Podcasts about screamin

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Best podcasts about screamin

Latest podcast episodes about screamin

Ajax Diner Book Club
Ajax Diner Book Club Episode 225

Ajax Diner Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 178:18


Vera Hall "Death, Have Mercy"Fleetwood Mac "Green Manalishi (With the Two Pronged Crown)"Bessie Smith "Graveyard Dream Blues"Billy Joe Shaver "The Devil Made Me Do It the First Time"Ted Leo and the Pharmacists "I'm A Ghost"Sister Rosetta Tharpe "Strange Things Happening Every Day"Tampa Red "Witchin' Hour Blues"Neil Young "Vampire Blues"Lefty Frizzell "The Long Black Veil"Muddy Waters "Got My Mojo Working"Dr. John "Black John the Conqueror"Leon Redbone "Haunted House"Little Willie John "I'm Shakin'"Shotgun Jazz Band "Old Man Mose"Lil Green "Romance In the Dark"The Make-Up "They Live By Night"Uncle Tupelo "Graveyard Shift"Bessie Jones "Oh Death"Albert King "Born Under a Bad Sign"Nina Simone "I Want a Little Sugar In My Bowl"Oscar Celestin "Marie Laveau"Reverend Gary Davis "Death Don't Have No Mercy"Roy Newman & His Boys "Sadie Green (The Vamp of New Orleans)"Jessie Mae Hemphill "She-Wolf"Screamin' Jay Hawkins "I Put a Spell On You"Eilen Jewell "It's Your Voodoo Working"George Olsen and His Music "Tain't No Sin to Dance Around in Your Bones"Son House "Death Letter"Johnny Cash "The Man Comes Around"Fleetwood Mac "Black Magic Woman"Blind Lemon Jefferson "See That My Grave Is Kept Clean"Elvis Costello & the Roots "Wise Up Ghost"Hank Williams "Howlin' At the Moon"Bob Dylan "That Old Black Magic"The Halo Benders "Scarin'"Blind Willie Johnson "Dark Was The Night, Cold Was The Ground"Steve And Justin Townes Earle "Candy Man"Billie Holiday "Sugar"Jeff Beck "I Ain't Superstitious"Cab Calloway/Cab Calloway Orchestra "St. James Infirmary"Bonnie Raitt "Devil Got My Woman"Sebadoh "Vampire"Fred McDowell "Death Came In"Howlin' Wolf "Evil"Ella Fitzgerald "Chew-Chew-Chew (Your Bubble Gum)"Robert Johnson "Hellhound On My Trail"John Mayall & The Bluesbreakers "The Super-Natural"Tom Waits "Big Joe and Phantom 309"

El sótano
El Sótano - Rock'n'Roll desde la Cripta - 31/10/22

El sótano

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 59:22


Noche de Halloween, día de difuntos, el momento perfecto para abrir el candado que lleva a nuestra cripta y volver a ofrecerte un capítulo de la serie más terrorífica de la radio. Un encuentro con monstruos, fantasmas, vampiros, zombis y otros seres más muertos que vivos, con melodías que te harán bailar mientras tiemblas de terror. Playlist; (sintonía) MESSER CHUPS “Temolo from the crypt” MERV GRIFFIN “House of horrors” BARON DAEMON “Ghost guitars” HOLLYWOOD FLAMES “Frankenstein’s den” BOBBY PLEASE “The monster” THE ROCKIN’ CONTINENTALS “Count Dracula” BILL BUCHANAN “Beware” ORCHESTRA BRUNO MARINO “Dracula cha cha” THE UPPERCLASSMEN “Cha cha with the zombies” THE SALMAS BROTHERS “Zombie” HAROLD McNAIR “Zombie jamboree” THE DUPONTS “Screamin’ ball (at Dracula’s hall)” LORD ROCKINGHAM XI “Lord Rockingham meets the monster” BELA LA GOLDSTEIN “Old Boris” THE NIGHTMARES “The Nightmare” THE MARK IV “Dante’s inferno” HUTCH DAVIE “Gwendolyn and the Werewolf” JIM BURGETT “The living dead” SALTY HOLMES “The ghost song” THE POETS “Dead” THE SPOOKS “The Spook walks” JOHNNY FRASER and THE REGALAIRES “It” THE STARLIGHTERS “Creepin’” HORROR CHARLY “Horror Horror dance” Escuchar audio

Blind Tiger Record Club Podcast
S5: B.T.R.C. Podcast Special Event - The Top 10 Halloween Songs of All Time

Blind Tiger Record Club Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 101:02


On this episode of the Blind Tiger Record Club Podcast, David W. Williams is joined by Kevin Lee and Jonathan Hibma to present the first ever B.T.R.C. Podcast Special Event:  The Top 10 Halloween Songs of All Time.  On this show, we will discuss songs by  Stevie Wonder, The Doors, Michael Jackson, Warren Zevon, Blue Oyster Cult, Screamin' Jay Hawkins, Ray Parker Jr, AC/DC, Rockwell, and Bobby "Boris" Pickett & the Crypt Kickers.  The songs are discussed and clips of songs are played.  We talk about charts, both at the time of the song's original release and any "re-entry" into Billboard's Hot 100 every Halloween.  We discuss TV and Film syncs, and the many cultural impacts that all the songs have had which is why they are on our G.O.A.T. list. We also present other important Halloween songs that are TV Themes, big film songs, or other culturally important songs as our transitions between each song on our Top 10 list.  This allows the panel to discuss ten more songs that include Halloween defining songs such as the themes of John Carpenter's Halloween, Tales from the Crypt, The Twilight Zone, Addams Family, and Stranger Things.  We also discuss other soundtrack and Halloween songs like Danny Elfman's "This Is Halloween" from Tim Burton's Nightmare Before Christmas and Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds' "Red Right Hand" made famous by the Scream franchise.  Andrew Gold's internet sensation "Spooky Scary Skeletons" and the genre bending song by the godfathers of "Horror Punk", the Misfits' "Halloween".  We also discuss a second song from the Stranger Things franchise that utilizes an amazing sampling of Journey's "Separate Ways". It's a really fun way to celebrate a lot of the incredible music surrounding Halloween.     Whether or not you are a member of Blind Tiger Record Club, the B.T.R.C. Podcast is a great way to get introduced to some new artists and discover some albums that you may not be familiar with.  All the music in our subscription program and that we discuss on this show are on vinyl and have been released or reissued in the last 30 - 60 days.  The show is designed to be a discovery platform for new music "on vinyl", but even if you do not collect or listen to vinyl, it's still a fun way to explore new music. *The Blind Tiger Record Club Podcast is sponsored by 85 Supply.  Go to 85supply.com or email info@85supply.com to get started. For 5% off of your first order, simply mention "Blind Tiger Record Club" via email or over the phone with your rep. It's that simple. Hosts: David W. Williams, Kevin Lee, and Jonathan Hibma Executive Producer - David W. Williams A Blind Tiger Entertainment, LLC Production This episode was edited and mixed by the team at Sound On Studios Theme song written and produced by Jasen Rauch Headbanger Intro theme by Love & Death For more information on becoming a member of the Blind Tiger Record Club, shopping the thousands of titles in the record store, or listening to previous episodes of the podcast, go to BlindTigerRecordClub.com.

RFS: The Devil's Mischief
The Devil’s Mischief #671 – Happy Halloween!

RFS: The Devil's Mischief

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 58:20


Happy Halloween! Hear a choice selection of Halloween comedy and novelty from EDDIE MURPHY, LEWIS BLACK, SCREAMIN’ JAY HAWKINS, THE DEAD BEAT JACKS, and more!

Downtown Soulville with Mr. Fine Wine | WFMU
Downtown Ghoulville from Oct 28, 2022

Downtown Soulville with Mr. Fine Wine | WFMU

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022


Chuck Edwards - "Downtown Soulville" - 45 [0:00:00] Music behind DJ: Teacho Wilshire and the Bad Men - "The Loping Ghost (Pt. 2)" - 45 [0:02:50] Bill Doggett - "Monster Party" - 45 [0:04:56] The Sharks - "Spookareno" - 45 [0:06:48] Philly Joe Jones - "Blues for Dracula" - 45 [0:08:58] Leonard Johnson - "The Bug" - 45 [0:11:18] The DeMires - "The Spider" - 45 [0:13:21] Music behind DJ: Jack Marshall's Music - "Theme From "The Munsters"" - 45 [0:15:13] The Tinglers - "The Tingler" - 45 [0:17:28] Gary Paxton - "Spookie Movies" - 45 [0:19:31] Louis Jones - "The Birds Is Coming" - 45 [0:21:32] Morgus & the 3 Ghouls - "Morgus the Magnificent" - 45 [0:23:30] Music behind DJ: The Blobs - "Party Pooper" - 45 [0:25:45] The Copycats - "The Abominable Snow-Man" - 45 [0:28:11] The Naturals - "The Mummy" - 45 [0:30:29] Gene Moss - "Ghoul Days" - 45 [0:32:48] Art Roberts - "Terrible Ivan" - 45 [0:35:19] Screamin' Jay Hawkins - "The Whammy" - 45 [0:36:52] Music behind DJ: The Tomko's - "The Spook" - 45 [0:39:26] Lurch - "The Lurch" - 45 [0:41:49] Don Hinson & the Rigamorticians - "Monster Jerk" - 45 [0:43:48] Travis Wammack - "There's a UFO Up There" - 45 [0:45:56] James Duhon - "Grave Yard Creep" - 45 [0:48:12] Music behind DJ: Rhythm 'n' Blues Classical Funk Band - "Monster Walk (Pt. 2)" - 45 [0:50:30] Jackie Wilson - "Haunted House" - 45 [0:52:46] Innervision - "There's a Fungus Among Us" - 45 [0:56:09] Music behind DJ: J.C. & the Soul Angels - "Nightmare Strut" - 45 [0:59:30] https://www.wfmu.org/playlists/shows/121118

AG Craft Beer Cast
AG Craft Beer Cast 10-23-22 Screamin Hill Brewery

AG Craft Beer Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 45:03


My guest is Brett Bullock @screaminhillfarmbrewery The #backroadramble is just a few weeks away. Details on @thebeerrun5k and @westfieldhops . News from @greenflashbeer Beer in Arizona made out of recycled water? The return of beer and donut pairing fromTorch and Crown. @lawsonsfinest releasing a beer outside of Vermont. @trilliumbrewing selling their original location & more. Suds and Duds too.   @njcraftbeer  @hoppedupnetwork @sjbeerscene @brewerystrong #metalforever #drinklocal #drinkcraftnotcrap #stouts #ipas #lagers #ales #sours #hops #pilsners #porters #gastropub #speakeasy  #growler #beer  #jerseybeers #fcancer #smallbusinessowners #beerfestivals #beertours #music #savenjbeer #podcasts #crowlersSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

95bFM
The 95bFM Jazz Show with Frances Chan, 23 October 2022

95bFM

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022


Frances Chan fully digs the jazzfunk and psychedelia with the latest from Louis Cole and The Comet Is Coming, and showcases the contemporary scenes from both sides of the Atlantic. Setlist: Louis Cole – Dead Inside Shuffle Medicine Singers ft Jaimie Branch – Sanctuary The Comet Is Coming – Technicolour Louis Cole – Bitches Thundercat – Thousand Knives Vulfmon – Boogie Man Scary Goldings – Louis Cole Sucks The Comet Is Coming – Lucid Dreamer GoGo Penguin – Erased by Sunlight Rebecca Vasmant & Nadya Albertsson – Broken Biscuits Myele Manzanza & Omar – Therapy Soccer96 – Flight Formation Richter City Rebels – Have No Fear Quentin Angus – Enigma Louis Cole – I'm Tight High Pulp – All Roads Lead to Los Angeles The Comet Is Coming – Pyramids Theon Cross – Wings Brandon Coleman – Mutha Afrika Nubya Garcia, Las Perla, Kaidi Tatham – La Cumbia Me Esta Llamado Louis Cole – Planet X Scary Goldings – Cornish Hen Butcher Brown – Lawd WhyTheo Croker ft Gary Bartz & Kassa Overall – Jazz Is Dead Screamin' Jay Hawkins – Whistling Past the Graveyard

Getting lumped up with Rob Rossi
RockerMike and Rob Presents: Laura Palmer

Getting lumped up with Rob Rossi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 29:15


Screamin' Rebel Angels' unrelenting and hi-octane original music reimagines the legacy of rock ‘n roll, rockabilly, and rhythm ‘n blues into a contemporary sound. Their thrilling live performances are packed with primal passion and authenticity. The sound is unapologetically their own, and they take their audiences on an exhilarating adventure into an untamed world of dangerous women, broken hearts, courage and conviction. Leading the band is Laura Palmer, a versatile multi-instrumentalist, song-writer, and producer. Equally adept at slapping out the rhythm on an upright bass or picking on a big ol' Gretsch, Laura Palmer's on stage presence and powerful vocals have garnered international attention and acclaim, including earning the 2020 Ameripolitan Award “Rockabilly Female of the Year.” Add in Brian Hack's stratospheric lead guitar and additional song-writing, drummer Jungle Jim Chandler and the combination is a truly unique sound not to be missed. Screamin' Rebel Angels regularly play like their lives depend on it throughout the U.S., Canada and Europe http://screaminrebelangels.com/press.html https://www.facebook.com/screaminrebelangels https://instagram.com/screaminrebelangels?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y= https://twitter.com/screaminnyc?s=21&t=Anrh8mbkHY5prKE4qbqKXQ https://youtube.com/c/screaminrebelangels https://music.apple.com/us/artist/screamin-rebel-angels/452111637 https://open.spotify.com/artist/4MwGT6KZFfH1bWDsr5nqRm?si=V9o2kGI8QmeWS6ZtlupuOA @screaminrebelangels @rockabilly @vocalist @songwriter @versatilemultiinstrumentalist @producer #screaminrebelangels #rockabilly #songwriter #producer #versatilemultiinstrumentalist #vocalist Park Dental Care 12419 101st Ave South Richmond Hill Queens (718) 847-3800 https://www.718DENTISTS.com Please follow us on Youtube,Facebook,Instagram,Twitter,Patreon and at www.gettinglumpedup.com https://linktr.ee/RobRossi Get your T-shirt at https://www.prowrestlingtees.com/gettinglumpedup And https://www.bonfire.com/store/getting-lumped-up/ Subscribe to the channel and hit the like button This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rob-rossi/support https://www.patreon.com/Gettinglumpedup --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rob-rossi/support

Death By Music Podcast
Screamin' Jay Hawkins and His 56 Children | Mini 77

Death By Music Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 22:41


Today we spoke about listener Garrett's suggestion - pioneer shock-rocker Screamin' Jay Hawkins and his litter of offspring. We can't think of anything more terrifying to cover this October!Support the show

Bandana Blues, founded by Beardo, hosted by Spinner
Bandana Blues #967 - The Originals

Bandana Blues, founded by Beardo, hosted by Spinner

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 121:43


Show #967 The Originals 01.  Bob Dylan - Everything Is Broken (3:15) (Oh Mercy, Columbia Records, 1989) 02.  Ray Charles - Hard Times (No One Knows Better Than I) [1955] (2:55) (The Genius Sings The Blues, Atlantic Records, 1961) 03a. Ray Charles - Mess Around (2:39) (45 RPM Single, Atlantic Records, 1953) 03b. Charles 'Cow Cow' Davenport - Cow Cow Blues (3:09) (78 RPM Shellac, Vocalion Records, 1928) 04.  Fabulous Thunderbirds - Full Time Lover (4:43) (Girls Go Wild, Takoma Records, 1979) 05.  Al Green - Love And Happiness (5:07) (I'm Still In Love With You, Hi Records, 1972) 06.  Dire Straits - Money For Nothing (8:26) (Brothers In Arms, Vertigo Records, 1985) 07a. Screamin' Jay Hawkins - I Put A Spell On You (3:31) (45 RPM Single, Okeh Records, 1956) 07b. Screamin' Jay Hawkins - I Put A Spell On You (2:52) (Unreleased, Grand Records, 1955) 08.  Sonny Boy Williamson II - Don't Start Me Talking (2:35) (45 RPM Single, Checker Records, 1955) 09.  Atlanta Rhythm Section - So In To You (4:16) (A Rock And Roll Alternative, Polydor Records, 1976) 10.  ZZ Top - Tush (2:14) (Fandango!, London Records, 1975) 11.  Mothers Of Invention - Trouble Comin' Every Day (5:47) (Freak Out!, Verve Records, 1966) 12.  Son House - Grinnin' In Your Face (2:07) (Father Of Folk Blues, Columbia Records, 1965) 13.  Lynyrd Skynyrd - Gimme Three Steps (4:24) (Lynyrd Skynyrd, MCA Records, 1973) 14.  Elvis Presley - Heartbreak Hotel (2:09) (45 RPM Single, RCA Victor, 1956) 15.  Neville Brothers - Yellow Moon (3:58) (Yellow Moon, A&M Records, 1989) 16.  Little Feat - Spanish Moon (4:50) (Waiting For Columbus, Warner Bros Records, 1978) 17a. Peggy Lee & Benny Goodman Orchestra - Why Don't You Do Right (3:14) (78 RPM Shellac, Columbia Records, 1942) 17b. Harlem Hamfats - Weed Smoker's Dream (3:17) (78 RPM Shellac, Decca Records, 1936) 17c. Lil Green - Why Don't You Do Right (3:00) (78 RPM Shellac, Bluebird Records, 1941) 18.  Prince & the Revolution - Kiss (3:38) (Parade, Paisley Park/Warner Bros Records, 1986) 19.  Fenton Robinson - Somebody (Loan Me A Dime) (2:23) (45 RPM Single, Palos Records, 1967) 20.  Jimi Hendrix - Voodoo Child (Slight Return) (5:12) (Electric Ladyland, Polydor Records, 1968) 21.  Tampa Red - It Hurts Me Too (2:28) (78 RPM Shellac, Bluebird Records, 1940) 22a. Leonard Cohen - First We Take Manhattan (5:58) (I'm Your Man, Columbia Records, 1988) 22b. Jennifer Warnes - First We Take Manhattan (3:47) (Famous Blue Raincoat, Cypress Records, 1986) 23.  Albert King - Oh Pretty Woman (2:47) (Born Under A Bad Sign, Stax Records, 1967) 24.  Fleetwood Mac - Black Magic Woman (2:49) (45 RPM Single, Blue Horizon Records, 1968) Bandana Blues is and will always be a labor of love. Please help Spinner deal with the costs of hosting & bandwidth. Visit www.bandanablues.com and hit the tipjar. Any amount is much appreciated, no matter how small. Thank you.

Monster Candy Podcast
Episode 84: Smile (2022)

Monster Candy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 84:30


It's October, and crossing the streams never smelled so good! Oobliette and Screamin' E are back and discussing Parker Finn's SMILE! Find out what they had to say and who might need a therapist on this episode of Monster Candy Podcast!

A Podcast on Elm Street
Screamin' September 5 - Scream 5 (2022)

A Podcast on Elm Street

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 143:52


What's up Dream Warriors! So September came and went in a flash, and that can only mean one thing. Our Screamin' September has officially come to a close. We had a great time this month, covering one of the most popular slasher franchises in horror history and we're grateful to have been able to do so with not one, but two awesome guests! This week Josh makes his return and joins us to discuss the newest entry in the Scream franchise and one that we all agree is one of our favourites. We wrap up our biggest Villain Faceoff series to date and see how Ghostface in Scream 5 competes with the previous ones and the results are pretty surprising! Our next episode will be a bit delayed, but we promise it'll be a banger as our two episodes in October will both be franchise episodes, starting off with Phantasm. This will be a first time franchise watch for both of us as we've both only seen the first one!

Skippy and Doogles Talk Investing
Housing Be Beamin' While the Market's Screamin' Lehman

Skippy and Doogles Talk Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 46:21


Skippy and Doogles release a premium episode hitting on some of their recent buys (https://skippydoogles.supercast.com/ (you can become premium here)). Cathie Wood is back to spewing economic nonsense. Housing remains expensive. Doogles recaps a Mark Suster post on what VC will look like after the crash. Skippy hits on data showing that market sentiment is near all time lows. Doogles covers Howard Marks' recent memo and discusses forecasting. The episode wraps with Annie Duke's new book "Quit." Join the https://skippydoogles.supercast.com/ (Skippy and Doogles fan club). You can also get more details about the show at http://skippydoogles.com/ (skippydoogles.com), show notes on https://skippydoogles.substack.com/ (our Substack), and send comments or questions to skippydoogles@gmail.com.

A Podcast on Elm Street
Screamin' September 4 - Scream 4 (2011)

A Podcast on Elm Street

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 159:49


What's up Dream Warriors! We're back this week to complete our set of Villain Faceoffs with Chuck from Chuck and Ruff Go to the Movies, with our discussion on Scream 4! As always, we had a blast recording this episode and we went off the rails multiple times with discussions about the teaser for the Deadpool/Wolverine movie, our crushes on Hayden Panettiere and randomly, Eric Roberts' ridiculous upcoming movie schedule. We cap off the episode with our Villain Faceoff and determine who we think would win if Scream 3's Ghostface were to match up with Scream 4's. Who do you think would take the crown? Join as next week as we finish off our Screamin' September with Scream 5 and the return of Josh from HMC!

Let It Roll
Shock Rock From Screamin' Jay Hawkins to Alice Cooper to Marilyn Manson

Let It Roll

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 65:14 Very Popular


The gang grapples with the "shock rock" umbrella that Sam Dunn uses to discuss a wide-range of acts that combined intense rock with the shock aesthetic of the Grand Guignol.  Slipknot emerges as a surprise favorite of the Puncholes.Download this episode.Have a question or a suggestion for a topic or person for Nate to interview? Email letitrollpodcast@gmail.comFollow us on Twitter.Follow us on Facebook.Let It Roll is proud to be part of Pantheon Podcasts.

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Rock is Lit: Janet Fitch, Author of 'Paint it Black'

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 85:09


HIGHLIGHTS FROM EPISODE 4:Janet Fitch talks about seeing a three-hour concert with Leonard Cohen; Joni Mitchell; what she'd ask Patti Smith, Björk, Neil Young, and Leonard Cohen if she could; creating an “I will survive” music playlist; Amy Winehouse; Janis Joplin; X; Nico; Jackson Brown.Janet and I talk about some of the major themes of her novel ‘Paint it Black'; grief and the aftermath of suicide; the significance of the title of her novel; the freedom that punk rock gives fans and musicians alike; why ‘Paint it Black' is a punk rock novel as opposed to a more generalized rock novel; how each of the three main characters in ‘Paint it Black' has their own distinct soundtrack; classical music and early 20th century Americana music; L.A. punk, especially The Germs and The Cramps; the deaths of John Lennon and Darby Crash; the changing punk scene in L.A. in the early ‘80s; how the Ingmar Bergman film ‘Persona' influenced the creation of Janet's novel; Janet's experience as a student filmmaker in the ‘80s; the 1913 poem “Trans-Siberian Prose and Little Jeanne from France”; the movie adaptation of ‘Paint it Black'.Pleasant Gehman talks about the beginning of the L.A. punk scene and her involvement in it. She mentions various bands and iconic L.A. punk rock venues, becoming friends with Darby Crash and Pat Smear of The Germs before they were in The Germs and dating Pat Smear, smoking pot with Tony Curtis, rooming with Belinda Carlisle and smoking pot with Screamin' Jay Hawkins at Disgraceland, hanging out with Joan Jett.To hear more from Pleasant about her involvement with some of the hottest punk bands in L.A. in the early ‘80s, including The Cramps, The Weirdos, Blondie, The Damned, X, and Black Flag, and how the scene began to deteriorate, listen to the outtake from this episode in the Rock is Lit Vault.Nicole Panter shares her memories of being friends with and managing The Germs; Darby Crash's childhood; why Germs shows were a trainwreck; Darby's abuse of alcohol and drugs; the making of The Germs' album, including Joan Jett's involvement; ‘The Decline of Western Civilization' documentary, in which Nicole and The Germs are featured; why Nicole stopped managing the band; Darby's fascination with Adam Ant; how Nicole heard about Darby's death; Nicole's dislike of the biopic about Darby and The Germs, ‘What We Do Is Secret', and The Germs reunion tour with the actor who played Darby in the film, Shane West; the legacy of The Germs. CLIPS OF MUSIC PLAYED IN THE EPISODE IN ORDER OF APPEARANCE:"Paint it Black" by the Rolling Stones"Land" by Patti SmithBrahms Piano Concerto No. 2 in B-flat major Op. 82, played by Yuja Wang with the Munich Philharmonic, conducted by Valery Gergiev, Dec 1, 2018“West End Blues” by Louis Armstrong“What We Do Is Secret” by The Germs“Human Fly” by The CrampsErich Wolfgang Korngold: ‘Kings Row', Main Title, music for the 1941 film“Our Way” by The Germs“Media Blitz” by The Germs“American Leather” by The GermsTwo short clips from the 1981 documentary 'The Decline of Western Civilization', directed by Penelope Spheeris,  featuring Darby Crash and The Germs appear in the episode. CONTACTS: Janet Fitch's websiteJanet Fitch Twitter, @JanetFitch323Janet Fitch Instagram, @janetfitch323Pleasant Gehman's websitePleasant Gehman Twitter, @PleasantGehman1Pleasant Gehman Instagram, @princessofhollywoodThe Devil's Music With Pleasant Gehman podcastBelle, Book, and Candle, Instagram, @belle_book_and_candleNicole Panter Instagram, @poseypChristy Alexander Hallberg's websiteChristy Alexander Hallberg Instagram, @christyhallbergChristy Alexander Hallberg Twitter, @ChristyHallbergChristy Alexander Hallberg YouTubeRock is Lit Vault

A Podcast on Elm Street
Screamin' September 3 - Scream 3 2000

A Podcast on Elm Street

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 114:08


Whats up Dream Warriors! We're heading back to Woodsbo...err...Hollywood for our third installment of our Screamin' September episode and we're joined by our good friend Chuck from Chuck and Ruff Go to the Movies to discuss Scream 3 from 2000! This is the lowest rated movie in the franchise but we all agree it's still a great time and not a terrible movie, much to the critics' dismay. We also kicked off the second set of Villain Faceoffs with this one and is it possible that this Ghostface is one of the best in the franchise...? Come back next week when we'll be joined by Chuck again to discuss Scream 4 and see which Ghostface comes out on top! You can find Chuck at: https://www.instagram.com/chuckruffgo2themovies/

A Podcast on Elm Street
Screamin' September 3 - Scream 3 (2000) ft. Chuck from Chuck and Ruff Go to the Movies

A Podcast on Elm Street

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 114:08


Whats up Dream Warriors! We're heading back to Woodsbo...err...Hollywood for our third installment of our Screamin' September episode and we're joined by our good friend Chuck from Chuck and Ruff Go to the Movies to discuss Scream 3 from 2000! This is the lowest rated movie in the franchise but we all agree it's still a great time and not a terrible movie, much to the critics' dismay. We also kicked off the second set of Villain Faceoffs with this one and is it possible that this Ghostface is one of the best in the franchise...? Come back next week when we'll be joined by Chuck again to discuss Scream 4 and see which Ghostface comes out on top! You can find Chuck at: https://www.instagram.com/chuckruffgo2themovies/

FridayAfterWorkAffair's Podcast
Episode 267: 264 FridayAfterWorkAffair by eSkay

FridayAfterWorkAffair's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 63:41


Tracklist1. Charles Dockins - Whistle Scat Screams ( CDock's Screamin' Solo Dub Mix)2. Zulumafia - Set it Off ( Lovesoul Mix) 3. D*Sol, Novakane Omega, Bradford James - Deny ( Brandford James OTR Remix) 4. A. Mochi - Want Me Back ( Jimpster Jazz'd Up Remix) 5. Franck Roger - Circles 6. Ralf Gum Feat. Bongi Mvuyana, Kafele - Fix Your Love ( Ralf Gum Instrumental) 7. Opolopo feat. Roland Clark - Salvation ( Deep Mix) 8. Cubique DJ & Exte C feat. Dearson - Revival 9. Myazisto - Return the Jewel 10. Dyrho feat. Griffith Malo & Bridgette Titiwe - Over the Rainbow Booking: music@fawamusic.comwww.fawamusic.comFacebook: FridayAfterWorkAffairTwitter/Instagram: @fawamusic

Monster Candy Podcast
Episode 83: Bodies, Bodies, Bodies (2022)

Monster Candy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 87:06


Oobliette and Screamin' E are back, and they're CROSSING THE STREAMS! This one went off the rails a little, as it usually does with these two, as they talked about many things, including Corey Feldman, Victor Miller, the apocalypse, and at some point, the 2022 horror comedy/who done it film, BODIES BODIES BODIES!

The Retro Junkies
70 - Screamin' Stan's Spooky Sing-Alongs!

The Retro Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 63:39


In this episode, we gear up for Halloween season with some spooooooky songs at Stan's Good Times Roller Rink! Thank you so much for listening! Here's our Petrifying Playlist for this Screamin' Season: "Mr. Werewolf" by The Kack-Ties "Jaws Theme" by John Williams "Friday the 13: Part 3 Theme" by Harry Manfredini "Psycho Theme" by Bernard Herrmann "White Night" by Torch Song "Possum Kingdom" by The Toadies "What Am I Gonna Be for Halloween?" by McDonald Land's Magical Radio "The Munsters Theme" by Jack Marshall "Splatter House 3 Intro" by Eiko Kaneda "Bloody Tears" SNES by Masanori Adachi and Taro Kudo Be sure to check out our friend Dave "The Demon" Vogt's AWECOME indie games, The Bounty and The Bounty V2 on Steam! Links: Instagram: @The_Retro_Junkies Twitter: @RJ_SuperShow Facebook: The Retro Junkies Email: trjsupershow@gmail.com Hoser Hotline: 865-309-4875 "The Moon: Ducktales" and all other closing songs by Daniel Tidwell Be sure to support our friends who produce AMAZING retro content on a daily basis! Blast Processing The Retro Gaming Times The No Swear Gamer DYA - Ninja Carnage Album Willie's Arcade USA Channel Xander's XS Gaming Podcast and Channel Bit Bros Network

Sounding Out with Izzy: A Grrrl's Two Sound Cents Podcast
Breathing Fire at the Patriarchy with Shilpa Ray

Sounding Out with Izzy: A Grrrl's Two Sound Cents Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 56:52


In today's episode, Izzy catches up with Brooklyn-based punk rocker and poet Shilpa Ray. Izzy and Shilpa discuss her upbringing in a Bengali family in New Jersey, being mentored by Nick Cave and Warren Ellis, her latest album 'Portrait of a Lady,' and why she believes counter-cultural anarchy was a sham for all the women involved in the movement. ✨ MORE ABOUT SHILPA RAY ✨Shilpa Ray is a self-described "fire-breathing cyclops ripping off Nina Simone ripping off Screamin' Jay Hawkins ripping off the devil." Combining punk rock with glam, gothic rockabilly, and blues, her music is unabashedly direct and politically charged. Her latest album 'Portrait of a Lady,' tackles this directness head-on with song titles like "Cry for the Cameras," "Charm School for Damaged Boys," and "Manic Pixie Dream Cunt." She is currently on tour in Europe. ✨ KEEP UP TO DATE WITH SHILPA RAY ✨Web: https://www.shilparay.netInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/shilparayofficial/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/shilpa.ray.9Twitter: https://twitter.com/shilparayisgodBandcamp: https://shilparay.bandcamp.com/musicSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/2aBdKyqYmbMAxMFCujJSqw?si=zx_E41niSfmjQGRito1cUQ✨ CONNECT WITH IZZY ✨YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCv6SBgiYCpYbx9BOYNefkIgWebsite: https://izzyshutup.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/agrrrlstwosoundcents/Twitter: https://twitter.com/missannthropei 

The Retro Junkies
70 - Screamin' Stan's Spooky Sing-Alongs!

The Retro Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 63:39


In this episode, we gear up for Halloween season with some spooooooky songs at Stan's Good Times Roller Rink! Thank you so much for listening! Here's our Petrifying Playlist for this Screamin' Season: "Mr. Werewolf" by The Kack-Ties "Jaws Theme" by John Williams "Friday the 13: Part 3 Theme" by Harry Manfredini "Psycho Theme" by Bernard Herrmann "White Night" by Torch Song "Possum Kingdom" by The Toadies "What Am I Gonna Be for Halloween?" by McDonald Land's Magical Radio "The Munsters Theme" by Jack Marshall "Splatter House 3 Intro" by Eiko Kaneda "Bloody Tears" SNES by Masanori Adachi and Taro Kudo Be sure to check out our friend Dave "The Demon" Vogt's AWECOME indie games, The Bounty and The Bounty V2 on Steam! Links: Instagram: @The_Retro_Junkies Twitter: @RJ_SuperShow Facebook: The Retro Junkies Email: trjsupershow@gmail.com Hoser Hotline: 865-309-4875 "The Moon: Ducktales" and all other closing songs by Daniel Tidwell Be sure to support our friends who produce AMAZING retro content on a daily basis! Blast Processing The Retro Gaming Times The No Swear Gamer DYA - Ninja Carnage Album Willie's Arcade USA Channel Xander's XS Gaming Podcast and Channel Bit Bros Network

Law Abiding Biker | Street Biker Motorcycle Podcast
LAB-312-Has Your Harley Warranty Been Voided? Tuning Days Are Over?

Law Abiding Biker | Street Biker Motorcycle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 73:11 Very Popular


Official Website: https://www.lawabidingbiker.com Has your Harley warranty been voided? Are the tuning days over? Harley-Davidson (HD) entered into an agreement with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) on June 23, 2022. This relates to all Harley warranties and if you're a Harley owner this is absolutely must-know information. Introduction: As part of this agreement, HD agreed to the findings that it had violated the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act when it forced warranty-holders to buy only Harley-Davidson branded parts or lose warranty coverage. Let's start by discussing what the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act is. The Magnusson-Moss Warranty Act basically prohibits manufacturers from requiring consumers to use only original equipment parts or services to keep their warranty. This means you can service your own motorcycle and use aftermarket parts without automatically voiding your warranty. Now, we've preached this for years, which is why we produce our very popular premium Harley tutorial videos such as Harley oil change and service videos, handlebar installs, stereo installs, and much more!  And, we have about 600 hundred free videos on the Law Abiding Biker YouTube channel.  Start saving money now by wrenching on your own Harley using our very detailed tutorial videos. SUPPORT US AND SHOP IN THE OFFICIAL LAW ABIDING BIKER STORE Neither Harley nor any other manufacturer can void your warranty for servicing your own motorcycle at home or having a third-party shop service your bike.  However, you are required to keep receipts for your oil and filter, etc, and keep track of whom performed the service, which would be you. A Deeper Dive: Let's dive into the meat and potatoes of the FTC settlement agreement.  And at the end of this article, I'll break this down into good' ol' biker language and what it actually means for you as a Harley owner. The FTC filed an administrative complaint against HD for illegally restricting customers' right to repair their Harley's. The FTC's complaint said warranties on HD bikes included terms that made buyers believe their warranty would be voided if they used independent dealers for parts or repairs. So, the FTC ordered HD to fix warranties by removing illegal terms and recognizing the right to repair, come clean with customers, and ensure that dealers compete fairly with independent third parties. While the FTC took action against Harley-Davidson, the organization does not have the authority to recover consumers' damages. A federal lawsuit filed against HD in Wisconsin's Eastern District Court last week seeks to recover any damages consumers who bought a Harley motorcycle from Aug. 1, 2018, up until now may have faced. A second lawsuit was filed in California's Northern District Court.  The lawsuits claim owners paid more for genuine HD parts, as compared to aftermarket parts, in fear of their warranties being voided. Neither Harley nor any other manufacturer can void your warranty for servicing your own motorcycle at home or having a third-party shop service your bike.  However, you are required to keep receipts for your oil and filter, etc, and keep track of whom performed the service, which would be you. A Deeper Dive: Let's dive into the meat and potatoes of the FTC settlement agreement.  And at the end of this article, I'll break this down into good' ol' biker language and what it actually means for you as a Harley owner. The FTC filed an administrative complaint against HD for illegally restricting customers' right to repair their Harley's. The FTC's complaint said warranties on HD bikes included terms that made buyers believe their warranty would be voided if they used independent dealers for parts or repairs. NEW FREE VIDEO RELEASED: Harley-Davidson Is Getting Sued!! This Affects All Motorcycle Owners! So, the FTC ordered HD to fix warranties by removing illegal terms and recognizing the right to repair, come clean with customers, and ensure that dealers compete fairly with independent third parties. While the FTC took action against Harley-Davidson, the organization does not have the authority to recover consumers' damages. A federal lawsuit filed against HD in Wisconsin's Eastern District Court last week seeks to recover any damages consumers who bought a Harley motorcycle from Aug. 1, 2018, up until now may have faced. A second lawsuit was filed in California's Northern District Court.  The lawsuits claim owners paid more for genuine HD parts, as compared to aftermarket parts, in fear of their warranties being voided. CHECK OUT OUR HUNDREDS OF FREE HELPFUL VIDEOS ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL AND SUBSCRIBE! We'll see what the outcome of these lawsuits will be. So, definitely subscribe to our YouTube Channel for a future update video as this all gets sorted out further in the courts. Remember, every time that subscribe button and bell icon are hit, another biker joins the #BikerRevolution and we'd love to have you be part of it. If you haven't already, you must make sure and listen to the Law Abiding Biker Podcast that is still going strong after 9 ½ years! We talk about issues like this, and in a lot more detail and we have a lot of fun doing it.  You can listen on any major podcast platform and we even have our own free app for you. Head over to LawAbidingBiker.com/App and choose where you want to listen. Requirements Of The Agreement: HD shall not imply or state that: A warranty will or may be void due to you using unauthorized or aftermarket parts or services in connection with your motorcycle.  A warranty will or may be void due to you making a modification to your motorcycle without the HD's authorization or approval. As a condition of warranty coverage, or within the Written Warranty, you must use only genuine Harley-Davidson parts or services provided by authorized service providers. However, HD may represent, both in its warranty documents or otherwise, that it will: Exclude warranty coverage for defects or damage caused by unauthorized parts, service, or use of the vehicle, including defects or damage caused by the use of aftermarket parts.  Or, use of the vehicle for racing or competition, and denial of coverage may be based on the installation of parts designed for unauthorized uses of the vehicle, such as a trailer hitch.  And, consistent with Harley-Davidson's July 2017 Consent Decree with the EPA, exclude warranty coverage and deny all warranty claims for functional defects of powertrain components. And, for any Harley-Davidson motorcycle registered in the United States if the vehicle was tuned using a tuning product not covered by a California Air and Resources Board (CARB) Executive Order or that was otherwise approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). HD must identify all consumers who purchased new or used motorcycles still under warranty and notify them of the FTC agreement and its terms. Further, HD must provide consumers with a complete copy of the warranty at the time of purchase. What Does All This Mean For A Motorcycle Owner? First, I want to let you know that we did a very popular and highly viewed video about Harley Davidson Warranties and issues some time ago and you'll definitely want to watch that video after this one to be well educated and understand the issues in their entirety. So, I mentioned earlier in this article that your warranty cannot be voided if you have your bike serviced at a third-party shop or simply decide to do your own oil changes and services in your own garage, which I highly recommend. You can save yourself a ton of money and have the pure satisfaction of wrenching on your own bike. The next question is; Can a motorcycle manufacturer void your warranty for installing non-OEM aftermarket parts on your motorcycle, such as headers, mufflers, intakes, handlebars, stereos, cams, and even EFI tuner?  They can deny any warranty claim if they determine the aftermarket parts you added to your bike caused the damage. Let's start with mufflers as a general example. Let's say you put aftermarket mufflers on your Harley and the transmission goes bad suddenly.  I think it'd be fair to say that mufflers did not cause a transmission failure, so you “should” be covered under a warranty. Or, you do an aftermarket stereo install and your engine then has a major failure. I think it'd be fair to say that a stereo install has nothing to do with the engine failure and thus you should be covered under a warranty.  Now, let's say you do a cam upgrade and afterward the engine has a catastrophic failure to a push rod. I think it'd be fair to say that the new cam upgrade caused the engine failure and you'd not be covered under a warranty. The real question then is, does simply doing a non-motor upgrade like stereo install or handlebars for example, automatically void your powertrain warranty or overall warranty? No, those upgrades do not affect the powertrain, thus you should not have your warranty voided. The next question is, does simply doing a powertrain upgrade such as a cam upgrade for example, automatically void your powertrain warranty? No, not by itself, however, you must remap your EFI after an upgrade like that and if you were to use a non-EPA compliant tuner, your powertrain warranty will be automatically voided by Harley-Davidson.  You see, when Harley dealerships plug your bike into Digital Technician II for diagnostics it auto-detects whether the bike has a tuner, and then it will be determined whether it is EPA compliant.  Digital Technician II automatically sends the detected tuner information to the Harley-Davidson mothership so to speak and your power train warranty is voided immediately if it's not compliant. Now, in regards to Harley-Davidson and other motorcycle and auto manufacturers for that matter, the EFI tuner issue is because of pressure and fines from the EPA, who is making them void warranties if non-compliant tuners are utilized.  In 2017, Harley entered a consent decree, filed by the United States EPA, that required them to cease the sale of all non-compliant EFI tuners. And, void warranties on those Harley's with non-compliant EFI tuners. And yes, Harley is voiding warranties for non-compliant EFI tuners as are other motorcycle companies and auto manufacturers. What Is An EPA-Compliant EFI Tuner? Well, that's not so clear, but we did some research and digging for you.  Currently, we can find no credible list of “EPA compliant tuners”.  I will mention that of course, Harley-Davidson has a Screamin' Eagle EPA-compliant EFI tuner that will not void your warranty.  But, it doesn't do much and we'll talk about that in a moment. So, this begs the overall question, is something like the Vance & Hines FuelPak EFI tuner EPA compliant, and will it void your Harley warranty?  Well, we spoke directly to two Vance & Hines technicians today, and here's what we learned. The FuelPak 3 (FP3) is not EPA compliant technically, because it allows you to tune non-EPA compliant engine upgrades such as cams and big bore kits. The FP3 will void your motorcycle warranty.  But, Vance & Hines says the FP4 is EPA compliant and will not void your warranty. However, it will only allow you to tune up to a stage one upgrade, which means pipes and intake. It will not allow tuning for cams and big bore kits now or in the future. Act Quickly If You Want A FuelPak 3: We do sell the Vance and Hines FP3 and FP4 in the Law Abiding Biker store.  With that said, you need to act very quickly if you want to get your hands on a Vance & Hines Fuelpak 3 for your 2014-2020 Harley before they're gone forever. Many of the large stores are already out of them. For all of you who own 2021 to current Harley's, you can only use the FP4 as it has a different style plug. We have stocked up with FP3's right in the Law Abiding Biker Store for you and they are moving very quickly. It's first come first serve and when they're gone they're gone forever.  If you have a 2014-2020 Harley and have ever thought about doing a future cam upgrade or big bore kit you'll need the FP3. In fact, we just did a cam upgrade on a Milwaukee eight and used the FP3 to tune it, and afterward, the bike ran like a raped ape. The FP3 is a very capable tuner with many options and we've used them for years.  We will be releasing a full detailed cam install tutorial video on our YouTube Channel, so make sure you're subscribed so you are notified as we release videos. Also, the FP3 allows you to tune your bike right from your smartphone, unlike some other tuners. It is super intuitive and we already have a tutorial video on that. Maybe you just want to do a simple stage 1 upgrade with pipes and intake right now, well you can with the FP3 while also future-proofing yourself in case you want to do more. And of course, if you want an FP4 we have those too in the store and they are plentiful. Also, if you're a California resident, you'll have to get the FP4 regardless. Customers in California can't buy the FP3 and dealers can't sell it to California residents.  If you appreciate this video and all the content we put out to help the biker community, please consider purchasing right from the Law Abiding Biker Store, so we can continue to put out great content like this. Now for argument's sake & for a better understanding of how all this works, I'll dive in a bit further. A Further Breakdown: Let's say you do an aftermarket muffler upgrade and have not installed an EFI tuner and your engine then has a failure. And, you take it to a Harley dealership, who decides to say that the mufflers caused it. Well, although the Magnusson-Moss Warranty Act is behind you it may or may not help you. You see, in a situation like this, the burden of proof is completely on you as the consumer.  You'd have to decide whether the cost is worth it. Because you're the one that will have to find and hire an Attorney that may be willing to file a lawsuit. Now, over the past years, we have had communications with Harley owners and particular dealerships conducting business like this in similar circumstances.  I would say our local dealership and the vast majority were not doing this and following the rules. With that said, the FTC agreement included contact info to file a complaint with HD Headquarters and the FTC. You may find a resolution at this first step. Federal Trade Commission Website Harley-Davidson Customer Support Page 1-800-258-2464 What Are Aftermarket Parts Manufacturers & Third-Party Shops Saying: A statement from Vance and Hines CEO Mike Kennedy in an article said, "This action taken by the FTC is a huge win for motorcycle riders. While we still need to see how this plays out, we anticipate that riders will have more choices in how they repair and update their motorcycles during the warranty period, which is clearly a big deal for companies in the motorcycle aftermarket, too. I hope that the ‘it will void your warranty threat for someone who just wants a better sounding or smoother running Harley is a thing of the past." What Am I Going To Do? I will simply buy the motorcycle without any extended warranty and ride it hard for a bit on the manufacturer's warranty until I'm comfortable that the bike is going to hold up. Then, I'll immediately put any damn parts and tuners I want on it and ride it like I stole it. You decide what you're going to do and let me know in the comments, Harley-Davidson reps do read them and so do we. And what does this mean for the overall future of power train upgrades for motorcycle consumers? Well, you'll have to tune into the Law Abiding Biker podcast for our thoughts on that. Sponsor-Ciro 3D CLICK HERE! Innovative products for Harley-Davidson & Goldwing Affordable chrome, lighting, and comfort products Ciro 3D has a passion for design and innovation Sponsor-RickRak CLICK HERE The Ultimate Motorcycle Luggage Rack Solution Forget those messy straps and bungee cords Go strapless with a RickRak quick attach luggage system & quality bag Sponsor-Butt Buffer CLICK HERE Want to ride longer? Tired of a sore and achy ass? Then fix it with a high-quality Butt Buffer seat cushion? New Patrons: R Zbinden of Santa Clarita, California Paul Reynolds of Kennewick, Washington Kenneth Lefsrud If you appreciate the content we put out and want to make sure it keeps on coming your way then become a Patron too! There are benefits and there is no risk. Thanks to the following bikers for supporting us via a flat donation: Darrence Lovejoy of Charlotte North Carolina Walter Lurz of Coram, New York Claude Maillet ________________________________________________________ FURTHER INFORMATION:   Official Website: http://www.LawAbidingBiker.com   Email & Voicemail: http://www.LawAbidingBiker.com/Contact   Podcast Hotline Phone: 509-731-3548 HELP SUPPORT US! JOIN THE BIKER REVOLUTION! #BikerRevolution #LawAbidingBiker

A Podcast on Elm Street
Screamin' September 2 - Scream 2 1997

A Podcast on Elm Street

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 106:29


What's up Dream Warriors! We're picking up where we left off last week and joining Sidney and crew in a new set of horrors and movie references in Scream 2! Josh was supposed to join us this but unfortunately was unable to, but he was still with us in spirit! This episode concludes our first faceoff of the month where we put Scream Ghostface(s) up against Scream 2 Ghostface(s). We weren't surprised by the outcome but we were a little surprised with how close it was. Who do you think would win if these characters were put up against each other? Let us know if you agree or disagree with our outcome! Make sure you join us next week where we'll be joined by our good friend Chuck from Chuck and Ruff Go To the Movies to discuss Scream 3!

Time Rock Machine
Time Rock machine (09/09/22)

Time Rock Machine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022


Última edición de Time Rock Machine en Canal Extremadura Radio, en un contexto de más de 10 años, periódicamente todos los viernes en citada sintonía.  Dossier sonoro para cerrar la historia de este programa con una colección de algunos de los mejores discos de la década de los 90 pero también de los más subestimados. En gran parte son Lps y bandas de culto que por uno y otro motivo no alcanzaron el éxito masivo o una fortuna acorde a sus respectivas propuestas. Escuchamos Company Of Wolves, Tangier, Tora Tora, Cry Of Love, Medicine Wheel, Kingdom Come, Screamin' Cheetah Wheelies, Flesh & Blood, Monster Magnet y Jaded Heart.  GRACIAS, a ti que lees estas líneas y que escuchaste a lo largo de estos años esta emisión hecha con sumo respeto, dedicación e ilusión. Respeto digo, tanto hacia ti, como hacia  el género musical que nos gusta el Rock Duro, el Heavy Metal y sus géneros relacionados.  ¡HASTA SIEMPRE! Con Pedro Barroso.  

Time Rock Machine
Time Rock machine (09/09/22)

Time Rock Machine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022


Última edición de Time Rock Machine en Canal Extremadura Radio, en un contexto de más de 10 años, periódicamente todos los viernes en citada sintonía.  Dossier sonoro para cerrar la historia de este programa con una colección de algunos de los mejores discos de la década de los 90 pero también de los más subestimados. En gran parte son Lps y bandas de culto que por uno y otro motivo no alcanzaron el éxito masivo o una fortuna acorde a sus respectivas propuestas. Escuchamos Company Of Wolves, Tangier, Tora Tora, Cry Of Love, Medicine Wheel, Kingdom Come, Screamin' Cheetah Wheelies, Flesh & Blood, Monster Magnet y Jaded Heart.  GRACIAS, a ti que lees estas líneas y que escuchaste a lo largo de estos años esta emisión hecha con sumo respeto, dedicación e ilusión. Respeto digo, tanto hacia ti, como hacia  el género musical que nos gusta el Rock Duro, el Heavy Metal y sus géneros relacionados.  ¡HASTA SIEMPRE! Con Pedro Barroso.  

A Podcast on Elm Street
Screamin' September - Scream 1996 ft Josh from HMC

A Podcast on Elm Street

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 156:59


What's up Dream Warriors! We're coming at you this week and month with a long overdue series that we can't believe has taken us this long to cover. For the whole month of September we will be covering the Scream franchise in it's entirety in what we're hoping will be our biggest month yet. This franchise is beloved by almost everyone in the horror community, but we couldn't think of a better person to kick off the month than Josh from Horror Movie Crew Podcast. He shares our love and adoration of this franchise and we knew he'd bring a lot to the table in the discussion. So strap in, memorize your rules and come check out this episode filled with theories, laughs and the usual shit talking.

A Podcast on Elm Street
The Lodge ft. Eryka from Horror Cafe Podcast

A Podcast on Elm Street

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 119:00


What's up Dream Warriors! This week I was joined by Eryka from Horror Cafe Podcast because Brooke is away on vacation and we sat down and talked about the 2019 psychological horror movie, The Lodge! We talked about our introduction to the horror genre, some timeless favourites and Eryka brought some interesting points about the movie that helped make sense of some questions I had. We also shit on Richard hard, because screw that guy! We're taking a one week break before we kick off our Screamin' September where we'll be joined by 2 of our great friends to have a month long discussion about the Scream franchise and each individual movie! Check out our IG at: https://www.instagram.com/a_podcast_on_elm_street/ Horror Cafe's IG at: https://www.instagram.com/horrorcafepodcast/ And our YouTube at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCly4X3l5pwfGeYo1tqeUO2Q

We Made This
Free With This Months Issue 43.5 - Bride Of Chucky OST - Bonus Chuckyvision Crossover

We Made This

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 80:29


We've got an extra bonus episode for you this week as Mark Adams & Dev Elson from the ChuckyVision podcast join Colin (Ian's still on paternity leave) to talk about the soundtrack to Bride Of Chucky from October 1998. As this is a crossover episode it will be going out on both the Free With This Month's Issue & Chuckyvision podcast feeds. The cd's full tracklisting is - 1 – The Screamin' Cheetah Wheelies - Boogie King 2 – White Zombie - Thunder Kiss '65 3 – Coal Chamber - Blisters 4 – Monster Magnet - See You In Hell 5 – Judas Priest - Blood Stained 6 – Type O Negative - Love You To Death 7 – Slayer - Human Disease 8 – Stabbing Westward - So Wrong 9 – Powerman 5000 - Son Of X51 10 – Bruce Dickinson - Trumpets Of Jericho 11 – Static-X - Bled For Days 12 – Motorhead - Love For Sale 13 – Kidneythieves - Crazy 14 – Graeme Revell - We Belong Dead ChuckyVision is Mark & Dev's podcast about all things Chucky (as in the psychotic murderer posessed doll from the Childs Play movies, not the ginger kid from Rugrats). Go listen & subscribe to them wherever you get your podcasts or at https://pod.link/1579168246 Follow Chuckyvision on twitter at https://twitter.com/ Mark's twitter is https://twitter.com/markadamshc and Dev's is https://twitter.com/absolutetravist Listen to all available songs on our ongoing Spotify playlist - https://open.spotify.com/playlist/1mzWOWEfQ5LklJyUZkpfs2?si=LbWBi9-oTl-eXjkUJbpx2Q You can buy a copy of the cd from Discogs here - https://www.discogs.com/master/69234-Various-Bride-Of-Chucky Host - Colin Jackson-Brown Recorded/Edited/Mixed/Original music by Colin Jackson Brown for We Dig Podcasts Part of the We Made This podcast network. https://twitter.com/we_madethis Twitter – https://twitter.com/thismonthsissue Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/freewiththismonthsissue/ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/freewiththismonthsissue/ Find our other episodes at www.wedigpodcasts.com Find other We Made This shows & writing at www.wemadethisnetwork.com

C86 Show - Indie Pop
Pleasant Gehman - Screamin' Sirens

C86 Show - Indie Pop

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 64:20


Pleasant Gehman in conversation with David Eastaugh https://pleasantgehman.com/tarotreadings/ Pleasant Gehman is a true renaissance woman. A lifelong multi-disciplinary artist, she is a writer, professional dancer, actor, psychic, musician and painter; she has  often been called “a force of nature”. A Hollywood rock ‘n' roll icon, during the 1970's, she was one of the first punks in Los Angeles, documenting the scene she helped create in her fanzine Lobotomy, which lead to writing for the top mainstream rock publications. During the 1980's, she toured fronting her three bands, all of whom released multiple recordings: The Screaming Sirens, The Ringling Sisters and Honk If Yer Horny. Concurrently, she was the talent booker for the seminal Los Angeles “alternative” clubs Cathay De Grande and Raji's.

Monster Candy Podcast
Episode 80: The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari - Screamin' E's Creature Feature Spotllight

Monster Candy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 15:54


Everyone's got the bug, so Screamin' E is back with another minisode, this time to talk a little bit about the 1920 German Expressionist film, The Cabinet Of Dr. Caligari!   

Pacific Street Blues and Americana
Episode 103: July 24, 2022 part one - Did I tell you I went to Nashville?

Pacific Street Blues and Americana

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 81:06


Pacific St Blues & AmericanaJuly 24, 20221. Magic Sam / All of Your Love 2. Ronnie Earl / Please Send Me Somebody to Love3. Fleetwod Mac Blues Band / Blues with a Feeling 4. Muddy Waters / I'm Your Hoochie Koochie Man5. The Rolling Stones / I Just Can't Be Satisfied6. Keb Mo (featuring Darius Rucker) / Good Strong Woman 7. Gregg Allman / Checking on My Baby 8. Johnny Cash / Hurt 9. Glenn Campbell / Galveston 10. Screamin' Cheetah Wheelies/Backwoods Traveler11. The Black Crowes / Jealous Again 12. BB King / See That My Grave is Kept Clean13. Aretha Franklin / Spirit in the Dark 14. Bonnie Raitt / Waiting for You to Blow 15. Sue Foley / Southern Man16. Joe Bonamassa / The Heart that Never Waits17. Joe Bonamassa & Beth Hart / Ain't No Way 18. Beth Hart / The Rain Song 

El sótano
El Sótano - Di Versiones (XXIX) - 22/07/22

El sótano

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 59:35


Nuevo episodio de la serie de versiones más divertida de la radio. Playlist; (sintonía) THE VENTURES “Love potion number 9” (The Clovers) THE DEMONICS “Little Honda” (The Beach Boys, The Hondells) SONIC SURF CITY “Surf City” (Jan and Dean) CRUMMY STUFF “Wave of mutilation” (Pixies) THE METEORS “Johnny remember me” (John Leyton) MAD SIN “I shot the sheriff” (Bob Marley) DEMENTED ARE GO “Crazy horses” (The Osmonds) THE QUAKES “Send me an angel” (Real Life) THE MR. T EXPERIENCE “What difference does it make?” (The Smiths) THE BLUE SHADOWS “What the hell I got” (Pagliaro) ELI PAPERBOY REED “Ace of spades” (Motorhead) ROCKETS “On the road again” (Canned Heat) THE WILDEBEESTS “Mongoloid” (Devo) SHANE McGOWAN and FRIENDS “I put a spell on you” (Screamin’ Jay Hawkins) GEOFF PALMER and LUCY ELLIS “In spite of ourselves” (John Prine) WALL OF DEATH “Light my fire” (The Doors) Escuchar audio

GENERATION RIPE
The Eighty-Eighth One... and Pleasant Gehman

GENERATION RIPE

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 66:08


Episode 88 and Wendi and Dfernando's guest interview is multi-disciplinary artist, writer, professional dancer, actor, psychic, musician and painter Pleasant Gehman.  A Hollywood rock ‘n' roll icon, during the 1970s, she was one of the first punks in Los Angeles, documenting the scene she helped create in her fanzine LOBOTOMY, which lead to writing for the top mainstream rock publications. During the 1980s, she toured fronting her three bands, all of whom released multiple recordings: Screamin' Sirens, The Ringling Sisters and Honk If Yer Horny. Concurrently, she was the talent booker for the seminal Los Angeles “alternative” clubs Cathay De Grande and Raji's.Since the early 1990s, under the stage name Princess Farhana, she has appeared internationally as a professional belly dance and burlesque performer and teacher, touring in Egypt, Turkey, China, Australia, and constantly across Europe, the United Kingdom and North America. She's danced and acted in numerous motion pictures, in music videos and on television shows and has been featured in many documentaries on belly dance and burlesque, performing and as an interview subject. In 2009, she was the star of Steve Balderson's feature-length documentary UNDERBELLY: A YEAR IN THE LIFE OF PRINCESS FARHANA, released worldwide in theaters as well as on DVD. A practicing witch, her work as a psychic, intuitive Tarot reader and energy healer has been life-long; she currently shares her gifts with clients worldwide. From the age of sixteen onwards, Pleasant has been a journalist and cultural commentator with literally thousands of articles published nationally and internationally on everything from rock ‘n' roll to the paranormal, from magic to homeless teenagers. Her memoirs, short stories and poetry have been widely anthologized and many works were recorded on her spoken word CD Ruined. In March 2020, she launched the  popular podcast THE DEVIL'S MUSIC, which explores the intersection of rock'n'roll and the occult. It is available across all podcasting platforms. Pleasant is the author and/or editor of eight books, including THE BELLY DANCE HANDBOOK and the memoir SHOWGIRL CONFIDENTIAL: MY LIFE ONSTAGE, BACKSTAGE AND ON THE ROAD.Her latest book ROCK 'N' ROLL WITCH: A MEMOIR OF SEX MAGICK, DRUGS AND ROCK 'N' ROLL, is a memoir of her astonishing life, where music and the unexplained have been constants for decades. Her supernatural experiences unfold to a soundtrack of old school punk, 50's rockabilly, vintage blues, classic rock and girl groups. Stranger than fiction, her true stories of spirit encounters, synchronicity and her own psychic abilities are populated with the friends who also experienced them, including The Go-Go's, The Cramps, The Germs, The Gun Club, The Blasters and many more. Her writing is riveting, loaded with humor and extraordinary details that will make readers question their own reality.She authored her own chapters in John Doe and Tom Desavia's UNDER THE BIG BLACK SUN: A PERSONAL HISTORY OF LA PUNK and MORE FUN IN THE NEW WORLD: THE UNMAKING AND LEGACY OF LA PUNK. She currently hosts BELL, BOOK & CANDLE - an occult burlesque show at El Cid in Los Angeles that is held every third Wednesday of every month.  Pleasant lives in Hollywood, California, with four spoiled rescue cats.Also on Episode 88, Dfernando and Wendi celebrate his new status as a new Californian and their weekend attending the play TILDA SWINTON ANSWERS AN AD ON CRAIGSLIST (at Los Angeles' Casita Del Campo) written by past guest Byron Lane and starring (another past guest) Tom Lenk.  And Wendi mentions she spoke on Lux ATL's MAKE IT HAPPEN VIRTUAL RETREAT.  Watch Wendi and Dfernando and their TEAM GENERATION RIPE: Greg Covey, Shelley McLendon and Ponciana Badia on Season 7 Episode 2 of CELEBRITY FAMILY FEUD - now on ABC OnDemand and Hulu and on the GENERATION RIPE website.  Follow us on our Instagram:Wendi McLendon-CoveyDfernando ZarembaGENERATION RIPE... and our guest Pleasant Gehman, her Twitter, and her Facebook page. Remember to subscribe to GENERATION RIPEAnd rate & leave us a review by clicking HERE!Visit Dfernando Zaremba's website: dfernandozaremba.com

The Music Authority LIVE STREAM Show
July 21, 2022 Thursday Hour 2

The Music Authority LIVE STREAM Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 60:19


Lily update!  She is eating and drinking more!  Vet got us the appetite pills to make her want to eat and drink.  She is getting up and down on things on her own.  The weird bend in her operated-on foot is still a worry for me and she does still limp around, but she appears to be limping a bit less.  Got her on kitty CBD oil for her pains…Still sleeping a great deal…but I remember her doing that BEFORE the surgery.  Still quite vocal, too, but her voice is different since surgery.  Makes me wonder if the cancer has moved into her throat!  The Music Authority LIVE STREAM Show & Podcast...listen, like, comment, download, share, repeat…heard daily on Podchaser, Deezer, Amazon Music, Audible, Listen Notes, Google Podcast Manager, Mixcloud, Player FM, Stitcher, Tune In, Podcast Addict, Cast Box, Radio Public, and Pocket Cast, and APPLE iTunes!  Follow the show on TWITTER JimPrell@TMusicAuthority!  Please, are you sharing the show? Please, are you listening? How does and can one listen in? Let me list the ways...*Listen LIVE here - https://fastcast4u.com/player/jamprell/ *Podcast - https://themusicauthority.transistor.fm/   The Music Authority LIVE STREAM Show & Podcast!  Special Recorded Network Shows, too!  Different than my daily show! *Radio Candy Radio Monday Wednesday, & Friday 7PM ET, 4PM PT*Rockin' The KOR Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday at 7PM UK time, 2PM ET, 11AM PT  www.koradio.rocks*Pop Radio UK Friday, Saturday, & Sunday 6PM UK, 1PM ET, 10AM PT!  July 21, 2022, Thursday, set two…Richard Turgeon - 09 Lonely Old Man [Go Deep] (@koolkatmusik.com)Tommy Keyes Music - Suzi Quatro (Teenage Discos '73)The Forty Nineteens - 02 Easy Come Easy Go [Good Fortune]The Jangle Band - 02 Now That's OverRob Bonfiglio - Earn Enough For Us [Power Pop Unplugged] (Zero Hour Records)@The Nearlies - 03_Vultures [Ghost Rock]@True Hearts - God's Gift To Girls [True Hearts]Syteria - It Hit MeThe Persian Leaps - Chalk Line Behemoth [Electric Living] (Land Ski Records)Nick Piunti - 04 - If This Was Right [Temporary High] (Jem Records)Wendi Dunlap - 04 Second Heartbreak [Learning Not To Be Perfect]The Flashcubes With Steve Conte - 01 Gudbuy T'Jane (Big Stir Records)@Distinctive - 01 Turn Off The Light (Before You Leave)@Grant Lindberg - 01 Bullseye [Super Mega Outtakes]The Grip Weeds- Lady Friend [DiG Deluxe Edition Disc 1] (Jem Records)Kekker - 01 Doveroverland [Greatest Hits Volume 1 & 2] (koolkatmusik.com)Bob Burger - Even If You Don't [The Domino Effect] (Jem Records)Tommy Sistak - Melody Shine On MePalisades - 12_Stepping Stone [Almost Night - 2CD] (koolkatmusik.com)@Screamin' Jay Hawkins - 12 - Frenzy [KM-CD-45] (Rhythm Bomb Records)

Spotlight On
Steve Kimock

Spotlight On

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 42:53


Welcome to Season 7 of Spotlight On! We're excited to be partnering with our friends at Osiris, the leading storyteller in music, for this season. The first episode is a conversation between LP and Steve Kimock, once touted by Jerry Garcia as his “favorite unknown guitar player.” Now Steve is known for his guitar playing in Zero, KVHB, Bob Weir's Kingfish, Ratdog, in addition to post-Grateful Dead ensembles including The Other Ones, Phil Lesh & Friends, and the Rhythm Devils featuring Mickey Hart and Bill Kreutzmann. Steve Kimock has proved himself a master of fluid improvisation for over four decades, in the process inspiring music fans with his transcendent guitar speak voiced through electric, acoustic, lap and pedal steel guitars. With his multi-decade reputation as a blazing psychedelic guitarist versatile enough to touch almost all aspects of American music, Steve Kimock continues to evolve creatively as illustrated in his last two critically acclaimed records, a romantic pop collaboration in Satellite City and an experimental solo effort in Last Danger of Frost.While one can say that his genre is rock, no one niche has ever confined him. Instead, through the years, he's explored various sounds and styles based on what's moved him at the time, whether it's blues or jazz; funk or folk; psychedelic or boogie; gypsy or prog-rock; traditional American or world fusion. Threaded through this expansive and highly nuanced musical landscape is Kimock's signature sound, the prodigious product of his ability to articulate crystal-clear tone, melody and emotion into intricately woven music crafted with technical brilliance. His passion and devotion to performing live is matchless, and his unparalleled ability to embrace and capture his audiences musically is the stuff of legend.Kimock co-founded the jazz/rock band Zero in the ‘80s and KVHW in the ‘90s; since then, he has recorded and toured in various outfits under his own name. His collaborations with assorted band mates and groups have provided an everlasting wellspring of inspiration for the guitarist, and he has shared the stage with a seemingly endless array of international musical luminaries. After more than 40 years on stage, Kimock is more committed than ever to a jubilant spirit of musical diversity — the same spirit that has fed his desire to pursue an authentic relationship with the guitar since the day he realized his calling.A musician's musician, Kimock has also shared the stage with countless other musical luminaires such as Taj Mahal, David Lindley, Jorma Kaukonen, Hot Tuna, Bonnie Raitt, The Allman Brothers, Merl Saunders, Buddy Miles, Derek Trucks, Elvin Bishop, Grace Potter, Grace Slick, Little Feat, Nicky Hopkins, Norton Buffalo, Papa John Creach, Peter Frampton, all members of Phish, Screamin' Jay Hawkins and more.Go see Steve on the road and support his music. Lean more about Lyte.Find more great podcasts from Osiris Media, the leading storyteller in music. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Spot Lyte On...
Steve Kimock

Spot Lyte On...

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 42:53


Welcome to Season 7 of Spotlight On! We're excited to be partnering with our friends at Osiris, the leading storyteller in music, for this season. The first episode is a conversation between LP and Steve Kimock, once touted by Jerry Garcia as his “favorite unknown guitar player.” Now Steve is known for his guitar playing in Zero, KVHB, Bob Weir's Kingfish, Ratdog, in addition to post-Grateful Dead ensembles including The Other Ones, Phil Lesh & Friends, and the Rhythm Devils featuring Mickey Hart and Bill Kreutzmann. Steve Kimock has proved himself a master of fluid improvisation for over four decades, in the process inspiring music fans with his transcendent guitar speak voiced through electric, acoustic, lap and pedal steel guitars. With his multi-decade reputation as a blazing psychedelic guitarist versatile enough to touch almost all aspects of American music, Steve Kimock continues to evolve creatively as illustrated in his last two critically acclaimed records, a romantic pop collaboration in Satellite City and an experimental solo effort in Last Danger of Frost.While one can say that his genre is rock, no one niche has ever confined him. Instead, through the years, he's explored various sounds and styles based on what's moved him at the time, whether it's blues or jazz; funk or folk; psychedelic or boogie; gypsy or prog-rock; traditional American or world fusion. Threaded through this expansive and highly nuanced musical landscape is Kimock's signature sound, the prodigious product of his ability to articulate crystal-clear tone, melody and emotion into intricately woven music crafted with technical brilliance. His passion and devotion to performing live is matchless, and his unparalleled ability to embrace and capture his audiences musically is the stuff of legend.Kimock co-founded the jazz/rock band Zero in the ‘80s and KVHW in the ‘90s; since then, he has recorded and toured in various outfits under his own name. His collaborations with assorted band mates and groups have provided an everlasting wellspring of inspiration for the guitarist, and he has shared the stage with a seemingly endless array of international musical luminaries. After more than 40 years on stage, Kimock is more committed than ever to a jubilant spirit of musical diversity — the same spirit that has fed his desire to pursue an authentic relationship with the guitar since the day he realized his calling.A musician's musician, Kimock has also shared the stage with countless other musical luminaires such as Taj Mahal, David Lindley, Jorma Kaukonen, Hot Tuna, Bonnie Raitt, The Allman Brothers, Merl Saunders, Buddy Miles, Derek Trucks, Elvin Bishop, Grace Potter, Grace Slick, Little Feat, Nicky Hopkins, Norton Buffalo, Papa John Creach, Peter Frampton, all members of Phish, Screamin' Jay Hawkins and more.Go see Steve on the road and support his music. Lean more about Lyte.Find more great podcasts from Osiris Media, the leading storyteller in music. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mary Versus the Movies
Episode 62 - Mystery Train (1989)

Mary Versus the Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 55:44


Jim Jarmusch's anthology film set in Memphis clears up a mystery for Mary, and Dennis is very excited to revisit this indie film which stars, among others, Joe Strummer, Steve Buscemi, and Screamin' Jay Hawkins. We talk about the declining American Empire, racial strife, and some of the worst motels we've ever stayed at.

Cars & Comrades
Robots Are Going To Steal Your Job

Cars & Comrades

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 128:33


Automation has been stealing working class jobs since the days of Ned Ludd, and Czinger is kicking it up a notch with their 3D printed car. You might think that your white collar engineering job is safe from automation, but the Czinger was largely designed by computers too. What does this mean for the future of work and the working class? Listen for our speculations. But first, project car updates.Main topic at 31:26Email us with tips, stories, and unhinged rants: carsandcomrades@gmail.com //Our social media links etc: linktr.ee/CarsAndComrades //Music by King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard: kinggizzardandthelizardwizard.com/polygondwanaland //https://kinggizzardandthelizardwizard.com/automation //Notes/Links:AI Designed This Car: https://youtu.be/VdG4gUTowXc //Czinger 21C Is a Screamin'-Good 253-MPH Proof-of-Concept: https://www.autoweek.com/news/future-cars/a39678192/czinger-21c-is-a-screamin-good-253-mph-proof-of-concept/ //3D-Printing the Czinger 21C Supercar Shows Us the Future of Car Making: https://www.autoweek.com/news/industry-news/a38009849/czinger-21c-supercar-3d-printing/ //The last job on Earth: imagining a fully automated world: https://youtu.be/Yvs7f4UaKLo //

Monster Candy Podcast
Episode 77: Creature Feature Spotlight

Monster Candy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 22:15


Screamin' E has gone rogue!!! Nic Cage has buried Oobzilla at work, Dominic is still recovering, and Shotzi has been taken over by pod people, so ol Screamin' is running the asylum and spotlighting a hidden gem he thinks deserves more credit! Which gem you ask? Find out on this minisode we're gonna call, "Screamin' E's Creature Feature Spotlight"!

Law Abiding Biker | Street Biker Motorcycle Podcast
LAB-302-Test Ride and Review of the Harley-Davidson Low Rider ST | A Trip to California

Law Abiding Biker | Street Biker Motorcycle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 73:07 Very Popular


Official Website: https://www.lawabidingbiker.com In this episode, I'm joined by Lurch and we discuss that Harley-Davidson recently flew me to Santa Barbara, California to test ride and review the 2022 Low Rider ST.  Understand, Harley-Davidson paid for the flights, meals, and lodging. However, no contract was mentioned or signed and I was never told what I could or could not say, so I will give you an unbiased real-world biker review as always. I'm going to give you a real-world biker review of the new 2022 Harley-Davidson Low Rider ST.  Oh, and in case you're new to Law Abidin Biker, I'm a full-time Police Motorcycle Officer and Instructor. Additionally, I have multiple bikes and put on many miles off duty on both street and off-road adventure rides.  SUPPORT US AND SHOP IN THE OFFICIAL LAW ABIDING BIKER STORE Now, I actually own a 2016 Dyna Low Rider S and after that year it was moved to the Softail frame. My 2016 has the Screamin' Eagle Twin Cam 110 ci engine and it is a ripper and so fun to ride.  I looked forward to how the new 2022 Low Rider ST would handle and feel like with the Milwaukee-Eight 117 cubic inch engine. I learned many things about the Low Rider ST from the Harley-Davidson Reps, so I think we should talk about where the Low Rider ST spawned from. You see, in recent years Harley has been paying much attention to the ever-changing demographics of Harley riders. Harley spotted a trend and was seeing riders, especially in Southern California, tweaking the Low Rider S by Increasing engine displacement, changing suspension, adding bags, and even fairings, just to name a few. Armed with that information Harley-Davidson set out to create a base model bike that was all of the aforementioned things, but yet came that way out of the box so to speak.  Thus, the Low Rider ST was born and came into existence with special care taken as to how it looked and rode.  The overall design was inspired by the iconic 80's FXRT. CHECK OUT OUR HUNDREDS OF FREE HELPFUL VIDEOS ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL AND SUBSCRIBE! I reviewed the Low Rider ST from the perspective of the average everyday biker out there and I'll tell you what you actually need to know about the bike, which has caused much stir and grabbed a lot of attention within the motorcycle community  There are so many pre-orders that so this bike hardly ever makes it to the dealership floors.  The 2022 Low Rider ST is super fast and nimble.  I really enjoyed dragging the footpegs through the twisties.  I liked the fairing and the vents it had in it.  The fairing created a wind tunnel around me and minimized buffeting.  The Low Rider ST is capable of touring, but you can easily remove the bags to give it a stripped-down look while riding around town.   NEW FREE VIDEO RELEASED: A Sport Touring Dream? 2022 Harley Davidson Low Rider ST Test Ride & Review There were a few negatives I found, and admittedly they are a bit nit-picky.  First, the right saddlebag is shorter than the left to accommodate the dual exhaust.  In my opinion, it aesthetically detracts from the look of the bike from the rear.  This issue would not keep me from buying this bike though.  Second, as a touring bike, I think the Low Rider ST should come from the factory with some sort of crash bars.  There are crash bars available from Harley-Davidson.   Sponsor-Ciro 3D CLICK HERE! Innovative products for Harley-Davidson & Goldwing Affordable chrome, lighting, and comfort products Ciro 3D has a passion for design and innovation Sponsor-RickRak CLICK HERE The Ultimate Motorcycle Luggage Rack Solution Forget those messy straps and bungee cords Go strapless with a RickRak quick attach luggage system & quality bag Sponsor-Butt Buffer CLICK HERE Want to ride longer? Tired of a sore and achy ass? Then fix it with a high-quality Butt Buffer seat cushion? New Patrons: Jay Engels of Holladay, Tennessee Dee Cooper of Glencoe, Oklahoma Bryan Young of Surprise, Arizona Michael Magee of Deland, Florida Mike Viera of Vacaville, California John Bebita of Overland Park, Kansas Alan Wright of Florence, Mississippi Thomas Diesel of Genoa City, Wisconsin Nick LaBrie of Port Charlotte, Florida If you appreciate the content we put out and want to make sure it keeps on coming your way then become a Patron too! There are benefits and there is no risk. Thanks to the following bikers for supporting us via a flat donation: Peter Hando Tim Joiner of Waverly, Kentucky Baggers and Brews ________________________________________________________ FURTHER INFORMATION:   Official Website: http://www.LawAbidingBiker.com   Email & Voicemail: http://www.LawAbidingBiker.com/Contact   Podcast Hotline Phone: 509-731-3548 HELP SUPPORT US! JOIN THE BIKER REVOLUTION! #BikerRevolution #LawAbidingBiker

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 148: “Light My Fire” by the Doors

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022


Episode one hundred and forty-eight of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “Light My Fire" by the Doors, the history of cool jazz, and Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "My Friend Jack" by the Smoke. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources As usual, I've put together a Mixcloud mix containing all the music excerpted in this episode and the shorter spoken-word tracks. Information on Dick Bock, World Pacific, and Ravi Shankar came from Indian Sun: The Life and Music of Ravi Shankar by Oliver Craske. Ray Manzarek, John Densmore, and Robby Krieger have all released autobiographies. Densmore's is out of print, but I referred to Manzarek's and Krieger's here. Of the two Krieger's is vastly more reliable. I also used Mick Wall's book on the Doors and Stephen Davis' biography of Jim Morrison. Information about Elektra Records came from Follow the Music by Jac Holzman and Gavan Daws, which is available as a free PDF download on Elektra's website. Biographical information on Maharishi Mahesh Yogi comes from this book, written by one of his followers. The Doors' complete studio albums can be bought as MP3s for £14. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript There are two big problems that arise for anyone trying to get an accurate picture of history, and which have certainly arisen for me during the course of this podcast -- things which make sources unreliable enough that you feel you have to caveat everything you say on a subject. One of those is hagiography, and the converse desire to tear heroes down. No matter what one wants to say on, say, the subjects of Jesus or Mohammed or Joseph Smith, the only sources we have for their lives are written either by people who want to present them as unblemished paragons of virtue, or by people who want to destroy that portrayal -- we know that any source is written by someone with a bias, and it might be a bias we agree with, but it's still a bias. The other, related, problem, is deliberate disinformation. This comes up especially for people dealing with military history -- during conflicts, governments obviously don't want their opponents to know when their attacks have caused damage, or to know what their own plans are, and after a war has concluded the belligerent parties want to cover up their own mistakes and war crimes. We're sadly seeing that at the moment in the situation in Ukraine -- depending on one's media diet, one could get radically different ideas of what is actually going on in that terrible conflict. But it happens all the time, in all wars, and on all sides. Take the Vietnam War. While the US was involved on the side of the South Vietnamese government from the start of that conflict, it was in a very minor way, mostly just providing supplies and training. Most historians look at the real start of US involvement in that war as having been in August 1964. President Johnson had been wanting, since assuming the Presidency in November 1963 after the death of John F Kennedy, to get further into the war, but had needed an excuse to do so. The Gulf of Tonkin Incident provided him with that excuse. On August the second, a fleet of US warships entered into what the North Vietnamese considered their territorial waters -- they used a different distance from shore to mark their territorial waters than most other countries used, and one which wasn't generally accepted, but which they considered important. Because of this, some North Vietnamese ships started following the American ones. The American ships, who thought they weren't doing anything wrong, set off what they considered to be warning shots, and the North Vietnamese ships fired back, which to the American ships was considered them attacking. Some fire was exchanged, but not much happened. Two days later, the American ships believed they were getting attacked again, and spent several hours firing at what they believed were North Vietnamese submarines. It was later revealed that this was just the American sonar systems playing up, and that they were almost certainly firing at nothing at all, and some even suspected that at the time -- President Johnson apparently told other people in confidence that in his opinion they'd been firing at stray dolphins. But that second "attack", however flimsy the evidence, was enough that Johnson could tell Congress and the nation that an American fleet had been attacked by the North Vietnamese, and use that as justification to get Congress to authorise him sending huge numbers of troops to Vietnam, and getting America thoroughly embroiled in a war that would cost innumerable lives and billions of dollars for what turned out to be no benefit at all to anyone. The commander of the US fleet involved in the Gulf of Tonkin operation was then-Captain, later Rear Admiral, Steve Morrison: [Excerpt: The Doors, "The End"] We've talked a bit in this podcast previously about the development of jazz in the forties, fifties, and early sixties -- there was a lot of back and forth influence in those days between jazz, blues, R&B, country, and rock and roll, far more than one might imagine looking at the popular histories of these genres, and so we've looked at swing, bebop, and modal jazz before now. But one style of music we haven't touched on is the type that was arguably the most popular and influential style of jazz in the fifties, even though we've mentioned several of the people involved in it. We've never yet had a proper look at Cool Jazz. Cool Jazz, as its name suggests, is a style of music that was more laid back than the more frenetic bebop or hard-edged modal jazz. It was a style that sounded sophisticated, that sounded relaxed, that prized melody and melodic invention over super-fast technical wizardry, and that produced much of what we now think of when we think of "jazz" as a popular style of music. The records of Dave Brubeck, for example, arguably the most popular fifties jazz musician, are very much in the "cool jazz" mode: [Excerpt: The Dave Brubeck Quartet, "Take Five"] And we have mentioned on several occasions the Modern Jazz Quartet, who were cited as influences by everyone from Ray Charles to the Kinks to the Modern Folk Quartet: [Excerpt: The Modern Jazz Quartet, "Regret?"] We have also occasionally mentioned people like Mose Allison, who occasionally worked in the Cool Jazz mode. But we've never really looked at it as a unified thing. Cool Jazz, like several of the other developments in jazz we've looked at, owes its existence to the work of the trumpeter Miles Davis, who was one of the early greats of bop and who later pioneered modal jazz. In 1948, in between his bop and modal periods, Davis put together a short-lived nine-piece group, the Miles Davis Nonette, who performed together for a couple of weeks in late 1948, and who recorded three sessions in 1949 and 1950, but who otherwise didn't perform much. Each of those sessions had a slightly different lineup, but key people involved in the recordings were Davis himself, arranger Gil Evans, piano player John Lewis, who would later go on to become the leader of the Modern Jazz Quartet, and baritone sax player Gerry Mulligan. Mulligan and Evans, and the group's alto player Lee Konitz, had all been working for the big band Claude Thornhill and his Orchestra, a band which along with the conventional swing instruments also had a French horn player and a tuba player, and which had recorded soft, mellow, relaxing music: [Excerpt: Claude Thornhill and his Orchestra, "To Each His Own"] The Davis Nonette also included French horn and tuba, and was explicitly modelled on Thornhill's style, but in a stripped-down version. They used the style of playing that Thornhill preferred, with no vibrato, and with his emphasis on unison playing, with different instruments doubling each other playing the melody, rather than call-and response riffing: [Excerpt: The Miles Davis Nonette, "Venus De Milo"] Those recordings were released as singles in 1949 and 1950, and were later reissued in 1957 as an album titled "Birth of the Cool", by which point Cool Jazz had become an established style, though Davis himself had long since moved on in other musical directions. After the Birth of the Cool sessions, Gerry Mulligan had recorded an album as a bandleader himself, and then had moved to the West Coast, where he'd started writing arrangements for Stan Kenton, one of the more progressive big band leaders of the period: [Excerpt: Stan Kenton, "Young Blood"] While working for Kenton, Mulligan had started playing dates at a club called the Haig, where the headliner was the vibraphone player Red Norvo. While Norvo had started out as a big-band musician, playing with people like Benny Goodman, he had recently started working in a trio, with just a guitarist, initially Tal Farlowe, and bass player, initially Charles Mingus: [Excerpt: Red Norvo, "This Can't Be Love"] By 1952 Mingus had left Norvo's group, but they were still using the trio format, and that meant there was no piano at the venue, which meant that Mulligan had to form a band that didn't rely on the chordal structures that a piano would provide -- the idea of a group with a rhythm section that *didn't* have a piano was quite an innovation in jazz at this time, and freeing themselves from that standard instrument ended up opening up extra possibilities. His group consisted of himself on saxophone, Chet Baker on trumpet, Bob Whitlock on bass and Chico Hamilton on drums. They made music in much the same loose, casual, style as the recordings Mulligan had made with Davis, but in a much smaller group with the emphasis being on the interplay between Mulligan and Baker. And this group were the first group to record on a new label, Pacific Jazz, founded by Dick Bock. Bock had served in the Navy during World War II, and had come back from the South Pacific with two tastes -- a taste for hashish, and for music that was outside the conventional American pop mould. Bock *loved* the Mulligan Quartet, and in partnership with his friend Roy Harte, a notable jazz drummer, he raised three hundred and fifty dollars to record the first album by Mulligan's new group: [Excerpt: Gerry Mulligan Quartet, "Aren't You Glad You're You?"] Pacific Jazz, the label Bock and Harte founded, soon became *the* dominant label for Cool Jazz, which also became known as the West Coast Sound.  The early releases on the label were almost entirely by the Mulligan Quartet, released either under Mulligan's name, as by Chet Baker, or as "Lee Konitz and the Gerry Mulligan Quartet" when Mulligan's old bandmate Konitz joined them. These records became big hits, at least in the world of jazz. But both Mulligan and Baker were heroin addicts, and in 1953 Mulligan got arrested and spent six months in prison. And while he was there, Chet Baker made some recordings in his own right and became a bona fide star. Not only was Baker a great jazz trumpet player, he was also very good looking, and it turned out he could sing too. The Mulligan group had made the song "My Funny Valentine" one of the highlights of its live shows, with Baker taking a trumpet solo: [Excerpt: Gerry Mulligan Quartet, "My Funny Valentine"] But when Baker recorded a vocal version, for his album Chet Baker Sings, it made Baker famous: [Excerpt: Chet Baker, "My Funny Valentine"] When Mulligan got out of prison, he wanted to rehire Baker, but Baker was now topping the popularity polls in all the jazz magazines, and was the biggest breakout jazz star of the early fifties. But Mulligan formed a new group, and this just meant that Pacific Jazz had *two* of the biggest acts in jazz on its books now, rather than just one. But while Bock loved jazz, he was also fascinated by other kinds of music, and while he was in New York at the beginning of 1956 he was invited by his friend George Avakian, a producer who had worked with Miles Davis, Louis Armstrong, and others, to come and see a performance by an Indian musician he was working with. Avakian was just about to produce Ravi Shankar's first American album, The Sounds of India, for Columbia Records. But Columbia didn't think that there was much of a market for Shankar's music -- they were putting it out as a speciality release rather than something that would appeal to the general public -- and so they were happy for Bock to sign Shankar to his own label. Bock renamed the company World Pacific, to signify that it was now going to be putting out music from all over the world, not just jazz, though he kept the Pacific Jazz label for its jazz releases, and he produced Shankar's next album,  India's Master Musician: [Excerpt: Ravi Shankar, "Raga Charu Keshi"] Most of Shankar's recordings for the next decade would be produced by Bock, and Bock would also try to find ways to combine Shankar's music with jazz, though Shankar tried to keep a distinction between the two. But for example on Shankar's next album for World Pacific, Improvisations and Theme from Pather Panchali, he was joined by a group of West Coast jazz musicians including Bud Shank (who we'll hear about again in a future episode) on flute: [Excerpt: Ravi Shankar, "Improvisation on the Theme From Pather Panchali"] But World Pacific weren't just putting out music. They also put out spoken-word records. Some of those were things that would appeal to their jazz audience, like the comedy of Lord Buckley: [Excerpt: Lord Buckley, "Willy the Shake"] But they also put out spoken-word albums that appealed to Bock's interest in spirituality and philosophy, like an album by Gerald Heard. Heard had previously written the liner notes for Chet Baker Sings!, but as well as being a jazz fan Heard was very connected in the world of the arts -- he was a very close friend with Aldous Huxley -- and was also interested in various forms of non-Western spirituality. He practiced yoga, and was also fascinated by Buddhism, Vedanta, and Taoism: [Excerpt: Gerald Heard, "Paraphrased from the Tao te Ching of Lao Tzu"] We've come across Heard before, in passing, in the episode on "Tomorrow Never Knows", when Ralph Mentzner said of his experiments with Timothy Leary and Ram Dass "At the suggestion of Aldous Huxley and Gerald Heard we began using the Bardo Thödol ( Tibetan Book of the Dead) as a guide to psychedelic sessions" -- Heard was friends with both Huxley and Humphrey Osmond, and in fact had been invited by them to take part in the mescaline trip that Huxley wrote about in his book The Doors of Perception, the book that popularised psychedelic drug use, though Heard was unable to attend at that time. Heard was a huge influence on the early psychedelic movement -- though he always advised Leary and his associates not to be so public with their advocacy, and just to keep it to a small enlightened circle rather than risk the wrath of the establishment -- and he's cited by almost everyone in Leary's circle as having been the person who, more than anything else, inspired them to investigate both psychedelic drugs and mysticism. He's the person who connected Bill W. of Alcoholics Anonymous with Osmond and got him advocating LSD use. It was Heard's books that made Huston Smith, the great scholar of comparative religions and associate of Leary, interested in mysticism and religions outside his own Christianity, and Heard was one of the people who gave Leary advice during his early experiments. So it's not surprising that Bock also became interested in Leary's ideas before they became mainstream. Indeed, in 1964 he got Shankar to do the music for a short film based on The Psychedelic Experience, which Shankar did as a favour for his friend even though Shankar didn't approve of drug use. The film won an award in 1965, but quickly disappeared from circulation as its ideas were too controversial: [Excerpt: The Psychedelic Experience (film)] And Heard introduced Bock to other ideas around philosophy and non-Western religions. In particular, Bock became an advocate for a little-known Hindu mystic who had visited the US in 1959 teaching a new style of meditation which he called Transcendental Meditation. A lot is unclear about the early life of Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, even his birth name -- both "Maharishi" and "Yogi" are honorifics rather than names as such, though he later took on both as part of his official name, and in this and future episodes I'll refer to him as "the Maharishi". What we do know is that he was born in India, and had attained a degree in physics before going off to study with Swami Brahmananda Saraswati, a teacher of the Advaita Vedanta school of Hinduism. Now, I am not a Hindu, and only have a passing knowledge of Hindu theology and traditions, and from what I can gather getting a proper understanding requires a level of cultural understanding I don't have, and in particular a knowledge of the Sanskrit language, so my deepest apologies for any mangling I do of these beliefs in trying to talk about them as they pertain to mid-sixties psychedelic rock. I hope my ignorance is forgivable, and seen as what it is rather than malice. But the teachings of this school as I understand them seem to centre around an idea of non-separation -- that God is in all things, and is all things, and that there is no separation between different things, and that you merely have to gain a deep realisation of this. The Maharishi later encapsulated this in the phrase "I am that, thou art that, all this is that", which much later the Beach Boys, several of whom were followers of the Maharishi, would turn into a song: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "All This is That"] The other phrase they're singing there, "Jai Guru Dev" is also a phrase from the Maharishi, and refers to his teacher Brahmananda Saraswati -- it means "all hail the divine teacher" or "glory to the heavenly one", and "guru dev" or "guru deva" was the name the Maharishi would use for Saraswati after his death, as the Maharishi believed that Saraswati was an actual incarnation of God. It's that phrase that John Lennon is singing in "Across the Universe" as well, another song later inspired by the Maharishi's teachings: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Across the Universe"] The Maharishi became, by his own account, Saraswati's closest disciple, advisor, and right-hand man, and was privy to his innermost thoughts. However, on Saraswati's death the leadership of the monastery he led became deeply contested, with two different rivals to the position, and the Maharishi was neither -- the rules of the monastery said that only people born into the Brahmin caste could reach the highest positions in the monastery's structure, and the Maharishi was not a Brahmin. So instead of remaining in the monastery, the Maharishi went out into the world to teach a new form of meditation which he claimed he had learned from Guru Dev, a technique which became known as transcendental meditation. The Maharishi would, for the rest of his life, always claim that the system he taught was Guru Dev's teaching for the world, not his own, though the other people who had been at the monastery with him said different things about what Saraswati had taught -- but of course it's perfectly possible for a spiritual leader to have had multiple ideas and given different people different tasks. The crucial thing about the Maharishi's teaching, the way it differed from everything else in the history of Hindu monasticism (as best I understand this) is that all previous teachers of meditation had taught that to get the benefit of the techniques one had to be a renunciate -- you should go off and become a monk and give up all worldly pleasures and devote your life to prayer and meditation. Traditionally, Hinduism has taught that there are four stages of life -- the student, the householder or married person with a family, the retired person, and the Sanyasi, or renunciate, but that you could skip straight from being a student to being a Sanyasi and spend your life as a monk. The Maharishi, though, said: "Obviously enough there are two ways of life: the way of the Sanyasi and the way of life of a householder. One is quite opposed to the other. A Sanyasi renounces everything of the world, whereas a householder needs and accumulates everything. The one realises, through renunciation and detachment, while the other goes through all attachments and accumulation of all that is needed for physical life." What the Maharishi taught was that there are some people who achieve the greatest state of happiness by giving up all the pleasures of the senses, eating the plainest possible food, having no sexual, familial, or romantic connections with anyone else, and having no possessions, while there are other people who achieve the greatest state of happiness by being really rich and having a lot of nice stuff and loads of friends and generally enjoying the pleasures of the flesh -- and that just as there are types of meditation that can help the first group reach enlightenment, there are also types of meditation that will fit into the latter kind of lifestyle, and will help those people reach oneness with God but without having to give up their cars and houses and money. And indeed, he taught that by following his teachings you could get *more* of those worldly pleasures. All you had to do, according to his teaching, was to sit still for fifteen to twenty minutes, twice a day, and concentrate on a single Sanskrit word or phrase, a mantra, which you would be given after going through a short course of teaching. There was nothing else to it, and you would eventually reach the same levels of enlightenment as the ascetics who spent seventy years living in a cave and eating only rice -- and you'd end up richer, too. The appeal of this particular school is, of course, immediately apparent, and Bock became a big advocate of the Maharishi, and put out three albums of his lectures: [Excerpt: Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, "Deep Meditation"] Bock even met his second wife at one of the Maharishi's lectures, in 1961. In the early sixties, World Pacific got bought up by Liberty Records, the label for which Jan and Dean and others recorded, but Bock remained in charge of the label, and expanded it, adding another subsidiary, Aura Records, to put out rock and roll singles. Aura was much less successful than the other World Pacific labels. The first record the label put out was a girl-group record, "Shooby Dooby", by the Lewis Sisters, two jazz-singing white schoolteachers from Michigan who would later go on to have a brief career at Motown: [Excerpt: The Lewis Sisters, "Shooby Dooby"] The most successful act that Aura ever had was Sonny Knight, an R&B singer who had had a top twenty hit in 1956 with "Confidential", a song he'd recorded on Specialty Records with Bumps Blackwell, and which had been written by Dorinda Morgan: [Excerpt: Sonny Knight, "Confidential"] But Knight's biggest hit on Aura, "If You Want This Love", only made number seventy-one on the pop charts: [Excerpt: Sonny Knight, "If You Want This Love"] Knight would later go on to write a novel, The Day the Music Died, which Greil Marcus described as "the bitterest book ever written about how rock'n'roll came to be and what it turned into". Marcus said it was about "how a rich version of American black culture is transformed into a horrible, enormously profitable white parody of itself: as white labels sign black artists only to ensure their oblivion and keep those blacks they can't control penned up in the ghetto of the black charts; as white America, faced with something good, responds with a poison that will ultimately ruin even honest men". Given that Knight was the artist who did the *best* out of Aura Records, that says a great deal about the label. But one of the bands that Aura signed, who did absolutely nothing on the charts, was a group called Rick and the Ravens, led by a singer called Screamin' Ray Daniels. They were an LA club band who played a mixture of the surf music which the audiences wanted and covers of blues songs which Daniels preferred to sing. They put out two singles on Aura, "Henrietta": [Excerpt: Rick and the Ravens, "Henrietta"] and "Soul Train": [Excerpt: Rick and the Ravens, "Soul Train"] Ray Daniels was a stage name -- his birth name was Ray Manzarek, and he would later return to that name -- and the core of the band was Ray on vocals and his brothers Rick on guitar and Jim on harmonica. Manzarek thought of himself as a pretty decent singer, but they were just a bar band, and music wasn't really his ideal career.  Manzarek had been sent to college by his solidly lower-middle-class Chicago family in the hope that he would become a lawyer, but after getting a degree in economics and a brief stint in the army, which he'd signed up for to avoid getting drafted in the same way people like Dean Torrence did, he'd gone off to UCLA to study film, with the intention of becoming a filmmaker. His family had followed him to California, and he'd joined his brothers' band as a way of making a little extra money on the side, rather than as a way to become a serious musician. Manzarek liked the blues songs they performed, and wasn't particularly keen on the surf music, but thought it was OK. What he really liked, though, was jazz -- he was a particular fan of McCoy Tyner, the pianist on all the great John Coltrane records: [Excerpt: John Coltrane, "My Favorite Things"] Manzarek was a piano player himself, though he didn't play much with the Ravens, and he wanted more than anything to be able to play like Tyner, and so when Rick and the Ravens got signed to Aura Records, he of course became friendly with Dick Bock, who had produced so many great jazz records and worked with so many of the greats of the genre. But Manzarek was also having some problems in his life. He'd started taking LSD, which was still legal, and been fascinated by its effects, but worried that he couldn't control them -- he couldn't tell whether he was going to have a good trip or a bad one. He was wondering if there was a way he could have the same kind of revelatory mystical experience but in a more controlled manner. When he mentioned this to Bock, Bock told him that the best method he knew for doing that was transcendental meditation. Bock gave him a copy of one of the Maharishi's albums, and told him to go to a lecture on transcendental meditation, run by the head of the Maharishi's west-coast organisation, as by this point the Maharishi's organisation, known as Spiritual Regeneration, had an international infrastructure, though it was still nowhere near as big as it would soon become. At the lecture, Manzarek got talking to one of the other audience members, a younger man named John Densmore. Densmore had come to the lecture with his friend Robby Krieger, and both had come for the same reason that Manzarek had -- they'd been having bad trips and so had become a little disillusioned with acid. Krieger had been the one who'd heard about transcendental meditation, while he was studying the sitar and sarod at UCLA -- though Krieger would later always say that his real major had been in "not joining the Army". UCLA had one of the few courses in Indian music available in the US at the time, as thanks in part to Bock California had become the centre of American interest in music from India -- so much so that in 1967 Ravi Shankar would open up a branch of his own Kinnara Music School there. (And you can get an idea of how difficult it is to separate fact from fiction when researching this episode that one of the biographies I've used for the Doors says that Krieger heard about the Maharishi while studying at the Kinnara school. As the only branch of the Kinnara school that was open at this point was in Mumbai, it's safe to say that unless Krieger had a *really* long commute he wasn't studying there at this point.) Densmore and Manzarek got talking, and they found that they shared a lot of the same tastes in jazz -- just as Manzarek was a fan of McCoy Tyner, so Densmore was a fan of Elvin Jones, the drummer on those Coltrane records, and they both loved the interplay of the two musicians: [Excerpt: John Coltrane, "My Favorite Things"] Manzarek was starting to play a bit more keyboards with the Ravens, and he was also getting annoyed with the Ravens' drummer, who had started missing rehearsals -- he'd turn up only for the shows themselves. He thought it might be an idea to get Densmore to join the group, and Densmore agreed to come along for a rehearsal. That initial rehearsal Densmore attended had Manzarek and his brothers, and may have had a bass player named Patricia Hansen, who was playing with the group from time to time around this point, though she was mostly playing with a different bar band, Patty and the Esquires. But as well as the normal group members, there was someone else there, a friend of Manzarek's from film school named Jim Morrison. Morrison was someone who, by Manzarek's later accounts, had been very close to Manzarek at university, and who Manzarek had regarded as a genius, with a vast knowledge of beat poetry and European art film, but who had been regarded by most of the other students and the lecturers as being a disruptive influence. Morrison had been a fat, asthmatic, introverted kid -- he'd had health problems as a child, including a bout of rheumatic fever which might have weakened his heart, and he'd also been prone to playing the kind of "practical jokes" which can often be a cover for deeper problems. For example, as a child he was apparently fond of playing dead -- lying in the corridors at school and being completely unresponsive for long periods no matter what anyone did to move him, then suddenly getting up and laughing at anyone who had been concerned and telling them it was a joke. Given how frequently Morrison would actually pass out in later life, often after having taken some substance or other, at least one biographer has suggested that he might have had undiagnosed epilepsy (or epilepsy that was diagnosed but which he chose to keep a secret) and have been having absence seizures and covering for them with the jokes. Robby Krieger also says in his own autobiography that he used to have the same doctor as Morrison, and the doctor once made an offhand comment about Morrison having severe health problems, "as if it was common knowledge". His health difficulties, his weight, his introversion, and the experience of moving home constantly as a kid because of his father's career in the Navy, had combined to give him a different attitude to most of his fellow students, and in particular a feeling of rootlessness -- he never owned or even rented his own home in later years, just moving in with friends or girlfriends -- and a lack of sense of his own identity, which would often lead to him making up lies about his life and acting as if he believed them. In particular, he would usually claim to friends that his parents were dead, or that he had no contact with them, even though his family have always said he was in at least semi-regular contact. At university, Morrison had been a big fan of Rick and the Ravens, and had gone to see them perform regularly, but would always disrupt the shows -- he was, by all accounts, a lovely person when sober but an aggressive boor when drunk -- by shouting out for them to play "Louie Louie", a song they didn't include in their sets. Eventually one of Ray's brothers had called his bluff and said they'd play the song, but only if Morrison got up on stage and sang it. He had -- the first time he'd ever performed live -- and had surprised everyone by being quite a good singer. After graduation, Morrison and Manzarek had gone their separate ways, with Morrison saying he was moving to New York. But a few weeks later they'd encountered each other on the beach -- Morrison had decided to stay in LA, and had been staying with a friend, mostly sleeping on the friend's rooftop. He'd been taking so much LSD he'd forgotten to eat for weeks at a time, and had lost a great deal of weight, and Manzarek properly realised for the first time that his friend was actually good-looking. Morrison also told Manzarek that he'd been writing songs -- this was summer 1965, and the Byrds' version of "Mr. Tambourine Man", Dylan's "Like a Rolling Stone", and the Stones' "Satisfaction" had all shown him that there was potential for pop songs to have more interesting lyrical content than "Louie Louie". Manzarek asked him to sing some of the songs he'd been writing, and as Manzarek later put it "he began to sing, not in the booze voice he used at the Turkey Joint, but in a Chet Baker voice". The first song Morrison sang for Ray Manzarek was one of the songs that Rick and the Ravens would rehearse that first time with John Densmore, "Moonlight Drive": [Excerpt: Rick and the Ravens, "Moonlight Drive"] Manzarek invited Morrison to move in with him and his girlfriend. Manzarek seems to have thought of himself as a mentor, a father figure, for Morrison, though whether that's how Morrison thought of him is impossible to say. Manzarek, who had a habit of choosing the myth over the truth, would later claim that he had immediately decided that he and Morrison were going to be a duo and find a whole new set of musicians, but all the evidence points to him just inviting Morrison to join the Ravens as the singer Certainly the first recordings this group made, a series of demos, were under Rick and the Ravens' name, and paid for by Aura Records. They're all of songs written by Morrison, and seem to be sung by Morrison and Manzarek in close harmony throughout. But the demos did not impress the head of Liberty Records, which now owned Aura, and who saw no commercial potential in them, even in one that later became a number one hit when rerecorded a couple of years later: [Excerpt: Rick and the Ravens, "Hello I Love You"] Although to be fair, that song is clearly the work of a beginning songwriter, as Morrison has just taken the riff to "All Day and All of the Night" by the Kinks, and stuck new words to it: [Excerpt: The Kinks, "All Day and All of the Night"] But it seems to have been the lack of success of these demos that convinced Manzarek's brothers and Patricia Hansen to quit the band. According to Manzarek, his brothers were not interested in what they saw as Morrison's pretensions towards poetry, and didn't think this person who seemed shy and introverted in rehearsals but who they otherwise knew as a loud annoying drunk in the audience would make a good frontman. So Rick and the Ravens were down to just Jim Morrison, Ray Manzarek, and John Densmore, but they continued shopping their demos around, and after being turned down by almost everyone they were signed by Columbia Records, specifically by Billy James, who they liked because he'd written the liner notes to a Byrds album, comparing them to Coltrane, and Manzarek liked the idea of working with an A&R man who knew Coltrane's work, though he wasn't impressed by the Byrds themselves, later writing "The Byrds were country, they didn't have any black in them at all. They couldn't play jazz. Hell, they probably didn't even know anything about jazz. They were folk-rock, for cri-sake. Country music. For whites only." (Ray Manzarek was white). They didn't get an advance from Columbia, but they did get free equipment -- Columbia had just bought Vox, who made amplifiers and musical instruments, and Manzarek in particular was very pleased to have a Vox organ, the same kind that the Animals and the Dave Clark Five used. But they needed a guitarist and a bass player. Manzarek claimed in his autobiography that he was thinking along the lines of a four-piece group even before he met Densmore, and that his thoughts had been "Someone has to be Thumper and someone has to be Les Paul/Chuck Berry by way of Charlie Christian. The guitar player will be a rocker who knows jazz. And the drummer will be a jazzer who can rock. These were my prerequisites. This is what I had to have to make the music I heard in my head." But whatever Manzarek was thinking, there were only two people who auditioned for the role of the guitar player in this new version of the band, both of them friends of Densmore, and in fact two people who had been best friends since high school -- Bill Wolff and Robby Krieger. Wolff and Krieger had both gone to private boarding school -- they had both originally gone to normal state schools, but their parents had independently decided they were bad influences on each other and sent them away to boarding school to get away from each other, but accidentally sent them to the same school -- and had also learned guitar together. They had both loved a record of flamenco guitar called Dos Flamencos by Jaime Grifo and Nino Marvino: [Excerpt: Jaime Grifo and Nino Marvino, "Caracolés"] And they'd decided they were going to become the new Dos Flamencos. They'd also regularly sneaked out of school to go and see a jug band called Mother McCree's Uptown Jug Champions, a band which featured Bob Weir, who was also at their school, along with Jerry Garcia and Pigpen McKernan. Krieger was also a big fan of folk and blues music, especially bluesy folk-revivalists like Spider John Koerner, and was a massive fan of the Paul Butterfield Blues Band. Krieger and Densmore had known each other before Krieger had been transferred to boarding school, and had met back up at university, where they would hang out together and go to see Charles Mingus, Wes Montgomery, and other jazz musicians. At this time Krieger had still been a folk and blues purist, but then he went to see Chuck Berry live, mostly because Skip James and Big Mama Thornton were also on the bill, and he had a Damascene conversion -- the next day he went to a music shop and traded in his acoustic for a red Gibson, as close to the one Chuck Berry played as he could find. Wolff, Densmore, Krieger, and piano player Grant Johnson had formed a band called the Psychedelic Rangers, and when the Ravens were looking for a new guitarist, it was natural that they tried the two guitarists from Densmore's other band. Krieger had the advantage over Wolff for two reasons -- one of which was actually partly Wolff's doing. To quote Krieger's autobiography: "A critic once said I had 'the worst hair in rock 'n' roll'. It stung pretty bad, but I can't say they were wrong. I always battled with my naturally frizzy, kinky, Jewfro, so one day my friend Bill Wolff and I experimented with Ultra Sheen, a hair relaxer marketed mainly to Black consumers. The results were remarkable. Wolff, as we all called him, said 'You're starting to look like that jerk Bryan MacLean'". According to Krieger, his new hairdo made him better looking than Wolff, at least until the straightener wore off, and this was one of the two things that made the group choose him over Wolff, who was a better technical player. The other was that Krieger played with a bottleneck, which astonished the other members. If you're unfamiliar with bottleneck playing, it's a common technique in the blues. You tune your guitar to an open chord, and then use a resonant tube -- these days usually a specially-made metal slide that goes on your finger, but for older blues musicians often an actual neck of a bottle, broken off and filed down -- to slide across the strings. Slide guitar is one of the most important styles in blues, especially electric blues, and you can hear it in the playing of greats like Elmore James: [Excerpt: Elmore James, "Dust My Broom"] But while the members of the group all claimed to be blues fans -- Manzarek talks in his autobiography about going to see Muddy Waters in a club in the South Side of Chicago where he and his friends were the only white faces in the audience -- none of them had any idea what bottleneck playing was, and Manzarek was worried when Krieger pulled it out that he was going to use it as a weapon, that being the only association he had with bottle necks. But once Krieger played with it, they were all convinced he had to be their guitarist, and Morrison said he wanted that sound on everything. Krieger joining seems to have changed the dynamic of the band enormously. Both Morrison and Densmore would independently refer to Krieger as their best friend in the band -- Manzarek said that having a best friend was a childish idea and he didn't have one. But where before this had been Manzarek's band with Morrison as the singer, it quickly became a band centred around the creative collaboration between Krieger and Morrison. Krieger seems to have been too likeable for Manzarek to dislike him, and indeed seems to have been the peacemaker in the band on many occasions, but Manzarek soon grew to resent Densmore, seemingly as the closeness he had felt to Morrison started to diminish, especially after Morrison moved out of Manzarek's house, apparently because Manzarek was starting to remind him of his father. The group soon changed their name from the Ravens to one inspired by Morrison's reading. Aldous Huxley's book on psychedelic drugs had been titled The Doors of Perception, and that title had in turn come from a quote from The Marriage of Heaven and Hell by the great mystic poet and artist William Blake, who had written "If the doors of perception were cleansed every thing would appear to man as it is, Infinite. For man has closed himself up, till he sees all things thro' narrow chinks of his cavern" (Incidentally, in one of those weird coincidences that I like to note when they come up, Blake's Marriage of Heaven and Hell had also inspired the book The Great Divorce by C.S. Lewis, about the divorce of heaven and hell, and both Lewis and Huxley died on the same date, the twenty-second of November 1963, the same day John F. Kennedy died). Morrison decided that he wanted to rename the group The Doors, although none of the other group members were particularly keen on the idea -- Krieger said that he thought they should name the group Perception instead. Initially the group rehearsed only songs written by Morrison, along with a few cover versions. They worked up a version of Willie Dixon's "Back Door Man", originally recorded by Howlin' Wolf: [Excerpt: Howlin' Wolf, "Back Door Man"] And a version of "Alabama Song", a song written by Bertholt Brecht and Kurt Weill, from the opera The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny, with English language lyrics by  Elisabeth Hauptmann. That song had originally been recorded by Lotte Lenya, and it was her version that the group based their version on, at the suggestion of Manzarek's girlfriend: [Excerpt: Lotte Lenya, "Alabama Song"] Though it's likely given their tastes in jazz that they were also aware of a recent recording of the song by Eric Dolphy and John Lewis: [Excerpt: Eric Dolphy and John Lewis, "Alabama Song"] But Morrison started to get a little dissatisfied with the fact that he was writing all the group's original material at this point, and he started to put pressure on the others to bring in songs. One of the first things they had agreed was that all band members would get equal credit and shares of the songwriting, so that nobody would have an incentive to push their own mediocre song at the expense of someone else's great one, but Morrison did want the others to start pulling their weight. As it would turn out, for the most part Manzarek and Densmore wouldn't bring in many song ideas, but Krieger would, and the first one he brought in would be the song that would make them into stars. The song Krieger brought in was one he called "Light My Fire", and at this point it only had one verse and a chorus. According to Manzarek, Densmore made fun of the song when it was initially brought in, saying "we're not a folk-rock band" and suggesting that Krieger might try selling it to the Mamas and the Papas, but the other band members liked it -- but it's important to remember here that Manzarek and Densmore had huge grudges against each other for most of their lives, and that Manzarek is not generally known as an entirely reliable narrator. Now, I'm going to talk a lot about the influences that have been acknowledged for this song, but before I do there's one that I haven't seen mentioned much but which seems to me to be very likely to have at least been a subconscious influence -- "She's Not There" by the Zombies: [Excerpt: The Zombies, "She's Not There"] Now, there are several similarities to note about the Zombies record. First, like the Doors, the Zombies were a keyboard-driven band. Second, there's the dynamics of the songs -- both have soft, slightly jazzy verses and then a more straight-ahead rock chorus. And finally there's the verse chord sequence. The verse for "She's Not There" goes from Am to D repeatedly: [demonstrates] While the verse for "Light My Fire" goes from Am to F sharp minor -- and for those who don't know, the notes in a D chord are D, F sharp, and A, while the notes in an F sharp minor chord are F sharp, A, and C sharp -- they're very similar chords. So "She's Not There" is: [demonstrates] While "Light My Fire" is: [demonstrates] At least, that's what Manzarek plays. According to Krieger, he played an Asus2 chord rather than an A minor chord, but Manzarek heard it as an A minor and played that instead. Now again, I've not seen anyone acknowledge "She's Not There" as an influence, but given the other influences that they do acknowledge, and the music that was generally in the air at the time, it would not surprise me even the smallest amount if it was. But either way, what Krieger brought in was a simple verse and chorus: [Excerpt: The Doors, "Light My Fire"] Incidentally, I've been talking about the song as having A minor chords, but you'll actually hear the song in two different keys during this episode, even though it's the same performance throughout, and sometimes it might not sound right to people familiar with a particular version of the record. The band played the song with the verse starting with A minor, and that's how the mono single mix was released, and I'll be using excerpts of that in general. But when the stereo version of the album was released, which had a longer instrumental break, the track was mastered about a semitone too slow, and that's what I'll be excerpting when talking about the solos -- and apparently that speed discrepancy has been fixed in more recent remasterings of the album than the one I'm using. So if you know the song and bits of what I play sound odd to you, that's why. Krieger didn't have a second verse, and so writing the second verse's lyrics was the next challenge. There was apparently some disagreement within the band about the lyrics that Morrison came up with, with their references to funeral pyres, but Morrison won the day, insisting that the song needed some darkness to go with the light of the first verse. Both verses would get repeated at the end of the song, in reverse order, rather than anyone writing a third or fourth verse. Morrison also changed the last line of the chorus -- in Krieger's original version, he'd sung "Come on baby, light my fire" three times, but Morrison changed the last line to "try to set the night on fire", which Krieger thought was a definite improvement. They then came up with an extended instrumental section for the band members to solo in. This was inspired by John Coltrane, though I have seen different people make different claims as to which particular Coltrane record it was inspired by. Many sources, including Krieger, say it was based on Coltrane's famous version of "My Favorite Things": [Excerpt: John Coltrane, "My Favorite Things"] But Manzarek in his autobiography says it was inspired by Ole, the track that Coltrane recorded with Eric Dolphy: [Excerpt: John Coltrane, "Ole"] Both are of course similar musical ideas, and either could have inspired the “Light My Fire” instrumental section, though none of the Doors are anything like as good or inventive on their instruments as Coltrane's group (and of course "Light My Fire" is in four-four rather than three-four): [Excerpt: The Doors, "Light My Fire"] So they had a basic verse-chorus song with a long instrumental jam session in the middle. Now comes the bit that there's some dispute over.  Both Ray Manzarek and Robby Krieger agree that Manzarek came up with the melody used in the intro, but differ wildly over who came up with the chord sequence for it and when, and how it was put into the song. According to Manzarek, he came up with the whole thing as an intro for the song at that first rehearsal of it, and instructed the other band members what to do. According to Krieger, though, the story is rather different, and the evidence seems to be weighted in Krieger's favour. In early live performances of the song, they started the song with the Am-F sharp minor shifts that were used in the verse itself, and continued doing this even after the song was recorded: [Excerpt: The Doors, "Light My Fire (live at the Matrix)"] But they needed a way to get back out of the solo section and into the third verse. To do this, Krieger came up with a sequence that starts with a change from G to D, then from D to F, before going into a circle of fifths -- not the ascending circle of fifths in songs like "Hey Joe", but a descending one, the same sequence as in "She Came in Through the Bathroom Window" or "I Will Survive", ending on an A flat: [demonstrates] To get from the A flat to the A minor or Asus2 chord on which the verse starts, he simply then shifted up a semitone from A flat to A major for two bars: [demonstrates] Over the top of that chord sequence that Krieger had come up with, Manzarek put a melody line which was inspired by one of Bach's two-part inventions. The one that's commonly cited is Invention No. 8 in F Major, BWV 779: [Excerpt: Glenn Gould, "Invention No. 8 in F Major, BWV 779"] Though I don't believe Manzarek has ever stated directly which piece he was inspired by other than that it was one of the two-part inventions, and to be honest none of them sound very much like what he plays to my ears, and I think more than anything he was just going for a generalised baroque style rather than anything more specific. And there are certainly stylistic things in there that are suggestive of the baroque -- the stepwise movement, the sort of skipping triplets, and so on: [Excerpt: The Doors, "Light My Fire"] But that was just to get out of the solo section and back into the verses. It was only when they finally took the song into the studio that Paul Rothchild, the producer who we will talk about more later, came up with the idea of giving the song more structure by both starting and ending with that sequence, and formalised it so that rather than just general noodling it was an integral part of the song. They now had at least one song that they thought had the potential to be a big hit. The problem was that they had not as yet played any gigs, and nor did they have a record deal, or a bass player. The lack of a record deal may sound surprising, but they were dropped by Columbia before ever recording for them. There are several different stories as to why. One biography I've read says that after they were signed, none of the label's staff producers wanted to work with them and so they were dropped -- though that goes against some of the other things I've read, which say that Terry Melcher was interested in producing them. Other sources say that Morrison went in for a meeting with some of the company executives while on acid, came out very pleased with himself at how well he'd talked to them because he'd been able to control their minds with his telepathic powers, and they were dropped shortly afterwards. And others say that they were dropped as part of a larger set of cutbacks the company was making, and that while Billy James fought to keep them at Columbia, he lost the fight. Either way, they were stuck without a deal, and without any proper gigs, though they started picking up the odd private party here and there -- Krieger's father was a wealthy aerospace engineer who did some work for Howard Hughes among others, and he got his son's group booked to play a set of jazz standards at a corporate event for Hughes, and they got a few more gigs of that nature, though the Hughes gig didn't exactly go well -- Manzarek was on acid, Krieger and Morrison were on speed, and the bass player they brought in for the gig managed to break two strings, something that would require an almost superhuman effort. That bass player didn't last long, and nor did the next -- they tried several, but found that the addition of a bass player made them sound less interesting, more like the Animals or the Rolling Stones than a group with their own character. But they needed something to hold down the low part, and it couldn't be Manzarek on the organ, as the Vox organ had a muddy sound when he tried to play too many notes at once. But that problem solved itself when they played one of their earliest gigs. There, Manzarek found that another band, who were regulars at the club, had left their Fender keyboard bass there, clipped to the top of the piano. Manzarek tried playing that, and found he could play basslines on that with his left hand and the main parts with his right hand. Krieger got his father to buy one for the group -- though Manzarek was upset that they bought the wrong colour -- and they were now able to perform without a bass player. Not only that, but it gave the group a distinctive sound quite unlike all the other bands. Manzarek couldn't play busy bass lines while also playing lead lines with his right hand, and so he ended up going for simple lines without a great deal of movement, which added to the hypnotic feel of the group's music – though on records they would often be supplemented by a session bass player to give them a fuller sound. While the group were still trying to get a record deal, they were also looking for regular gigs, and eventually they found one. The Sunset Strip was *the* place to be, and they wanted desperately to play one of the popular venues there like the Whisky A-Go-Go, but those venues only employed bands who already had record deals. They did, though, manage to get a residency at a tiny, unpopular, club on the strip called The London Fog, and they played there, often to only a handful of people, while slowly building in confidence as performers. At first, Morrison was so shy that Manzarek had to sing harmony with him throughout the sets, acting as joint frontman. Krieger later said "It's rarely talked about, but Ray was a natural born showman, and his knack for stirring drama would serve the Doors' legacy well in later years" But Morrison soon gained enough confidence to sing by himself. But they weren't bringing in any customers, and the London Fog told them that they were soon going to be dropped -- and the club itself shut not long after. But luckily for the group, just before the end of their booking, the booker for the Whisky A-Go-Go, Ronnie Haran walked in with a genuine pop star, Peter Asher, who as half of Peter & Gordon had had a hit with "A World Without Love", written by his sister's boyfriend, Paul McCartney: [Excerpt: Peter and Gordon, "A World Without Love"] Haran was impressed with the group, and they were impressed that she had brought in a real celebrity. She offered them a residency at the club, not as the headlining act -- that would always be a group that had records out -- but as the consistent support act for whichever big act they had booked. The group agreed -- after Morrison first tried to play it cool and told Haran they would have to consider it, to the consternation of his bandmates. They were thrilled, though, to discover that one of the first acts they supported at the Whisky would be Them, Van Morrison's group -- one of the cover versions they had been playing had been Them's "Gloria": [Excerpt: Them, "Gloria"] They supported Them for two weeks at the Whisky, and Jim Morrison watched Van Morrison intently. The two men had very similar personalities according to the other members of the Doors, and Morrison picked up a lot of his performing style from watching Van on stage every night. The last night Them played the venue, Morrison joined them on stage for an extended version of “Gloria” which everyone involved remembered as the highlight of their time there. Every major band on the LA scene played residencies at the Whisky, and over the summer of 1966 the Doors were the support act for the Mothers of Invention, the Byrds, the Turtles, the Buffalo Springfield, and Captain Beefheart and the Magic Band. This was a time when the Sunset Strip was the centre of Californian musical life, before that centre moved to San Francisco, and the Doors were right at the heart of it. Though it wasn't all great -- this was also the period when there were a series of riots around Sunset Strip, as immortalised in the American International Pictures film Riot on Sunset Strip, and its theme song, by the Standells: [Excerpt: The Standells, "Riot on Sunset Strip"] We'll look at those riots in more detail in a future episode, so I'll leave discussing them for now, but I just wanted to make sure they got mentioned. That Standells song, incidentally, was co-written by John Fleck, who under his old name of John Fleckenstein we saw last episode as the original bass player for Love. And it was Love who ensured that the Doors finally got the record deal they needed. The deal came at a perfect time for the Doors -- just like when they'd been picked up by the Whisky A Go-Go just as they were about to lose their job at the London Fog, so they got signed to a record deal just as they were about to lose their job at the Whisky. They lost that job because of a new song that Krieger and Morrison had written. "The End" had started out as Krieger's attempt at writing a raga in the style of Ravi Shankar, and he had brought it in to one of his increasingly frequent writing sessions with Morrison, where the two of them would work out songs without the rest of the band, and Morrison had added lyrics to it. Lyrics that were partly inspired by his own fraught relationship with his parents, and partly by Oedipus Rex: [Excerpt: The Doors, "The End"] And in the live performance, Morrison had finished that phrase with the appropriate four-letter Oedipal payoff, much to the dismay of the owners of the Whisky A Go Go, who had told the group they would no longer be performing there. But three days before that, the group had signed a deal with Elektra Records. Elektra had for a long time been a folk specialist label, but they had recently branched out into other music, first with the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, a favourite of Robby Krieger's, and then with their first real rock signing, Love. And Love were playing a residency at the Whisky A Go Go, and Arthur Lee had encouraged Jac Holzman, the label's owner, to come and check out their support band, who he thought were definitely worth signing. The first time Holzman saw them he was unimpressed -- they sounded to him just like a bunch of other white blues bands -- but he trusted Arthur Lee's judgement and came back a couple more times. The third time, they performed their version of "Alabama Song", and everything clicked into place for Holzman. He immediately signed the group to a three-album deal with an option to extend it to seven. The group were thrilled -- Elektra wasn't a major label like Columbia, but they were a label that nurtured artists and wouldn't just toss them aside. They were even happier when soon after they signed to Elektra, the label signed up a new head of West Coast A&R -- Billy James, the man who had signed them to Columbia, and who they knew would be in their corner. Jac Holzman also had the perfect producer for the group, though he needed a little persuading. Paul Rothchild had made his name as the producer for the first couple of albums by the Paul Butterfield Blues Band: [Excerpt: The Paul Butterfield Blues Band, "Mary Mary"] They were Robby Krieger's favourite group, so it made sense to have Rothchild on that level. And while Rothchild had mostly worked in New York, he was in LA that summer, working on the debut album by another Elektra signing, Tim Buckley. The musicians on Buckley's album were almost all part of the same LA scene that the Doors were part of -- other than Buckley's normal guitarist Lee Underwood there was keyboard player Van Dyke Parks, bass player Jim Fielder, who had had a brief stint in the Mothers of Invention and was about to join Buffalo Springfield, and drummer Billy Mundi, who was about to join the Mothers of Invention. And Buckley himself sang in a crooning voice extremely similar to that of Morrison, though Buckley had a much larger range: [Excerpt: Tim Buckley, "Aren't You the Girl?"] There was one problem, though -- Rothchild didn't want to do it. He wasn't at all impressed with the band at first, and he wanted to sign a different band, managed by Albert Grossman, instead. But Holzman persuaded him because Rothchild owed him a favour -- Rothchild had just spent several months in prison after a drug bust, and while he was inside Holzman had given his wife a job so she would have an income, and Holzman also did all the paperwork with Rothchild's parole officer to allow him to leave the state. So with great reluctance Rothchild took the job, though he soon came to appreciate the group's music. He didn't appreciate their second session though. The first day, they'd tried recording a version of "The End", but it hadn't worked, so on the second night they tried recording it again, but this time Morrison was on acid and behaving rather oddly. The final version of "The End" had to be cut together from two takes, and the reason is that at the point we heard earlier: [Excerpt: The Doors, "The End"] Morrison was whirling around, thrashing about, and knocked over a TV that the engineer, Bruce Botnick, had brought into the studio so he could watch the baseball game -- which Manzarek later exaggerated to Morrison throwing the TV through the plate glass window between the studio and the control room. According to everyone else, Morrison just knocked it over and they picked it up after the take finished and it still worked fine. But Morrison had taken a *lot* of acid, and on the way home after the session he became convinced that he had a psychic knowledge that the studio was on fire. He got his girlfriend to turn the car back around, drove back to the studio, climbed over the fence, saw the glowing red lightbulbs in the studio, became convinced that they were fires, and sprayed the entire place with the fire extinguisher, before leaving convinced he had saved the band's equipment -- and leaving telltale evidence as his boot got stuck in the fence on the way out and he just left it there. But despite that little hiccup, the sessions generally went well, and the group and label were pleased with the results. The first single released from the album, "Break on Through", didn't make the Hot One Hundred: [Excerpt: The Doors, "Break on Through"] But when the album came out in January 1967, Elektra put all its resources behind the album, and it started to get a bit of airplay as a result. In particular, one DJ on the new FM radio started playing "Light My Fire" -- at this time, FM had only just started, and while AM radio stuck to three-minute singles for the most part, FM stations would play a wider variety of music. Some of the AM DJs started telling Elektra that they would play the record, too, if it was the length of a normal single, and so Rothchild and Botnick went into the studio and edited the track down to half its previous seven-and-a-half-minute length. When the group were called in to hear the edit, they were initially quite excited to hear what kind of clever editing microsurgery had been done to bring the song down to the required length, but they were horrified when Rothchild actually played it for them. As far as the group were concerned, the heart of the song was the extended instrumental improvisation that took up the middle section: [Excerpt: The Doors, "Light My Fire"] On the album version, that lasted over three minutes. Rothchild and Botnick cut that section down to just this: [Excerpt: The Doors, "Light My Fire (single edit)"] The group were mortified -- what had been done to their song? That wasn't the sound of people trying to be McCoy Tyner and Elvin Jones, it was just... a pop song.  Rothchild explained that that was the point -- to get the song played on AM radio and get the group a hit. He pointed out how the Beatles records never had an instrumental section that lasted more than eight bars, and the group eventually talked them