just geographically, but idealistically, philosophically and spiritually. Island uncovers our true lost American History. It examines the city's effect on religious and personal freedoms throughout the world. Chance's own heritage is central to much of this story directly as his great, great, great uncle Honest John Kelly, himself emerged from the slums of Five Points to become one of the first Irish-Catholic Congressmen in 1856, and would later reform the reeling Tammany Hall in the wake of the Boss Tweed era. John Kelly was a fiercely courageous advocate for oppressed immigrants from everywhere. Island is the character-driven portrait of the inimitable souls responsible for a place founded on capitalism but perpetuated on an infectious and unapologetic measure of tolerance. Our narrative begins in 1609 when Henry Hudson happens upon Manhattan and the river that would come to bear his name, and culminates in 1909 when Western interloper William Randolph Hearst has infiltrated New York publishing and the fistfight that is Manhattan politics. Climb aboard this voyage of discovery as we tell the epic story, over three centuries, of the forging of the epicenter of the universe. Researched, written and produced by Chance Kelly and Dr. Jaap Jacobs. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Made Women
Introducing: ISLAND

Made Women

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 2:42


From Cavalry Audio, iHeartRadio and executive producer Alec Baldwin, Island chronicles the first three hundred years of colonization of Manhattan Island and its resounding impact on our culture and our world. Hosted by actor, writer, and New Yorker Chance Kelly, the series illustrates how this place is an island unto itself, not just geographically, but idealistically, philosophically and spiritually. Island uncovers our true lost American History. It examines the city's effect on religious and personal freedoms throughout the world. Chance's own heritage is central to much of this story directly as his great, great, great uncle Honest John Kelly, himself emerged from the slums of Five Points to become one of the first Irish-Catholic Congressmen in 1856, and would later reform the reeling Tammany Hall in the wake of the Boss Tweed era. John Kelly was a fiercely courageous advocate for oppressed immigrants from everywhere. Island is the character-driven portrait of the inimitable souls responsible for a place founded on capitalism but perpetuated on an infectious and unapologetic measure of tolerance. Our narrative begins in 1609 when Henry Hudson happens upon Manhattan and the river that would come to bear his name, and culminates in 1909 when Western interloper William Randolph Hearst has infiltrated New York publishing and the fistfight that is Manhattan politics. Climb aboard this voyage of discovery as we tell the epic story, over three centuries, of the forging of the epicenter of the universe. Researched, written and produced by Chance Kelly and Dr. Jaap Jacobs. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Devil Within
Introducing: ISLAND

The Devil Within

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 2:42


From Cavalry Audio, iHeartRadio and executive producer Alec Baldwin, Island chronicles the first three hundred years of colonization of Manhattan Island and its resounding impact on our culture and our world. Hosted by actor, writer, and New Yorker Chance Kelly, the series illustrates how this place is an island unto itself, not just geographically, but idealistically, philosophically and spiritually. Island uncovers our true lost American History. It examines the city's effect on religious and personal freedoms throughout the world. Chance's own heritage is central to much of this story directly as his great, great, great uncle Honest John Kelly, himself emerged from the slums of Five Points to become one of the first Irish-Catholic Congressmen in 1856, and would later reform the reeling Tammany Hall in the wake of the Boss Tweed era. John Kelly was a fiercely courageous advocate for oppressed immigrants from everywhere.Island is the character-driven portrait of the inimitable souls responsible for a place founded on capitalism but perpetuated on an infectious and unapologetic measure of tolerance. Our narrative begins in 1609 when Henry Hudson happens upon Manhattan and the river that would come to bear his name, and culminates in 1909 when Western interloper William Randolph Hearst has infiltrated New York publishing and the fistfight that is Manhattan politics. Climb aboard this voyage of discovery as we tell the epic story, over three centuries, of the forging of the epicenter of the universe.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Can You Survive This Podcast?
Introducing: ISLAND

Can You Survive This Podcast?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 2:42


From Cavalry Audio, iHeartRadio and executive producer Alec Baldwin, Island chronicles the first three hundred years of colonization of Manhattan Island and its resounding impact on our culture and our world. Hosted by actor, writer, and New Yorker Chance Kelly, the series illustrates how this place is an island unto itself, not just geographically, but idealistically, philosophically and spiritually. Island uncovers our true lost American History. It examines the city's effect on religious and personal freedoms throughout the world. Chance's own heritage is central to much of this story directly as his great, great, great uncle Honest John Kelly, himself emerged from the slums of Five Points to become one of the first Irish-Catholic Congressmen in 1856, and would later reform the reeling Tammany Hall in the wake of the Boss Tweed era. John Kelly was a fiercely courageous advocate for oppressed immigrants from everywhere. Island is the character-driven portrait of the inimitable souls responsible for a place founded on capitalism but perpetuated on an infectious and unapologetic measure of tolerance. Our narrative begins in 1609 when Henry Hudson happens upon Manhattan and the river that would come to bear his name, and culminates in 1909 when Western interloper William Randolph Hearst has infiltrated New York publishing and the fistfight that is Manhattan politics. Climb aboard this voyage of discovery as we tell the epic story, over three centuries, of the forging of the epicenter of the universe. Researched, written and produced by Chance Kelly and Dr. Jaap Jacobs. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Up Against The Mob
Now & Then - Associations: From the Masons to the Mob

Up Against The Mob

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 65:42


What's the history of associations and powerful internal groups in American life? On this episode of Now & Then, “Associations: From the Masons to the Mob,” Heather Cox Richardson and Joanne Freeman discuss the popularity of the Freemasons and other secret clubs among the early national elite, the growth of political machines like Tammany Hall during the 1800s, and the development of organized crime during Prohibition. Then, Elie Honig, the host of Up Against the Mob and a former mafia prosecutor, joins Heather and Joanne to discuss the origins and goals of the controversial Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) Act, which Congress passed in 1970 to go after nefarious associations. When do associations promote democracy? When do they become problematic? And how should law enforcement guard against dangerous associations?  Listen to all six episodes of CAFE's Up Against the Mob podcast, hosted by Elie Honig: cafe.com/up-against-the-mob Sign up for the CAFE Brief to receive the weekly Note from Elie and a slate of articles: cafe.com/brief Join CAFE Insider to listen to “Backstage,” where Heather and Joanne chat each week about the anecdotes and ideas that formed the episode. And for a limited time, use the code HISTORY for 50% off the annual membership price. Head to: cafe.com/history.   For references & supplemental materials, head to: cafe.com/now-and-then/associations-from-the-masons-to-the-mob Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Now & Then
Associations: From the Masons to the Mob

Now & Then

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 64:47


What's the history of associations and powerful internal groups in American life? On this episode of Now & Then, “Associations: From the Masons to the Mob,” Heather Cox Richardson and Joanne Freeman discuss the popularity of the Freemasons and other secret clubs among the early national elite, the growth of political machines like Tammany Hall during the 1800s, and the development of organized crime during Prohibition. Then, Elie Honig, the host of Up Against the Mob and a former mafia prosecutor, joins Heather and Joanne to discuss the origins and goals of the controversial Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) Act, which Congress passed in 1970 to go after nefarious associations. When do associations promote democracy? When do they become problematic? And how should law enforcement guard against dangerous associations?  Listen to all six episodes of CAFE's Up Against the Mob podcast, hosted by Elie Honig: cafe.com/up-against-the-mob Sign up for the CAFE Brief to receive the weekly Note from Elie and a slate of articles: cafe.com/brief Join CAFE Insider to listen to “Backstage,” where Heather and Joanne chat each week about the anecdotes and ideas that formed the episode. And for a limited time, use the code HISTORY for 50% off the annual membership price. Head to: cafe.com/history.   For references & supplemental materials, head to: cafe.com/now-and-then/associations-from-the-masons-to-the-mob Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Off Stage and On The Air

     Listen to the Show Right Click to Save GuestsAustin Shakespeare Bollywood Twelfth NightWhat We Talked About

change zoom performance dance theater musical dark normal broadway afraid sharks opera priority nose stuart broken signature accent msonormal compatibility colorful times new roman human condition calibri gilliam koop spring awakening moulton cambria math style definitions worddocument shiro saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves msonormaltable trackformatting lidthemeother snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules lidthemeasian x none mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate right click centergroup latentstylecount showtunes donotpromoteqf subsup undovr mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc wrapindent allowpng intlim narylim defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked qformat latentstyles semihidden unhidewhenused table normal trouble in mind strange loop name title name normal name strong name emphasis name quote name no spacing name intense quote name light shading name dark list accent name light list name colorful shading accent name light grid name colorful list accent name medium shading name medium list name colorful grid accent name medium grid name subtle emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference name colorful list name intense reference name colorful grid name book title name default paragraph font name light shading accent name bibliography name subtitle name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name revision name table grid name list paragraph name placeholder text tammany hall step right up virginia wolf name e light accent dark accent colorful accent name list name date name plain text name message header name table columns name list table name salutation name table list name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name normal indent name table web name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name list number name normal table name plain table name closing name no list name grid table light name signature name outline list name grid table name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful theatre history msonospacing relyonvml name mention name hashtag name unresolved mention what we talked about scheps name smart link dean johanesen
Violent Femme
Stephanie St. Clair: Harlem Gangster

Violent Femme

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 28:15


Some call it the numbers racket but true believers call it policy banking because the numbers games provide much needed cash flow for economic life in 1920s Harlem. Numbers kings abound, but there is only one Queen, Madame Stephanie St. Clair, a French Caribbean-born self-made black woman.In the fall of in 1929, New York City police who've long taken a cut from the numbers queen, raid her house, rob, and arrest her to send a message. With the police pummeling her on one side and mobster Dutch Schultz, who has been eyeing St. Clair's rising power and wealth pouncing on the other, most people assume Stephanie St. Clair will wave the white flag and bow out. But Madame St. Clair always fights back.Contact us: violentfemmearmy@gmail.comWebsite: violentfem.meFollow ViolentFemme on instagram: https://www.instagram.com/violentfem.me/Follow Rahaleh on instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rahaleh/Support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/violentfemme

BroadwayRadio
Special Episode: Cole, Wright on Creating Immersive History in ‘Tammany Hall’

BroadwayRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 27:00


On this episode, Matt chats Darren Lee Cole and Alexander Wright the co-creators and directors of the new site-specific, immersive theater experience at New York’s SoHo Playhouse, Tammany Hall. Performances begin on Friday, Oct. 15 for the show which takes visitors back 92 years to Election Night, November 2, 1929 read more The post Special Episode: Cole, Wright on Creating Immersive History in ‘Tammany Hall’ appeared first on BroadwayRadio.

The Long Island History Project
Episode 146: The Life of Philip Merkle with Bruce Seger

The Long Island History Project

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 38:06


If you were a corrupt or incompetent official in 19th century New York City, Philip Merkle was your worst nightmare: an idealistic German immigrant with subpoena power. As city coroner from 1881-1885, he investigated murders, suicides, and gruesome accidents, seeking to right every wrong and improve every aspect of the system he encountered. He was also a champion for social order and progress, founding aid organizations dedicated to advancing his fellow immigrants. Implacable foe of Tammany Hall and Boss Tweed, friend to Teddy Roosevelt and Jacob Riis, Merkle's story is ripe for dramatization and greater renown. We are talking today with Suffolk County Community College librarian Bruce Seger, the man who is shining a light on Merkle and compelling us to take an episode away from Long Island to investigate. Bruce's new book, Matters of Life and Death: The Remarkable Journey of Dr. Philip Merkle, is a fictionalized retelling of the five years of research Bruce put into uncovering this eventful life. Merkle is a distant relative along the Seger family tree and once he started looking, Bruce couldn't believe what he found. Further Research Matters of Life and Death: The Remarkable Journey of Dr. Philip Merkle Bruce Seger New York City Research NYS Historic Newspapers database Brooklyn Daily Eagle New York Municipal Archives collections Related New York City-themed shows The Knick The Alienist Copper Jacob Riis: Revealing "How the Other Half Lives" exhibition from the Library of Congress Dan Sickles Trial: 1859 Freinsheim, Germany

True Crime Never Sleeps
Cold Case Files: Judge Joseph Force Crater

True Crime Never Sleeps

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2021 16:39


Joseph Force Crater (January 5, 1889 – disappeared August 6, 1930; declared legally dead June 6, 1939) was a New York State Supreme Court Justice who went missing amid a political scandal. He was last seen leaving a restaurant on West 45th Street in Manhattan and entered popular culture as one of the most mysterious missing persons cases of the twentieth century. Despite massive publicity, the case was never solved and was officially closed forty years after he disappeared. Crater's disappearance fueled public disquiet about New York City corruption and was a factor in the downfall of the Tammany Hall political machine. Let us know what you think happened to Judge Crater. Follow Us on Social MediaTwitter: http://www.twitter.com/truecrimensIG: https://www.instagram.com/truecrimeneversleepspodcastFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/truecrimeneversleepspodcastSupport The Show by Buying Us a Coffee:https://www.buymeacoffee.com/tcns

The John Batchelor Show
1501: 1/2 Eric Adams aims to be the big, prosperous, practical-ideas mayor. @Siegel, Harry, @HarrySiegel @NYDailyNews

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 13:40


Photo: "New York's new solar system": Tammany Hall revolves around Boss Croker in this 1899 cartoon in Puck. 1/2  Eric Adams aims to be the big, prosperous, practical-ideas mayor. @Siegel, Harry, @HarrySiegel @NYDailyNews    https://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/ny-oped-eric-steal-these-ideas-20210710-klmpvwkconfrrba53j226hcrn4-story.html?utm_source=siegeltown&utm_medium=email  

American Ground Radio
ARG 6-24-2021 Full Show

American Ground Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2021 39:07


It is becoming increasingly obvious that our education system across the country is doing a very poor job of teaching our children the knowledge required for Americans to collectively maintain our independence and our systems of American society. In fact, it has done such a poor job for so long, most adults do not have a good, functional understanding of our system of government under our US Constitution. They do not know America's basic history, not even basic general concepts and definitely not in the context of time or centuries. This lack of critical knowledge makes it very hard to find good leaders for our elected offices. As our third President, Thomas Jefferson, said, “If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be.”Have you noticed as soon as Democrats get something they have been demanding to have for a long time, they suddenly move on to something else to gripe about that is making them very unhappy? They act like spoiled, self-centered children who never learned how to share or to compromise. Well, they wanted Juneteenth to become a National holiday, and as soon as they got it, they started griping about people with white skin getting that Federal Holiday, too. That definitely is a self-centered, racist attitude, and it won't help anyone get along……but do they want to?Our American Mamas, Teri Netterville and Denise Arthur, discuss the conflict between the reality of who George Floyd was and how he has been promoted by the media and the socialist Democrats. They warn parents to teach their children how to avoid the mistakes Floyd made. But an unanswered question remains why are they expecting everyone to be impressed with a statue of George Floyd when they have been so hateful about other statutes around the Nation, including George Washington,Christopher Columbus, Thomas Jefferson, the 9-11 Firefighters, Jesus, and the Virgin Mary.No one ever called the politics of New York State “honest and ethical” — not now and not throughout most of American history. [The Tammany Hall society, founded in 1786, “became the main local political machine of the Democratic Party” until the mid-1960's — which is just about all of American history, when you look at it closely. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tammany_Hall ] And while it may now have a different name, it is still engaging in using political power to attack those who oppose its ruthless control. This time, and apparently without appropriate, legal “due process”, the New York Bar just stripped Rudy Giuliani of his New York State Law License — because he represents Donald Trump. Time will tell if Giuliani can get that overturned through the courts.Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY) represents parts of Brooklyn and Queens in New York City, and is the 4th most powerful Democrat in the US House of Representatives. He declared the Democrats to be a collection of honest, hard-working people trying to investigate the January 6 Capitol Building incident, and attacked the Republicans as being part of a “full-blown cult” with unquestionable allegiance to Donald Trump! He went on to say, “They have chosen to place Party over patriotism. They have chosen the big lie over the rule of law. They've chosen autocracy over democracy.” [REMEMBER: The Democrat Party is the party of projection — so turn it around and reverse the words “Democrat” and “Republican” and you will have something closer to the truth.]Being committed to being the Nation's “Green Energy Leader” and thus no longer allowing gasoline or diesel vehicles into the state after 2035, California has just admitted it cannot supply enough electricity to meet the state's current needs right now! A DO NOT CHARGE YOUR ELECTRIC VEHICLES order just went into effect!California does some really weird stuff, even when it isn't fair to its residents, this one because of Cesar Chavez! For over 45 years and in honoring had forced agriculture land owners to allow labor unions to come onto their property for up to three hours a day, 120 days per year, to try to organize their temporary, migrant workers without any financial compensation paid to the land owners. In a 6-3 decision, the Supreme Court ruled this was a violation of the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments, and thus prohibited. Justice Roberts referred to this as the “Takings Clause” of the 5th Amendment, and he further stated property owners have an inherent “right to exclude” as a fundamental aspect of American property rights which cannot be taken away by any government.

Chosen by Committee
Episode 39- Fiorello (1960)

Chosen by Committee

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2021 43:54


After a long hiatus, the boys are back with everyone's favorite Tammany Hall musical, Fiorello.

Contra Radio Network
The Dave Kershner Lightning Round Ep. 15

Contra Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2021 58:44


In Episode 15, Dave hits the ground running with the second installment of his new segment "The Biden Jackassery Minute." There's plenty of fodder to choose from this week but he zeroes in on the following: Biden's moron of a nominee for the ATF who can't define what an assault rifle is but he knows he wants to ban it, the anti 2A narrative being fulfilled in San Jose, barring GOP Congressional members from the El Paso migrant facility, Comrade Kamala is still MIA, shutting down the investigation into the factual coronavirus origins even though researchers were hospitalized prior to the world knowing about the virus, the wo"man" behind the curtain, judges finally ruling and allowing voter audits in GA and the results of on-going investigations (AZ) - minus the routers of course, U-Haul prices, and he concludes the segment by connecting the dots between all of the Dem tactics applied during the Trump presidency that culminated with the greatest political theft of all time. Tammany Hall tactics have nothing on what the Dems pulled off in 2020. After that, he checks his stocks and then heads into his preparedness topic of the week which is long term food storage. He reviews methods for storage (quickly), suppliers, pricing, and making sure that the number of servings aligns with basic math. Give it a listen! You can also follow along with Dave's antics and thoughts, read his research papers, review his recommended books and websites, and more at his website at www.davidjkershner.com. Pick up a copy of his "Preparing to Prepare" non-fiction book and read all of the details he's provided for a large number of the topics his covered these last fifteen weeks --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/contra-radio-network/support

Contra Radio Network
The Dave Kershner Lightning Round Ep. 15

Contra Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2021 57:44


In Episode 15, Dave hits the ground running with the second installment of his new segment "The Biden Jackassery Minute." There's plenty of fodder to choose from this week but he zeroes in on the following: Biden's moron of a nominee for the ATF who can't define what an assault rifle is but he knows he wants to ban it, the anti 2A narrative being fulfilled in San Jose, barring GOP Congressional members from the El Paso migrant facility, Comrade Kamala is still MIA, shutting down the investigation into the factual coronavirus origins even though researchers were hospitalized prior to the world knowing about the virus, the wo"man" behind the curtain, judges finally ruling and allowing voter audits in GA and the results of on-going investigations (AZ) - minus the routers of course, U-Haul prices, and he concludes the segment by connecting the dots between all of the Dem tactics applied during the Trump presidency that culminated with the greatest political theft of all time. Tammany Hall tactics have nothing on what the Dems pulled off in 2020. After that, he checks his stocks and then heads into his preparedness topic of the week which is long term food storage. He reviews methods for storage (quickly), suppliers, pricing, and making sure that the number of servings aligns with basic math. Give it a listen! You can also follow along with Dave’s antics and thoughts, read his research papers, review his recommended books and websites, and more at his website at www.davidjkershner.com. Pick up a copy of his "Preparing to Prepare" non-fiction book and read all of the details he's provided for a large number of the topics his covered these last fifteen weeks

Smarty Pants
#180: Two Parts Gin, One Part Sin

Smarty Pants

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2021 27:22


The first Gilded Age was a time of rampant corruption, the big business crooks of Tammany Hall, and lavish displays of wealth rivaled by abject poverty. It was also the period when America’s elite mastered the art of crafting the perfect cocktail. Though there were a few missteps along the way—including the Black Velvet, which included equal parts champagne and, disturbingly, porter—the era birthed the classic cocktails that we drink to this day. But what parties, what people, were around for the debut of the Manhattan? Or the martini, the daiquiri, the pisco sour? Cecelia Tichi, professor of American literature and culture at Vanderbilt University, tells all in her new book, The Gilded Age of Cocktails.Go beyond the episode:Cecelia Tichi’s The Gilded Age of CocktailsTichi mentioned a few other keepers of bartending history: David Wondrich, who wrote Imbibe!; and our own Wayne Curtis, who wrote And a Bottle of Rum and Neutral Ground, a long-running column on our website about all things New Orleans (including alcohol)For a reminder on how to partake with class, Michael Fontaine graced the podcast last year to talk about his book How to DrinkHere’s a great article on how to rustle up vintage cocktail books, like Jerry Thomas’s 1862 classic, The Bar-Tender’s GuideA few more how-to manuals to grace your bar: Mittie Helmich’s The Ultimate Bar Book, Gary Regan’s The Joy of Mixology, Amy Stewart’s The Drunken Botanist, David Embury’s The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks (which pairs well with Wayne Curtis’s great essay on reconciling Embury’s legacy with his bigotry)Tune in every week to catch interviews with the liveliest voices from literature, the arts, sciences, history, and public affairs; reports on cutting-edge works in progress; long-form narratives; and compelling excerpts from new books. Hosted by Stephanie Bastek. Follow us on Twitter @TheAmScho or on

Smarty Pants
#180: Two Parts Gin, One Part Sin

Smarty Pants

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2021 27:22


The first Gilded Age was a time of rampant corruption, the big business crooks of Tammany Hall, and lavish displays of wealth rivaled by abject poverty. It was also the period when America’s elite mastered the art of crafting the perfect cocktail. Though there were a few missteps along the way—including the Black Velvet, which included equal parts champagne and, disturbingly, porter—the era birthed the classic cocktails that we drink to this day. But what parties, what people, were around for the debut of the Manhattan? Or the martini, the daiquiri, the pisco sour? Cecelia Tichi, professor of American literature and culture at Vanderbilt University, tells all in her new book, The Gilded Age of Cocktails.Go beyond the episode:Cecelia Tichi’s The Gilded Age of CocktailsTichi mentioned a few other keepers of bartending history: David Wondrich, who wrote Imbibe!; and our own Wayne Curtis, who wrote And a Bottle of Rum and Neutral Ground, a long-running column on our website about all things New Orleans (including alcohol)For a reminder on how to partake with class, Michael Fontaine graced the podcast last year to talk about his book How to DrinkHere’s a great article on how to rustle up vintage cocktail books, like Jerry Thomas’s 1862 classic, The Bar-Tender’s GuideA few more how-to manuals to grace your bar: Mittie Helmich’s The Ultimate Bar Book, Gary Regan’s The Joy of Mixology, Amy Stewart’s The Drunken Botanist, David Embury’s The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks (which pairs well with Wayne Curtis’s great essay on reconciling Embury’s legacy with his bigotry)Tune in every week to catch interviews with the liveliest voices from literature, the arts, sciences, history, and public affairs; reports on cutting-edge works in progress; long-form narratives; and compelling excerpts from new books. Hosted by Stephanie Bastek. Follow us on Twitter @TheAmScho or on

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2592 - How New York Helped Keep the Slave Trade Thriving Before the Civil War w/ Jonathan Daniel Wells

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2021 60:41


Emma hosts today’s Majority Report, featuring an interview Sam recorded with Jonathan Daniel Wells, University of Michigan Professor of History, on his latest book “The Kidnapping Club: Wall Street, Slavery, and Resistance on the Eve of the Civil War.” They explore slavery's deep ties to the financial centers of the North, NYC in particular, even after slavery laws began to change. Centering on the southern ties of Wall Street and Tammany Hall, Jonathan and Sam talk about the horrors of the Kidnapping Club, a collection of NY Police, Judges, Slave Catchers and US Marshals who trafficked free Black folk from the North into Southern captivity regardless of fugitive status, and how Black abolitionists such as David Ruggles fought and organized to push back against their reign of terror. Next, Emma reviews Tim Ryan’s passionate performance on the floor, and how he found a way to be stunned by Republicans’ refusal to engage in bipartisanship over January 6th and climate change and looks into Ted Cruz’s claim that Biden is sabotaging Netanyahu’s apartheid regime by… selling them $700 million in arms. And in the Fun Half: Dave from Jamaica calls in to chat about the success of right-wing Israeli propaganda before Fox’s Katie Pavlich and Dan Bongino give us some perfect examples of what he was talking about, forcing Geraldo Rivera of all people into the anti-War Crime camp. Emma and Matt dig into the tired “human shield” excuse for Israeli slaughter, and how refusing Palestinians any chance of self-governance or freedom has engendered Hamas's control of the region. Then, Andrew Giuliani fudges his political resume, citing the first decade of his life as central to his time spent in politics, and the Cuomos show off their own take on NY political dynasties, plus, your calls and IMs! Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ (Merch issues and concerns can be addressed here: majorityreportstore@mirrorimage.com) The AM Quickie is now on YouTube Subscribe to the AM Quickie at https://fans.fm/amquickie Make the AMQ part of your Alexa Flash Briefing too! You can now watch the livestream on Twitch Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein’s podcast News from Nowhere, at https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel! Check out The Nomiki Show live at 3 pm ET on YouTube at patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Matt’s podcast, Literary Hangover, at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover, or on iTunes. Check out Jamie’s podcast, The Antifada, at patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattLech @BF1nn  

Slate Star Codex Podcast
Your Book Review: Progress And Poverty

Slate Star Codex Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2021 132:12


https://astralcodexten.substack.com/p/your-book-review-progress-and-poverty   [This is the third of many finalists in the book review contest. It’s not by me - it’s by an ACX reader who will remain anonymous until after voting is done, to prevent their identity from influencing your decisions. I’ll be posting about two of these a week for several months. When you’ve read all of them, I’ll ask you to vote for your favorite, so remember which ones you liked. - SA] In 1879, a man asked "How come all this new economic development and industrialized technology hasn't eliminated poverty and oppression?" That man was Henry George, his answer came in the form of a book called Progress & Poverty, and this is a review of that book. Henry George is variously known for leading an early movement that popularized Universal Basic Income, sporting a fancy beard while shouting "The Rent Is Too Damn High!" and inspiring a popular board game that was shamelessly ripped off and repackaged as Monopoly. But he didn't just write a book. He also ran for Mayor of New York city in 1886, beating out some rando Republican named "Theodore Roosevelt," but ultimately losing to the favored candidate of Tammany Hall, who saw George's radical economic ideas as a threat to their well-oiled political machine (Andrew Yang take note). He ran again in 1897 but died just 4 days before the election, prompting a national outpouring of mourning. According to Ralph Gabriel's Course of American Democratic Thought, in New York alone 200,000 people came to see his body lying in repose, half of which had to be turned away. For context, that one crowd was roughly the size of 1% of the entire population of New York at the time. I'm writing this book review for three reasons: George's arguments about land, labor, and capital present a fresh alternative to conventional ideas about "Capitalism" and "Socialism" (and whatever we mean by those on any given day) The book has timeless advice for navigating modern crises such as ever-rising rents, homelessness, and the NIMBY vs. YIMBY wars. This is a golden opportunity to shamelessly over-use the catchy phrase "By George!"

ObscureBall
Take Nothing For Granted

ObscureBall

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2021 60:45


The story of how one base running mistake in September of 1908 led to a bizarre chain of events that changed baseball forever.

Priključenija
36: Beton

Priključenija

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2021 23:57


arhitektura, brutalizam, robert mozes Links:RTS :: U narednih 100 godina proleće počinje 20. marta — "Oprostili smo se sa 21. martom 2011. godine, pre toga je bio duži period u kome su se 20. i 21. mart smenjivali, od 2011. pa u narednih bezmalo 100 godina 20. mart će biti za nas ovde dan kada počinje proleće", rekao je Simonović. Аmbasada Republike Srbije u SAD — Adresa 2233 Wisconsin Avenue, NW, Suite 410William Wallace Lincoln - Wikipedia — William Wallace Lincoln (December 21, 1850 – February 20, 1862) was the third son of President Abraham Lincoln and Mary Todd Lincoln. He was named after Mary's brother-in-law Dr. William Wallace.Oak Hill Cemetery (Washington, D.C.) - Wikipedia — Oak Hill Cemetery is a historic 22-acre (8.9 ha) cemetery located in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C., in the United States. It was founded in 1848 and completed in 1853, and is a prime example of a rural cemetery. Many famous politicians, business people, military people, diplomats, and philanthropists are buried at Oak Hill, and the cemetery has a number of Victorian-style memorials and monuments.Dumbarton Oaks - Wikipedia — Dumbarton Oaks is a historic estate in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C. It was the residence and garden of Robert Woods Bliss (1875–1962) and his wife Mildred Barnes Bliss (1879–1969).The Asphalt Jungle (1950) - IMDb — A major heist goes off as planned, but then double crosses, bad luck and solid police work cause everything to unravel.U.S. Route 29 in the District of Columbia - Wikipedia — The elevated section of U.S. Route 29 in D.C. is better known as the Whitehurst Freeway. Called the city's most ridiculed bridge in 1989, there have been several attempts to have the Whitehurst Freeway torn down but cost and other considerations have stopped these proposals from being acted on.The Power Broker - Wikipedia — The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York is a 1974 biography of Robert Moses by Robert Caro. The book focuses on the creation and use of power in local and state politics, as witnessed through Moses' use of unelected positions to design and implement dozens of highways and bridges, sometimes at great cost to the communities he nominally served. It has been repeatedly named one of the best biographies of the 20th century, and has been highly influential on city planners and politicians throughout the United States. The book won a Pulitzer Prize in 1974.Jones Beach State Park — World famous Jones Beach State Park, home of 6.5 miles of beautiful white-sand beach on the Atlantic Ocean, is made up of more than 2,400-acres of maritime environment on the south shore of Long Island.Robert Moses and His Racist Parkway, Explained. - Bloomberg — The story: Robert Moses ordered engineers to build the Southern State Parkway's bridges extra-low, to prevent poor people in buses from using the highway. The truth? It's a little more complex.Tammany Hall - Wikipedia — Tammany Hall, also known as the Society of St. Tammany, the Sons of St. Tammany, or the Columbian Order, was a New York City political organization founded in 1786 and incorporated on May 12, 1789, as the Tammany Society. It became the main local political machine of the Democratic Party, and played a major role in controlling New York City and New York State politics and helping immigrants, most notably the Irish, rise in American politics from the 1790s to the 1960s.Intelsat headquarters - Wikipedia — 3400 International Drive (also known as Intelsat Headquarters) is an office complex in the North Cleveland Park neighborhood of Washington, D.C. by the Van Ness metro station designed by the Australian architect John Andrews[5] and built by Gilbane Building Company. Formerly used as the U.S. headquarters of the International Telecommunications Satellite Organization (Intelsat), it is known for its futuristic, high-tech architecture.Yugoslavia's “Space Age” Monuments Revisited – Balkanist — Photos of “Yugoslav space age monuments” have been all over the internet in recent years, entirely decontextualized from both their original and evolving meanings. Susanna Bitters takes a closer look. Links:RTS :: U narednih 100 godina proleće počinje 20. marta — "Oprostili smo se sa 21. martom 2011. godine, pre toga je bio duži period u kome su se 20. i 21. mart smenjivali, od 2011. pa u narednih bezmalo 100 godina 20. mart će biti za nas ovde dan kada počinje proleće", rekao je Simonović. Аmbasada Republike Srbije u SAD — Adresa 2233 Wisconsin Avenue, NW, Suite 410William Wallace Lincoln - Wikipedia — William Wallace Lincoln (December 21, 1850 – February 20, 1862) was the third son of President Abraham Lincoln and Mary Todd Lincoln. He was named after Mary's brother-in-law Dr. William Wallace.Oak Hill Cemetery (Washington, D.C.) - Wikipedia — Oak Hill Cemetery is a historic 22-acre (8.9 ha) cemetery located in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C., in the United States. It was founded in 1848 and completed in 1853, and is a prime example of a rural cemetery. Many famous politicians, business people, military people, diplomats, and philanthropists are buried at Oak Hill, and the cemetery has a number of Victorian-style memorials and monuments.Dumbarton Oaks - Wikipedia — Dumbarton Oaks is a historic estate in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C. It was the residence and garden of Robert Woods Bliss (1875–1962) and his wife Mildred Barnes Bliss (1879–1969).The Asphalt Jungle (1950) - IMDb — A major heist goes off as planned, but then double crosses, bad luck and solid police work cause everything to unravel.U.S. Route 29 in the District of Columbia - Wikipedia — The elevated section of U.S. Route 29 in D.C. is better known as the Whitehurst Freeway. Called the city's most ridiculed bridge in 1989, there have been several attempts to have the Whitehurst Freeway torn down but cost and other considerations have stopped these proposals from being acted on.The Power Broker - Wikipedia — The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York is a 1974 biography of Robert Moses by Robert Caro. The book focuses on the creation and use of power in local and state politics, as witnessed through Moses' use of unelected positions to design and implement dozens of highways and bridges, sometimes at great cost to the communities he nominally served. It has been repeatedly named one of the best biographies of the 20th century, and has been highly influential on city planners and politicians throughout the United States. The book won a Pulitzer Prize in 1974.Jones Beach State Park — World famous Jones Beach State Park, home of 6.5 miles of beautiful white-sand beach on the Atlantic Ocean, is made up of more than 2,400-acres of maritime environment on the south shore of Long Island.Robert Moses and His Racist Parkway, Explained. - Bloomberg — The story: Robert Moses ordered engineers to build the Southern State Parkway's bridges extra-low, to prevent poor people in buses from using the highway. The truth? It's a little more complex.Tammany Hall - Wikipedia — Tammany Hall, also known as the Society of St. Tammany, the Sons of St. Tammany, or the Columbian Order, was a New York City political organization founded in 1786 and incorporated on May 12, 1789, as the Tammany Society. It became the main local political machine of the Democratic Party, and played a major role in controlling New York City and New York State politics and helping immigrants, most notably the Irish, rise in American politics from the 1790s to the 1960s.Intelsat headquarters - Wikipedia — 3400 International Drive (also known as Intelsat Headquarters) is an office complex in the North Cleveland Park neighborhood of Washington, D.C. by the Van Ness metro station designed by the Australian architect John Andrews[5] and built by Gilbane Building Company. Formerly used as the U.S. headquarters of the International Telecommunications Satellite Organization (Intelsat), it is known for its futuristic, high-tech architecture.

THE HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN MAFIA
THE ERA OF IMMIGRATION IN NEW YORK

THE HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN MAFIA

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2021 8:02


Music by Syon (Thomas Nicosia) Prelude in Em.By 1900, the center of economic development was New York, one of the most prosperous and cosmopolitan cities in the world. Eighty percent of the biggest billing companies in America were based in this metropolis. Everything was happening in those streets, in fact you crossed the capitals from Wall Street with the labor of Italian migrants landed by the transatlantic at Ellis Island.In the island were waiting for a hundred inspectors and health officers inside a huge center for immigration.By 1910, the number of Italians living in New York was nearly half a million, two-thirds of whom were men. They lived in promiscuity and in the almost total absence of hygiene.The neighborhoods in which immigrants went to live were the oldest in the city, occupied by two generations before by the Irish. It was Elizabeth and Mulberry Street.The only advantage over those who worked in Italy was the salary. Decidedly higher in the United States of America. Even if life cost much more Italian immigrants, enduring tremendous deprivations, were able to put something aside and then send it home.Immediate were the clashes with the Irish community already present in New York. The two communities immediately began a real racial conflict.In those years, the Irish controlled the metropolis through Tammany Hall, an Irish political organization. It was clear that social political control was carried out with violence.

New Books Network
Jeffrey D. Broxmeyer, "Electoral Capitalism: The Party System in New York's Gilded Age" (U Pennsylvania Press, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2021 54:22


Jeff Broxmeyer has written a fascinating and insightful book about the party system in New York during the Gilded Age, but this is really only the foundation of the analysis. Electoral Capitalism: The Party System in New York's Gilded Age (U Pennsylvania Press, 2020) unwraps the many layers that contribute to our understanding of the party system not only in New York during this period after the Civil War, but throughout much of American politics during this time. As Broxmeyer notes throughout the book, this concept of electoral capitalism organized the party system in Gilded Age New York—and helps us think about how struggles over unequal wealth, or wealth gaps, shape democracy in America and the evolution of the party system in the U.S. Electoral Capitalism essentially examines these ideas from the top down and from the bottom up, spending the first half of the book examining the different political machines that became the power and wealth brokers in New York (William “Boss” Tweed and Tammany Hall, and Roscoe Conkling and the Stalwart machine), and the second half of the book exploring the “spoilsmen” and the individuals who were desperate for these very precarious positions that would possibly help them through a difficult economic situation or keep them from losing their homes. Broxmeyer focuses particular attention on the interweaving of wealth and power that came together in politics during this time, and that it is quite difficult, if not impossible, to disentangle wealth and power from each other and from politics during the Gilded Age. Electoral Capitalism braids together historical and cultural contexts to better understand American political parties and their development, the evolution of democracy in the United States, and the role of money and politics. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Economics
Jeffrey D. Broxmeyer, "Electoral Capitalism: The Party System in New York's Gilded Age" (U Pennsylvania Press, 2020)

New Books in Economics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2021 54:22


Jeff Broxmeyer has written a fascinating and insightful book about the party system in New York during the Gilded Age, but this is really only the foundation of the analysis. Electoral Capitalism: The Party System in New York's Gilded Age (U Pennsylvania Press, 2020) unwraps the many layers that contribute to our understanding of the party system not only in New York during this period after the Civil War, but throughout much of American politics during this time. As Broxmeyer notes throughout the book, this concept of electoral capitalism organized the party system in Gilded Age New York—and helps us think about how struggles over unequal wealth, or wealth gaps, shape democracy in America and the evolution of the party system in the U.S. Electoral Capitalism essentially examines these ideas from the top down and from the bottom up, spending the first half of the book examining the different political machines that became the power and wealth brokers in New York (William “Boss” Tweed and Tammany Hall, and Roscoe Conkling and the Stalwart machine), and the second half of the book exploring the “spoilsmen” and the individuals who were desperate for these very precarious positions that would possibly help them through a difficult economic situation or keep them from losing their homes. Broxmeyer focuses particular attention on the interweaving of wealth and power that came together in politics during this time, and that it is quite difficult, if not impossible, to disentangle wealth and power from each other and from politics during the Gilded Age. Electoral Capitalism braids together historical and cultural contexts to better understand American political parties and their development, the evolution of democracy in the United States, and the role of money and politics. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm

New Books in History
Jeffrey D. Broxmeyer, "Electoral Capitalism: The Party System in New York's Gilded Age" (U Pennsylvania Press, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2021 54:22


Jeff Broxmeyer has written a fascinating and insightful book about the party system in New York during the Gilded Age, but this is really only the foundation of the analysis. Electoral Capitalism: The Party System in New York's Gilded Age (U Pennsylvania Press, 2020) unwraps the many layers that contribute to our understanding of the party system not only in New York during this period after the Civil War, but throughout much of American politics during this time. As Broxmeyer notes throughout the book, this concept of electoral capitalism organized the party system in Gilded Age New York—and helps us think about how struggles over unequal wealth, or wealth gaps, shape democracy in America and the evolution of the party system in the U.S. Electoral Capitalism essentially examines these ideas from the top down and from the bottom up, spending the first half of the book examining the different political machines that became the power and wealth brokers in New York (William “Boss” Tweed and Tammany Hall, and Roscoe Conkling and the Stalwart machine), and the second half of the book exploring the “spoilsmen” and the individuals who were desperate for these very precarious positions that would possibly help them through a difficult economic situation or keep them from losing their homes. Broxmeyer focuses particular attention on the interweaving of wealth and power that came together in politics during this time, and that it is quite difficult, if not impossible, to disentangle wealth and power from each other and from politics during the Gilded Age. Electoral Capitalism braids together historical and cultural contexts to better understand American political parties and their development, the evolution of democracy in the United States, and the role of money and politics. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in American Studies
Jeffrey D. Broxmeyer, "Electoral Capitalism: The Party System in New York's Gilded Age" (U Pennsylvania Press, 2020)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2021 54:22


Jeff Broxmeyer has written a fascinating and insightful book about the party system in New York during the Gilded Age, but this is really only the foundation of the analysis. Electoral Capitalism: The Party System in New York's Gilded Age (U Pennsylvania Press, 2020) unwraps the many layers that contribute to our understanding of the party system not only in New York during this period after the Civil War, but throughout much of American politics during this time. As Broxmeyer notes throughout the book, this concept of electoral capitalism organized the party system in Gilded Age New York—and helps us think about how struggles over unequal wealth, or wealth gaps, shape democracy in America and the evolution of the party system in the U.S. Electoral Capitalism essentially examines these ideas from the top down and from the bottom up, spending the first half of the book examining the different political machines that became the power and wealth brokers in New York (William “Boss” Tweed and Tammany Hall, and Roscoe Conkling and the Stalwart machine), and the second half of the book exploring the “spoilsmen” and the individuals who were desperate for these very precarious positions that would possibly help them through a difficult economic situation or keep them from losing their homes. Broxmeyer focuses particular attention on the interweaving of wealth and power that came together in politics during this time, and that it is quite difficult, if not impossible, to disentangle wealth and power from each other and from politics during the Gilded Age. Electoral Capitalism braids together historical and cultural contexts to better understand American political parties and their development, the evolution of democracy in the United States, and the role of money and politics. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Political Science
Jeffrey D. Broxmeyer, "Electoral Capitalism: The Party System in New York's Gilded Age" (U Pennsylvania Press, 2020)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2021 54:22


Jeff Broxmeyer has written a fascinating and insightful book about the party system in New York during the Gilded Age, but this is really only the foundation of the analysis. Electoral Capitalism: The Party System in New York's Gilded Age (U Pennsylvania Press, 2020) unwraps the many layers that contribute to our understanding of the party system not only in New York during this period after the Civil War, but throughout much of American politics during this time. As Broxmeyer notes throughout the book, this concept of electoral capitalism organized the party system in Gilded Age New York—and helps us think about how struggles over unequal wealth, or wealth gaps, shape democracy in America and the evolution of the party system in the U.S. Electoral Capitalism essentially examines these ideas from the top down and from the bottom up, spending the first half of the book examining the different political machines that became the power and wealth brokers in New York (William “Boss” Tweed and Tammany Hall, and Roscoe Conkling and the Stalwart machine), and the second half of the book exploring the “spoilsmen” and the individuals who were desperate for these very precarious positions that would possibly help them through a difficult economic situation or keep them from losing their homes. Broxmeyer focuses particular attention on the interweaving of wealth and power that came together in politics during this time, and that it is quite difficult, if not impossible, to disentangle wealth and power from each other and from politics during the Gilded Age. Electoral Capitalism braids together historical and cultural contexts to better understand American political parties and their development, the evolution of democracy in the United States, and the role of money and politics. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm