Podcasts about Daimler

  • 850PODCASTS
  • 2,280EPISODES
  • 26mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 20, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about Daimler

Show all podcasts related to daimler

Latest podcast episodes about Daimler

Conversations About Conversations
The Confidence Project: Strategies to Project a More Confident You with Tracy Hooper

Conversations About Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 40:45


Our guest on this episode is Tracy Hooper. Tracy is the Founder of The Confidence Project. Her prestigious client list includes Nike, Intel, Microsoft, Merck, Daimler, and Kaiser Permanente. She leads dynamic presentations for high-achieving teams of any size and advises executives and professionals in a wide variety of industries. Her work results in cultures where people elevate their presence, communicate with clarity, and work together better. She's been a TV news reporter, anchor, producer, and voice-over professional for corporate clients including Disney and NFL Films. WATCH the episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/34W1yh21er0 LISTEN to the podcast on Spotify, Apple, Amazon, Google,  or iHeartRadio Conversations About Conversations – Episode 282 #ConversationsAboutConversations #Confidence #ConfidenceCanBeLearned

That Does Suit Madame, a Podcast about
Episode 86: "The Darts Match" - Are You Being Served Again / Grace & Favour.

That Does Suit Madame, a Podcast about "Are You Being Served?"

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 82:40


In this podcast episode, we review the very final original content from the AYBS Universe. :( Your two podcast hosts had a lovely chat with Brian Slade, author “Simon Cadell: The Authorised Biography”, the beloved Hi-De-Hi actor. We received a delightful voicemail from the “Keeping Up Appearances: The Luxury Podcast” with chums of the pod William Hanson (from the “I Sexted My Boss” podcast) and Jonathan Vernon-Smith from the BBC “The JVS Show” programme. The staff has finally turned on Mr. Rumbold's managerial role. “Fanny Adams” is a phrase that translates to “fuck all” but points to a very tragic news event which was popularized by the English Navy regarding an 8 year old girl in 1867. What if there -was- a 3rd season of Grace & Favour/AYBS? We learn about the fate of Mrs. Rumbold. Mr. Molturd randomly announces that the lads from the pub have challenged the staff with a darts match! We try to explain how darts is played (visualize a pizza). Find old episodes of “Bullseye” on YouTube, the Darts Game Show from 1980s' UK! Sheep are being sold to the estate next-door. Mr. Humphries is proud of his Australian hat (sent from his penpal). Capt. Peacock's mysterious bite marks that Miss. Lovelock somehow is privy to. Enter the 1928 Daimler sedan. What is a “tax disc”? Percy the local police officer and Molturd's bribe. And the super cute freeze-frame of Billy Burden in this scene with a great big smile. The Vine Tree Pub was where the exterior shots of the episode were filmed in Norton, England. It's still open today and is a 14 minute drive away from Chavenage House (“Millstone Manor”). Apple orchards in the West Country of England generates excess apples which are then crafted into “scrumpy”- a high-octane alcohol. A quick history of why we call the graphite in pencils “lead”. Mavis can handle her scrumpy and “is just getting started”! Paul Humpoletz player Henry Heathcliff, Malcom's father. Mr. Brandon finally stumps Mr. Jeff: Paul Humpoletz also played one of the thieves in the “The Hold Up” from the original series 10: episode 3! And her past catches up with her again from Tiverton. A shoving match starts up; Rumbold and Henry step outside! Both men are posturing until Slocombe finally smashes Henry with her handbag. Dressed all in black, the staff try to sneak onto the neighbouring estate to spirit away the sheep. Mr. Humphries accepts Slocombe's cold cream! Marketing made men think cold cream was only for young women. Humphries tries to bribe a terrier dog with the tandoori chicken (which no one likes, including the dog). And the sheep find their way back to Millstone Manor! Happy ending! And the final lines of Grace & Favour: Peacock: “A large drink and a hot bath.” Slocombe: “Now that's real leadership that is”. Superfan John-Brian Hopkins on Twitter shared that the terrier in this episode was Wendy Richard's dog named “Shirley Brahams”. The terrier gets the final credit of the series! Our NEXT episode: Behind the Pink Curtain. We discuss our thoughts about making the podcast series, AYBE today and yesterday, and how YOU can make your own podcast. Final call: send us your last voicemail for our final podcast! Treat yourself to some That Does Suit Madame merch at our Bargain Basement podcast shop at imfree.threadless.com for t-shirts, mugs, tote bags, and more! Leave the show a voicemail at the Peacock Hotline: (662)-PEACOCK (662-732-2625) and find us on Twitter @DoesSuitMadame and #AYBS #AreYouBeingServed #ImFree #Britcom #comedy #ThatDoesSuitMadame #GraceBros #podcast #LGBT #BlackLivesMatter #BBC #AreYouBeingServedAgain #GraceAndFavour #GraceAndFavor

HR Leaders
How to Design Your Company Culture to Connect with Strategy and Purpose, with Melissa Daimler

HR Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 37:52


In this episode of the HR Leaders podcast I'm joined by Melissa Daimler to discuss Reculturing: how to design your company culture to connect with strategy and purpose.Melissa Daimler is the Chief Learning Officer at Udemy, author of ReCulturing, an organisational culture & learning advisor and a sought-after keynote speaker. Melissa helps leaders design, operationalise, and scale their culture. Prior to Udemy, Melissa created and built Learning, Organisational, and Talent Development functions for Adobe, Twitter, and WeWork. She is also a speaker, panelist, and contributor to major industry publishers, as well as the author of an upcoming McGraw Hill book, ReCulturing: Design Your Company Culture to Connect with Strategy and Purpose for Lasting Success.

Trucker Dump - A Trucking Podcast
TD180: Weather Apps For Truckers, Women In Trucking Group Gets Busy, Electric Truck Video, & More

Trucker Dump - A Trucking Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 48:54


In this week's show, we've two cool weather apps for truckers, an HOS exemption denial, new ELD rules for California, a new product from the Jake Brake people, the FMCSA's new Women In Trucking initiative gets to work, a video showing the cab of an electric truck, free food for some truckers, self-driving trucks in Australia, and much more. Also, my world has now been restored since we finally got a new Trucker Grub submission and a bit of Listener feedback. This episode of Trucker Dump is sponsored by: Porter Freight Funding - So many services to offer, including Factoring, Dispatching, Freight Brokering, Fuel Cards, Insurance, and Compliance. Call 205-576-8257 to learn more. Introduction Links: Weather On The Way app Truck Driver Power app News Links: Brake system corrosion prompts massive Daimler recall from OverdriveOnline.com House bill looks to give independent contractors more flexibility from OverdriveOnline.com 'We're not going away': Owner-operator regroups after FMCSA denies hours of service exemption request from OverdriveOnline.com California moves to implement intrastate ELD mandate for in-state-only truckers from OverdriveOnline.com Jacobs unveils cylinder deactivation tech to cut emissions from LandLine.media Watch: Driving recap of Volvo's VNR Electric from ccjdigital.com (Commercial Carrier Journal) Self-driving trucks hit the road for Australia's first live-traffic trial from BigRigs.com Women of trucking criticize FMCSA crime study from FreightWaves.com TA donates $100K to St. Christopher Fund after round-up campaign from OverdriveOnline.com Love's, Chester's Chicken offer truckers free Super Snack from LandLine.media Trucker Grub: Mis Tres Potrillos in Olney, Illinois Show info: You can email your comments, suggestions, questions, or insults to TruckerDump@gmail.com Join the Trucker Dump Podcast Facebook Group Join the Trucker Dump Slack Group by emailing me at TruckerDump@gmail.com Got a second to Rate and/or Review the podcast on iTunes? Download the intro/outro songs for free! courtesy of Walking On Einstein

Winning In Asia: A ZoZo Go Podcast
Introducing Extreme Fast Charging With Doron Myersdorf, Founder, StoreDot.

Winning In Asia: A ZoZo Go Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 40:32


StoreDot is an Israeli-based technology startup with deep expertise in charging batteries. The company is focused on extreme fast charging for electric cars. How extreme? StoreDot aims to deliver 100 miles of charge to your car battery in only five minutes. Among his financial backers: Samsung, Daimler, British Petroleum and VinFast. Doron and his team will demonstrate the "100 in 5" charge breakthrough in November 2022 at the high profile Web Summit in Lisbon, Portugal. In today's conversation, we look at how StoreDot will save us thousands of hours of charging time. #DrivingWithDunne / #ZozoGo https://twitter.com/Dunne_ZoZoGohttps://www.instagram.com/zo.zo.go/?hl=enhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-dunne-a696901a/

Transportation Matters - The CEO Podcast of Daimler Trucks & Buses
#04.06 | Anna Mascolo – Zero emissions: The infrastructure challenge

Transportation Matters - The CEO Podcast of Daimler Trucks & Buses

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 23:35


Martin Daum talks to Anna Mascolo, Executive Vice President for Emerging Energy Solutions at Shell. They discuss the zero emissions target, focusing especially on the infrastructure – an aspect that is highly interesting and relevant for the industry and consumers alike. What challenges and dependencies do exist? Which fuel do we bet on? What is the role of society, politics and the industry? And why are the two convinced that scale and speed are crucial factors? Enjoy listening!

From Start-Up to Grown-Up
Episode 28 - Melissa Daimler, Udemy

From Start-Up to Grown-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 62:43


Melissa Daimler helps leaders design, operationalize, and scale their culture. She currently serves as the Chief Learning Officer for Udemy, where she develops learning strategies for both customers and employees. Melissa brings over two decades of experience across Learning and Development, Talent Management, and Organizational Development. Prior to Udemy, Melissa created and built Learning, Organizational, and Talent Development functions for Adobe, Twitter, and WeWork. Melissa is a speaker, panelist, and contributor to broad industry publishers including Harvard Business Review, Huffington Post, Chief Learning Officer, and Chief Talent Development Officer magazines. She has served as a board member for the Association of Talent Development (“ATD”) and the Advisory Board for the University of San Francisco, Master's Program for Organization Development. Melissa is also the author of the McGraw Hill book, ReCulturing: Design Your Company Culture to Connect with Strategy and Purpose for Lasting Success.We talk all about culture, including what it takes to build a strong company culture, what she's learned from her experiences in different cultural environments. This includes WeWork, and when she realized they weren't going to change. Melissa shares how she's managing her worklife now as an executive, author, and speaker, and the systems she's put in place to keep up with all of her activities.To stay up to date on future episodes and learn more from Alisa, sign up for her newsletter.If you like what you hear, please subscribe to the podcast!Learn more about Melissa Daimler | LinkedInFor more stories and advice on founders and CEOs, head to alisacohn.com

Left to Our Own Devices
Ronen Lago: Shifting Gears in Product Security

Left to Our Own Devices

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 24:48


Ronen Lago has spent the past 20 years as CTO and Head of Product, in companies such as Daimler, Lockheed Martin, Motorola, and CYE. We sat with him to discuss why device manufacturers need to make drastic changes to their operations and hear his tips and tricks for product security teams.

Transportation Matters - The CEO Podcast of Daimler Trucks & Buses
#04.05 | Sherry Sanger – Co-creation & autonomous trucks

Transportation Matters - The CEO Podcast of Daimler Trucks & Buses

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 28:08


In the latest episode, Martin Daum and Sherry Sanger talk about the power of co-creation and how we can use it to unlock the full potential of autonomous driving. Sherry Sanger is Executive Vice President for Marketing and Chief Marketing Officer at Penske Transportation Solutions, a U.S.-based provider of global transportation services and a long-time Daimler Truck customer. What is co-creation? What's so special about it? What are the advantages? Can it bring us closer to autonomous driving? And if so, what will be the future job description of a truck driver? Find the answers to these questions in our latest episode.

Trucker Dump - A Trucking Podcast
TD175: Teamsters Striking, New Truck Parking Problems, Pepsi Goes Tesla, & More

Trucker Dump - A Trucking Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 63:35


In today's show, we we've got lots of info on electric trucks, including Tesla's version finally hitting the road, and maintenance and parking problems associated with EV's. Got a crap-ton on autonomous trucks too. Also, electronic ID tags on trucks and Teamsters striking. In listener feedback, we talk about flatbed companies, driving school grants, and then an old friend touches base. This episode of Trucker Dump is sponsored by: Porter Freight Funding - So many services to offer, including Factoring, Dispatching, Freight Brokering, Fuel Cards, Insurance, and Compliance. Call 205-397-0934 to learn more. News Links: Multi-state I-70 police blitz taking place this weekend from CDLLife.com Meritor axle issue prompts Navistar, Daimler recalls from OverdriveOnline.com ‘Profound delays' ahead as Georgia DOT begins 8 month lane closures on I-285 in Atlanta from CDLLife.com Electronic IDs for trucks: 'Big brother' or a step forward? from OverdriveOnline.com Tesla Plans to Deliver Semis to Pepsi Five Years After Unveiling from ttnews.com (Transport Topics) California Finds Truck Parking Shortage Complicated by EV Mandates from ttnews.com (Transport Topics) Want a Volvo electric truck? Go for Gold or go away from FreightWaves.com USDOT Unveils Guide, Grants to Combat Truck Parking Shortage from ttnews.com (Transport Topics) CVSA Launches Procedures for Inspections of Autonomous Trucks from ttnews.com (Transport Topics) Watch driverless yard trucks at work at new BMW logistics center in South Carolina from CDLLife.com Truck brake-light exemption denied despite industry support from FreightWaves.com Teamsters, most of them drivers, on strike at 2 Sysco facilities from FreightWaves.com Mom and son killed after colliding with trailer that separated from semi shortly after driver left truck stop from CDLLife.com Trucking's toughest niche? Inside log hauling, which could be on the brink of a powertrain revolution from OverdriveOnline.com Listener Feedback Links: Steven Gorman, who co-hosted TD111: Improving Our Reputation As Truckers, dropped me an email to catch up and to tell me about his TikTok channel. Zachary Smacher, a.k.a. @trucker smack and @cannon bryan had a great conversation about flatbed companies over in the Trucker Dump Podcast Slack group. Dave Weidemann, a.k.a. @MoHican from the the Trucker Dump Podcast Slack group reminded everyone that government grants are a useful thing when it comes to making truck driving school affordable. Show info: You can email your comments, suggestions, questions, or insults to TruckerDump@gmail.com Join the Trucker Dump Podcast Facebook Group Join the Trucker Dump Slack Group by emailing me at TruckerDump@gmail.com Got a second to Rate and/or Review the podcast? Download the intro/outro songs for free! courtesy of Walking On Einstein

Eins zu Eins. Der Talk
Edzard Reuter, Ex-Daimler-Chef

Eins zu Eins. Der Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 39:20


Putin hatte noch nicht seinen letzten Schritt getan, als Edzard Reuter sein aktuelles Buch "Der Preis der Freiheit" schrieb. Da hatte er sich die Frage stellt: "Was Europa jetzt tun muss?" Heute, sagt der 94jährige, würde er diese Frage anders beantworten, auch er habe nicht geglaubt, dass Putin so weit gehen würde. Moderation: Gregor Hoppe

Bilar med sladd
Så gör elbilen dig kriminell

Bilar med sladd

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 105:26


Gör sig svenska Tesla-ägare ovetandes skyldiga till brott? Är det brandfarligt att ladda sin elbil på natten? Hur var det egentligen nu med kärnkraften och stabiliteten i elsystemet? Och hur ska men egentligen ställa sig om man laddar en icke-Tesla på en Tesla laddare? Frågorna är många – men så också svaren i veckans avsnitt.

The Road to Autonomy
Episode 106 | Scaling Autonomy Profitability, A Conversation with Andrew Culhane, Torc Robotics

The Road to Autonomy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 43:55


Andrew Culhane, Chief Strategy Officer, Torc Robotics joined Grayson Brulte on The Road to Autonomy Podcast to discuss scaling autonomy profitability along with Torc's strategic relationship with Daimler.The conversation begins with Andrew reflecting on the last 14 years of Torc, as he first joined the company in 2008 as a Sales Engineer. Up until Daimler acquired a majority stake in 2019, the company never took any outside funding and was profitable each and every year. Torc was bootstrapped from day one. We had no outside capital into Torc until the Daimler deal. – Andrew CulhaneThis is a success story. This is Torc. The can do attitude of running a growing profitable business has proven to be extremely successful for the company. While it's successful today, it was a journey that was full of hard decisions and moments of uncertainty. It's these moments of uncertainty that laid the groundwork for Torc pivoting to autonomous trucking as Andrew explains in detail. These decisions led to what the company is today, a company with a Daimler partnership that is solely focused on autonomous trucking.We had learned a lot of lessons over all of those years and really understanding what it was going to take, and made that move to trucking before anybody else. – Andrew CulhaneThe decision to pivot from passenger vehicles, mining and military to focus solely on autonomous trucking was not an an easy decision. While the decision was not an easy one, it allowed the company to focus their entire effort on autonomous trucking. As part of their focus on autonomous trucking, the company is focused on a hub-to-hub model. This model was chosen based on experience and listening to the needs of their customers. It has been three years since Daimler took a majority stake in Torc and there has been a great deal of collaboration during this time. It's been a really interesting partnership and collaboration. – Andrew CulhaneThis approach follows Torc's track record of not overhyping and not making promises that they cannot keep. Torc has never publicly set a date to remove the driver and operate driver-out operations as they have always kept true to who they are. With this in mind, Grayson and Andrew discuss the boom and bust hype cycles of autonomy. While Torc is not making timeline promises, the company is clearly laying the groundwork towards commercialization as the company recently appointed Peter Vaughn Schmidt (Head of Daimler Truck Autonomous Technology Group) as CEO. Wrapping up the conversation, Andrew discusses what drove Torc's financial discipline from day one.Follow The Road To Autonomy on Apple PodcastsFollow The Road To Autonomy on LinkedInFollow The Road To Autonomy on TwitterRecorded on Tuesday September 13, 2022See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Workplace Stories by RedThread Research
Using Connection To Build Successful Cultures, with Udemy's Melissa Daimler

Workplace Stories by RedThread Research

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 54:11


In this episode, CLO at online education leader Udemy Melissa Daimler—who recently published a new book on making workplace reconnection work, ‘ReCulturing'—sits down with Chris and Stacia to detail practical steps on making our new complex workplaces human once again.

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman
Rapid Response: Flipping your strategy in a volatile market, w/Zillow's Susan Daimler

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 31:27 Very Popular


When markets are in turmoil, you can't rely on business as usual, but that doesn't mean you should panic. As the housing climate has turned volatile, rest estate marketplace Zillow has been forced to rethink some priorities, while doubling down on others. Zillow president Susan Daimler talks about the importance of a strategy focused on the future, despite layoffs and pullbacks, and how maintaining a clear shared mindset has enabled forward progress in a challenging climate. Read a transcript of this interview at: mastersofscale.comSubscribe to the Masters of Scale weekly newsletter at http://eepurl.com/dlirtXSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Vijay Kailash Show
EP31: The Power of Thinking Big - Exponential Theory with Aaron Bare

The Vijay Kailash Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 57:58


On this week's episode, I'm excited to have Aaron Bare join us as a guest.Aaron is a Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and #1 Amazon Bestselling Author of Exponential Theory; the Power of Thinking Big (X-Theory). Aaron is a Change Agent, a Strategic Facilitator, "A Human Profit Center," that has facilitated innovation and strategy in over 90 countries and all 50 States working with companies like Google, Daimler, Coca-Cola, Accenture, M&C Saatchi, and Belfius Bank.Aaron was EIR at Thunderbird Global School of Management and Singularity University at NASA Ames. He also holds a Global MBA from Thunderbird and an International MA from Indiana University. He lives in Arizona.Check out these books mentioned in the episode:The Power of Starting Something StupidExponential Organizations: New Organizations Are Ten Times Better, Faster, and Cheaper Than Yours (and What to Do About It)Bold: How to Go Big, Make Bank, and Better the WorldAbundance: The Future Is Better Than You ThinkThe Exponential Age: How Accelerating Technology Is Transforming Business, Politics, and SocietyLearn more about Aaron Bare at http://www.aaronbare.com.Get a copy of Exponential Theory here--Do you invest in the stock market?Here's a strategy you can use today to help you grow your portfolio to 7-figures in half the time (compared to the buy and hold strategy).This conservative strategy can generate generous income (25-30% a year) and has outperformed SPY for over a decade.The best part? This strategy takes less than 30-minutes a month to execute.Learn for FREE here: https://www.optionsellingsecrets.com/--Required disclosures: No statement on this video or comments is to be construed as an endorsement, recommendation or solicitation to purchase or sell any security, or to provide investment advice. Options involve risk and are not suitable for all investors. Prior to buying or selling an option, a person must receive a copy of the disclosure document, Characteristics and Risks of Standardized Options. Individuals should not enter into option transactions until they have read and understood this document. Past performance is not indicative of future performance. Achieving a 7-figure index fund portfolio in half the time is not guaranteed.--Connect with Vijay on Instagram: @RealVijayKailashConnect with Vijay on LinkedIn: Vijay Kailash, CFA | LinkedInConnect with Vijay on his website: https://vijaykailash.com/

Transportation Matters - The CEO Podcast of Daimler Trucks & Buses
#04.04 | Dr. Frank Appel – The future of logistics

Transportation Matters - The CEO Podcast of Daimler Trucks & Buses

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 31:21


Martin Daum and Dr. Frank Appel talk about the backbone of modern life: transportation and logistics – the network that connects markets across regions, countries, and continents. They discuss the challenges the logistics network is facing: supply bottlenecks, geopolitical tensions, and of course the necessity to decarbonize. Dr. Frank Appel is the CEO of Deutsche Post AG, a global leader in logistics. He studied chemistry and earned a Ph.D. in Neurobiology. As a natural scientist he has expert knowledge to share about the issue of decarbonization. Listen to the new episode to learn what the future of logistics could look like!

Startup Insider
VC Talk mit Freigeist Capital – die angesagtesten Investoren im Porträt

Startup Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 49:44


In der Nachmittagsfolge begrüßen wir heute in der Rubrik „VC Talk“ Niklas Hebborn, Partner bei Freigeist Capital. Freigeist Capital ist ein Venture Capital Unternehmen mit Fokus auf Startups in der Frühphase, die das Potenzial haben, mit innovativen Technologien das private und geschäftliche Leben unserer Gesellschaft positiv zu verändern. Zudem liegt auch ein weiterer Fokus auf den Foundern selbst, die mit ihren technologischen Entwicklungen und einer großen Vision die Lebensqualität und Nachhaltigkeit verbessern wollen. Dabei investiert Freigeist Capital in Seed- und Pre-Series-A-Runden mit bis zu siebenstelligen Beträgen. Neben dem investierten Kapital unterstützt der VC auch mit seiner Erfahrung und hilft in enger Zusammenarbeit den Foundern, innovative Technologieunternehmen aufzubauen. Dabei verfolgt der Risikokapitalgeber einen 360°-Ansatz. So umfasst die Unterstützung die Bereiche Produkt, Geschäftsentwicklung, Vertrieb, Betrieb, Finanzen und Personalwesen. Bei weiteren spezifischen Fragestellungen und Unterstützungsbedarf, wird den Portfoliounternehmen auch darüber hinaus individuell geholfen. Nach der Investition wird mit den Foundern eine Roadmap für die kommenden 1-2 Jahre erstellt, um bestimmte Meilensteine zu erreichen und die erforderliche Finanzierung mit zuverlässigen und bekannten Partnerinvestoren zu sichern. Freigeist Capital wurde im Jahr 2017 von Frank Thelen, Alex Koch, Marc Sieberger und Niklas Hebborn in Bonn gegründet. Mittlerweile zählt auch Marcel Vogler zum Partnerkreis des Early-Stage VCs. Die Partner investieren neben ihrem Kapital auch ihre Zeit, indem sie die Portfoliounternehmen mit ihrer Expertise und ihrem breit aufgestellten Netzwerk in Politik, Wirtschaft und Medien in allen Bereichen zur Seite stehen. Zum Unternehmensportfolio zählen u.a. das Urban Air Mobility Startup Lilium, der Energiespeicher Kraftblock, das Blockchain Startup Neufund, das KI-Startup Smartlane und Hardt Hyperloop. Zu den bekanntesten Exits zählen die von Microsoft übernommene App Wunderlist, der von Daimler akquirierte Uber-Wettbewerber MyTaxi sowie kaufDA, welches heute Teil der Axel Springer Gruppe ist. Infos der Werbepartner: DB Mindbox: Jetzt bei der DB MINDBOX bewerben & gemeinsam durchstarten! Weitere Informationen auf WWW.DBMINDBOX.COM OMR Reviews: One more thing wird präsentiert von OMR Reviews – Finde die richtige Software für Dein Business. Wenn auch Du Dein Lieblingstool bewerten willst, schreibe eine Review auf OMR Reviews unter https://moin.omr.com/insider. Dafür erhältst du einen 20€ Amazon Gutschein.

The Local Maximum
Ep. 243 - Eric Daimler on Conexus and Category Theory

The Local Maximum

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 39:24


Todays guest is CEO and co-founder of Conexus, the first spinoff of the MIT math department that takes discoveries in high level mathematics (category theory) and applies them to make databases intelligent across many industries.

The Hydrogen Podcast
Who Is In The Fast Lane In FCEV Trucking? A Major Deal Is Announced And Someone's Credit Rating Looks Good.

The Hydrogen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 10:33 Very Popular


Welcome to The Hydrogen Podcast!In episode 146, Bosch invests big and making fuel cells in the United States. JERA, Uniper and ConocoPhillips announced an agreement. And Air Liquide has a new credit rating. All of this on today's hydrogen podcast.Thank you for listening and I hope you enjoy the podcast. Please feel free to email me at info@thehydrogenpodcast.com with any questions. Also, if you wouldn't mind subscribing to my podcast using your preferred platform... I would greatly appreciate it. Respectfully,Paul RoddenVISIT THE HYDROGEN PODCAST WEBSITEhttps://thehydrogenpodcast.comCHECK OUT OUR BLOGhttps://thehydrogenpodcast.com/blog/WANT TO SPONSOR THE PODCAST? Send us an email to: info@thehydrogenpodcast.comNEW TO HYDROGEN AND NEED A QUICK INTRODUCTION?Start Here: The 6 Main Colors of Hydrogen

21st Century HR
ReCulture the Workplace With Udemy's Chief Learning Officer, Melissa Daimler

21st Century HR

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 38:05


In this episode of Redefining HR, I spoke with Melissa Daimler, chief learning officer at Udemy and author of the new book “ReCulturing: Design Your Company Culture to Connect with Strategy and Purpose for Lasting Success.” Melissa and I talk about her book, her career path and how learning and organizational development have evolved. We also discuss how to intentionally apply system thinking to design so you can reculture the workplace.

CamBro Conversations
144) Eric Daimler - The Future of Artificial Intelligence

CamBro Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 59:59


Today's conversation is with Dr Eric Daimler. Eric is an authority in Artificial Intelligence with over 20 years of experience in the field as an entrepreneur, executive, investor, technologist, and policy advisor. Eric served under the Obama Administration as a Presidential Innovation Fellow for AI and Robotics in the Executive Office of President, as the sole authority driving the agenda for U.S. leadership in research, commercialisation, and public adoption of AI & Robotics. Expect to understand on a basic level what AI is, how it has been implemented in society and which sectors it is likely to be more prominent in. I ask about Healthcare, transport, and even data. Importantly this leads to ethical discussions on what AI can and should do, what boundaries we should draw, and what frameworks need to be in place. As part of this, we delve into the impact of AI on the job market which is a common criticism of machines taking the jobs of humans. Eric shares his vision for AI in our lives and how he hopes people like you and I engage with the conversation about how it will impact society and our lives. Today's podcast is supported by Crypto Glasgow. Founders Donald and Dec have appeared three time on the podcast sharing the principles behind the best performing investment asset of the last 12 months and the inner workings of the Crypto currency market. The Crypto space is vast and growing. You can get easily lost in the noise. Investing in crypto differs to other assets and the Crypto Glasgow team have 20+ years of investing experience in all asset classes, you can rely on their specific crypto expertise to navigate what can be a confusing market. No matter your investment approach and how much you are looking to invest, whether you're a newbie or experienced investor, Crypto Glasgow have you covered with their wide range of products and services to support you in the fast growing and innovative world of cryptocurrencies. I'm a member of the CG Pro discord for just £29.99 per month/ It combines everything you need from investing, trading and education to go from beginner to PRO. There is also the CG PRO affiliate program where you can earn a side income from simply being a member of CG Pro. You can visit https://www.ccgla.co.uk to learn more today. Today's podcast is sponsored by FitLogic Systems. Owner Joe McNee has worked in the fitness space for a number of years whilst juggling a full time job. He started automating boring repetitive tasks and over time grew the part time hobby into a business and has worked with some of big names in the fitness industry. FitLogic systems can fully implement a custom automation solution to your business. This allows you as coach to do more coaching and less admin work. This can work whether you are a one man band looking to get back more time, a coach looking to reduce their admin load, or you're trying to scale your business to the next level and increase your capacity with more coaches and more clients. Regular podcast guest, David Hatt uses FitLogic systems to ensure he can keep the quality of coaching high without getting bogged down in boring admin work. Not sure if its right for you? Take the quick quiz below and find out https://readinesstoscale.scoreapp.com/ Or find him on Instagram www.instagram.com/joe_fitlogic_systems Connect with Eric: Website - https://conexus.com/ LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/ericdaimler/

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova
Reculturing Your Company with Melissa Daimler

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 27:45


Welcome to the What's Next! podcast with Tiffani Bova.  This week we take on the world of cultural innovations with organizational leader and learning strategist Melissa Daimler, who guides us through the continuous act of re-designing, reimagining, and re-connecting our behaviors, processes, and practices that make up culture. Melissa Daimler is the Chief Learning Officer of Udemy, a leading destination for learning and teaching online. She is helping the company evolve their platform and approach to learning, helping the global workforce also re-design how they think about culture and work. Prior to Udemy, she launched Daimler Partners, a boutique advisory and coaching company that worked with founders and leaders to help them design and scale their culture. Daimler led HR for a fast-growing venture-funded startup. She also created and built Learning & Organizational Development functions for Adobe, Twitter and WeWork. Daimler is a speaker, panelist, and contributor to Harvard Business Review (HBR) and Forbes.   THIS EPISODE IS PERFECT FOR…  people who want to improve their own lives by learning and then help others by creating a culture where learning is encouraged and explored.   TODAY'S MAIN MESSAGE… culture is a loaded word that holds a lot of different meanings depending on who you ask. For a while, business had the idea of onsite amenities, wellness programs, company retreats, and other perks, but focusing on these external benefits instead of individual needs wasn't integrating people into a bigger more meaningful system. Ultimately, culture is what you make of it together with the people around you and a more strategic approach is to create a culture where work gets done and people have the opportunity to learn and grow in their role and beyond.   WHAT  I  LOVE  MOST… Melissa believes culture is an “active process” created together by members of the community you're engaging with, so whether it's within the boundaries of the workplace or even the world at large, we must work together with each other to establish the values we hold dear and reinforce those ideals in our day-to-day behaviors and practices.     Running time: 27:44 Subscribe on iTunes     Find Tiffani on social: Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Instagram   Find Melissa on social: Website Twitter LinkedIn Instagram     Melissa's Book: Reculturing

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
A Word in Edgewise 8/29/22: Before & After Gottleib Daimler’s Motorcycle Patent . . .

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 8:02


Producer/Host: R.W. Estela The post A Word in Edgewise 8/29/22: Before & After Gottleib Daimler's Motorcycle Patent . . . first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

Dvojka
Příběhy z kalendáře: První motocykl. Devadesát kilo a maximální rychlost 11 kilometrů za hodinu

Dvojka

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 17:53


Gottlieb Daimler získal 29. srpna 1885 patent na jednostopé vozidlo poháněné výbušným motorem. Světlo světa tak spatřil první motocykl. Daimler se od mládí zajímal o spalovací motory. Uvažoval o nich i jako technický ředitel ve firmě Nicolase Otty v Kolíně nad Rýnem. Jejich motory byly ovšem objemné a málo výkonné. Daimler se spojil s kolegou Wilhelmem Maybachem a rozhodli se, že sestrojí motor, který dokáže efektivně pohánět malé vozidlo.

Transport Topics
Transport Topics (Aug. 25, 2022)

Transport Topics

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 2:15


More autonomous truck testing is happening in Texas, this time an effort between Daimler Truck and Waymo. The companies will partner to put self-driving trucks on a route between Dallas and Houston via Interstate 45, a corridor that has become one of the country's key testing grounds for driverless trucks. Waymo, a subsidiary of Google parent company Alphabet Inc., creates the technology that can be attached to trucks and other vehicles to make them fully autonomous. Its partnership with Daimler began in 2020.

Brilliant Thoughts with Tristan Ahumada
How to Design a Strong Work Culture with Melissa Daimler

Brilliant Thoughts with Tristan Ahumada

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 47:45


Work culture is more important than ever, especially post-pandemic. Melissa Daimler talks with Tristan about her new book, ReCulturing, and the various dynamics, like behaviors and processes, that play a role in a company's culture. She explains why a work culture can die out, and how to actively build a strong one that resonates with employees and job candidates alike.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

SUCCESS Insider
Brilliant Thoughts: How to Design a Strong Work Culture with Melissa Daimler

SUCCESS Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 47:45


Work culture is more important than ever, especially post-pandemic. Melissa Daimler talks with Tristan about her new book, ReCulturing, and the various dynamics, like behaviors and processes, that play a role in a company's culture. She explains why a work culture can die out, and how to actively build a strong one that resonates with employees and job candidates alike.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

SUCCESS Talks
Brilliant Thoughts: How to Design a Strong Work Culture with Melissa Daimler

SUCCESS Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 47:45


Work culture is more important than ever, especially post-pandemic. Melissa Daimler talks with Tristan about her new book, ReCulturing, and the various dynamics, like behaviors and processes, that play a role in a company's culture. She explains why a work culture can die out, and how to actively build a strong one that resonates with employees and job candidates alike.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

C-Suite Conversations with Scott Miller
Episode #33 Melissa Daimler

C-Suite Conversations with Scott Miller

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 35:51


Join Chief Learning Officer of Udemy, Melissa Daimler, as she offers insights on impactful ways leaders can design, optimize, and scale their culture. Melissa shares how to balance being forward thinking while also being efficient enough to focus on what's in front of you in an effort ensure your organization's culture is happening by design rather than by default.

Future Sight with Capgemini Invent
041: ReCulturing (feat. Melissa Daimler)

Future Sight with Capgemini Invent

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 35:12


Traditionally, company cultures have always been the domain of HR, or an afterthought to success involving ping pong tables and staff bonus packages. For many, the concept of changing an entire organisation's way of doing things seemed daunting, a task that fell well behind hitting targets and ensuring the basic welfare of staff. However, following the pandemic and new approaches to the work life balance, things have truly started to shift. People are realising the vital importance of creating a dynamic and effective company culture which fosters productivity, welfare and growth. In this episode of Future Sight, host Claudia Crummenerl speaks to Melissa Daimler, whose new book ReCulturing, examines the challenges that companies face when looking to change their old practices, and posits a new way forward for organisations to develop an effective culture.This week's guest:Melissa Daimler is the Chief Learning Officer for Udemy, where she develops learning strategies for both customers and employees, and previously created and built Learning, Organizational, and Talent Development functions for Adobe, Twitter, and WeWork. Alongside being a speaker, panelist, and contributor to  publications including Harvard Business Review (HBR), Huffington Post, Chief Learning Officer, and Chief Talent Development Officer magazines, she has also served as board member for various high profile associations and companies.She is also the author of ReCulturing: Design Your Company Culture to Connect with Strategy and Purpose for Lasting Success - you can find it here: https://www.mheducation.co.uk/reculturing-design-your-company-culture-to-connect-with-strategy-and-purpose-for-lasting-success-9781264278619-emea You can listen back to some our previous Future Sight episodes on Organisation and Workforce below:024: The Future of Work Part 1 - https://share.transistor.fm/s/ae9df0fb034: The Future of Work Part 2 - https://share.transistor.fm/s/aaedf934 This episode was hosted by Claudia Crummenerl and produced by Harry Stott.This podcast is brought to you by Capgemini Invent. You can find out more about them at https://www.capgemini.com/service/invent/ and follow them on Twitter https://twitter.com/CapgeminiInvent.

Transportation Matters - The CEO Podcast of Daimler Trucks & Buses
#04.03 | Bernd Heid – The Power of Hydrogen

Transportation Matters - The CEO Podcast of Daimler Trucks & Buses

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 29:14


In this episode, Martin Daum talks to Bernd Heid about the transformation of the energy sector - more specifically, they address one of the most controversial topics: the role of hydrogen. Bernd Heid, one of the leading experts on climate technologies and a strategic partner of the Hydrogen Council, discusses with Martin Daum whether hydrogen can be used as a fuel for commercial vehicles. Bernd Heid also clarifies myths and facts around hydrogen and explains what role this energy source has for the transformation of the transport sector. Listen to the latest episode and learn more about the future of carbon-neutral transport and how hydrogen can be part of this transformation. Enjoy the episode!

Tech. Cars. Machines.
Jan Krönig, Strategy, Daimler Truck

Tech. Cars. Machines.

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 47:04


Jan Krönig is the head of Strategy & Corporate Development for Daimler Truck, the world's largest producer of medium- and heavy-duty commercial vehicles.  When are battery-powered vehicles most appropriate, and when is the answer hydrogen fuels? What are the challenges and timelines associated with each?  Jan explains Daimler's approach to meeting the challenge of climate … Continue reading Jan Krönig, Strategy, Daimler Truck →

Trucker Dump - A Trucking Podcast
TD168: Overtime Pay, 60-ft Trailers, Rising Trucker Pay, & More

Trucker Dump - A Trucking Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 57:10


In this week's show, we discuss more about AB5, drug testing, overtime pay, Tesla trucks, 60-ft trailers, new trucking services, apps, and truck stops, and unfortunately a crap-ton of recalls. On the plus side, trucker pay has gone up. So there's that. In the feedback section, listeners have follow-up on the rising Pennsylvania toll rates and the new parking program and the ParkUnload app. This episode of Trucker Dump is sponsored by: Porter Freight Funding - So many services to offer, including Factoring, Dispatching, Freight Brokering, Fuel Cards, Insurance, and Compliance. Call 205-397-0934 to learn more. News Links: Steering gear recall hits 47k Kenworth, Peterbilt trucks from OverdriveOnline.com Nearly 1400 Daimler trucks recalled for unexpected engine shutdown risk from CDLLife.com Navistar recalling more than 8,000 LoneStar and LT trucks from LandLine.media Tesla Semi could be on the road by the end of 2022 from LandLine.media Walmart rolls out ‘first of its kind' 60-foot multi-temp reefer trailer from CDLLife.com Drivewyze integrated into Verizon Connect from OverdriveOnline.com DAT launches new mobile app from OverdriveOnline.com U.S. DOT considers electronic forms for drug testing program from LandLine.media Submit your comments on the electronic forms for the drug and alcohol testing. Overtime pay for employee drivers: Market benefits and drawbacks from OverdriveOnline.com Washington State formula for overtime pay Truck driver salary increased significantly in 2021, according to study from CDLLife.com Schneider driver ruled an employee in federal court appeal from FreightWaves.com What's happening with AB5? The OOIDA Foundation explains from LandLine.media Pilot renovates six locations from OverdriveOnline.com Listener Feedback: Trevor and Matt have thoughts on the rising Pennsylvania toll rates. Bruce shares his experience with the ParkUnload app and shares photos too (see bottom of post)! Show info: You can email your comments, suggestions, questions, or insults to TruckerDump@gmail.com Join the Trucker Dump Podcast Facebook Group Join the Trucker Dump Slack Group by emailing me at TruckerDump@gmail.com Got a second to Rate and/or Review the podcast? Download the intro/outro songs for free! courtesy of Walking On Einstein

Coach Juan Carlos Maya
PODCAST #29 Lo que todo equipo necesita

Coach Juan Carlos Maya

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 18:21


En este episodio el ingeniero Francisco Caballero, gerente de Daimler nos comparte, cuáles son las principales necesidades de un equipo o grupo y qué áreas de oportunidad tienen un líder para hacer que su equipo tenga resultados extraordinarios.

Building Better Systems
Episode #22: Eric Daimler — Guaranteeing the Integrity of Data Models with Category Theory

Building Better Systems

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 37:50


In this episode, we're joined by Eric Daimler, CEO & co-founder of Conexus AI, Inc, an MIT spin out. We discuss the Conexus software platform, which is built on top of breakthroughs in the mathematics of Category Theory, and how it guarantees the integrity of universal data models. Eric shares real-world examples of applying this approach to various complex industries, such as transportation and logistics, avionics, and energy.Listen to this episode wherever you listen to podcasts. Eric Daimler: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ericdaimler/ Joey Dodds: https://www.linkedin.com/in/joey-dodds-4b462a41/ Rob Dockins: https://galois.com/team/robert-dockins/ Galois, Inc.: https://galois.com/ Contact us: podcast@galois.com

DeCent People
Tara Fung

DeCent People

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 54:41


Tara Fung always had a curiosity about the world that led her to want to understand finance and economics. While an early job at the automaker Daimler wasn't exciting enough, she did pass the background check to join the CIA, though she didn't join the agency. She finished off her application the the Harvard Business School as her bridesmaids were gathered around her for her wedding and soon found the world of Bitcoin and cryptocurrencies. She co-founded Co:Create earlier this year to help non-fungible token (NFT) projects create sustainable revenue models. We talk about her upbringing in the South, how living in New York City isn't for everyone and the tech scene in Nashville, Tennessee. Follow Tara on Twitter Tara on LinkedIn Read the Co:Create white paper

The Data Stack Show
98: Category Theory and the Mathematical Foundation of the Technologies We Use with Eric Daimler of Conexus

The Data Stack Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 61:30


Highlights from this week's conversation include:Eric's background and career journey (3:30)Presenting to people without knowledge of AI (11:04)Why math was chosen over AI (19:03)From compilers to databases (25:42)The contribution of category theory (30:09)The Connexus customer experience (37:45)The primary user of Connexus (46:33)Interacting with 300,000 databases (51:07)When Connexus begins to add value (54:02)The best way to learn this mathematical approach (55:46)The Data Stack Show is a weekly podcast powered by RudderStack, the CDP for developers. Each week we'll talk to data engineers, analysts, and data scientists about their experience around building and maintaining data infrastructure, delivering data and data products, and driving better outcomes across their businesses with data.RudderStack helps businesses make the most out of their customer data while ensuring data privacy and security. To learn more about RudderStack visit rudderstack.com.

The Amped EV Podcast
Time to embrace some EV realities

The Amped EV Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 19:30


There's a moment when you've been working toward something where that “something” becomes very real and all the excitement you used to feel about it takes a back seat to the challenges that lie ahead. Moving forward means taking a deep breath, swallowing hard and remembering why you started down this path in the first place. Then you plow ahead.That moment for commercial decarbonization efforts within the trucking industry happened at this year's ACT Expo. Sure there was plenty of excitement with a bevy of new EV announcements from new players and established OEMs, alike, as well as a few teases of what's to come. But there was also a very clear message that trucking industry decarbonization efforts need to happen faster to gain ground on transportation's impact on climate change.Of course, it's easy to point fingers at the logistics industry, but the fact is that there's a role for everyone to play, if they chose to accept it. On this episode of The Amped EV Podcast we discuss some of the automotive industry's latest decarbonization efforts on both the trucking and consumer sides; the latest infrastructure happenings, and what the open job market tells us about the future of electrification and fossil fuels.

Motoring Podcast - News Show
No Name Yet - 26 July 2022

Motoring Podcast - News Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 46:48


FOLLOW UP: GREY HACKERS TO DE-SUBSCRIPTION OPTIONSGrey-market hackers are looking to liberate options fitted to BMW cars but not activated from the subscription models being proposed by the manufacturer. You car read more in this article from Vice.DIESS TO LEAVE VOLKSWAGENHerebert Diess is to leave his position as Volkswagen CEO on 1st September and will be replaced by Porsche boss Oliver Blume. Read more in this article from electrive.com.LONDON ULEZ EXTENSION HAD LESS IMPACT THAN HOPEDThis article from the Evening Standard looks at TfL figures showing a much lower impact on air quality than expected whet he London ULEZ zone was extended.ASTON MARTIN'S NEW OLD LOGOAston Martin has updated its logo in a bit to secure younger buyers. We're not sure how that's going to work, but you can see old and new in this Autocar article.AMAZON & RIVIAN ROLL OUT NEW EV DELIVERY VANSAmazon and Rivian are launching their electric delivery vans in a selection of US cities over the coming months according to this article from Autocar.FORD DEVELOPS EV CHARGER FOR DISABLED DRIVERSFord has developed a prototype EV charging unit that can automatically plug in an EV, meaning disabled drivers don't have to wrestle with heavy cables. You can read more in this article from Move Electric.NEW HYDROGEN FUEL CELL FACTORY FOR HERTFORDSHIREJohnson Matthey has announced a £80million investment in a new factory at Royston in Hertfordhire to make hydrogen fuel cells for automotive and transport use. There's more detail in this article from CNBC.MOKE INTERNATIONAL RECEIVES NEW OWNERGood news if you're looking for an electric, MINI-based 4-seater utility/fun car, MOKE International has been bought by EV Technology Group, which is looking to invest more int he company. Find out more from Move Electric here.DAIMLER LAUNCHES SECOND ELECTRIC TRUCK MODELDaimler has launched a second electric model, this time based on its urban-focused Econic model and called the eEconic. You can find out more from this Reuters article.MOTORSPORT: PADDY HOPKIRKWe were saddened to hear of the death of rally legend Paddy Hopkirk at the age of 89. You can read his obituary on Dirtfish.com here.NEW NEW CAR NEWSHonda Civic Type-R -The launch is still underway, so many details haven't been released yet, but the next generation of Civic Type-R is upon us. You can read more and see pictures in this Autocar article.Alpine A110 E-ternité - Alpine has revealed an electric A110 concept to celebrate 60 years since the launch of the original A110 model. Click through to the press release to see pictures and find out more.LUNCHTIME READ: ‘SAFETY BY NUMBERS'This week, we have Chris Pollitt's article on Car & Classic talking about how to keep your classic safe on the road and, possibly, make it even safer than it was when it left the factory. LIST OF THE WEEK: THE 10 BEST FRENCH CONCEPT CARSThere was a lot of competition to get on this list, but Goodwood Road & Racing have done a great job of collating this list of 10 mostly-left-field concepts from l'Hexagone's finest. Have a look and pick your favourite or, you know, simply the craziest…AND FINALLY: THE STAR OF INDIAEverybody needs a car that's perfect for tiger hunting, right? This 1926 Daimler was designed for exactly that. This intriguing article from Revivaler discusses the who, why and how of this unique, beautiful car.

The Accidental Trainer
ReCulturing: Melissa Daimler's Playbook for Re-Designing Workplace Culture

The Accidental Trainer

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 35:38


Melissa Daimler, CLO of Udemy, and former ATD board member joins the Accidental Trainer podcast to discuss how to redesign workplace culture. She defines system thinking and how she applies this mindset and approach to change the way people work together. Melissa provides practical guidance on addressing culture gaps and operationalizing a continuous review of behaviors, practices, and processes. No matter what your role is within your organization, Melissa shares how you can be a culture champion. Find Melissa at: Her website: https://www.melissadaimler.com/ On LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/melissadaimler On Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mdaimler/ Check out her new book: ReCulturing: Design Your Company Culture to Connect with Strategy and Purpose for Lasting Success

Transportation Matters - The CEO Podcast of Daimler Trucks & Buses
#04.02 | Prof. Ferdinand Dudenhöffer – Technological transformation (German)

Transportation Matters - The CEO Podcast of Daimler Trucks & Buses

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 27:40


The topic of the latest episode is the electrification and digitization in the transport sector. What are the opportunities and the challenges? One of the most renowned automotive experts will help to answer these questions: Ferdinand Dudenhöffer. As director of the Center of Automotive Research in Duisburg, he has been researching the auto industry for decades. Martin Daum and Ferdinand Dudenhöffer will take stock of the commercial vehicle industry's efforts at transformation and discuss how these can be accelerated. Enjoy our new episode!

El Garaje Hermético de Máximo Sant
Cuando los Mercedes eran auténticos Mercedes

El Garaje Hermético de Máximo Sant

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 22:47


¿Son malos lo actuales Mercedes No, para nada. ¿Son claramente mejores que los modelos de su competencia? Pues, desde luego, no o no siempre. Pero hubo un tiempo en que fue así, un tiempo en que la calidad de los coches Mercedes se podía decir que estaba por encima de su competencia. Antes de comenzar insisto en una cosa: Los Mercedes actuales son coches muy buenos y muy recomendables. Además, la marca ha conseguido “rejuvenecer” a su clientela, porque al menos en España hubo un tiempo es que tener un Mercedes era propio de señores de una edad avanzada, en ocasiones ricos y en otras, nuevos ricos. La marca se ha rejuvenecido… pero ya no es una marca que supera a todas en cuanto a calidad de fabricación y fiabilidad… ¿Y cuándo los Mercedes dejaron de ser verdaderos Mercedes? Bertha Benz Es curiosa la relación de la marca Mercedes con las mujeres. Y os lo explico. El que se considera el primer automóvil de la historia es el triciclo Benz patentado el 29 de enero de 1886. Tenía motor de explosión de 954 cm3, 0,74 CV y tenía una velocidad máxima asombrosa de 16 km/h. Bertha Benz hizo el primer viaje largo en coche, 104 km con sus dos hijos y con total desconocimiento de su marido Karl Benz. Lo cierto es que la señora Bertha Benz dio la mejor publicidad posible a la empresa de su marido. Dos en una. En los albores de la automoción hubo dos marcas alemanas muy destacadas: D Cannstatt Daimler-Motoren-Gesellschaft (fundada en 1890) y Mannheim Benz&Co (fundada en 1883), respectivamente las marcas de Karl Benz y Gottlieb Daimler. Pero al comienzo del siglo XX entra en escena el señor Emil Jellinek un austro-húngaro, rico, diplomático y empresario que hizo mucho, mucho por la marca… incluso darle el nombre. ¿Por qué Mercedes? Emil Jellinek no era mal piloto y de hecho ganó la carrera de Niza a Magnanone con un coche de la marca Phoenix, y la dio a conocer la marca en todo el mundo. Pero poco después entró en contacto con Daimler Benz y le gustó mucho los coches que hacían. Y les hizo una propuesta irresistible: comprar prácticamente toda la producción de Daimler a cambio de ser distribuidor exclusivo en Austria, Hungría, Francia, Bélgica y EEUU. Pero había una condición más: El nombre Mercedes. Su hija se llamaba así y sus muchas propiedades tenían ese nombre. Mercedes y la guerra. Mercedes se dedica a fabricar casi de todo, especialmente coches de lujo. Y cuando Hitler llega al poder, la relación entre la marca y el nazismo es absoluta, hasta el punto de utilizar judíos en régimen de esclavitud en sus fábricas. Das Beste oder nichts. Estas palabras en alemán son el lema de la marca: “Lo mejor o nada”. Y yo creo que representan a la perfección los modelos que, una vez superadas las penurias de la guerra y de la post guerra, comienza a fabricar Mercedes. El “secreto” de Mercedes. Y, como os decía, entre los años 60, ya superada la postguerra y los primeros 90, los Mercedes ofrecían un nivel de tecnología, calidad y fiabilidad muy superior a la media. ¿Y cuál es la verdad? Sencillo: Los modelos de Mercedes tenían una larga vida. Los rivales europeos “restilizaban” sus coches cada 2 ó 3 años y los cambiaban por modelos nuevos cada 4 ó 5. ¿Y qué hacía Mercedes mientras tanto? Pues cambiaban sus modelos por otros nuevos cada 7, 8 e incluso más de 10 años. ¿Y cuál es la ventaja? Muchas. La primera, en Mercedes se tomaban su tiempo para desarrollar los coches, era de lejos la marca que más pruebas previas hacían entes de lanzar un coche al mercado. Y en cuanto a los famosos “restyling” o “lavados de cara” o no lo había o eran mínimos. Y esto suponía una importante ventaja para los propietarios de Mercedes: El precio de reventa era muy bueno, porque eran coches de mucha calidad, generalmente cuidados y muy bien mantenidos y que, aunque tuvieran años, no parecían viejos. Algunos ejemplos. Os voy a hablar del Mercedes W114, para las personas nacidas en los 60 y 70, podríamos decir que es “el Mercedes de toda la vida”. Y es que apareció en 1968 y duró casi 9 años en catalogo y aún hoy, no se ve un coche “viejo”. Algo parecido le pasaba al W123 más moderno, que apareció en 1975 y tuvo una larga vida de 11 años. Aún se ven muchos circulando. Pero llega un punto de inflexión que asocio a tres coches, al Mercedes Clase S W140 de 1992, que está en venta solo 5 años y para mí se puede decir que es el último de su especie y con la llegada del Mercedes SLK que aparece un 1994 y con el Mercedes Clase A de 1997. Y ahora, ¿qué? No voy a ser yo quien diga si Mercedes se ha equivocado o no, porque una cosa es lo que piense un aficionado o lo que sienta y otra, más importante, la cuenta de resultados. Pero algunos, yo entre ellos, echamos de menos cuando los Mercedes eran auténticos Mercedes.

Human-Centric AI: Affectiva Asks
AI Potential, Regulation and More with “AI for Good” Author, Dr. Eric Daimler

Human-Centric AI: Affectiva Asks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 28:10


Today's episode features Dr. Eric Daimler, who is an authority in the Artificial Intelligence community with over 20 years of experience in the field. He currently leads MIT's first-ever spinout from its Math department and has co-founded six technology companies that have pioneered work in fields ranging from software systems to statistical arbitrage. As a Presidential Innovation Fellow during the Obama Administration, Eric helped drive the agenda for U.S. leadership in research, commercialization, and public adoption of AI. Eric is a passionate technologist, and we dove deep into conversations about AI - the potential, algorithm regulation and much more. It was great speaking with Dr. Daimler on compositionality, his work at Conexus and I loved his points on having “circuit breakers” for AI, and his philosophy around lifesaving AI innovations should be quickly adopted and embraced, while emphasizing that it is important to be bringing more people into the conversation around AI so more people are comfortable with it - particularly with regard to bias and ethics in AI. Links of interest: Dr. Eric DaimlerAbout Conexus - Adaptable Data Consolidation

The British Broadcasting Century with Paul Kerensa
Daimler, 5MG and 2BP: The In-Car Radios of 1923

The British Broadcasting Century with Paul Kerensa

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 38:27


"There's not a lot written about 2BP," says our guest Tony Currie, radio historian, author and presenter. And yet for episode 48, we've wrung a whole 40mins out of it! In January 1923, the BBC had sole right to broadcast in Britain, and yet a couple of experimental radio stations existed in Glasgow. 5MG had been on the air since October, operated by shop-owners Frank Milligan and George Garscadden, just to sell some wireless sets. And Daimler wanted to sell something too - in-car radios. So they set up a temporary station, 2BP, at the Glasgow Motor Show. Pull over and hear all about it. Plus from Scotland to Somerset: hear Neil Wilson's tour of his wonderful Radio Museum in Watchet. See the full 20mins Radio Museum tour here: https://youtu.be/ZjDXKQ63RaI Visit the Radio Museum in Watchet - details here: https://www.radiomuseum.uk Come and see my show The First Broadcast, in Watchet, in conjunction with the Radio Museum - or in Ludlow, Bedford, Tunbridge Walls, Guildford, Salford, Chelmsford, London, Isle of Wight... paulkerensa.com/tour Thanks Tony Currie for the expert knowledge and loan of his documentary on Scotland's Radio. Tony's books include The Radio Times Story - and his radio station is Radio Six: https://www.radiosix.com Find us on Twitter: twitter.com/bbcentury Or Facebook: Facebook.com/bbcentury Help us on Patreon - thanks if you do! patreon.com/paulkerensa  Thanks to Will Farmer for the original music. We're nothing to do with the present-day BBC - it's entirely a solo-run operation. Archive clips are either public domain due to age, or some rights may belong to owners we know not whom. BBC content is used with kind permission, BBC copyright content reproduced courtesy of the British Broadcasting Corporation. All rights reserved. Subscribe, share, rate, review us - it all helps! Next time: Peter Eckersley joins the BBC as its first Chief Engineer... and Professor David Hendy joins us for a chat. paulkerensa.com

Second City Works presents
Getting to Yes, And… | Melissa Daimler – ‘ReCulturing'

Second City Works presents "Getting to Yes, And" on WGN Plus

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022


Kelly talks to Melissa Daimler, the Chief Learning Officer for Udemy who has also worked for Adobe, Twitter and WeWork. She has a new book: “ReCulturing: Design Your Company Culture to Connect with Strategy and Purpose for Lasting Success.” “Culture is active. It is something we do.”  “Listening is an overlooked management tool.”  “View challenges as […]

MoneyBall Medicine
Eric Daimler at Conexus says Forget Calculus, Today's Coders Need to Know Category Theory

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 56:12


Harry's guest Eric Daimler, a serial software entrepreneur and a former Presidential Innovation Fellow in the Obama Administration, has an interesting argument about math. If you're a young person today trying to decide which math course you're going to take—or maybe an old person who just wants to brush up—he says you shouldn't bother with trigonometry or calculus. Instead he says you should study category theory. An increasingly important in computer science, category theory is about the relationships between sets or structures. It can be used to prove that different structures are consistent or compatible with one another, and to prove that the relationships in a dataset are still intact even after the data has been transformed in some way. Together with two former MIT mathematicians, Daimler co-founded a company called Conexus that uses category theory to tackle the problem of data interoperability. Longtime listeners know that data interoperability in healthcare, or more often the lack of interoperability, is a repeating theme of the show. In fields from drug development to frontline medical care, we've got petabytes of data to work with, in the form of electronic medical records, genomic and proteomic data, and clinical trial data. That data could be the fuel for machine learning and other kinds of computation that could help us make develop drugs faster and make smarter decisions about care. The problem is, it's all stored in different databases and formats that can't be safely merged without a nightmarish amount of work. So when someone like Daimler says they have a way to use math to bring heterogeneous data together without compromising that data's integrity – well, it's time to pay attention. That's why on today's show, we're all going back to school for an introductory class in category theory.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian, and this is The Harry Glorikian Show, where we explore how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.My guest today is Eric Daimler, a serial software entrepreneur and a former Presidential Innovation Fellow in the Obama Administration.And he has an interesting argument about math. Daimler says if you're a young person today trying to decide which math course you're going to take, or maybe an old person who just wants to brush up, you shouldn't bother with trigonometry or calculus.Instead he says you should study category theory.That's a field that isn't even part of the curriculum at most high schools. But it's increasingly important in computer science.Category theory is about the relationships between sets or structures. It can be used to prove that different structures are consistent or compatible with one another, and to prove that the relationships in a dataset are still intact even after you've transformed that data in some way.Together with two former MIT mathematicians, Daimler co-founded a company called Conexus that uses category theory to tackle the problem of data interoperability.Now…longtime listeners of the show know that data interoperability in healthcare, or more often the lack of interoperability, is one of my biggest hobby horses. In fields from drug development to frontline medical care, we've got petabytes of data to work with, in the form of electronic medical records, genomic and proteomic data, and clinical trial data.That data could be the fuel for machine learning and other kinds of computation that could help us make develop drugs faster and make smarter decisions about care. The problem is, it's all stored in different databases and formats that can't be safely merged without a nightmarish amount of work.So when someone like Daimler says they have a way to use math to bring heterogeneous data together without compromising that data's integrity – well, I pay attention.So on today's show, we're all going back to school for an introductory class in category theory from Conexus CEO Eric Daimler.Harry Glorikian: Eric, welcome to the show.Eric Daimler: It's great to be here.Harry Glorikian: So I was reading your varied background. I mean, you've worked in so many different kinds of organizations. I'm not sure that there is a compact way or even an accurate way to describe you. So can you describe yourself? You know, what do you do and what are your main interest areas?Eric Daimler: Yeah, I mean, the easiest way to describe me might come from my mother. Well, where, you know, somebody asked her, is that the doctor? And she says, Well, yes, but he's not the type that helps people. So I you know, I've been doing research around artificial intelligence and I from a lot of different perspectives around my research in graph theory and machine learning and computational linguistics. I've been a venture capitalist on Sand Hill Road. I've done entrepreneurship, done entrepreneurship, and I started a couple of businesses which I'm doing now. And most notably I was doing policy in Washington, D.C. is part of the Obama administration for a time. So I am often known for that last part. But my background really is rare, if not unique, for having the exposure to AI from all of those angles, from business, academia and policy.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. I mean, I was looking at the obviously the like you said, the one thing that jumped out to me was the you were a Presidential Innovation Fellow in the Obama administration in 2016. Can you can you give listeners an idea of what is what is the Presidential Innovation Fellowship Program? You know, who are the types of people that are fellows and what kind of things do they do?Eric Daimler: Sure, it was I guess with that sort of question, it's helpful then to give a broader picture, even how it started. There was a a program started during the Nixon administration that's colloquially known as the Science Advisers to the President, you know, a bipartisan group to give science advice to the president that that's called the OSTP, Office of Science and Technology Policy. There are experts within that group that know know everything from space to cancer, to be super specific to, in my domain, computer security. And I was the authority that was the sole authority during my time in artificial intelligence. So there are other people with other expertise there. There are people in different capacities. You know, I had the particular capacity, I had the particular title that I had that was a one year term. The staffing for these things goes up and down, depending on the administration in ways that you might be able to predict and guess. The people with those titles also also find themselves in different parts of the the executive branch. So they will do a variety of things that are not predicted by the the title of the fellow. My particular role that I happened to be doing was in helping to coordinate on behalf of the President, humbly, on behalf of the President, their research agenda across the executive branch. There are some very able people with whom I had the good fortune of working during my time during my time there, some of which are now in the in the Biden administration. And again, it's to be a nonpartisan effort around artificial intelligence. Both sides should really be advocates for having our research agenda in government be most effective. But my role was coordinating such things as, really this is helpful, the definition of robotics, which you might be surprised by as a reflex but but quickly find to be useful when you're thinking that the Defense Department's definition and use, therefore, of robotics is really fundamentally different than that of health and human services use and a definition of robotics and the VA and Department of Energy and State and and so forth.Eric Daimler: So that is we find to be useful, to be coordinated by the Office of the President and experts speaking on behalf. It was started really this additional impulse was started after the effects of, I'll generously call them, of healthcare.gov and the trip-ups there where President Obama, to his great credit, realized that we needed to attract more technologists into government, that we had a lot of lawyers to be sure we had, we had a ton of academics, but we didn't have a lot of business people, practical technologists. So he created a way to get people like me motivated to come into government for short, short periods of time. The the idea was that you could sit around a cabinet, a cabinet meeting, and you could you would never be able to raise your hand saying, oh, I don't know anything about economics or I don't know anything about foreign policy, but you could raise your hand and say, Oh, I don't know anything about technology. That needs to be a thing of the past. President Obama saw that and created a program starting with Todd. Todd Park, the chief technologist, the second chief technology officer of the United States, is fantastic to to start to start some programs to bring in people like me.Harry Glorikian: Oh, yeah. And believe me, in health care, we need we need more technologists, which I always preach. I'm like, don't go to Facebook. Come here. You know, you can get double whammy. You can make money and you can affect people's lives. So I'm always preaching that to everybody. But so if I'm not mistaken, in early 2021, you wrote an open letter to the brand new Biden administration calling for sort of a big federal effort to improve national data infrastructure. Like, can you summarize for everybody the argument in that piece and. Do you see them doing any of the items that you're suggesting?Eric Daimler: Right. The the idea is that despite us making some real good efforts during the Obama administration with solidifying our, I'll say, our view on artificial intelligence across the executive, and this continuing actually into the Trump administration with the establishment of an AI office inside the OSTP. So credit where credit is due. That extended into the the Biden administration, where some very well-meaning people can be focusing on different parts of the the conundrum of AI expressions, having various distortions. You know, the popular one we will read about is this distortion of bias that can express itself in really ugly ways, as you know, as individuals, especially for underrepresented groups. The point of the article was to help others be reminded of of some of the easy, low hanging fruit that we can that we can work on around AI. So, you know, bias comes in a lot of different ways, the same way we all have cognitive distortions, you know, cognitive biases. There are some like 50 of them, right. You know, bias can happen around gender and ethnicity and age, sexual orientation and so forth. You know, it all can also can come from absence of data. There's a type of bias that's present just by being in a developed, rich country in collecting, for example, with Conexus's customers, my company Conexus's customers, where they are trying to report on their good efforts for economic and social good and around clean, renewable energies, they find that there's a bias in being able to collect data in rich countries versus developing countries.Eric Daimler: That's another type of bias. So that was that was the point of me writing that open letter, to prioritize, these letters. It's just to distinguish what the low hanging fruit was versus some of the hard problems. The, some of tthe low hanging fruit, I think is available, I can say, In three easy parts that people can remember. One is circuit breakers. So we we can have circuit breakers in a lot of different parts of these automated systems. You know, automated car rolling down a road is, is the easiest example where, you know, at some point a driver needs to take over control to determine to make a judgment about that shadow being a person or a tumbleweed on the crosswalk, that's a type of circuit breaker. We can have those circuit breakers in a lot of different automated systems. Another one is an audit. And the way I mean is audit is having people like me or just generally people that are experts in the craft being able to distinguish the data or the biases can become possible from the data model algorithms where biases also can become possible. Right. And we get a lot of efficiency from these automated systems, these learning algorithms. I think we can afford a little bit taken off to audit the degree to which these data models are doing what we intend.Eric Daimler: And an example of a data model is that Delta Airlines, you know, they know my age or my height, and I fly to San Francisco, to New York or some such thing. The data model would be their own proprietary algorithm to determine whether or not I am deserving of an upgrade to first class, for example. That's a data model. We can have other data models. A famous one that we all are part of is FICO scores, credit scores, and those don't have to be disclosed. None of us actually know what Experian or any of the credit agencies used to determine our credit scores. But they they use these type of things called zero knowledge proofs, where we just send through enough data, enough times that we can get to a sense of what those data models are. So that's an exposure of a data model. A declarative exposure would be maybe a next best thing, a next step, and that's a type of audit.Eric Daimler: And then the third low hanging fruit, I'd say, around regulation, and I think these are just coming towards eventualities, is demanding lineage or demanding provenance. You know, you'll see a lot of news reports, often on less credible sites, but sometimes on on shockingly credible sites where claims are made that you need to then search yourself and, you know, people in a hurry just won't do it, when these become very large systems and very large systems of information, alert systems of automation, I want to know: How were these conclusions given? So, you know, an example in health care would be if my clinician gave me a diagnosis of, let's say, some sort of cancer. And then to say, you know, here's a drug, by the way, and there's a five chance, 5 percent chance of there being some awful side effects. You know, that's a connection of causation or a connection of of conclusions that I'm really not comfortable with. You know, I want to know, like, every step is like, wait, wait. So, so what type of cancer? So what's the probability of my cancer? You know, where is it? And so what drug, you know, how did you make that decision? You know, I want to know every little step of the way. It's fine that they give me that conclusion, but I want to be able to back that up. You know, a similar example, just in everyday parlance for people would be if I did suddenly to say I want a house, and then houses are presented to me. I don't quite want that. Although that looks like good for a Hollywood narrative. Right? I want to say, oh, wait, what's my income? Or what's my cash? You know, how much? And then what's my credit? Like, how much can I afford? Oh, these are houses you can kind of afford. Like, I want those little steps or at least want to back out how those decisions were made available. That's a lineage. So those three things, circuit breaker, audit, lineage, those are three pieces of low hanging fruit that I think the European Union, the State of New York and other other government entities would be well served to prioritize.Harry Glorikian: I would love all of them, especially, you know, the health care example, although I'm not holding my breath because I might not come back to life by how long I'd have to hold my breath on that one. But we're hoping for the best and we talk about that on the show all the time. But you mentioned Conexus. You're one of three co founders, I believe. If I'm not mistaken, Conexus is the first ever commercial spin out from MIT's math department. The company is in the area of large scale data integration, building on insights that come out of the field of mathematics that's called category algebra, categorical algebra, or something called enterprise category theory. And to be quite honest, I did have to Wikipedia to sort of look that up, was not familiar with it. So can you explain category algebra in terms of a non mathematician and maybe give us an example that someone can wrap their mind around.Eric Daimler: Yeah. Yeah. And it's important to get into because even though what my company does is, Conexus does a software expression of categorical algebra, it's really beginning to permeate our world. You know, the the way I tell my my nieces and nephews is, what do quantum computers, smart contracts and Minecraft all have in common? And the answer is composability. You know, they are actually all composable. And what composable is, is it's kind of related to modularity, but it's modularity without regard to scale. So the the easy analogy is in trains where, yeah, you can swap out a boxcar in a train, but mostly trains can only get to be a couple of miles long. Swap in and out boxcars, but the train is really limited in scale. Whereas the train system, the system of a train can be infinitely large, infinitely complex. At every point in the track you can have another track. That is the difference between modularity and composability. So Minecraft is infinitely self referential where you have a whole 'nother universe that exists in and around Minecraft. In smart contracts is actually not enabled without the ability to prove the efficacy, which is then enabled by categorical algebra or its sister in math, type theory. They're kind of adjacent. And that's similar to quantum computing. So quantum computing is very sexy. It gets in the press quite frequently with forks and all, all that. If it you wouldn't be able to prove the efficacy of a quantum compiler, you wouldn't actually. Humans can't actually say whether it's true or not without type theory or categorical algebra.Eric Daimler: How you think of kind categorical algebra you can think of as a little bit related to graph theory. Graph theory is those things that you see, they look like spider webs. If you see the visualizations of graph theories are graphs. Category theory is a little bit related, you might say, to graph theory, but with more structure or more semantics or richness. So in each point, each node and each edge, in the vernacular, you can you can put an infinite amount of information. That's really what a categorical algebra allows. This, the discovery, this was invented to be translating math between different domains of math. The discovery in 2011 from one of my co-founders, who was faculty at MIT's Math Department, was that we could apply that to databases. And it's in that the whole world opens up. This solves the problem that that bedeviled the good folks trying to work on healthcare.gov. It allows for a good explanation of how we can prevent the next 737 Max disaster, where individual systems certainly can be formally verified. But the whole plane doesn't have a mechanism of being formally verified with classic approaches. And it also has application in drug discovery, where we have a way of bringing together hundreds of thousands of databases in a formal way without risk of data being misinterpreted, which is a big deal when you have a 10-year time horizon for FDA trials and you have multiple teams coming in and out of data sets and and human instinct to hoard data and a concern about it ever becoming corrupted. This math and the software expression built upon it opens up just a fantastically rich new world of opportunity for for drug discovery and for clinicians and for health care delivery. And the list is quite, quite deep.Harry Glorikian: So. What does Conexus provide its clients? Is it a service? Is it a technology? Is it both? Can you give us an example of it?Eric Daimler: Yeah. So Conexus is software. Conexus is enterprise software. It's an enterprise software platform that works generally with very large organizations that have generally very large complex data data infrastructures. You know the example, I can start in health care and then I can I can move to an even bigger one, was with a hospital group that we work with in New York City. I didn't even know health care groups could really have this problem. But it's endemic to really the world's data, where one group within the same hospital had a particular way that they represented diabetes. Now to a layman, layman in a health care sense, I would think, well, there's a definition of diabetes. I can just look it up in the Oxford English Dictionary. But this particular domain found diabetes to just be easily represented as yes, no. Do they have it? Do they not? Another group within the same hospital group thought that they would represent it as diabetes, ow are we treating it? A third group would be representing it as diabetes, how long ago. And then a fourth group had some well-meaning clinicians that would characterize it as, they had it and they have less now or, you know, type one, type two, you know, with a more more nuanced view.Eric Daimler: The traditional way of capturing that data, whether it's for drug discovery or whether it's for delivery, is to normalize it, which would then squash the fidelity of the data collected within those groups. Or they most likely to actually just wouldn't do it. They wouldn't collect the data, they wouldn't bring the data together because it's just too hard, it's too expensive. They would use these processes called ETL, extract, transform, load, that have been around for 30 years but are often slow, expensive, fragile. They could take six months to year, cost $1,000,000, deploy 50 to 100 people generally from Accenture or Deloitte or Tata or Wipro. You know, that's a burden. It's a burden, you know, so the data wasn't available and that would then impair the researchers and their ability to to share data. And it would impair clinicians in their view of patient care. And it also impaired the people in operations where they would work on billing. So we work with one company right now that that works on 1.4 trillion records a year. And they just have trouble with that volume and the number of databases and the heterogeneous data infrastructure, bringing together that data to give them one view that then can facilitate health care delivery. Eric Daimler: The big example is, we work with Uber where they they have a very smart team, as smart as one might think. They also have an effectively infinite balance sheet with which they could fund an ideal IT infrastructure. But despite that, you know, Uber grew up like every other organization optimizing for the delivery of their service or product and, and that doesn't entail optimizing for that infrastructure. So what they found, just like this hospital group with different definitions of diabetes, they found they happen to have grown up around service areas. So in this case cities, more or less. So when then the time came to do analysis -- we're just passing Super Bowl weekend, how will the Super Bowl affect the the supply of drivers or the demand from riders? They had to do it for the city of San Francisco, separate than the city of San Jose or the city of Oakland. They couldn't do the whole San Francisco Bay Area region, let alone the whole of the state or the whole of the country or what have you. And that repeated itself for every business question, every organizational question that they would want to have. This is the same in drug discovery. This is the same in patient care delivery or in billing. These operational questions are hard, shockingly hard.Eric Daimler: We had another one in logistics where we had a logistics company that had 100,000 employees. I didn't even know some of these companies could be so big, and they actually had a client with 100,000 employees. That client had 1000 ships, each one of which had 10,000 containers. And I didn't even know like how big these systems were really. I hadn't thought about it. But I mean, they're enormous. And the question was, hey, where's our personal protective equipment? Where is the PPE? And that's actually a hard question to ask. You know, we are thinking about maybe our FedEx tracking numbers from an Amazon order. But if you're looking at the PPE and where it is on a container or inside of a ship, you know, inside this large company, it's actually a hard question to ask. That's this question that all of these organizations have. Eric Daimler: In our case, Uber, where they they they had a friction in time and in money and in accuracy, asking every one of these business questions. They went then to find, how do I solve this problem? Do I use these old tools of ETL from the '80s? Do I use these more modern tools from the 2000s? They're called RDF or OWL? Or is there something else? They discovered that they needed a more foundational system, this categorical algebra that that's now expressing itself in smart contracts and quantum computers and other places. And they just then they found, oh, who are the leaders in the enterprise software expression of that math? And it's us. We happen to be 40 miles north of them. Which is fortunate. We worked with Uber to to solve that problem in bringing together their heterogeneous data infrastructure to solve their problems. And to have them tell it they save $10 million plus a year in in the efficiency and speed gains from the solution we helped provide for them.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's leave a rating and a review for the show on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing a lot to help other listeners discover the show.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer.It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in print and ebook formats. Just go to Amazon or Barnes & Noble and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: So your website says that your software can map data sources to each other so that the perfect data model is discovered, not designed. And so what does that mean? I mean, does that imply that there's some machine learning or other form of artificial intelligence involved, sort of saying here are the right pieces to put together as opposed to let me design this just for you. I'm trying to piece it together.Eric Daimler: Yeah. You know, the way we might come at this is just reminding ourselves about the structure of artificial intelligence. You know, in the public discourse, we will often find news, I'm sure you can find it today, on deep learning. You know, whatever's going on in deep learning because it's sexy, it's fun. You know, DeepMind really made a name for themselves and got them acquired at a pretty valuation because of their their Hollywood-esque challenge to Go, and solving of that game. But that particular domain of AI, deep learning, deep neural nets is a itself just a subset of machine learning. I say just not not not to minimize it. It's a fantastically powerful algorithm. But but just to place it, it is a subset of machine learning. And then machine learning itself is a subset of artificial intelligence. That's a probabilistic subset. So we all know probabilities are, those are good and bad. Fine when the context is digital advertising, less fine when it's the safety of a commercial jet. There is another part of artificial intelligence called deterministic artificial intelligence. They often get expressed as expert systems. Those generally got a bad name with the the flops of the early '80s. Right. They flopped because of scale, by the way. And then the flops in the early 2000s and 2010s from IBM's ill fated Watson experiment, the promise did not meet the the reality.Eric Daimler: It's in that deterministic A.I. that that magic is to be found, especially when deployed in conjunction with the probabilistic AI. That's that's where really the future is. There's some people have a religious view of, oh, it's only going to be a probabilistic world but there's many people like myself and not to bring up fancy names, but Andrew Ng, who's a brilliant AI researcher and investor, who also also shares this view, that it's a mix of probabilistic and deterministic AI. What deterministic AI does is, to put it simply, it searches the landscape of all possible connections. Actually it's difference between bottoms up and tops down. So the traditional way of, well, say, integrating things is looking at, for example, that hospital network and saying, oh, wow, we have four definitions of diabetes. Let me go solve this problem and create the one that works for our hospital network. Well, then pretty soon you have five standards, right? That's the traditional way that that goes. That's what a top down looks that looks like.Eric Daimler: It's called a Golden Record often, and it rarely works because pretty soon what happens is the organizations will find again their own need for their own definition of diabetes. In most all cases, that's top down approach rarely works. The bottoms up approach says, Let's discover the connections between these and we'll discover the relationships. We don't discover it organically like we depend on people because it's deterministic. I, we, we discover it through a massive, you know, non intuitive in some cases, it's just kind of infeasible for us to explore a trillion connections. But what the AI does is it explores a factorial number actually is a technical, the technical equation for it, a factorial number of of possible paths that then determine the map of relationships between between entities. So imagine just discovering the US highway system. If you did that as a person, it's going to take a bit. If you had some infinitely fast crawlers that robot's discovering the highway system infinitely fast, remember, then that's a much more effective way of doing it that gives you some degree of power. That's the difference between bottoms up and tops down. That's the difference between deterministic, really, we might say, and probabilistic in some simple way.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I'm a firm believer of the two coming together and again, I just look at them as like a box. I always tell people like, it's a box of tools. I need to know the problem, and then we can sort of reach in and pick out which set of tools that are going to come together to solve this issue, as opposed to this damn word called AI that everybody thinks is one thing that they're sort of throwing at the wall to solve a problem.Harry Glorikian: But you're trying to solve, I'm going to say, data interoperability. And on this show I've had a lot of people talk about interoperability in health care, which I actually believe is, you could break the system because things aren't working right or I can't see what I need to see across the two hospitals that I need information from. But you published an essay on Medium about Haven, the health care collaboration between Amazon, JPMorgan, Berkshire Hathaway. Their goal was to use big data to guide patients to the best performing clinicians and the most affordable medicines. They originally were going to serve these first three founding companies. I think knowing the people that started it, their vision was bigger than that. There was a huge, you know, to-do when it came out. Fireworks and everything. Launched in 2018. They hired Atul Gawande, famous author, surgeon. But then Gawande left in 2020. And, you know, the company was sort of quietly, you know, pushed off into the sunset. Your essay argued that Haven likely failed due to data interoperability challenges. I mean. How so? What what specific challenges do you imagine Haven ran into?Eric Daimler: You know, it's funny, I say in the article very gently that I imagine this is what happened. And it's because I hedge it that that the Harvard Business Review said, "Oh, well, you're just guessing." Actually, I wasn't guessing. No, I know. I know the people that were doing it. I know the challenges there. But but I'm not going to quote them and get them in trouble. And, you know, they're not authorized to speak on it. So I perhaps was a little too modest in my framing of the conclusion. So this actually is what happened. What happens is in the same way that we had the difficulty with healthcare.gov, in the same way that I described these banks having difficulty. Heterogeneous databases don't like to talk to one another. In a variety of different ways. You know, the diabetes example is true, but it's just one of many, many, many, many, many, many cases of data just being collected differently for their own use. It can be as prosaic as first name, last name or "F.last name." Right? It's just that simple, you know? And how do I bring those together? Well, those are those are called entity resolutions. Those are somewhat straightforward, but not often 100 percent solvable. You know, this is just a pain. It's a pain. And, you know, so what what Haven gets into is they're saying, well, we're massive. We got like Uber, we got an effectively infinite balance sheet. We got some very smart people. We'll solve this problem. And, you know, this is some of the problem with getting ahead of yourself. You know, I won't call it arrogance, but getting ahead of yourself, is that, you think, oh, I'll just be able to solve that problem.Eric Daimler: You know, credit where credit is due to Uber, you know, they looked both deeper saying, oh, this can't be solved at the level of computer science. And they looked outside, which is often a really hard organizational exercise. That just didn't happen at Haven. They thought they thought they could they could solve it themselves and they just didn't. The databases, not only could they have had, did have, their own structure, but they also were stored in different formats or by different vendors. So you have an SAP database, you have an Oracle database. That's another layer of complication. And when I say that these these take $1,000,000 to connect, that's not $1,000,000 one way. It's actually $2 million if you want to connect it both ways. Right. And then when you start adding five, let alone 50, you take 50 factorial. That's a very big number already. You multiply that times a million and 6 to 12 months for each and a hundred or two hundred people each. And you just pretty soon it's an infeasible budget. It doesn't work. You know, the budget for us solving solving Uber's problem in the traditional way was something on the order of $2 trillion. You know, you do that. You know, we had a bank in the U.S. and the budget for their vision was was a couple of billion. Like, it doesn't work. Right. That's that's what happened Haven. They'll get around to it, but but they're slow, like all organizations, big organizations are. They'll get around to solving this at a deeper level. We hope that we will remain leaders in database integration when they finally realize that the solution is at a deeper level than their than the existing tools.Harry Glorikian: So I mean, this is not I mean, there's a lot of people trying to solve this problem. It's one of those areas where if we don't solve it, I don't think we're going to get health care to the next level, to sort of manage the information and manage people and get them what they need more efficiently and drive down costs.Eric Daimler: Yeah.Harry Glorikian: And I do believe that EMRs are. I don't want to call them junk. Maybe I'm going too far, but I really think that they you know, if you had decided that you were going to design something to manage patients, that is not the software you would have written to start. Hands down. Which I worry about because these places won't, they spent so much putting them in that trying to get them to rip them out and put something in that actually works is challenging. You guys were actually doing something in COVID-19, too, if I'm not mistaken. Well, how is that project going? I don't know if it's over, but what are you learning about COVID-19 and the capabilities of your software, let's say?Eric Daimler: Yeah. You know, this is an important point that for anybody that's ever used Excel, we know what it means to get frustrated enough to secretly hard code a cell, you know, not keeping a formula in a cell. Yeah, that's what happened in a lot of these systems. So we will continue with electronic medical records to to bring these together, but they will end up being fragile, besides slow and expensive to construct. They will end up being fragile, because they were at some point hardcoded. And how that gets expressed is that the next time some other database standard appears inside of that organization's ecosystem from an acquisition or a divestiture or a different technical standard, even emerging, and then the whole process starts all over again. You know, we just experience this with a large company that that spent $100 million in about five years. And then they came to us and like, yeah, we know it works now, but we know like a year from now we're going to have to say we're going to go through it again. And, it's not like, oh, we'll just have a marginal difference. No, it's again, that factorial issue, that one database connected to the other 50 that already exist, creates this same problem all over again at a couple of orders of magnitude. So what we discover is these systems, these systems in the organization, they will continue to exist.Eric Daimler: These fragile systems will continue to exist. They'll continue to scale. They'll continue to grow in different parts of the life sciences domain, whether it's for clinicians, whether it's for operations, whether it's for drug discovery. Those will continue to exist. They'll continue to expand, and they will begin to approach the type of compositional systems that I'm describing from quantum computers or Minecraft or smart contracts, where you then need the the discovery and math that Conexus expresses in software for databases. When you need that is when you then need to prove the efficacy or otherwise demonstrate the lack of fragility or the integrity of the semantics. Conexus can with, it's a law of nature and it's in math, with 100 percent accuracy, prove the integrity of a database integration. And that matters in high consequence context when you're doing something as critical as drug side effects for different populations. We don't want your data to be misinterpreted. You can't afford lives to be lost or you can't, in regulation, you can't afford data to be leaking. That's where you'll ultimately need the categorical algebra. You'll need a provable compositional system. You can continue to construct these ones that will begin to approach compositionality, but when you need the math is when you need to prove it for either the high consequence context of lives, of money or related to that, of regulation.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, well, I keep telling my kids, make sure you're proficient in math because you're going to be using it for the rest of your life and finance. I always remind them about finance because I think both go together. But you've got a new book coming out. It's called "The Future is Formal" and not tuxedo like formal, but like you're, using the word formal. And I think you have a very specific meaning in mind. And I do want you to talk about, but I think what you're referring to is how we want automated systems to behave, meaning everything from advertising algorithms to self-driving trucks. And you can tell me if that my assumption is correct or not.Eric Daimler: Though it's a great segue, actually, from the math. You know, what I'm trying to do is bring in people that are not programmers or research technology, information technology researchers day to day into the conversation around automated digital systems. That's my motivation. And my motivation is, powered by the belief that we will bring out the best of the technology with more people engaged. And with more people engaged, we have a chance to embrace it and not resist it. You know, my greatest fear, I will say, selfishly, is that we come up with technology that people just reject, they just veto it because they don't understand it as a citizen. That also presents a danger because I think that companies' commercial expressions naturally will grow towards where their technology is needed. So this is actually to some extent a threat to Western security relative to Chinese competition, that we embrace the technology in the way that we want it to be expressed in our society. So trying to bring people into this conversation, even if they're not programmers, the connection to math is that there are 18 million computer programmers in the world. We don't need 18 million and one, you know. But what we do need is we do need people to be thinking, I say in a formal way, but also just be thinking about the values that are going to be represented in these digital infrastructures.Eric Daimler: You know, somewhere as a society, we will have to have a conversation with ourselves to determine the car driving to the crosswalk, braking or rolling or slowing or stopping completely. And then who's liable if it doesn't? Is it the driver or is it the manufacturer? Is it the the programmer that somehow put a bug in their code? You know, we're entering an age where we're going to start experiencing what some person calls double bugs. There's the bug in maybe one's expression in code. This often could be the semantics. Or in English. Like your English doesn't make sense. Right? Right. Or or was it actually an error in your thinking? You know, did you leave a gap in your thinking? This is often where where some of the bugs in Ethereum and smart contracts have been expressed where, you know, there's an old programming rule where you don't want to say something equals true. You always want to be saying true equals something. If you get if you do the former, not the latter, you can have to actually create bugs that can create security breaches.Eric Daimler: Just a small little error in thinking. That's not an error in semantics. That level of thinking, you don't need to know calculus for, or category theory for that matter. You just need to be thinking in a formal way. You know, often, often lawyers, accountants, engineers, you know, anybody with scientific training can, can more quickly get this idea, where those that are educated in liberal arts can contribute is in reminding themselves of the broader context that wants to be expressed, because often engineers can be overly reductionist. So there's really a there's a push and pull or, you know, an interplay between those two sensibilities that then we want to express in rules. Then that's ultimately what I mean by formal, formal rules. Tell me exactly what you mean. Tell me exactly how that is going to work. You know, physicians would understand this when they think about drug effects and drug side effects. They know exactly what it's going to be supposed to be doing, you know, with some degree of probability. But they can be very clear, very clear about it. It's that clear thinking that all of us will need to exercise as we think about the development and deployment of modern automated digital systems.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, you know, it's funny because that's the other thing I tell people, like when they say, What should my kid take? I'm like, have him take a, you know, basic programming, not because they're going to do it for a living, but they'll understand how this thing is structured and they can get wrap their mind around how it is. And, you know, I see how my nephew thinks who's from the computer science world and how I think, and sometimes, you know, it's funny watching him think. Or one of the CTOs of one of our companies how he looks at the world. And I'm like you. You got to back up a little bit and look at the bigger picture. Right. And so it's the two of us coming together that make more magic than one or the other by themselves.Harry Glorikian: So, you know, I want to jump back sort of to the different roles you've had in your career. Like like you said, you've been a technology investor, a serial startup founder, a university professor, an academic administrator, an entrepreneur, a management instructor, Presidential Innovation Fellow. I don't think I've missed anything, but I may have. You're also a speaker, a commentator, an author. Which one of those is most rewarding?Eric Daimler: Oh, that's an interesting question. Which one of those is most rewarding? I'm not sure. I find it to be rewarding with my friends and family. So it's rewarding to be with people. I find that to be rewarding in those particular expressions. My motivation is to be, you know, just bringing people in to have a conversation about what we want our world to look like, to the degree to which the technologies that I work with every day are closer to the dystopia of Hollywood narratives or closer to our hopes around the utopia that's possible, that where this is in that spectrum is up to us in our conversation around what these things want to look like. We have some glimpses of both extremes, but I'd like people, and I find it to be rewarding, to just be helping facilitate the helping catalyze that conversation. So the catalyst of that conversation and whatever form it takes is where I enjoy being.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, because I was thinking about like, you know, what can, what can you do as an individual that shapes the future. Does any of these roles stand out as more impactful than others, let's say?Eric Daimler: I think the future is in this notion of composability. I feel strongly about that and I want to enroll people into this paradigm as a framework from which to see many of the activities going around us. Why have NFTs come on the public, in the public media, so quickly? Why does crypto, cryptocurrency capture our imagination? Those And TikTok and the metaverse. And those are all expressions of this quick reconfiguration of patterns in different contexts that themselves are going to become easier and easier to express. The future is going to be owned by people that that take the special knowledge that they've acquired and then put it into short business expressions. I'm going to call them rules that then can be recontextualized and redeployed. This is my version of, or my abstraction of what people call the the future being just all TikTok. It's not literally that we're all going to be doing short dance videos. It's that TikTok is is an expression of people creating short bits of content and then having those be reconfigured and redistributed. That can be in medicine or clinical practice or in drugs, but it can be in any range of expertise, expertise or knowledge. And what's changed? What's changed and what is changing is the different technologies that are being brought to bear to capture that knowledge so that it can be scalable, so it can be compositional. Yeah, that's what's changing. That's what's going to be changing over the next 10 to 20 years. The more you study that, I think the better off we will be. And I'd say, you know, for my way of thinking about math, you might say the more math, the better. But if I were to choose for my children, I would say I would replace trig and geometry and even calculus, some people would be happy to know, with categorical algebra, category theory and with probability and statistics. So I would replace calculus, which I think is really the math of the 20th century, with something more appropriate to our digital age, which is categorical algebra.Harry Glorikian: I will tell my son because I'm sure he'll be very excited to to if I told him that not calculus, but he's not going to be happy when I say go to this other area, because I think he'd like to get out of it altogether.Eric Daimler: It's easier than calculus. Yeah.Harry Glorikian: So, you know, it was great having you on the show. I feel like we could talk for another hour on all these different aspects. You know, I'm hoping that your company is truly successful and that you help us solve this interoperability problem, which is, I've been I've been talking about it forever. It seems like I feel like, you know, the last 15 or 20 years. And I still worry if we're any closer to solving that problem, but I'm hopeful, and I wish you great success on the launch of your new book. It sounds exciting. I'm going to have to get myself a copy.Eric Daimler: Thank you very much. It's been fun. It's good to be with you.Harry Glorikian: Thank you.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find a full transcript of this episode as well as the full archive of episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and MoneyBall Medicine at our website. Just go to glorikian.com and click on the tab Podcasts.I'd like to thank our listeners for boosting The Harry Glorikian Show into the top three percent of global podcasts.If you want to be sure to get every new episode of the show automatically, be sure to open Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast player and hit follow or subscribe. Don't forget to leave us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. And we always love to hear from listeners on Twitter, where you can find me at hglorikian.Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.