Podcast appearances and mentions of ernst young

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Best podcasts about ernst young

Latest podcast episodes about ernst young

Bankless
Unlocking Privacy on Ethereum with Paul Brody

Bankless

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 71:33


Paul Brody is the head of EY's blockchain business. EY is Ernst & Young, one of the “big 4” global professional services and accounting firms. He's been at EY for nearly 8 years now and before that he was a VP at IBM where he started IBM's first blockchain project. Paul is deeply intertwined with the Ethereum community as well as enterprise use cases. If anyone is going to crack the nut of Enterprise use cases for public blockchains, it's going to be him. ------ Crypto Tax Calculator | Free Crypto Tax Calculator https://bankless.cc/CTCpodcast  ------ JOIN BANKLESS PREMIUM: https://newsletter.banklesshq.com/subscribe  ------ BANKLESS SPONSOR TOOLS: KRAKEN | MOST-TRUSTED CRYPTO EXCHANGE https://bankless.cc/kraken  UNISWAP | ON-CHAIN MARKETPLACE https://bankless.cc/uniswap  ️ ARBITRUM | SCALING ETHEREUM https://bankless.cc/Arbitrum  EARNIFI | CLAIM YOUR UNCLAIMED AIRDROPS https://bankless.cc/earnifi  ----- Timestamps: 0:00 Intro 7:00 Enterprise Blockchains 11:20 Public vs. Private Blockchains 15:00 Use Cases 18:36 Supply Chains vs. Digital Money 22:00 Disruption 23:55 Network Effects 26:40 EY's Nightfall 30:50 Low-Cost Transactions 37:30 Tokenizing the World 41:50 Real-World Assets 47:10 Transactions 50:44 Stablecoin Adoption 54:15 DeFi Integration 56:35 Operating Nightfall 59:40 Nightfall Roadmap 1:01:35 Why EY 1:05:15 Enterprise Blockchain Burn Leaderboard 1:08:40 Action Items & Disclaimers ----- Resources: Paul Brody https://twitter.com/pbrody  ----- Not financial or tax advice. This channel is strictly educational and is not investment advice or a solicitation to buy or sell any assets or to make any financial decisions. This video is not tax advice. Talk to your accountant. Do your own research. Disclosure. From time-to-time I may add links in this newsletter to products I use. I may receive commission if you make a purchase through one of these links. Additionally, the Bankless writers hold crypto assets. See our investment disclosures here: https://www.bankless.com/disclosures 

Online Success Journey
#365: Kurt Wilkin

Online Success Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 25:41


As an entrepreneur, Kurt has experience growing, scaling, and exiting high-growth companies and now devotes his time to helping business leaders unlock their own success. Through his roles as the Co-Founder at HireBetter and Managing Partner at Bee Cave Capital, he's had the opportunity to work with hundreds of entrepreneurs and CEOs—challenging and inspiring them to take their companies to that much hyped “next-level.” Kurt began his career with Ernst & Young, and prior to founding HireBetter, Kurt founded and led The Controller Group (TCG), a professional services  An alumnus of the University of Arkansas, Kurt is a Certified Public Accountant and an active member and officer of Young Presidents' Organization (YPO). Kurt is passionate about entrepreneurship, is an active angel investor and sits on the boards of several companies and nonprofits. He lives in Austin with his wife and three sons and can usually be found coaching youth sports around town.

Deliberate Leaders Podcast with Allison Dunn
Growing Leaders with Matt Blumberg

Deliberate Leaders Podcast with Allison Dunn

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 26:18


Matt's company, Bolster, is an on-demand executive talent marketplace that helps accelerate companies' growth. Bolster connects companies with experienced, vetted executives for interim, fractional, advisory, project-based or board roles.Matt has been recognized as one of New York's 100 most influential technology leaders by Business Insider, by Crain's as one of New York's Top Entrepreneurs, and by Ernst & Young as an Entrepreneur of the Year finalist.Before Bolster, Matt built businesses and worked in marketing, consulting, and venture capital. He is the author of Startup CEO, Startup CXO, and Startup Boards, set to be released in June 2022.During the interview, we discuss…growing and scaling leadershow to build a strong corporate culturewhat it takes to hire and run a strong leadership teamthe future of workcompetition for talenthow to build and lead an effective boardwhat aspiring board directors need to knowConnect with Matt after the interview…Visit Bolster: https://bolster.comLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/blumbergmattTwitter: https://twitter.com/mattblumbergGet Matt's books:Startup Boards: A Field Guide to Building and Leading an Effective Board of Directors https://www.amazon.com/Startup-Boards-Building-Effective-Directors-ebook/dp/B0B3217C4DStartup CXO: A Field Guide to Scaling Up Your Company's Critical Functions and Teams https://www.amazon.com/Startup-CXO-Companys-Functions-Techstars-ebook/dp/B0949F83K5Startup CEO: A Field Guide to Scaling Up Your Business https://www.amazon.com/Startup-CEO-Scaling-Business-Techstars-ebook/dp/B08CKCT17BClaim your free gift!We're giving away a one-year membership to the world's #1 business book summary service for leaders! Our gift will help you stay on top of the latest ideas, decide which books to read next, and engage your teams.To get your gift:Leave a rating or review on your favorite listening channel.Take a screenshot of your review.Share the screenshot on LinkedIn, and mention either “Allison Dunn” or “Deliberate Directions” and the “Deliberate Leaders Podcast”.=============Allison DunnExecutive Business CoachDeliberate Directions + Executive Business Coaching + Training Center3003 W Main Street, Suite 110, Boise ID 83702(208) 350-6551Website https://www.deliberatedirections.comLinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/allisondunnPodcast https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/deliberate-leaders-podcast-with-allison-dunn/id1500464675

EY Cross-Border Taxation Alerts
EY Cross-Border Taxation Spotlight for Week ending 6 January 2023

EY Cross-Border Taxation Alerts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 4:01


A review of the week's major US international tax-related news. In this edition: IRS issues interim guidance on application of new corporate alternative minimum tax – IRS releases interim guidance on excise tax on certain corporate stock buybacks – IRS releases final regulations on FIRPTA tax exception for qualified foreign pension funds and qualified controlled entities.

Purpose-Driven Wealth
Episode 60 - How Does Private Money Lending Work?

Purpose-Driven Wealth

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 28:30


When one applies for a loan, the process could take several days, only to find out that it was denied. In this episode, Mo is joined by Bradley, CFO/CIO of S&L Capital Group. Bradley shares that borrowers need not talk to an account executive, to an account manager, then have to deal, then go to underwriting, only to find out fourteen days later that they do not have a deal even on a straightforward bridge loan. So he and his business partner found a way to leverage all the available technologies to keep the cost down and cut all the fat out of operation so clients can get an answer on day one. He even dives into the details of private money lending. So if you want to learn more about it, tune in and enjoy! In this episode, Bradley talks about… How Brad met his business partner The hard part of hard money loans Technological changes in private money lending What is the underwriting process like for passive investors? His target asset classes in his business   About Bradley Laddusaw… Brad Laddusaw, CPA, graduated from California State University, Fullerton, with a double major in Accounting & Finance. He started his career in the audit practice of Ernst & Young, where he serviced clients in the Real Estate, Home Building, and Retail Consumer Product industries. Subsequent to leaving Ernst & Young, he joined the Investor Relations team at a Los Angeles-based private lending company, where he quickly moved up the ranks to Vice President of Finance. In July 2017, Brad started S&L Capital Group, a Southern California-based private lending firm, with his business partner, Corey Siegel, another Cal State Fullerton alumni. Since entering the private lending industry, he has been involved in underwriting and directly placing over $200,000,000 in trust deed investments to accredited investors and Family Offices. Catch Bradley Laddusaw on… Website:     https://www.slcapitalgroup.com/                    Brad@SLCapitalGroup.com     Connect with Mo Bina on… Website:          https://www.high-risecapital.com/ Medium:          https://mobina.medium.com/ YouTube:        https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5ISsEKBHlkX7lk9b68SKLA/featured Instagram:      https://www.instagram.com/highrisecapital/ For more information on passive investing in commercial real estate, please check out our free eBook — More Doors, More Profits — by clicking here: https://www.high-risecapital.com/resources-index

EY Cross-Border Taxation Alerts
EY Cross-Border Taxation Spotlight for Week ending 23 December 2022

EY Cross-Border Taxation Alerts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 4:37


A review of the week's major US international tax-related news. In this edition: US Congress passes $1.7 trillion spending bill; no Tax Title – Treasury plans guidance on CAMT and stock buyback excise tax by year-end – IRS announces it will issue proposed regulations amending final Section 1446(f) final withholding regulations for PTPs – Treasury official says GILTI will need to be reformed – Congressional Republican lawmakers voice concerns over BEPS Pillar Two Undertaxed Profits Rule – OECD issues (i) consultation document on Pillar One MLI re: DSTs; (ii) consultation document on Pillar Two GloBE information return; (iii) consultation document on Pillar Two tax certainty for GloBE rules; and (iv) guidance on Pillar Two safe harbors and penalty relief.

Plan B Success
Business Succession Planning w/ Ravi Mamodiya, Chartered Accountant

Plan B Success

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 20:52


Ravi Mamodiya is a Chartered Accountant by training, an entrepreneur by choice, and a business consultant by passion. His perspectives on organizations and processes fly in the face of conventional wisdom. Ravi is also a fellow member of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of India of the 2011 Batch and did his post-graduation from Rajasthan University. Currently, he is the managing partner of M/s A R Mamodiya & Co., Chartered Accountants, Jaipur. In his long career with Hindustan Zinc, Ernst & Young, and later working closely with many SMEs, he specialized in turnarounds by providing ground-level solutions. Through his unorthodox career, he has challenged and transformed the way organizations plan the organization's continuity. As you observe him communicate his views on business growth, Ravi has earned a reputation for straight talk, logical explanations, and effective organizational design. In this episode, we discuss his passion for succession planning and understand the basics of succession in a simplified manner. It will be helpful for professionals and business owners to understand the critical aspects of succession planning and create strategies for better business continuity planning. _____________________________________________________   Rajeev Mudumba's Website: www.planb.live   Plan B Success Podcast: Available on your favorite platform including iTunes @ https://apple.co/2JCSysL?ls=1 or www.planbsuccess.live or www.planb.live   Want to SUPERCHARGE your personal or business brand with your own podcast, GO HERE => rajeevmudumba.gumroad.com/l/toppodcastmastery   Rajeev's Books - Available on Amazon Worldwide on your local Amazon site or @ https://www.amazon.com/stores/author/B07VGMGBBT/allbooks   Plan B Success YouTube Channel: https://youtube.com/@planbsuccess   Medium Articles: https://rajeevmudumba.medium.com   LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rajeevmud...   Facebook Plan B Success Page: https://www.facebook.com/planbsuccess...   Facebook My Inspiration Book Page: https://www.facebook.com/myinspiratio...   Instagram: @hifromraj1

Accounting Today Podcast
EY's $1B bet on audit technology

Accounting Today Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 21:08 Very Popular


Marc Jeschonneck, global assurance digital leader at Ernst & Young, and Paul Goodhew, EY's global assurance innovation and emerging technology leader, discuss the firm's $1 billion investment in AI and other advanced technologies for auditing, as the firm contemplates spinning off its consulting side.

The MM+M Podcast
Advancing Health Equity, in partnership with Ernst & Young

The MM+M Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 9:04


The healthcare system has faced significant challenges ensuring all patients of various backgroundsreceive quality, reliable access to care. While leaders and organizations have made strides to makeinstitutional change happen in recent years, advancing health equity is ultimately a long-term journeyfor the healthcare ecosystem.During a sponsored MM+M podcast, digital editor Jack O'Brien and Muna Tuna, EY U.S. market access,pricing and reimbursement leader at Ernst & Young, discussed pharma's role, responsibilities andopportunities in addressing disparities along the journey. Follow us on twitter: @MMMnews www.mmm-online.com

Wealth On Any Income
Episode 120: Strategies for Success in Life & Leadership with Larry Broughton

Wealth On Any Income

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022 27:56


For Episode 120 of the Wealth On Any Income Podcast, Rennie is joined by Larry Broughton. Larry is an award-winning hotel owner and entrepreneur, CEO, bestselling author, keynote speaker, and former US Army Green Beret. As Founder and CEO of California-based Broughton HOTELS, CBS News has called Larry “the nation's foremost expert on leadership and entrepreneurship.” The host of the Travel Channel's hit show, Hotel Impossible, says he is, “among the top hospitality experts in the country.” Larry's upbeat, creative approach to business and life has been featured in newspaper and magazine articles across the country and he has been a recurring guest expert on news and TV programs on every major television and cable network, including MSNBC, CNN, CNBC, CBS, and Travel Channel. Among Larry's awards are: Ernst & Young's Entrepreneur of the Year®; the National Veteran-Owned Business Association's Vetrepreneur® of the Year; and Passkeys Foundation's National Business Leader of Integrity. Are you interested in some strategies for success?In this episode, Rennie and Larry cover:03:33 How Larry ended up in the hospitality industry after he left the military.07:16 Larry was described as being in the right place and waited for the right time.08:48 The three charities that are most important to Larry – The Green Beret Foundation, International Justice Mission (IJM), and the micro-lending organization KIVA.11:12 Larry shares that he believes entrepreneurship is one of the most powerful forces in the world.12:08 The biggest failure in Larry's life and what he learned from the journey of healing and recovery it sent him on.17:13 It takes guts to ask for help and the lone wolf myth of success.18:40 How the pandemic impacted Larry's industry and what he did to survive, including some practices he implemented in his management meetings.22:22 The biggest lesson Larry learned from these last few years and a challenge for you!24:44 How to learn more about Larry and get access to his recording - REVEALED! 8 Mission-Tested Strategies for Success in Life & Leadership at  https://yoogozi.com/revealed‘What I realized is that there's really kind of eight major spans in our lives and that includes physical, financial, professional, spiritual, friends, relationships -  all those kinds of things. But if I'm focusing on my business 100% of the time - guaranteed those other areas of my life are being neglected. And so the idea with this tool that we have developed is that we want to have a whole health in all areas..' – Larry BroughtonGet Larry's recording Revealed! 8 Mission-Tested Strategies for Success in Life & Leadership at https://yoogozi.com/revealedTo learn more about Larry visit https://larrybroughton.me/If you'd like to know how books, movies, and society programs you to be poor, and what the cure is visit wealthonanyincome.com/tedx. You'll hear Rennie's TEDx talk and can request a free 27-page Roadmap to Complete Financial Choice® and receive a weekly email with tips, techniques, or inspiration around your business or money. AND if you'd like to see how you can increase your wealth and donate to the causes that touch your heart. Please check out our affordable program ‘Wealth with Purpose'.Rennie's Books and Programshttps://wealthonanyincome.com/books/Wealth with Purpose:https://wealthonanyincome.com/wealthwithpurposeRennie's 9 Days to Financial Freedom program:https://wealthonanyincome.com/programsConnect with Rennie Websites:WealthOnAnyIncome.comRennieGabriel.comEmail: Rennie@WealthOnAnyIncome.comLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/renniegabriel/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WealthOnAnyIncome/Twitter: https://twitter.com/RennieGabrielYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdIkYMOuvzHQqVXe4e_L8PgInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/wealthonanyincome/

303Endurance Podcast
CX with Kristin Weber

303Endurance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 69:40


This week we have Pro/Master's Cyclocross racer Kirstin Weber joining us. She won two Master's National Titles and three podiums at Master's Cyclocross World Championships. Kristin has been bike touring all over the world, including Costa Rica, all over Europe, New Zealand, and the United States.   Show Sponsor: UCAN Generation UCAN has a full line of nutrition products powered by LIVESTEADY to fuel your sport.   LIVSTEADY (formerly SuperStarch) was purposefully designed to work with your body, not against it, delivering long-lasting energy you can feel. LIVSTEADY is different. Its unique time-release profile allows your body to access energy consistently throughout the day, unlocking your natural ability to stay focused and calm while providing the fuel you need to meet your daily challenges.   Use UCAN in your training and racing to fuel the healthy way, finish stronger and recover more quickly!  Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co   Your best discount 12/29/22 - FUEL25 for 25% off anything in your cart.   In Today's Show Feature Interview with Kirstin Weber Endurance News Gwen Jorgensen return to triathlon Cyclocross Nationals and reactions to trans competitors What's new in the 303 A Tireside Chat with Jens Voigt All I want for Christmas Video of the Week Kirstin post finish at 2018 Nationals   News Sponsor Buddy Insurance: Buddy Isurance gives you peace of mind to enjoy your training and racing to the fullest. Buddy's mission is simple, to help people fearlessly enjoy an active and outdoor lifestyle.    Get on-demand accident insurance just in case the unexpected happens. Buddy ensures you have cash for bills fast.  Go to buddyinsurance.com and create an account.  There's no commitment or charge to create one.  Once you have an account created, it's a snap to open your phone and in a couple clicks have coverage for the day.  Check it out!   Feature Interview: Kirstin Weber Kristin got into cycling when she took a job as a Graphic Designer at Schwinn Cycling & Fitness. She had just done a 10-week cycling tour of New Zealand, and she rode that passion all the way into a career as a Pro/Master's Cyclocross racer. She won two Master's National Titles and three podiums at Master's Cyclocross World Championships. Kristin has been bike touring all over the world, including Costa Rica, all over Europe, New Zealand, and the United States. In the late 90s, Kristin was a wrangler at a guest ranch in the beautiful rustic mountains of Wyoming where she honed her fly fishing skills and wrangled a herd of 75 horses and 50 cows. Mostly recently, Kristin has become passionate about ski touring and earned her Avalanche I training certification this past winter. She loves people, she loves to travel, and she loves sharing her passion for spending days outside getting to know a place. Kristin has 3 teenage kids, so her ability to do 10 things at once is well-formed. She can't wait to share the road with you.   Endurance News:   U.S. Olympic gold medalist Gwen Jorgensen is returning to elite short-course triathlon competition.   COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — U.S. Olympic gold medalist Gwen Jorgensen today announced her plans to return to elite short-course triathlon competition. Jorgensen in 2016 won the United States' first-ever Olympic gold medal in the sport of triathlon, and in 2017 transitioned to a professional running career following the birth of her first son, Stanley. This October, Jorgensen gave birth to her second child, George.   Together with her husband and chef (and former pro cyclist) Patrick Lemieux by her side, the family works seamlessly as a team. A relatable and accessible working mom, Jorgensen continues to inspire throughout her athletic journey, with her family's support every step of the way.    “I am thrilled to announce my return to the blue carpet. I'm collaborating with my team to return to form and look forward to the work ahead as I invest in myself and USA Triathlon. I am inspired by the U.S. Mixed Relay team's silver medal in Tokyo and aspire to contribute to that team in 2024. I believe Team USA can be one step higher in Paris!” Jorgensen said. “But this return is about more than just me. As a mom of two and long-time supporter of USA Triathlon, I strive to set an example that motivates and inspires my family and Team USA.”   “Gwen's Olympic gold medal and incredible sustained success at the highest level of the sport lifted triathlon's profile to unprecedented heights throughout her remarkable career,” said Victoria Brumfield, USA Triathlon CEO. “We, along with many multisport fans, can't wait to follow her journey back to the sport.”    Jorgensen looks to rejoin a U.S. Women's Elite Triathlon National Team that has produced unprecedented results on the global stage. 2022 marked the eighth consecutive year two U.S. women have placed in the top four in World Triathlon overall rankings and in 2021 the U.S. became the first country to place five women in the top 12 in World Triathlon overall rankings. Six different U.S. women have placed in the top four in the World Triathlon overall rankings since 2014. U.S. women captured two medals in the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games and its four total Olympic medals across six Olympic Games are tied for the second-most of any country.    “Our Elite Women's Triathlon National Team has proven itself year-after-year to be among the strongest and deepest in the world,” said Scott Schnitzspahn, USA Triathlon High Performance General Manager. “As our team builds toward Paris 2024, we are excited to welcome Gwen back to the sport.”   An All-American track and cross-country runner for the University of Wisconsin and a member of the Badgers' swim team, Jorgensen was recruited into the sport of triathlon in 2010 by USA Triathlon through its newly developed Collegiate Recruitment Program (CRP). That year, she balanced work as a Certified Public Accountant at EY (formerly Ernst & Young) with training and learning the basics of the sport, eventually earning her elite license in her first competitive triathlon.     'We all deserve an opportunity' - riders react as two trans women finish in CX Nationals top 5 Ahead of the 2022 USA Cycling National Cyclocross Championships in Hartford, CT, this past week, organizers, racers and fans alike braced themselves for another showing of protests against trans athletes competing in women's categories.   During the 2021 championship event in Illinois, a group of “Save Women's Sport” demonstrators took to the cyclocross grounds holding signs and heckling trans athletes.   The group is “a coalition that fights to preserve sex-based eligibility standards for participation in female sports” and strongly opposes USA Cycling's admission of trans women athletes in its women's races.   The protests at that time were part of a nation-wide campaign that had sparked a social media outrage. Some condemned the protestors, but most condemned cycling's governing body, USA Cycling, for either not putting a stop to the protests or conversely, for allowing trans women to compete in the women's categories.   This led to USA Cycling amending its Fan Code of Conduct this year to include prohibiting “displaying signs, symbols, images, using language, or making gestures that are threatening, abusive, or discriminatory on the basis of race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, gender, gender identity, ability, or sexual orientation.”   In the end, the pre-event worries never materialized. Instead, last year's hostilities led to a showing of love and support with images of kids in rainbow hats and signs bearing “We love our trans athletes” messages coming out of Hartford this year.   Online, however, the anti-transgender sentiment and protests continued across social media. Twitter in particular was a buzz after Austin Killips (Nice Bikes) —a target of last year's protests— made history when she rode herself into the bronze medal in the women's elite race behind three-time winner Clara Honsinger (EF Education-Tibco-SVB) and Raylyn Nuss (Steve Tilford Foundation Racing), thereby becoming the first transgender woman to podium at this event. Jenna Lingwood (Point S Nokian), another trans athlete, rounded out the top five.   “We braced for the worst but the only energy that filled Riverside Park was love and support for everyone racing their hearts out. Sometimes, thanks to careful planning and kind souls the best possible outcomes happen,” Killips commented in a post-race message.   “I just want to live in and help make a world marked by love, solidarity, and grace and the cyclocross community was able to realize that for an afternoon here. I'll hold days like this close to my heart when my faith in the goodness of others wavers.”   With two trans women in the top five of the cyclocross national championships, transgender athletes have rarely been so visible. And while the internet is easily incensed, the question of fairness in competition ought to be posed to the athletes currently competing with and alongside trans athletes.   And so, Cycling Weekly reached out to Anna Megale of Comp Edge Racing, who finished just outside the top-five in sixth place.   When asked if it matters to her just who the five racers in front of her are, Megale responded with a simple, “no it doesn't.”   “This is a super hard topic and there's a little part of me that feels conflicted on what women athletics should and shouldn't be but at the end of the day, I'm super supportive of all athletes out there,” the 32-year-old Oregon native said.   “I think we all deserve an opportunity. I'm so happy for all five athletes and I'm proud of them. I think they worked just as hard for it as anyone else did. This is what the game is right now so, what does the sixth person think? I think we all raced well."   Fifth at last year's event and sixth this year, Megale has been a consistent performer since breaking through the UCI ranks.   She grew up a swimmer and like so many cyclists out there, started cycling due to an injury. She was introduced to bike racing by her husband in 2014, and quickly started making her way through the local scene in Boise, Idaho.   In 2018 she began tackling national level UCI races, chasing that first UCI point. She garnered an impressive 57 UCI points that first year and by the end of the 2021/22 season, she was sporting a USA skinsuit and lining up at the UCI World Cyclocross Championships.   Megale said the controversy and protests surrounding nationals these past two years not only detract from the racing, she also fears for her fellow competitors' safety.   “I'm glad USAC put out a Code of Conduct for that because it's scary. I worry that it's not safe and I want it to be safe for everyone,” she commented   “I truly believe we all need a safe place to discuss this topic. I want all people, no matter who they are, to feel heard and loved. Like most things, there is no perfect answer and continuing to work towards fairness for all is most important. I am grateful for my cycling community and feel every athlete I have lined up with this year has raised the bar and pushed us all to be better. Most importantly, there is no room for hate, ever."   Ahead of the race, Pan American Champion, Raylyn Nuss, called the trans athlete debate "the big elephant in the room” and also championed further discourse on the matter.   "I almost wish we could just have a panel discussion with [the trans women] in a safe space. And we could all just ask a bunch of questions, and just clear the air more or less, and then just proceed on as normal,” she told Cyclingnews.   "The rules are what they are. So we cannot sit and just think about what advantages she might have."   These rules Nuss is referring to is the UCI's policy on eligibility and regulations for transgender athletes, which USA Cycling has adopted. Last revised in July 2022, these regulations state that those who transition from male to female (MTF) are eligible to compete in the female category as long as:   - the athlete has declared their gender identity as female,   - the athlete can demonstrate that their total testosterone level in serum has been below 2.5 nmol/L for a period of at least 24 months,   - and their total testosterone level in serum must remain below 2.5 nmol/L throughout the period of desired eligibility to compete in the female category.   Not all cycling nations have adopted this policy, which has led to conflict and confusion for elite trans athletes. British Cycling even went so far as to block trans riders from competing until it has reviewed and decided on a new licensing policy.   In the U.S. however, trans women are allowed to compete at all levels as long as qualifications are met, and for most cis women riders in the field, it's an accepted addition of competition.   "[Trans women] are just competitors that I want to beat every single time I go to the line, someone that's strong, and is really giving me a run for my money," Nuss commented.   With the national championships now behind them, a contingent of American racers, including Megale, Honsinger, Nuss and Killips, now head to Europe for a block of racing. The riders will contest celebrated events like Superprestige Diegem, X2O Trofee Koksijde and the UCI World Cup in Zonhoven.     What's New in the 303:   Shut up, Body! A Tireside Chat with Jens Voigt The Jensie, Jens Voigt talks about retirement, reflects on his professional career, professes his love for Colorado, and shares his enthusiasm for Napoleon Dynamite (2004) and Lindsey Vonn By Kate Agathon   Jens night in Denver at Campus Cycles November 21, 2022 Jens Voigt is surprisingly relatable. He gets starstruck. He listens to Metallica. He considers it a good morning when he wakes up and his back and knees don't hurt.   Now that he is no longer obliged to tell his legs to shut up, he tells his body to shut up instead. “I hate to admit it, but now I'm getting older. Now, instead of shut up legs, it's shut up body!” exclaimed Voigt.   Voigt recently made a whirlwind trip to Denver, where he visited Campus Cycles and Primal.   On the same trip, he also made a quick stop in Arizona to participate in the El Tour de Tucson 2022 Prologue and tour ride along with Bob Roll, Kristin Armstrong, Christian VandeVelde, Bobby Julich, and George Hincapie.   During the last leg of his visit, the King of Breakaways himself stopped by Campus Cycles for VIP Night and took some time for an impromptu Tireside Chat.   Voigt has a thing for Colorado. His favorite area to ride in is Durango, and he likes to watch American Flyers (1985). Most importantly, Colorado is where some of his most cherished pro cycling memories took place. “Colorado is a wonderful state! You guys are actually pretty blessed: great road biking, mountain biking, and hiking all in one place,” Voigt remarked.   Voigt's professional cycling career spanned nearly two decades and took him around the world. However, he chose Colorado and the 2014 USA Pro Challenge for his final professional race.  “It felt right to end my career here. Colorado has been good to me. It's such a wonderful place!” said Voigt.   Voigt has many fond memories of Colorado. It's the place where he went fly fishing with his Trek Factory Racing teammates. The place where he momentarily got starstruck when skiing legend Lindsey Vonn awarded him a lifetime ski pass to Vail/Beaver Creek for winning Stage 4 of the 2012 USA Pro Challenge.   Xmas List Rich's List: EKOI HEAT CONCEPT 5 winter gloves Wahoo KICKR SNAP Trainer MEN'S MAVERICK MX WETSUIT (MAXIMUM BUOYANCY)     Video of the week: Kristin Weber: Women's Masters 45-49 National Champion, 2018 Louisville Cyclocross Nationals   Closing: Thanks again for listening in this week.  Please be sure to follow us @303endurance and of course go to iTunes and give us a rating and a comment.  We'd really appreciate it! Stay tuned, train informed, and enjoy the endurance journey!

EY Cross-Border Taxation Alerts
EY Cross-Border Taxation Spotlight for Week ending 16 December 2022

EY Cross-Border Taxation Alerts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 6:16


A review of the week's major US international tax-related news. In this edition: US Congress passes temporary stopgap spending measure to facilitate omnibus bill negotiation; Tax Title uncertain – IRS releases Rev. Ruling 2022-43 with final qualified intermediary   withholding agreement – IRS issues proposed regulations on single-entity treatment of consolidated groups for purposes of Section 951 – FinCEN further extends FBAR filing deadline – FinCEN issues proposed regulations on beneficial ownership – OECD releases consultation document on Amount B of BEPS 2.0 Pillar One – EU adopts Directive on global minimum tax.

Conscious Millionaire Show
2562: Tony Nitti: Tax-Favored Sales of Small Businesses

Conscious Millionaire Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 37:54


Tony Nitti: Tax-Favored Sales of Small Businesses Tony Nitti is a Tax Partner in the Private Tax group of Ernst & Young's National Tax Department, where he chairs the S Corporation and Section 1202 subgroups. Welcome to the Conscious Millionaire Show for entrepreneurs,  who want to create an abundant future for themselves and humanity. Heard by millions in 190 countries.  Do you want to put more money in the bank, create a powerful impact, and enjoy a purposeful life? This is the podcast for you! Join host, JV Crum III, as he goes inside the minds of Millionaire Entrepreneurs and World-Class Business Experts. Like this Podcast? Get every episode delivered to you free!  Subscribe in iTunes Download Your Free Money-Making Gift Now... "Born to Make Millions" Hypnotic Audio - Click Here Now! Please help spread the word. Subscribing and leaving a review helps others find our podcast. Thanks so much! Inc Magazine "Top 13 Business Podcasts." Conscious Millionaire Network has over 3,000 episodes and millions of listeners in 190 countries. Join us as a regular listener to get money-making secrets on how you can grow your business and profits faster!

Conscious Millionaire  J V Crum III ~ Business Coaching Now 6 Days a Week
2562: Tony Nitti: Tax-Favored Sales of Small Businesses

Conscious Millionaire J V Crum III ~ Business Coaching Now 6 Days a Week

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 37:54


Welcome to the Conscious Millionaire Show for entrepreneurs,  who want to create an abundant future for themselves and humanity. Heard by millions in 190 countries.  Do you want to put more money in the bank, create a powerful impact, and enjoy a purposeful life? This is the podcast for you! Join host, JV Crum III, as he goes inside the minds of Millionaire Entrepreneurs and World-Class Business Experts. Today's featured episode... Tony Nitti: Tax-Favored Sales of Small Businesses Tony Nitti is a Tax Partner in the Private Tax group of Ernst & Young's National Tax Department, where he chairs the S Corporation and Section 1202 subgroups. Like this Podcast? Get every episode delivered to you free!  Subscribe in iTunes Download Your Free Money-Making Gift Now... "Born to Make Millions" Hypnotic Audio - Click Here Now! Please help spread the word. Subscribing and leaving a review helps others find our podcast. Thanks so much! Inc Magazine "Top 13 Business Podcasts." Conscious Millionaire Network has over 3,000 episodes and millions of listeners in 190 countries. Join us as a regular listener to get money-making secrets on how you can grow your business and profits faster!

Ernst & Young ITS Washington Dispatch
EY ITTS Washington Dispatch, November 2022

Ernst & Young ITS Washington Dispatch

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 14:26


A monthly review of US international tax-related developments. In this edition: IRS proposed FTC regulations offer relief from cost recovery and source-based attribution rules, other key changes – IRS moving forward on cryptoasset issues – Section 367(d) regs coming early next year, IRS official says – No delay or transition period for final Section 1446(f) regs implementation date – Congressional Republicans urge Biden Administration to not terminate US-Hungary treaty – IRS will consider applying economic substance doctrine and related penalties more frequently in transfer pricing audits – US House Republicans seek retention of BEPS Pillar One documents and communications – OECD updates guidance on implementation of CbC Reporting.

EY Cross-Border Taxation Alerts
EY Cross-Border Taxation Spotlight for Week ending 9 December 2022

EY Cross-Border Taxation Alerts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 2:41


A review of the week's major US international tax-related news. In this edition: US Congress grapples with government funding in lame duck, will impact tax package options – US, Croatia sign tax treaty – OECD releases consultation document on design elements of BEPS Pillar One Amount B re: simplification of transfer pricing rules.

EY Cross-Border Taxation Alerts
EY Cross-Border Taxation Spotlight for Week ending 2 December 2022

EY Cross-Border Taxation Alerts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 3:07


A review of the week's major US international tax-related news. In this edition: Congress returns for lame duck session; business tax measures could be included in omnibus spending bill – IRS Corporate Alternative Minimum Tax guidance possible before year-end.

Mindfulness Exercises
Connecting With Emotions Through the Body, with Sean Fargo

Mindfulness Exercises

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 24:56


We tend to live in our heads, experiencing our world conceptually. Yet wisdom, and our emotions, live in the body. So, how do we move from the head to the body? Improving interoception - awareness of the body's internal sensations - is a good place to start becoming truly present with our bodies, our emotions, and ourselves. As we deepen our awareness, there's no end to where the body scan can take us.  In this episode, Mindfulness Exercises founder Sean Fargo teaches us how deepening mindfulness of the body offers a better understanding of our emotions and the opportunity to heal from past trauma. A former Buddhist monk, Sean Fargo has taught mindfulness and meditation for corporations including Tesla, Kaiser Permanente, Facebook, Ernst & Young, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and for health and government organizations, prisons, and hospitals around the world. He has dedicated himself to teaching mindfulness in a way that's clear and practical. Sean has also trained hundreds of others to teach and share mindfulness in their own communities. His Mindfulness Meditation Teacher Training Program is a unique, self-paced certification program that is accessible entirely online. Students in the program receive weekly live, in-person mentorship from Sean Fargo and his team. They are joined by the world's most respected voices in mindfulness and meditation who present on a wide range of topics.  Train to share mindfulness with confidence, compassion and skill within a supportive online community. Learn more at teach.mindfulnessexercises.com or, schedule a 15-minute call with Sean to see if this program is right for you at https://calendly.com/sean-108/application

Healthcare Entrepreneur Academy Podcast
#294: Turning Income Into Assets to Build Wealth with Tom Wheelwright (Rebroadcast)

Healthcare Entrepreneur Academy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 43:48


“Employees pay the highest percentage of taxes. Big business and investors pay the least.” – Robert Kiyosaki   In today's rebroadcast episode, Jason A. Duprat, Entrepreneur, Healthcare Practitioner, and Host of the Healthcare Entrepreneur Academy podcast, sits down with Tom Wheelwright, CPA, and CEO of "WealthAbility." Tom highlights how your business can be the best tax shelter. We also learn how to save more money while increasing your gross income, as well as tax strategies for long-term tax reduction. Tune in to learn more from Robert Kiyosaki's Tax Advisor himself!   3 KEY POINTS: The government wants and supports business owners for the sake of the economy. One beginner mistake is handling taxes yourself without having a financial partner. Instead of asking if it's deductible, the better question is “How do I make it deductible?”   EPISODE HIGHLIGHTS: Tom began his career with Ernst & Young, where he spent seven years. He went on to work for a Fortune 1000 company and has spent 25 years buying and selling CPA firms. Tom was handpicked by Robert Kiyosaki to be one of his Rich Dad advisors. He serves as Robert's tax advisor as well. He's authored two chapters in “The Book of Real Estate” by Robert and contributed to four other books. Most recently, Tom has been touring with Robert providing financial education. Together, they have 50 CPA firms worldwide. Tom left big company accounting because he wanted to work with entrepreneurs. When business owners work from home, they get a tax benefit. However, employees don't so there's massive inequality. You should consider starting a side hustle. It allows you to put extra money in your pocket and offers massive tax savings that can add up. One small business tax strategy is to have a home office. Rather than take a flat deduction, itemize. Also, it's better to claim % of rooms vs % of square footage. If you set up a home office right, not only does it give you a deduction for a portion of the utilities, maintenance, and even the cost of the house, but it even gives you a bigger deduction for your car because it turns your commute into a business expense. Ultimately, you want to evolve into an LLC or S Corp for tax deductions. With an S Corp, only your wages are taxed, not the distribution. An S Corp can cut your taxes in half. Tom cautions against filing as a sole proprietor because it's risky and costly to set up. In addition, 100% of your net income is subject to social security tax. Never plan to be small. Act like a big guy and get big guy benefits! Business owners often overlook the fact that business travel and meals are tax-deductible. Don't intermingle funds. Your business isn't a hobby. You must behave like a real business to reap the best tax benefits and optimize write-offs. Not only is it okay to employ your children, but the government likes you to employ them and they'll give you tax benefits. Children can earn up to $12,000 tax-free, allowing them to save for college more effectively than a 529 Plan. As an entrepreneur, there are three tax planning principles to keep in mind: reduction of taxable income, tax credits, and tax rates. Focus on permanent tax benefits vs postponing paying taxes. Have a team including a tax advisor, attorney, insurance agent, and bookkeeper.   TWEETABLE QUOTES: “If you take your money and you put it back into your business, you don't pay any tax.” – Tom Wheelwright “Employing your children is a great way to teach them how to work and the value of money and investing.” – Tom Wheelwright   CONNECT WITH JASON DUPRAT LinkedIn | Facebook | Instagram | Youtube Email: support@jasonduprat.com Join our Facebook group: https://jasonduprat.com/group   RESOURCES Want to become a Ketamine Therapy provider? Enroll NOW in The Ketamine Academy course: https://ketamineacademy.com/presentation Sign up for one of our free business start-up Masterclasses by heading over to https://jasonduprat.com/freemasterclass Have a healthcare business question? Want to request a podcast topic? Text me at 407-972-0084 and I'll add you to my contacts. Occasionally, I'll share important announcements and answer your questions as well. I'm excited to connect with you! Do you enjoy our podcast? Leave a rating and review: https://lovethepodcast.com/hea Don't want to miss an episode? Subscribe and follow: https://followthepodcast.com/hea   RELATED EPISODES: #248: ERIC MILLER: BUILD BUSINESS PROFITS, ENTERPRISE VALUE & ASSETS AS A PRACTICE OWNER #132: TACTICAL TUESDAY: PROTECT ASSETS & LIMIT LIABILITIES WITH AN LLC #232: TACTICAL TUESDAY: TWO FACTORS THAT IMPACT YOUR EARNINGS AS A BUSINESS OWNER: TAX RATES & RETIREMENT PLANNING   #HealthcareEntrepreneurAcademy #healthcare #HealthcareBoss #entrepreneur #entrepreneurship #podcast #businessgrowth #teamgrowth #digitalbusiness

EY Cross-Border Taxation Alerts
EY Cross-Border Taxation Spotlight for Week ending 23 November 2022

EY Cross-Border Taxation Alerts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 2:05


A review of the week's major US international tax-related news. In this edition: IRS pivoting to cryptocurrency, opens digital asset project office – IRS drafting questions on cryptocurrency, digital assets for corporate and partnership returns.

EY Cross-Border Taxation Alerts
EY Cross-Border Taxation Spotlight for Week ending 18 November 2022

EY Cross-Border Taxation Alerts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 4:24


A review of the week's major US international tax-related news. In this edition: Republicans take House, Democrats hold Senate; lame-duck legislation remains uncertain – IRS issues highly anticipated foreign tax credit proposed regulations – IRS proposed regulations under Section 367(d) will be released early next year – IRS considering use of economic substance in transfer pricing audits, even with TP documentation.

Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning
Neuroscientist, Wall Street Journal Best-Selling Author, Friederike Fabritius on her NEW book ”The Brain-Friendly Workplace: Why Talented People Quit and How to Make Them Stay”

Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 69:53


"The old corporate paradigm of extreme hours, little sleep, endless meetings, and nonstop travel is dead. No one wants to go back to that. It's bad for performance and for everyone's mental and physical health. The future of business is hybrid and requires a flexible new paradigm that helps everyone reach peak performance: the brain-friendly workplace." (Friederike Fabritius) Watch this interview on YouTube here https://youtu.be/Mmv9PmuioFs On this episode we will learn:  ✔ How to create a workplace of the future. A Brain-Friendly Workplace. ✔ How an understanding our brain-type, can help us to be happier and more productive in the workplace. ✔ What is causing the "Neuro-Gap" and why is it important to have different brain-types represented at the higher levels of corporations or organizations. ✔ How can someone with ambition and persistence, move forward into a management position? What should they be prepared to show if their brain-type isn't often represented in these higher level positions? ✔ What is lateral or creative thinking, versus linear thinking, and why are both important in the workplace? ✔ Where do those "flashes of insight" come from, that creative people can see? Can science prove this type of thinking to be useful? ✔ What are the 4 brain types, or neurosignatures, and how can we be sure we understand them for ourselves, and for others? ✔ Why is understanding our optimal level of stress important for our workplace productivity and happiness? ✔ An example of when Friederike used her neurosignature under pressure. ✔ What to expect from some of the interviews in The Brain-Friendly Workplace ✔ An important tip from John Medina on the "power problem" that happens at the brain level, for people in positions of leadership.     FOLLOW FRIEDERIKE FABRITIUS Website https://friederikefabritius.com/ LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/friederikefabritius/ Twitter https://twitter.com/FriederikeFab YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8wD4PRM2RablIfUVDzT2WA Facebook https://www.facebook.com/FriederikeFabritius Amazon: www.amazon.com/author/friederikefabritius SEE PAST NEUROSCIENCE MEETS SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL LEARNING PODCAST EPISODES https://www.achieveit360.com/episodes/ There's much more to this new workplace, overriding old, outdated paradigms, than meets the eye, and Friederike Fabritius's NEW book, The Brain-Friendly Workplace is FULL of ideas to help all of us adapt our workplace, so that our brains will work at their best.   Welcome back to The Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast where we bridge the gap between theory and practice, with strategies, tools and ideas we can all use immediately, applied to the most current brain research to heighten productivity in our schools, sports environments and modern workplaces. I'm Andrea Samadi and launched this podcast to share how important an understanding of our brain is for our everyday life and results. My vision is to bring the experts to you, share their research, books, ideas and resources to help you to implement their proven strategies, whether you are a teacher working in the classroom or in the corporate environment. Be sure to listen to the EPISODE prior to this one, #257, as I do cover a DEEP DIVE to put us all in the right mind-set, or should I say, brain-set, for today's interview. I'm so very excited for today's interview, EPISODE #258, as we have a returning guest, from one of our early episodes, #27[i], Friederike Fabritius, all the way from Germany, who dove deep into her book, The Leading Brain: Neuroscience Hacks to Work Smarter, Better, Happier when we first launched our podcast back in 2019. What was crazy about finding Friederike back then, is that I found her on YouTube, from a presentation she did on Leadership and the Brain, and it really helped me to understand the chemicals involved in the brain during peak performance, and what it looks like when the brain is involved in FLOW, which is something I think we all want to master. What Friederike might not know, is that I watched her presentation many times over, back in 2017, taking notes OVER my notes, as it helped me to understand why people perform the way they do at work, why some people excel, and others seem to be missing something, and why certain people gravitate towards certain positions based on the chemicals predominantly in their brain. What became clear to me from this diagram, from this presentation where you can watch Friederike[ii], on “Fun, Fear and Focus” is that some positions in the workplace (at the beginning of the curve) are routine, and require people to do the same thing every day, (and some people are wired this way) but for those who are not, they will find themselves to be under-challenged and bored, without a brain strategy in place. Similarly, some positions that require NEW daily challenges are designed for those workers who enjoy constantly putting out fires and would be bored if their work was routine, the same way every day, but these positions often lead to burnout, without a brain strategy in place. We ALL need to find our optimal stress point, so that our work challenges us just the right amount, leading us to that place of optimal workplace happiness. I could see clearly with this example, why I was very unhappy when I left my “exciting” job in field sales, covering Higher Education/University Campuses in the southwest region, moving to “inside” sales where I sat at a desk, and was bored and under-challenged until I figured out that I needed to offset my desk time, with exercise. This diagram also comes into my mind when I see someone working very hard, or burning the candle at both ends, as Friederike cautioned that this type of work pattern isn't sustainable and can lead to depression, burnout and even changing the brain to where people under these high levels of stress begin to see stress in places where there isn't any, or experience “hyper arousal.”   I'm always looking for productivity tips that we can all use, and it's clear that stress in our workplaces is at an all-time high, globally. We know that “2/3 of people report being stressed at work, to the point they can't sleep at night”[iii]  so I was thrilled to see that Friederike's new book was focused on changing the workplace, not the employee, to create the best environment for happiness and productivity. Let's welcome back, returning guest, and my friend from EP #27 Friederike Fabritius[iv], a neuroscientist, author and public speaker, who works with leaders to help them to understand how their brain works, and like I mentioned from that first presentation I saw with high level business executives, she will share how we can all find our optimal stress points,  with the secrets from her NEWLY released book, The Brain-Friendly Workplace that hit #3 on The Wall Street Journal Best-Selling Books List, and remains on this list today, and show us how we can all adapt our workplaces, for optimal productivity, health and happiness.   Welcome back Friederike! It's incredible to see you again. Congratulations on your new book hitting the Wall Street Journal's Best-Selling List!! That's AWESOME!! INTRO Q: So, I was reading your book, and you know, I feel like we can think we know someone, but when you read their book, you get a whole new layer of understanding behind someone with knowledge you might not have known before. I felt like I knew you fairly well from studying everything I could find online about your work, interviewing you with your first book back on EP #27, and then I'm reading your NEW book, preparing for this interview, and I come to the part in the Introduction on “Happy to Be Fired” and I knew you came from the Max Plank Institute[v] where all the Nobel prize winners came from, but I had no idea why you left. Your story gave me so much insight into my own neurosignature, or what I need to be happy with work, and I think this understanding is a HUGE missing link in the workplace. Can we start with why you were “Happy to be Fired” and why understanding our brain is the first step towards being happy with our work? Q1:. My next question is kind of long, but it will help set up how to Address the Neuro-Gap from Chapter 1 of your book. Can I share how I see the “Neuro-Gap?” I'm always learning something, and trying to make connections with this learning. Last week I took this fascinating course called “How to Think Like an FBI Profiler”[vi] with Special Agent John Douglas who they created the Netflix Series Mindhunter after his cases. I learned so much from him, but one part that stuck out to me was he spoke about how he brought creativity, intuition, keeping an open mind to solving his cases, something that the FBI lacked before he came on board because women were under-represented in the FBI.[vii] He talked about solving a case when a female investigator said she wanted to go with her gut, and blow up a note from a murderer and place it on a billboard to see if anyone would recognize the writing.  Creative, out of the box thinking wasn't a usual strategy within the male dominated FBI agents, but he was known for his out of the box thinking, and went with this woman's idea, and this method is how they identified their criminal and were able to put him behind bars. Is this what you call “The Neuro-Gap?” (overrepresentation of high dopamine/high testosterone brain systems, and systems thinking, at the executive level) that would have ignored this type of creative thinking to solve problems that came from this one female agent? Q1B: Of course, I saw the Neuro-Gap in the corporate world when I was there. My creative, intuitive ideas for building curriculum that covered social and emotional learning connected to neuroscience was something that our curriculum team couldn't even fathom 13 years ago, when I worked in the publishing field, so I had to leave, and highlight this space on this podcast years later. What about others in different fields? Women in sports? Female actors? Or even like the example I used with female agents in the FBI? How do you see change occurring here in our present-day workplaces? Not everyone can just quit and start over like we did. How can people move forward if their brain signature is not what's usually at the top? Q1C: Can you give some examples of lateral thinking vs linear or systems thinking and perhaps ways that you've seen creative thinking emerge in The Brain-Friendly Workplace? I was definitely told my ideas were lateral. Can you explain this type of thinking and why it's important to embrace people who think this way in the workplace? Q1D: Where do these flashes of insight come from? Can science give us some insight to why some people can “see” things that others might think to be crazy? Q2: What's a quick and simple way to discover what our neurosignature is? I know that my brain is high with dopamine, as I get bored easily, need autonomy, and challenge on a daily basis, and there's also this intuitive, creative side to me, that's the estrogen/oxytocin signature that I think is the same as yours? How can we pinpoint what our signature is? IMAGE CREDIT: Carolin Nischwitz Q2B: I had to laugh at the Testosterone Signature, because it's my husband to a “t.” Not to name call or anything, but I would take out direct and put the word that starts with an a in there. It's actually something I admire in strong people (male or female) because I wish I was like this more myself. The strong drive to succeed at any cost even if they come off as being abrupt, I like people who are decisive and direct. You say that 1/3 of women have a high testosterone brain, yet women don't make up 1/3 of corporate leaders. How would you suggest women with this neurosignature embrace their brain and move into leadership positions to change this in the future? Q3: Can we review your incredible presentation that I mention in the backstory, where I first found your work back in 2017 with what we should all know and understand about ourselves, to achieve peak performance/find our optimal stress point? Q4: When I got to Chapter 4 of your book, and you were talking about your first-ever TEDx talk, I had to look through my LinkedIn messages, as I thought I remembered chatting with you just BEFORE you went onstage for that event as we were planning our first interview, and you mentioned that your technology had failed.  How did your neurosignature help you in this situation? This has been the STORY of 2022 for me. Q5: Your book is something I'm going to be studying for some time. I could ask you a question on each chapter, each interview, and each brain tip but we'd be here for a long time. I loved seeing some of the researchers I most admire, like Dr. Andrew Huberman, from Stanford, and Mathew Walker, the Sleep Diplomat, but I most loved seeing your interview with John Medina, as I remember you asking me for his contact information. I was thrilled to see him in there in Chapter 7 and so glad you were able to reach and connect with him. I forgot how absolutely funny  he can be, but also, he covers a serious topic, of some brain “power problems” that I think are important to understand for those in positions of leadership. What would be one “power problem” John Medina mentioned, and how can those in leadership positions mitigate this problem? NOTE: Andrea asked John Medina if there's a way he would suggest this "power problem" could be mitigated. He said: "You pose a great question, and I have one piece of bad news and two pieces of good news to share in response. To date, there is no randomized blinded trial of which I am aware that has been shown to successfully force someone to understand the consequences of their actions, especially when they think normal rules don't apply to them.  The first piece of good news is that the research world isn't clueless about the issue. Connecting one's behaviors to the consequences of those behaviors is the hallmark of a cognitive gadget called executive function. There is a wealth of solid behavioral work discussing how to improve executive function.  The second piece of good news concerns the concept of prophylactic education, essentially warning people in advance of what is likely to happen to them if they're not careful. Prophylactic education can go along way towards neutralizing certain bad behaviors, from reducing the number of medical malpractice lawsuits in surgical units to reducing sexism in the workplace." John Medina This was exactly what Friederike suggested as a solution. Make people aware of the consequences of their actions. John Medina called this "prophylactic education." Q6: Is there anything important I've missed? Friederike, I want to thank you very much for coming back on the podcast for a second time, and for creating such an engaging and important book that I know will help all of us to become happier in the workplace. For people who want to reach you, is the best place your website? Thank you!  About The Brain-Friendly Workplace The Brain-Friendly Workplace[viii] envisions a new kind of office where thought-diversity is acknowledged, invited, and supported. Complementing racial and gender diversity, and coinciding with shifting employee trends following the Great Resignation and remote work revolution, “diversity of mind” can lead to better employee retention, higher innovation and creativity, and increased sales.  In The Brain-Friendly Workplace, Friederike Fabritius makes the case for a radically different kind of environment that recognizes the unique “neurosignature” of each person and supports employee wellbeing by shifting from “hustle” to “outcome” culture. These cultural and environmental changes naturally create pathways for more diverse executive leadership. Especially for women who have long had to choose between high-impact careers and having a family. Where “lean-in” trainings and countless DEI initiatives have failed to make material differences in corporate diversity, The Brain-Friendly Workplace is a science-backed, field tested approach with proven impact at leading companies like EY (formerly Ernst & Young), thyssenkrupp, and Boston Consulting Group. Rather than approaching diversity from a numbers perspective, Fabritius demonstrates that supporting neurodiversity naturally leads to better gender and racial representation at the top.  THE BRAIN FRIENDLY WORKPLACE https://friederikefabritius.com/books/the-brain-friendly-workplace/   REFERENCES: [i] Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast EPISODE #27 with Friederike Fabritius on “The Recipe for Achieving Peak Performance.” https://andreasamadi.podbean.com/e/pioneer-in-the-field-of-neuroleadership-friederike-fabritius-on-the-recipe-for-achieving-peak-performance/ [ii] Friederike Fabritius “Neuroleadership: A New Approach” YouTube Published Dec. 11th, 2016 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2g4XhlLZ5ak [iii] Intro to The Brian Friendly Workplace Published on YouTube September 2022  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=La9yqt0v9f4 [iv] Friederike Fabritius on The Brain-Friendly Workplace  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wI3XxIkNSOQ [v] Max Plank Institute https://www.mpg.de/institutes [vi] How to Think Like an FBI Profiler https://www.masterclass.com/classes/john-douglas-teaches-how-to-think-like-an-fbi-profiler/chapters/ [vii] Women Agents in the FBI: In Their Own Words https://www.fbi.gov/video-repository/own-words.mp4/view [viii] The Brain Friendly Workplace: Why Talented People Qui and How to Make Them Stay by Friederike Fabritius Published Oct. 11th, 2022  https://www.amazon.com/Brain-Friendly-Workplace-Talented-People-Quit/dp/1538159538/ref=sr_1_3?crid=3NVHQ2JCDQ2NP&keywords=brain+friendly+workplace&qid=1667939024&sprefix=brain+friendly+%2Caps%2C213&sr=8-3

EY Cross-Border Taxation Alerts
EY Cross-Border Taxation Spotlight for Week ending 11 November 2022

EY Cross-Border Taxation Alerts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 3:49


A review of the week's major US international tax-related news. In this edition: US congressional lame duck tax legislation unclear amid midterm election uncertainty – Proposed foreign tax credit regulations coming soon, limited CAMT guidance this year – IRS releases 2022-2023 Priority Guidance Plan – Congressional ranking Republicans urge reversal of decision to terminate US-Hungary tax treaty – Biden Administration nominates new IRS Commissioner.

Once An Owl, Always An Owl
Ep. 15 - The Best of Both Worlds at FAUHS - Then and Now!

Once An Owl, Always An Owl

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 42:50


Today's guests bring fun and great energy wherever they go. They participate in activities and clubs that center around helping others. Dr. Molly Adam, the Director of FAU High School - Jupiter Campus, in Partnership with Max Planck Academy, is always looking for ways to allow students to pursue their passion. Pablo Fabregas and Vedaant Mutha are the founders and Co-President of Deca. They are currently working on starting a non-profit business with other members of the DECA Club and are a mentor for students transitioning to the University. And joining us from Reno, NV, is one of the outstanding alumni Kira Wolak who graduated from FAUHS in 2017. Now 23 years of age, she is an IT Consultant for Ernst & Young.

EY Cross-Border Taxation Alerts
EY Cross-Border Taxation Spotlight for Week ending 4 November 2022

EY Cross-Border Taxation Alerts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 3:40


A review of the week's major US international tax-related news. In this edition: US Treasury warns there may be little guidance re new corporate minimum tax and stock buyback tax before effective date – No transition period or delay in implementation date for final Section 1446(f) withholding regulations – IRS expects more penalties in transfer pricing cases – House Ways and Means Committee Republicans request Treasury retain all documents, communications re OECD BEPS 2.0 Pillar One Agreement.

Ernst & Young ITS Washington Dispatch
EY ITTS Washington Dispatch, October 2022

Ernst & Young ITS Washington Dispatch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 14:36


A monthly review of US international tax-related developments. In this edition: Proposed US FTC regs release expected soon, PTEP regs in first half of 2023 – US Treasury official says proposed crypto regs before year end – IRS may be more selective on APAs given availability of ICAP in transfer pricing disputes – IRS to reconsider APA revenue procedure guidance – Treasury developing measures for future treaties to address new tax regimes, new US-Croatia treaty before year end – G20 Finance Ministers welcome progress on BEPS 2.0, call for swift implementation – OECD releases public consultation document on administration and tax certainty aspects of Amount A of Pillar One – OECD releases report on interaction of Tax Incentives and Pillar Two – OECD/G20 Inclusive Framework holds 14th plenary meeting, publishes 6th annual progress report.

Manage 2 Win
#196 – Business Optimization Tips From 400 Startups with Jon Darbyshire

Manage 2 Win

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 36:00


Work smarter, not harder.  Are you ready for this challenge? Jon Darbyshire believes a shared vision of “helping teams be more productive by working smarter” enriches culture, promotes accountability, and empowers collaboration through automation.   In 2021, Jon Darbyshire and his team launched SmartSuite, a work management platform that manages any process, from any industry, on one platform.  This podcast is different for David, our host, because he chose to ask questions about SmartSuite to confirm how well it aligns with his own best practices.  This is not a product demo or pitch.  The conversation weaves Jon's experience with David 50 years in business.  Although the framework of the conversation is SmartSuite, Jon and David discuss many of the best practices they have learned through their decades of experience and hundreds of companies they have helped. Jon has invested in over 400 startups, and it has been a learning process.  David has advised over 1,000 organizations through his consulting and workshops.  What makes one startup overcome its challenges whereas another stumbles or fails?  Prior to SmartSuite, Jon ran the Archer Foundation. The mission of the foundation is to advance entrepreneurial achievement, extend the reach of community service programs, and foster educational opportunities for students and single mothers.  Prior to that, he was CEO & Founder of Archer Technologies, and held leadership positions at Ernst Young and Price Waterhouse. Learn how to optimize workflow to save time and improve results in this engaging episode. Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/41rIZOQ Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0 Manage2Win: https://www.manage2win.com/podcast   ------- This Manage 2 Win Podcast episode is brought to you by Habitly.  I (David) review Habitly best practices regularly, and teach these essential people skills to clients weekly.  This advice has changed my life, and made millions for our clients. I started developing Habitly content in 2004.  Habitly's powerful best practices have now been taught to thousands of people worldwide.  For instance, you can learn how to Create time in your day;  Get more from meetings;  Stay calm;  Achieve significant targets;  and Become a great leader.  Simply study and apply the expert knowledge provided in Habitly courses and micro-learning episodes. Whether you're just out of college, or someone with over 20 years work experience, learn the habits of highly successful people on Habitly.  Test drive Habitly for 7 days on us!  This includes full access to the entire Habitly knowledgebase – www.habitly.com.

To The Top: Inspirational Career Advice
#71 Joey Pointer: CEO of Fleet Feet on Taking Risks and Building Brand Around Community

To The Top: Inspirational Career Advice

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 51:10


Joey pointer, CEO of Fleet Feet, shares his story about how he grew up on a tobacco farm, landed at job at Ernst & Young in finance, and took a leap of faith to join a startup shoe retailer named Fleet Feet based in Sacramento which has grown to over 250+ stores. In this episode we discuss: -Lessons Joey learned from his parents growing up on a tobacco farm -How he navigated the leap of faith from the consulting firm to Fleet Feet -Innovation and investments they've made into the brand that have led to its growth -What he does to show up as the best version of himself at work and at home, and more.. -- Subscribe to my newsletter for the latest updates (www.omaid.me)

Principled
S8E8 | Compliance benchmarking: Benefits, limitations, and best practices

Principled

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 31:13


What you'll learn in this podcast episode Guidance from the US Department of Justice, particularly the recent 2020 memorandum, stresses that a company's compliance program must reflect and evolve with its risks—and should not be a snapshot or on cruise control. But in assessing those risks, it's helpful to see what other companies in the same area or circumstances have done to meet them. Collective action and coordination can be very useful in dealing with common risks. So, when is benchmarking and a collective approach to risk helpful? And when can it backfire? In this episode of the Principled Podcast, LRN Director of Advisory Services Emily Miner continues the conversation from Episode 6 about benchmarking with her colleague Susan Divers. Listen in as the two discuss the benefits and limitations of benchmarking, and how organizations can ensure they benchmark their E&C programs effectively.    Featured guest: Susan Divers Susan Divers is the director of thought leadership and best practices with LRN Corporation. She brings 30+ years' accomplishments and experience in the ethics and compliance arena to LRN clients and colleagues. This expertise includes building state-of-the-art compliance programs infused with values, designing user-friendly means of engaging and informing employees, fostering an embedded culture of compliance, and sharing substantial subject matter expertise in anti-corruption, export controls, sanctions, and other key areas of compliance. Prior to joining LRN, Mrs. Divers served as AECOM's Assistant General for Global Ethics & Compliance and Chief Ethics & Compliance Officer. Under her leadership, AECOM's ethics and compliance program garnered six external awards in recognition of its effectiveness and Mrs. Divers' thought leadership in the ethics field. In 2011, Mrs. Divers received the AECOM CEO Award of Excellence, which recognized her work in advancing the company's ethics and compliance program. Before joining AECOM, she worked at SAIC and Lockheed Martin in the international compliance area. Prior to that, she was a partner with the DC office of Sonnenschein, Nath & Rosenthal. She also spent four years in London and is qualified as a Solicitor to the High Court of England and Wales, practicing in the international arena with the law firms of Theodore Goddard & Co. and Herbert Smith & Co. She also served as an attorney in the Office of the Legal Advisor at the Department of State and was a member of the U.S. delegation to the UN working on the first anti-corruption multilateral treaty initiative.  Mrs. Divers is a member of the DC Bar and a graduate of Trinity College, Washington D.C. and of the National Law Center of George Washington University. In 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014 Ethisphere Magazine listed her as one the “Attorneys Who Matter” in the ethics & compliance area. She is a member of the Advisory Boards of the Rutgers University Center for Ethical Behavior and served as a member of the Board of Directors for the Institute for Practical Training from 2005-2008. She resides in Northern Virginia and is a frequent speaker, writer and commentator on ethics and compliance topics.  Featured Host: Emily Miner Emily Miner is a director of LRN's Ethics & Compliance Advisory services. She counsels executive leadership teams on how to actively shape and manage their ethical culture through deep quantitative and qualitative understanding and engagement. A skilled facilitator, Emily emphasizes co-creative, bottom-up, and data-driven approaches to foster ethical behavior and inform program strategy. Emily has led engagements with organizations in the healthcare, technology, manufacturing, energy, professional services, and education industries. Emily co-leads LRN's ongoing flagship research on E&C program effectiveness and is a thought leader in the areas of organizational culture, leadership, and E&C program impact. Prior to joining LRN, Emily applied her behavioral science expertise in the environmental sustainability sector, working with non-profits and several New England municipalities; facilitated earth science research in academia; and contributed to drafting and advancing international climate policy goals. Emily has a Master of Public Administration in Environmental Science and Policy from Columbia University and graduated summa cum laude from the University of Florida with a degree in Anthropology.   Principled Podcast Transcript Intro: Welcome to the Principled Podcast, brought to you by LRN. The Principled Podcast brings together the collective wisdom on ethics, business and compliance, transformative stories of leadership and inspiring workplace culture. Listen in to discover valuable strategies from our community of business leaders and workplace change makers. Emily Miner: Guidance from the US Department of Justice, particularly the recent 2020 memorandum, stresses that a company's compliance program must reflect and evolve with its risks and should not be a snapshot or on cruise control. But in assessing those risks, it's helpful to see what other companies in the same area or circumstances have done to meet them. Collective action and coordination can be very useful in dealing with common risks. So when is benchmarking and a collective approach to risk helpful, and when can it backfire? Hello, and welcome to another episode of LRN's Principled podcast. I'm your host, Emily Miner, director of Advisory Services at LRN. Today I'm continuing my conversation from episode six about benchmarking with my colleague Susan Divers, our director of Thought Leadership and Best practices. We're going to be talking about the benefits and the limitations of benchmarking and how organizations can ensure they benchmark their E&C programs effectively. Susan brings more than 30 years experience in both the legal and E&C spaces to this topic area with subject matter expertise in anti-corruption, export controls, sanctions, and other key areas of compliance. Susan, thanks for coming on the Principled podcast. Susan Divers: Oh, Emily, it's always nice to talk with you. Emily Miner: So Susan, before we get started, let's kind of define benchmarking and summarize the conversation that I had in our last podcast with our colleague Derek. So benchmarking means comparing what you do as an organization in this case to a usually large number of comparable organizations or individuals. And most often, this is done in a quantitative way, although there are also opportunities to benchmark qualitatively. And at LRN, we've been using benchmarks for a number of years now through our research reports. We've conducted major panel research on the role of ethical culture in an organization and in organization's risk of misconduct. So looking at how that varies across countries, across industries. We conduct every year research into ethics and compliance program effectiveness research that you lead and that you and I collaborate on. And we've been doing that for, oh gosh, coming up on, I don't know, maybe eight years now. That's been given us a insightful look into Ethics & Compliance Program best practices, and how they've evolved over time. We've also conducted research on codes of conduct, analyzing nearly 150 publicly listed codes of conduct from the top listed companies around the world and looking at similarities and differences and best practices in that space. But we have a brand new product at LRN that we're launching later this month that I know we're all really excited about called Catalyst Reveal, which is a platform that will, as it's name suggests, reveal insights to our clients about their ethics and compliance program, things like course level data training, data, employee sentiment, ethical culture. It will also give our clients the ability to see how their results along these metrics compare with other organizations in the LRN client universe. So looking at by industry, by company size, and a few other comparable filters. So with that exciting launch as our backdrop, I wanted to talk to you as an expert and a thought leader in this space about benchmarking compliance programs, when to do it, when not to do it, et cetera. So let me turn it over to you, Susan, and let's start with the benefits. What are the benefits of benchmarking in ethics and compliance program? Susan Divers: Sure, Emily, I'd be happy to talk about that. In thinking about this topic, there are really three really good functions that benchmarking is appropriate for. And then there are some where it's not so appropriate and we can talk about all of that. But starting with what it's very appropriate for, the first is if you're setting up a program, you need to figure out kind of what are the basics that you need to do at the outset. And it can be very helpful particularly if it's a new program, and it usually is if it's setting it up to be able to say your management, "We have to have a code. We have to have policies. We have to have audit. And we have to have training" and those are kind of the four basic pillars and being able to make that case. That's very basic, but it can be very helpful in terms of people who are struggling to get started in what we all know is a really complicated area. So that's kind of the first setting where benchmarking I think can be very helpful. And then the second is you've got your program and you're up and going. Now, no two companies are alike, no two industries are alike, and I can get into that a little bit later, but it's helpful to know if you're mainstream or not. Like for example, our Ethical Pulse Culture check lets you sort of get an idea from a short questionnaire embedded in our platform in Reveal whether your culture is really out of whack or pretty much along the same lines as mainstream. And again, that's really helpful because it can show you an area where you're maybe excelling and it's good to take credit for that and scale it, or it can show you an area where you're deficient and it's good to know about that too. And then the last is, and this is where for example Ethisphere has done a lot of really good work, best practices. People are constantly innovating. I'm always amazed at how ethics and compliance programs are changing and getting better. And we can talk about that a little bit, and Reveal's going to be very helpful there. But benchmarking can give you ideas that can be very valuable for enhancing your program. So those are sort of the three big areas where I think benchmarking can be extremely helpful. Emily Miner: Yeah, thanks Susan. And on that last point that you shared, that's really resonating because if nothing else, benchmarking or surveying what other companies are doing out there with respect to ethics and compliance and different facets of that, it gives you as an ethics and compliance professional just an idea of what's possible. Maybe there's a new approach to communicating with your employees that you haven't thought of that might work for your organization. I'm at the SCCE's Compliance & Ethics Institute right now, and there was a session yesterday about one particular organization's sort of their evolution of their compliance program following some significant trust that was lost in the organization to senior leader misconduct. One of the things that they talked about was having employees around the globe put on skits that they turned into videos that dealt with ethics moments and how the actors, which were the employees of the organizations, would kind of get famous around the world for their skits. It was a very lighthearted way of communicating very serious topics that resonated for this particular organization. But a lot of people in the room were asking questions, "Oh, well, how could I put together a skit like that? Did you write the script or did the employees come up with it and this and that?" Just that it's a way of sharing ideas and fostering innovation across the industry that can be really exciting and powerful. Susan Divers:    Yeah, that's a great example, but maybe it's time to talk a little bit about the limits of benchmarking too because that's a good illustration of the point that benchmarking's good for the three things we just talked about. Setting up, making sure that you're in the mainstream and not at either end, or maybe you want to be excelling and then getting ideas and best practices. What it's not good for is saying, "Hey, we met the criteria." And the reason is there isn't a criteria. In fact, there was a quote two days ago or so from the CEO of Advanced Micro Devices, and she said, I quote, "It's like running a different company every two years." So the point I'm trying to make here is that your program has to be based on your risks, and those risks can change dramatically, I mean, certainly in the semiconductor area, and that's what she was talking about. The risks have changed, they basically changed radically with all the changes with China and the export sanctions and the war in the Ukraine. So it's not enough to say, "Hey, I'm doing what everybody else is doing in that area." And secondly, the other big problem is comparing apples to apples. I picked three consumer companies to sort of illustrate this. One is Walmart, which obviously is a big consumer company. Another is PepsiCo, another is Mondelez. And if you look at all three, they all have really different risk profiles. They may be in the same area generally, but Walmart's much bigger than the other two. Walmart had a major scandal a number of years ago where they wound up paying, I think it was 137 million in 2019 because in order to get permits for their stores in Latin America, particularly Mexico, their lawyers were actually paying bribes. When you think about it, that should have been something that they were sensitive to on their risk profile and both training and auditing the local lawyers. Also, there was some lawyers on their teams internally. That was a risk and they failed to mitigate it. PepsiCo is bottling, and so do Mondelez has plants, but it's not quite the same level of regulatory intensity as setting up a store, hiring people, environmental health. So I use that example because I'm trying to pick an industry and say, "Well, if you compared yourself to one, you might miss some of the particular risks that you have." One of the also things to bear in mind, and you alluded to it when we started, is that DOJ has never recommended benchmarking in all of the guidance. In fact, they've said things that kind of contradict benchmarking if you were using it to say, "Hey, we met the norm." They've said, "You don't want to be on cruise control," and that's because things change. And they've also said, "You don't want to just take a snapshot of your program at a given time." And that's kind of what the CEO of Advanced Micro Devices was saying too. And that's because any time you're looking backwards rather than forwards, you could miss the iceberg that's looming up ahead and going to sink the Titanic. So at any rate, I think benchmarking can be very useful, but you have to use it for the right purposes and you have to bear in mind the limitations. Emily Miner: Right. Absolutely. It's never the be all end all. It's one data point that we should be collecting and looking at in some situations and not others. And in those situations, it's one of many that we should be considering when we're thinking about program effectiveness. Susan Divers: Yeah, it's an element. Yep, absolutely. Emily Miner: So let's kind of tease this out a little bit more. Where do you see benchmarking being helpful? I know that you gave those three scenarios, but maybe if you could pick out a concrete example to share against any of those three scenarios to illustrate how it can be helpful or when it can backfire. Susan Divers: Sure. Well, let's pick another consumer company, Anheuser-Busch. This is a great example because it illustrates how benchmarking can be used very effectively to drive a best practice. Anheuser-Busch had a very prominent CECO who has very recently left to go to the Department of Justice in the last couple of months. When he was there, he set up an internal data analytics program that was able to pull data from their own systems, payments, SAP of course, onboarding and pick out red flags without, if you will, human intervention. In other words, he was able to take a number of data streams from various parts of the company and meld them together. And because he was very good CECO, he was able to figure out what some of the risk signs were or the red flags. What it did is it enabled Anheuser to manage its third parties, which if you think about it, beer distribute, beer companies have a lot of third parties. And then they could focus in on those companies, those third parties where there were red flags. They didn't have to audit everybody to the same degree of intensity. And that approach of internal data analytics was a best practice that was gathering steam, sorry. But once Matt really took it to the next level and showed how it could be done, then it really became mainstream in the E&C area. And Matt's now at DOJ. So if you're going to go in and have tense talks with regulators, being able to talk about what you're doing in benchmarking is important. And it takes us back to Reveal where Reveal is a really powerful tool that we've developed that will enable you to see red flags or predictive factors. And again, remember looking backwards doesn't really help you because it doesn't tell you if there's a big iceberg about to sink the Titanic. But looking forward and saying, gosh, the data that's coming in from Asia on attempts to pass courses or on our Ethical Pulse Culture check or other features is worrying. It's nothing specific that we know about at this point, but it indicates that, I'm just picking on Asia randomly, it indicates that we need to spend some time in Asia figuring out what's going on. So that's really an excellent use of benchmarking and that's a good story as to how understanding what best practices are emerging and adapting them then for you, because nobody could simply take Matt's system of third party analytics and plug it into their company and come up with the same results. It has to be tailored and it has to be specific. But that's a really good example of what DOJ is talking about in this area where they say you have to tailor it to your risks. So does that make sense? Emily Miner: Yeah, absolutely. It's a great example with Anheuser-Busch and the system that they set up. I want to kind of talk about specific types of data that we collect in ethics and compliance or can collect, because I feel like the kind of two most common ones that organizations want to benchmark are training completion rates, that's a metric that is easy to collect and is often one that is shared, and hotline. "Oh, my hotline reports. How does this compare?" And the hotline providers will publish annual benchmarking reports on hotline. So we've got course completions, we've got hotline data, but we also collect other data points, or there are other places where we could to think about program effectiveness. I'd love to hear from you, as you think about the universe of ethics and compliance data, where do you think kind of benchmarking holds water and where does it not? Susan Divers: That's a great question, Emily, and I'm glad you asked it. Let's start with the hotline because that's a really good example in a lot of ways of two of the pitfalls. One of the major pitfalls that we touched on is are you comparing apples to apples or apples to potatoes? A company, let's take Starbucks for example, they have 300,000, relatively young, many of them first job employees. And are they going to call the hotline if they see something or worried about something? The odds are probably no even though they've got a big kind of young and engaged workforce because they're inexperienced. Most of their employees, I was talking to their CECO last week, and most of their employees really haven't worked extensively in the workplace. So Starbucks might have really low hotline numbers. Another company that's largely unionized, on the other hand, because unionized workers generally know about the hotline and they know about formal complaint processes, they'll have high hotline usage compared to other companies. Let's just pick a slightly ridiculous example, but a big manufacturer of clothing like the Gap or something. You'll have unionized workers in the plants, but Booz Allen is a consulting company. Are you going to compare hotlines between Booz Allen and the Gap? That really is an apples to potatoes comparison. So I think hotline benchmarking, and I know most of my colleagues in the E&C area would agree is very, very difficult because you'd have to really know what the workforces are to try to get an idea. And then secondly, it can be driven by other factors such as when I was at AECOM, we deployed a lot of people in the Middle East and the conditions were harsh. So our hotline complaints would go up when people were under stress, but another company might not have that circumstance. Emily Miner: Yeah, that's such a great point about when you're using benchmarking and you're considering using benchmarking, you have to be really thoughtful about what that benchmark pool is made up of. The union example is such a great one because even within the same industry, you compared the Gap to Booz Allen, but even within the manufacturing industry, for example, not all manufacturing company has a unionized workforce. So you can think, "Oh, well it's manufacturing, so it's comparable," but it might not be depending on the workforce dynamics. That level of insight isn't always available when we're benchmark data sources. Susan Divers: We forgot one thing that both of us know, which is I think the last stat I saw was more than 90% of meaningful issues are not raised through the hotline, they're raised in conversations with managers. So I've never been a fan of hotline benchmarking. Emily Miner: Yes, absolutely. Susan Divers: But to turn to training completions, that's an interesting one too. Again, it really depends. If you're using an old fashioned training provider whose library consists of 45 minute or even longer lectures, sort of Soviet style on the evils of sexual harassment, first, it's probably not very effective. And secondly, a lot of people won't complete a 45 minute course just because it's long. If the training is repetitive and hectoring, they'll drop out. Whereas the kinds of courses that we have and that we emphasize are very engaging, they tend to be shorter, they tend to be more microburst learning. So again, what are you comparing? Do you have a lot of employees on the shop floor? Well, it's hard for them. They can't really just take a break, sit down at their laptop and open up a course on antitrust. So again, I think training completions can be tricky. It doesn't mean it isn't interesting to see that data, but figuring out, again, whether you're making an apples to apples or an apples to potato comparison, I think is really important. And then secondly, remember, it's retrospective looking. It's not telling you anything about what's coming around the corner. Emily Miner: Mm-hmm. One thing that we've focused on in this discussion is comparing ourselves to other organizations. I mean, that was how I even defined benchmarking at the outset, but there's also internal benchmarking, comparing your own performance year over year or whatever the period of time is. When you were just talking about training completion, it made me think about that internal comparison, less so with training completion because I think it tends to be high, a lot of companies mandate it so there can be penalties for not completing training. So if it's high for that reason alone whether or not it's good or relevant to employees or they liked it or whatever. But thinking about metrics like pass/fail rates or number of attempts or test outs or some of those more nuanced training related data points and comparing against yourself year over year and seeing what has changed and what might be the result of that. I mean, maybe you noticed in year one that it was taking the majority of your employees or a significant minority of your employees more attempts than you wanted to answer certain questions correctly related to a certain risk topic. And so then as a result, you rolled out some focused communication and maybe you targeted specific groups of people where you noticed were particularly struggling for additional manager led conversations or whatever. And then in year two, does that pass rate or attempt rate improve? That's a helpful metric because you're comparing apples to apples, you're comparing yourself and you're able to connect it back directly to specific interventions that you may have need to make improvements in that area. So I just wanted to point out that benchmarking can be done internally as well. It's not always an external exercise even though that does tend to be how we talk about it. Susan Divers: Well, and you're exactly right, and that's where it gets really valuable because first you can make sure that you're comparing apples to apples. For example, if you've just done a merger and suddenly your population of employees has doubled, well obviously then you know that you've got a much different comparison year over year, but you can break that down and you can make those comparisons by manipulating the data. Secondly, your Ethical Culture pulse survey is a really good tool year over year adjusted for employee population size. And if we've got new people coming in the company, a merger for example. And it can be proactive. It can, again, spot trends as you were just saying that indicate that you may need to spend more time with people. But the beauty of internal benchmarking, particularly the way Reveal has set that up for our clients and made it easy is that you can get genuine insights looking at what happened last year, what happened this year and you know some of the reasons why there may have been a change. Whereas if you're comparing yourself to, I don't know, Ernst & Young, you don't. You don't have visibility in terms of their numbers. So internal benchmarking, I think you're right to stress that. And it's a very, very valuable tool. Emily Miner: I've done, as you know, a lot of work with organizations evaluating and assessing their ethical culture. The trend that I've noticed with those clients that we've done this type of work year over year over year is that the benchmark, the external benchmark just grows. It's important kind of in year one and maybe year two, but after that it ceases to be relevant and the companies don't really care what it is anymore because it's also they're not shooting for the benchmark. The benchmark is often the average and they want to be above average. And so it's more about competing with yourselves and how did we improve against our own performance last year? And so that's just been interesting to observe. I think as companies get more robust in their use of data and their tools and how it informs their strategy in some areas like ethical culture for example, that external comparison just becomes less relevant over time. Susan Divers: That's a really good point too. And that gets back to the Department of Justice saying, "Don't put your program on cruise control." And I do remember, I think it was 15 years ago when benchmarking was much more trendy and before people really thought through the limitations, someone was bragging that they had benchmarked their program against Boeing. Boeing then subsequently had major meltdowns left, right, and center most specifically and tragically the 737 MAX where people died. And so running around saying, "Hey, my program benchmarks well against Boeing" may not have been really a compliment to the program in the end. But it also misses the point which you're making, which is you have to look at your program and what's gaining traction with your people and where the proactive red flags are emerging because that's what enables you not to be Boeing, not to pick on Boeing, but it's a good example. Emily Miner: So Susan, let's wrap up by offering some recommendations to organizations that are thinking about program effectiveness, how they measure that. They want to have those benchmarks. Maybe they fall into those three scenarios that you outlined at the beginning. What recommendations or best practices would you offer to those organizations, to your peers? Susan Divers: Well, the first one is be really smart about it and avoid comparing apples to potatoes. And to do that, you have to really think it through. What are we comparing to whom and how similar are they? I really, again, think that's most useful for kind of like, "Are we in the mainstream? Or is there something maybe we forgot?" If it turns out that everybody in your industry has suddenly amended their training curriculum to train about trade controls in the wake of the Ukraine war and you haven't, well, that's a helpful benchmark. But I think the main ones that are valuable are what we were talking about with best practices and data analytics and the creative use of data analytics that are tailored to that particular company is a great example of that. And then the second one as you pointed out which I think is equally valuable and really essential too, is internal benchmarking up to a point where you're able to see what direction things are going in. And again, it's more in the nature of red flags rather than a way of saying, "Hey, we met the requirement, we're good." It's, "How are people doing this year compared to last? What does that tell me about where I need to focus my resources?" Emily Miner: Mm-hmm. Mm-hmm. Yeah, Susan, thank you so much. And thank you for joining me on this episode. We are out of time for today. So to everyone out there listening, thank you for listening to the Principled Podcast by LRN. It was a pleasure to talk with you, Susan. Susan Divers: Oh, it's always a pleasure to talk to you, Emily. Outro: We hope you enjoyed this episode. The Principled Podcast is brought to you by LRN. At LRN, our mission is to inspire principled performance in global organizations by helping them foster winning ethical cultures rooted in sustainable values. Please visit us at lrn.com to learn more. And if you enjoyed this episode, subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, or wherever you listen and don't forget to leave us a review.        

EY Cross-Border Taxation Alerts
EY Cross-Border Taxation Spotlight for Week ending 28 October 2022

EY Cross-Border Taxation Alerts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 3:36


A review of the week's major US international tax-related news. In this edition: US Treasury working on ‘prophylactic' measures to address new tax regimes in the context of future tax treaties – US, Croatia to sign tax treaty before year-end – Treasury official expects proposed crypto regulations release in 2022 – OECD wants broad acceptance of its Crypto Asset Reporting Framework.

The Politics of Everything
158: The Politics of Comfort Zones - Tel K. Ganesan

The Politics of Everything

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 24:18


Tel K. Ganesan is a self-made serial entrepreneur, engaging public speaker, philanthropist, mentor, film producer, and world traveller with a globally recognized reputation across multiple industries. He currently serves as Founder/CEO of multiple thriving enterprises, including Kyyba, Inc. - a Michigan-headquartered global IT company with over 700 employees and millions in annual revenue - Kyyba Films, Kyyba Wellness, Kyyba Innovations, Kyyba Fashions, and Kyyba Music. Infectious enthusiasm and courageous determination power his drive to do what others are afraid to do as he blazes a trail for the next generation of entrepreneurs with a simple secret to success: do what makes you happy. Ganesan earned a Mechanical Engineering degree from Wayne State University before getting his start at the Chrysler Corporation. Over 13 years, he earned multiple awards and promotions in manufacturing and product development. The desire to make a bigger impact and build something of his own then took Ganesan in the direction of entrepreneurship with the establishment of Kyyba, Inc. Ganesan is fuelled by a belief that entrepreneurs make the world a better place for everyone, founding TiECon Detroit - the largest entrepreneurial conference in Michigan. Today, TiE boasts over 56 chapters in at least 13 countries, with a specific focus on supporting women in male-dominated industries such as manufacturing, automotive, and financial services. Additionally, the Kyyba Kidz Foundation uplifts underprivileged women and orphans, providing vital education, skills, and on-the-job training opportunities. Over a 30-year career, Ganesan's ground-breaking work has earned him consistent national recognition, including: Ernst & Young's Entrepreneur of the Year finalist (2012, 2013, 2014) and a place among D Business Magazine's “Detroit 500” most powerful business leaders. On any given weekday morning, Ganesan can be found in deep meditation and yoga poses before heading into his business ventures. He actively “levels up his comfort zone” with tennis, kayaking, and traveling to new places. After everything he has worked hard to achieve, Ganesan is still convinced that his biggest potential is yet to be realized, and he works hard daily to push the limits of what's possible synonymous with the tagline of Kyyba, make impossible, possible. We discuss: The term ‘comfort zone' is firmly embedded in our everyday cultural discourse – say the metaphor of ‘leaving one's comfort zone' became popular in the 1990s, coined by management thinker Judith Bardwick in her 1991 work Danger in the Comfort Zone: How do you define a comfort zone and surely it varies depending on your risk appetite? Please explain your view and why. Within the comfort zone, there isn't much incentive for people to reach new heights of performance. It's here that people go about routines devoid of risk, causing their progress to plateau. Is that always a bad thing? Can you enhance your own sense of comfort zones and how do you push that beyond your basic level of comfort? How can we make the impossible seem possible and still remain balanced in how we live our lives and not say burnout? Take away: What is your final takeaway message for us on The Politics of Comfort Zones?   Connect via @TelKGanesan www.TelKGanesan.com www.Kyyba.com Special Listener Zencastr offer for all my podcast friends! I love Zencastr for all my podcast recordings. For everyone that signs up for the Pro Plan or higher, you will be receiving $10 for every month they stay on past the 14-day trial period, for a a maximum of $30 if you stay on for at least 3 months on the Pro Plan. To use your code, go to this pricing page and enter promo code - thepoliticsofeverything at the Coupon Code field found underneath the individual plans.

The Entrepreneur Way
http://theentrepreneurway.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/10/Timber_Barker_Founder_and_Owner_of_Boom_Interactive_Inc-Validate_Prototype_Build_a_Team_Sacrifice_and_Protect-wide.jpg

The Entrepreneur Way

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 79:48


Timber Barker is the CEO/Founder of Boom Interactive, a software development company that specializes in AI solutions. An advocate for making the design process easier, the technology Timber and his team have created reads, recognizes and learns from complex line drawing, floor plans, and sketches which are then used to generate real time 3D environments in the Construction (Design & Build) Industry, Education, Film and TV, Public Safety and eCommerce markets. Prior to co-founding Boom Interactive, Timber was the CEO/Owner of Studio 11k, which provided technical marketing solutions, mainly focusing on software development, web, and mobile tech. Before dabbling in the entrepreneurial space, Timber worked for notable companies such as Ernst & Young, AT&T and Citigroup. An advocate for education, Timber simultaneously serves as the Chief Technology Officer for a nonprofit called Sneak On The Lot, a filmmaking school for the younger generation that provides them with a safe and effective way to express themselves through film and the arts. During a time when many arts programs have been cut due to budgetary constraints, Timber is fighting for Sneak On The Lot to be placed in underserved schools across the country. “You want to validate, you want to create a prototype, build a team, sacrifice and then protect. And not necessarily in that order . But you need to show those five things before you are worthy enough to ask for anyone else to give you money. and then you only have a chance. So, if you can do those five things and do them in your way and however you want to interpret those you will find more success. I truly believe if you omit any one of those it will be harder for you… I am not saying impossible but it will be harder”…[Listen for More] Click Here for Show Notes To Listen or to Get the Show Notes go to https://wp.me/p6Tf4b-npB

Case Interview Preparation & Management Consulting | Strategy | Critical Thinking
518: Discover Your Unfair Advantage (with Ash Ali & Hasan Kubba)

Case Interview Preparation & Management Consulting | Strategy | Critical Thinking

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 49:15


Welcome to an episode with startup entrepreneurs Ash Ali and Hasan Kubba. Get Ash and Hasan's book here: https://amzn.to/3Q8ctPD In this episode, we speak about the concept of unfair advantage and the process of identifying and managing it so it's your edge over any competition. Many people have the limiting belief that they don't have something authentic to offer, but what they don't realize is that we all have unique skill sets and talents. It only takes self-awareness to realize that the ingredients to success are already within you.  Ash Ali is an award-winning serial tech entrepreneur and angel investor. Ash sold his first internet business at just 19 years old (and most recently, his Dubai-based on-demand mobile app startup in 2018). As the first marketing director of Just Eat UK, which IPO'd for £1.5 billion, he was included in the Top 250 Growth Hackers, as well as the Top 100 Asian Tech Stars in the UK. With over 20 years of hands-on experience creating and growing startups, he has consulted, advised, and invested in hundreds of startups at various funding stages. Ash is a highly sought-after international speaker and expert on digital disruption and tech transformation, and has spoken at numerous global organizations and conferences, including Salesforce, Ernst & Young, and TEDx. He is currently co-founder of Uhubs, a new skills training platform that helps entrepreneurs and professionals upskill.   Hasan Kubba is an author, entrepreneur, and startup strategist. Hasan is a specialist in technology startups, marketing, and fundraising. With his own London-based digital marketing business and startup investment experience, Hasan is particularly strong at breaking down complex business concepts into simple and effective strategies and tactics. His recent TEDx talk titled Startups, Entrepreneurship, and Unfair Advantages was voted the highest ever on the official TED subreddit. He is passionate about the future of entrepreneurship and digital disruption globally and is an in-demand startup mentor to early-stage entrepreneurs, workshop trainer, and international speaker.  Get Ash & Hasan's book here:  The Unfair Advantage: How You Already Have What It Takes to Succeed. Ash Ali and Hasan Kubba: https://amzn.to/3Q8ctPD Enjoying our podcast? Get access to sample advanced training episodes here: www.firmsconsulting.com/promo

Following to Lead with Kevin East
Ep.107 Exemplary Leadership with Dustin Doll

Following to Lead with Kevin East

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 26:12


In this episode of Following to Lead with Kevin East, he speaks with Dustin Doll. Dustin Doll is the CEO of Accord Group of companies. DHI Roofing, Oak Crest Roofing, Steve Kemper Builder, and Secured Roofing. He is an Ernst & Young's Entrepreneur of the Year heartland finalist in 2018. Dustin talks about what he does, focusing on the kingdom, hearing from God, living a submitted life, and the importance of the word and prayer. Do you know the difference between ownership and stewardship? Listen to this episode to find out more.   Follow Jesus Lead Differently. The Mentoring Alliance https://www.thementoringalliance.com/   For donations https://www.thementoringalliance.com/donate   https://weareaccord.com https://mysharepal.com https://dhicommercial.com/ https://hegetsus.com/en     Similar Episodes: Ep. 105 Mentoring the Next Generation with Shane Pruitt Ep.103 Leading with Resilience with Sam Kim Ep. 102 Following Jesus in the Workplace with Dupree Scovell Ep. 100 How to Flourish as a Leader with Tom Nelson

EY Cross-Border Taxation Alerts
EY Cross-Border Taxation Spotlight for Week ending 21 October 2022

EY Cross-Border Taxation Alerts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 4:09


A review of the week's major US international tax-related news. In this edition: IRS proposed foreign tax credit regulations ‘weeks away' – 2006 proposed PTEP regs officially withdrawn, new regs in first half of 2023 – IRS official offers update on new corporate alternative minimum tax – IRS plans to reconsider APA revenue procedure guidance in light of recent Eaton Corporation decision.

DESOBEDIÊNCIA PRODUTIVA POR IVAN MORÉ
OS SEGREDOS DO MAIOR EMPREENDEDOR DE FRANQUIAS DO BRASIL

DESOBEDIÊNCIA PRODUTIVA POR IVAN MORÉ

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 64:45


Raphael Mattos é CEO da PremiaPão e Cofundador do Revolução Digital. Antes de atuar no empreendedorismo de forma integral, Raphael passou 3 anos da sua carreira profissional na Ernst & Young, auditando empresas como Coca-Cola, Fiat, Fedex Brasil e Burger King. Atualmente, é o maior empreendedor de franquias do Brasil.

Vell's World Podcast
Balling on a Budget

Vell's World Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 28:20


This episode talks about Vell's balling on a budget. The Good Read for this episode is Tax-Free Wealth: How to Build Massive Wealth by Permanently Lowering Your Taxes by Tom Wheelwright. After 31 years… Major Tax Reform — and what it means to you True overhaul of the tax law only happens about once every 30 years. In the past 75 years, the U.S. tax law has only seen three major revisions; one in 1954, the next in 1986 and most recently at the end of 2017. I have been fortunate as a tax professional to be heavily involved in the last two reforms. In 1986, I was a manager in the National Tax Department (NTD) of Ernst & Whinney (now Ernst Young). My primary responsibility during my three years there was to create, teach and administer tax courses to the Firm's U.S. tax professionals. Just as I arrived in the summer of 1985, I discovered that much of NTD's resources were being devoted to following the tax reform bill that had been introduced that year. This gave me, as a young tax professional, some amazing insight into the legislative process as well as the horse trading for tax reform. President Reagan wanted two things; simplicity (the 1985 act was call the Tax Simplification Act of 1985) and he wanted it to be revenue neutral (no net increase to the deficit). It took another year before bill was finally passed as the Tax Reform Act of 1986. (Simplicity took a back seat to other goals of the reform.) In 1986 the big winners from tax reform were individuals, with significantly lower tax rates, insurance companies (who got by relatively unscathed) and businesses. The big loser was real estate investors (the passive loss rules were used as a last-ditch effort to make a “revenue-neutral” bill. The result a few years later was the Savings and Loan debacle accompanied by a massive real estate depression and the government bailing out real estate through the RTC (Resolution Trust Corporation). Fast forward 31 years to 2017. What's Popping in Vell's World consist of Nia Long UPDATE, Delux Magazine's 2022 Power 100, Hurricane Ian, and more. Follow on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter @VellsWorldPodcast Email vellsworldpodcast@ldmonger.com with any comments, questions, or concerns you would like mentioned in our upcoming episodes. To sponsor an episode send us an email. Don't forget to subscribe, tell a friend, and follow on all social media platforms. You can leave a voice message and become a monetary supporter for as little as .99 cent on the anchor.fm. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/vellsworldpodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/vellsworldpodcast/support

Tank Talks
How VC LPs are thinking about the Markets with Jeffrey Rinvelt of Renaissance Venture Capital

Tank Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 47:42


It's tempting to think of Venture Capitalists as the top of the food chain, but in reality, we are closer to founders. VCs build an investment thesis and then go test that thesis, both in the fundraising marketplace and in doing their investments. Just like with founders, sometimes the marketplace demands VCs to pivot and change their thesis, sometimes dramatically. And always—always—VCs are held accountable by their investors, known as Limited Partners, or LPs. Our guest today is Jeffrey Rinvelt, his work at Renaissance Venture Capital finds him investing as an LP across many funds. He's got some great insights into what LPs are thinking, and what the market may hold in the coming months.About Jeffrey Rinvelt:Jeffrey Rinvelt is a Partner with the Rennaisance Venture Capital. He was previously part of Ardesta, where he was a Director engaged in sourcing, evaluating, and conducting due diligence on investment opportunities, as well as monitoring and providing assistance to the companies in Ardesta's portfolio. Prior to joining Ardesta, Jeff was a co-founder of GrapeVINE Technologies, providing Product Management and Marketing for their knowledge management product, eventually resulting in an acquisition by Sun Microsystems. Jeff was also part of the start-up team for MAXfunds.com, an Internet company providing complete coverage of the mutual fund industry, including hundreds of funds not available on any other site. In addition, Jeff spent five years with Ernst & Young's Information Technology group as a senior consultant.Jeff is a proud trustee of Western Michigan University and also lends his expertise to a number of local non-profits.A word from our sponsor:At Ripple, we manage all of our fund expenses and employee credit cards using Jeeves. The team at Jeeves helped get me and my team setup with physical and virtual credit cards in days. I was able to allow my teammates to expense items in multiple currencies allowing them to pay for anything, anywhere at anytime. We weren't asked for any personal guarantees or to pay any setup or monthly SaaS fees.Not only does Jeeves save us time, but they also give us cash back on our purchases including expenses like Google, Facebook, or AWS every month. New users can earn up to 3% cashback for their first 90 days.The best part is Jeeves puts up the cash, and you settle up once every 30 days in any currency you want, unlike some other corporate card companies that make you pre-pay every month. Jeeves also recently launched its Jeeves Growth and Working Capital initiative for startups and fast-growing companies to enable more financial freedom for companies. The best thing of all is that Jeeves is live in  24 countries including Canada, US and many other countries around the world.Jeeves truly offers the best all-in-one expense management corporate card program for all startups especially the ones at Ripple and we at Tank Talks could not be more excited to officially partner with them. Listeners of Tank Talks can get set up with a demo of Jeeves today and take advantage of our Tank Talks special with a‍ $250 statement credit after the first $2,500 in spend or a $500 statement credit after the first $5000 in spend. Lastly, all Jeeves cardholders receive access to their Lounge Pass program and access to over 1300 airports globally.Visit tryjeeves.com/tanktalks to learn more.In this episode we discuss:02:38 Jeff's journey into Venture Capital and why he started in Michigan05:11 How he got through the 2008 financial crisis06:11 The original investing thesis for Renaissance Venture Capital08:59 Inspiration and innovations around Renaissance10:33 What makes a good fund manager12:20 Red flags for emerging managers14:52 What's more important for a manager, track record or technical chops?17:10 How Jeff works to give value as an LP19:33 Building a platform as an LP20:29 What the current market is like as an LP22:50 Internal conversations around deployment of funds in 202224:05 Types of returns they are looking for in the current market25:38 Are preferred returns required to get LPs27:15 Advice to new LPs28:46 Why isn't there standardized reporting around track record for Venture30:55 The problems with current 409A valuations32:55 Thoughts on opportunity funds34:29 Why Jeff stopped doing direct investments35:12 Philosophies around co-investing opportunities36:37 Investment categories Jeff is excited about38:20 Showing off results from research and investments39:24 The best career advice he's ever gottenFast Favorites

Remarkable Retail
Accelerating Innovation in Turbulent Times with Guest Tim Simmons, Chief Product Officer at Sam's Club

Remarkable Retail

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 41:11


We're recording live this week from the just wrapped GroceryShop conference in Las Vegas.Our guest this week is Tim Simmons, SVP & Chief Product Officer of Sam's Club, who takes  us deep into the transformation process that he's been helping lead. We learn how Walmart and Sam's Club have been evolving and accelerating the pace of innovation. It's a Master Class on how to embed a culture of experimentation and the role of design thinking and agile methodology. We also learn what "The 5 Why's" and "low fidelity prototyping" are all about and how they are making a real difference at Sam's. We close on the critical role of executive leadership in driving the innovation agenda--turns out "Scooby snacks" might be the key.But first we share our top take-aways from the conference before diving into our hot-takes on the latest retail news, including what a big jump in interest rates means for retail. But Walmart and Target say "damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead" when it comes to holiday hiring plans. Then it's thoughts and prayers time for JC Penney as they revel more details about their turnaround plans. We raise questions around Wegman's decision to bail on "scan-and go" before returning to the Wobbly Unicorn Corner to discuss Stitch Fix's earnings whiff and the potential acquisition of Purple. About TimTim serves as the Senior Vice President and Chief Product Officer at Sam's Club. In this role, he oversees product management, operations transformation, and the user experience across omnichannel commerce, digital in-club experiences, supply chain, merchandising, and more. Tim joined Sam's Club in 2015 and has worked in various areas of the business including Membership and Marketing, Operations Transformation and In-Club Product Management and Fulfillment before taking on his current role in 2021.Before joining Sam's Club, he spent more than 15 years working largely in professional services, doing advertising and consulting for companies such as MRM/McCann, RAPP, Peppers & Rogers Group and Ernst & Young. During this time, he worked with clients across numerous industries including technology, retail, oil and gas, entrainment, travel, food services and health care to help generate growth, increase market share, and provide measurable impact.Tim has an Associate of Arts degree from Snow College, a Bachelor of Arts degree from Brigham Young University, and an MBA and Masters of International Studies from the Marriott School of Management at Brigham Young University.About UsSteve Dennis is an advisor, keynote speaker and author on strategic growth and business innovation. You can learn more about Steve on his       website.    The expanded and revised edition of his bestselling book  Remarkable Retail: How To Win & Keep Customers in the Age of Disruption is now available at  Amazon or just about anywhere else books are sold. Steve regularly shares his insights in his role as a      Forbes senior contributor and on       Twitter and       LinkedIn. You can also check out his speaker "sizzle" reel      here.Michael LeBlanc  is the Founder & President of M.E. LeBlanc & Company Inc and a Senior Advisor to Retail Council of Canada as part of his advisory and consulting practice.   He brings 25+ years of brand/retail/marketing & eCommerce leadership experience, and has been on the front lines of retail industry change for his entire career.  Michael is the producer and host of a network of leading podcasts including Canada's top retail industry podcast,       The Voice of Retail, plus  Global E-Commerce Tech Talks  ,      The Food Professor  with Dr. Sylvain Charlebois and now in its second season, Conversations with CommerceNext!  You can learn more about Michael   here  or on     LinkedIn. Be sure and check out Michael's latest venture for fun and influencer riches - Last Request Barbecue,  his YouTube BBQ cooking channel!

Women Blazers
The One with Stacy Johns

Women Blazers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 54:06


In this episode we welcome Stacy Johns, Chief Financial Officer for the Los Angeles Football Club of MLS. Stacy shares her incredible career journey where she built her foundation in Finance with Ernst & Young and Eli Lilly. Thanks to her hard work, relationship building, and never passing up an opportunity, she was swept away from the public sector and into the sports industry where she worked for the the Indianapolis Colts for 16 seasons before being named as the CFO for LAFC.

Principled
S8E3 | What is the purpose of the United States Sentencing Commission?

Principled

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 26:21


What you'll learn in this podcast episode A few weeks ago, the United States Sentencing Commission (USSC) issued a report titled The Organizational Sentencing Guidelines: Thirty Years of Innovation and Influence. The publication summarizes the history of Chapter Eight's development and discusses the two substantive changes made to the elements of an effective compliance and ethics program. So, what does this mean for compliance professionals? In this episode of the Principled Podcast, host Jen Uner, Strategic Communications Director at LRN, talks about the guidelines with Eric Morehead, Director of Advisory Services at LRN. Listen in as the two discuss how these updates—and the wider USSC—impact corporate governance. The purpose of the U.S. Sentencing Commission is to study and develop sentencing policies for the federal courts. The Commission serves as an information resource for Congress, the executive, the courts, and the public on matters relating to federal crime and sentencing. Our episode today focuses on Chapter 8, which addresses organizational sentencing guidelines, not individual sentencing guidelines which is also a significant focus for the USSC.     Principled Podcast Show Notes [1:24] – Explanation of the new publication from the U.S. Sentencing Commission and why it matters. [6:42] - How the original standards have held up over the last 30 years. [7:51] - Eric outlines some of the highlights of the most recent publication. [12:53] - The real repercussions for organizations. [14:58] - The relationship of the Sentencing Commission with the DOJ and SEC. [18:33] - Steps organizations should take when crafting their own E&C programs. [21:43] - The role of company culture in determining how effective the program will be.   Featured guest: Eric Morehead Eric Morehead is a member of LRN's Advisory Services team and has over 20 years of experience working with organizations seeking to address compliance issues and build effective compliance and ethics programs. Eric conducts program assessments and examines specific compliance risks, he drafts compliance policies and codes of conduct, works with organizations to build and improve their compliance processes and tools, and provides live training for Boards of Directors, executives, managers, and employees. Eric ran his own consultancy for six years where he advised clients on compliance program enhancements and assisted in creating effective compliance solutions. Eric was formally the Head of Advisory Services for NYSE Governance Services, a leading compliance training organization, where he was responsible for all aspects of NYSE Governance Services' compliance consulting arm. Prior to joining NYSE, Eric was an Assistant General Counsel of the United States Sentencing Commission in Washington, DC. Eric served as the chair of the policy team that amended the Organizational Sentencing Guidelines in 2010. Eric also spent nearly a decade as a litigation attorney in Houston, Texas where he focused on white-collar and regulatory cases and represented clients at trial and before various agencies including SEC, OSHA and CFTC.       Featured Host: Jen Üner Jen Üner is the Strategic Communications Director for LRN, where she captains programs for both internal and external audiences. She has an insatiable curiosity and an overdeveloped sense of right and wrong which she challenges each day through her study of ethics, compliance, and the value of values-based behavior in corporate governance. Prior to joining LRN, Jen led marketing communications for innovative technology companies operating in Europe and the US, and for media and marketplaces in California. She has won recognition for her work in brand development and experiential design, earned placements in leading news publications, and hosted a closing bell ceremony of the NASDAQ in honor of the California fashion industry as founder of the LA Fashion Awards. Jen holds a B.A. degree from Claremont McKenna College.        Principled Podcast Transcript Intro:   Welcome to the Principled Podcast brought to you by LRN. The Principled Podcast brings together the collective wisdom on ethics, business and compliance, transformative stories of leadership, and inspiring workplace culture. Listen in to discover valuable strategies from our community of business leaders and workplace change makers. Jen Uner: A few weeks ago, the United States Sentencing Commission issued a report titled The Organizational Sentencing Guidelines: 30 Years of Innovation and Influence. The publication summarizes the history of Chapter Eight's development and discusses the two substantive changes made to the elements of an effective compliance and ethics program. Hello, and welcome to another episode of LRN's Principled Podcast. I'm your host, Jen Uner, strategic communications director at LRN, and today, I'm joined by my colleague, Eric Morehead, director of advisory services solutions at LRN. We're going to be talking about the guidelines, and how it impacts corporate governance and what compliance professionals need to know. Eric Morehead is a real expert in the space as he once worked on these guidelines in a prior role at the US Sentencing Commission. He advises LRN clients now on these topics. Eric, thank you for coming on the Principled Podcast. Eric Morehead: Thanks, Jen. It's good to be here. Jen Uner: So hot off the press is this new publication from the US Sentencing Commission. Tell us about what it is, why it matters, and especially to owners of compliance programs at their organizations. Eric Morehead: Well, it's sort of a look back over the last 30 years. The Sentencing Guidelines for organizations were first promulgated and came into effect in 1991, so technically the 30th anniversary was last year, but the report has just come out now, and over those 30 years, there's been about 5,000 organizations that have been sentenced under the US Sentencing Guidelines. The Sentencing Commission and the Sentencing Guidelines have to do with federal sentencing, so either individuals or organizations who have been charged with a federal offense and find themselves in a federal district court, somewhere in the United States, and they either have pled guilty, or been found guilty by a jury, or found guilty by a judge after a bench trial, and now they're being sentenced. So when you sentence an individual, obviously, that can include a fine in restitution, but also time in a federal penitentiary. You can't jail an organization, but the Organizational Guidelines have put together over the last 30 years standards by which the judge can assess fines, restitution, and also order when necessary compliance reforms and implementation. Since you can't put the organization behind bars, you can however, put the organization on probation and require the organization to make some necessary reforms, if you will. So that's a kind of quick background of what the guidelines are for those of you who weren't sure, and why they matter to us, because the implementation of compliance standards is baked into any kind of probationary sentence or sentence that's handed down to an organization, or can be baked into, I should say. Jen Uner: And you have personal experience at the USSC. Eric Morehead: Yes, I worked at the Sentencing Commission from about 2007 to 2011, and during that period, there have been two amendments to the original guidelines that were first put out in 1991 for organizations. The first was in 2004, partly in response to Sarbanes-Oxley and the legislation that came out at that point around implementing reforms for organizations and their governance, but also there was back at the time in the early 2000s, a task force put together that the Sentencing Commission took some advice from. And so they made some amendments in 2004. The primary thing that happened in 2004 is that these compliance standards that are in the Sentencing Guidelines were put more front and center. They had been what are called application notes before, and they were actually promoted, if you will, to an actual textual listing in the guidelines. Just making them more prominent is really what it boiled down to. Also, putting a little further definition around the components of an effective program, training, governance and oversight, written standards, and procedures in place, reporting mechanisms, that we all know most organizations have an anonymous reporting mechanism, a hotline or helpline out there. That comes out of these standards that were first put together by the US Sentencing Commission. They were the first national standard in the United States anyway that suggested having a reporting mechanism, including with an anonymous option. Enforcement, discipline, and incentives often overlooked, but the Sentencing Guidelines have been talking about incentives for the past couple decades as well. And then in 2010 while I was there, the second amendment to the Organizational Sentencing Guidelines was undertaken, and that also strengthened that relationship between the governing authority of the organization, the board of directors, or whatever the oversight of a particular organization might be, because these guidelines affect not just public companies, but any kind of organization, so nonprofits, governmental agencies. Any kind of organizational structure is contemplated by the guidelines, and the 2010 amendments strengthened that relationship between the people actually responsible for the program and the governing authority of the organization, and also provided some incentives for organizations to come forward and to reform their programs. So those things have all happened over the years. Given the length of time that the Sentencing Guidelines have been in effect, now 30 years plus, to only have gone back and revisited them twice is not that significant. So they've been kind of bedrock standards that have existed and been well known. We often talk about them as the hallmarks of an effective program for this entire time, and the commission gathers data, and so the other big piece of this report that's very interesting is there's 30 years worth of data. And in fact, the majority of the report goes through in much detail about the demographic characteristics of organizations that have been sentenced over the years, how many organizations have received credit for having an effective program. Spoiler alert, not very many out of the 5,000, less than a dozen. So that's the other great thing about this report for those of us who are interested in compliance is you have a great wealth of data to see what the characteristics are, and how organizations have gotten into real serious trouble in the past. Jen Uner: So you were saying there have only been two amendments since inception? Eric Morehead: Yes. Jen Uner: That's pretty interesting, because it kind of speaks to how enduring. Eric Morehead: Yeah, they got it right, and the primary takeaway in this report in the executive summary in the beginning is that the biggest impact that the commission sees for its work is that these standards have become so universally accepted, and that's not just in the United States. That's across the world. These standards are seen to be when you're talking about effective compliance programs, they're seen to be sort of the bedrock, if you will. There are obviously other international standards out there in Europe, and Asia, and other places where government agencies and international agencies like the OECD Good Guidance that came out well over two decades ago itself. They all kind of trend and follow the same path, if you will, that the Sentencing Guidelines started 30 years ago. So it really has been the guiding light for not just individual organizations that want to build a better program, but also other regulators out there, whether that's the Department of Justice, or other agencies here in the United States, or international organizations that are adopting compliance standards. Jen Uner: So the most recent publication, it provides great historical context about the commission and its impact. Can you outline some of those highlights? I remember that the report is chock full of charts, data, as you were saying, which is great if you're needing to report about program effectiveness, for example. What do you think is most salient for leaders in that report? Eric Morehead: Yeah, as far as those particular pieces of data, nothing here if you've been paying attention to the sentencing guideline data over the years, and every year, I should mention that the Sentencing Commission puts out what they call the Sentencing Source Book, and that has a lot of data about not only individual's sentencing, which is the primary thing that the Sentencing Commission collects data on is the actual, real living human beings that are being sentenced year in, year out in federal courts around the nation, but it also includes data on the organizations that have been sentenced in that prior year. So if you've been paying attention over the years and looking at these source books, you will have noted that pretty much year in, year out, the vast majority of organizations that are sentenced, 70% of them have less than 50 employees, and 12.1% have 99 to 400 employees. And just a very small percentage, 8%, have more than 500 employees. So the vast majority of organizations that get sentenced are very small, but if you think about it, that makes logical sense, because smaller organizations tend to have less governance structure, probably have less resources, probably don't have a compliance program, and that's certainly the finding that courts when they review these cases 89.6% of the time, so almost 90% of the time organizations have been found not to have a program in place, or what was in place was not significant enough to be considered a compliance program. So those two figures seem to correlate well, right? The organizations that face the most serious repercussions are small and also don't have a program, so probably hadn't even contemplated having a program before misconduct occurred. The other real striking piece of information that comes out of this report and is also something that's been consistent through the years is the number of actual living human beings that are being sentenced along with the organizations in these cases. When we look at these cases, often we're talking about the demographics of the company, how many employees they have, what sort of crimes they have been found guilty of, how big the fines are, et cetera, but sometimes what gets lost in that discussion is the fact that if there's misconduct that's occurred, very often, there are individuals who are charged right along with the company for violations of the law. And in fact, over time, 53% of these cases include at least one other individual, and sometimes multiple individuals, who've also been charged with crime. The other really striking piece of data out of this that I think a lot of people don't realize is the vast majority of individuals who are charged are not considered "high level", so these are folks that have some authority to engage in whatever behavior underlies the conduct that led to a criminal offense. So they probably are not at the very lowest level of the organization most of the time, but they are not necessarily in the C-suite. Only 25.7% of the individuals charged with an offense along with an organization were considered high level. So almost three quarters of those individuals who find themselves facing criminal sanction, potentially going off to the federal penitentiary are folks that are not considered high level in their organization, and I think that is perhaps counterintuitive, because we oftentimes hear the headlines of executives and other senior folks in organizations getting in trouble and facing criminal sanction, but the reality is the opposite of that. Jen Uner: That's kind of scary, I got to say. I mean, it makes me as an individual in the company really want to pay attention to my compliance training. Eric Morehead: Certainly. Anytime an organization... And granted these cases are not as numerous as situations where organizations may have an investigation and might settle with either the Department of Justice or an agency, like have a civil settlement, something short of a criminal conviction, and there are a lot of situations where organizations might receive a subpoena or have some sort of investigation that occurs, that just ends without any kind of charges or settlements being attained. So there's a lot of data that we don't have, right? Where things may not go perfectly, but don't go quite as bad as ending up with a criminal conviction, but it is scary to consider that there are individuals that are being charged right along with these organizations for this misconduct. Jen Uner: It's really interesting, because so often inside organizations, you've got pressure on one side to perform or deliver in a certain way, and then you can find maybe shortcuts. I mean, I don't know how else to describe it, but a quicker way to get there that maybe is potentially outside the law. So it's true that there are real repercussions for taking those shortcuts, and also for not speaking up, if you see something. Eric Morehead: Yeah, and the real repercussions here for organizations, again, you can't jail a company. You can only fine them. You can order restitution. A federal judge can order them to implement compliance reforms, put together a program if they don't have a program. Those are all things they can do, but the other thing to consider here too is if you take a federal felony conviction, and you are an organization that does any amount of work with the federal government, you can be debarred from future federal contracting, so that can very often... Taking a federal conviction beyond the fines and the costs associated with having to defend the organization against those charges, if it actually ends up with a conviction, and your organization relies heavily or primarily on government contracting, that's the end of the organization. I mean that's the death penalty. The best example of that that we all can probably remember is Arthur Andersen. When they took the federal conviction in Houston for conduct involving Enron, that was the end of Arthur Andersen. They could no longer audit public companies, and they were debarred from government contracting, obviously, after that point too, and that was just the death sentence. Oftentimes when we're looking at these cases, when we look at the data, those are organizations that just had no options, because if there were any options before that to settle the case, to make reforms, to have some sort of civil settlement, those on-ramps just weren't available to them. Jen Uner: I do remember that whole upheaval. My father was in accounting at I think Ernst & Young at the time. I can't even remember, but I do remember that massive upheaval for Arthur Andersen, and how they had to completely pivot the entire business. Eric Morehead: Yeah. The consequences reputational and lost opportunity, real bottom line business costs involved in having misconduct, even if it doesn't rise to the level where we're talking about Sentencing Guidelines or having to implement Sentencing Guidelines for the organization, just an investigation can really derail an organization in a significant way. Jen Uner: I'm going to ask kind of a uninformed question now. It's because I'm not a lawyer. This is going to be maybe really obvious for others, but in case you're like me, can you describe what the Sentencing Commission's relationship is with the DOJ and the SEC, and how do these organizations sort of interrelate? We so often hear about DOJ guidance, for example. How is that different from Sentencing Commission? Eric Morehead: Over the years, we've seen more and more guidance both here in the United States and abroad from prosecuting entities like the DOJ, but also other regulatory agencies like SEC, and many of these regulatory organizations have compliance standards they put together. As far as I'm aware, they're pretty universally based on the same basic standards that we talk about in the Sentencing Guidelines. The DOJ guidance, and primarily we're talking about the memoranda that the criminal division has put out periodically since I think 2017 with the most recent iteration being the 2020 summer one, I believe, that guidance is based and explicitly cites the Sentencing Guidelines as its fundamental basis. Now, obviously there's a lot more detail and specificity within the DOJ guidance. The difference between guidance from the Department of Justice, other guidance that you might see in other agencies, but particularly the memoranda that we're talking about from the DOJ, is that can be withdrawn at any time, and as we've seen over the past few years, it can be amended at any time. It's only a few years old, and it's been amended twice. The DOJ, if there's a change of administration or a change within the hierarchy of the criminal division, those new officials that come in may want to make a change. The former deputy attorney general in the prior administration had talked about doing away with memoranda from the department altogether and codifying everything in as much as you can codify it in the US Attorney's Manual. So there are various things that could potentially happen at any time.           Because the US Sentencing Commission is a rule making organization, there's a whole process that the commission has to go through before there are changes made to the Sentencing Guidelines. That's one of the reasons why there have been very few amendments to the Organizational Sentencing Guidelines over the years is because there's a whole process involved. The commission first has to publicly publish its intention to make any changes. It'll often, if there are proposals to make changes, it will seek public comment, often have a public hearing, and then it votes. And once a commission votes, if a new amendment is promulgated, then it's sent to Congress to both the House and the Senate, and they have a period of time to either make changes or not allow those guideline amendments to come into effect, but if they don't do anything, they automatically come into effect and basically have the force of law as the Sentencing Guidelines. Now, granted the Sentencing Guidelines don't officially apply to your organization except when you're in front of a federal judge being sentenced, right? So if there's no sentence, there's no criminal offense where the sentence is being determined, the guidelines don't have any official capacity, but we've all taken them as the standards by which we measure the effectiveness of a program. So I guess what I'm saying here is I think any guidance is helpful guidance. Certainly the DOJ guidance has been very helpful and added more detail into what regulators are looking for when they peer into an organization, but just the sort of bread and butter basic pieces of a compliance program are always going to reflect back to those seven hallmarks of an effective program within the Sentencing Guidelines, because they're pretty immutable. Jen Uner: So if you're building an E&C program, what are the steps that organizations should be taking to lower their risk? Can you go into a little bit more detail on that? How do you unearth all the rules that apply, and how can you effectively transmit them to the people in your organization? Eric Morehead: Yeah. Whether you're using the Sentencing Guidelines, looking at the guidance from the Department of Justice, or guidance from international organizations like the OECD or others, I feel like, and this is backed up by the specific guidance that the department has given over the past few years of what they look for, every organization is unique. It's its own unique snowflake, right? And so you're going to have your own unique risk profile, and you're going to have to develop your own unique compliance program to be an effective control for those risks. So you evaluate all of these standards, but you put together a program, and you put together standards that really address what your program needs. One of the key provisions of the Sentencing Guidelines, by the way, is what I would call the not one size fits all provision. The guidelines from the very beginning stages of when they were developed had this notion that not every program is going to look the same, not every program is going to be as extensive as other programs. Smaller organizations that are purely domestic here in the United States, for example, and maybe are smaller probably don't have the same exposure to anti-corruption concerns, for example, foreign bribery anti-corruption concerns that international organizations might have for just as an example. So really the best advice is to make sure that your program meets your needs, and so the first step along that process is evaluating and figuring out what your needs are. What are compliance risks that your organization faces, and how are you addressing those risks, and do you need to reform those controls, put more resources behind training or monitoring and auditing, or whatever it might be to address those particular risks? So it's really an