Podcasts about NetEase

Chinese Internet technology company

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  • 394EPISODES
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  • Jan 30, 2023LATEST
NetEase

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Best podcasts about NetEase

Latest podcast episodes about NetEase

Yo soy un Gamer
Blizzard se queda fuera de China

Yo soy un Gamer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 23:59


El pasado 23 de Enero de 2023 fue un día muy oscuro para los fans de Blizzard en China, ya que juegos como World of Warcraft, Diablo 3, Hearthstone y Overwatch en esencia pararon de existir allá debido a que sus servidores fueron cerrados y sin ninguna fecha de regreso. Todo esto se debe a consecuencia del fin de la asociación entre Blizzard y Netease, lo cual sin duda alguna se ha convertido en un divorcio malo. #Blizzard #Activision #China

Massively OP
Episode 406: Ulduar and Umbar

Massively OP

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 68:38


On this week's episode, Bree and Justin talk about the Blizzard's doomsday in China, Lord of the Rings Online's 2023 roadmap, WoW Classic's latest phase, the January drop for Final Fantasy XIV, and how Blizzard can rebuild its reputation. It's the Massively OP Podcast, an action-packed hour of news, tales, opinions, and gamer emails! And remember, if you'd like to send in your question to the show, use this link or call in to our voicemail at (734) 221-3973. Show notes: Intro Adventures in MMOs: LOTRO, ESO News: Blizzard and NetEase don't back down from the game apocalypse in China News: Wrath Classic moves into Phase 2 News: Final Fantasy XIV Update 6.3 arrived News: Lord of the Rings Online has 'ambitious' 2023 plans Mailbag: What can Blizzard do to restore its standing? Outro Other info: Download Episode 406 Podcast theme: "The Shadow Rises" from LOTRO Your show hosts: Justin and Bree Listen to Massively OP Podcast on iTunes, Stitcher, Player FM, TuneIn, iHeartRadio, Pocket Casts, Amazon, and Spotify Follow Massively Overpowered: Website, Twitter, Facebook, Twitch If you're having problems seeing or using the web player, please check your flashblock or scriptblock setting.

Playconomics
Is The Last of Us The Best Show Ever? | Playconomics Ep. 79

Playconomics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 45:38


First up, we have a story about Ubisoft, one of the largest game publishers in the world. According to a recent report in The Washington Post, Ubisoft is set to release a new game called "Strike" that will feature a new type of gameplay that combines elements of both first-person shooters and massively multiplayer online games. The article states that the game will be set in a futuristic world and will allow players to team up and take on missions together. This sounds like a really exciting development and we can't wait to see more details about this game in the future. Next, we're going to talk about the topic of game remakes. Recently, IGN published an article discussing the importance of remakes being more than just HD clones of old games. The article states that remakes should be more than just a simple graphical upgrade and should instead offer new gameplay elements, improved mechanics and updated stories. This is a valid point and we hope to see more game remakes that offer new and improved experiences for players. We also have a story about the critically acclaimed game "The Last of Us." According to Forbes, the game has received an overwhelming response from both critics and audiences alike. The article states that the game has received near-perfect scores from many reviewers and has also been a commercial success. This is a remarkable achievement and it's a testament to the hard work and dedication of the developers. Another interesting story is about Phil Spencer, the head of Xbox, who recently spoke about the need for game companies to turn away from dividing players and creators. According to Video Games Chronicle, Spencer believes that companies should focus on creating a positive and inclusive environment for players and developers alike. This is a great point and we hope to see more companies adopt this philosophy in the future. Lastly, we have a story about Activision Blizzard and NetEase, two major players in the gaming industry. According to GamesIndustry.biz, Activision Blizzard has claimed that NetEase rejected a proposal to extend their partnership in China. This is a significant development and it will be interesting to see how this affects both companies in the future. ---------------------------------------------------- LET'S CONNECT Podcast: https://open.spotify.com/show/4Eo0q02x6SmCkWWEwxLCRE Discord: https://discord.com/invite/BScMqXWPqv Instagram: https://bit.ly/3dXoZA7 Tik Tok: https://bit.ly/3uEnYne Twitter: https://twitter.com/playconomics --------------------------------------------- Playconomics is a weekly Podcast breaking down the business behind the 138 billion dollar industry that is Video Games. Hosted by industry nobodies (yet) Bobby Kawecki & Matt Mascari, Playconomics aims to educate and entertain, running down the news of the week, speculating, commentating, and having a great time. New episodes post each Monday at 9:00 am EST

Coin Concede: A Hearthstone Podcast
379 – Coin Concede “Tour Stop”

Coin Concede: A Hearthstone Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2023 110:00


This episode gets more emotional than even we were expecting as the era of Hearthstone esports largely comes to a close. Join us for a reflection on the experiences we had and where the scene goes from here. Don't worry, we're not going anywhere. News – 10:19 Patch 25.2 and Hotfix 25.2.1 Known Issues Shop Updates Balance Change coming Netease stuff Tournaments – 45:43 The Hearthstone Esports announcement The Show Notes for this week's episode are on our Website You can monetarily support our show on Patreon Join us every week live, by following us on Twitch Join our community chats in our Discord channels and write in to our Email Follow us on Twitter as well as like share and follow us on Facebook Save our RSS feed or subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Music Play. And please leave a review on iTunes or Stitcher

The FrogPants Studios Ultra Feed!
CORE 349: Taking Down The Axe

The FrogPants Studios Ultra Feed!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 162:05


We get into the mess surrounding Blizzard and Netease in China. Genre's we were sure we would never like. A bunch of games this week too, plus Dear Martha, your calls and emails and more! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Into the Nexus: The Heroes of the Storm Podcast
The First of Us | The Grinding Gear Podcast #24

Into the Nexus: The Heroes of the Storm Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023


The new year maneuvering was fired up. Every game company seems to be unleashing their big moves and bad news. D&D, Microsoft, Netease and Tencent all got a little weird this week. But don't you worry, we got a big The Last of Us chaser for you as Garrett and Kyle have both watched the HBO pilot.

CORE - Core Gaming for Core Gamers
CORE 349: Taking Down The Axe

CORE - Core Gaming for Core Gamers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 162:05


We get into the mess surrounding Blizzard and Netease in China. Genre's we were sure we would never like. A bunch of games this week too, plus Dear Martha, your calls and emails and more! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Nick's Nerd News
Episode 245: Cubicle of 10k layoffs

Nick's Nerd News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 54:39


Plat Chat
Profit RE-SIGNS with Seoul Dynasty! Should he have pursued a title elsewhere?— Plat Chat 160

Plat Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 136:15


Esports podcast specializing in feeding and Overwatch. Featuring Matt "Mr.X" Morello, Joshua "Sideshow" Wilkinson, Jonathan "Reinforce" Larsson, Brennon "Bren" Hook and Connor "Avast" Prince, Scott "Custa" Kennedy, and Jack "Jaws" Wright. Yiska's Interview with GMs: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bZIxso0x0cA

Generation X Gaming
Keep Microsoft in Check? | Generation X Gaming Ep #324 (Sept 1, 2022)

Generation X Gaming

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 128:08


Generation X Gaming is a weekly Podcast that goes over a few of the top stories from the past week and we rant along the way. On today's show we talk about what we have been playing. We talk about What have we been playing. Disney +, Disney Lorcana, Ubisoft, Assassin's Creed Mirage, Assassin's Creed Odyssey, Quantic Dreams, NetEase, Sonic Frontiers, Halo Infinite Campaign Co-Op, Activision Blizzard acquisition, Microsoft, Starfield, Gotham Knights, and much more. #blizzard #haloinfinite #gtaonline 00:00:00 Start of Stream 00:00:30 Intro 00:03:29 The Run Down 00:04:40 What have we been playing 00:16:08 Disney + 00:23:41 Disney Lorcana 00:32:38 Ubisoft Changes Plans Grain of Salt --------------------------------------------------- 00:35:38 Assassin's Creed Mirage 00:36:47 Assassin's Creed Odyssey Game pass? ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 00:38:07 Quantic Dreams & NetEase 00:53:48 Sonic Frontiers Trailer 01:07:47 Halo Infinite Campaign Co-Op 01:24:23 Activision Blizzard acquisition 01:35:27 investigation of Microsoft's Activision 01:49:47 Starfield is the biggest game they have made 01:53:37 Gotham Knights Preview 02:05:21 Story we didn't get too 02:06:07 Outro Join this channel to get access to perks: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCidq... Support the stream: https://streamlabs.com/30nstillgaming2 Check out more of @30nstillgaming at: Nerding with 30 - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0501Cs-cwTv1elpGGSpqYA Website http://www.30nstillgaming.live Twitch: http://www.twitch.tv/30nstillgaming Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/30nstillgaming --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/genxgaming/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/genxgaming/support

The Metacast
NetEase's SkyBox Acquisition / Square Enix Analysis / Meta UA - Roundtable

The Metacast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 63:06


Why are NetEase and Tencent diversifying into Western AAA game development? How could EU regulations affect Meta's performance as a UA channel? We dive into the latest game business news with Aaron Bush, Matt Dion, and your host Maria Gillies00:00 - Start04:25 - China Issues Licences for International Games09:12 - YouTube Policies Demonetize Gaming Content15:10 - PSVR2 Soon!20:32 - NetEase's SkyBox Acquisition: Why?33:44 - EU Personalised Ads Regulation (GDPR Fun)47:03 - Square-Enix President's New Year's Letter Analysis01:01:36 - OutroIf you would like us to discuss any other gaming-related topics, reach out at metacast@naavik.co. We'd love to hear your feedback! And as always, if you like the episode, you can help others find us by leaving a rating or review!Go premium with Naavik Pro to access an ever-growing library of deep exclusive research including free-to-play and blockchain game deconstructions, and market analysis. Use the promo code METACAST to save 10%.TLDListen?: Episode summaryWatch the episode: YouTube video Join the discussion: Naavik DiscordRead more: Naavik DigestWatch more: YouTube channelGo premium: Naavik ProFollow us: Twitter | LinkedIn | Facebook | WebsiteSound design by Gavin Mc Cabe.

Multiform: An Xbox Podcast
Hitman World of Assassination - Multiform Ep. 229

Multiform: An Xbox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 67:08


This week in the news we discuss the details of Hitman 3 becoming Hitman World of Assassination, Skybox Labs acquisition by Netease, ASUS launching an officially licensed Xbox controller, the lack of Game Pass announcements in early January, Microsoft retracting their constitutional argument to FTC lawsuit, Forza Horizon 5 Xbox Series X bundle details and System Shock remake release window announcement.   We also discuss games we've been playing including Marvel's Midnight Suns, Saints Row, Vampire Survivors, High on Life, and Marvel SNAP. You can email the show at questions@multiformpodcast.com or reach us on Twitter @multiformpod

Group Quest
S08E01: Leeroy Jenkins for Speaker

Group Quest

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 125:56


Gulvan and Joe discuss Leeroy Jenkins in congress, another Activision Blizzard company voting to unionize, current state of WOW, Netease branching out, and AGDQ starts! Continue reading →

ACG - The Best Gaming Podcast
The Best Gaming Podcast #373 Xbox Rumors, Starfield Rumors, CES Wrapup, AI's Use in Future Game Development, 3d Printing, Dead Games, Hasbro, Bungie, PSVR2 Futures

ACG - The Best Gaming Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 202:14 Very Popular


The Best Gaming Podcast #373 Xbox Rumours, Starfield Rumours, AI's Use in Future Game Development, 3d Printing, Dead Games, Hasbro, Bungie, PSVR2 Futures In this podcast, we talk about Bungie's future, Destiny 2's bad onboarding, World War Z, Xbox rumors, Starfield's future and hot rumors, the use of AI in future game development, CES wrap-up, 3D printing, Hasbro stopping most of its videogame development, and the PSVR2 and VR costs. We also talk about CES, League of Legends, Netease, Bloober Team and Silent Hill 2, games that have died, the future of Halo, miss, and more. More news on the Stupid Wizards ogl thing. Really sucks https://gizmodo.com/dnd-wizards-of-the-coast-ogl-1-1-open-gaming-license-1849950634 We celebrate fans! Amazon Affiliate https://amzn.to/3XuHcL8 us this for any shopping if you don't want to worry about specific links from Jonny or Karak Buying a game on Epic use the ACG creator code KARAK-ACG My Gaming and News Webpage https://www.acgamer.net/ All my links https://linktr.ee/ACG_Karak Follow me on Twitter for reviews and info @jeremypenter JOIN the ACG Reddit https://www.reddit.com/r/ACGVids/ https://www.patreon.com/AngryCentaurGaming --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/acg/message

Game*Spark コアゲーマー向けゲーム情報
NetEaseが『Halo Infinite』共同開発などで知られるカナダのSkyBox Labsを買収―スタジオは引き続き独立運営

Game*Spark コアゲーマー向けゲーム情報

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 0:09


『マインクラフト』『Age of Empires II(2013)』『Halo Infinite』など、多数のタイトルに参加している開発スタジオです。

Kinda Funny Games Daily
Bungie's Multiple Unannounced PlayStation Projects - Kinda Funny Games Daily 01.06.23

Kinda Funny Games Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 54:11 Very Popular


Blessing and Tim talk Bungie's unnannounced Playstation projects, Starfield playtesters enjoying the game, and CD Projekt Red settling a Cyberpunk 2077 suit. Time Stamps - 00:00:00 - Start 00:01:52 - Housekeeping Game of The Year is happening! This Monday we're going live right here on Youtube and Twitch at 10 AM Pacific with a live Gamescast counting down Kinda Funny's Game of The Year. You don't want to miss it. The Blessing Show is back next week with a brand new episode wrapping up 2022 with Blessing's Non-Game of The Year awards; the only awards show with a category dedicated to Sonic The Hedgehog. That'll be up on Wednesday (a one day delay because of the SF storm) on Youtube.com/KindaFunnyGames at 9am pacific as a youtube premier. A new PS I Love You XOXO is up right now going through a list of all the games coming to PlayStation in 2023. That's up on Youtube.com/KindaFunnyGames The Roper Report  - 00:07:40 - Bungie is working on ‘a number of unannounced projects' with Sony 00:19:46 - Starfield Playtesters Are Reportedly Loving the Game 00:30:20 - Ad 00:31:23 - CD Projekt Red Settles Lawsuit Over Cyberpunk 2077's Rough Launch for $1.85 Million 00:34:28 - Vampire Survivors dev had to release their mobile port to fight copycats 00:42:45 - NetEase acquires Canadian game studio SkyBox Labs 00:45:55 - Deathverse: Let It Die is going back into development 00:49:00 - Out today 00:51:00 - You‘re Wrong Monday's Hosts: No Games Daily! Live Gamescast GOTY Episode instead!

一席英语·脱口秀:老外来了
2003年,已经是20年前了

一席英语·脱口秀:老外来了

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 16:43


主播:梅莉 | 翩翩歌曲 : Bana Ellerini Ver(开头)+那些花儿(结尾)2003年,已经是二十年前了。2003 was a very abnormal year(那一年是极不平凡的一年)。The SARS pandemic(非典) and war in Iraq(伊拉克战争) broke out(爆发)。就这样,病毒和战争,knocked on 2003's door (敲开了2003年的大门) 。今天,我们就来盘点一下,2003年发生过的大事(key events):1. 非典“新冠”出现之前,上一个全民戴口罩的年份,要date back to(追溯到)2003年。2003年,SARS was raging(“非典”肆虐),很多城市的空气中was filled with the smell of white vinegar and isatis root(充斥着白醋和板蓝根的味道)。People were panic buying. 人们疯狂抢购。The price of isatis root for a few yuan increased tenfold.(几块钱一包的板蓝根涨价十倍。)• raging /ˈreɪdʒɪŋ/ adj. 猛烈的• tenfold adv.& adj. 十倍地(的)钟南山是抗击“非典”(SARS)的一面banner (旗帜),当时已年过花甲的他,took the lead in fighting the epidemic(带头奋战在抗疫一线)。他说:“医院是战场,作为战士,我们不冲上去谁上去?” (“Hospitals are battlefields. As soldiers, who do we not rush to?”)这听上去是deja vu (似曾相识的感觉)。钟老在2003年说的这句话,也是20年后医护人员的现状。• take the lead in doing 带头……• deja vu /ˌdeɪʒɑ:ˈvu:/ 似曾经历过的感觉春节后,病毒扩散,到了4月,Beijing became the hardest hit area(北京成为疫情重灾区)。北京政府,用7个昼夜建成小汤山定点医院。 “小汤山奇迹”之后,the "SARS" epidemic entered an declining point(“非典”疫情进入拐点 )。• declining /dɪˈklaɪnɪŋ/ adj. 越来越少的2. 中国经济飞速发展2003年,中国加入WTO(World Trade Organization)刚两年,距离北京奥运会举办还有五年。这一年,"globalization" was still a fashionable hot topic(“全球化”仍是一个时髦的热门话题)。《南方周末》(Southern Weekly)2003年的新年献词,主题为“全面小康”(moderately prosperous society)与“公平社会”(social equality)。这篇New Year's message(新年献词)的最后结尾的两句话是:“我们寄望于2003年,寄望于今后20年”。( "We look forward to 2003 and to the next 20 years.”)———那是一个充满希望的时代。• moderately /ˈmɑ:dərətli/ adv. 适度地• prosperous /ˈprɑ:spərəs/ adj. 繁荣的英国《金融时报》撰写《世界应心平气和地对待醒来的中国》一文,并引用拿破仑的名句:“中国是一只沉睡的雄狮,一旦它醒来,整个世界都会为之颤抖。”(“China is a sleeping lion. Let her sleep, for when she wakes, she will shake the world.”)中国经济的增长,来自于:• Foreign trade power formed by "Made in China" (“中国制造”形成的外贸力量)• 以房地产(real estate)为代表的内需市场2003年,“温州炒房团”在全国购置房产,北京、上海、深圳、杭州等,房价约在5,500 yuan per square meter(5500元/平方米)以上。• estate /ɪˈsteɪt/ n. 庄园,地产3. 互联网2003年, e-commerce was in its infancy(电商处于萌芽状态),非典的危机却令电商达到一个a new peak(新高峰)。其中,阿里巴巴在电子商务领域一骑绝尘。网易(NetEase)股价攀升,32岁的丁磊,成为福布斯富豪榜上(on the Forbes Rich List),首位互联网出身的中国大陆首富。• infancy /ˈɪnfənsi/ n.婴儿期;初期这一年,网易推出了一款名为《梦幻西游》(Fantasy Westward Journey)的游戏。这一年,QQregistered users(注册用户)数exceeded(突破)2亿,成为年轻人的社交“新宠”。• exceed /ɪkˈsi:d/ v. 超过,超出4. 影视A. 有人说,2003年,是Hong Kong's entertainment industry(香港演艺圈)最黑暗的一年。“非典”让影院空空如也, film production in Hong Kong was put on hold(香港的电影制作也被迫停顿)四个月。而且,演员张国荣和梅艳芳先后passed away(离世)。2003年4月1日,张国荣从24楼纵身一跳,从此,人间再无张国荣。2003年12月30日,梅艳芳去世。2003年,香港电影《无间道》(Infernal Affairs)系列came to an end(迎来完结)。• put on hold 搁置;延期;暂停• pass away 对“去世”的委婉说法• come to an end v. 结束,终止B. 那一年,看春晚(Spring Festival Gala)仍是过年重要的消遣(an important pastime),经典的春晚节目层出不穷。2003年小品中,喜剧演员(comedian)赵本山作为心理医生,为中了大奖的范伟治疗心理疾病。• pastime n. 消遣,娱乐C. 那一年,very good TV dramas emerged one after another(好的电视剧层出不穷)。央视推出《大染坊》;《金粉世家》里,董洁、刘亦菲惊艳了一代人;《还珠格格3》为这个创造收视神话的系列画下句号;《粉红女郎》至今仍是中国都市剧的标杆;张纪中版的《射雕英雄传》《天龙八部》以及苏有朋版《倚天屠龙记》相继热播。5. 流行音乐2003 was also an eventful year for pop music,流行音乐界也有很多大事。周杰伦在这一年出了专辑,再次斩获多个大奖。林俊杰发行第一张专辑,正式出道。蔡依林带着《看我72变》,冲进了大众视野。Jay Chou, JJ Lin and Jolin Tsai really made the front pages that year!周杰伦、林俊杰和蔡依林真的登上了当年的头版!这一年,金曲奖(Golden Melody Awards)上,Eason Chan was crowned (陈奕迅封王)。• make the front pages 成为头版• crown v. 为…加冕2003年,出了很多歌曲,成为之后几年KTV必唱歌曲。比如:刘德华的《17岁》陈奕迅的《十年》孙燕姿的《遇见》容祖儿的《挥着翅膀的女孩》朴树的《那些花儿》刘若英的《原来你也在这里》……俄国诗人普希金说:"The past will become a kind memory."(“过去了的,会变成亲切的怀念。”) In a blink of an eye(转眼间),2003年,已经是20年前了。希望20年后,我们再一起回忆2023年。请留言告诉我们:2003年,你在做什么?灵感来源于公众号:最爱历史。

Alles auf Aktien
Milliardengeschäft im Kiffer-Paradies und die 50-Prozent-Aktien

Alles auf Aktien

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 19:57


In der heutigen Folge „Alles auf Aktien“ sprechen die Finanzjournalisten Laurin Meyer und Holger Zschäpitz über eine geplatzte transatlantische Milliardenhochzeit, Aktienrückkauf-Fantasien bei Tesla und gute Geschäfte bei Rheinmetall. Außerdem geht es um Brenntag, Univar Solutions, HomeToGo, Global X Cannabis ETF (WKN: A3DN58), Canopy Growth, Aurora, Tilray, Rize Medical Cannabis ETF and Life Sciences ETF (WKN: A2PX6U), HanETF Medical Cannabis and Wellness (WKN: A2PPE8), SAP, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Merck, Bayer, Rational, Sartorius, Bayer, Crowdstrike, Palo Alto, Sentinel One, Atlassian, Cloudflare, Zscaler, Zoominfo, Salesforce, Alphabet, Match, Nippon Telegraph & Telephone, Olympus, Nintendo, Lasertec, Keyence, Hexagon, Novo Nordisk, AstraZeneca, Dr. Reddy's Laboratories, TSMC und Netease. Wir freuen uns an Feedback über aaa@welt.de. Disclaimer: Die im Podcast besprochenen Aktien und Fonds stellen keine spezifischen Kauf- oder Anlage-Empfehlungen dar. Die Moderatoren und der Verlag haften nicht für etwaige Verluste, die aufgrund der Umsetzung der Gedanken oder Ideen entstehen. Für alle, die noch mehr wissen wollen: Holger Zschäpitz können Sie jede Woche im Finanz- und Wirtschaftspodcast "Deffner&Zschäpitz" hören. Impressum: https://www.welt.de/services/article7893735/Impressum.html Datenschutz: https://www.welt.de/services/article157550705/Datenschutzerklaerung-WELT-DIGITAL.html

Up on Game Presents
Up On Game Presents: Business Of ESports GameStop Still Dead, FTC Activision Lawsuit, Fortnite Addiction, NetEase Plagiarism, Kid-Friendly Gaming, Adult Fortnite, MrBeast Tournament, Tesla Steam

Up on Game Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 56:03


In the latest weekly news and podcast after-show (sponsored by YouGov), we discuss GameStop posting a massive decline in quarterly revenues, the Microsoft acquisition of Activision-Blizzard being challenged by the FTC, a judge authorizing a class-action lawsuit against Fortnite for the game being too addictive, Riot Games suing NetEase for copyright infringement, Epic Games launching child-friendly accounts, Fortnite dominating Pornhub searches, MrBeast hosting a $1 million Fortnite tournament, Steam launching on Tesla vehicles, and so much more! Be sure to check out the Business of Esports Podcast with Paul "The Profit" Dawalibi and the Honorable Jimmy Baratta! Each week, our hosts invite a special guest onto the show with ties to the esports industry so that we can get learn more about gaming while also getting a more in-depth look at all the important aspects that make up the world's fastest-growing industry!! Tune in every Thursday for new episodes!!!! Subscribe/Rate/Review to Up On Game Presents on the iHeartRadio App, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts! WATCH FULL EPISODES ON THE UP ON GAME NETWORK YOUTUBE CHANNEL JUST SEARCH UP ON GAME NETWORKSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Business of Esports
316. GameStop Still Dead, FTC Activision Lawsuit, Fortnite Addiction, NetEase Plagiarism, Kid-Friendly Gaming, Adult Fortnite, MrBeast Tournament, Tesla Steam

The Business of Esports

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022 56:03 Transcription Available


In the latest weekly news and podcast after-show (sponsored by YouGov), we discuss GameStop posting a massive decline in quarterly revenues, the Microsoft acquisition of Activision-Blizzard being challenged by the FTC, a judge authorizing a class-action lawsuit against Fortnite for the game being too addictive, Riot Games suing NetEase for copyright infringement, Epic Games launching child-friendly accounts, Fortnite dominating Pornhub searches, MrBeast hosting a $1 million Fortnite tournament, Steam launching on Tesla vehicles, and so much more!

Let's Play: Daily Gaming News
Monday, December 12th 2022

Let's Play: Daily Gaming News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 7:41


Today on Lets Play: Daily Gaming News-Riot is suing NetEase over an alleged Valorant cloneClass action lawsuit comparing Fortnite to cocaine will be allowed to proceedPS5 and Modern Warfare 2 help drive November spending to $6.3 billion | US Monthly ChartsFollow Nate on Twitter @NateBenderama Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Eclectic Gamers Podcast - Pinball & Video Games
Episode 182 - Where Are You?

Eclectic Gamers Podcast - Pinball & Video Games

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 101:43


Pinball: We spend most of our time talking about Spooky Pinball's reveal of Scooby Doo, but we do conclude with Rumor Corner as usual. Video Games: This segment covers a lot of legal updates (Epic and Fortnight addiction, Riot against NetEase, and the FTC opposing the Microsoft purchase of Activision). The rest of the time is primarily focused on covering highlights from The Game Awards. Episode Links: Spooky Pinball's Scooby Doo Pinball reveal video: https://youtu.be/feNL8zCWWTA Spooky Pinball's Scooby Doo Pinball gameplay video: https://youtu.be/VFUe5j36UGU Knapp Arcade write-up on Scooby Doo Pinball: https://www.knapparcade.org/post/spooky-pinball-shows-first-video-of-new-scooby-doo-pinball-machine Show Links: EGP Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/eclectic_gamers Website: http://eclecticgamers.com EGP T-shirts: https://teespring.com/stores/eclectic-gamers-podcast iTunes: http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/eclectic-gamers-podcast/id1088802706?mt=2 SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/user-465086826 Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=86805 Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/eclecticgamerspodcast/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Eclectic_gamers Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/eclectic_gamers YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC40Frd1Fep4u5bjrw3cvwoQ Discord: https://discord.gg/sgnrsBT Watches with Dennis YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/WatcheswithDennis Email: eclecticgamerspodcast@gmail.com

Nautilus Link
Café com Videogames #104 - Mundinho Embracer e NetEase

Nautilus Link

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 87:53


Apoie o projeto e permita que ele continue: apoia.se/nautilus | picpay.me/canalnautilus Algumas notícias envelheceram desde que gravamos, mas acompanhe pra ouvir aquele papo sobre consolidação corporativa do jeito que só o Nautilus sabe fazer O Café com Videogames acontece toda segunda, às 9:30 da manhã, lá na twitch.tv/nautiluslink Participantes: Host: Lucas Zavadil | @lucaseduardrz Convidado: Luir Luli | @discoflutuante Encontre-nos também nas redes sociais: Discord: discord.gg/FPd6hgE Twitter: twitter.com/nautiluslink Instagram: instagram.com/nautiluslink

Video Game Tango
Pokemon Scarlet and Violet Fail

Video Game Tango

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 68:49


This time on Video Game Tango, Netease blames some jerk for not having WoW in China any more, The Disco Elysium lawsuit is just now putting on it's dancing shoes, Call of Duty will probably continue coming to Playstation, Valheim's Mistlands update brings more fun and magic to the game, Starfield isn't going to require you siphon gas from your neighbors just to play a little longer, and Pokemon Scarlet and Violet might be good games, but the best bits still haven't loaded in.

Brooklyn, USA
64 | You Wanna Play?

Brooklyn, USA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 29:26


They say, “love your job, and you'll never work a day in your life.” But what happens when you turn a hobby or interest into a profession? This week, we spoke with members of the Nets Gaming Crew – a professional NBA2K team affiliated with the Brooklyn Nets, and the founder of CoExist gaming – a hub for professional gamers in the NYC area, about what happens when play becomes work.  • Brooklyn, USA is produced by Emily Boghossian, Shirin Barghi, Charlie Hoxie, Khyriel Palmer, and Mayumi Sato. If you have something to say and want us to share it on the show, here's how you can send us a message: https://bit.ly/2Z3pfaW• Thank you to Kuye Youngblood, Alex Bernstein, Ian Curtis, Letta J, and Mike Ren.• LINKSIvan Curtiss, also known as OG KING CURT, is the General Manager of The Brooklyn Nets Gaming Crew of The NBA 2K League. He also co-founded The (MPBA) MyPlayer Basketball Association, which is commonly regarded as the most competitive online NBA 2K League in the country. Curtiss is considered a pioneer within branding and gaming and has often been known in the industry as the “Godfather of 2K”. As an industry professional, Curtiss has been featured on platforms like The Undefeated, Getty Images, Dimer 2K, Nets Daily and more. He has also launched his own podcast, The #OG2CENTS Podcast, which aims to bridge the gap between lifestyle and gaming. The show airs every Sunday. Alongside his podcast, Curtiss has created his own line of merchandise to promote his brand and influence. His mission is to spread awareness about the NBA 2K League and gaming culture as a whole.  Alexander "Steez" Bernstein is a power forward for The Brooklyn Nets Gaming Crew of The NBA 2K League. He is originally from Santa Ana, CA.Jaye (Letta J): Founder & CEO of Coexist Gaming. Gamer. FGC Champ. Grammy Nominated. Recording Artist. Songwriter. Anime Lover. Afro-Latina. Executive Chef. Wine Enthusiast. Foodie. Leftie. Tatted. Author. Educator. Activist.Mike Yi Ren is a Chinese-American Game Designer and Video Producer currently living in Brooklyn, NYC. Previously, he lived in Shanghai, China for 8 years. His professional experience includes projects for Ubisoft, Netease, RADII China, Lonelyleap Films, and other recognized international organizations. Through his company, Arcadia Creative Consulting and Design Ltd., he specializes in Game Design, Film & Animation, and Graphic Design in production and consulting roles. His independent games have been covered in press including Rock Paper Shotgun, Kotaku, Vice and more.• TRANSCRIPT: ~coming soon~• Follow us on Twitter and Instagram @BRICTV Visit us online at bricartsmedia.org/Brooklyn-USA

Neo-Reality Collective | Pop-Culture News and Reviews Talk
NRC Episode Fifty-Eight: The End of Twitter?, Dawn of The DCU; DCEU Mister Terrific

Neo-Reality Collective | Pop-Culture News and Reviews Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 39:57


Welcome to Neo-Reality Collective | Pop-Culture News and Reviews Talk, Hosted by Eric Brown! In the Fifty-Eight Episode, Battlefield 2042, the game that was dead on arrival and I have no interest in playing despite people saying its good NOW after a YEAR of release, launches its third season of content that makes me think had the game has been delayed another year, it would've done better for fans. Activision-Blizzard, the company for many harassment cases and controversial events for the past decade, is now cutting ties with NetEase, rendering their games such as Diablo, Overwatch, and WoW unplayable in China by January 2023, Dead Island 2 faces a 12-week delay in 2023 as Phil Spencer explains his decision in delaying Starfield. As the final season of Stranger Things begins production, we learn more details along with the upcoming BioShock movie and the future of the DCEU with reports and updates on Amy Adams' Lois Lane, Henry Cavill's Superman, and the potential debut of Mister Terrific down the road! MultiVersus Season 2 launches with new content and updates. Marvel/Square Enix's Avengers gets an upcoming Winter Soldier addition to their game as we learn Rockstar turned down an offer for a GTA Movie with Eminem. Disney gets a seismic shakeup with Bob Chapek's ousting and Bob Iger's return to The Position of CEO of The Walt Disney Company. Marvel's Blade hires a new director and writer, with the star having a role in their hirings while Silk, a spider-man character, is set to arrive in live action on Amazon Prime Video. Elon Musk's Twitter Era continues to spiral out of control when offices are closed during Thanksgiving week, with signs of Twitter's potential ending. In the wake of Dark Crisis on Infinite Earths and Lazarus Planet events, DC Comics launches the Dawn of The DC Universe in 2023 with over 20 new titles with superstar writers and artists. All this and more on Neo-Reality Collective! Brought to you by TheEveryDayFan, check out their links below! The EDF Links https://theeverydayfan.com https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnEZoZqtklXhw95WkF2BY4g/ https://open.spotify.com/show/0EwipBBMm4jcL2GRyBwauu

Jogabilidade (Games)
Vértice #359: Pokémon Scarlet/Violet, Pentiment, Yuji Naka preso, Blizzard fora da China e mais

Jogabilidade (Games)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 154:59


No Vértice dessa semana, André Campos, Eduardo Sushi, Rafael Quina e Fernando Mucioli comentam o melhor jogo bugado do ano, Pokémon Scarlet/Violet e também o verdadeiro jogo do ano, Pentiment. Também comentamos algumas notícias como: as tretas que rolaram ao redor do jogo brasileiro 171, a prisão de Yuji Naka, a Blizzard saindo da China e mais! 00:09:03: Copa do Mundo 2022 00:13:36: Polêmica envolvendo o lançamento de "171" 00:26:32: Yuji Naka, criador do Sonic, é preso 00:37:11: Jogo 1: Pokémon Scarlet & Violet 01:06:27: Perguntas dos ouvintes 01:16:20: Fim do acordo entre NetEase e Blizzard 01:32:56: Jogo 2: Pentiment 02:10:31: Finalmentes: God of War Ragnarök 02:26:57: Finalmentes: Otherworld Legends Contribua | Twitter | YouTube | Twitch | Contato

The GamesIndustry.biz Podcast
Brokémon: Gotta Patch 'Em All

The GamesIndustry.biz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 49:59


The GamesIndustry.biz Podcast is back, as the team once again gathers around their mics to discuss the biggest stories of the week. We start with the highs and lows of the latest Pokémon launch. Pokémon Scarlet and Violet are smashing series records in key territories and are the most ambitious entries to date – but it turns out that ambition comes at a price. With widespread complaints and viral examples of technical issues, we discuss the potential impact of Scarlet and Violet's woes on the franchise's reputation, and what Game Freak and The Pokémon Company need to do to avoid this in future generations. We also discuss the end of Blizzard's 14-year partnership with NetEase, how the publisher might try to re-enter the lucrative Chinese market, and why NetEase is setting its sights on the Western markets. (A quick apology about the audio quality, particularly for Jeffrey. We are investigating the issue and hope to fix this by the next episode)

The Metacast
Blizzard x NetEase / Google Play Competition / Gameloft Strategy - Roundtable

The Metacast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 57:21


Why didn't Blizzard renew its partnership with NetEase? How will they return to mainland China's market? We dive into the latest game business news with Matt Dion, David Amor, Marie Mejerwall, and your host Maria Gillies.00:00 - Start05:20 - Gameloft's Cross-Platform Strategy08:55 - Generative AI's Valuable Disruption17:40 - Embracer Group Earnings Analysis19:20 - Sony Patent For NFT and Blockchain Technology23:52 - Blizzard Does Not Renew Contract with NetEase40:12 - Google Struck Deals to Prevent Play Store Competition56:46 - OutroIf you would like us to discuss any other gaming-related topics, reach out at metacast@naavik.co. We'd love to hear your feedback! And as always, if you like the episode, you can help others find us by leaving a rating or review!Go premium with Naavik Pro to access an ever-growing library of deep exclusive research including free-to-play and blockchain game deconstructions, and market analysis. Use the promo code METACAST to save 10%. TLDListen?: Episode summaryWatch the episode: YouTube video Join the discussion: Naavik DiscordRead more: Naavik DigestWatch more: YouTube channelGo premium: Naavik ProFollow us: Twitter | LinkedIn | Facebook | WebsiteSound design by Gavin Mc Cabe.

Press X to Start
Level 6.45 - Is Pokemon Scarlet/Violet The Jankiest Pokemon Game Ever?

Press X to Start

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 65:48


SUBSCRIBE NOW!!!! on iTunes, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher & Audible. This week on the Press X to Start Podcast: DJ, Sean, Jordan & Avery talk about Bethesda & Mick Gordon airing each other's dirty laundry, Blizzard divorcing itself from China, Pokemon Violet, God Of War Ragnarök and much more! Gaming News - Time code: 4:25 Vaporware game Dead Island 2 continues to be vaporware with yet another delay; The messy Twitter war between Bethesda & Mick Gordon intensifies; Phil Spencer reveals why they cancelled their Game Pass console; Sonic Co-Creator to get jail time over insider trading; Blizzard set to pull games from China after NetEase deal collapses; Gearbox to consume Volition after the Saints Row reboot flop. What We've Been Playing - Time code: 31:47 The guys give their final God Of War Ragnarök impressions before our review; DJ gives his early impressions of Pokemon Violet; Sean runs us through the new and improved MW2 Multiplayer suite; Jordan solves spooky puzzles in Signalis and then unwinds with the dad game goodness of PGA 2k22. If you're enjoying the show, please take a moment to rate/review it on whatever service you're using. Every little bit helps!  Want to ask a question, ask us at PressX2start.com/Questions Join/Follow Us: Youtube: Press X To Start TV Twitch: pressxtostarttv Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pressx2start Twitter: @PressX2S  Instagram: @PressX2Start TikTok: @pressx2start You can find more info about the Press X and who we are at www.PressX2start.com. If you have any questions or just want to tell us how great (or just slightly okay) we're doing or how we can be better, be a friend and reach out and email us at pressxtostartpodcast@gmail.com End music by @MarcoMavy on Twitter & IG Be good to each other, Peace!

Strike Force : Masters of Launch Podcast
1899, NetEase, Pokemon, and God of War

Strike Force : Masters of Launch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 66:32


Come listen to the guys talk about all the upcoming gaming and nerdy news!

Deconstructor of Fun
TWiG #210 - Blizzard & NetEase Break Up / 10 Years of Candy Crush

Deconstructor of Fun

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 63:30


Eric, Eric and Laura are joined by guest David Nelson, former head of the experimentation group at King, to discuss the last 10 years of Candy Crush Saga and the Blizzard and NetEase divorce. Seufert shares his experience at Slush last week in Helsinki and Kress blames the switch hardware for the lackluster performance of the otherwise interesting new Pokemon game, Scarlet and Violet. And lastly, it wouldn't be an TWIG episode without at least 1 mention of Netflix. Until next week. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/deconstructoroffun/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/deconstructoroffun/support

Tactical Crouch - Your Source for Overwatch League News, Interviews, & More!
Toronto Shifting Gears? APAC In Trouble!? - Tactical Crouch Ep. 271

Tactical Crouch - Your Source for Overwatch League News, Interviews, & More!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 98:44


Net Ease broke up with Blizzard and now we're all crying in the club, but what does it mean for Overwatch League? Are the Seoul Dynasty going budget this year? And are our hopes for the Toronto Defiant at an all-time high? Yiska and Volamel dive into the mud this week to break down all the news. 00:00:00 - Introduction 00:04:48 - China OnlyWatch. NetEase issue & impact on OWL free agency 00:36:09 - Moonfall 00:45:00 - Profit posts LFT as restricted FA, Arnold shares comments 00:49:50 - Handing over the Reign. Kai a hot commodity? 01:15:20 - Toronto turnover. Casores cooking up a contender? 01:28:28 - Talking about Ramattra's coming preview 01:35:03 - Concluding remarks Links discussed in the show & recent content from our hostsSideshow on the potential loss of viewers - https://youtu.be/NZYV9eT83vU GamesBeat panel with Seoul CEO Arnold - https://youtu.be/mY1pGCx1GDI?t=6091 Yiska's discord server - https://discord.me/tacticalcrouch Yiska's Casores interview - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omkCQBu4unQ Follow the show & our hosts on Twitterhttps://twitter.com/tactical_crouchhttps://twitter.com/imAVRLhttps://twitter.com/YiskaOuthttps://twitter.com/VolamelJoin our communities to connect with other OWL fanshttps://discord.me/tacticalcrouchhttps://discord.gg/YGB8aVXgzThttps://www.twitch.tv/avrl/Ways to support the show:http://patreon.com/tacticalcrouch

Hitbox!
Pokemon Scarlet and Violet bug report

Hitbox!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 102:13


Justin and Peter discuss Pokemon Scarlet and Violet bugs, Dark Pictures Anthology: the Devil in Me, the closure of Activision Blizzard servers in China, Xbox's plans to own Candy Crush, Yuji Naka being arrested, God of War: Ragnarok, and more!Follow us on Twitter @HitboxPodJoin our Discord server!https://discord.gg/unmGxETX3USupport us on Patreon!https://www.patreon.com/hitboxpod@peterspittech and @JustinMatkovichMetacritic Roundup games:Dark Pictures Anthology: Devil in MePokemon ScarletPokemon VioletMade possible by our wonderful Deluxe Podcast Patreon producers:Dave ParkerJ KnolThe intro and outro of Hitbox! is by ali_ontheguitar, check out their work right here:https://www.fiverr.com/aliontheguitar?source=gigpageBlizzard games set to be pulled in China after dispute with NetEase over license // VGC // Andy Robinsonhttps://www.videogameschronicle.com/news/blizzard-games-set-to-be-pulled-in-china-after-dispute-with-netease-over-license/Sonic creator Yuji Naka arrested in insider trading scandal // the Verge // Jess Weatherbedhttps://www.theverge.com/2022/11/18/23465956/sonic-yuji-naka-arrested-insider-trading-scandal-game

All You Can Geek
Pokemon Bug/Glitch - AYCG Gamecast #622

All You Can Geek

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 35:59


Its a light gaming news this week but we have some juicy tidbits to satisfy your Thanksgiving hunger. Yuji Naka, co-creator of Sonic, was arrested in Japan for insider trading over the development of a new Dragon Quest game. Meanwhile Blizzard will be suspending all games in China due to not being able to reach an agreement with its licensing and publishing partner, NetEase. Finally, Microsoft's streaming console gets indefinitely pushed back. #sonic #blizzard #microsoft #pokemon #xbox #allyoucangeek #podcast #videogames

Virtual Economy
Episode 145: NetEase Thinks Activision is a Big Jerk (News Show)

Virtual Economy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 64:41


A NetEase exec has pulled no punches after the Chinese giant's Blizzard relationship hits the skids. Also: NPD spending report for October 2022, Embracer group earnings and reorganization, more on Microsoft's plans to acquire Activision, new studio announcements, and more! You can support Virtual Economy's growth via our Ko-Fi and also purchase Virtual Economy merchandise! TIME STAMPS [00:01:26] - NPD US Video Game Spending Report for October 2022 [00:09:11] - Embracer Group Q2 FY 2023 Earnings [00:21:09] - Investment Interlude (Now in Activision Jerk Flavor!) [00:39:31] - Quick Hits [00:54:58] - Labor Report SOURCES NPD Report on US Video Game Spending for October 2022 | Mat Piscatella (@MatPiscatella) on Twitter EMBRACER GROUP PUBLISHES INTERIM REPORT Q2 | Embracer Group Bethesda Responds to Mick Gordon Allegations | Bethesda (@Bethesda) on Twitter Microsoft to Adopt New Sexual Harassment Policies After Gates, Misconduct Audit | Bloomberg (Paywall) INVESTMENT INTERLUDE The Banished Vault | Nic Tringali on Medium European Commission responds as staff member says COD will stay on "my PlayStation" | Eurogamer Microsoft's Xbox chief settles the Call of Duty PlayStation debate once and for all | The Verge Blizzard Entertainment and NetEase Suspending Game Services in China | Activision In candid email, Blizzard head details suspension of game sales in China | Washington Post BLIZZARD ENTERTAINMENT AND NETEASE SEVERING TIES | Niko Partners Sweden's Behold Ventures raises $25.9M to invest in Nordic gaming startups | GamesBeat Senior Executive behind global beloved franchises, such as THE WALKING DEAD, THE BOYS, INVINCIBLE and many others, announces ASTRID ENTERTAINMENT | GamesPress We Are Methodical | Methodical Games Ex-Wargaming and Valve devs form Eschatology Entertainment, raise $4 million in funding | Game Developer NetEase Executive Responds to Falling Out with Blizzard | Simon Zhu on LinkedIn

Dense Pixels
Pokemon Pitfalls and Bavarian Intrigue (Ep 445)

Dense Pixels

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 72:41


This week, Brad and Carrie discuss the performance issues plaguing Pokemon Scarlet and Violet, the surprise of Pentiment being one of the most engrossing games of the year, NetEase and Activision-Blizzard's falling out, Yugi Naka running afoul of the law, the massive takedown of Tommy Tallarico, video game endings, and our ability to survive in the wilderness.

Plat Chat
NetEase & Blizzard agreement expires + Off-season Moves! — Plat Chat Episode 152

Plat Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 111:49


Esports podcast specializing in feeding and Overwatch. Featuring Matt "Mr.X" Morello, Joshua "Sideshow" Wilkinson, Jonathan "Reinforce" Larsson, Brennon "Bren" Hook and Connor "Avast" Prince.

Infinite Respawn Podcast
Podcast 377- Disappointing Acquisitions, Blizzard Bids Farewell, & On Demand PvP

Infinite Respawn Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 54:38


This week Chicken FINALLY got into the Uncharted series and has LOTS of thoughts on the franchise. In the news: Blizzard is leaving China after parting ways with NetEase. Sea of Thieves' new season adds a real port town and "on demand" PvP. And Gearbox bought up Volition (Saints Row) and Hopoo Games (Risk of Rain). Booo. All this and more on this week's Infinite Respawn Podcast! Follow us on Twitter: @InfiniteResPC @MDBOAKTREE @GrifsLynam @EliteChicken313 @BakaPickle Discord: https://discord.gg/d7cEJqT Grif's YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/@grifslynam Chicken's Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/elitechicken313 Oak's Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/MDBOAKTREE  

DLC
470: Spencer Campbell: PC Gaming 2023 Preview Show, Blizzard and Netease breakup, GTA movie that could have been, God of War Ragnarok, Somerville, F1 22, Legends of Runeterra, RTX 4080 review, Altspace VR

DLC

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 121:52


Jeff and Christian welcome gaming social media creative, Spencer Campbell to the show for the first time to discuss the revelation that GTA almost became a movie in 2002, the end of Blizzard's deal with Netease in China, the biggest games of the PC Gaming 2023 showcase, and more! The Playlist: God of War Ragnarok, F1 22, Legends of Runeterra, RTX 4080 (Plague Tale Requiem; Spider-Man PC; Cyberpunk 2077); Vampire Survivors xCloud Touch, Sommerville VR Talk: Altspace VR, Half-Life Alyx Parting Gifts!

Rock i Borys
Koniec Blizzarda w Chinach

Rock i Borys

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 60:21


(00:00) Co tam u nas słychać? (01:35) Państwo na Spotify już widzą (06:32) Mundial w Katarze (10:01) Pentiment (17:08) God of War Ragnarok (23:30) Blizzard wychodzi z Chin Podcast Piotrka z Xboxa - Zgrajcy https://www.youtube.com/@ZgrajcyPL Blizzard wycofuje się z Chin; firma zawiesi większość usług w tym kraju https://www.gry-online.pl/newsroom/blizzard-wycofuje-sie-z-chin-firma-zawiesi-wiekszosc-uslug-w-tym/z52359b Dziwna Wersja World of Warcraft z Chin! https://youtu.be/eNOSSlSW3cA Blizzard and Netease end 14-year partnership: Everything you need to know https://www.gamesindustry.biz/blizzard-and-netease-end-14-year-partnership-everything-you-need-to-know W Chinach zabraniają nieletnim grać w sieci dłużej niż godzinę dziennie. To cios dla branży gamingowej https://www.wirtualnemedia.pl/artykul/chinach-zakaz-gry-nieletnim-w-internecie-dluzej-niz-godzine-dziennie-to-cios-dla-branzy-gamingowej China's Video Games Market Declines As 39 Million Youth Gamers Have Stopped Playing https://www.thegamer.com/china-video-games-market-declines-39-million-youth-gamers-stop-playing/ Blizzard Entertainment and NetEase Suspending Game Services in China https://investor.activision.com/news-releases/news-release-details/blizzard-entertainment-and-netease-suspending-game-services Grupa Rock i Borys na FB - https://www.facebook.com/groups/805231679816756/ Podcast Remigiusz "Pojęcia Nie Mam" Maciaszek https://tinyurl.com/yfx4s5zz Podcast metaKINO - Borys Nieśpielak i Wiktor Obrok https://youtu.be/jMxVfgf_OQc Serwer Discord podcastu Rock i Borys! https://discord.com/invite/AMUHt4JEvd Słuchaj nas na Lectonie: https://lectonapp.com/p/rckbrs Słuchaj nas na Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2WxzUqj Słuchaj nas na iTunes: https://apple.co/2Jz7MPS Program LIVE w niedzielę od osiemnastej - https://jarock.pl/live/rock Rock i Borys to program o grach, technologii i życiu

Group Quest
S07E39: The Switch Pro Game Awards

Group Quest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 85:21


Gulvan and Joe discuss the Game Awards nominations, Switch's lackluster performance on the latest Pokemon title, Blizzard splitting with NetEase, and more! Continue reading →

Video Game Tango
Huge Bethesda Drama

Video Game Tango

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 49:38


This time on Video Game Tango: Activision Blizzard won't let China play their games, Mick Gordon claps back at Id Software over Doom's soundtrack controversy, then Activision Blizzard has blessed us with a new Mei skin even though she's still on ice, Phil Spencer says they're delaying their own Google Stadia, and instead are putting games on your TV with blackjack and hookers, and Spiderman Miles Morales is coming to the PC and according to Josh, it's also Steampad Guaranteed!

Alles auf Aktien
Schlechte Nachrichten für Gamer und Gewinnen mit König Fußball

Alles auf Aktien

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 17:55


In der heutigen Folge „Alles auf Aktien“ sprechen die Finanzjournalisten Anja Ettel und Laurin Meyer über volle Einkaufskörbe in den USA, einen Punktebringer im Dax und die wertvollsten Sammelkarten der Welt. Außerdem geht es um Macys, GAP, Bath & Body Works, Cisco Systems, Activision Blizzard, Berkshire Hathaway, NetEase, Microsoft, Siemens, Siemens Energy, MTU, Adidas, Puma, Nike, Ebay, Mudrick Capital und Adevinta. Wir freuen uns an Feedback über aaa@welt.de. Disclaimer: Die im Podcast besprochenen Aktien und Fonds stellen keine spezifischen Kauf- oder Anlage-Empfehlungen dar. Die Moderatoren und der Verlag haften nicht für etwaige Verluste, die aufgrund der Umsetzung der Gedanken oder Ideen entstehen. Für alle, die noch mehr wissen wollen: Holger Zschäpitz können Sie jede Woche im Finanz- und Wirtschaftspodcast "Deffner&Zschäpitz" hören. Impressum: https://www.welt.de/services/article7893735/Impressum.html Datenschutz: https://www.welt.de/services/article157550705/Datenschutzerklaerung-WELT-DIGITAL.html

FactSet U.S. Daily Market Preview
Financial Market Preview - Thursday 17-Nov

FactSet U.S. Daily Market Preview

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 4:09


US futures are pointing to a positive open as of 4:05 ET. European equity markets have started higher, following mostly lower levels in Asia. Wednesday's stronger-than-expected US retail sales data has dampened the pivot narrative. Fed's George is the latest to call for a slower pace of rate hikes, but Daly has said that pausing is off the table. ECB still appears to be willing to take a few more hikes, BoE has also signaled the likelihood of more rate hikes, while G20 has pledged to calibrate the pace of monetary tightening amid spillover risks.Companies Mentioned: Tesla, Blizzard, NetEase

Daily Tech Headlines
Amazon lays off 3% of staff – DTH

Daily Tech Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022


Amazon announced a lay off of approximately 10,000 workers, Nvidia and Microsoft team up for a cloud computer focused on AI, and Blizzard will suspend World of Warcraft and other titles in China due to the end of agreement with NetEase. MP3 Please SUBSCRIBE HERE. You can get an ad-free feed of Daily Tech HeadlinesContinue reading "Amazon lays off 3% of staff – DTH"

Kinda Funny Games Daily
We've Played Pokemon Scarlet/Violet & Marvel's Midnight Suns - Kinda Funny Games Daily 11.17.22 (Ad-Fre

Kinda Funny Games Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 68:00


Blessing and Greg talk Marvel's Midnight Suns previews, Pokemon Scarlet & Violet Reviews, Embracer Group delaying Dead Island 2 and changing Volition, id Software firing back at Mick Gordon, Blizzard and Netease breaking up, and somehow SO much more! Time Stamps - 00:00:00 - Start 00:02:35 - Housekeeping A new Xcast is up right now featuring an interview with Pentiment lead Josh Sawyer. That's on youtube.com/KindaFunnyGames. The Roper Report  - 00:05:48 - Marvel Midnight Suns Preview Round Up 00:21:05 - Pokemon Scarlet & Violet review round up 00:42:15 - Ad 00:45:31 - Dead Island 2 has been Delayed Again 00:48:21 - Volition is becoming part of Gearbox 00:51:44 - Blizzard Games Are Disappearing From China 00:55:20 - Bethesda responds to Mick Gordon 00:59:06 - Streets of Rage is getting a movie 01:01:30 - We have the name and details on Supermassive's next Dark Pictures game 01:04:45 - Out today 01:06:19 - You‘re Wrong Tomorrow's Hosts: Tim & Bless

Deconstructor of Fun
TWiG #208 - Layoffs, Earnings Reports, FTX Collapse & NFT Royalties Explained

Deconstructor of Fun

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 46:09


Ethan and Eric S are in the house to talk about all the dramatic news this week! We're talking about massive layoffs across the tech industry and gaming in particular, new mobile game studios from NetEase and Nintendo, Playtika's latest earnings report, the dramatic and sudden collapse of FTX and the ongoing creator royalty debate going on in the world of NFTs. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/deconstructoroffun/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/deconstructoroffun/support

The Come Up
Taehoon Kim — CEO of nWay on Raising $90M, Selling to Animoca, and Gaming x Web3

The Come Up

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 56:20


This interview features Taehoon (TK) Kim, Co-Founder and CEO of nWay. We discuss going to arcades with his mom in South Korea, why he wasn't allowed to play console games as a kid in Canada, what he learned from Samsung's work culture, why it's hard for VCs to invest in gaming, finding passion at the intersection of technology and art, the best type of IP for game partnerships, how he ended up selling nWay to Animoca Brands, and how player ownership in games creates attachment and meaning, and prevents gamer exploitation.Subscribe to our newsletter. We explore the intersection of media, technology, and commerce: sign-up linkLearn more about our market research and executive advisory: RockWater websiteFollow us on LinkedIn: RockWater LinkedInEmail us: tcupod@wearerockwater.comInterview TranscriptThe interview was lightly edited for clarity.Chris Erwin:Hi, I'm Chris Erwin. Welcome to The Come Up, a podcast that interviews entrepreneurs and leaders.Taehoon Kim:So I was really upset when Lightspeed thing fell through. I went out drinking with my friends and I got hammered that night. I had another VC pitch the next morning. I was so hungover that during the presentation I threw up three times. During the pitch, I would say, "Excuse me, I'd run to the bathroom." I would throw up, come back, continue the pitch. And I did that three times., And I did the presentation 9:00 AM I came home and I was, "Oh, my God, I totally screwed that up." I fell asleep. I woke up at 4:00 PM, got a call at 5:00 PM saying that he was in. Usually it doesn't happen that way, but it was a really weird period of time in my life.Chris Erwin:This week's episode features TK Kim, CEO of nWay and a serial gaming entrepreneur. So TK was born in Seoul, South Korea to a mom who was a gamer and a lover of arcades. After studying at Cornell, TK started his career at Samsung, where he helped launch their smartphone and next gen mobile gaming businesses. TK then went on to co-found three gaming companies, and raised over $90 million in venture capital. Today he's the CEO of nWay, which is a developer, publisher, and tech platform for competitive multiplayer games across mobile, PC, and consoles. nWay was sold to Animoca in 2020.Some highlights of our chat include why he wasn't allowed to play console games as a kid in Canada, why it's hard for VCs to invest in gaming, finding passion at the intersection of technology and art, why he doesn't mind getting rejected by investors, the best type of IP for game partnerships, and how player ownership in games creates attachment and meaning and prevents gamer exploitation. All right, let's get to it.TK, thanks for being on The Come Up podcast.Taehoon Kim:Hey, thanks for having me. Super excited to be here.Chris Erwin:We have a pretty amazing story to tell about your career, but as always, we're going to rewind a bit and kind of go to the origin story. So it'd be awesome to hear about where you grew up and what your parents and what your household was like.Taehoon Kim:I was born in Seoul, Korea, and then I moved to Vancouver, Canada when I was in fourth grade. I think I was 10 or 11. At the time, growing up in Seoul, a little bit more strict environment. One funny thing is that my mom was a gamer and she would take me to the arcade, I think when I was super young, five or six years old. That's when I got really into gaming and how fun could that could be. But when I moved to Canada, however, she didn't really let me have any consoles, when that switch from the arcade era to the console era happened.I think she was a little bit influenced from the Asian culture and didn't want me to be getting too loose on academics. But when I got the computer, that's when I started really getting back to gaming. She didn't know I was playing games, but I was really into that. And then when Doom came out, that's when I really also started getting into online gaming, which is a big part of the reason why I'm so into PVP and competitive gaming.Chris Erwin:So your mom was a gamer and she would take you to the arcades in Seoul. What were the types of games that you guys liked to play together? And was this just something special that you and your mom did? Or was it a whole family outing that you did with your mom and dad and your siblings?Taehoon Kim:My dad didn't really like games, so it was just me and my mom. And she was really into Galaga and getting on the top of the leaderboard there. Oftentimes, I would watch her play and I would also try, but I wasn't as good as her. So I mean, I would mostly try to beat a record, but I couldn't. That's how I got into it early on.Chris Erwin:Did you also go to the arcade with a lot of your peers growing up when you were in Korea? And did any of your peers parents play? Or was it kind of like, I have the cool mom, she's into gaming, and we'd go do that on the weekends?Taehoon Kim:Oh, later on when I got older and I got in elementary school, yes, I definitely did go to the arcade with my friends. And then later on, in Seoul, arcades turned into PC bang. I'm not sure if you heard of it, but it's like the room full of PCs and it would play PC games there. I mean, I got in earlier than my friends, because of my mom.Chris Erwin:Remind me, what was the reason that you guys came to Vancouver from Korea?Taehoon Kim:I'm not a 100% sure if this is the real reason, but my parents would always tell me it's because I wasn't really fitting well with the type of education in Korea, where it was more, much more strict and less creative. They wanted us, me and my brother, to get a Western education. I think it turned out to be good for me, I guess.Chris Erwin:Do you remember when you were kind of joined the academic and the school system in Vancouver, I know it was at a young age, you were about 10 years old, you said, did you feel that that was like, "Hey, this is immediately different and I really like it and enjoy it"? Or was it nerve-wracking for you to make such a big change in your life to be uprooted at such a young age? What were you feeling at that time?Taehoon Kim:It was immediately different, lot less grinding. Even at third or fourth grade, back in Seoul, it was pretty tough. After school was over at 5:00 PM, I still had to go to all these after school programs until 9:00 PM or something like that. And I didn't do the homework afterwards and everybody was doing it. So there was a lot of peer pressure for parents to also put their kids to the same kind of rigorous program. And when I was in Vancouver, I didn't have to do any of that. So it felt more free and math was a lot easier.Chris Erwin:Math was a lot easier in Vancouver.Taehoon Kim:You know how crazy it is for Asian countries with math early on.Chris Erwin:So you're probably the top of your class. You were such a standout, and I bet at a young age that was pretty fun because it was easy to you too.Taehoon Kim:People thought I was super smart. I wasn't, it was just that I started earlier doing more hard stuff in math. It wasn't necessarily that was smarter. But again, on the other subject, because my English was suffering, I had to get a lot of help. So I would help them in math and they would help me with the other subjects.Chris Erwin:And you mentioned that in Western education there's also probably more emphasis on using the creative part of your brain as well, and balancing that out with the math or the quantitative side. What did that look like to you as you were going through middle school and high school before you went to college? Any specific applications or stories stand out?Taehoon Kim:Yeah, one thing that stood out to me was how a lot of the homeworks and assignments were project based and group based. Where teamwork mattered, and I would have to work with two or three other students to do a project, where we had a lot of freedom to create what we wanted. And the fact that there's no right answers. And it was really weird for me at the beginning, but I got used to it later on. But I think that's kind of a key difference. And at least at that time.Chris Erwin:During your teenage years and coming of age, before you go to Cornell, what was the gaming culture in Vancouver? And what was your role in it?Taehoon Kim:Early '90s when the console wars were happening with Nintendo and Sega, and there was a lot of cool things happening there, but I didn't get to really partake in that. My parents didn't allow me to have consoles. But same things were happening in the PC gaming, especially without modems and the early stage of internet happened. Me and my friends, we got started with Wolfenstein, which was mind blowing.Chris Erwin:Oh, I remember Wolfenstein, it was one of the earliest first person shooters on a PC.Taehoon Kim:It was mind blowing. It was the first game to really utilize 3D spaces in the way it did. But then the real game changer was Doom because you can... Even with the slow modem, I think it was an amazing feat, think about it now, with limited technology and networking, I could dial into, using my modem, and then connect with my friends, and I could play PVP. And that was when the gaming was the most fun for me, actually, playing with friends live. And I would play it late until night early in the morning, over and over again, the same map.Chris Erwin:I remember playing Wolfenstein at my friend's place, shout out, Adam Sachs. And then I also remember playing Doom, and I remember having the cheat codes where I can go into God mode.Taehoon Kim:Oh, right.Chris Erwin:And I was invincible and I could play with five different types of guns, including the rocket launcher. I can specifically remember from my youth some of the different levels. And sitting at my PC station kind of right next to my family's common room. Those are very fun memories. I don't think I was ever doing... I was never live playing with friends. Were you able to do that within the Doom platform? Or were you using a third party application on top of that?Taehoon Kim:I think it was within the Doom platform. It's pretty amazing. Doom was a fast game, so the fact that it worked, it was amazing. When Quake came out, afterwards, that's when I think e-sports was really ended up becoming more serious and people were going to playing at a more higher tier. But that's when I got out of FPS and dove into fighting games.Chris Erwin:Got it. You moved to Vancouver, you're a standout in school, on the math side just because of all your training in Korea. And you're learning about work in these more kind of project based environments or team based work, where there's also a lot of freedom for collaboration. You end up going to Cornell. When you were applying to school, what was your intention? Did you have a very clear focus of, "This is what I want my career to look like, so this is what I'm going to study in undergrad"? Or was it a bit more free flowing?Taehoon Kim:I really wanted to go into a top engineering school. I knew that was what I wanted to do. I wanted to study electrical engineering or computer science, and I was looking at Cornell, MIT, Stanford, they had really good engineering programs. And I knew that the playing online games and doing a lot of mods and all that stuff in the computer, and looking at kind of the early stage of internet, I knew that was going to be a big thing later on. My goal was to kind of get into that sector by studying engineering or information technology.Chris Erwin:Was there any certain moments when you were at Cornell that to help to point you in kind of this gaming leadership, gaming entrepreneurship career path that you've now been on for the last couple decades?Taehoon Kim:Well, a couple things happened. I was good at math. I was good at engineering, and internet was happening. And then one thing I didn't talk about was that I was also really good at art. At one point, I even thought about going to art school. I think it was because of my mom's side of the family, a lot of artists. And I think it was the DNA from my mom's side. What I love about gaming was the fact that you can kind of combine technology and my love for technology and also my love for art.And when I graduated, Cornell, started work at Samsung and there was an opportunity to go into a new gaming. That's when it clicked for me. I was like, "Wow, I really want to get into this industry. It's as both of what I love." But at Cornell, because we had super fast ethernet, a lot of people were playing StarCraft at that time. And that's how I saw the world in terms of, "Wow, these type of massively play online games. I mean, RPGs or games where you can play competitively is going to be a big thing."Chris Erwin:I don't want to date you TK, if that's uncomfortable, but around what time period was this? What year was this around?Taehoon Kim:College was from 1997 to 2002.Chris Erwin:I have to ask, too, when you say that you almost went to art school, and that you had a passion for arts, since it's very early on, what type of art applications? Was it painting? Was it drawing? Was it sculpture? Was it something completely different? What did that look like?Taehoon Kim:Sculpture, I was good, but I didn't excel at it. I was mainly good at sketching, painting, and doing just a lot of creative art, concept art, which is a big part of game development, actually.Chris Erwin:Your first role, what you did for work right after Cornell was you went to Samsung, and there you were a product manager where you helped start Samsung's smartphone business, and you're also a product manager for next-gen mobile gaming. And as you said, this was exciting to you, because you saw gaming as the intersection of technology and art. Tell us how that first role came to be and kind of what you focused on there.Taehoon Kim:I was part of a team called new business development team. Group of 13 people, and our job was to create next-gen businesses. Three businesses that we isolated as something that we should work on was telematics, which is using the map data to help people and navigations and bring new technologies to the car. Second one was smartphone business, taking some of the operating systems from PDAs at the time and then moving that over to the phone. And then third one was gaming, because Nokia was going big with gaming at that time. And Samsung was second to Nokia in market share and someone wanted to do whatever Nokia was doing at that time.So those were three main things. And I got into the gaming side after one of the first business trips was to San Jose, which at that time was hosting GDC, Game Developer Conference. And it was my first time going to GDC. And, yeah, I was just fascinated with the group. It was engineers, artists, players, developers, publishers. And that community really fascinated me, and that's when I decided, "Hey, I really want to be part of this group. I want to get into gaming." So I came back and said, "Hey, I want to take on this project." And a lot of my peers were avoiding the gaming sector, because they knew that was difficult. And Samsung previously tried to do a console and it failed. So they knew it was difficult, but I wanted to get into it. I was super excited to get into it.Chris Erwin:Was it hard to convince your leadership, just based on the past challenges that Samsung had, to do it? Or did they just say, "Hey, TK, sure if you have an idea, see what you can do and then come back to us"?Taehoon Kim:Well, the leadership really wanted to do it mainly because Nokia at the time, that's when they launched their first gaming phone called N-Gage. I'm not sure if a lot of people remember, but it was a really weird device. They launched that business, and it was getting a lot of press. And our CEO was like, "We also have to a quick follow, and we have to get into gaming phones as well." So it was but different from what they did in the past, because it wasn't just a pure console, it's a smartphone plus a gaming device.So it was a completely different type of environment at that time compared to when they were doing console. But nonetheless, because gaming is a [inaudible 00:14:06] driven and also because it's a tough business, my peers were, "Hey, I want to be in another sector." So it was less competitive for me to take on that project.Chris Erwin:So that must have been pretty exciting. Your first role out of school, you work for a very large technology company that essentially gives you as a young in your career a mandate. It's like, "Hey, TK, you know what? You want to go forward and figure out a new gaming business line for Samsung? You got the green light to go and do it." That must have felt pretty good. And I think you were there for a few years. What did you accomplish? And then what was the reason for why you decided to move on from that opportunity?Taehoon Kim:It was a very unique opportunity for me. I think I got lucky being at the right place at the right time, because that's when Samsung was really taking off as a global brand name. That's when they first overtook Sony in brand value. And that's when the consumers were looking at the brand more than as a microwave company, and a major player in the IT space. And that's when they were also hiring a lot of people from overseas.And I did both undergrad and master's program at Cornell. And when I was in my masters, I got to know the founders of Palm, which was also a Cornell EE grad, through my professor. I got really stuck into Palm OS. I was semi expert with the Palm OS. I think that's why they hired me, because Samsung was the first major mobile manufacturer to adopt the Palm OS into their phone. And then the second thing is, because at that time Samsung's culture was still, it wasn't easy for Western certain people to... A lot of people from the US schools starting there, they weren't lasting that long. So it was hard for me as well, but I kind of decided, "Hey, I'm going to really make sure that I can stick around and tough it out."Chris Erwin:I think this is another important point for the listeners is that you are also building another company that you had founded while you were at Samsung called IvyConnection. Is that right?Taehoon Kim:Right.Chris Erwin:I like this because I think this is the beginning of a ongoing theme in your career that you are a builder and you're a founder. You're working at a full-time role, you're also building something on the side. And then this leads to, I think, some other big entrepreneurial ambitions kind of later on that we'll get to. But tell us quickly about IvyConnection.Taehoon Kim:IvyConnection kind of came out of the school project that was doing at Cornell, my master's program. At first, it was supposed to be a platform to connect tutors and students. And then I quickly realized, when I got to Seoul that there were a lot of parents who were looking to send their kids overseas to top schools, and they didn't know that things were different over there in terms how admissions worked. So I kind of created the category, which is a huge category is now it was the first company to do it. And so we did get a lot of demand. I started that right before I started working at Samsung, and it was just continuously growing. I recruited a whole bunch of my friends, and I had them kind of run the company. I was a co-founder, and while working at Samsung, I was advising and helping the growth.Chris Erwin:It's amazing, because you describe at Samsung it was a very brutal work culture at the headquarters. So you're probably working very long hours, very demanding, and then you're also building something on the side. It's like when did you have time to sleep?Taehoon Kim:I was young though, so I didn't need... I was happy to just work, until I was young and single. I was at my early 20s, so it was not problem for me. But, yeah, it was pretty brutal. We had to get to work right at 8:00 AM and the system kind of keeps record of exactly when you get into the company. And then you also had to come out on Saturdays for half a day.Chris Erwin:I did not realize that, that's the expectation across... Is that across all companies in Korea, as part of the work culture and the work norms? Or is that just unique to Samsung?Taehoon Kim:I think what's pretty unique to Samsung. I think at that time chairman wanted us to start early. You basically only have one day weekend.Chris Erwin:And for you, where you're also building another company on the side, it's almost like you never had time that you weren't working or very little bit, most likely. So you're at Samsung for about three years, but then you transition to Realtime Worlds. Explain why did you transition from your Samsung role? And what were you building at Realtime Worlds?Taehoon Kim:As I said, I was a project manager for a new gaming platform, and part of my job was also to source content for the device. And I remember playing Lemmings and I met the creator of Lemons, Dave Jones who just sold DMA Design and created Realtime Worlds. And I try to convince him to create games for my platform, but him and his co-founder, they ended up recruiting me. They're like, "Hey, join us. We just started Realtime Worlds, and we'd love to get your help, because we want to get into online gaming. And you have a lot more exposure to online gaming from Seoul, from Korea. So we wanted to be part of this exciting venture." So I decided to leave Samsung and joined them.Chris Erwin:How was that experience? Was it a similar work culture? Did you feel your past experience was very helpful and so you got in there and you're like you knew exactly what to do? Or was it still a very steep learning curve at that point in your career?Taehoon Kim:It was a steep learning curve for me, in terms of game development, because I have never done game development. Because Realtime Worlds is a game developer and publisher. That's right around when they just signed a contact with Microsoft for a game called Crackdown. It was like a souped up version of GTA. Dave Jones was also the creator and designer of GTA, the original GTA 1 and 2. So it was creating a similar game. And they had ambition to also create an online version of GTA, which is where I got involved.I got one of the large publishers in Korea called Webzen to do a publishing deal to fund portion of development for the GTA online project, and be a publisher for that. So they wanted me to create the Asia branch for Realtime Worlds, they called it Realtime World Korea. I started the studio here in Seoul, recruited some engineers and designers and also did biz dev work to get that publishing deal with Webzen.Chris Erwin:And I think also one of the highlights from your time there is that, did you also help to raise money from NEA, in your role at the company as you guys were growing?Taehoon Kim:Oh, yes. My professor from Cornell, he was friends with the founder of NEA, and he knew a lot of VCs. And Realtime Worlds was based in Scotland, and they knew very little about Silicon Valley. So I told him, "Hey, we're doing something amazing here and online gaming is a new sector, so I think we should be able to raise some money." So I created the deck, which I learned from school on how to do, so created a deck, created a business plan, and then flew over to Sand Hill Road in Menlo Park and pitched to a few VCs including NEA. I was surprised. I was like, it was fairly easy at that time to raise money. NEA decided to, all by themselves, bring $30 million into the company and we didn't even have product launched at that time.Chris Erwin:This is pre-product. Did you go to Sand Hill Road by yourself? Or did you have a support team? Or was the company leadership saying, "Hey, TK, you know what you're doing here, you have the connections, go make this happen by yourself"?Taehoon Kim:It was just me at the beginning. It was just me by myself, just trying it out, because the first meeting is exploratory anyways. So at the beginning it was me. They love what they saw, and then afterwards it was like everybody, all the partners from the NEA side and also everyone from our side. At the beginning, it was just me.Chris Erwin:Wow. Did you enjoy the fundraising process? I mean, it seems like you're wearing so many hats, you're doing business development, you're fundraising, you're also building out different offices as part of the core game development practice. Was there something that you felt like you were gravitating towards more specifically? Or did you like doing it all and having a broad top down view of the company?Taehoon Kim:Yeah, I think the reason I ended up taking the fundraising process is because I actually enjoyed the process. A lot of people hate it, because part of the fundraising process is just being comfortable with getting rejected. But I didn't mind that at all. I'm like, "Fine [inaudible 00:21:57]." And big part of the process is also not only selling, but knowing what they're looking for. So I got really good at researching all the VCs, and instead of having one deck and just one approach for all the VCs, I would custom create the deck for each of the VCs, and only target the top tier ones. I quickly realized that it's actually easier to raise money from the top tier VCs than the second or third tier VCs, surprisingly. And that approach really worked, and I love the process.Chris Erwin:Why is it easier to raise money from top VCs versus tier two, tier three?Taehoon Kim:It's actually simple. The top tier VCs are able to make decisions on their own, even though it seems odd or different or something that doesn't seem intuitive. They are able to say, "Hey, we're going to take a bet on this," and they can make a quick decision. The second and third tier VCs are always looking to see what others are doing. They're always looking for validation. They're always looking to see what the first tier guys are doing.So a lot more due diligence, it takes a lot more work, and they kind of beat around the bush a lot more. They take a lot longer to make their decisions. And a lot of times they bring in other VCs to co-lead or see what they think. So it's actually a lot more work to get them to lead. So if you have a great product and you have a good vision, then just go to the top tier guys. Go straight to top to your guys. They'll be able to make a much quicker and faster decision.Chris Erwin:That's a great insight. TK, though, I do have to say yet again, while you're at Realtime Worlds, I think the same year that you start working there, is 2005, you also are the co-founder of another company called Nurien Software. So yet again, you're working at a company, it's a very big role, you're working across a variety of different company functions, but you're also building something on the side. Is that right?Taehoon Kim:Right. Yeah.Chris Erwin:What was Nurien Software?Taehoon Kim:So Nurien Software was actually a spinoff off of the Realtime Worlds' Korea office. Dave Jones, he introduced me to the guys at Epic Games, and that's when they were launching on Unreal Engine 3. And he also introduced me to another studio who was doing a music game, and that kind of clicked for me. I was like, "Hey, what if we take Unreal Engine 3, which is very high graphics fidelity, which is usually used for like MMORPGs and then create a music game out of it, because the music is to be very visual." And they wanted this to be kind of separate. So I decided to be make it, instead of doing it Realtime Worlds Korea made it into a separate one.And that also started to get momentum. And it turns out music plus gaming was a huge thing, especially in Asia. Just as we were starting the development for, we call it MStar, a music based MMO, another game called Audition just took off massively in China. It was doing a billion a year. It was a tough time for me because Realtime Worlds and Nurien Software, at the same time, was kind of taking off.Chris Erwin:And again, for Nurien Software, you also led a $25 million fundraise from NEA and top VCs.Taehoon Kim:I pitched them on Friday, and they told me they were in on Monday. So it was crazy times. That's when online gaming was really taking off. So it was actually, it's not just me, but it was much easier to raise money at that time.Chris Erwin:Probably, again, working a lot, building, not a lot of sleep. You're running both these companies. And then Nurien Software sells in 2010 to Netmarble CJ E&M. And what was the end result for Realtime Worlds? What happened to that company?Taehoon Kim:I was only running both companies for a short period of time. So right after Nurien Software got funded, the board wanted me to focus on the new VCs, and Nurien Software wanted me to focus on Nurien Software. So I helped Realtime Worlds find a replacement for me, and I left Realtime Worlds, and I was full-time at Nurien.Chris Erwin:Hey, listeners, this is Chris Erwin, your host of The Come Up. I have a quick ask for you, if you dig what we're putting down, if you like the show, if you like our guests, it would really mean a lot, if you can give us a rating wherever you listen to our show. It helps other people discover our work, and it also really supports what we do here. All right, that's it everybody. Let's get back to the interview.Taking a step back, so, TK, you're part of these very exciting companies. The leadership and the founders clearly, really believe in you, and think you are someone special. So they're giving you the green light to essentially co-found spinoffs, and then go raise additional venture funding for that. Did you feel at this point in your early career that you're like, "I'm exactly where I'm supposed to be. This is an exciting path, These are growing industries. I'm good at it. I have the right international connections. And now it's time where I want to double down on this, and I'm going to be an entrepreneur. I see white space in these gaming markets, and I want to build towards that. And I'm going to go raise capital to make that happen." What was going through your head? Because it feels like the story that you're telling is so exciting for someone to be at your career stage. What were you feeling?Taehoon Kim:That's when I realized that this act of dreaming something up, raising money for it, and actually launching it and seeing it become real and seeing a product go live, and enjoyed by millions of people, is just really fulfilling. And it's something that I knew that I wanted to continue doing. It's something that I really enjoy.So even to this day, that's the main reason that I'm doing this. Well, it's more than financially driven motives. I just love creating new things and bringing it out to people and surprising people and seeing them delighted. It makes all the hard work worthwhile, and it's a very kind of thrilling experience for me. And that's when I realized, "Hey, I want to do this long term. This is what I'm good at. Coming out with new ideas and getting it funded and launching it." Not all of them are successful, but that's fine. The act of doing it is a reward.Chris Erwin:Very well said. So I think, was it that mindset, I think, a company that you did found and you worked at for one to two years before nWay was Pixelberry. What was the quick take on Pixelberry? What was that?Taehoon Kim:So Pixelberry was also a spinoff from Nurien Software. Nurien Software was an MMO company, so, as I said, it was using Unreal Engine 3. It was still very heavy. You had to download a big client, and run it on pc. And back in 2009, 2010, that's when social gaming and hyper-accessible gaming was taken off. So Pixelberry, at the beginning, was an experiment to try to bring over a lot of the core technologies built at Nurien Software and make them more accessible, and make it so that people can just instantly play on a browser.And the first game that we tried to do was a fashion game, because we realized from launching MStar, which was a music MMO, the best way to monetize those games were through, we're making a lot of money by selling clothing for the avatars, selling fashion, in other words. So we wanted to create a game, a social game, focused on creating fashion and selling fashion.Chris Erwin:I didn't realize that Pixelberry was also a spinoff of Nurien Software. So it seems that you had a really good thing going with the founding team of Lemmings that created Realtime Worlds. There was a lot of market opportunity. The founders really believed in you, and you had all these different ways, as you said, to kind of create and innovate as the gaming markets were evolving, and bring these incredible gaming experiences to users. And I think you were part of that team for almost six years, from 2005 to 2011. What was the catalyst that caused you to break off from that, start the venture that you still run today, which is nWay?Taehoon Kim:I was doing Pixelberry and it wasn't doing that well, mainly because, me as a gamer, didn't really enjoy fashion games that much. Maybe that was the reason. Or maybe because the industry was kind of changing rapidly, but it wasn't doing that well. Zynga and a handful of others were kind of dominating the social gaming space. And the co-founders of Realtime Worlds, Dave Jones and Tony Harman, at that time, just sold realtime worlds to GamersFirst. And they're like, "Hey, TK, let's start a new company together." And that's when I kind of jumped at the opportunity, because I really wanted to work with those guys again. And that's when nWay was founded.Chris Erwin:Oh, got it. So Dave and Tony are part of the founding team of nWay?Taehoon Kim:Yes, the three of us that were the founders [inaudible 00:30:16].Chris Erwin:So I think what would be helpful for the listeners is to explain what was the initial vision for nWay, when you, Dave, and Tony were coming together to found the company. What was your vision for what you wanted to build?Taehoon Kim:By that time, I did a lot of different type of games, did [inaudible 00:30:31] mobile gaming at Samsung, I did MMOs, PC MMOs Unreal Engine 3, and then also browser based games at Pixelberry. And the vision at nWay was like, "Hey, a lot of people are becoming gamers now through new technologies, new devices, mobile was really taking off. People were playing games on mobile browsers, smart TVs, and there was new technologies to bring them all together." So the vision was, "Hey, let's go back to the type of games that we love. Let's go back to the days when we were playing Doom online, and playing fighting games with other live players. Let's bring competitive gaming, let's bring real time multiplier gaming to the emerging platforms." So that was the vision.Let's create new technologies to bring console quality, competitive multiplier games that could run on mobile browsers, smart TVs, where people can kind of play together regardless of what device they were on." That turned out to be a big thing, these days with Fortnite and Minecraft, everybody's playing crossplay games. Your friend is on tablet, somebody else is on a Nintendo Switch, and you can play together.Chris Erwin:Okay, so when you start out, that's the vision. So where do you start? What was the first steps? Is it pre-product, we're going to go raise money, and put together a team? Or in the beginning of it self-finance and you were working on a certain game or a certain platform? What were your first early moves?Taehoon Kim:I took a lot of the learnings from the previous products. So by then I knew how to make games that would run on multiple devices. I knew it wasn't easy, but we wanted to do a quick prototype of an action RPG game, where it can have four player co-op and two player PVP mode that would run on a mobile phone and a browser. We were able to create a quick prototype in about six weeks, and the prototype, it did all the selling for us.Because I could just show it to the investors, "Hey, look, I'm over here. There's another guy on a mobile device, there's another guy on another device." And they could see that we're all synchronized, and they could see that it was a very fast action game. A lot of them were blown away at how there was low latency and running so fast just over the internet. And so we were able to raise money from the top tier VCs. But at the same time, 2011, 2012 was a period of time when there were a lot of acquisitions happening, and we were also getting a lot of acquisition offers at the same time, that complicated the process.Chris Erwin:So six weeks into building a prototype, you're fundraising on Sand Hill Road, but you're also getting inbounds from companies that want to buy your business that early.Taehoon Kim:Yeah. They saw the prototype and immediately give us ridiculous offers to buy the company. It was basically VCs and companies trying to buy us competing, which helped the valuation to go up.Chris Erwin:All right. So a couple questions on that. It's really interesting. One, were you at a point, because you've successfully raised money from Silicon Valley investors, you've had exits for them, where you and the investment funds made money. Were you able at that point, where you felt like you could walk into a room, do a product demo, you didn't need to show up with a deck and they would say, "Yeah, this sounds great, TK, we're going to give you money"? Were you at that point or were you still running a formal process? You show up with the business plan and everything?Taehoon Kim:We didn't need the business plan anymore, but we still need a deck. By then, I just became really an expert on how to create a simple deck that walked through the business, and I knew what type of prototype need to be created to fundraise. It was a simple 15 to 20 slides deck plus a quick demo. And simpler story the better, is this basically a storytelling deck walkthrough, why you're able to do what you're doing now. Why it hasn't been done until now. And then you talk about the market and how big the market would get, show a quick prototype, and talk about the technologies involved. And that was pretty much it.Chris Erwin:You're getting these incredible inbounds from companies who want to buy you, plus, you're also raising from venture capitalists. How did you and the two other founders come together to decide, do we sell or do we not sell?Taehoon Kim:The VCs helped us with that as well, maybe because they were trying to convince us to maybe take their deal. But they would let us know what each of the companies are like, and they would connect us to founders who have sold to that company previously. And I was able to pick their brains or interview them. We decided, "Hey, we really want to try this on our own." So we decided to take the VC route. And I think at that time that was, the VC was Lightspeed Ventures, who gave us a good term sheet and we decided to sign that term sheet.And the reason in the beginning I told you why things became complicated is because after we signed the term sheet with Lightspeed, one of their portfolio companies, KIXEYE, they also decided that they wanted to buy us. And they give us an offer we rejected, and then they got really mad at Lightspeed Ventures asking them why they're funding a company that could be a competitor to them. And KIXEYE basically threatened to sue them if they invested in us. So at the last minute it kind of fell apart.Chris Erwin:Oh, so Lightspeed did not end up investing in you at that point.Taehoon Kim:So imagine this Zynga gave us an offer, a pretty good offer to buy us. We rejected Zynga's offer and signed with Lightspeed, but Lightspeed couldn't follow through because of KIXEYE. I'm thankful to them because at that time they actually gave me a check for a million dollars, it was like a loan, with no interest rate.Chris Erwin:Lightspeed gave it to you?Taehoon Kim:Yeah, I was really surprised by this. They were like, "Hey, we need to talk." I met them at a coffee shop, and they like, "Hey, here's a check for million dollars. I'm really sorry to have wasted your time, and take this money and use it to give more time to find another investor, because it's not your fault that this deal kind of fell through." So if we didn't get that, it would've been a lot harder for us. Because we did spend a lot of time, a lot of cycles with them, and that meant we had less time to finish the fundraising. That million dollar check, give us more time.Chris Erwin:Think about that million dollar Check is an incredible marketing for Lightspeed as being a go-to partner, as a tier one VC, right? Because one, for you, TK, in your career, knowing that they did that, that they had your back, they understood the challenging situation that they put you in. And they were very direct with you about how they want to do a make good. Next time you go need to go raise money for the next thing that you found, are you probably going to have a conversation with Lightspeed? I would say the answer is yes.Taehoon Kim:Yeah, became really good friends with them. But isn't that incredible? They don't know if they're going to get the million dollar back. What if we fail, and we just kind of go bankrupt or whatever, and then I have to pay them back? But they were, "Hey, here's a million dollars, there's no interest rate. You can pay us back time."Chris Erwin:I agree, it is amazing. I think what they were putting a price tag on was, we want to be in the TK business. We want to be in business with Dave and Tony. And so this is not the last time that we're going to have a chance to invest in a company that could make them millions, if not billions of dollars. And so they said, "We're going to invest in that relationship," and probably a $1 million check to them was easy money, right?Taehoon Kim:Yeah.Chris Erwin:That's amazing. I've never heard of something like that before, but I totally get why they did it. That's incredible. So I understand that Lightspeed and other venture firms were introducing you to founders who had sold their businesses to these potential acquirers of your business. What was one or two things that you learned that made you decide, "I don't want to sell right now"?Taehoon Kim:They were describing to me the culture of the company, because once you sell, you're basically getting a job at that company. And if there's a culture fit, that's great. But if it's a different type of culture, then maybe you won't enjoy it as much. Again, I was doing it because I love that process because the actual act of creating and launching is what's rewarding for us. So I think that's main reason why we decided, "Hey, maybe we shouldn't sell." But after Lightspeed thing fell through, we were like, "Oh, maybe we should have sold." Right after that million dollar check and that conversation, literally, the next day or two days from then I was able to get another term sheet from another VC. So this one is actually a funny story. So I was really upset when Lightspeed thing fell through. I went out drinking with my friends, and I got hammered that night. I had another VC pitch the next morning. I was so hungover that during the presentation I threw up three times, and I was doing a pitch.Chris Erwin:During the pitch.Taehoon Kim:Yeah, during the pitch, I would say, "Excuse me, I went to the bathroom." I would throw up, come back, continue the pitch. And I did that three times, and whenever I made that trip to the bathroom, people were kind of laughing at me, who were at the front desk. I did the presentation 9:00 AM, I came home and I was, "Oh, my God, I totally screwed that up." I fell asleep. I woke up at 4:00 PM, got a call at 5:00 PM saying that he was in. So I was like, "What the..." Because I told him the story of what happened as well, so he said, "Hey, all that stuff just added more color to your storytelling," and then he was in.But then later I realized that the reason he was able to make quick decision, this is a Baseline Ventures, by the way. Baseline Venture was, it was a very unique firm that they had one partner, so they were able to make decision very quickly. And I pitched to them, I think, two days after Instagram was acquired by Facebook. So Baseline was in a flush with cash and they were very happy about the outcome. And so I think that's one of the reasons why they were also able to make a bet, and make that decision very quickly. I literally made a pitch 9:00 AM, and then got a call 5:00 PM saying, they wanted to put in the money. Usually, it doesn't happen that way, but it was a really weird period of time in my life.Chris Erwin:No incredible in a situation in which you thought that that was probably the worst pitch that you've ever given in your life, because you're running to the bathroom to throw up. It turns out that it was, at least one of the more impressive pitches in converting a VC into someone who has interest within just a handful of hours. So it just goes to show you got to stay resilient. And you're human, you just went through this traumatic event where Lightspeed pulled out at the last minute, so you need to go blow off some steam. You go out boozing with your buddies, but you come back the next morning, you put your game face on, and you do what you got to do. That's an incredible story. Thank you for sharing that.So then you raised the money from Baseline, and a few others, and then when did you feel, "Okay, we turned down some initial inbound offers to buy the company," but when did you feel that you really started to get some real momentum that showed you and the other founders, "Hey, we have something much bigger here"? What did that look like?Taehoon Kim:That's when mobile gaming was becoming more serious and evolving from just casual Match 3 games to a device that could run any type of game. So that's when we really got a lot of momentum. So the first prototype they created, I told you it was a four player co-op plus a PVP action RPG game. So we continued to develop on that prototype. We called the game ChronoBlade, and when we had a much more alpha version of the game, that's when things were really blowing up in Asia for RPG games and mobile.And during GDC, when a lot of the publishers were in San Francisco, we had publishers after publishers lined up, literally, signing offers on a napkin table and presenting us, "Here's how much we were willing to pay for MGM and royalty fees for your game." And we were able to just pick from the top tier ones. So we had offer from Tencent, NetEase, Netmarble, the biggest and the best. That was at the point in the company when we knew that things were becoming really serious.Chris Erwin:What year was that?Taehoon Kim:I think that was like 2013, about a year after fundraising.Chris Erwin:Seven years later you do end up selling the company to Animoca. How did that come to be?Taehoon Kim:Oh, this is a complicated story. So in 2018 there was a company called Tron, it's a big blockchain company, who moved in right above our office space. And that company was just taking off like crazy and they had happy hours, they had events. As neighbors we would show up, and that's how we kind of learned about blockchain space, and merging blockchain with gaming could be a new thing. And at that time it was getting really difficult to monetize competitive games because the game has to be fair. So we can't sell things that's [inaudible 00:42:30] base, it can only sell cosmetics. And we were always trying to find new ways to innovate on how to monetize those type of games.And we quickly realized, "Hey, if we can make items in the games that players can earn into NFTs, and if the players can kind of trade NPS items among themselves, and we don't have to even sell them, they can get them in the game, and then exchange from themselves," which was already happening in the MMORPG space anyways. And if we can charge a transaction fee for each of the trades, that could be a model where we didn't have to do any of the [inaudible 00:43:01] box stuff that the players didn't like, and have a enough steady and viable business model.And that's how we got into the blockchain space. At the same time, Animoca was investing like crazy into anything related to the blockchain. It's when I met Yat Siu, the chairman of Animoca, and we kind of hit it off. But funny thing happened to my board at that time, I've never seen this happen. I had a five member board, and our lead investor, our biggest investor at the time, Bridge Ventures, which was a IDG Ventures US, who renamed themselves Bridge Ventures, and they separated from IDG. And so they had to raise their own LPs, and their LPs looked at their investment portfolio and said, "Hey, you do a lot of gaming, you do a lot of enterprise, maybe you guys should pick one instead doing both."And they decided to pick enterprise and get out of gaming. But the partner at Bridge Ventures who was on our board, basically, said, "Hey, then what am I going to do?" And he ended up leaving with Bridge Ventures to create a new VC fund called Griffin. Now it's like the biggest gaming fund by the way, but he left. And then TransLink Ventures, which was our second biggest investor, partner from TransLink Ventures for another whole separate reason, he ended up leaving TransLink. And so he was gone. And then our third board member, Peter Levin from Lionsgate, he ended up leaving Lionsgate. So he was gone from the board. So three of our biggest board members all left for different reasons around at the same time, and they were all replaced by new people and the mandate was to get out of gaming. All of a sudden, boom, my board was gone.And so they wanted to get out. They wanted to sell the company. So when I went met with Yat Siu, I hit it off with the Yat, and I thought it would be amazing to work together. And that's how the deal went through. If it was the same board and then there wasn't that kind of shake up at the board level, I'm not sure if I'd be able to sell the company, probably would've been the state of independent. But because of that and the special circumstance, the deal was able to go through. So that was a good thing for Animoca.Chris Erwin:Good thing for Animoca. But if it was up to you, you would've stayed independent for at least a few years longer, because you saw a bigger opportunity ahead, right?Taehoon Kim:Yeah. If it wasn't for that shake, I probably would've stayed independent. But looking back now, I'm thinking that it was a good thing to kind of join forces with Animoca. Right after we joined forces with Animoca, Animoca went through a growth phase. I've never seen a company grow that fast. They basically went from a $100 million valuation to the $6 billion valuation in like two years. They were doubling in valuation every three months. It was kind of nuts. It was really fun to be part of that ride. And right now it's an amazing partnership.Chris Erwin:In that sale, was it a cash and equity deal? So are you able to participate in this crazy run that Animoca's had?Taehoon Kim:It was mostly equity, so it was a huge upside for the investors.Chris Erwin:Got it. A final note before we get to the rapid fire section is now that you're partnered up with Animoca, what do you see as the future for nWay and what you're building together? What gets you excited? And what is some recent success that you want to be building upon?Taehoon Kim:I'm super excited about what we're doing. I think that we're still very early stage with about three, and this whole kind of digital ownership revolution that we're going through. I think there are opportunities for companies like us to develop and publish online games where players can truly own things. I don't want to make a game where it's like an instrument for people to just make money, but I do think that there's something special about being able to really own some of the items that you're playing with. I think it adds meaning, and when you have ownership you just get more attached to things. And so our vision right now is to create more meaningful entertainment through real games that players can play and also have ownership in. And we're going to be doing a lot of experiments and try to really bring together the Web3 community and the gamers under one community.Chris Erwin:And I know something that you've talked about is some recent wins and partnerships and games that you've done is the International Olympic Committee you published Sean White NFTs, likely a powerful marketing engine for that. And then also you have a Power Rangers game, and a game with the WWE. Do you have similar type projects that are upcoming that build on top of these?Taehoon Kim:So Power Rangers and WWE, those are just regular free to play games. They don't have any blockchain or NFT components in there. The innovation there was to have a game where people can just quickly pick up and play and immediately play with another player. Power Rangers especially was super successful. We had over 80 millions downloads, and I think it's in two year five now, and it's continuously profitable. So the game's been amazing.With the Olympic game, we were able to meet with IOC right when their decades long exclusivity with Nintendo and Sega was coming to an end. And so they wanted to explore a new type of game partnerships. One thing that they were noticing is that the younger audience, who were not watching TV anymore was caring less about Olympics and they wanted to focus on bringing the younger audience into caring more about their brand. And they also at the same time noticed that the younger audience are on Fortnite and Minecraft and they're playing games that are crossplay.So they were looking for a game developer or game development partnership where they could have their game run on multiple devices at the same time. And a real time game where people can play to have a social experience. And as you know that's like right on our sweet spot. We were able to prove that we have some of the best kind of technology to make that happen. With another Power Rangers game called Power Rangers: Battle for the Grid, I think it's still is the only fighting game in the world where it runs on everywhere, the runs on Xbox, PlayStation, and the Switch. It even ones on a browser through Stadia. And it's a really fast action game and you can play together with anybody on any device, and there's no lag and there's no [inaudible 00:48:45] issues.So they saw that and they were like, "Hey, we want to partner with you guys." I threw them curve ball and said, "We want to partner with you guys, but we also want to add this thing called NFTs. And we think that there's a 100-year-old tradition that's already there with your brand. When people go to the Olympics they still trade the Olympic pins. We want to make the pins into NFTs, also integrate them to the game, so that when people collect these NFT pins, they could use it in the game to give them a boost in the game." To my surprise, even though they are a very conservative organization, we won the RFP, and they wanted to partner with us. And we launched the project and we got a lot of press from that. And that was a really fun project to launch.Chris Erwin:And I just have to ask, this is a minor detail, but this 100-year-old tradition about trading Olympic pins, are these pins like representative? If you're from the United States and you go to the Olympics, you're wearing a US pin, and then the different athletes will trade them amongst themselves. Is that how that works?Taehoon Kim:Well, there's tons of variety of pins created from poster artworks, emblems, mascots, Coca-Cola always creates Olympic pins together. But the tradition got started, I think, in 1932 or something like that, when they had Olympics in Paris, and the officials, for the first time, had badges or pins and they started trading that. But right now there's a really high variety of pins out there.Chris Erwin:Super cool. It sounds like digitizing those pins and converting them into NFTs that can be traded on chain and in an efficient digital manner that seems it's like a perfect application. I had no idea about the underlying tradition behind that, but makes a ton of sense to me.So let's go into rapid fire. Before we do that, I just want to give you some quick kudos. Look, I think we first met two to three months ago over a Zoom call. And so this is literally our second conversation ever. I did research into years story online, but hearing it come to life, there's a few things that really stand out. I think, one, that your willingness to really work hard and also try different things and take bets very early on in your career, but align those bets with things that you are really passionate about.So even if they were risky, you are doing them down these vectors where it was strong, passionate, and meaningful areas to you. And there's almost in a way you were going to will them into existence or make them work. And clearly you took a bet at the intersection of technology and art, which manifested in gaming that has really paid off.Something also stands out is within the category that you've bet on, in contrast to others that would just say, "Hey, I found myself in this unique opportunity. I'm able to open up doors to raise capital, build businesses." And instead of having the goal just be, "I want to make a lot of money," it is. Instead, "I want to bring delight to users. I have a unique expertise of what the gaming ecosystem, where it comes from and where it's going. And I know what users want. And I want to give them delights. And I'm going to enjoy the journey along the way."And I think that's probably something that we didn't get into, but this probably speaks to a reason why you've been able to recruit teams that build alongside you consistently, and investors that want to back you is because you're going to enjoy the journey. And I think when you focus on the end user and the experience and delight, the money is then going to follow versus going about it the other way. So it's clearly worked out incredibly well for you and very excited to see what you continue building next.Taehoon Kim:Thank you.Chris Erwin:Welcome. Let's go to rapid fire. So six questions, the rules are very straightforward. I'm going to ask six questions and the answers can be either one sentence, or maybe just one to two words. Do you understand the rules?Taehoon Kim:Yes.Chris Erwin:All right, here we go. What do you want to do less of in 2022?Taehoon Kim:Less of Zoom meetings, and more of in-person interactions.Chris Erwin:Got it. What one to two things drive your success?Taehoon Kim:I think it's the ability to read the market, ability to raise money, and then having the optimism to try new things and innovate on things that could be deemed risky.Chris Erwin:Got it. What advice do you have for gaming execs going into the second half of this year?Taehoon Kim:The advice would be to focus on making a fun game. There are a lot of game companies who are getting funded going to kind of play to earn or Web3 games, where they're kind of losing that kind of focus. But I think at the end of the day, the game should be fun. And if the games are able to create a community of gamers who really care about the game and their kind of community inside the game, then you can create an economy within the game that's not a bubble, that's sustainable.Chris Erwin:Well said. Any future startup ambitions?Taehoon Kim:I think AR and VR would make a comeback. It's a really difficult business to be in now, but if I kind of look decades into the future, I think that could be something that could be a new space that could be blossoming later on.Chris Erwin:Proudest life moment?Taehoon Kim:I think that would be a tie between when I got married to my wife and also when I had my twin boys in 2011.Chris Erwin:Oh, you're a father of twins. I'm actually a twin myself.Taehoon Kim:Oh, yeah, I have twin boys.Chris Erwin:Oh, that's the best. How old are they?Taehoon Kim:They're both 11.Chris Erwin:Very cool. TK, it's been a delight chatting with you. Thank you for being on The Come Up podcast.Taehoon Kim:Thank you so much. It was definitely a pleasure.Chris Erwin:All right. Quick heads up that our company has a new service offering. We just introduced RockWater Plus, which is for companies who want an ongoing consulting partner at a low monthly retainer, yet, also need a partner who can flex up for bigger projects when they arise. So who is this for? Well, three main stakeholders, one, operators who seek growth and better run operations. Two, investors who need help with custom industry research and diligence. And, three, leadership who wants a bolt-on strategy team and thought partner.So what is included with RockWater Plus? We do weekly calls to review KPIs or any ad hoc operational needs. We create KPI dashboards to do monthly performance tracking. We do ad hoc research ranging from customer surveys to case studies to white space analysis, financial modeling where we can understand your addressable market size, do P&L forecast, ROI analyses, even cash runway projections. We also do monthly trend reports to track new co-launches, M&A activity, partnerships activity in the space. And lastly, we make strategic introductions to new hires, investors for fundraising, and then also potential commercial strategic partnerships. So if any of this sounds appealing or you want to learn more, reach out to us at hello@wearerockwater.com. We can set a call with our leadership.All right. Lastly, we love to hear from our listeners. If you have any feedback on the show or any ideas for guests, shoot us a note at tcupod@wearerockwater.com. All right, that's it everybody. Thanks for listening.The Come Up is written and hosted by me, Chris Erwin, and is a production of RockWater Industries. Please rate and review this show on Apple Podcast. And remember to subscribe wherever you listen to our show. And if you really dig us, feel free to forward The Come Up to a Friend. You can sign up for our company newsletter at wearerockwater.com/newsletter. And you could follow us on Twitter, @tcupod. The Come Up is engineered by Daniel Tureck. Music is by Devon Bryant. Logo and branding is by Kevin Zazzali. And special thanks to Alex Zirin and Eric Kenigsberg from the RockWater team.