Podcasts about singaporean

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Latest podcast episodes about singaporean

Fareed Zakaria GPS
Western tanks for Ukraine; Iranian protest update; Israeli democracy in danger?

Fareed Zakaria GPS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 29, 2023 39:26


How will the West's decision to send tanks to Ukraine impact the war and what can we learn from India and China's reaction to the war?  Fareed talks about that and more with New America CEO Anne-Marie Slaughter, former Swedish Prime Minister Carl Bildt and former Singaporean diplomat Kishore Mahbubani. Then, John Hopkins professor Vali Nasr updates Fareed on the protest movement in Iran and how the government is dealing with ongoing internal discontent. Plus, Israeli political analyst Dahlia Scheindlin tells Fareed why the new Israeli government's proposed judicial reform laws are a threat to checks and balances in the only liberal democracy in the Middle East.GUESTS: Anne-Marie Slaughter (@SlaughterAM) , Carl Bildt (@carlbildt), Kishore Mahbubani (@mahbubani_k), Vali Nasr (@vali_nasr), Dahlia Scheindlin (@dahliasc) Air Date: 29/01/2023To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Go Fact Yourself
Ep. 119: Mike Doughty & Ting Lim

Go Fact Yourself

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 69:16


You're on deep background for a brand new episode of Go Fact Yourself!Mike Doughty is a singer-songwriter who's written music as a solo artist and with the band “Ghost of Vroom.” He finds it easier to start songs than to finish them; so as an incentive to do better, he promised one new song a week for fans who support him on Patreon. He'll tell us about that and why he would like exactly $35 for his work (sort of) appearing on “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt.”Ting Lim is a Singaporean comedian based in Brisbane, Australia. She's fallen in love with the area because of the landscape and the generosity of her Australian audiences. The kindness that she's found in her new home is a far cry from her experience in Singapore; she'll tell us about how she got in trouble with the justice system for the crime of littering.Our guests will answer trivia about freedom of the press and freedom of the whales.Appearing in this episode:J. Keith van StraatenHelen HongMike DoughtyTing LimWith Guest ExpertsJason James Richter, actor whose work includes starring in films in the Free Willy franchise.Dr. Malena Simon, senior scientist at the Greenland Climate Research CentreBob Woodward, associate editor of the Washington Post who reported on the Watergate scandal with Carl Bernstein.Go Fact Yourself was devised and is produced by Jim Newman and J. Keith van Straaten, in collaboration with Maximum Fun. Theme Song by Jonathan Green.Live show engineer is Dave McKeever.Maximum Fun's Senior Producer is Laura Swisher.Associate Producer and Editor is Julian Burrell.Seeing our upcoming live shows in LAby YOU!

The Bizarre Files
The Bizarre Files #1370

The Bizarre Files

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 14:40


A group of drunk YouTubers' upset Singaporean locals after they snuck into a safari park... Man accused of smuggling cocaine into Australia in Kinder Egg capsules… English family shocked to find two-legged fox in their garden… & more.

flavors unknown podcast
Tasting the Future: How to Add Heat and Flavor with Sambal

flavors unknown podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 6:32


Sambal is a spicy condiment or sauce that has gained popularity in the United States in recent years, thanks to its versatility and bold flavor. Originally from Southeast Asia, sambal sauce is made with chili peppers, shallots, garlic, and salt, and may also include other ingredients such as vinegar, sugar, and shrimp paste. It is commonly used in Indonesian, Malaysian, and Singaporean cuisine, but has also found its way into the menus of many non-Asian restaurants and bars in the United States. It is a great addition to many different types of dishes, including grilled meats, fried rice and noodles, steamed or stir-fried vegetables, sandwiches, burgers, soups, stews, grilled cheese sandwiches, roasted or baked potatoes, tofu, tempeh, and avocado toast. I'd like to share a potential educational resource, "Conversations Behind the Kitchen Door", my new book that features dialogues with accomplished culinary leaders from various backgrounds and cultures. It delves into the future of culinary creativity and the hospitality industry, drawing from insights of a restaurant-industry-focused podcast, ‘flavors unknown”. It includes perspectives from renowned chefs and local professionals, making it a valuable resource for those interested in building a career in the culinary industry.Get the book here! The taste of the Sambal sauce In terms of flavor, sambal is generally quite spicy, thanks to the chili peppers that are used in its production. The heat level can vary depending on the specific type of chili peppers used and the amount of sambal that is added to a dish. In addition to the heat, sambal also has a bold, complex flavor that is a result of the combination of ingredients used in its production. The shallots and garlic provide a mild sweetness and a hint of pungency, while the vinegar and sugar add a touch of acidity and sweetness to balance out the heat of the chili peppers. The shrimp paste, if included, adds an additional layer of savory, umami flavor to the sauce. Overall, sambal is a flavorful and spicy condiment that adds a lot of character to the dishes it is used in. Sambal recipe Here is a recipe for making sambal at home (recipe created by A.I.)Ingredients:1 cup chili peppers, seeds removed (you can use bird's eye chili peppers, jalapeno peppers, serrano peppers, or a combination)1/2 cup shallots, peeled and roughly chopped4 cloves garlic, peeled and roughly chopped1 teaspoon salt2 tablespoons vinegar (you can use white vinegar, rice vinegar, or apple cider vinegar)2 tablespoons sugar (you can use white sugar, brown sugar, or palm sugar)2 tablespoons shrimp paste (optional)Instructions:In a blender or food processor, combine the chili peppers, shallots, garlic, and salt. Pulse until the mixture is finely chopped.Transfer the mixture to a small saucepan and add the vinegar, sugar, and shrimp paste (if using). Bring the mixture to a boil over medium heat, stirring frequently.Reduce the heat to low and simmer for 5-10 minutes, or until the mixture has thickened slightly.Remove the saucepan from the heat and let the sambal cool to room temperature. Transfer the sambal to a clean jar or container and store in the refrigerator until ready to use.This recipe makes about 1 cup of sambal, and it will keep in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks. You can adjust the heat level by using different types of chili peppers or adjusting the amount of chili peppers used. You can also adjust the flavor by using different types of vinegar or sugar. Enjoy! Nasi Goreng recipe featuring Sambal sauce One savory dish that uses sambal as an ingredient is Nasi Goreng, a popular Indonesian fried rice dish. To make Nasi Goreng, you will need the following ingredients:2 cups cooked rice1 tablespoon vegetable oil2 cloves garlic, minced1 small onion, diced1 cup diced chicken, beef, or shrimp2 tablespoons sambal2 tablespoons soy sauce1/2 cup frozen peas and carrots2 green onions,

ONE FM 91.3's Glenn and The Flying Dutchman
What is Singaporean's FAVOURITE Word To Use?

ONE FM 91.3's Glenn and The Flying Dutchman

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 78:17


On The BIG Show today, we discussed what would be Singaporean's favorite word to use, we did a poll to find out if we preferred Potato or Sardine for our curry puffs and reminisced when was the last time we shined our shoes! Tune in to The BIG Show weekdays from 6am - 10am, for your daily dose of unadulterated fun and wit, on ONE FM 91.3! Connect with us on Instagram: @onefm913 @Glennn @angeliqueteo @thefdsg  @shaun_tupaz Don't forget to support our other podcast - Angel's - "The Land Before Bed Time"See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Follow The Brand Podcast
Season 7 Episode 1: Building Brand Trust with Dr. Jerome Joseph The Chief Experience Officer

Follow The Brand Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 56:01


Ranked #2 in the World! Authored over 8 Books! Over 25 years of experience! Worked with over 1000 brands in 36 countries! My next guest Dr. Jerome Joseph has the winning formula to help you with your personal brand!Jerome Joseph, CSP s' experience as CEO a publicly listed Brand Agency, has led him to work with some of the biggest Global Brands. including Dell, Standard Chartered, Pfizer, BASF, and many more). He is an award-winning global speaker on Branding and in 2018, was recognized as one of the TOP 30 GLOBAL GURUS worldwide for Branding. He is the only Asian based in Asia on the list. He was ranked No. 2 as a Global Brand Thought Leader in 2020Dr. Joseph talks about creating strategic communications with certainty to drive the customer experience. He builds his brand message on four key pillars of Clarity, Credibility, Consistency, and Connection!   He has a clear focus on storytelling that ties in key points to involve his audience with high emotion to build brand trust.Dr. Jerome Joseph is a brand experience strategist, brand coach, and best-selling author. His experience with world-acclaimed brands has led him to become one of the early pioneers of internal branding – an employee and company culture-focused approach to branding as well as driving brand across people, customers, and organizations. With more than twenty years of branding experience under his belt, Jerome is a master in innovative brand differentiation and creating extraordinary branded experiences. Jerome runs programs and keynotes ranging from Internal Branding (Building Brand Champions in your organization), Brand Mastery (Strategies to Build a World Class Brand), Branded Customer Experience, Personal Branding, and Asian Brand Strategies based on Lessons from the top 30 Asian Brands.Dr. Jerome has impacted more than 1000 brands in over 36 countries, such as Pfizer, Dell, BASF, SENAAT, Prudential, AIA, Singapore Sports Council, QIAGEN, SAP, Asia Pacific Breweries, Singtel, Master Builder Solutions, Petronas, Honeywell, DBS and many more.His cutting-edge thinking, solid case studies, and systematic approach to brand building have enthralled audiences all around the world, making each of his programs a truly memorable one. His love for story-telling and talent for distilling experiences into succinct, bite-sized lessons has garnered rave reviews from clients.Dr. Jerome holds the Certified Speaking Professional (CSP) designation, which is held by the top 12% of speakers in the world as an award for speaking expertise. He was awarded the prestigious Global Speaking Fellow in 2015 as the 2nd Singaporean to earn this award and the 30th speaker in the world to achieve this. Currently, less than 1% of speakers globally hold this designation. He also holds the Practicing Management Consultant (PMC) designation awarded to experienced industry veterans in consulting.Let us Welcome Dr. Jerome Joseph to the Follow The Brand Podcast, Where we are Building a 5 STAR Brand That You Can Follow!

Your Money & Career
S1E13: Reflecting at being happier in life and at work this year: Work Talk

Your Money & Career

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 13:07


Synopsis: Every first and third Monday of the month, get our tips on working smarter, getting ahead in your career and investing like a pro with ST's business correspondents and editors. Host Krist Boo discusses happiness at work in this episode of Work Talk, a podcast to help you work smarter, think deeper and get ahead in your work life. In the workplace, 80 per cent of workers say "yes" when asked if they enjoy their work, says Gallup chief executive, Mr Jon Clifton. But ask about their relationships with co-workers and their boss, and they start getting miserable. Can managers do anything that will make our lives less unhappy in 2023?  After a motorbike accident in Cambodia eight years ago, Mr Jason Lim spent 40 days in a coma. He was 24. The doctor had his death certificate prepared. How would an experience like this change your view of happiness?     His colleague at SGTech - marketing manager Ms Low Rui Yin - says she's always harried, annoyed, and wanting to be better, quicker, perfect. But this year, maybe the status quo is enough.  Join Krist Boo's conversation with Mr Lim, Ms Low and Mr Clifton. After all, it is tradition to start each year by throwing everything we can at happiness, just to raise the odds of being happy for the rest of the year, isn't it? Here's to a happy New Year for you. Highlights (click/tap above): 0:06 The accident  1:39 The kancheong, or harried and excitable, Singaporean  2:23 Singapore, the emotionless society 8:53 The premature death certificate  10:30 Happiness and sadness Read more: https://str.sg/wyhe Produced by: Krist Boo (kristb@sph.com.sg), Ernest Luis, Teo Tong Kai Edited by: Teo Tong Kai Follow ST's new Your Money & Career Podcast channel here: Channel: https://str.sg/wB2m Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/wuN3 Spotify: https://str.sg/wBr9 Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/wVpX SPH Awedio app: https://www.awedio.sg/ Read Krist Boo's Column: https://str.sg/wB2P Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts Feedback to: podcast@sph.com.sg  --- Discover ST's special edition podcasts: The Unsolved Mysteries of South-east Asia: https://str.sg/wuZ2 Stop Scams: https://str.sg/wuZB Singapore's War On Covid: https://str.sg/wuJa Invisible Asia: https://str.sg/wuZn --- Discover more ST podcast series: Asian Insider: https://str.sg/JWa7 Green Pulse: https://str.sg/JWaf Health Check: https://str.sg/JWaN In Your Opinion: https://str.sg/w7Qt #PopVultures: https://str.sg/JWad ST Sports Talk: https://str.sg/JWRE Bookmark This!: https://str.sg/JWas Lunch With Sumiko: https://str.sg/J6hQ Discover ST Podcasts: http://str.sg/stpodcasts Discover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPL Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts! #moneycareerSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Straits Times Audio Features
S1E13: Reflecting at being happier in life and at work this year: Work Talk

The Straits Times Audio Features

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 13:07


Synopsis: Every first and third Monday of the month, get our tips on working smarter, getting ahead in your career and investing like a pro with ST's business correspondents and editors. Host Krist Boo discusses happiness at work in this episode of Work Talk, a podcast to help you work smarter, think deeper and get ahead in your work life. In the workplace, 80 per cent of workers say "yes" when asked if they enjoy their work, says Gallup chief executive, Mr Jon Clifton. But ask about their relationships with co-workers and their boss, and they start getting miserable. Can managers do anything that will make our lives less unhappy in 2023?  After a motorbike accident in Cambodia eight years ago, Mr Jason Lim spent 40 days in a coma. He was 24. The doctor had his death certificate prepared. How would an experience like this change your view of happiness?     His colleague at SGTech - marketing manager Ms Low Rui Yin - says she's always harried, annoyed, and wanting to be better, quicker, perfect. But this year, maybe the status quo is enough.  Join Krist Boo's conversation with Mr Lim, Ms Low and Mr Clifton. After all, it is tradition to start each year by throwing everything we can at happiness, just to raise the odds of being happy for the rest of the year, isn't it? Here's to a happy New Year for you. Highlights (click/tap above): 0:06 The accident  1:39 The kancheong, or harried and excitable, Singaporean  2:23 Singapore, the emotionless society 8:53 The premature death certificate  10:30 Happiness and sadness Read more: https://str.sg/wyhe Produced by: Krist Boo (kristb@sph.com.sg), Ernest Luis, Teo Tong Kai Edited by: Teo Tong Kai Follow ST's new Your Money & Career Podcast channel here: Channel: https://str.sg/wB2m Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/wuN3 Spotify: https://str.sg/wBr9 SPH Awedio app: https://www.awedio.sg/ Read Krist Boo's Column: https://str.sg/wB2P Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts Feedback to: podcast@sph.com.sg  --- Discover ST's special edition podcasts: The Unsolved Mysteries of South-east Asia: https://str.sg/wuZ2 Stop Scams: https://str.sg/wuZB Singapore's War On Covid: https://str.sg/wuJa Invisible Asia: https://str.sg/wuZn --- Discover more ST podcast series: Asian Insider: https://str.sg/JWa7 Green Pulse: https://str.sg/JWaf Health Check: https://str.sg/JWaN In Your Opinion: https://str.sg/w7Qt #PopVultures: https://str.sg/JWad ST Sports Talk: https://str.sg/JWRE Bookmark This!: https://str.sg/JWas Lunch With Sumiko: https://str.sg/J6hQ Discover ST Podcasts: http://str.sg/stpodcasts Discover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPL Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts! #moneycareerSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Fresh Off The Pod
Ep 16: It's Everywhere Among Us: Imposter Syndrome with @yangermeister_

Fresh Off The Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 39:38


“I felt like I was holding on to my breath for a long, long time.” Ever felt like a fraud, wondering “how did I even get here”? Imposter syndrome can also sound like this in your head: Surely, this is all by chance. And, what if I fail? If such thoughts have crossed your mind, you're not alone. In this ep, we chat with Tan Yang Er (@yangermeister_), a multi-disciplinary Singaporean artist. Join us for an honest conversation about her journey navigating art and the creative field, mental wellness and coming out stronger on the other side. TW: Suicide Equipment support: Blackmagic Design, Audio-Technica, City Music - Blackmagic Design Pocket Cinema Camera 4K - Lens: Olympus 12-100mm f/4 Lens - ATR2100xUSB dynamic mic - Zoom PodTrak P4 Fresh Off The Pod is an infotainment podcast from *SCAPE (@scapesg). Join Ebeth (@ebeth.lee) and Shane (@shanesoh) to get up to speed about what's FRESH and what's TRENDING. From current affairs to pop culture and even deeper conversations about life, let's have a sizzling good time. This series is brought to you by *SCAPE, recorded at The Pod Studio, powered by Audio Technica and City Music. Headline of the week: They're well-educated and holding good jobs but feel like a fraud. Psychologists call it ‘imposter syndrome'

MONEY FM 89.3 - The Breakfast Huddle with Elliott Danker, Manisha Tank and Finance Presenter Ryan Huang
Mind Your Business: Singaporean luxury leather label Tocco Toscano's brand revamp

MONEY FM 89.3 - The Breakfast Huddle with Elliott Danker, Manisha Tank and Finance Presenter Ryan Huang

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 13:04


The newly rebranded Singaporean luxury leather label Tocco Toscano, which started as a small leather workshop in Florence in 1987, is now helmed by a second generation entrepreneur.  Joseph Lor, CEO, Tocco Toscano gives us an inside look on the brand's revamp and how it pivoted through the Covid-19 pandemic.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The ROS Developers Podcast
109. ROS Based Cleaning Robots

The ROS Developers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022


I would like to dedicate this episode to the people that are working to create ROS-based robots to do all the most tedious tasks like ironing, cleaning… or refilling the paper at the WC when finished. Today we are going to learn about an amazing Singaporean company that is a leader worldwide in the field […] The post 109. ROS Based Cleaning Robots appeared first on The Construct.

Melting Pot
Journey into the World of Films with Alvin Lee

Melting Pot

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 22:03


In episode 4 of the special Melting Pot limited series, our host Payal talks to Alvin Lee a Singaporean filmmaker who received his Bachelor of Film Directing degree from the most prestigious Beijing Film Academy.Lee's short films have won numerous awards at film festivals. Alvin is also a Media Education Scheme scholar with the Singapore Infocomm Media Development Authority (Film). Stay tuned as we discuss his journey in our next episode.His previous short film, "Bon Voyage," won Best Director and Best Sound at the 6th Singapore Short Film Awards. "Seed" won Best New Director at the 2016 China Short Film Golden Hummingbird Award and Best Actress at the 2017 Short Shorts Film Festival & Asia. "A Time For Us" is his thesis film from Beijing Film Academy which premiered at the 29th Singapore International Film Festival, Southeast Asia Short Film Competition, and won awards at international and local festivals. Alvin also directed the film segments of the 2019 National Day Parade, which feature the inspiring stories of four different characters and how their stories are linked to Singapore's progress. Tune in and catch our host @Payal in conversation with Alvin Lee as he talks about his journey into the film world. Alvin's film is being screened at the 33rd edition of The Singapore International Film Festival.Episodes available on all podcast streaming platforms and on YouTube.Apple Podcasts: https://buff.ly/2Vf8vv8⠀Spotify: https://buff.ly/2Vf8uHA⠀Google Podcasts:https://buff.ly/2Vds6LX⠀-Original music credit: Rish Sharma.His music is available on Spotify, Apple Music, YouTube and other streaming platforms.-October2019 voicesandmore Pte Ltd All rights reserved Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/melting-pot. https://plus.acast.com/s/melting-pot. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

IPS On Diversity Podcast
S3E7: IPS On Diversity Podcast S3E7 Palliative Care for the Young and Old

IPS On Diversity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 55:54


Death has always been a taboo topic in Singapore. With our ageing population rising as well as Health Minister Ong Ye Kung's plans to increase the proportion of people dying at home or in palliative care settings instead of hospitals, is it time we begin talking more openly about our end-of-life plans? In this episode, host and Associate Director at the Institute of Policy Studies Liang Kaixin chats with guests Dr Chong Poh Heng, Medical Director at HCA Hospice Limited and Tay Jia Ying, an end-of-life doula and Founder of Happy Ever After. They discuss the concept of what a good death means, the changes needed to allow more people to spend their final moments at home and when people should begin thinking of their end-of-life plans. Read more about palliative care in Singapore: CNA (2 July 2022): IN FOCUS: Dying at home may seem ideal to many, but it's not always straightforward The Straits Times (2 June 2022): MOH to boost palliative care at home, better support caregivers About our guests: Chong Poh Heng Medical Director HCA Hospice Limited Dr Chong is Vice Chair of Singapore Hospice Council and Medical Director at HCA Hospice Limited. He founded Star PALS (Paediatric Advanced Life Support), a specialist paediatric palliative care service under HCA Hospice in 2012.  He advocates in his field nationally as chairperson of the paediatric and young adults Advanced Care Planning (ACP) task force, and internationally at Asia Pacific Hospice Network (APHN) Paediatric Palliative Care Special Interest Group respectively.   Dr Chong received the Healthcare Humanity Award in 2015, and won the Leader of Good (adult category) at the President's Volunteerism and Philanthropy Award ceremony in 2021. Tay Jia Ying Founder Happy Ever After Jia Ying started her exploration into end-of-life work in 2013 through her involvement as a producer with Both Sides, Now, an arts-based community engagement project on end-of-life issues. After seven years working with the community, she founded Happy Ever After in 2021 to connect directly with individuals to support them and their loved ones in navigating the complexities of life and death, love and loss, hopes and fears, laughter and tears. She is a certified end-of-life doula with The Dying Year, and a certified Respecting Choices 1st Steps Advance Care Planning facilitator. She is also a member of the National End-of-life Doula Alliance (NEDA), and is NEDA proficient. On Diversity is a podcast inspired by the Institute of Policy Studies Managing Diversities research programme. In each episode, we chat with guests to explore what diversity means to them, the changes they are making, and the changes they hope to see in an increasingly fragmented society. More from On Diversity Season 3 Episode 6: Social Worker Burnout with Louis Ng, MP for Nee Soon GRC and Cindy Ng-Tay, Director of Home at Children's Aid Society Season 3 Episode 5: Leaving the Law Profession with Andrew Chan, Partner at Allen & Gledhill LLP and Michelle Yeo, Of Counsel at LVM Law Chambers LLC Season 3 Episode 4: Racism at Work with Dharesheni Nedumaran, Head of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, APAC, at Mediabrands and Shamil Zainuddin, Research Associate at IPS Social Lab Season 3 Episode 3: Ableism at Work with Cassandra Chiu, a vision impaired counsellor and advocate for PWDs, and Justin Lee, Senior Research Fellow at IPS Season 3 Episode 2: Ageism at Work with Heng Chee How, Deputy Secretary-General of the National Trade Union Congress (NTUC), and Associate Professor Helen Ko of the Master & PhD in Gerontology Programmes at the Singapore University of Social Sciences (SUSS) Season 3 Episode 1: Sexism at Work, with Corinna Lim, Executive Director of the Association of Women for Action and Research (AWARE) and Simran Toor, Chief Executive Officer at SG Her Empowerment Limited (SHE)  Season 2 Episode 9: Youth Mental Health, with Dr Jacqueline Tilley, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology at the National Institute of Education (NIE) and Asher Low, Founder of Limitless Season 2 Episode 8: What Makes Us Singaporean, with Matthew Matthews, Principal Research Fellow of IPS and Head of IPS Social Lab, and Oon Shu An, Singaporean actress and host See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Daily Crypto Report
"SBF says he can only speculate about what happened to customer funds" Dec 04, 2022

Daily Crypto Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 6:22


Today's blockchain and cryptocurrency news Bitcoin is up slightly at $16,958 Ethereum is down slightly at $1,257 Binance Coin is up slightly at $290 SBF tells WSJ he can only speculate about what happened to customer funds 3AC liquidators seize $35M from the firm's accounts in Singaporean banks  Galaxy Digital set to acquire GK8 LedgerX is up for sale ByBit will reduce workforce again citing bear market. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Up Next In Commerce
The Asian Snack Brand That is Making Waves in the U.S.

Up Next In Commerce

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 28:03


How do you make a popular Asian product thrive in the U.S. market? Irvin Gunawan, Founder and CEO of Irvins, shares his experience building a snack food brand out of their restaurant in Singapore and later bringing these products to the U.S, introducing Americans to a new snacking sensation. Tune in to hear about the company's backstory and what Irvin learned from this unique expansion.Tune in to learn:Irvin's journey from a Singaporean restaurant into a viral snack product (1:50)Building relationships with major U.S. retailers (11:00)What changes are needed to bring a product from Asia to the U.S. (16:30)Mentions:Cardi BUp Next in Commerce is brought to you by Salesforce Commerce Cloud. Learn more at http://www.salesforce.com/commerce Mission.org is a media studio producing content for world-class clients. Learn more at http://www.mission.org.

The Design Dialogues
Olivia Lee

The Design Dialogues

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 46:00


Olivia Lee runs a multi-disciplinary studio in Singapore. Her work pivots from product to spatial design, research insights to ideation. A graduate of Central Saint Martins, Olivia Lee combines her London experience with her Singaporean roots to establish a culturally nuanced design practice at the heart of South East Asia. Editor-in-chief Suzy Annetta sits down with her for a conversation about her work and career.The Design Dialogues is presented in partnership with Fifth Black.

My Worst Investment Ever Podcast
Adrian Choo and Sze-Yen Chee – The Great Career Paradox

My Worst Investment Ever Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 41:14


BIO: Adrian Choo is a Career Strategist in Asia and the founder of Career Agility International. Sze-Yen Chee is the Executive Director/Co-founder of Career Agility International and is a top Singaporean career coach.STORY: We look at their book The Great Career Paradox (When Pursuing Career Success May Not Lead To Career Happiness).LEARNING: Your career is not everything. “You're more than your career. You can fail in your career, but you haven't failed in life.”Adrian Choo and Sze-Yen Chee Guest profileAdrian Choo is the One and Only Career Strategist in Asia and is the founder of Career Agility International. Sze-Yen Chee is the Executive Director/Co-founder of Career Agility International and is Singapore's top Career Coach. Together, they wrote a great book: The Great Career Paradox (When Pursuing Career Success May Not Lead To Career Happiness).In today's episode, we're going to do things differently. Instead of talking about Adrian Choo's worst investment ever—we already did that in episode 495—we'll talk about the book he's co-authored with Sze-Yen Chee: The Great Career Paradox (When Pursuing Career Success May Not Lead To Career Happiness).The book idea is bornPost-COVID, Adrian and Sze-Yen noticed a shift in values manifesting in the form of quiet quitting and the Great Resignation. Many people were still coming to terms with that. This led to the idea of writing a book to amalgamate and put together all the observations they'd made.One of the reasons why the authors named the book The Great Career Paradox is because they noticed a fascinating trend where many believe that to achieve personal happiness, they must have career success. They work hard to drive their career success and don't care about other things in their life, such as their health, family, hobbies, etc., that are equally important. Then they achieve success, yet they feel empty inside. To fill this gap, they work even harder in their career to get even more successful. And hence, a career paradox that you cannot achieve happiness through just your career.Breaking out of the career paradoxAdrian and Sze-Yen wrote their book to help people break out of their career paradox. They use their wisdom to help their readers manage the little speed bumps people experience in their career journey.The book will help readers take care of the career path aspects of their life or at least be aware of what they can do to manage their careers better. That gives them a lot more bandwidth, time, and mind space for the things that really matter—including family, hobbies, health, etc.The book gives you clarity and introduces you to new logic and different points of view toward career progression.Your career is not everythingOne of the biggest things that Adrian and Sze-Yen want to dispel is that your career is everything. You're more than your career. You can...

Yah Lah BUT...
#342 - Malaysia king to decide on next PM & Singapore might soon have an extra 1.5 hours of quiet everyday

Yah Lah BUT...

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 60:46


After the latest General Election, Malaysia is facing a hung parliament for the first time ever, with two rival factions tussling for power. The king has been tasked with the tough decision of selecting the new PM. We go through the sequence of events that led us to this situation, and try to break it down for the average Singaporean to understand. Closer to home, we might have an extra 1.5 hours of quiet time in our neighbourhoods, if the recommendations of the Community Advisory Panel on Neighbourhood Noise are adopted. Do we need more quiet time in Singapore? Find us here! - YLB Subreddit - YLB TikTok - YLB IG Folklory If you're looking for a meaningful Christmas gift, we'd love to help you create a personal podcast for a loved one. Get started at Folklory.com! And here are the full answers from Terence and Haresh to the question: "Who made 2022 great for You?" Malaysia king to decide on next PM Malaysia king to choose prime minister in post-election crisis Malaysia's Election: More Turmoil Ahead? Malaysia election: Why isn't there a government yet?   Singapore might soon have an extra 1.5 hours Extending quiet time by 1½ hours among recommendations to tackle neighbourhood noise in Singapore   One Shiok Comment Comment by iamKhairulisa Comment by thecleantone   One Shiok Thing What Qatar Doesn't Want the World to See | WORLD CUP 2022 | Johnny Harris Avatar: The Way of Water | New Trailer

IPS On Diversity Podcast
S3E6: IPS On Diversity Podcast S3E6 Social Worker Burnout

IPS On Diversity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 56:14


The demands of the social work profession have recently been in the spotlight, in part because of the pandemic, as well as highlighted in Parliament. The heavy caseload and long working hours are just some of the problems social workers struggle to deal with. What are the pitfalls of working in a job that focuses so greatly on passion? What policies can be put in place to alleviate the challenges social workers face, and encourage them to stay in the profession? In this episode, host and Associate Director at the Institute of Policy Studies Liang Kaixin chats with two of our guests Louis Ng, Member of Parliament for Nee Soon Group Representation Constituency (GRC) and Cindy Ng-Tay, Director of Home at Children's Aid Society. They discuss how the community can support social workers, what the government can do to help the industry and what needs to change in the industry itself to retain younger social workers. Find out more about social worker burnout: CNA (17 April 2022): Back-to-back crises, days that end at 4am: Why some social workers in Singapore are burning out The Straits Times (14 December 2021): S'pore social workers' mental health badly hit during Covid-19 peak in 2020: Study About our guests: Louis Ng Member of Parliament (MP) Nee Soon GRC Louis was elected as MP for Nee Soon GRC in 2015. In 2001, he founded the ACRES (Animal Concerns Research and Education Society), an animal protection charity. He currently chairs the Government Parliamentary Committee for Sustainability and the Environment and is a member of the Government Parliamentary Committee for National Development. In 2014, he received the Advocate of the Year award in the inaugural Singapore Advocacy Awards in 2014 and the Inaugural Yahoo! “Singapore 9” award in 2011. Louis has been advocating on the issue of social worker burnout in Singapore since May 2021, pushing for legislative change in parliament. Cindy Ng-Tay Director of Home Children's Aid Society Cindy is a social worker by training with extensive experience working with low-income families and persons experiencing violence and abuse. Over the years, she has developed and executed programmes that aim to address poverty, violence and abuse in families and the community. Cindy is passionate about issues relating to early childhood trauma, poverty, income inequality and social mobility. She is an active advocate for disadvantaged communities in Singapore, where she contributes commentaries to local publications. She is also passionate about good social work practice and has developed standards framework to guide programmes and services and competency framework to guide the development of Social Workers and Social Service Practitioners. On Diversity is a podcast inspired by the Institute of Policy Studies Managing Diversities research programme. In each episode, we chat with guests to explore what diversity means to them, the changes they are making, and the changes they hope to see in an increasingly fragmented society. More from On Diversity Season 3 Episode 5: Leaving the Law Profession with Andrew Chan, Partner at Allen & Gledhill LLP and Michelle Yeo, Of Counsel at LVM Law Chambers LLC Season 3 Episode 4: Racism at Work with Dharesheni Nedumaran, Head of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, APAC, at Mediabrands and Shamil Zainuddin, Research Associate at IPS Social Lab Season 3 Episode 3: Ableism at Work with Cassandra Chiu, a vision impaired counsellor and advocate for PWDs, and Justin Lee, Senior Research Fellow at IPS Season 3 Episode 2: Ageism at Work with Heng Chee How, Deputy Secretary-General of the National Trade Union Congress (NTUC), and Associate Professor Helen Ko of the Master & PhD in Gerontology Programmes at the Singapore University of Social Sciences (SUSS) Season 3 Episode 1: Sexism at Work, with Corinna Lim, Executive Director of the Association of Women for Action and Research (AWARE) and Simran Toor, Chief Executive Officer at SG Her Empowerment Limited (SHE)  Season 2 Episode 9: Youth Mental Health, with Dr Jacqueline Tilley, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology at the National Institute of Education (NIE) and Asher Low, Founder of Limitless Season 2 Episode 8: What Makes Us Singaporean, with Matthew Matthews, Principal Research Fellow of IPS and Head of IPS Social Lab, and Oon Shu An, Singaporean actress and host Season 2 Episode 7: Homelessness, with Harry Tan, IPS Research Fellow, and June Chua, Co-founder of T Project See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

That's Cool News | A weekly breakdown of positive Science & Tech news.
132. Tinnitus Treatment on Your Phone, Nanoscale 3D Printing Sped Up, Lab-Grown Meat

That's Cool News | A weekly breakdown of positive Science & Tech news.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 31:24


"Polytherapeutic" tinnitus treatment app delivers impressive results | New Atlas (00:49) Tinnitus is when you experience ringing or other noises in one or both of your ears.  5% of people experience tinnitus at some point in their lives A team of researchers at the University of Auckland has found it's new smartphone app treatment is getting strong results This polytherapeutic “combines goal-based counseling with personalized passive and active game-based sound therapy."  It has tailored the digital tools in the app to the user's own experience of tinnitus. The primary measurement of effectiveness was the Tinnitus Functional Index, a standard scale used to quantify a person's experience of tinnitus A 13 point change is regarded as a clinically meaningful difference. It is a survey so take this with a grain of salt The group using the polytherapeutic reported an average improvement of 16.36 points after six weeks, and 17.83 points after 12 weeks 55% of participants experiencing a clinically meaningful improvement after six weeks 65% at 12 weeks. The Auckland team is working on obtaining regulatory approval for the polytherapeutic app, and hope to have it clinically available within six months or so. Rare Elephant Twins are Born in 'Historic Moment' at Syracuse Zoo | Today (05:54) Twin Asian elephant calves were born at the Rosamond Gifford Zoo in Syracuse, New York, in what the zoo is calling a “miracle.” Born on Oct. 24 Ten hours after Mali's (Mama Elephant obviously) first male calf was born, weighing in at 220 pounds, a second male calf arrived, weighing 237 pounds.  The zoo commented on this improbability and rarity: “To date, there has never been a recorded case of surviving elephant twins in the United States …  The few successful twin births have only taken place in their range countries in Asia and Africa and nowhere else in the world.” Additionally, less than 1% of elephant births worldwide are twins When twins do occur, the calves are often stillborn or do not survive long after birth. Engineers designed a new nanoscale 3D printing material that can be printed at a speed of 100 mm/s | Interesting Engineering (09:43) A new nanoscale 3D printing material developed by Stanford University engineers may provide superior structural protection for satellites, drones, and microelectronics An improved lightweight, a protective lattice that can absorb twice as much energy as previous materials of a similar density Nanoscale 3D printing material creates structures that are a fraction of the width of a human hair. Enabling the printing at very small scales. The engineers added metal nanoclusters (tiny groupings of atoms) to their printing medium to create a superior 3D printing material. Effective in kicking off the reaction to harden the material  Produced a substance that was a mixture of the metal and the polymer printing medium. The printing process was accelerated by the nanoclusters. They were able to print at a speed of 100 millimeters per second using the nanoclusters and proteins. Roughly 100 times faster than what had previously been possible with nanoscale protein printing. The engineers are in some ways imitating what nature has already mastered. For instance, the mix of a hard exterior, nanoscale porosity, and trace amounts of soft substance gives bone its durability. Where to go from here? Wendy Gu, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering and a corresponding author on the paper stated: “Since the nanoclusters are able to polymerize these different classes of chemicals, we may be able to use them to print multiple materials in one structure … That's one thing we'd like to aim for.” Researchers develop a new method for analyzing rock glaciers | Phys.org (15:20) Scientists at the University of Arizona developed a new method to determine rock glaciers' ice thickness and the ratio of ice to debris, allowing for more precise measurements of these glaciers than previously possible.  Lead by Tyler Meng who is pursuing a doctoral degree in planetary science This new method will allow scientists to better understand water resources on both Earth and Mars, as well as how resilient this type of buried ice will be to the changing climate on both planets. Both pure ice glaciers and rock glaciers can move across landscapes—very slowly.  The debris in rock glaciers causes them to flow even more slowly than ice glaciers, as the inclusion of rocks makes them much stiffer. Using two different antenna configurations, the researchers used ground-penetrating radar to measure both the radar wave speed and the angle at which the wave was reflected from the subsurface.  The two antenna configurations allowed the researchers to better calculate the dimensions of the rock glacier. According to Meng, understanding rock glaciers on Earth is important because they are essentially water reservoirs. To continue: “Our research gives us a better idea of the total water budget in mountainous regions, where major rivers have headwaters … By having a map of the debris thickness and ice concentration, we can essentially characterize the ability of rock glaciers to withstand effects of a warming climate compared to clean ice glaciers" The whole goal of the research is to use Earth rock glaciers as an analog to processing them on Mars. Meng stated: "By mapping the patterns of debris thickness on Earth, we're trying to understand how that debris thickness may also vary on Mars. Also, by learning about the differences in flow parameters between clean ice and debris-rich ice, that will help simulations for the Martian case as well." Moving forward, the research group will continue to make similar measurements using surface-based radar while also collecting new data using drones.  Drone-based data collection will help the group to gain a more complete understanding of rock glacier flow and subsurface characteristics A Lab-Grown Meat Startup Gets the FDA's Stamp of Approval | MIT Tech Review (20:00) A company called Upside Foods will soon be able to sell chicken made from real animal cells grown in bioreactors instead of requiring the slaughter of live animals.   Cultivated meat has been greenlit in the United States for the first time. There are just two smaller regulatory steps remaining until cultivated meat can be made available to the public.  Require a grant of inspection from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)  The food itself will need a mark of inspection before it can enter the US market Different startups are focusing on a range of cultivated meats, including: beef, chicken, salmon, and tuna It's likely that tasting these meats will be limited to a very small number of exclusive restaurants. With the CEO Uma Valeti wanting chefs to initially bring this to people's attention with well made meals. In December 2020, Singaporean regulators gave the green light to cultivated chicken from the San Francisco–based startup Eat Just.  The chicken nuggets were sold at a members-only restaurant called 1880 and later made available for delivery. Cultivated meat is different from plant-based meats because it contains real animal cells and is—theoretically—indistinguishable from real meat itself. The process: Cell line: a single cell is stimulated to allow it to expand into multiple cells Cells are initially isolated from an animal and developed into cell lines that are then frozen.  Small samples from these cell lines can then be transferred to bioreactors Bioreactors are where cells are fed growth media containing the nutrients that cells need to divide. Once grown, the cells are differentiated into the correct kind of tissue where they can be harvested and used in cultivated meat products. Startups keep the exact cost of growing their cells tightly under wraps, but it's likely that pure cultivated meat will still be several times the cost of conventional meat. But this has dropped considerably from when this method was first used. In August 2013, Dr Mark Post from the Netherlands created the world's first hamburger made from the stem cells of a cow for $325,000 USD at a taste testing and cooking demonstration in London, United Kingdom. Some projections for future facilities suggest that even large facilities will produce meat at a cost of $17 per pound. Translation: higher prices in restaurants and grocery stores. Current production facilities are very small, and many in the industry have serious reservations about lab-grown meat's ability to eventually put a dent in global meat consumption.   

First Generation Burden
75. 'There is No Playbook to Success" w/ Danica Tan Lijun, Animation Director

First Generation Burden

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 76:09


Danica Tan Lijun is a Singaporean art and animation director with a multidisciplinary background in design, animation and film. She was recently inducted into the global class of ADC Youngs Guns 20 and won the second annual COLORFUL Awards with the OneClub. Danica and Rich Tu have a conversation about her upbringing in Singapore, the creative path that brought her to LA, her recent experience at SXSW, and how she tells "tender and ferocious" coming-of-age stories. Check out FirstGenBurden.com for all the episodes Follow us @firstgenburden and Rich Tu / @rich_tu Audio produced by Timothy Simonson / @timwicked Illustration by Eugenia Mello / @eumiel _______________ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/firstgenburden/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/firstgenburden/support

Squawk Box Europe Express
SQUAWK BOX, THURSDAY 17TH NOVEMBER, 2022

Squawk Box Europe Express

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 22:27


UK Chancellor Jeremy Hunt is set to present his autumn budget in the House of Commons later today. Bank of England governor Andrew Bailey says that recent political and financial turmoil has battered the country's reputation. U.S. markets are in the red following a Christmas warning note from retail giant Target. Federal Reserve governor Christopher Waller indicates that pace of rate hikes may be close to slowing. Tuesday's fatal explosion in eastern Poland has been judged not to have been part of a deliberate attack by Russia. However, European Parliament President Roberta Metsola tells CNBC that pressure on Moscow must be maintained. Singaporean investment titan Temasek writes down its $300m stake in FTX. It says it misplaced trust in CEO Sam Bankman-Fried. Short-seller Carson Block tells this channel that the crypto sector has lost its way.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Interviews with pioneers in business and social impact - Business Fights Poverty Spotlight

Palm oil and climate justice – what is the story? Social impact pioneer, Anita Neville, helps us unpack this complex topic. This podcast forms part of a series - examining how business addresses climate justice. Together, we hear how businesses are working to put people at the heart of their climate action. Listen to this conversation to find out how one major agricultural business is working to remove deforestation from its business; where green washing and green hushing collide; and why supporting workers and farming communities, both big and small, is essential in creating a just transition in a low carbon future. Palm oil is a contentious topic. On the one hand its high yields and efficient land use provides a highly sustainable product vital to the global food chain as well as much needed income for small farmers in rural Indonesia. On the other, vast areas of tropical forest have been cleared to make way for palm plantations and these plantations are often monocultural. Listen to this podcast to find out the goings on within of one of the world's biggest palm oil companies and how it is moving to address the urgent need for more sustainable practices. Anita Neville is the Chief Sustainability and Communications Officer for Golden Agri-Resources, the Singaporean palm oil company with over 170,000 employees, primarily working out of Indonesia. Anita's career journey includes ten years with the Rainforest Alliance working to conserve tropical forests, time spent with WWF, and several years with E3G, the environmental politics think tank specialising in climate diplomacy and energy policy. Anita talks from the fringes of the climate COP27, in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt. She shares the impressions she has from her first climate conference and why bringing together organisations from across sectors can help drive deeper social and environmental impact. Links: Golden Agri Resources: https://www.goldenagri.com.sg LinkedIn, Anita Neville: https://www.linkedin.com/in/anitaneville/ If you liked this, try: Business Fights Poverty Climate Justice Summit 2022: businessfightspoverty.org/climate-just…it-register/ Business Fights Poverty Climate Justice Resource Library: businessfightspoverty.org/climatejustice/

I Survived Theatre School

Intro: Sometimes the little guy just doesn't cut it.Let Me Run This By You: Time's a wastin' - giddyup, beggars and choosers.Interview: We talk to star of Parks and Recreation, Easter Sunday, and Barry - Rodney To about Chicago, Marquette University, Lane Tech,  getting discovered while pursuing a Chemistry degree, The Blues Brothers, Dürrenmatt's The Physicists, playing children well into adulthood, interning at Milwaukee Rep, Lifeline Theatre, Steppenwolf, doing live industrials for Arthur Anderson, Asian American actors and their representation in the media, IAMA Theatre Company, Kate Burton, and faking a Singaporean accent.FULL TRANSCRIPT (UNEDITED):1 (8s):I'm Jen Bosworth RAMIREZ2 (10s):And I'm Gina Pulice.1 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand2 (15s):It. 20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all.1 (21s):We survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet?2 (30s):How's your, how's your eighties decor going for your1 (35s):New house? Okay, well we closed yesterday. Well,2 (39s):Congratulations.1 (40s):Thank you. House buying is so weird. Like we close, we funded yesterday, but we can't record till today because my lender like totally dropped the ball. So like, here's the thing. Sometimes when you wanna support like a small, I mean small, I don't know, like a small bank, like I really liked the guy who is the mortgage guy and he has his own bank and all these things. I don't even, how know how this shit works. It's like, but anyway, they were so like, it was a real debacle. It was a real, real Shannon situation about how they, anyway, my money was in the bank in escrow on Friday.1 (1m 20s):Their money that they're lending us, which we're paying in fucking fuck load of interest on is they couldn't get it together. And I was like, Oh no.2 (1m 29s):They're like, We have to look through the couch cushions,1 (1m 31s):Right? That's what it felt like, Gina. It felt like these motherfuckers were like, Oh shit, we didn't actually think this was gonna happen or something. And so I talked to escrow, my friend Fran and escrow, you know, I make friends with the, with the older ladies and, and she was like, I don't wanna talk bad about your lender, but like, whoa. And I was like, Fran, Fran, I had to really lay down the law yesterday and I needed my office mate, Eileen to be witness to when I did because I didn't really wanna get too crazy, but I also needed to get a little crazy. And I was like, Listen, what you're asking for, and it was true, does not exist. They needed one. It was, it was like being in the, in the show severance mixed with the show succession, mixed with, it was like all the shows where you're just like, No, no, what you're asking for doesn't exist and you wanna document to look a certain way.1 (2m 25s):And Chase Bank doesn't do a document that way. And she's like, Well she said, I don't CH bank at Chase, so I don't know. And I said, Listen, I don't care where you bank ma'am, I don't care. But this is Chase Bank. It happens to be a very popular bank. So I'm assuming other people have checking accounts that you deal with at Chase. What I'm telling, she wanted me to get up and go to Chase Bank in person and get a printout of a certain statement period with an http on the bottom. She didn't know what she was talking about. She didn't know what she was talking about. And she was like, 18, 18. And I said, Oh ma'am, if you could get this loan funded in the next, cuz we have to do it by 11, that would be really, really dope.1 (3m 6s):I'm gonna hang up now before I say something very bad. And then I hung up.2 (3m 10s):Right, Right. Yeah. Oh my God, I know. It's the worst kind of help. And regarding like wanting to support smaller businesses, I what, that is such a horrible sadness. There's, there's no sadness. Like the sadness of really investing in the little guy and having it. That was my experience. My big experience with that was going, having a midwife, you know, with my first child. And I really, I was in that whole thing of that, that time was like, oh, birth is too medicalized. And you know, even though my husband was a doctor, like fuck the fuck the medical establishment we're just, but but didn't wanna, like, I didn't wanna go, as my daughter would say, I didn't wanna be one of those people who, what did she say?2 (3m 52s):You know, one of those people who carry rocks to make them feel better.1 (3m 57s):That's amazing. Super.2 (4m 0s):So I didn't wanna go so far as to be one of those rock carrying people to have the birth at my house, but at the same time I really wanted to have this midwife and then there was a problem and she wasn't equipped to deal with it. And it was,1 (4m 11s):I was there,2 (4m 13s):Fyi. Yes, you were1 (4m 15s):The first one, right? For your first one.2 (4m 16s):The first one.1 (4m 18s):Here's the thing you're talking about this, I don't even remember her ass. What I, she, I don't remember nothing about her. If you had told me you didn't have one, I'd be like, Yeah, you didn't have one. I remember the problem and I remember them having to get the big, the big doctor and I remember a lot of blood and I remember thinking, Oh thank God there's this doctor they got from down the hall to come or wherever the hell they were and take care of this problem because this gene is gonna bleed out right here. And none of us know what to do.2 (4m 50s):Yes. I will never forget the look on your face. You and Erin looking at each other trying to do that thing where you're like, It's fine, it's fine. But you're such a bad liar that, that I could, I just took one look at you. I'm like, Oh my God, I'm gonna fucking bleed out right here. And Aaron's going, No, no, no, it's cool, it's cool, it's cool. And then of course he was born on July 25th and all residents start their residency on July 1st. So you know, you really don't wanna have a baby or have surgery in July cuz you're getting at a teaching hospital cuz you're getting a lot of residents. And this woman comes in as I'm bleeding and everything is going crazy and I haven't even had a chance to hold my baby yet. And she comes up to me and she says, Oh cuz the, the midwife ran out of lidocaine. There was no lidocaine.2 (5m 30s):That's right. They were trying to sew me up without lidocaine. And so this nurse comes in, she puts her hand on my shoulder, she says, Hi, I'm Dr. Woo and I'm, and I said, Dr. W do you have any lidocaine? I need some lidocaine stat right up in there. Gimme some lidocaine baby. And she had to call her boss. You know who I could tell when he came in, of course he was a man and I could tell when he came in, he looks at my midwife and is like, Oh, this is what you did here. I see we have to come in and clean up. But sometimes that's the case. Sometimes it's really just true that, you know, it's that the, that the bigger kind of like more corporate option is better cuz it just works better.1 (6m 8s):Well, and they've done this before, like there is, they've done the job before in a way, and they've seen the problems. They know how to troubleshoot in a way because they just have the fucking experience. Now you could say that getting that experience is like super fucked up and patriarchal and, and all the isms, it's, and you'd be right, but when you are bleeding to death or when you know you are in a big financial negotiation that could go south at any moment and lead to not having a ho like a all feeling lost. You want someone who knows how to fucking troubleshoot, dude. Like, come on. And I, you know, and it is sad, it's heartbreaking when you like, fuck man.1 (6m 50s):I really wanted this, like Dr. Altman always said, and I have an update on Dr. Altman, my favorite psychiatrist mentor of mine. But he always said like, well when I was going through med titration, when they put this dingling at Highland Park Hospital, who tried her best but put me on lithium thinking I was bipolar and then I was and all the meds, right? All the meds. And he's like, well they could've worked2 (7m 15s):It could've worked it1 (7m 17s):All's. And I was like, you are right. So like, it could've worked, it could've gone differently, but it just didn't. So it's like, yeah, it's better to look at it like that because, or else it's just infuriating that it didn't work in the first place, Right? Like, you're like, well fucker, Well they tried.2 (7m 35s):Yeah. I use that all the time that it could have worked. Things that I got through you from Dr. Altman, you know, my husband is having like some major, you know, growth moments. Like come like those moments where all the puzzle pieces become clear and you go, Okay, my childhood isn't what I thought it was and this person has got this and this person has got that. Yes. You know? And, and whenever he's doing the thing that we all do, which is like lamenting the life, the family he wish he had had, I always say like, well, as Dr. Almond says, it could have worked. Yes, these parents could have been just fine for you if you were a different person, but you're you.2 (8m 16s):And so, and they're them and it wasn't a good match. And like that happens sometimes.1 (8m 21s):And I think it's really good with kids maybe too. Cause it's like, listen, like, like I say to my niece, like it could, this could have been whatever it is the thing or my nephew too that worked and like that you loved volleyball or that you loved this. Like you are just looking, and I think it's all about titration, right? Like it's all about figuring out where we fit in, where we belong, where we don't. And it's a fucking process, which is what he was saying and like, and that you don't, we don't get it right the first time. Even in medicine, even in it's maybe especially in medicine, maybe in especially in relationships, like, so it, it also opens the door for like, possibility, right? That like, it's an experiment and like, we don't know, even doctors don't know, Hey, run this by you, Miles did of course.1 (9m 14s):And done. What about you? What about you?2 (9m 17s):I'm gonna do it after this, after we're done recording today, I'm gonna go over and I always like to take one of my kids so they, you know, see that this is the process and you have to do it and it's everybody's responsibilities to do it. That doesn't mean that I didn't get all angry at my own party this week. You know, my mom has a great expression. I think it's her expression. She says it. In any case, all politics is local, right? Like where it really, where the really meets the road is what's happening in your backyard. And like, I have a lot of problems with my town,1 (9m 52s):So Right.2 (9m 53s):They don't wanna have, you know, they voted down this measure to put a a, like a sober living place, wanted to take up residence here. Couldn't think of a greater idea. Nobody wanted it. You know, it's a lot of nis not in my backyarders over here. And it really drives me crazy. And in the, in the paper this week, there was a big scandal because there's this particular like committee in our town, Okay. That was in charge of, there was gonna be this, what is it, like a prize maybe or an honor or not a scholarship Okay. But something where they were gonna have to name it.2 (10m 33s):Okay. And they were, you know, really looking around for names. They were trying to think up what names would be appropriate. And somebody put forward the name of this person who is already kind of a named figure in our town. Like, we had this beautiful fountain, it's named after him. He was, he was a somewhat of a big guy, you know, he was an architect, whatever. Sure. So this name gets put forward in this woman who's on this committee says, I don't think this is a great time to name something after an old white man. Now, to me couldn't be a more reasonable thing in the world to say everybody's calling for her resignation. And these, you know, the thing that I hate the most about, not just conservatives, but it seems like it's especially conservatives.2 (11m 20s):I hate this saying. And I remember, I think I've said this before on the podcast, I remember hearing some black activists saying a lot of white, you know, a lot of racism perpetrated by white people is like founded on pretending. Pretending like you don't see color pretending like, you know, saying things like, Oh, well why would you have had that experience, you know, walking down our street at night? Like, or why would you have had that difficulty getting that job? I don't understand. And pretending like they don't know that this person just got1 (11m 51s):That job because of2 (11m 52s):The color biscuit and that kind kind of a thing. So of course the way that people are coming down on this woman is to say, Well, I don't know about you, but I was taught that we have to look beyond race and we have to recognize the person before the color of their skin. And if you can't be, you know, representing the needs of white men, then I just don't really think that you, there's a place on this council. And of course, you know, somebody who I know and have in the past really respected was quoted in this article as saying, Oh, somebody who considers himself like a staunch liberal. Yeah. I mean, I just really can't think of any people of note from our town who weren't white men.2 (12m 34s):Sure. And this motherfucker let himself be quoted in our newspaper as saying this. Now maybe he feels fine about it. Maybe he doesn't think there's anything wrong with it. But I I I think it's completely, completely disgusting. Of course. So then I went and I just did this research of like all the people who have lived in our town historically, they're not just white men. We, there's other people to choose from. Needless1 (12m 58s):To say. Yeah. Well also, like, it's so interesting. I mean, it's just that that quote just is so problematic on so many levels. It like goes so deep. But like the other thing is like, maybe they miss, the only thing I can think of is that dude, did they miss the second half of your quote? Which was, and that's a problem. Like, like if, if you can't, if you can't finish that quote with, you know, I can't really think of like anyone of note in our being or anyone being recognized in our town in this way that wasn't a white dude and that's really crazy. We should really reevaluate how we're doing things here.1 (13m 39s):Period. You're so2 (13m 41s):To offer, you're so, you're so sweet to offer him this benefit of the doubt. Of course I don't offer that to him because this is a person who, you know, there's been a few people in my life who I've had the opportunity to, you know, know what they say privately and then know what they say publicly. Right? And I, and I know this, you know, I know this person personally. And no, it doesn't surprise me at all that, that that would've been the entirety of the quote. It would've been taken out of context. Now it might have been, and I don't know, and I'm not, I'm not gonna call him up to ask him, but you know, at a minimum you go on the local Facebook page and say, I was misquoting.1 (14m 20s):No, no, yeah. Chances are that this, this person just said this. And actually the true crime is not realizing if, if, if that's the case, that they, that that statement is problematic. So that's really fucked up. And also, like, think of all the native people that were on that land, on our land. Like, you're gonna tell me that just because you haven't done, they haven't done the research. They don't think that a native person from the northeast did something of greatness. Shut up, man. Excellent. Before it was rich.2 (14m 56s):Excellent point, Excellent point. Maybe when I write to my letter to the editor, maybe I'll quote you on that because Yeah, yeah. It's like, it's so, it's just, and I'm, by the way, I'm, I have been, I'm sure I'm still am guilty of the same thing too, of just being the laziness of like, well, I don't know, we'd love to, you know, hire a person of color, but none have applied. I mean, I have definitely said things like that and I just understand differently now I understand. No, no, no, they're not gonna be at the top of the pile of resumes that you're gonna get because historically these people haven't felt like there's a place for them at your table. So what you have to do is go above and beyond and say, we are specifically recruiting people of color for this position. I understand.1 (15m 35s):And how about even like, do some research online and find out who those people are and try to like, hire them away from wherever they are to and make them a great offer. You know what I mean? Like all those things. Well,2 (15m 48s):This experience did cause me to go on my little Wikipedia and look up, you know, people who have lived here and I was really like, surprised to learn how many people have known. Now it's true to say that, you know, when, when you're just looking up a list of famous people, it is gonna mostly be white men because that's who mostly, you know, sort of, she made, made history, made the news, whatever. But yeah, one of the very first things that come up, comes up when you look it up my town on Wikipedia, is that the fact that this was the Ramapo tribe that lived here. You know, this is who we took the land away from. I was also surprised to that.1 (16m 29s):I've never,2 (16m 30s):Yeah, Yeah. It was also interesting to learn, supposedly according to this, how many people of live here currently, including people like Harvey Firestein, who I have, I've never seen around town, but God I would really love to. And like some other, you know, sort of famous people. But anyway, That's1 (16m 50s):So cool.2 (16m 51s):Yeah. So, so I will be voting after this and I really, I don't have a great feeling about the election, but I'm, you know, I'm just like, what can you do? You can just sort of go forward and, you know, stick to your values. Yeah. I mean,1 (17m 7s):The thing is, stick to your values, move forward. And like my aunt, happy birthday, Tia, it's her birthday today, and she is like super depressed that, you know, she, she said, what she says is like, fascism is really, today is the day that we really something about fascism, it's like really dire and like really, Okay. So my, it's so interesting that I think boomers feel really bad because they had it so good, even though it wasn't really good, there was an illusion of goodness. Right? So I, I am depressed. But here's the thing, and I was, I was gonna bring this up to you.1 (17m 47s):It's like I, I had an experience last night where I went to this theater and saw the small theater, which I really wanna do my solo show in which is this famous theater called The Hayworth, which is, they show silent movies and all, but there's now it's like an improv sort of venue and, and it's really cute and throwbacky. But anyway, I went there and I just was thinking like, as I was watching these performers, like, oh, it is not even that, Like, it's literally that I spent 45 years thinking that I was worse than everybody else, right? And so now that I don't really think that, I actually don't have that much time left to accomplish what I would like to accomplish. So I, I spent all this time feeling like I couldn't do what she's doing.1 (18m 29s):I can't do what he's doing, can't do what theirs doing. They're, they are doing because I'm not good enough. Like literally. And now I'm like, Oh my God, I'm good enough. I have things to say. I really wanna leave a legacy. And literally the clock is ticking. Now, I'm not saying I'm running around like a nut, but what I'm saying is like, I, I, I do feel that I literally don't have the time left to participate in half-assed measures of art or whatever we're gonna do. We gotta make it purposeful because I w i, I spent all this time getting ready 45 years to not hate myself. And now the clock is ticking, I donate myself and there are things to do.1 (19m 13s):That's literally how I feel. So then when I see art or something where I'm like, Why are you using your platform this way? What are you talking about? What are you saying? Oh no, I can't, I even now I know why people leave movies early, plays early if it is, and some, for me anyway, like some people probably just assholes and like the, the person on stage doesn't look cute and they're out or whatever, but, or they're having panic attacks like I used to and I have to leave. But like, mostly I understand where it's like this is wasting my, my time, time I could be using to sort of plant seeds that may do something to be of service.1 (19m 53s):So I'm gonna jet and good luck to you. But yeah, it's the first, I just really feel like time is of the essence. And I always thought that was such a stupid thing that old people said, which was, you know, time is our most precious commodity. And I was always like, that is the dumbest thing I've ever heard. And now I'm like, oh shit. Yeah, it's really true Dude.2 (20m 15s):Yeah. Yeah. I actually had an experience some that I relate to with that, which is that, you know, I, I volunteered to be part of this festival of one act and you know, the thing we were supposed to do is read all of the submissions and then pick our top three. And then they were gonna do this rank order thing where they're attempting to put each director with one of their top three choices. Well, I read, it was like 10 plays I read them and I, I didn't have three, three ch choices. There was only one play that I felt frankly was worth my time.2 (20m 56s):And I felt really uncomfortable about having that feeling. And I was doing all of the like, who do you think you are? And you know, it's, you haven't directed something in three years and beggars can't be choosers in the whole thing. And I just thought, you know, I know what I'm gonna do if I don't stand up for whatever it is I think I can do here is I'm gonna resent the thing that I get, you know, pitted with and then I'm gonna do something self-destructive or I'm gonna kind of like blow up the relationship and I don't wanna do that. So I spend a lot of time thinking about how I was gonna write this email back saying basically like, I don't have three choices. I only have one choice. And I understand if you don't want to give that to me that this, I might not be a good fit for you.2 (21m 37s):You know? But I really, I really kind of sweated over it because when you don't, you know, when you're a very, if I was an extremely established theater director, you know, I wouldn't have thought twice about it. But I'm not, I'm trying to be established here and I, you know, so my, my, my go-to has always been well having opinions and choices and stuff like that is for people who, you know, have more than you do or have more to offer than you do. And it doesn't always work out that when you kind of say, This is me and take me or leave me. It doesn't always work out. But in this case it doesn't. They gave me my first choice. And so I'm, I'm happy about that, but there's a lot.2 (22m 18s):Thank you. Thank you. Yeah, there's a lot that just goes into the, it's all just work I have to do on myself. Like, I have this, a way of thinking about things is like, I have to do this work with this other person or I have to convince them why it has nothing to do with that. It's just that I have to do this.1 (22m 34s):Well that's what I'm realizing, like Gina, Absolutely. And good for you for like, coming at it from a place of like, okay, like this might not work, but I have to do it to see and put it out there and it may not work and they may say, go fuck yourself. But the alternative one is resentment, but also is like, hmm, not doing anybody else any favors either. If you aren't saying like, I actually don't have three choices here, I'm not gonna do justice. And I also, it brings me to my other thing, which I thought was so full of shit, which is so true. It's like most things are just not, it's about not being a right fit. It's not about you're bad and I'm good, I'm good and you're bad.1 (23m 15s):It's like, this is not a good match. And I, I think it just takes what it takes to learn that it is a not, it's about a matching situation. So like you knew that like those other two wouldn't be good matches and you wouldn't do a service to them or yourself. And it's not, And also like this thing about beggars can't be choosers. I fucking think it's so dumb because like most of us are beggars all the time and, and we, we settle for garbage. And it doesn't, like, I feel like we can, like beggars should be more choosy. And I also feel like, I'm not saying not be humble, but like, fuck you if you take away our choices, like we have to have choices.1 (23m 57s):That's the thing. It's like beggars have choices, whatever you call a beggar, we still have choices. Like how we're gonna interact and how and how we're gonna send emails and shit. I'm just like,2 (24m 9s):Yeah. Plus that whole phrase is so like, in a way rooted in this kind of like terrible supremacy structure that we're trying to fight against, which is like, we wanna tell, of course we wanna tell beggars that they can't be choosers cuz we just, we don't wanna think about them as people who have the same agency in life as we do.1 (24m 25s):Sure. And now I've started saying to people when I have this conversation about like, about unhoused, people like having tent encampments and I get it, like, you're going to school, you're walking your kid to Montessori and there's a fucking tent encampment in your front yard. You did not pay for that. You did not sign up for that. You are, I get it. And also my question is, what are we gonna do when the tents outnumber the people in homes? Because then it's a real fucking problem. So like, how are we gonna do that? You think it's uncomfortable? I think it's uncomfortable to walk by a tent encampment as I'm on my way to a coffee date with someone or whatever.1 (25m 8s):That's uncomfortable. But what are we gonna do when, like in India, the, the quote slums or whatever people, you know, whatever people choose to call it, outnumber the goddamn people in the towers. Then we, then it's gonna be a different problem.2 (25m 35s):Today on the podcast, we were talking to Rodney Toe. Rodney is an actor, you know him from Parks and Recreation, Barry good girls Rosewood. He was in a film this summer called Easter Sunday. Anyway, he's a delight. He's also a professor of theater at USC and he's charming and wonderful and we know you are going to love listening to him as much as we loved talking to him. So please enjoy our conversation with Rodney Toe.3 (26m 8s):Can you hear me? Can you hear me okay?2 (26m 11s):Yes, you sound great. You sound1 (26m 13s):Happy. No echo. You have beautiful art behind you. We can't ask for a2 (26m 17s):Better Easter Sunday. We were just talking about Easter Sunday, so we're gonna have to ask you Oh sure about it, Beth. But first I have to say congratulations, Rodney tell you survive theater school.3 (26m 28s):Oh, thank you. Yes, I did. I sure did. Was2 (26m 31s):It usc? Did you go to3 (26m 32s):Usc? No, I, I'm a professor. I'm currently a professor at usc. So1 (26m 36s):We just assumed you went there, but where did you go3 (26m 38s):To No, no, no, no, no. I, that, that came about like in a roundabout way, but no, I, I totally, I went, went to Marquette University. Oh, in Milwaukee?1 (26m 46s):In Milwaukee. Oh my gosh. Yeah. So3 (26m 48s):Everybody's reaction, everybody's reactions like, well1 (26m 53s):I actually love Mil, I'm from Chicago and Evanston you do and then you are,3 (26m 58s):Yeah, born and raised north side. My family's still there. What1 (27m 1s):The hell? How did I not know this? Yeah, I'm from Evanston, but lived in Rogers Park and went to, we went to DePaul.3 (27m 7s):Well I hear the park. Yes, yes. Born and raised. My family's still there. I am a Chicago, I'm an undying Chicago and through and through. Yeah.1 (27m 15s):Wait a minute. So, so, okay, okay, okay. So you grew up on the north, you grew up in, on the north side.3 (27m 20s):Yeah, I grew up in, I, I grew up and I went to Lane Tech. Oh1 (27m 24s):My gosh, that's where my niece goes right this very minute. She goes, Yeah,3 (27m 28s):It's1 (27m 28s):Quite the school. I dunno how it was when you went, but it went through a hard time and now it's like one of these3 (27m 34s):Go, I mean when I went it was, it was still considered a magnet school. And I I, you know, I think like in like it went maybe through a period of like, sort of like shifting, but then it's like now it's an incredible school. I'm September 17th is apparently Rodney to day at Lane 10. No, Yeah, it just happened. I mean it's, it's silly. It's Easter significance. No, cause of Easter Sunday they did like a bunch of, you know, I do a lot of advocacy for the Asian American for Asian-American representation. So sort like all together1 (28m 4s):That movie had broke so many, broke so many barriers and was, I mean it was a phenomenal, and also I just feel like it's so obviously so needed. Duh. When people say like, more representation is needed, I'm like, okay, no shit Sherlock. But it's true. It bears repeat again. Cause it still is true that we need more representation. But I am fascinated. Ok, so you went to Lane Tech and were you like, I'm gonna be a famous actor, comedian? No, what,3 (28m 34s):What anything about it? Didn't I, you know, it's called Lane Tech for a reason, right? It's a technical school. Correct. So like we didn't, you know, it didn't, I mean there were arts, but I, it never really, you know, it was one of those things that were like, you know, I guess like when you were a kid, it's all like, hey, you wanna learn how to like macrame. But there were theater arts in my, in my high school, but it wasn't like,1 (28m 54s):In fact, my mother did macrame. And let me tell you something, it has come back in style. And the shit she made, we could be selling for $199 at Urban Outfitters right now. I'm just,3 (29m 4s):Oh yeah, it's trendy now. Yeah. It's like, yeah, it's in style.1 (29m 7s):Anyway, side note, side note. Okay, so you were like, I'm not doing, there was no performing at Lane Tech. There was no like out there, there,3 (29m 13s):There was, and there was, but it wasn't, again, you know, in terms of representation, there was nothing that like, I mean there was nothing that that showed me any kind of like longevity in, in, you know, it didn't even really occur to me that this was a business that people sort of like, you know, pursued for themselves. So it wasn't until I went to Marquette that I discovered theater. And so it was one of those things that like, I was like, oh, there's something here. So it wasn't like, it wasn't fostered since I was a kid.1 (29m 43s):This,2 (29m 44s):And this is my favorite type of origin story because it means, you know, like there are people who grow up in LA or their, their parents are in the industry. And then, so it's always a question like, am I gonna go into this industry? But, but people like you and like me and like Boz, who, there's no artist in our family, you know,3 (30m 4s):You2 (30m 4s):Just have to come to it on your own. So I would love to hear this story about finding it at Marquette.3 (30m 10s):So like the, this, I, I've told this story several times, but the short version of it is, so I went to college for chemistry. And so again, because I came from, you know, that that was just sort of the path that, that particularly, you know, an Asian American follows. It's a very sort of stem, regimented sort of culture. And when I went to Marquette, my first, my sort of my first like quarter there, it was overwhelming, you know, I mean, college was, was a big transition for me. I was away from home and I, I was overwhelmed with all of the STEM courses that I was taking, the GE courses. And I, I went to my advisor and at the time, you know, this is pre-internet, like he, we sat down, I sat down with him and he pulled out the catalog.3 (30m 52s):Oh yeah, the catalog, right? I1 (30m 54s):Remember the catalog. Oh yeah.3 (30m 56s):And so he was like, let's take a class that has nothing to do with your major. Oh,1 (30m 60s):I love this. I love this advisor. I love this advisor. Do you know, can he you say his name3 (31m 7s):At the, was it Daniel? Dr. Daniel t Hayworth. I mean, it's been a while I went to college with Dahmer was arrested. So that's been a1 (31m 15s):While. Okay. Yeah's, same with us. Same with me. Yeah.3 (31m 18s):Yeah. So like, I think it was Daniel Daniel Hayworth. Yeah. Cuz he was a, he was a chemistry professor as well. So he opened up, he opened up the, the thing in the, the catalog and it said acting for non-majors. And I remember thinking, that sounds easy, let's do that. And then I went to the class, I got in and he, he, he was able to squeeze me in because already it was already in the earl middle of the semester. And so I, the, the, the, the teacher for that class was a Jesuit priest. His name is Father Gerald Walling. And you know, God rest his soul. And he, his claim to fame was he had like two or three lines on Blues Brothers, the movie.1 (31m 59s):Amazing. I mean like great to fame to have Yes. Get shot in Chicago. Yeah. And if you're a Jesuit priest that's not an actor by trade, like that is like huge. Like most people would like die to have two to three lines on Blues Brothers that are working anyway. So, Okay, so you're, so he, so how was that class?3 (32m 19s):So I took the class and he, after like the first week he asked me, Hey is, and it was at 8:00 AM like typical, like one of those like classes that I was like, Oh my gosh, I'm gonna go in here miserable. Yeah. But he said to me early on, he said, Do you have any interest in doing this professionally? And I said, no. And he's like, and he, he said, and he said, I was like, You're hilarious. You know,1 (32m 43s):You're a hilarious Jesuit.3 (32m 45s):Yeah. I'm like, Good luck with God. He, he then he was directing, he was directing the university production of, and he asked me to audition for it. And I was, I don't even know what an audition was. That's amazing. So like, it was one of those things that I didn't really know how to do it. I didn't know much about it. And so he's like, Can you come in and audition for it? And I did and I got it and it was, it was Monts the physicist,1 (33m 12s):What the fuck is that?3 (33m 14s):Oh man, I love that play. It's Amont, it's the same, you know, it's the same. He's, you know, Exactly. It's really, it's one of those like sort of rarely done plays and it's about fictitious Albert Einstein, the real, lemme see if I, it's been so long since I recall this play. The real, So Isaac Newton and what was the other Mobius? A fictitious, So the real, I'm sorry, The real Albert Einstein, The real, the real Albert Einstein, the real Isaac Isaac New and a fake, a fictitious play scientist named Mobius.3 (33m 55s):And they were, they were all in, in a mental institution. And I1 (33m 60s):Think that I have this play and my shelves and I just have never read it before. Okay, so3 (34m 4s):Who did you play? It's extraordinary. Extraordinary. And so I played, I played a child like I did up until my mid thirties. I played a child who had like one line, and I remember it took, it took place in Germany, I believe. And I remember he's like, Do you have a German accent? I was like, No. You're1 (34m 20s):Like, I I literally am doing chemistry 90.3 (34m 23s):Yeah. I was all like, you're hilarious. Yeah. Only children do accents, You know what I mean? Like, it was totally, I was like, whatever's happening, I don't even know what's happening. And, and then I made up a European accent. I mean, I, I, I pulled it on my ass. I was like, sure, don't even remember it. But I was like, one of,1 (34m 39s):I love when people, like, recently Gina showed me a video of her in college with an accent. Let me tell you something, anytime anyone does an accent, I'm like, go for it. I think that it's so3 (34m 51s):Great. Yeah. I've got stories about, about, I mean, I'm Asian, right? So like, I mean it's been one of those things that all my life I've had to sort of navigate people being like, Hey, try this on for Verizon. I was like, Oh gosh. And you know, anyway, I can go on forever. But I did that, I had a line and then somebody saw me in the production with one line and said, Hey, this is at the Milwaukee Repertory Theater, somebody from the Milwaukee Repertory Theater. It's huge1 (35m 18s):Theater. Fyi. Right,3 (35m 20s):Right. Again, it's, it's to this day. And so they asked if I would intern, if I would be considered interning while I was in school. And I said, I didn't even know what that was. So I met with them. And when I walked into that theater, it was one of those, it's one of the biggest, most extraordinary music theaters in the wor in the country. Right. Won the regional, Tony and I, again, I had no frame of reverence for it. So walking in, it was like this magical place. And so I started, I started interning right, right off the bat. And it was one of those like life changing experiences. I, I mean, to this day, the best acting I think I've ever seen, you know, face to face has been on that stage. It's, you know, many of those actors are still, I'm still in touch with to this day.3 (36m 3s):Some of them have passed away. However, it was the best training, right? I mean, I got thrown into the deep end. It was like working with some of the greats who never, no one ever knew. Right. So it really, it was really a wonderful experience. And that's when I sort of, you know, that's when I was like, Oh, I actually can do this for a living. So it was,1 (36m 21s):Oh yeah, Milwaukee rep. I've seen some amazing stuff there. And also what would've been great is, yeah, we like, I mean there's so many things that would've been great at DePaul at the theater school, but one of them would've been, Hey, there's all these regional theaters, like if you wanna make some dough, it was either like, you are gonna be doing storefront and Die of Hunger, or you're gonna be a star. Hilarious was no like, what about Milwaukee Rep? What about the Guthrie? Like all the things3 (36m 50s):Gut, Yeah. Never1 (36m 51s):Told at least. Or I didn't listen or I was like in a blackout drunk state. But like, I just feel like hilarious. I just feel like that is so amazing that you got to do that. So then, Wait, did you change3 (37m 2s):Your It wasn't, I did. I eventually did. Yes. So I have both. And so now it was one of those, like, it was, it was harrowing, but eventually, I mean, I did nothing with my chemistry degree. Nothing. Like literally nothing. That's,2 (37m 16s):Most people do nothing with their theater degree. So, so it all evens out. Wait, I have a question. Now. This is a question that would be difficult for me to answer. So I wouldn't fault to you if it's difficult for you. What do you think it was in you that this person saw and said, have you ever considered doing this professionally? I mean, just trying to be really objective about the, the asce the essence of you that you bring to the table. Always. How, what did that person identify, do you think, if you3 (37m 44s):Had to guess? You know, I'd like to say it was talent. I'd love to be that person and be like, you know, they recognized in me in one line that ordinary artist was going to emerge into the universe and play children into his thirties. I, I wish I could. It was that, I mean, honestly, I looked different than everybody else on that's a white school and Milwaukee rep, you know, God, forgive me for saying this, but it was a sensibly all white institution.1 (38m 12s):Super white. Super white. Yeah.3 (38m 14s):So in comes this little Asian guy who like they thought might have had potential and also is Asian. And I checked off a lot of boxes for them. And you know what I could easily say, like I, I could easily sort of, when, if you asked me like 20 years ago, I was like, Oh, I was talented, but now I'm like, no, I made my way in because of, because I, I checked boxes for people and, and1 (38m 37s):Talented,3 (38m 38s):You couldn't,1 (38m 39s):You3 (38m 39s):Couldn't have done it if you didn't have talent to thank you. And I can, I can, you know, whatever, I can own that now. But the, but the reality is like, I made it in and that's how I got in. And I'm okay with that. And I'm not saying that it's not taking anything away from talent, but the reality is it's like you gotta get in on the inside to work your way out. And if I didn't have that exposure early on, I certainly wouldn't have had the regional career that I did for a little while. You know? So like that credit, like you, like you said Jen, it's like, it's a, it's a huge credit. So like I would not have made it in any other way. Right. And I certainly,1 (39m 12s):Yeah, I just am like noticing also like my reaction to, Yeah, it's interesting too as other humans in this industry or any industry, it's like, it's like we have had to, especially those of us that are, you know, I'm 47 and like those of us who have made it in or sort of in for, in my, I'm just speaking for myself. Like I, I sort of, right, It could have been fucked up reasons or weird reasons that we got in the door or even filling someone's need or fantasy. But then it's like what we do with it once we're in the room, that really, really matters. And I think that yeah, regardless of how you ended up in Milwaukee rep, like I think it's smart and like I really like the idea of saying okay, like that's probably why I was there.1 (39m 58s):I checked, I've checked boxes, but Okay. But that's why a lot of people are a lot of places. And so like, let's, let's, let's, you could stop there and be like, that is some fucked up shit. Fuck them. Or you could say, Wait a second, I'm gonna still have a fucking career and be a dope actor. Okay, so you're there, you're, you're still, you graduate from Marquette with a double major, I'm assuming, right? Chemistry and, and was it theater, straight up theater or what was your degree?3 (40m 23s):It's, well, no, no, it's called, it's, it's, it's the, at the time it's called, they didn't have a theater degree. Right. It was called the, you graduated with a degree in Communications. Communications,1 (40m 32s):Right? Yes. Okay, okay. Yeah. My, my niece likes to say Tia, all the people in communications at UCLA are the dumbest people. I'm like, No, no, no, no, no. That would've been me. And she's like, Well, anyway, so okay, so, so you graduate and what happens? What happens to you?3 (40m 54s):So, you know, I, I went from there. I went to, I got my equity card pretty ear pretty early cuz I went for my, I think it was my final between my, the summer, my junior year and my senior year I went to, because of the Milwaukee rep, I got asked to do summer stock at, at ppa, which is the Pacific Conservatory, the performing Arts, which is kind of like an Urda contract out in the West Co on the west coast. And so I was able to get credits there, which got me my equity card very quickly after, during that time I didn't get it at the institution, but I got like enough, you know, whatever credit that I was able to get my equity card. And again, at the time I was like, eh, what are the equity? I didn't even know know what that was really.3 (41m 34s):I don't know if anybody truly knows it when they're, when they're younger. So I had it and I went, right, I had my card and I went right to Chicago because family's there. So I was in Chicago. I did a couple of shows, I did one at at Lifeline at the time. I did one at North. Yeah. So it was nice to sort of go back and, and, and, and then I, you know, right then I, it's my favorite story, one of my favorite stories. I, I got my, my my SAG card and my after card in Chicago that summer, because at the time the union was separate. That's how old I am. And I got my SAG card doing a Tenax commercial, and I got my after card doing, I'm not sure if they're still there.3 (42m 18s):I think they are actually. It is a company called Break Breakthrough Services and they did it live industrial. Oh yeah.1 (42m 24s):They, I think they still wait live. How does that work? Yeah,3 (42m 29s):Exactly. So it's a lot of like those training, you know, you see it a lot, like the people do it, like corporate training stuff. Right. So they used, at the time it was really new. So like they used a lot of actors and they paid well.1 (42m 42s):Well, I did an Arthur Anderson one that like paid my rent3 (42m 45s):Long time. Yeah, yeah, yeah. So exactly when Arthur Anderson was still a, I think I did one too. So like, they,1 (42m 53s):Rodney,3 (42m 55s):Were you in St. Charles, Illinois?1 (42m 57s):I don't know. I had to take the Amtrak. It could have been,3 (42m 59s):Yeah. In St. Charles. Right? That's where they were centered. Yes. Yeah.1 (43m 2s):Okay, go ahead. Go ahead. So you, okay, so you got your, I know our world. Do you live, Where do you live?3 (43m 8s):I'm in, I'm in LA right now. This is my home. Yeah.1 (43m 11s):Okay. Well I'm coming to your home. Okay, great. I'm in Pasadena right now. Okay. Anyway, go ahead. Oh yeah.3 (43m 17s):Okay. So we, yeah, I went to Chicago, got my cards, and then was there for, you know, a hot minute and then I moved to New York. Okay.1 (43m 25s):Wait, wait, wait. Moved. Did you have, what years were you working in Chicago? Like were we still, were Gina and I in school? What, what, what years were that were you were like, Tampa, a man Chicago.3 (43m 35s):I did God bless that commercial. Yeah, it was so good. I did, let's see here, I grad, I was there in 90, let's see, 97,1 (43m 47s):We were there. Well, Gina was graduating and I, I was, yeah. Anyway, we were there.3 (43m 52s):And then I moved to New York in 98 and then I moved to New in 98. So1 (43m 55s):You were only in Chicago a hot minute? Yeah, yeah, yeah.3 (43m 57s):Okay. Yeah. But then I came back, I came back in 2004 five to do a show at Victory Gardens. Oh. And then I did a show at Victory Gardens, and then I did a workshop at Stepin Wolf. So it was nice. Look at1 (44m 12s):Victory Gardens. Victory Gardens. That was a whole,3 (44m 15s):I'm sorry, what was that?1 (44m 16s):R i p, Victory Gardens.3 (44m 17s):Oh, yeah. I mean, well I was there pre-K. Yeah. And so, but it was, yeah, r i p I mean, r i it was truly one of the most magnificent, magnificent shows that I've been part, but I mean,1 (44m 30s):Okay, so wait, wait, wait. Okay, so why New York? Why weren't you like, I'm gonna bust out and go to LA and be a superstar on,3 (44m 38s):It's all about representation. I mean, I didn't see at the time, and you know, if you think about it, like there were people on television, but, you know, in terms of like the, the, the, it wasn't pervasive. It was like sort of every once in a while I'll turn on my TV and I'll see like Dante Bosco or I'll see like, you know what I mean? But it wasn't like I saw like, you know, I wasn't flooded with the image of an Asian American making it. However, at the time, you know, it was already Asian Americans were starting to sort of like flood the theater world, right? So I started, you know, through James c and, and Lisa Taro in Chicago, and like, people who are like, who are still friends of mine to this day, Asian American actors, they were doing theater. And so I was like, you know what, I'm gonna do theater. And so I, it was just one of those, like, I went to, and I already had these credits.3 (45m 19s):I had my equity card, I had some credits. My natural proclivity was then to go to, to, to first theater in New York. So it wasn't, I didn't even think about LA it wasn't like, oh, let me, let me like think about doing television and film. So I went1 (45m 32s):To York. I just feel like in LA it's so interesting. As an actor, writing is a little different, but as an actor, it, most of us, if we plan to go to LA as actors, we're gonna fail. I just feel like you have to end up here as an actor by accident because you do something else that you love and that people like, and then they're like, I just, it's not the most welcoming. Right. Medium film and tv. So like, it's so hard. So I think by accident is really sort of the only way, or if you're just already famous for something else, but like, anyway, So you're in New York. Did you, did you love it? Wait, can I,2 (46m 9s):Can I hang on Buzz, Can I do a timeout? Because I've been wanting to ask this just a little bit back to, you know, your undergrad experience. Did you wanna be, did you love chemistry or did you just do that because Oh, you did, Okay. So it wasn't, it wasn't like, oh, finally I found something that I, like you liked chemistry.3 (46m 29s):Yeah. To this day, to this day, I still like, it's still very much like, you know, the, the, the values of a stem field is still very much in how I teach, unfortunately. Right? Like, I'm very empirical. I, I, I need to know an, I need to have answers. Like, you know, it tends to, sometimes it tends to be a lot of it, like, you know, you know, sort of heady and I'm like, and now I need, I need, I'm pragmatic that way. I need to understand like why, Right? That2 (46m 53s):Doesn't seem unfortunate to me. That seems actually really fortunate because A, you're not the only artist who likes to think. I mean, you know, what about DaVinci? Like, a lot of people like to think about art in a, in a, I mean it's really, they're, they're, they're really kind of married art and science.3 (47m 8s):Yeah. They really are people. I, I think people would, It's so funny. Like people don't see it as such, but you're absolutely right. I agree. It's so more, Yeah. There's so much more in common.1 (47m 18s):The other thing that I'm glad Gina brought that up is cuz I'm questioning like, okay, so like, I don't know about at Marquette, but like at DePaul we had like, we had, like, we had these systems of, you got warnings if you, you weren't doing great and I bet like you probably didn't have the cut system cause that just is okay, good. But okay.3 (47m 36s):Well we were, we remember we were, we weren't a conservatory, right? So we were very much a, a liberal programming.1 (47m 42s):Yeah, I love it. Oh God, how I longed for that later, right? But anyway, so what would've helped is if someone with an empirical, like someone with more a stem mind sat down with me and said, okay, like, here are the things that aren't working in a practical way for you, and here are the things that you can do to fix it. Instead, it was literally this nebulous thing where my warning said, You're not living up to your star power now that's not actually a note. So that, that, that Rick Murphy gave me, and I don't, to this day, I'm like, that is actually, so I would love if I had someone like you, not that you'd be in that system, but like this to say like, okay, like here's the reasons why.1 (48m 25s):Like there was no why we were doing anything. It was like, you just do this in order to make it. And I said, Okay, I'll do it. But I was like, what the hell? Why are we doing this? That's,3 (48m 35s):That's like going to a doctor and a doctor being like, you're sick. You know what I mean? And you're like, but can, that's why I'm here is for you to help me get to the root of it and figure it out. Right. Being like, you're,1 (48m 46s):I think they didn't know, Here's the thing, I don't think it, it3 (48m 50s):Was because they're in.1 (48m 51s):Yeah. I I don't think it was because they were, I mean, they could have been rude in all the things. I literally, now that I'm 47, looking back on that experience, I'm like, Oh, these teachers didn't fucking know what they were, how to talk. And3 (49m 3s):This is how I came. Yeah, yeah. Which is how I came back to usc. So like that's,1 (49m 7s):Anyway, continue your New York adventure. I just wanted to know.3 (49m 11s):No, no, no. New York is was great. New York is New York was wonderful. I love it. I still love it. I I literally just got back with it. That's why, remember I was texting you, emailing you guys. I I just got back, Yes. The night before. Some amazing things. My husband would move back in a heartbeat if I, if I like texted him right now. And I was like, Hey, like let's move back. The house would be packed and we'd, he'd be ready to go. He loves, we both love it. You know, Am I in love with New York? I, that, that remains to be seen. I mean, you know, as I get older that life is, it's a hard life and I, I love it when there's no responsibilities when you can like, skip around and have tea and you know, walk around Central Park and like see shows.3 (49m 53s):But you know, that's obviously not the real, the reality of the day to day in New York. So I miss it. I love it. I've been back for work many times, but I, I I don't know that the life is there for me anymore. Right. I mean, you know, six fuller walkups. Oh no. Oh no. I just, yeah, I1 (50m 11s):Just like constantly sweating in Manhattan. Like I can't navigate, It's like a lot of rock walking really fast and3 (50m 20s):Yeah. And no one's wearing masks right now. I just, I just came back and I saw six shows when I was there. No one's wearing masks. It's like unnerving. And again, like, you know, you know, not throwing politics in it. I was like, you guys, like, how are you okay with it? I'm just like, how are you not unnerved by the fact that we're cramped in worse than an airplane? And everyone's like coughing around you and we're sitting here for three hours watching Death of a Salesman. I mean, like, how was that1 (50m 43s):Of an2 (50m 45s):Yeah know?3 (50m 46s):I mean,2 (50m 47s):So what about the, so at some point you, you pretty much, I mean, you don't do theater anymore, right? You transition to doing3 (50m 55s):Oh, I know, I do. Very much so, very much. I'm also the associate, Yeah. I'm the associate artistic director of, I am a theater company, so like I'm, I'm very much theater's. I will never let go. It's, it's just one of those things I will never as, as wonderful as television and film has been. It's, it's also like theater's, you know? It's the, it's my own, it's my first child. Yeah.2 (51m 19s):Yeah.1 (51m 20s):We have guests like Tina Parker was like that, right? Wasn't,2 (51m 23s):Yeah. Well a lot of, a lot of people. It's also Tina Wong said the same thing.3 (51m 26s):He and I are different. She's part, we're in the same theater company. So Yeah. Tina's.2 (51m 30s):That's right. That's right. That's right. Okay, now I'm remembering what that connection was. So I have a question too about like, when I love it, like I said, when people have no idea anything related to performing arts, and then they get kind of thrust into it. So was there any moment in sort of discovering all this where you were able to make sense of, or flesh out like the person that you were before you came to this? Like a lot of people have the experience of, of doing a first drama class in high school and saying, Oh my God, these are my people. And never knowing that their people existed. Right. Did you have anything like that where you felt like coming into this performing sphere validated or brought some to fullness?2 (52m 14s):Something about you that previously you hadn't been able to explore?3 (52m 18s):Yeah. I mean, coming out, you know what I mean? Like, it was the first time that people talk, you know? Of course, you know, you know, I was born to, you know, like was God, I said I was born this way. But that being said, like again, in the world in which I grew up in, in Chicago and Lane Tech, it's, and, and the, you know, the technical high school and, and just the, the, the, I grew up in a community of immigrants. It's not like it was laid out on the table for one to talk about all the time. Right. It wasn't, and even though I may have thought that in my head again, it wasn't like, it was like something that was in the universe and in the, in the air that I breathed. So I would say that like when I got to the theater, it was the first time, you know, the theater, you guys we're, we're theater kids, right?3 (53m 2s):We know like every, everything's dramatic. Everything's laid, you know, out to, you know, for everyone. Everyone's dramas laid out for everyone. A the, and you know, part of it was like sexuality and talking about it and being like, and having just like, just being like talking about somebody's like ethnic background. And so it was the first time that I learned how to talk about it. Even to even just like how you even des you know, you know how you even describe somebody, right? And how somebody like, cuz that again, it's not, it wasn't like, it wasn't language that I had for myself. So I developed the language and how to speak about people. So that's my first thing about theater that I was like, oh, thank God.3 (53m 43s):You know? And then, you know, even talking about, you know, like queer, like queer was such a crazy insult back when I was a kid. And then now all of a sudden queer is now this embraced sort of like, badge of honor, Right? And so like, it was just like that and understanding like Asian and Asian American breaking that down, right? And being Filipino very specifically breaking that down, that all came about from me being in theater. And so like, I, I'm, I owe my, my life to it if you, and, and because I've, yeah, I didn't, you know, it's so funny how the title of this is I Survived Theater School for me. It's, Yes, Yes.3 (54m 23s):And I also, it also allowed theater also gave, allowed me to survive. Yes.2 (54m 31s):Theater helped you survive. Yes. That's beautiful. So in this, in the, in this spectrum or the arc, whatever you wanna call it, of representation and adequate representation and you know, in all of our lifetimes, we're probably never gonna achieve what we think is sort of like a perfect representation in media. But like in the long arc of things, how, how do you feel Hollywood and theater are doing now in terms of representation of, of specifically maybe Filipino, but Asian American people. How, how do you think we're doing?3 (55m 3s):I think we, you know, I think that there's, there's certainly a shift. You know, obviously it, we'd like it to be quicker than faster than, than it has been. But that being said, there's certainly a shift. Look, I'm being, I'll be the first person to say there are many more opportunities that are available that weren't there when I started in this, in this business, people are starting to like diversify casts. And you know, I saw Haiti's Town, it was extraordinary, by the way. I saw six shows in New York in the span of six days out of, and this was not conscious of me. This is not something I was doing consciously. Out of the six shows, I saw every single show had 90% people of color.3 (55m 43s):And it wasn't, and I wasn't conscientious of it. I wasn't like, I'm going to go see the shows that like, it just happened that all I saw Hamilton, I saw K-pop, I saw, you know, a death of a Salesman I saw. And they all were people of color and it was beautiful. So there's definitely a shift. That said, I, for me, it's never, this may sound strange, it's not the people in front of the camera or on stage that I have a problem with. Like, that to me is a bandaid. And this is me speaking like an old person, right? I need, it needs to change from the top down. And for me, that's what where the shift needs to happen for me. Like all the people at top, the, the, the people who run the thing that needs to change. And until that changes, then I can expect to starter from1 (56m 25s):The low. It's so interesting cuz like, I, I, I feel like that is, that is, we're at a point where we'd love to like the bandaid thing. Like really people really think that's gonna work. It never holds. Like that's the thing about a bandaid. The longer the shit is on, it'll fall off eventually. And then you still have the fucking wound. So like, I, I, I, and what I'm also seeing, and I don't know if you guys are seeing it, but what I'm seeing is that like, so people got scared and they fucking started to promote execs within the company of color and othered folks and then didn't train them. And now are like, Oh, well we gave you a shot and you failed, so let's get the white kid back in that live, you know, my uncle's kid back in to, to be the assistant.1 (57m 6s):And I'm3 (57m 7s):Like, no people up for success is a huge thing. Yeah. They need to set people up for success. Yes, yes, for sure.2 (57m 12s):Yeah. So it's, it's performative right now. We're still in the performative phase of1 (57m 16s):Our, you3 (57m 17s):Know, I would say it feels, it, it can feel performative. I I'm, I'm definitely have been. I've experienced people who do get it, you know what I mean? It's just, Sunday's a perfect example of somebody who does get it. But that being said, like again, it needs to, we need more of those people who get it with a capital I like, you know, up at the top. Cause again, otherwise it's just performative, like you said. So it's,1 (57m 38s):Does it make you wanna be an exec and be at the top and making choices? Yeah,3 (57m 42s):You know, I've always, people have asked me, you know, people have asked me what is the next thing for me. I'd love to show run. I've, I just, again, this is the, this is the stem part of me, right? Like, of us, like is I'm great at putting out fires, I just have been that person. I'm good with people, I'm, I'm, you know, and I've, I, you know, it's, it's, it's just one of those things that like I, I see is a, is a natural fit. But until that happens, you know, I'm, I'm, I'm also, you know, a professor is very much a version of show learning. So I've been doing that every day.1 (58m 14s):We talk about how, cause you've mentioned it several times about playing children into your thirties. So a lot, we have never had anyone on the show that I'm aware of that has had that sort of thing or talked about that thing. They may have had it. Mostly it's the opposite of like, those of us who like, I'll speak for myself, like in college, were playing old people at age, you know, 16 because I was a plus size Latina lady. And like that's what what went down. So tell me what, what that's what that journey has been like for you. I'm just really curious mostly, cuz you mentioned it a couple times, so it must be something that is part of your psyche. Like what's that about? Like what the, I mean obviously you look quote young, but there's other stuff that goes into that.1 (58m 57s):So how has that been for you and to not be, It sounds like you're coming out of that.3 (59m 1s):Yeah, I mean, look, all my life I've always been, you know, I mean I'm, I'm 5, 5 6 on a good day and I've always just been, I've always just looked young. Like, I mean, I mean, and I don't mean that like, oh I look young. Like I don't mean that in any sort of self-aggrandizing way. I literally just am one of those and you're built, like me, my one of my dear friends Ko, God rest his soul, he was always like, Rodney, you're like a little man look, looks, you're like a man that looks like a boy. And I was like that, that's hilarious. Like, and look, I for growing up little in, in high school and, and it, it was one of those things that I was always like, you know, like I was always chummy with people, but I was never sort of like, like there's a look, let's face it.3 (59m 45s):Like we're, we're a a a body conscious society and when you're, whatever it is, you can't help. There's implicit bias, right? Implicit bias, right. Supremacy at it's most insidious. And so I am not all my life, I was like always trying to, you know, the Napoleon complex of always trying to sort of be like, prove that I was older than I was.1 (1h 0m 6s):How did you do it? How did you do, how were you, what kind of techniques did you use? For3 (1h 0m 10s):Me, it wasn't even my technique. It was about doing everything and anything I possibly could. I mean, I was like president or vice president, I a gajillion different clubs. So it1 (1h 0m 18s):Was doing, it was doing, it was not like appearance. Okay, okay. So you3 (1h 0m 23s):Was actually yeah, I couldn't do anything about this. Yeah.1 (1h 0m 25s):Right. So yeah, but like people try, you know, like people will do all kinds of things to their body to try to, But for you, it sounds like your way to combat that was to be a doer, like a super3 (1h 0m 36s):Duer. And I certainly, I certainly like worked out by the time I got to college I was like working out hardcore to try and masculinize like, or you know, this. And, and eventually I did a gig that sort of shifted that mentality for me. But that being said, I think the thing that really, that the thing that, that for me was the big sort of change in all of this was just honestly just maturity. At some point I was like, you know what? I can't do anything about my age. I can't do anything about my height, nor do I want to. And when that shifted for me, like it just ironically, that's when like the maturity set in, right? That's when people started to recognize me as an adult.3 (1h 1m 17s):It's when I got got rid of all of that, that this, this notion of what it is I need to do in order for people to give me some sort of authority or gimme some sort of like, to l

IPS On Diversity Podcast
S3E5: IPS On Diversity Podcast S3E5 Leaving the Law Profession

IPS On Diversity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 53:35


2021 saw a five-year record high number of lawyers leaving the industry locally. What must change to encourage lawyers to stay on in the profession? What is being done to increase the retention of lawyers, especially younger ones? In this episode, host and Associate Director at the Institute of Policy Studies Liang Kaixin chats with Andrew Chan, Partner at Allen & Gledhill LLP and Michelle Yeo, Of Counsel at LVM Law Chambers LLC. They discuss what exactly is causing the mass exodus of lawyers from the profession, and how individual firms as well as the industry at large can help to reduce the stress faced by lawyers in Singapore. Find out more about lawyers leaving the profession in Singapore: AsiaOne (24 January 2022): Quitting law jobs for something 'risky': Young ex-lawyers on why they left the profession The Straits Times (23 January 2022): Young lawyers cite long hours, stress for quitting amid calls for more support from legal fraternity Today (22 January 2022): The Big Read: Burnt out and disillusioned, young lawyers head for the exit — and the industry is worried The Straits Times (10 January 2022): 538 lawyers in Singapore left profession in 2021, a five-year high About our guests: Andrew Chan Partner Allen & Gledhill LLP Andrew Chan's practice encompasses commercial work, and he is a specialist in dispute resolution (especially arbitration), trusts, and insolvency (corporate and personal). In arbitration, he has acted as counsel, been appointed arbitrator and appointed to give expert evidence on Singapore law. Andrew was admitted to the bar in 1993. In October 2011, he was presented the Minister for Law Outstanding Volunteer Award, the highest volunteer award for individuals given by the Ministry of Law Singapore, for providing expertise and helping shape insolvency practice in Singapore. Andrew is passionate about the topic of lawyers leaving the profession, and how to make changes in the industry. He wrote an article on the Great Resignation in the February 2022 issue of the Law Gazette. Michelle Yeo Of Counsel LVM Law Chambers LLC Michelle Yeo is a litigator with a special focus on white-collar criminal law. Qualified in Singapore and in the UK, she is a former legislation drafter and Deputy Public Prosecutor with experience in English law. Michelle began her legal career in 2011 as a Deputy Public Prosecutor at the Attorney-General's Chambers. In 2013, Michelle joined the AGC's Legislative Division, where she drafted Parliamentary bills and subsidiary legislation. She moved to the UK in 2016, where she worked in a law firm and volunteered at a prison law charity. An advocate for social justice and action, Michelle co-founded and is actively involved with ReadAble Ltd, a children's literacy and numeracy charity. She has also drafted Parliamentary speeches and questions for a former Nominated Member of Parliament. On Diversity is a podcast inspired by the Institute of Policy Studies Managing Diversities research programme. In each episode, we chat with guests to explore what diversity means to them, the changes they are making, and the changes they hope to see in an increasingly fragmented society. More from On Diversity Season 3 Episode 4: Racism at Work with Dharesheni Nedumaran, Head of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, APAC, at Mediabrands and Shamil Zainuddin, Research Associate at IPS Social Lab Season 3 Episode 3: Ableism at Work with Cassandra Chiu, a vision impaired counsellor and advocate for PWDs, and Justin Lee, Senior Research Fellow at IPS Season 3 Episode 2: Ageism at Work with Heng Chee How, Deputy Secretary-General of the National Trade Union Congress (NTUC), and Associate Professor Helen Ko of the Master & PhD in Gerontology Programmes at the Singapore University of Social Sciences (SUSS) Season 3 Episode 1: Sexism at Work, with Corinna Lim, Executive Director of the Association of Women for Action and Research (AWARE) and Simran Toor, Chief Executive Officer at SG Her Empowerment Limited (SHE)  Season 2 Episode 9: Youth Mental Health, with Dr Jacqueline Tilley, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology at the National Institute of Education (NIE) and Asher Low, Founder of Limitless Season 2 Episode 8: What Makes Us Singaporean, with Matthew Matthews, Principal Research Fellow of IPS and Head of IPS Social Lab, and Oon Shu An, Singaporean actress and host Season 2 Episode 7: Homelessness, with Harry Tan, IPS Research Fellow, and June Chua, Co-founder of T Project Season 2 Episode 6: The Young vs The Old, with Kanwaljit Soin, Orthopaedic and Hand Surgeon, and Teo Kay Key, IPS Research Fellow See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Be Wealthy & Smart
Not All Cryptocurrencies are the Same, Some Will Win Big

Be Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 15:45


Discover why not all cryptocurrencies are the same and some will win big. Just recently, JP Morgan tweeted that it successfully tokenized money market funds and transferred them on a public blockchain cross-border. "The trades consisted of live, cross-currency transactions involving tokenized Japanese yen (JPY) and Singaporean dollar (SGD) deposits, in addition to a simulated exercise involving the buying and selling of tokenized government bonds." This is a big step forward for tokenized assets. My newest book is here! Learn why the technological revolution is shaving decades off the time it takes for investing success and why this is the investing opportunity of our lifetimes. Click here to listen to Chapter One: https://www.lindapjones.com/three-steps-to-quantum-wealth-chapter-one/ To listen to Chapter Two, click here: https://www.lindapjones.com/3-steps-to-quantum-wealth-chapter-two/ To purchase the book "3 Steps to Quantum Wealth", click here: https://amzn.to/3c7lma8 These bonuses are available when you buy my book, 3 Steps to Quantum Wealth: The Wealth Heiress' Guide to Financial Freedom by Investing in Cryptocurrencies on Amazon, here.  AUDIOBOOK IS NOW AVAILABLE My audiobook of "3 Steps to Quantum Wealth" is now available! Get it on Amazon here: https://amzn.to/3c7lma8 As a thank you for buying the book or audiobook on Amazon, you will receive a: Set of 4 Wealthy Mindset Blueprint audio recordings to help you create a wealthy mindset ($197 value) Webinar with Linda called “Financial Freedom by Investing in Cryptocurrencies” ($1,500 value) On the webinar you will learn: -The wealth building potential of the 8 cryptocurrencies mentioned in the book -Why they will experience exponential growth -Strategies for accumulation The link to the book bonus page is here.  Are you investing well for financial freedom...or not? Financial freedom is a combination of money, compounding and time (my McT Formula). How well you invest, makes a huge difference to your financial future and lifestyle. If you only knew where to invest for the long-term, what a difference it would make, because the difference between investing $100k and earning 2% or 10% on your money over 30 years, is the difference between it growing to $181,136 or $1,744,940, an increase of over $1.5 million dollars. Your compounding rate, and how well you invest, matters!  INTERESTED IN THE BE WEALTHY & SMART VIP EXPERIENCE? -Asset allocation model with ticker symbols and % to invest -Monthly investing webinars with Linda -Private Facebook group with daily insights -Weekly stock market commentary email -Lifetime access -US and foreign investors, no minimum $ amount required Extending the special offer, enjoy a 50% savings on the VIP Experience by using promo code "SAVE50" at checkout. More information is here or have a complimentary consultation with Linda to answer your questions. To set up an appointment to talk with Linda, click here. PLEASE REVIEW THE SHOW ON ITUNES If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe and leave a review. I love hearing from you! I so appreciate it! SUBSCRIBE TO BE WEALTHY & SMART Click Here to Subscribe Via iTunes Click Here to Subscribe Via Stitcher on an Android Device Click Here to Subscribe Via RSS Feed WEALTH HEIRESS TV Please subscribe to Wealth Heiress TV YouTube channel (it's not just for women, it's for men too!), here. PLEASE LEAVE A BOOK REVIEW Leave a book review on Amazon here. Get my book, “You're Already a Wealth Heiress, Now Think and Act Like One: 6 Practical Steps to Make It a Reality Now!” Men love it too! After all, you are Wealth Heirs. :) Available for purchase on Amazon. International buyers (if you live outside of the US) get my book here. WANT MORE FROM LINDA? Check out her programs. Join her on Instagram. WEALTH LIBRARY OF PODCASTS Listen to the full wealth library of podcasts from the beginning. Use the search bar in the upper right corner of the page to search topics. WANT TO BUY STOCK PRE-IPO? For Accredited Investors, invest in businesses before they go public. Sign up and receive a $250 investing credit from Linqto, click here. If you are watching this on YouTube, you will need to copy and paste this into your browser: https://www.linqto.com/signup?r=e9tdhbl49v  Need to find out how to get Accredited? Listen to my podcast. TODAY'S SPONSOR Get Think and Grow Rich or another book on Amazon from my recommended financial books list, and be sure to get started checking off the books you have read. Be Wealthy & Smart, is a personal finance show with self-made millionaire Linda P. Jones, America's Wealth Mentor™. Learn simple steps that make a big difference to your financial freedom.  (Some links are affiliate links. There is no additional cost to you.)      

The Iron Fist and the Velvet Glove
Episode 362 - Central Banks Cannot Print Oil

The Iron Fist and the Velvet Glove

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 104:10


In this episode we discuss:(00:00) Talk about ideas(00:23) Introduction(05:41) Twitter and Mastodon(11:45) Dictator Dan and those steps and that accident(20:39) Labor takes step towards new religious discrimination laws(24:58) Negative gearing and capital gains tax discount(34:05) Average Vs Median(37:56) Alan Joyce(44:58) Rules Based International Order(48:45) Oil Price Cap(50:54) Oil – Financial market versus the energy market(59:13) Hence Europe is Stuffed(01:03:24) Patrons and Newsletter(01:05:59) Computer Chips(01:14:39) Top 10 recent news that portend a terrible future for the US-led world order:(01:19:25) How the world views Russia and China(01:21:35) Singaporean diplomat Bilahari Kausikan(01:25:51) Population to hit 8 Billion(01:30:06) The Farther People Are From The Fighting In Ukraine, The More They Oppose Peace Talks(01:38:08) SubmarinesHow to support the PodcastMake a per episode donation via PatreonorDonate through Paypalandtell your friends.

IPS On Diversity Podcast
S3E4: IPS On Diversity Podcast S3E4 Racism at Work

IPS On Diversity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 49:52


Race has recently been at the forefront of conversations surrounding workplace culture and hiring in Singapore. In addition to the new anti-discrimination laws which will soon be enshrined, what other measures must be put in place to ensure a racially inclusive workspace? Is Singapore's racial diversity truly represented at individual workplaces? In this episode, which is in conjunction with IPS' annual flagship conference, Singapore Perspectives 2023, host and Associate Director at the Institute of Policy Studies Liang Kaixin chats with Dharesheni Nedumaran, Head of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, APAC, at Mediabrands and Shamil Zainuddin, Research Associate at IPS Social Lab. They discuss how hiring and appraisal processes can be made more equitable, how to approach the sensitive topic of race at work, and how workplaces can be made more inclusive for minority groups especially. Find out more about conversations on racism at work: CNA (27 June 2022): The Big Read: To stamp out everyday racism or microaggression, treat it as anything but casual The Straits Times (28 May 2022): Formalising HR practices can fight workplace racism: Panellists at race forum South China Morning Post (29 August 2021): Singapore will pass new laws to combat racism, workplace discrimination: PM Lee About our guests: Dharesheni Nedumaran Head of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, APAC Mediabrands Dharesheni Nedumaran (Sheni) is a global Diversity & Inclusion specialist, with more than 10 years international experience spanning tech, NGOs, global businesses and government, working on data driven projects and programs with underrepresented communities, tailored to countries regulations and culture. In her current role as Mediabrands APAC Head of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion, she works across a network of more than 3000 media and marketing professionals in multiple agencies across 13 Asia-Pacific countries, to lead the development of a long term strategy and roadmap that helps to increase representation, create a culture of belonging and contribution, and promote respect, equity and fairness. Accredited with Campaign Asia's Women Leading Change award for Diverse & Inclusive Workplace for Mediabrands Singapore in 2022, Sheni has a Master's of Work & Organisational Psychology from the Vrije Universiteit. Shamil Zainuddin Research Associate IPS Social Lab Shamil Zainuddin specialises in applied ethnography and holds qualifications in Sociology which he has taught as a Teaching Assistant while completing his Masters in the National University of Singapore. Prior to joining IPS in 2018, he was a Senior Design Ethnographer at NCR Corporation, a global enterprise technology company. There, he spent five years using qualitative methods researching human experiences to inform R&D, innovation and marketing. He has received awards for applied ethnographic work and is the recipient of the Ministry of Home Affairs, National Day Award in 2005. Above all, he is most interested in carrying out the work to make the everyday easier for especially disadvantaged communities. He is an active volunteer with Beyond Social Services and highly encourages everyone to volunteer with an organisation they believe in. On Diversity is a podcast inspired by the Institute of Policy Studies Managing Diversities research programme. In each episode, we chat with guests to explore what diversity means to them, the changes they are making, and the changes they hope to see in an increasingly fragmented society. More from On Diversity Season 3 Episode 3: Ableism at Work with Cassandra Chiu, a vision impaired counsellor and advocate for PWDs, and Justin Lee, Senior Research Fellow at IPS Season 3 Episode 2: Ageism at Work with Heng Chee How, Deputy Secretary-General of the National Trade Union Congress (NTUC), and Associate Professor Helen Ko of the Master & PhD in Gerontology Programmes at the Singapore University of Social Sciences (SUSS) Season 3 Episode 1: Sexism at Work, with Corinna Lim, Executive Director of the Association of Women for Action and Research (AWARE) and Simran Toor, Chief Executive Officer at SG Her Empowerment Limited (SHE)  Season 2 Episode 9: Youth Mental Health, with Dr Jacqueline Tilley, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology at the National Institute of Education (NIE) and Asher Low, Founder of Limitless Season 2 Episode 8: What Makes Us Singaporean, with Matthew Matthews, Principal Research Fellow of IPS and Head of IPS Social Lab, and Oon Shu An, Singaporean actress and host Season 2 Episode 7: Homelessness, with Harry Tan, IPS Research Fellow, and June Chua, Co-founder of T Project Season 2 Episode 6: The Young vs The Old, with Kanwaljit Soin, Orthopaedic and Hand Surgeon, and Teo Kay Key, IPS Research Fellow Season 2 Episode 5: The New Civil Society, with Carol Soon, IPS Senior Research Fellow and Head of Society and Culture, and Woo Qiyun, Environmentalist and creator of The Weird and Wild            See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Good Morning Thailand
Good Morning Thailand - Episode 380

Good Morning Thailand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 19:04


Overstaying Foreigners Crackdown in Pattaya, Thailand | GMT Overstaying foreigners targeted in Pattaya club inspections. Chiang Rai doctor suspended over ‘stupid' argument. Singaporean man trashes red-plate Lamborghini on Don Mueang Tollway. Thailand ends emergency Covid vaccine procurement. Khon Kaen Zoo treats tigers and hippos to the Loy Krathong feeding festival. Fly tipping with real flies – ‘Tourist' trash anger Kanchanaburi villagers. - all are coming up today. Place Your First Trade with AAAFx in less than 15 minutes: https://my.aaafx.com/register Tour BISP Today! https://bis.openapply.com/tours/new Checked out our new podcast ft.Greg Lange | Thaiger Podcast Ep.11: https://youtu.be/WJD8nWgdh8g Ad-free website, 3 months free for subscribers and members: https://thethaiger.com/?youtube=membership Join our podcast: https://forms.gle/HWHjJudjApKECnVD7 For sponsoring GMT or any business inquiries, please get in touch with us here: info@thethaiger.com BROWSE to read the latest news: https://thethaiger.com

KBS WORLD Radio Korea 24
Korea 24 - 2022.11.04

KBS WORLD Radio Korea 24

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022


Korea24 – 2022.11.04 (Friday) News Briefing: South Korea and the US announced that the Vigilant Storm joint air drills will be extended until Saturday, as two nation’s defense chiefs also warned that if North Korea uses nuclear weapons against the South, it would lead to “the end of the Kim Jong-un regime.” (Koo Hee-jin) In-Depth News Analysis 1: Almost a week has passed since over 150 people lost their lives in a crowd crush incident in Itaewon Seoul. But questions still remain about the failings by the police to prevent the tragedy. Meanwhile, many of the bodies of the foreign victims have yet to be sent back to their home countries. William Gallo, the Seoul Bureau Chief for Voice of America, joins us on the line to provide a foreign journalist's perspective on the tragedy and its implications. In-Depth News Analysis 2 (Weekly Economy Review): This week, we discuss another “giant step” rate hike by the US Federal Reserve, which comes as the country struggles to contain inflation. We will also take a closer look at the growth in South Korea's consumer prices in October, and the seventh consecutive month of a trade deficit for Korea. Economics Professor Yang Jun-suk from the Catholic University of Korea joins us to provide his analysis. Korea Trending with Walter Lee: 1. An unofficial memorial outside exit 1 of Itaewon station to remember the victims of the crowd crush disaster has drawn a large number of mourners over the past week. (추모공간이 된 이태원역 1번 출구...자원봉사자와 시민이 관리) 2. The Korea Football Association will not be hosting public spaces to watch the 2022 Qatar World Cup in Qatar in the wake of the Itaewon crowd crush disaster. (이번 월드컵에선 거리응원 안 열린다) 3. The US is offering up to 5 million dollars for information on a Singaporean national who allegedly provided illegal services to North Korea. (美 대북제재 위반자 첫 현상수배...최대 71억 원 지급) Next Week From Seoul with Richard Larkin: - The ASEAN Summits will take place in Cambodia, with several non-member nation leaders set to attend. - President Yoon will hold a government-civilian meeting to analyze the cause of the Itaewon crowd crush incident and discuss improved safety measures. - The special envoy for climate change and former lawmaker Na Kyung-won will attend the COP 27 conference in Egypt.

IPS On Diversity Podcast
S3E3: IPS On Diversity Podcast S3E3 Ableism at Work

IPS On Diversity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 48:42


As part of The Enabling Masterplan 2030, Singapore aims to have 40 per cent of working persons with disabilities (PWDs) employed by 2030. Are the current measures in place sufficient to encourage the employment of PWDs? How big is the problem of ableism at the workplace in Singapore? What more must be done to ensure workplaces are inclusive for PWDs? On the third episode of the third season, which is in conjunction with IPS' annual flagship conference, Singapore Perspectives 2023, host and Associate Director at the Institute of Policy Studies Liang Kaixin chats with Cassandra Chiu, a vision impaired counsellor and advocate for PWDs, as well as Justin Lee, Senior Research Fellow at IPS, about the state of disability inclusion in Singapore and what can be done to ensure that PWDs are meaningfully employed and engaged at the workplace. Find out more about ableism at work: The Straits Times (17 August 2022): Singapore aims to have 40% of working-age persons with disabilities employed by 2030 The Straits Times (25 August 2022): People with disabilities bring new perspectives, strengths to workplace, say forum panellists Today (26 August 2022): Strides made towards an inclusive S'pore but more can be done, say disabled community and experts About our guests: Cassandra Chiu Psychotherapist and Coach Director at The Safe Harbour Counselling Centre Cassandra Chiu is a Director at The Safe Harbour Counselling Centre and is also a Consultant for Equal Opportunity and Corporate Disability Policies. She is vision impaired. Ms Chiu is also a lecturer in the post-graduate program under Executive Counselling and Training Academy Pte Ltd. She teaches modules on counselling the disabled, where she imparts knowledge to understand issues that disabled clients face and how to work with them. An active advocate and speaker for PWDs, Ms Chiu has written on the issue for local publication Today. She has also been featured on CNA938 and Must Share News. She received her Masters in Professional Counselling from Swinburne University of Technology in 2011. Justin Lee Senior Research Fellow at IPS Justin Lee is a Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of Policy Studies. He is interested in issues related to disability, community development and social services. He has created a wiki platform that allows mass participation in the mapping of social needs (socialcollab.sg) and co-founded a skilled volunteer matching platform (serve.sg). He is Chairman of ArtsWok Collaborative, and also serves on the Board of Trampolene and the Research Committee of Singapore Children's Society. He has a PhD in Sociology from UCLA. On Diversity is a podcast inspired by the Institute of Policy Studies Managing Diversities research programme. In each episode, we chat with guests to explore what diversity means to them, the changes they are making, and the changes they hope to see in an increasingly fragmented society.   More from On Diversity Season 3 Episode 2: Ageism at Work with Heng Chee How, Deputy Secretary-General of the National Trade Union Congress (NTUC), and Associate Professor Helen Ko of the Master & PhD in Gerontology Programmes at the Singapore University of Social Sciences (SUSS). Season 3 Episode 1: Sexism at Work, with Corinna Lim, Executive Director of the Association of Women for Action and Research (AWARE) and Simran Toor, Chief Executive Officer at SG Her Empowerment Limited (SHE)  Season 2 Episode 9: Youth Mental Health, with Dr Jacqueline Tilley, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology at the National Institute of Education (NIE) and Asher Low, Founder of Limitless Season 2 Episode 8: What Makes Us Singaporean, with Matthew Matthews, Principal Research Fellow of IPS and Head of IPS Social Lab, and Oon Shu An, Singaporean actress and host Season 2 Episode 7: Homelessness, with Harry Tan, IPS Research Fellow, and June Chua, Co-founder of T Project Season 2 Episode 6: The Young vs The Old, with Kanwaljit Soin, Orthopaedic and Hand Surgeon, and Teo Kay Key, IPS Research Fellow Season 2 Episode 5: The New Civil Society, with Carol Soon, IPS Senior Research Fellow and Head of Society and Culture, and Woo Qiyun, Environmentalist and creator of The Weird and Wild Season 2 Episode 4: Diversity in Elite Schools, with Gillian Koh, IPS Deputy Director and Senior Research Fellow, and Paul Jerusalem, master's student at NUS Season 2 Episode 3: The Plight of Buskers, with Yeo Ying Hao, Co-chairman of Buskers Assocation, and Louis Ng, Nee Soon GRC MP              See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.