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Growth Mode
Be the Face of Your Company

Growth Mode

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 30:34


Calling all current and aspiring company owners! Your company is a brand and your brand is you. Getting your voice heard and your brand known is vital to your growth, networking, and sales. While pursuing my sales career, I grew my network in Fort Worth, TX, and its surrounding area. But when I first launched Success Champion Networking, my prior work didn't exactly just carry over. I had to rebuild from ground zero. Links Website - https://successchampionnetworking.com/ (https://successchampionnetworking.com/) YouTube Video - (available soon) Blog - (available soon) Facebook Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/SuccessChampion (https://www.facebook.com/groups/SuccessChampion)

Sound & Vision
Chie Fueki

Sound & Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 94:23


Chie Fueki (b. 1973) lives and works in Beacon, NY. Fueki was born in Yokohama, Japan, and raised in São Paulo, Brazil. She earned her MFA at Yale University and her BFA at The Ringling College of Art and Design. She is an inaugural recipient of the 2021 Joan Mitchell Fellowship. Other recent solo exhibitions include: Shoshana Wayne Gallery, Los Angeles, CA (2005, 2008, 2013, 2021); Mary Boone Gallery, New York, NY (2006, 2011); Orlando Museum of Art, FL (2014); and Mother Gallery, Beacon, NY (2020). Her work was recently included in group exhibitions at Inman Gallery, Houston, TX; Miles McEnery Gallery, New York, NY; Essex Flowers, New York, NY; The ReInstitue, Millerton, NY; Fredricks Freiser Gallery, New York, NY; Geoffrey Young Gallery in Great Barrington, MA; Jeff Bailey Gallery, Hudson, NY; LABspace, Hillsdale, NY; and Greater New York at PS1 Contemporary Art Center in Long Island City, NY. She has public artwork at PS 92Q, Queens NY, and HHS Lerner Children Pavilion, New York, NY. Her work is included in permanent collections of the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, TX; Orlando Museum of Art, FL; San Jose Museum of Art, CA; the Hirshhorn Museum, D.C.; and the Pizzuti Collection at Columbus Museum of Art, OH. Chie has a show up now at DC Moore Gallery in NYC.

The FORT with Chris Powers
#193: Chris Pate - Managing Director of True North Advisors - A Masterclass in Capital Allocation

The FORT with Chris Powers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 87:58


Chris Pate, Managing Director of independent wealth management firm True North Advisors, spent the first 11 years of his career at a multi-strategy hedge fund. Prior to True North Advisors, Chris spent 8 years managing the investment activities for Western Commerce Group in Fort Worth. Chris oversaw both public markets and private investments within Western's investment advisory operations, including equities, fixed income, alternatives, and hard assets.  On this episode, they discuss what Chris learned while working at a hedge fund, how True North selects and underwrites GP sponsors. They chat about capital allocation decisions in today's market, best practices when thinking about wealth management, and Chris' thoughts on the market. Follow Chris on Twitter: www.Twitter.com/FortWorthChris Learn more about Chris Powers and Fort Capital: www.FortCapitalLP.com Follow Chris on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/chrispowersjr/ (01:58) - Chris' Career with Q Investments & the Hedge Fund industry (05:27) - How Hedge Funds Determine Where To Focus Their Attention and When to Move Along (12:15)  - Transition into Wealth Management and Chris' Current Role with True North (22:25) - What is a Multi-series LP? (24:20) - The Difference Between Private & Public Investments (28:35) - How do you identify good portfolio managers? (38:38) - What are things that are immediate No's for you? (45:36) - What are some reasons companies want to get into a larger fund? (47:51) - How are some people so good at raising money without a track record? (50:03) - How much time do you spend on references? (52:35) - How much weight goes into due diligence when you are familiar with other folks in a deal? (55:43) - How do you underwrite hedge fund managers vs. private investment managers? (56:52) - How do you think about deal structures? (1:00:47) - How do you think about the movement behind the democratization of capital? (1:03:33) - Does more alpha exist in direct deals than anything public? (1:04:18) - How do you think about capital allocation? (1:10:54) - Is there any reason that would cause you to not continue investing in specific funds? (1:13:24) - What are your thoughts on the current market? (1:21:06) - Final Thoughts on True North and Working With Entrepreneurs The Fort is produced by Johnny Peterson & Straight Up Podcasts

The Remote Real Estate Investor
What investors need to know about buying in Galveston TX

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 42:46


Ariana White is part of the Roofstock Certified Agent Network and serves in the Galveston TX area. In this episode, she shares what investors need to be looking at if they are considering investing in the Galveston market. We cover both the short term and longterm rental markets, property taxes, zoning, climate and much more.      Ariana's contact info: arianawhitesellstx@gmail.com - @arianasellstexas --- Transcript   Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals.   Michael: What's going on everybody? Welcome to another episode of The Remote Real Estate Investor. I'm Michael Albaum and today I'm joined by Ariana and Larry White. And they're gonna be talking to us today both about the long term and short term rental markets out in Houston and Galveston, Texas. So let's get right into it.   Ariana and Larry White, thank you both so much for joining me today. I really appreciate you taking the time.   Ariana: Yeah.   Larry: Pleasure to be here, man.   Michael: I'm so excited. You two are kicking butt in the short term rental space out in the Houston and Galveston markets. And I'm wondering if you can give our listeners just a really quick background on who you two are as power couple.   Ariana: Oh, power couple. Wow, that's nice.   Larry: Crazy. Yeah. All right, Jay Z and Beyonce over here.   Michael: That's it.   Ariana: But you're Beyonce, and I'm Jay Z!   So um, so my name is Ariana. I've been a real estate agent for eight years. And I originally started in Vegas, I managed a team out there. Larry drags me to Houston, and actually took like a year off of real estate while I got my license here. And now I manage a team out in Houston. And so we specialize primarily in first time homebuyers and investors. And now going deep into the short term rental market.   Michael: Awesome. Love it. And Beyonce. I mean, Larry?   Larry: Yeah. And so I have a little bit different. I started about 1516 years ago, and convinced her to get into real estate, about halfway through my career. And so I've been a pretty successful solo agent, ran some very large teams grew a national real estate brokerage around foreclosures and REOs, which took me into the investor space to begin with. And so now we really have some of the most successful groups of Realtors across the country that we teach to duplicate what we did. And we focus and Ariana has a very successful team here in Houston. And as she mentioned, we're actually in the short term rental space personally. And so we're teaching other people, you know, investors that come to us quite often teaching them how to kind of duplicate what we've done and learn from our mistakes as well.   Michael: Oh, my God, amazing. Well, we are going to have a lot of fun with this episode. I can't wait to hear about what you two are doing personally, in the short term rental space. But to kick things off, I would love to just get a high level overview of the Houston and kind of Galveston markets. Ariana, as you see them, like what should investors What do investors need to know if I'm totally unfamiliar with those markets?   Ariana: Yeah, so Houston is really interesting, because we're one of the only cities where there is no zoning in Houston.   Michael: So multi family, commercial single family, there's no…   Ariana: Whatever you want.   Michael: A whole smorgasbord.   Ariana: Yes, and it changes as it goes out into the suburbs. But um, what's really every street is different in Houston. And there's certain little, little neighborhoods that have been, you know, people have moved in and fixed up old homes, and it's really developed, each little area of Houston has really developed its own adorable community. And I will say that the most, for the most part, my investors typically end up being either somewhere around the Med Center, which is a community here it is full of like young professional renters. And there many people in grad school, you have ages down there, Rice University is down there. And there's lots of young professionals that are all working in the hospitals. And so that area is a big area for renters and very high rents, and that is located in the heart of Houston.   And also, one of the biggest areas that we're currently seeing is the Spring Tomball Humble. It's looks like humble, you pronounce it Um, okay, so, um, that neighborhood, the all of those neighborhoods, and great low tax rates, that's going to be like the major. That's the key piece. You're looking for a low tax rate in Texas, because property taxes can fluctuate a lot. Yeah. And all of those areas seem to have like young, single family homes that are consistently rented and low property taxes, which is a double win. So those are up and coming areas. Right now we're seeing a lot of our investors kind of go towards   Michael: Love it.   Larry: And then on the you know, it shifts a little bit when you start getting into the short term rental market, right? Because the taxes, I mean, you always want the lowest taxes. But if you are able to, you know, they talk about in real estate, location, location, location, right. So if you have a high demand because your next Minute Maid Park, because you're in Galveston, and it's a beach destination, not just for people coming in from out of town, but from people in Houston going and renting beach houses and stuff, their taxes can be offset that way. And so that's where you start getting into what is the drive? What is the demand? And like, what are our occupancy ratios, you know, for the entire month.   And so that's where you start looking at seasonality and what's driving traffic, are there sporting events, or they're this or they're that. And that's where a lot of our investors can start buying maybe a little bit more expensive properties, right, like, maybe they go down to Edo, which is kind of East downtown, which is one of the top four markets and neighborhoods. And if you were doing a long term rental, it wouldn't make sense, it has high tax rates, you have to minimum prices, probably around 430. And it probably only rents for $3,000 a month. So most of the time, that's not going to pencil out for a long term.   But you switch that to a short term, that it's close proximity to everything, and you can get three or $400 that night, and it's occupied 50% of the month, you start doing those, those numbers and you're like, Oh, hold on, this makes sense. So this is really where, you know, when you're looking at an investor, what is your strategy? What is your goal this year, and then we try and create a portfolio or a plan that aligns with their goals. And the numbers will tell us if we're on the right track or not.   Michael: I love it. I love it. So and I think this is great, the conversation kind of naturally bifurcated into the long term side and the short term side, which is I think exactly where I want to take it anyhow. So getting back to the long term side for just a minute. And then I wanted to back to the short term side. What should people be aware of in terms of like, big companies that are headquartered out there? Like, why are people moving to the Houston Galveston area? And then for the short term side? Why are they visiting the area? I know you mentioned the beach, but curious to know, what other attractions are drawing people to the area?   Ariana: Yeah, so in Houston, and what's real, we have seen what I'm lovingly referring to as the great migration. So we have had a lot of people move here from out of state, their number one draw is low cost of living, right, much lower than many other states that we're going to see either on the East Coast or on the West Coast. And, and what people are really looking for, and what I'm seeing mostly is, um, they're having, like the biggest draw is space. And we see a lot of people moving here from like, very populated areas. And granted, you can get a city feel here, but you can also go 30 minutes out and have an acre of land if you want to and have a full garden and farm and some cows like I mean, and you can have all kinds of tax exemptions, too.   So if for any of our military clients, you get a huge tax tax exemption, particularly if you're a disabled vet, you have a homestead exemption here for property taxes. If this is your main living area, you can also have a senior citizen tax exemption. So Texas is really they love tax exemption. So a lot of our clients will use them.   To draw that's a huge draw to Texas, people are looking for a little bit more space to either like a personal or business. I'm out here. short term rental wise in Galveston area. We have Moody Gardens. It's the closest beach the water's warm, and it's like a really great place to go take young like children because it doesn't get super deep. And   Larry: Yeah, the NASA you have the space center, right and so all of that starts to come into play, which gives you a pretty good occupancy. And what we've seen during kind of this pandemic, right is that people have been wanting to get away and have more staycations and stuff as well. So you know when we get into our we have a short term rental we have a 20 acre ranch out in Fredericksburg and we saw our vacancies like drop drastically because everybody was able to work from home. So as long as we had a decent Wi Fi, they were like, Well, man, why don't I go out in Texas wine country, you know, versus my house and let's go on and the kids can go play outside and do this.   So it you know, the market is changing, and we just have to keep stepping along with it. And the customers will tell us exactly what they're looking for.   Ariana: Yeah, I actually had a client today call me today. She's gonna be moving here from California. And she's a nurse. And she's like, and I was like, you know, what's your timeline look like? When do you want to be here, and she said, You know, I can really move anytime I'm just planning on flying back. She's in the Bay Area in California. And she's like, I'm just planning on flying back to work. And then I'll live in Texas,   Michael: She's gonna commute.   Ariana: Mm hmm. And that was a very common thing that we see. So if you're able to remote work, or maybe you don't have to be in the office only, like one or two days a week, people are just buying a little, you know, having a little studio wherever they are based out of renting that out when they're not they're coming back living their main life in Texas and doing you know, flip flopping the opposite. So yeah, so it's, it's provided a lot of this new way of looking at how to be efficient in your workforce has provided a lot of opportunities for a lot of people, as well, in their, you know, in looking looking at your business in a different way.   Michael: Oh, that's incredible. Gonna be racking up those frequent flyer miles for sure. Yeah. That's awesome. So Arianna, you were mentioning a couple of the neighborhoods up and coming neighborhoods? Yeah. That you were seeing curious if you can give everyone listening and watching an idea of kind of price points. And what you mean when you say low taxes?   Ariana: Yes. Okay. So taxes here in Texas can range differently depending on every every little city has a different tax rate. And so we're known for having our property taxes be a little bit higher than some other states. And so that was definitely something that we have to consider when you're going into an investment property, right, the taxes can either make you or break you. And so when we're looking at properties that we're submitting to Roofstock, and for our investors, I am looking specifically for areas that have lower tax rates, because those are the ones that are giving us our best ROI. So one city here is Missouri City, it's south of the heart of Houston. And that city has notoriously low tax rates, which is great. It's also like a high, it's not a city feel. And it is a suburbia field. So there's lots of single family residences there. That area typically commutes to Houston for work. So there's lots of renters in that area. We've seen great success there.   And Rosenberg, Tomball, Spring, and Humble. Those are all of those areas have had really low tax rates in certain pockets and have given our investors like a really good opportunity to get a home up there.   Larry: And also what you're seeing is that Houston is expanding, right? If you look at from Dallas, to Houston over to Austin, San Antonio is called the Texas triangle. Okay, it's the fastest growing region in the country. And so what happened? What's happening? You have Dallas expanding, you have Austin, San Antonio, expanding, you have Houston expanding? And so everything's kind of like merging together together. Yeah. Uh huh. And so these suburbs, right, like, especially when you start getting this increase in prices, you know, people start going outside of the metro area, because the metro area, the median price point might be 400 500, etc. Now they can move out and pay 200 300 and get, you know, just a lot more bang for your buck.   And so those cities that that she's talking about there are starting to see that and so they're still have a lot of population, a lot of people going to them, you have the difference in the prices, which could help you drastically if you're in that long term rental space.   Michael: Totally. And what are some of those medium price points and associated rents that you'd expect to see in some of these markets?   Ariana: So for the suburbia area of Houston, and what I'm typically seeing median price points, you can find a for the ideal property, right? The ideal property is a four bedroom. Single Story, maybe two story home, two and a half bath. And right now we're seeing those rents typically, well, we're seeing those sales, typically between 280,000 to 400,000, depending on the community, somewhere in that I just got one of my Roofstock investors into a new home community actually, this one particular new home community, a lot of 10% investors. And so we were one of the last homes to get in there. And he bought a beautiful four bedroom, two and a half bath in a great neighborhood brand new home. And he got that one for 330. And so that was yeah, it was it was a great, great deal. And we're expecting to rent it out for right around $3,000.   Michael: Holy smokes. I mean, you're just flirting with that 1% rule.   Ariana: Yes, we're right. We can get like right in there. If I get like one person, I get really super excited. So we're like, right there.   Michael: Yeah, awesome. Well, something I think people like either fail to recognize or don't want to recognize is like, you might not buy it at 1%. But in five years, it could absolutely be a 1% property and all your expenses should remain relatively unchanged or increased slightly. But if your rent can outpace your expense increase, you got to meet in the shade.   Larry: Yeah. And here's one of the things for Texas, specifically that you have to think about in 2008. And nine, the market got crushed, right. I mean, we like we came from Las Vegas, we saw homes depreciate 60 to 70%. Yeah, right, like just crush, you did not see that same price depreciation here in Texas for a reason, right? You also didn't see it go up 90%, like you saw really good appreciation, you didn't see the counter the effects of the depreciation. And part of that is because to do a cash out refi, like the state of Texas requires that if you're going to pull money out, you have to keep 80% in your home, so you still had some you still had a cushion there.   So they might have lost their equity. Right, but they weren't upside down on their homes. And I'm not saying that Texas wasn't affected or anything like that. It just wasn't as affected as much as some of the other areas. And so, you know, there's an appreciation, because there's this built in stability factor here in Texas, that you're going to get some appreciation play. It's not going to be 90%. But it's going to be healthy, it's going to be sustainable, which is what we saw in the last cycle.   Michael: Interesting. Okay. Very good to know. Very good to know. And from a short term rental perspective, what is it that you look for? Because you taught you spoke about your ideal, you know, for two and a half single story for your long term? What is it that you're looking for when you're putting short term stuff on Rootstock?   Ariana: So specifically to Galveston, we like to have something that's close to beach access, that's going to be number one, it doesn't have to be exactly on the water, either. It can be a couple streets back as long as you're able to get there. There's also some services in Galveston, if you do get once a little bit farther away, you can rent a golf cart for the week. So those are fun services that you can have awesome with your rentals as well. And access to the look, there's like maybe like one gigantic strip going down Galveston, so access to that, but not so close that it's going to impede or you have to cross it to get to the water. And that's ideal. And then what we're always looking for is a space that has enough to at least have one of the bedrooms have a couple bunk beds in it.   So an ideal situation is that you could fit, you know, at least two bedrooms, preferably three bedrooms, and a big living area. And a lot of the houses and Galson. I know you said you'd never been up here. They're up high. So they're up high to make way for the water to come in. So they're built on stilts. And so it's called a pier and beam, but they're up high. And so a lot of times there is like an outdoor activity where that people can add that to the house, under under the under the actual house. So there's like badminton and some people put pool tables down there and make use of the space. It's a very, it's super fun to drive through because all the houses are really tall. They all look like they're walking.   So yeah. So if you've never been to I mean, it's really, really it's an Galveston, my girlfriend was just there this weekend, they rented a big old house for her. Typically, it's like at least two families people have to travel together to Galveston. So um, so she wanted a big ol house and the people that were next to her were from Fort Worth, and they had you know, they had six kids and for adults with them and people like to go because when you go to the beach you don't have to be the only one in charge of your children right so   Michael: Built in babysitters   Ariana: But it's so accessible to so many parts of Texas you know it's just a it's the closest beach to most people in Texas so and no to everybody in Texas I gotta Yeah, I'm on the road down south to like Corpus Christi, right. But it's it's The closest beach to so many of us, yeah, that it's, um, it's just so accessible. So one of the big things is just obviously like, making sure it's super clean, outdoor showers are a big plus. So that you can stand inside your house, these are all kind of things you have to think about to be Galveston specific. And, and then water rental situations, you know, you can have that extra up, you can have your clients pay extra in order to have that and that's all part of the property management takes care of that. But you know, if you wanted paddleboards, or other things that you wanted accessible to be special for your client.   And then also, one of the biggest benefits is that this isn't a one and done situation for the people that are renting out this area, which is why it's not necessarily seasonal. And there are in the summer, obviously super booked 100% capacity all the time. But even in December, November, January, February, people go even if it's cold, because they the water never gets like freezing. So today it's like 45 degrees, which is like a one off. But last week it was it was 85.   Michael: So Holy smokes   Ariana: And like I can speak in, in my own experience. If there's a house that you liked when you went to Galveston and it's in the you know Surfside community or Pirates Cove, or, you know any of the little communities inside Galveston, you go back to the same house. Like if you like that house, you'll go back to the same house. And so like, like my girlfriend who just went this past weekend, she has stayed at that house three times already. And she likes that house. So she will continue to go to that house. Yeah, and so that's really one of the benefits of Galveston is a It isn't like an aspen where you only go, you know, once a year, or you can only go you know, it's easily accessible. And it's really used very often. Interesting. Yeah, you create recurring recurring clients.   Larry: And people want also, you know, when you start talking about Airbnb, people want that hotel feel, right, they want it to be crisp, they want it to be clean, right? So the furniture, the aesthetics that that you put into it, right? They want it to be like, Oh, if they have this dream vacation home, what would this look like? Even if it's small, right? They want that aesthetic to it, which is important to make sure that you decorate it correctly, that you have the right furniture and stuff to it, because there's a lot of competition now. And so reviews are super important. Who you have managing it? Is it super important? Are you responsive? are you handling issues and stuff. And that's been an entire learning experience for ourselves as we just entirely remodel this 20 acre ranch, right? All of the units on it, and we're coming up with a lot, man, it's a 30 year old home and you know, it has a pump house and these things that we're not used to dealing with.   And, you know, it's it's a very different experience, but all things that need to be thought about to make sure that you're at the top of the list, you're getting the most exposure. And, you know, you have, you know, the highest, you know, occupancy as possible, because I mean, do the math, right, like I've just pulled up Airbnb over here right now and looking at Galveston. And I mean, probably the average, you know, for this weekend is $300 a night there's some going up to six $700 A night, but $300 A night average. Now, it's not going to be 100% occupancy all the time. But man, that's a potential of $9,000 a month in cash flow, right like you have one or two good months and like you're paying for your entire year off of off of one good season there.   Michael: That's incredible. That's incredible. So we've talked about so many of the benefits and Lewers of the Texas market. Now let's talk about the dark underbelly because there's got to be one there can only be this great heaven on earth. So talk to us about what should investors especially remote investors who might not be familiar with the Texas market, be aware of what's some of the the hair that some of these deals might have.   Ariana: So number one, you need to and and to cover that when we're looking at Roofstock properties. I'm specifically picking for myself and my team properties to show investors that do not have this okay. So you have to look at the flood maps. That is like in Houston and Galveston, that is the number one deal killer. Because as an investor, you don't want renters in there, they're going to be in a 100 year floodplain that's going to create a lot of problems for you. It's going to create a lot of money for you. And on top of that flood insurance can really take, make it or break it in this in this deal. There are some properties where you can get, you know, your flood insurance for $400 a year.   Also, just a little side note, as a real estate agent in the Houston market, it doesn't matter if that area has ever flooded or not buy the flood insurance, it's a good investment. So um,   Michael: Even if it's outside of a flood zone?   Ariana: Even if it's outside of a flood zone as a real estate agent, I would highly recommend because you never know, we moved here nine months before Harvey we are not in a floodplain. We asked her real estate agent at the time and our insurance provider at the time do we need flood insurance? They said no. Nine months later, we flooded in Harvey, so do not take it from our pain. Let us like learn off our pain. And that is a very expensive fix when you don't have flood insurance,   Larry: the 400 and it literally because we weren't in a floodplain because our home had never flooded the flood insurance was $425 for the year.   Ariana: Yeah, right. And we did it. We're like, No, we don't need it. It's fine. We've come from the desert, like who really floods? I didn't really know. No. So I tell everybody just do it. I mean, just just by the flood insurance, you never know what's going to happen. Houston has crazy weather. So that's number one. That's definitely the one when you're looking at properties. See if you're in a floodplain, see if the property has ever flooded before, ask your agent. If it has, that's not necessarily a deal killer if it was a one off, but we need to look at your flood insurance, if you can be grandfathered into these flood insurance rates, if the flood insurance is going to be extraordinarily high, it's a good opportunity during your option period to maybe look at other properties that fit what you're looking for specifically. Um, yeah, so that's number one.   And number two, what else is weather?   Larry: Weather is by far the biggest one. I mean, as we've seen, winter freezes, right? Like all the pipes rusting, like, hurricanes, like weather is number one. Two, I would say is the is the taxes as the property taxes that was kind of eye opening and shocking. As we started diving into this market, it was much higher than anything that we were used to. I mean, yeah, tax rates can be upwards of 3% of a home's value. And so that drastically changes some of your numbers and stuff when you're looking at that investment.   Michael: Yeah, yeah, that makes total sense.   Ariana: And then anything else parking if you're looking in Houston parking is a necessary thing you need to look at, you need to make sure that you know, there's lots of teeny tiny, you know, three story homes, that would be great rental homes, but they're parking on the street. And that will really it'll it'll be very hard to get, you know, some renters in there that want to be able to drive into a driveway and so that that is definitely something to look at specifically that is for inside Houston.   Larry: And one other thing, especially as we're talking about short term, Airbnb, is deed restrictions, community restrictions. And this isn't just for Houston and Galveston, this is a cross the country for instance, Fredericksburg, right, they have, they're trying to pass like no short term Airbnb. Now we're outside of the city. And so it doesn't really affect us. But this is what some of the other Airbnb owners are going through that they're having to fight legislation. They're having to register properties, which is additional expense, paying taxes and stuff, additional taxes.   So based on the municipality, you have to look at some of these details and know what you're looking for to make sure that that it's again fitting your short term and your long term goal, right.   Michael:  Yeah, but I thought you said that Texas love tax exemptions, what's what's with the bait and switch?   Ariana: Now we do love tax exemptions. So you just got to find the right one that fits what your look all right.   Michael: Makes sense. It makes sense.   Larry: In Fredericksburg, we have an agricultural exemption, we have Longhorns and donkeys and stuff on the property. And so literally, our taxes are almost nil. There's wildlife tax exemptions, there's a lot of things. But again, this is where you have to do some research. If the numbers work as status quo and now you start digging and it just elevates that return on investment. Now we're we're really into the money.   Michael: So what you're saying is I need to go buy a property downtown Houston and get a couple cattle for the backyard.   Ariana: You There are many places in Houston you will see I mean you will be right off i 10 And there will be building building building building empty lot cows on it building building building. And the reason is because the builders when they're going in there, and they bought the land they put cows on the property in order to bypass the exemptions, or I'm sorry, bypass the taxes and have an exemption until they're ready to build. So   Michael: Oh my gosh,   Ariana: You can also do that with goats. You can also have bees. So that's wild. Yeah. And so they leave, they leave the cows there, they get the exemption, the cows eat the grass, they chill for a couple months. And then when they're ready to build, they move their cows to the next place that they bought. So   Michael: Oh, my What a trip. That's awesome.   Something I wanted to mention that you were you were talking about flood insurance, is I think it's so important for investors to be thinking about too, as we do start to see more and more storms, more aggressive storms, like flood zones change. And so I think that's something that people need to be aware of is just because you're not in a flood zone today doesn't mean you won't be tomorrow or next year, or whatever the case may be. And so just be cognizant of that, if it's an investment that you might be selling at some point down the road. That's a hurdle that any buyer who buys your investment property is going to have to deal with. So just be thinking about that, putting it out there for whatever that's worth.   Ariana: Yep, that was that is very, you're absolutely. After any major storm, if FEMA came out, they'll redo the flood maps. And so you should get an update of that like from your agent. Or you can always inquire about a property and ask and we'd be able to pull that real easily.   Michael: Awesome. Okay, I want to shift gears here really quick with the last few minutes with y'all and find out what it is that you're all doing with this 20 acre ranch and short term rentals. That is friggin awesome.   Ariana: Yes, yeah. So it was a COVID purchase. Actually, I had found the property we had been looking all over, we just really wanted something we didn't know where we wanted it. And we wanted it originally closer to us, because we want it to be able to manage it. Fredericksburg is about three and a half hours away from us. But then we have a certain budget in place. But then you know, there I am wandering the internet at night looking for whatever I'm looking for. And here comes this 20 acre property that shows up with this old 1970s Looking ranch style on it. And it was double our bedrooms. And double the size without looking for the double was hired early, double, double everything.   Larry: The time is there like I was like no way.   Ariana: No way. Yeah, it really was exactly double everything because we're looking at an hour and a half from us. And this is three and a half hours from us. And it's twice as vague and it's twice as expensive. And he's like, I don't know. And I was like, I'm very intuitive. You know, some people just feel things. I don't know, this is it. I was like you got to find an extra $1,000   Michael: Start looking at couch cushions.   Ariana: So we found that. Yeah, so we went we bought it. It was a single owner. She was she was her husband, but she owned the vineyard next door to it. And she's like, you know, it was just too much. And I have all this other land. And so I just want to I really wanted to give it to somebody who would do something interesting with it. And so and she had, you know, there's some people who want to go in there and do an RV park. There are some people who wanted to go in there and do some other I don't remember what it was something else. She didn't like them. She was like, No, this is this is like my baby. And then we went in there and said, you know, we'd really like to short term rental it and then eventually, as we continue to grow build tiny homes, that's my ultimate dream is I want to have a tiny home condo for people to just like get off the grid and just detox and you know, like, just have some solitude. And that's really important to us. And so she was like, Yeah, let's go for it. As longest escrow lives.   Larry: Yeah. Took appraisal issues.   Ariana: Like I mean, it was so it was like things were you know, appraisals are taking forever and getting a 20 acre property appraised and surveyed.   Michael: Yeah, took a long time.   Ariana: Yeah. And you know, we work in cities so the whole ranch and like the dirt lots were they called ranch land and land and ranch.   Larry: Oh farm and land   Ariana: I don't do I don't do farming land. So we had to bring somebody else from our company who does farming land to come help us with our own deal because I didn't know about farming land and septics you know, I know city septics I don't know about these subjects in the middle of nowhere and the properties on a well you know, there's it's been fun and, and quite a learning experience. Navigating all of this but um,   Larry: We call we fully remodeled it like we took it down to the studs, remodeled everything because we bought it it was a 1600 square foot, one bedroom, one bath, which is why it was still on the market, because there weren't a lot of families but we knew that that's not what we wanted it for. So we converted the laundry room into a second bathroom, and the living area into a second bedroom. So now we have a 1600 square foot, two bedroom, two bath rents for four to $600 a night with a pool. And then it has a 600 square foot guest house that we fully remodeled as well, which rents for 150 to 250 a night. And then we've already purchased our first Airstream that we're rehabbing. And we'll build a deck around it. And that will be our first additional unit that we add on.   Michael: So cool.   Ariana: And then we're talking. So we're talking to some people who want to do goat yoga, in Fredericksburg, and they want to hold their goats on our land. And so that's, you know, where Larry and I are, kind of hippies. And so   Larry: We're like, let's do this. Let's use all 20 acres.   Ariana: So cool. But really, it's because it's outside the city. It's got dark sky. So it is incredible to be out there in the middle. I mean, it is dark,   Larry: You can see the Milky Way actually running through   Ariana: It's beautiful. And we call it wild soul sanctuary. Love that. So we've just started doing some retreats out there and bringing in some people who do you know, Healing Retreats on the weekends, they'll rent it from us and you know, can sleep a good amount of people and we're open to people like camping on our land and stuff. So   Michael: Yeah, I was gonna ask, have you ever heard of hipcamp?   Ariana: Yeah, so we haven't quite dealt. We had people personally ask us if they can camp on our land, which we're open to. But we haven't quite. I haven't gotten into that yet. That's kind of next on our list to see. You know, how much of this we can rent out. Yeah. To camping. So tonight.   Michael: I bet a ton, I have been to some some hipcamps and they don't provide jack squat and like, seriously, I'm paying whatever, 60 bucks a night for like plastic Adirondack chairs and a dirt piece of lots of foot, my head, whatever. So there's definitely a market for it.   Ariana: Okay, well, that definitely writing you said hip camp camp.   Michael: Yep, yep, hipcamp.   Ariana: Okay. I knew there was a name for it. But you know, I'm also not much of a camper. And   Larry: She's more of that city. Like,   Ariana: Like, I let me take my shoes off, but like, let me get into a shower. So like,   Michael: There you go. Well set up glamping tents to?   Arianna: Well, that wasn't a yurts are a possibility. Yes, I think what I really want is like a one bedroom a frame. Like that's what I that's like, that's like mine, and no one's gonna be allowed in it. It's just gonna be for me.   Michael: That's so good. Oh, that's so good. Well, just the last question I have for you both, is how do you run your expense numbers on short term rentals? I think that's what throws a lot of investors for a loop. They hear like, holy crap, I can make nine grand a month, and then they're comparing that against their long term rental expenses. And that doesn't always jive. So how should people be thinking about expenses?   Larry: Yeah, so um, that is definitely it is the expenses are going to be increased, right? Because you have more turnover, you have cleaning crews, you have maintenance, you have handyman, etc. And   so we're, we're paying about 10% a month for property management, but we take on a lot of the communication. There's other, like, it's not uncommon to see 20 or 30%. You know, property management fees. Yeah. But they're also they're renting, they're renting it out. They're handling the calls, they're doing everything. So really depends. As our first one we wanted to be kind of hands on, see how this worked, and then evaluate, like, do we want to manage this this much, or do we want to outsource? And so that's where we're testing right now. So we can give people feedback on our experience.   But I would say I would estimate 30-35% I think that you can get it down a lot lower than that. Okay, but I would estimate that I'm a big fan of under promise over deliver. And so if you estimate it 35% and ends up at 25% You're like bonus, right? Yeah, I'm on that side. But again, even if you take, you know, $9,000 Uh, you know, if we just did $9,000 a month, and you minus 35%. I mean, you're that's still almost $6,000 a month, right now, you got to start looking at occupancy rates and things like that. And now seasonality comes into play, like after summertime, it will almost be like for three or four months 100% occupied. And so those months will really make up for some of the slower months right now. It's pretty much every weekend, like weekend warriors kind of get aways, but we haven't had anybody stay there during the weekend. Yeah.   Michael: Okay. Okay. Yeah. See, I guess it's really very much market specific around what your occupancy and then associated expenses are because those two are related. How much cleaning you're gonna do, how much turnover you're going to have is a function of your occupancy.   Ariana: Exactly.   Larry: I would say Galveston, you know, right now, when you're looking at the school seasons and stuff like that, you won't see as many weekday rentals. Okay, so that's, that's one thing to kind of look at. Christmas, spring breaks, like Thanksgiving, you start to get kind of the weekdays when people can travel with their families and stuff is what we've noticed so far.   Michael: Okay. Well, that makes sense. Well, you two have been so generous with your time. Thank you so much, again, for hanging out with me and sharing all this wisdom. If people have more questions for you, or want to get a hold of you, what's the best way for them to do that?   Ariana: You can email me at Arianawhitesellstx@gmail.com. Or you can also find me on Instagram: Ariana Sells Texas. And yeah, I'm more than happy to speak with anybody about the current market.   Ariana: So she's like she's licensed here in Texas runs the entire team. So she's the go to for anything here. Yeah, if I can connect or just add value to people anywhere else across the country, I would say connect with me on any social media platform. And my handles the same on all of them @LarryMFWhite.   Michael: So good. You too will thank you again and I can't wait to see where this ranch takes you both.   Ariana: Yes. Yeah, we'd love to have you out someday.   Larry: Yeah, come on down. Come at come fly into Austin or San Antonio and come out to the ranch. Let us know we'll do some wine tours.   Michael: Do some goat yoga. Careful what you wish for.   Larry: Yeah. Awesome.   Michael: Thank you to take care and enjoy the new year.   Ariana: Oh, thank you so much.   Michael: Alrighty everyone that was our episode a big big big thank you to Larry and Arianna. It was so much fun having them on. We chit chatted after the show after we finished recording here and they are hilarious if you didn't already catch that from the show. Definitely a market worth checking out Houston Galveston both for short and long term rentals. Exciting stuff. As always, if you like the episode, feel free to leave us a rating or review wherever it is you will see your episodes. And as always, we look forward to seeing the next one. Happy investing

Influential Entrepreneurs with Mike Saunders, MBA
Interview with LM Stamper Managing Director with Evermore Wealth Discussing Retirement Planning for Women

Influential Entrepreneurs with Mike Saunders, MBA

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 22:32


LM Stamper's (“Stamp”) mission is to help educate the general public about the laws of money so they can make better, more informed decisions regarding their finances.Stamp received his degree in Management Information Systems with a minor in Business from Texas Tech University and went on to study at The American College for Financial Services. Stamp has won various awards for accomplishments in the education and implementation of financial strategies for his clients, as well as for the development of new advisors.Stamp oversees a successful team of financial advisors at his Fort Worth office, mentoring and assisting with client interaction and plan development. He is also The Living Balance Sheet® go-to person and trainer for his office. Using a powerful model that begins with education first, Stamp helps his clients move toward a position of financial independence in their lives. His value to the public lies in his desire to educate his clients first and to help provide them with the appropriate financial tools they need to achieve proper financial balance.Stamp grew up as an Army brat, traveling the world with his family from Los Angeles, to Lubbock, to Austin, to Germany.He's thankful to have seen what the world has to offer and now proudly makes Texas his home with his beautiful wife and daughter.In his spare time, Stamp can be found painting, enjoying good movies, cooking, listening to music, watching sports and mentoring his Little Brother via the Big Brothers Big Sisters program. Still, his favorite activity outside of the office is fantasy football I. He's the commissioner of his league with good friends of over 24 years, and he says it never seems to get old.Learn More: https://lmstamper.com/Influential Influencers with Mike Saundershttps://businessinnovatorsradio.com/influential-entrepreneurs-with-mike-saunders/Source: https://businessinnovatorsradio.com/interview-with-lm-stamper-managing-director-with-evermore-wealth-discussing-retirement-planning-for-women

The Dallas Morning News
1/18/22: 1 dead, others injured in shooting at large gathering in Fort Worth...and more news

The Dallas Morning News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 3:34


1 dead, others injured in shooting at large gathering in Fort Worth; Mesquite construction updates: highways 80 and 635, multi-city bike trail; Conservative host Glenn Beck to headline Collin County GOP's Lincoln Day Dinner; Hostage details calling 911, family during Colleyville synagogue attack

Go Time in Fort Worth with Mayor Mattie Parker
Fort Worth Focus: redistricting update

Go Time in Fort Worth with Mayor Mattie Parker

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 7:50


Happy New Year, Fort Worth! In the first episode of 2022, Mayor Parker is sharing a quick redistricting update. Learn more about where we are in the process, what is coming next, and how to get involved. See the schedule of upcoming redistricting meetings and public hearings: https://www.fortworthtexas.gov/government/redistricting/redistricting-schedule Learn more about the redistricting process: https://www.fortworthtexas.gov/government/redistricting..A podcast hosted by Mayor Mattie Parker, Go Time takes a look at current city issues, innovative Fort Worth residents, and how we are moving the 13th largest city in the nation forward....Learn more about Go Time and nominate a future Go Time guest at fortworthtexas.gov/gotime. Listen to the show wherever you get your podcasts. Go Time is produced by staff here at the City of Fort Worth: Bethany Warner, Katy Holloway, and John-Michael Perkins.Katy and John-Michael also produce our Water Utility's podcast H2OMG, give it a listen.

Ironweeds
128 - Googling Ourselves to Death

Ironweeds

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 89:31


In Biden's America, parents face fines for keeping sick kids home in a pandemic, blue-pilled Senators flagrantly violate public health and safety rules, and the plebes are told to treat Covid testing like going to your favorite brunch place. The Spanish Secret Service was behind the 2017 terror attack in Barcelona in an attempt to keep Catalonia in line. The 1/15 hostage situation in Fort Worth surrounds a shadowy figure called the Gray Lady of Bagram. How the decision to have kids is personal, regional, global, and everything in between. And great news on the Covid front: a cannabis cure and a vaccine for all.    Latham restaurateur: Senator doesn't get pass on mask mandate https://www.timesunion.com/news/article/Latham-restaurateur-says-Gillibrand-doesn-t-get-16778202.php    Secret Service was behind Barcelona attack: https://www.thenational.scot/news/19841925.secret-service-behind-barcelona-terror-attacks-says-ex-cop/    To breed or not to breed: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/20/style/breed-children-climate-change.html   Aafia Siddiqui: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2009/nov/24/aafia-siddiqui-al-qaida   More on Siddiqui: https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2021/10/21/us-pakistan-protests-release-neuroscientist-aafia-siddiqui   Texas hostage situation: https://abcnews.go.com/US/armed-man-takes-hostages-texas-synagogue-source/story?id=82285896   Weed and covid: https://www.bostonglobe.com/2022/01/14/marijuana/can-cannabis-really-prevent-covid-not-quite-new-study-shows-promise/   Patent Free Vax Development: https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2022/jan/15/corbevax-covid-vaccine-texas-scientists

That's What She Said
Deep Water: Contemplating Baptism 1/7

That's What She Said

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022


Don't Get It Twisted. The wildest thing about saying “yes” to God is, the human mind (or a personified Enemy, you decide) can come up with a million ways to twist religious commitment into US getting what WE want. The one with a new (or renewed) enthusiasm for Christian faith can imagine all kinds of ways that this is going to make life better, easier, more prosperous… but we're invited here to be extremely skeptical of that. To tell us your thoughts on this sermon, click through to the web posting and leave us a comment. Or, find us on social media: Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Or, email us the old-fashioned way: info@galileochurch.org. To contribute financially to the ongoing ministry of Galileo Church, find us on Venmo, Patreon, or PayPal, or just send a check to 6563 Teague Rd., Fort Worth, TX 76140.

gone cold podcast - texas true crime
Lost in the Desert Part 2: Cheryl Lynn Vasquez-Dismukes

gone cold podcast - texas true crime

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 35:04


During the Summer of 1987, the disappearances of girls and young women were stacking up in El Paso. Though the police seemed to think most were simply runaways, they changed their tune when the bodies of two missing females were found in the city's Northeast desert on September 4th. When two more bodies were found a month and a half later, El Paso police acted fast and arrested their suspect – but he wasn't charged with the murders, rather, he was charged with the rape of a woman who he had to let go. Eventually, David Leonard Wood was convicted of a total of six Northeast El Paso murders that occurred in the summer of 87 but three area females are still missing to this day. This episode of gone cold is the further story of the Desert Killer's known victims and the third that is potentially his victim: Cheryl Lynn Vasquez-Dismukes.If you have any information about the disappearances of Melissa Alaniz or Cheryl Vasquez Dismukes, please contact the El Paso Police at 915-832-4445.If you have any information about the disappearances of Marjorie Alice Knox, please contact the Dona Ana County, New Mexico Sheriff's Office at 575-526-0795.Be sure to check out our pals over at the podcast Fort Worth Roots.Please consider donating to the Fort Worth Cold Case Support Group, a non-profit set up in hopes to fund the testing needed to give the families of Fort Worth murder victims justice. You can make an incredible impact on these folks' lives by donating. Please go to: https://haynow.appcapable.com/customerForm?paymentFormId=6169c6306671d56b5e215507&fbclid=IwAR2pnENlLwT7msIXDCF3Bot6fu0T4dLthEoMZOe4QFhDb8JClEv9KORAkv0You can donate to law enforcement investigations that need funding or upload your DNA into a database used only for law enforcement investigations at DNAsolves.comIf you don't have DNA data from a consumer testing site, you can get a kit at connect.DNAsolves.comYou can support gone cold and listen ad-free at patreon.com/gonecoldpodcastFind us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by using @gonecoldpodcast......and on YouTube at: youtube.com/c/gonecoldpodcastThe El Paso Times, The Austin Statesman, the article Memories of Angie on New Mexico State University's website, and court appeal documents were used as sources for this episode.#JusticeForCherylVasquezDismukes #JusticeForMarjorieKnox #JusticeForMelissaAlaniz #ElPaso #ElPasoTX #Texas #TX #GoneCold #GoneColdPodcast #TexasTrueCrime #TrueCrime #TrueCrimePodcast #Podcast #ColdCase #UnsolvedMysteries #Missing #MissingPersons #TheDesertKiller

Oklahoma Sooners Podcast
Sooner Radio Network Postgame Show - Sooner Hoops Drop A Heartbreaker in Fort Worth

Oklahoma Sooners Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 29:31


Toby and Kevin Henry recap the tough loss to TCUSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Focus Group
Frigorific Alienism

The Focus Group

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 46:58


Shop Talk reveals nine words that have been removed from some dictionaries in 202. Also, we explore North Korea's fascination with triplets. The Amazing Kreskin is our Business Birthday as he celebrates his 87th today. Caught My Eye solves the rat and rodent problem in NYC—yum…Oreos. Finally, Elvira loses 11K “horny old men” and then shortly gains 60K new followers after coming out in September 2021. Thanks to our Fort Worth listener for the Oreo cookies and Key Lime Kit Kat! Taste test coming soon. We're all business. Except when we're not.Apple Podcasts: apple.co/1WwDBrCSpotify: spoti.fi/2pC19B1iHeart Radio: bit.ly/2n0Z7H1Tunein: bit.ly/1SE3NMbStitcher: bit.ly/1N97ZquGoogle Podcasts: bit.ly/1pQTcVWPandora: pdora.co/2pEfctjYouTube: bit.ly/1spAF5aAlso follow Tim and John on:Facebook: www.facebook.com/focusgroupradioTwitter: www.twitter.com/focusgroupradioInstagram: www.instagram.com/focusgroupradio

The Dallas Morning News
1/14/22: COVID-19 pills and antibody treatments are in short supply...and more news

The Dallas Morning News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 4:07


COVID-19 pills and antibody treatments are in short supply; Granbury man who founded Oath Keepers charged with seditious conspiracy in Capitol riot; Fort Worth schools superintendent announces plans to retire; Energy drink company Monster buys Deep Ellum Brewing in Dallas

EST. - For the Established Church with Micah Fries, Sam Rainer and Josh King

Pastors can be busy. But you should not be too busy to make the most of your lunch hour. There is a better use of your time than eating a sandwich at your desk. Josh and Sam discuss three key ways to leverage your lunch to make the most of ministry.Episode Sponsor: On March 22-24, experienced ministry leaders from around the country will gather on the campus of Southwestern Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas, to explore how God's church can thrive in this ever-changing ministry context. Founded on an unyielding commitment to biblical truth, built by expert practitioners, and designed to encourage and equip God's people in every area of ministry, this gathering is a place where you can be empowered to live your calling, wherever God has called you. So join us in Fort Worth, Texas, on March 22-24, and learn more at swbts.edu/ministrynow2022.

Reading With Your Kids Podcast
Reading With Your Kids - The Grandmother Of Juneteenth

Reading With Your Kids Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 38:01


Alice Faye Duncan is on the #ReadingWithYourKids #Podcast to celebrate Opal Lee & What It Means To Be Free. Alice tells us that this is the true story of Black activist Opal Lee and her vision of Juneteenth as a holiday everyone celebrates. At the age of 89, she walked from Fort Worth, Texas to Washington, D.C., in an effort to gain national recognition for Juneteenth. Click here to visit Alice's website - https://alicefayeduncan.com/ Click here to visit our website - www.readingwithyourkids.com

The Dallas Morning News
1/13/22: Dallas ISD Superintendent Michael Hinojosa to resign...and more news

The Dallas Morning News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 4:25


Dallas ISD Superintendent Michael Hinojosa to resign; Number of kids hospitalized for COVID-19 at Fort Worth hospital system is at all-time high; Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins says masking, vaxxing and testing key to fighting omicron; American Red Cross calls for blood donations amid nation's worst blood shortage in over a decade

The Chris Salcedo Show
Chris Salcedo Show: CRT In The Medical Field

The Chris Salcedo Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 8:14


You want to get antibodies... You aren't black or hispanic, so no. It's happening in Fort Worth. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Y'all-itics
The State of Texas is Calling Out Sick

Y'all-itics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 40:20


From ambulances to airlines, school buses to paramedics, and garbage pickup to water main breaks.  The latest wave of COVID in Texas is, fortunately, not killing as many people as other variants.  But Omicron is certainly disrupting many aspects of our daily lives. Despite your job title, many Texans are picking up new responsibilities at work as businesses and governments try to remain open.  In this episode of Y'all-itics, the Jasons call up Hallie Stewart, the North Texas Operations Manager for Acadian Ambulance. She not only manages that operation from the office, but she is now forced to actually hop on ambulances and respond to dispatches since the sick call list at her company has tripled with Omicron. But it's not just ambulances. Fort Worth, like many cities across the state, is moving employees around to different departments to have enough staff to keep the city open.  The Jasons also called in to that city's noticeably empty command center to talk with the person in charge, Brandon Bennett. He and Hallie share new insight, and both answer the question of when this surge will peak.

That's What She Said
Baby Driver 8/8

That's What She Said

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022


Son of God, Son of Humanity. This is Jesus, blissfully in tune with God and the human family, the mediator who understands us both, the peacemaker, the one who stands in the gap, Repairer of the Breach, Restorer of Streets to Live In.To tell us your thoughts on this sermon, click through to the web posting and leave us a comment. Or, find us on social media: Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Or, email us the old-fashioned way: info@galileochurch.org. To contribute financially to the ongoing ministry of Galileo Church, find us on Venmo, Patreon, or PayPal, or just send a check to 6563 Teague Rd., Fort Worth, TX 76140.

gone cold podcast - texas true crime
Lost in the Desert Part 1: Marjorie Knox & Melissa Alaniz

gone cold podcast - texas true crime

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 35:01


Almost immediately after rapist and pedophile David Leonard Wood left prison in Huntsville, Texas and paroled to his mother's house in El Paso, teenaged girls and young women began disappearing. Though the bodies of six of the females were eventually found, and Wood convicted of killing them, three remain missing to this day. This episode of gone cold is the story of the Desert Killer's known victims and two that are potentially are as well: Marjorie Knox and Melissa Alaniz.If you have any information about the disappearances of Marjorie Alice Knox, please contact the Dona Ana County, New Mexico Sheriff's Office at 575-526-0795.If you have any information about the disappearance of Melissa Alaniz, please contact the El Paso Police at 915-832-4445.Please consider donating to the Fort Worth Cold Case Support Group, a non-profit set up in hopes to fund the testing needed to give the families of Fort Worth murder victims justice. You can make an incredible impact on these folks' lives by donating. Please go to: https://haynow.appcapable.com/customerForm?paymentFormId=6169c6306671d56b5e215507&fbclid=IwAR2pnENlLwT7msIXDCF3Bot6fu0T4dLthEoMZOe4QFhDb8JClEv9KORAkv0You can donate to law enforcement investigations that need funding or upload your DNA into a database used only for law enforcement investigations at DNAsolves.comIf you don't have DNA data from a consumer testing site, you can get a kit at connect.DNAsolves.comYou can support gone cold and listen ad-free at patreon.com/gonecoldpodcastFind us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by using @gonecoldpodcast......and on YouTube at: youtube.com/c/gonecoldpodcastThe El Paso Times, The Austin Statesman, and court appeal documents were used as sources for this episode.#JusticeForMarjorieKnox #JusticeForMelissaAlaniz #ElPaso #ElPasoTX #Texas #TX #GoneCold #GoneColdPodcast #TexasTrueCrime #TrueCrime #TrueCrimePodcast #Podcast #ColdCase #UnsolvedMysteries #Missing #MissingPersons #TheDesertKiller

Fierce Lab
Owning Your Mental Health and Self-Care in 2022 with Dr. Jamie Erwin

Fierce Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 65:50


In this episode, Tara talks with Dr. Jamie Erwin of VIVI Women's Health about the correlation between mental and physical health, as well as the different stages of womanhood. Throughout their discussion, Jamie offers advice on coping with isolation and talking to your physician. Mental and physical health Mental and physical health are sometimes linked. Mental health issues can manifest in physical symptoms, such as anxiety causing an increase in heart rate and blood pressure. Stress can even have an impact on a woman's menstrual cycle. Jamie says she tends to see more adolescents seeking guidance about period abnormalities in January after final exams. Jamie's background and some advice on success Jamie grew up in Fort Worth and attended the University of Arkansas. She returned to Texas to attend medical school at UT Southwestern and got married to a West Point graduate after her first year. Jamie talks about the low points, the challenges of loneliness and worrying, she went through while she was in school, and her husband was deployed. For women experiencing isolation and anxiety, Jamie suggests finding someone to talk to who either has been through something similar or is a professional, which could include an OB-GYN. The most important thing a doctor can do is listen and build trust with their patients. Adolescence In this episode, Jamie walks through the different stages of womanhood, from adolescence to the reproductive years to menopause. Adolescence is a challenging time, as a young woman's body is changing, and an initial visit with a gynecologist can be a scary experience. Jamie strives not only to help normalize body differences, speaking to the negative impacts of social media, but also to create a safe space for having difficult conversations. Reproductive years Jamie describes the reproductive years as those in which many women find themselves — many are finishing education, starting careers, looking for a potential partner, etc. Women may deviate from set expectations and are often faced with pressures about starting a family, though it's a deeply personal choice. Jamie talks about the challenges of infertility and the courage she sees in women that decide to keep trying. She also discusses postpartum, as well as postpartum depression, and how taking care of a newborn is often the hardest thing a woman has ever done, likening it to running a race without knowing where the finish line is. Jamie compares mental health issues to a broken arm — they require care and time to heal. Menopause Jamie says menopause, which is defined as twelve consecutive months without having a period, is a very individualized experience unique to every woman. She explains that a woman can be perimenopausal, or experience "pre menopause," for up to 14 years, during which time she can experience hot flashes and night sweats. SIGN UP FOR THE APP Eager for more tools and resources to help you find your fierce? Now you can access additional content across the four content pillars using the Fierce Lab app. Premium subscribers get access to articles, guides, checklists, video content, and workshops as well as exclusive events for members only. FOLLOW FIERCE LAB Follow Fierce Lab on Instagram or LinkedIn for the latest updates. Please be sure to SUBSCRIBE, REVIEW, and SHARE Fierce Lab with women who are looking to level up.

OurDailyPodcast
#295 - OurDailyPodcast: Basketpod - Big 12 Play is Underway!

OurDailyPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 69:47


Game Recaps David and Brent, take a look at yet another Top 10 win for the Bears, this time to start conference play on the road in Ames against Iowa State. They also recount the Big 12 home opening win over the Oklahoma Sooners and new head coach, Porter Moser. Bookmarks David mulls over his favorite tweets of the week, including an absolute gem from Baylor Legend MaCio Teague's mother, Barbara. How good is this Baylor team? All eight regular contributors rank inside EvanMiya.com's Top 200 most impactful players. Game Previews Then the guys turn to a preview of the next two games— a weekend showdown against TCU in Fort Worth and Tuesday's game against a stingy Texas Tech defense at home. Bears. Horned Frogs. Fort Worth, Texas. Saturday at 4:00pm on ESPN+. Bears. Red Raiders. Waco, Texas. Tuesday at 6:00pm on ESPN2. Starting Five: Best NIL Deals

EST. - For the Established Church with Micah Fries, Sam Rainer and Josh King
The Good That's Coming for the Church in the Post-Pandemic World (Ep, 267)

EST. - For the Established Church with Micah Fries, Sam Rainer and Josh King

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 34:59


Most pastors and church leaders are still in recovery mode from a two-year whirlwind. Decision fatigue and burnout are real. But there is hope. On this episode, Josh and Sam discuss some good things that are coming for the church. God has a way of using difficult seasons to refine His people. Better days are on the horizon!Episode Sponsor: On March 22-24, experienced ministry leaders from around the country will gather on the campus of Southwestern Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas, to explore how God's church can thrive in this ever-changing ministry context. Founded on an unyielding commitment to biblical truth, built by expert practitioners, and designed to encourage and equip God's people in every area of ministry, this gathering is a place where you can be empowered to live your calling, wherever God has called you. So join us in Fort Worth, Texas, on March 22-24, and learn more at swbts.edu/ministrynow2022.

PMU School: A Podcast For Artists by Artists
35. @unionbeautylab: Is Anemia Affecting Your Healed Results

PMU School: A Podcast For Artists by Artists

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 7:06


Have you ever ran into this scenario? You've done a clients brows, but despite great color selection she can't hold onto the pigment, and/or she turns grey.  This is a common issue in the beauty industry and in today's episode @unionbeautylab discusses ways to treat this problem also known as Amenia.  Tune in! Meet Bianca: Bianca Elise is the owner and founder of Union Beauty Lab and Union Beauty school, a five-star Bespoke PMU Studio and Training Academy in Dallas, Fort Worth.  Her journey started over 20 years ago as a freelance graphic designer and fine art portrait painter. Desiring a more stable financial future, she pursued a medical career.  She soon pivoted once she discovered PMU and the opportunity to use both her artistic and medical training. Along with her six-year career in PMU, Bianca has gained extensive experience in running a successful Studio, and most importantly, the personal relationships that keep businesses growing and thriving.  Warm, patient, and kind, Bianca is motivated to teach women how to pivot from their 9-5 to a 6 figure income in PMU in less than two years!⁣ DM and find her on Instagram: @@UnionBeautyLab      

Innovate Fort Worth
#54 Cameron Cushman: How to Deliver a Toothpick to Bono

Innovate Fort Worth

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 30:31


In this episode, we literally flip the script and put our host in the hot seat. Marco Johnson, our very first guest on the show, serves as guest host as we interview our very own host Cameron Cushman about his work to build the innovation and entrepreneurial ecosystem in Fort Worth. He talks about his work in the George W. Bush Administration, his time at the Kauffman Foundation in Kansas City and about his failed startup, My Groom Room. And about that time he met Bono too.

That's What She Said

The kids are all right. If last Sunday honored the long lifetime wait, this Sunday speaks to the possibility of youth as a revelation of what God is going to do next. Here, God is revealed as Jesus's “father” (much to Joseph's chagrin, I imagine), and we catch the foreshadowing of his provocative engagement with scripture and VRPs as he begins to imagine what comes next.To tell us your thoughts on this sermon, click through to the web posting and leave us a comment. Or, find us on social media: Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Or, email us the old-fashioned way: info@galileochurch.org. To contribute financially to the ongoing ministry of Galileo Church, find us on Venmo, Patreon, or PayPal, or just send a check to 6563 Teague Rd., Fort Worth, TX 76140.

817 Podcast
The Fort Worth Road Dilemma: What projects will get funded in the 2022 Bond Program?

817 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 48:59


Happy New Year to all of you who make us a part of your life! We appreciate you and are excited to continue to deliver a fresh perspective on the news in Fort Worth. The big story today is about the funding for roads and how North Fort Worth councilmen are fighting for projects when recent data shows that stretches of road where concentrations of people have been killed or seriously hurt in crashes in Fort Worth are predominantly in neighborhoods where at least 75% of the residents are people of color.Map of the new roads that might make the bond package: https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=1wgsL71Fg1EdjObXhklVBheyfiE8k1Ujf&hl=en&usp=sharing

City Life Church Podcast
Your Word for 2022 - Audio

City Life Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 45:55


Welcome to the weekly podcast of Pastor Tim Woody and City Life Church in Fort Worth, Texas. City Life Church exists to influence culture by making Jesus known. For more information visit us online at www.citylifefw.org

The Informed Life
Dan Klyn on the BASIC Framework

The Informed Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 35:51


Dan Klyn is co-founder of The Understanding Group, an information architecture consultancy based in Michigan. Dan has also created useful and influential IA frameworks, and in this conversation, we focus on his latest: the BASIC framework. If you're enjoying the show, please rate or review it in Apple's Podcasts directory: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-informed-life/id1450117117?itsct=podcast_box&itscg=30200 Show notes Dan Klyn The Understanding Group The BASIC framework Chris Farnum Peter Morville Louis Rosenfeld Andreas Resmini Richard Saul Wurman Bob Royce Edith Farnsworth House Ludwig Mies van der Rohe Kimbell Art Museum Louis Kahn Renzo Piano Brian Eno Some show notes may include Amazon affiliate links. I get a small commission for purchases made through these links. Read the transcript Jorge: Dan, welcome to the show. Dan: Thank you. Jorge: It is such a pleasure to have you here. As I was telling you before we started recording, you're one of the people that I originally thought of having as a guest on the show, when I first conceived of the show. I am constantly inspired and just amazed by the contributions you've brought to our field of information architecture. And I'm honored to have you on the show and looking forward to hearing about you. In particular, about a framework that you've been sharing recently. About Dan Jorge: But before we get into that, I'm hoping that you will tell us about yourself. Who are you, Dan? Dan: Sure. Let's see... I was a fat baby. I think the reason that I have the pleasure of talking with you today... we can blame Chris Farnham, who is an information architect in Southeast Michigan. I went to a conference about information architecture in 2009. My first professional conference had ever been to in any field, and I didn't know if I was particularly welcome or fit well into the field of information architecture, but I had a mentor who encouraged me and that was Peter Morville. So Chris Farnham and Peter Morville, these two guys from Ann Arbor are the only people I thought I knew at this conference, which was true for about five minutes. And as we were walking to the opening reception, Chris said, "Hey, those two guys walking in front of us... those guys are architect-architects. Like, you know, like what you're interested in, Klyn!" Because even back then, the architecture part of information architecture is what I was mostly interested in. And walking in front of me on the way to this opening reception at the IA Summit, as it was called back then was Jorge Arango and Andreas Resmini. And I never talked to Chris again for four or five years, I think. And I have held fast to Jorge and Andreas ever since. And I'm so grateful to have had... I've been given by you guys permission to be as excited as I am about the architecture part of information architecture. Which is so different than my experience with other professionals in the built environment. When I started enthusing about information architecture and the ways that I think what makes places good for people in the built environment has something immediately relevant for us to learn from, as people who make digital products and services.... they're not into it. They scold me for not having consulted the correct sources. Or having the wrong opinions about some buildings or what have you. And you and Andreas both welcomed my amateurism, at a time when you could have just, you know... I don't know! So that's why I'm here. Hi, my name is Dan Klyn. I'm an information architect and I am fascinated by — I am on fire about — the ways that architecture in the built environment can teach us how to do things with digital products and services. And any second now, metaverse-icle products and services and such. So that's what I'm interested. I'm interested in the spatiality of meaning. That is a mouthful that nobody wants to hear, but that's how I say it sometimes. And I have drawn most of my ways of thinking about and seeing this from an increasingly intensive pursuit of Richard Saul Wurman from a biographical standpoint. I figured if I could learn everything that he knows about information architecture, then that would be pretty good. So I've been trying to turn him upside down and shake him, and catch what comes out of his pockets for about seven years or so now. So, that's what I do. Jorge: That's a great intro and I feel like this episode is turning into the Jorge and Dan mutual appreciation society. But I think that we can't wrap up the intro without also naming the fact that you are a co-founder of The Understanding Group, Dan: right? The Understanding Group Dan: That's right. Yes! And Mr. Wurman having been so essential to the founding of our company. Bob Royce and I, when he... he as a serial entrepreneur was in the school of information and library studies at the same time that Peter and Lou were back in the day. And so, as somebody from a business development background standpoint, interested in information architecture, his interest in it went all the way back to Richard Saul Wurman. And the first time I saw Richard in person was a speech that he gave at the University of Michigan and the only person that I knew in the audience and we sat right next to each other right in the front row is Bob Royce. So yeah, together, our enthusiasm for information architecture, digital strategy... whatever ways that we can apply architectural thinking to usually large-scale software and information systems, that's what we wanted to start a company to focus on. And certainly we were inspired by and got to learn through their advice. Peter and Lou having operated the world's first really large scale information architecture consultancy, which was called Argus, which operated back in the late 1990s and disbanded, about the same time that a lot of things did in March of 2001. Yeah, there's probably a way that you could have a business that focuses on information architecture and that... we want it to be that. So, that was 10 years ago and TUG continues to be among the... if you were to say, "Hey, who should we get to help us with information architecture?" people would probably say, Jorge Arango, Abby Covert. An aspiration that we're just pleased that we are often in that same sort of three or four things that you would just know about when it comes to taking on significant information architectural challenges in software and digital products and services, yeah! That's what we've become. "The spatiality of meaning" Jorge: I want to circle back to this phrase, "the spatiality of meaning." And you referenced being inspired by Mr. Wurman. And you also talked about "Being on fire about the architecture of the built environment," and talking about gravitating to Andreas and myself at that first information architecture summit. And one thing that the three of us have in common, the three of us being Mr. Wurman, Andreas, and myself, is that our background is in building architecture. But that is not your background, right? Dan: Correct. Library science over here. Jorge: Library science. So, I'm wondering what drew you to the architecture of the built environment? Dan: It's gonna sound... it's exactly... think of the most boring cliche way to answer your question and that's the answer. Since I was a little boy, I had a Crayola drafting set of a T-square and a triangle. And big paper. And my parents got me a tilty desk. Like it was the only thing I knew that I wanted it to be until I didn't think that I could because I was bad at math. So, for as long as I can remember, I wanted to make the shapes that I make on paper turn into an experience that people could have. Especially me, but other people may be also. And since then, and especially since becoming a consultant who travels a lot, I have had an extraordinary opportunity to go to buildings. And I have had my cognition, my heart rate, my pulse, my skin temperature... I have been physically changed by every different kind of place that I've been to. And by doing that on purpose, that's where the BASIC Framework comes from is an awareness that I developed at some point that what these buildings do is they are machines that uniquely change our human experience by changing our blood pressure and our cognition and our pulse. And the effects that it uses are both, you know, the physics of the earth, the density of the walls... if you're in a crypt of a cathedral and the density of the walls is two feet thick and it is granite, the air pressure changes in there make what your body can... what's possible for you to experience has been concrete-ized literally in ways that are just extraordinary. And so, by putting myself in so many of these different places, and yes, I've catered to my list of initially is canonical buildings that architects who control what is considered to be a good building in the Western tradition, right? But that's the kind of list that I started from. And by going to as many of these places as possible, continually re-energizing and re-believing in reifying the reality... not some neat-o idea that I choose to have, but an actual experience that is undeniable that the way that these places have been set up through the arrangement of material and space and through the arrangement of the information that is either encoded in that material or inscribed on that material, the situatedness of things in space changes how we... how we experience things. The radical architect, Christopher Alexander — people scoff! Like, spit their coffee out when he says stuff like that he knows how to make God appear in a field. But that's... I think also a part of why I've been so interested in this is having been raised in a deeply religious context and hearing about power that people can have access to and experiences with and transformation, transfiguration, transubstantiation, immanence... that I've had those experiences. And they're not so much with sermons of words — it's sermons in stone that really changed my whole life. So, now I seek out experiences in places so that I can understand better how to somehow transfer or remember at a minimum, all of the different ways that I've been made to feel through experiences with architectures. And then, how can I tap into that at some other time for some other purpose. That's how I've been trying to rationalize such the luxurious experience of going to so many kick-ass buildings. Jorge: Well, that was beautifully put and I'll reflect it back to you. What I heard there is that this phrase, "the spatiality of meaning," at least part of it, has to do with the fact that buildings play a functional role in our lives, right? Like they keep us dry and warm — you know, safe from external conditions. But there's this other role that they can play — at least some buildings can play — which has to do with somehow moving us, reminding us of perhaps higher states of being somehow. And the question is... you and I both work on architecting experiences that people have mostly within the confines of the small glass rectangles that we carry around in our pockets. And what's the connection between these — if any — between these transcendent experiences that you have when walking into a special place and the sort of experience that you can have through a digital artifact? Back to screens Dan: Well, I'm trying to think about it in terms of the last thing that I worked on or some real case in point. And I'm thinking about an app that I've been working on that has all kinds of different functionality. And there are ideas about what does prominence mean? So, imagine that this app that has all sorts of different kinds of functions, that there's a giant global organization, and there are people who are mapped to those functions and that they all feel like their thing needs to be the most important and therefore the most prominent or vice versa. So, there's a space race, or there's a competition for the most opportune positions on screens in this screen-iverse that they operate. And finding an order that both works from the, "I'm a brain in a jar," and there are semantic categories and there are things... there's knowledge in the world, not just in my head. And on the basis of knowledge in the world and on figuring things out from a sense-making standpoint, there's no right way. But there are good ways. And so what I'm trying to learn from the built environment, every location in the built environment is special. So, it's not so much that I've been to special places and then, "oh crap. What do you do when you're working on something quotidian? Something that's just every day." It's the idea that every place is charged with wonder. Every... everything is amazing. Because look at it! There it is! People made that! And so, trying to help this organization, this global organization with all these poor people who are, you know, if their thing is high up on the screen, then they win. Trying to posit order for how to situate all of those things in space that's both good for the organization that they can continue to operate as an organization and as a business. It's good for people who have to use it because it isn't like, "oh! Where is the blank?" And also then the trifecta is: and could all of this be key to our embodiment as human beings? And so, we came up with a way to position proprioceptively. Imagine yourself looking at your phone screen. There's left, right, up, down. To make left and right and up and down mean something, other than "most important," "least important," or "most prominent" and "least prominent." So, things of this nature you can expect to find them over to the left. Things of that other nature you can expect to find those to the right. And governance... a way of working with the organization to help diffuse the person with the highest tolerance for discomfort wins, for there to be reasons for belonging and space and place that everybody can understand, and that, when people follow it, it creates more wellbeing and prosperity. It sounds like fantasy, but that's really what we get to do when we're doing it right. And it's great! And I couldn't do it if I didn't have these experiences in my own body and have felt and believed in the pleasure and the learnability and the... to reliably be able to reach over here and get something because you know it's going to be there. And on what basis, other than, "well, that's where it always was." Jorge: What I'm getting from what you're saying there is that in both cases, in both the physical environment than these information environments, there is the possibility of a higher level of order that might bring coherence to what might otherwise be forces that are pulling the experience into different directions, that make it incoherent, right? Dan: That's right. The BASIC framework Jorge: And with that in mind I wanted to ask you... during your career, you've shared a few frameworks that have been influential and helped us see the type of work that we do in different ways. And recently you've shared a draft of a framework that is new to me at least, called BASIC. And it seems to me to be an effort in this direction of providing kind of a framework for order and coherence. Dan: Yes. Jorge: And I was hoping that you would tell us about the BASIC framework. What is it? Dan: I am learning along with everybody else what it is. That's one of the risks! When you put something out there that isn't done yet, that's the reason to do something like that. And so, having put it out there not entirely baked, and then asking for and eliciting feedback... one of the first most powerful pieces of feedback that I got after presenting it for the first time at a meetup online was from a colleague in the UK who posited that what BASIC is, is it's about where you as the designer... it gives you five vantage points into the problem space. It's like, "where should I stand to see the thing that would be good to notice?" So, that's one way to start explaining it is: it's an easy-to-remember acronym that gives you five ways to have a posture vis-a-vis some kind of a complex system. And if you stand in these five places, and if you ask some of the questions that I've provided with each of those postures, then possibly you will see the architecture of the thing. So, that's really the goal. And one of the ways that I came to make it, was a friend of mine... we went on a field trip. We went to the Edith Farnsworth house in Plano, Illinois by Mies van der Rohe. And we were so lucky! It was in the winter and we were the only ones on the tour. So we had a whole hour with the docent. Couldn't go in because it was winter, have since of rectified that. Have been back with the same friend and we got to go inside. But first time we're just outdoors, in the snow, circling the Edith Farnsworth house. And then afterward, I shared the photos that I took. And my friend noted that... he looked at the photos that he... we went to the same place, we took many of the same pictures. But that there was something going on in the pictures that I was taking that he wanted to know about, because it seemed like I was accessing different parts of the same experience. And whether it was just purely on the basis of the otherness of the what... something that somebody else is doing it in the same place, you wonder what that is? It's not... I don't believe it's because I have superior aesthetic judgements or anything like that. I think it has to do though with having developed a set of postures for when I'm trying to relate to buildings first of all, in order to see the right stuff. By my own internal compass, the right stuff. And then, talking this out with my friend and then him encouraging me to do something with it because it seemed like it could be learnable. Like, if I stood there and if I cocked my head that way, I would see it too. So, that's what it is. It's postures that you can use. Questions... So, the first one is boundaries. And if you didn't do any of the other elements, if you found a way to perceive the boundaries... and where was the boundary before where it is now, and who gets to move the... just some really dumb questions about boundaries and where one material stops and another begins is an especially potent thing to notice in buildings. But whether it's buildings or an intranet, the boundaries. How did they get here? Where were they before? Is there a plan to make there be different boundaries? Do you see any evidence of, you know, the ghost traces of where things used to be, or where they're fixing to go? And then you can go right on down the line. And the second one, let's see, what is the second one? You've got the book there, you tell me! Jorge: There is a little booklet that you can print out and I'm holding one in my hands. So, the first one is boundaries. The second one is associations. Dan: Yes. Perfect! So, what do we associate a stepped gable with in the built environment? I'm Dutch. If you go to Holland, Michigan, nearby where I live, there are these buildings that were built within the last 20 years that have these stepped gables not because they serve any functional purpose, but because they remind everybody who lives there, that many of the people here have Dutch heritage, and that that's how the buildings look. So there are direct associations like that. There are more diffused associations, like the kind... does it link to a PDF? You associate that differently than if it's to HTML page, then if it's a video. So just associations. The A, S... Situatedness. Why is anything where it is? If you go to the Kimbell Museum in Fort Worth, Texas — which I encourage you to do — there has been an expansion to that museum. It was originally by Louis Kahn opened in 1972, the year I was born. An expansion to the museum was done by Renzo Piano in the nineties. You now enter the Kimbell from the back, relative to where the architect imagined you would enter the building. So just little... why is anything where it is gives you access to so many architectural decisions that were made in the environment. And then the last two are twinned. And probably I'm too in love with BASIC because it's so easy to remember and I want it to be basic like food-hole, air-hole, dumb-basic. But the last two are invariants. So, what are the forces in the environment that don't change or that seem like they don't change? Brian Eno has wisely said that repetition is a form of change. So you have to be careful with this one. And that's why it is paired with cycles. And those two postures, those two places to stand relative to some complex system... if you were able to perceive what was invariant in the environment, that would explain to you why it shows up the way that it does and each of these elements in the model has a building that I've been to. They're all in the United States so far, and the example cartoon of a building for invariance is a garage I saw in Seattle. Where I live in Michigan, the roofs are a pointy, peaked roof, like kids around here would draw a picture of a house. But in Seattle, there's a shape of a roof that is inverted to catch the rain because it is on a steep hill, in a microclimate that is a rainforest basically. So, it's an invariant. There's so much water there, you're going to change the shape of the roof to rise to channel those forces better. And that was the consequence... consequence to that, a million other decisions about the building. And then cycle, the last one, you can plug that one into what's invariant. In Michigan, we have four seasons. In Seattle, they have maybe two. And so, by looking at what has the system done to anticipate cyclical change in the environment that it's in... put all those five postures together, ask a question from each one, and I feel pretty good that you're not talking about the design so much as you're talking about the architecture of the system. Jorge: What attracts me so much about this framework is that it takes a systemic lens at examining the... or a set of lenses, right? To your point, these are different vantage points from which you can examine the system. And although it is grounded in architecture, as in built architecture — and like you said, the booklet includes drawings of buildings as illustrations of these various lenses — they seem applicable to other types of things that might be architected, right? Like this notion that you can examine the system through the perspective of what distinctions does it manifest, versus what perhaps memories, cultural or otherwise, it triggers, right? Like those are very different perspectives that are part of architected systems, regardless of whether they are buildings or what have you. Dan: That's right. And the caveat here with any methods that I've developed, if you're trying to apply them, it has to be in an architectural context where the nature of the change that is expected or at least possible? Is more than an increment. It can be executed incrementally but the nature of the change... if you're looking for recommendations about how to change the architecture, it should be safe to presume that those kinds of changes are harder to do, possibly take more time, and are more costly because they are more consequential. And so, if people are just making shit, then this framework won't help you because there isn't a reason for everything that was done. And that is... I'm so glad that we've got to here and maybe because of time, we might land here or start landing here, is: the built environment is such a terrific teacher because almost always, except now, every decision that was made is because of a reason. And the traceability of every move that is made to a reason, you need to do that in design too, if you're doing it right. But when you're talking about architecture what that means is that it's being taken on and thought of systemically. And if the thing is being made in a way where it doesn't care about being systemic, then these lenses won't help you because it just is the way that it is because it is. This all presumes total accountability for every move that you make as a recommender of changes to an environment. And I've recommended changes to a digital environment that have made it so that people's jobs went away. I'm glad that I haven't worked on products and services where the changes I've recommended have caused harm to people, that I know of, but it's certainly possible. And as we enter into this metaverse time of everything being part of the experiences that we work on, I think having a framework like this is also helpful because it might check an impulsive feeling of, "oh, I get it." Or, "I've seen it." Or, "I know what it is." Or, "clearly the solution is..." Maybe this framework would help you go slower and not move with so much certainty. Maybe these are five ways to undermine the decision that you were about to make. And I would be good with that, in most cases. Jorge: How do you keep that from paralyzing you altogether? Because when you say you have full accountability over a thing, like... Dan: It all depends on having extraordinary clients. Without clients who are willing to work in that fashion... I mean, whether you want to take maximum accountability for your recommendations or not, Jorge: I can see what you mean, but I can also understand how that sense would or could paralyze you as a designer, right? So, how do you keep the dance going? Responsibility Dan: It's a two way street and if the client isn't playing along and giving you that accountability and that responsibility, then you're not actually... you know, it's not actually happening. So, I think it absolutely depends on having the right clients and TUG has been so fortunate to have not prospered enough to have clients that aren't the right kind. It's weird to engage with information architects to affect change to complex digital products and services. And I think we show up... weird enough, where we've scared away the ones who wouldn't be a good partner with us in wanting to have that level of accountability, that level of traceability for the recommendations that we make. Because it requires that the stakeholders be super accountable to what they want, because you're going to get it, right? Like, that's what I'm saying is, as your architect, if you show me your intent, if you let me make a model of your intent and then the model is more or less correct, then I can make a whole bunch of decisions about the situatedness of things in your space that will deliver against that intent. So God help you if you don't know what you want. Because I need that in order to make decisions on your... with you, not on your behalf. When we started TUG a long time ago, we decided the word agency must not be the word for... We don't want to borrow anyone's agency for money for a couple of months and then give it back to them. They need to keep their agency all along the way to keep instructing us and intending back when we make our moves to make sure that things stay good. So, yeah, it's all about having the right clients and quite frankly, it has a lot to do with my own personal choices over the last year or so to get away from consulting as much as I personally can, and be more in the mode of scholarship and writing because I don't know how much longer the client world is going to be able to make room for the kinds of work that I personally want to do. Closing Jorge: Well Dan, I would love to hear more about what that might be. And I would like to extend you an invitation to do another recording with me, if you are open to it, to explore that and the notion of architecting the thing that architects the thing, somehow, right? Because that's what is implied in what you're saying, I think. But for now, where can folks follow up with you? Dan: Well, I think maybe BASIC would be a good way to start. So if you go to understandinggroup.com/basic, you can download a PDF of the most recent version of the little mini booklet. I've created an instructional video for how to cut and fold said booklet so that it has its maximum booklet-iness for you when you make it. And from there I... yeah, I'm omni-available, except through Facebook, WhatsApp, or Instagram. Jorge: You're not going Meta. Dan: I would accept money from Facebook, Instagram, and WhatsApp to research the potential for harm to human beings, through what they intend to do in the so-called metaverse. But I'm not willing to use their products. Jorge: It sounds like that might yet be another reason for us to have a second conversation here. But I'll just allude to it because I'll include links to the stuff that you've been discussing on the show. And, I'll just reiterate that the booklet is beautiful, simple, useful. I have one printed out and keep it on my desk. So, I encourage folks to check it out. Thank you, Dan, for... Dan: The only thing better than that for me Jorge, is if I could be little and be there on your desk instead of the booklet, but that's... I'd love that. Jorge: I can see you on a little screen here. On a little window in my screen, so... it's not the same, but it's... it'll have to do for now. Well, thank you so much for being with us, Dan. It's always a pleasure to talk to you. Dan: Let's talk again.

The Hills Church, Fort Worth, Texas
What You're Looking For | Taylor Walling

The Hills Church, Fort Worth, Texas

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 31:49


ABOUT THE HILLS Wherever you are in life, you have a purpose. THE HILLS wants to help you find your next step. Our hope is that your journey will include joining us at one of our 3 locations around Fort Worth, or online at https://thehills.online.church. Find locations, videos, and more info about us at https://www.thehills.org. FIND US ON SOCIAL MEDIA Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thehillschurch Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hillschurchtx

The Real Estate Syndication Show
WS1168: Weekly Investor Update: December 26, 2021 to January 1, 20222

The Real Estate Syndication Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 20:40


MARKET INDICATORS SNAPSHOTWEEKLYMortgage Rate (30-Year Fixed): 3.05% (as of 12/23)MONTHLYExisting Home Sales: +1.9% (November 2021)New Residential Sales: +12.4% (November 2021)Median Sales Price for New Houses Sold: $416,900 (November 2021)Construction Spending: +0.2% (October 2021)New Residential Construction: 3.6% (November 2021)QUARTERLYHomeownership Rate: +65.4% (3Q21)Rental Vacancy Rate: +5.8% (3Q21)Sources: NAR, BLS, Federal Reserve Bank, MBACOMMERCIAL REAL ESTATERecord year for commercial real estate in 2022 expectedCBRE announced a positive outlook for the commercial real estate economy despite the threat of the COVID Omicron variant and other risks.Return-to-office trend will raise office space demand this yearThe National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts predicts that the office will remain the hub of business activity.CRE expected to deliver 6% unlevered returns to investors in 2022Commercial real estate will remain strong this year with yields averaging 6% and values rising 11% according to real estate advisory firm Green Street.The end of LIBOR expected to shift the CRE marketIt has been observed that most lenders are not yet confident with substitute benchmark rates such as SOFR and BSBY.Growth in life sciences jobs to fuel real estate space for lab and research usesWith such strong demand for life sciences jobs, a total of 23.8 million square feet of labs were under construction in 3Q2021.Self-storage industry remains strong despite the pandemicThe industry has considerably gained some of the best returns in the market since the pandemicVacation rental demand to grow 14.1% in 2022Occupancy will also remain strong with an expected averate rate of 59.8% HOUSINGWill the housing market crash in 2022? Questions on how the housing market can weather issues has prompted many to expect a market crash in the coming months.Multifamily properties' rental growth to continue this yearMarket tightness, sales volume and equity financing remain strong.Best Cities for Real Estate Investing in 2022Las Vegas, Fort Worth and Atlanta lead low-ratio markets. REAL ESTATE INVESTINGReal estate ETFs continue rallyMany ETFs have appreciated last year, performing better than what analysts have predicted.Which REITs will top in January 2022?The top three REITS with the best value, fastest growth and most momentum were named.

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch
Absurd Truth: Unisex Prisons

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 15:27


*Note: This is a best-of Absurd Truth podcast*A Fort Worth dad threatens a school board in a militia-style fashion, meanwhile a Washington state prison allows a transgender man to be in the female penitentiary.Please visit our great sponsors:Kel-Techttps://KelTecWeapons.comKelTec: Creating Innovative, Quality Firearms to help secure your world. Legacy Precious Metalshttps://legacypminvestments.comPick up your free guide to precious metal investments today.

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch
Absurd Truth: Unisex Prisons

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 15:27


*Note: This is a best-of Absurd Truth podcast*A Fort Worth dad threatens a school board in a militia-style fashion, meanwhile a Washington state prison allows a transgender man to be in the female penitentiary.Please visit our great sponsors:Kel-Techttps://KelTecWeapons.comKelTec: Creating Innovative, Quality Firearms to help secure your world. Legacy Precious Metalshttps://legacypminvestments.comPick up your free guide to precious metal investments today.

Recovered Podcast
John A Glass House Group Part 5 - Recovered 1219

Recovered Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 68:01


John A. from Dallas, TX speaking on steps 11 to 12 at the Glasshouse Group in Fort Worth, TX - August 1st 2002 http://recoveredcast.com

EST. - For the Established Church with Micah Fries, Sam Rainer and Josh King
Keeping Your People During the Great Reshuffling (Ep. 266)

EST. - For the Established Church with Micah Fries, Sam Rainer and Josh King

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 32:49


Not only are church members shuffling during this season but so are church staff. Almost every church will lose some people and some staff, but you can minimize the impact. A new focus on retention is necessary. On this episode, Josh and Sam discuss how you can keep your people during the great reshuffling. Episode Sponsor: On March 22-24, experienced ministry leaders from around the country will gather on the campus of Southwestern Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas, to explore how God's church can thrive in this ever-changing ministry context. Founded on an unyielding commitment to biblical truth, built by expert practitioners, and designed to encourage and equip God's people in every area of ministry, this gathering is a place where you can be empowered to live your calling, wherever God has called you. So join us in Fort Worth, Texas, on March 22-24, and learn more at swbts.edu/ministrynow2022.

Mysteries and Histories
39: The Missing Fort Worth Trio: Rachel Trlica, Julie Ann Moseley and Renee Wilson

Mysteries and Histories

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 31:57


Two days before Christmas in 1974, three girls went to do some last minute Christmas shopping at their local mall in Fort Worth, Texas, but they never came home. The next day a mysterious letter arrives, saying that the girls decided to run away for a week, but were they the ones who wrote it?

Recovered Podcast
John A Glass House Group Part 4 - Recovered 1218

Recovered Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 51:46


John A. from Dallas, TX speaking on steps 8 to 10  at the Glasshouse Group in Fort Worth, TX - August 1st 2002 http://recoveredcast.com

The Running Grind
058: Let's Run with Stephanie Platt (@stephanie.runs)

The Running Grind

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 57:04


Feels good to be back with the last episode of 2021. And I got a good one for you as we head to Fort Worth, Texas and chat with the super fun Stephanie Platt. A 20+ half marathoner that made the leap to the full marathon this year. And she made quite the leap with three marathon in five months: St. Georges, Boston and New York. We catch up with her fresh off the Dallas Half Marathon a few weeks ago and talk her run journery and where it's led her to. @bibrave @gatoradeendurance @hylandspowered 

That's What She Said
Baby Driver 6/8

That's What She Said

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021


What if we wait our whole lives... We live accelerated lives. Everything is fast. But the life of faith is s-l-o-w. On God's timeline, you could wait your whole life, fasting and praying in the temple, for one glimpse of one baby, and say “I can die now.” We're invited to see our lives, our generation, as one in a long line of the faithful, stretching out behind and before us, like Simeon, like Anna.To tell us your thoughts on this sermon, click through to the web posting and leave us a comment. Or, find us on social media: Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Or, email us the old-fashioned way: info@galileochurch.org. To contribute financially to the ongoing ministry of Galileo Church, find us on Venmo, Patreon, or PayPal, or just send a check to 6563 Teague Rd., Fort Worth, TX 76140.

That's What She Said
Baby Driver 5/8

That's What She Said

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021


The nobility of the shitty job. Out of everybody the angels could have appeared to that night – shepherds! Was everyone else too busy to see them? Too focused to look up? In bed, with the privilege of daytime work? Could we find here a redemption of our own shitty jobs – the ones we've had, the ones we have now? Does God's favor extend to people who are working tonight, on Christmas Eve?To tell us your thoughts on this sermon, click through to the web posting and leave us a comment. Or, find us on social media: Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Or, email us the old-fashioned way: info@galileochurch.org. To contribute financially to the ongoing ministry of Galileo Church, find us on Venmo, Patreon, or PayPal, or just send a check to 6563 Teague Rd., Fort Worth, TX 76140.

The Steve Gruber Show
Rey “R.T.” Trevino, Gas prices in Europe are marching higher. Many experts think we will see $100+ oil in 2022

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 11:00


Rey "R.T." Trevino runs Pecos Country Energy, a privately owned oil and gas exploration and production company headquartered in Fort Worth. Pecos Country Energy owns and operates wells across the South Central United States. Gas prices in Europe are marching higher. Many experts think we will see $100+ oil in 2022  

City Life Church Podcast
Rejoice! Jesus is Coming! - Audio

City Life Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 31:20


Welcome to the weekly podcast of Pastor Tim Woody and City Life Church in Fort Worth, Texas. City Life Church exists to influence culture by making Jesus known. For more information visit us online at www.citylifefw.org

Forensic Tales
Warren Horinek

Forensic Tales

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 47:13


#104 - In March 1995, Fort Worth Police officers responded to a 911 call about an apparent suicide. The caller, Warren Horinek, told first responders that his wife, Bonnie, shot and hilled herself. But when the police arrived at the house, he changed his story. Although the Fort Worth police and District Attorney's office refused to charge Warren with his wife's death, a Grand Jury indicted Warren on first-degree murders charges.At trial, the prosecution and defense shared two very different stories about what happened on the night of Bonnie's death. The trial would come down to blood spatter testimony. Support My WorkIf you love the show, the easiest way to show your support is by leaving us a positive rating with a review. You can also tell your family and friends about Forensic Tales.Patreon - If you would like to get early AD-free access to new episodes, have access to exclusive bonus content, snag exclusive show merch or just want to support what I'm doing, please visit our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/forensictalesMerchandise - For t-shirts, stickers, hoodies, coffee mugs & more check out:https://www.teepublic.com/user/forensic-talesSupport Us by Supporting Our Sponsors:NIIN. Tobacco Free Nicotine Pouches. Shop today: https://niinpouches.com/Smile Brilliant. Get 30% off your entire order with promo code "TALES" at checkout. Shop: https://www.smilebrilliant.com/Perkies. Shop today. https://perkies.com/For a complete list of sources used in this episode, please visit: forensictales.comSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/forensictales)

Recovered Podcast
John A Glass House Group Part 3 - Recovered 1217

Recovered Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 61:48


John A. from Dallas, TX speaking on step 1 at the Glasshouse Group in Fort Worth, TX - August 1st 2002 http://recoveredcast.com

EST. - For the Established Church with Micah Fries, Sam Rainer and Josh King
Technology In The Worship Service - When Is It Too Much? (Ep. 265)

EST. - For the Established Church with Micah Fries, Sam Rainer and Josh King

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 32:18


Every church uses technology. Air conditioners, heating units, or electricity are all forms of technology. But can you overdo it with lighting, screens, and sound amplification? The EST.church producer, Taylor Standridge, joins the show to discuss what is appropriate for worship and what might be too much. Episode Sponsor: On March 22-24, experienced ministry leaders from around the country will gather on the campus of Southwestern Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas, to explore how God's church can thrive in this ever-changing ministry context. Founded on an unyielding commitment to biblical truth, built by expert practitioners, and designed to encourage and equip God's people in every area of ministry, this gathering is a place where you can be empowered to live your calling, wherever God has called you. So join us in Fort Worth, Texas, on March 22-24, and learn more at swbts.edu/ministrynow2022.

Not Another Baptist Podcast
Episode 254: Episode 218: Merry Christmas from NAB Podcast and the Texas Baptist College Band

Not Another Baptist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 10:25


Kyle and Matt think you have better things to do than listen to them go on and on about x, y, and z, but in case you're suffering at the in-laws, here's our Merry Christmas to you from NAB Podcast and the Texas Baptist College Band.Check out the video: https://youtu.be/Y0YImznk8ZcARRANGEMENT DETAILSFree lead sheets of “Noel” are available at: https://artistictheologian.com/2021/12/09/noel-texas-baptist-college-band/Additional worship ministry resources available through the SWBTS Artistic Theologian:  http://www.artistictheologian.comCREDITSWords and Music by: Matt Redman, Chris Tomlin, and Ed CashArranged by the Texas Baptist College BandDean of the School of Church Music and Worship: Dr. Joseph R. CriderExecutive Producer and Associate Dean: Dr. Chuck T. LewisTexas Baptist College Band Director: Ricky JohnsonSWBTS Communications Director of Digital Content: Adam CovingtonSWBTS Director of Events Production: Jimbob BrownSWBTS Camera Operator:  Chinsop ChongLighting Director: Bryan StevensonAudio and Mix Engineer: Randy Adams© 2021 The Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, Seminary Hill Records––used by permissionAnother Christmas song for you: https://www.facebook.com/SBCPastorsConference/videos/624210725671851A Christmas book for you: https://amzn.to/3yGD136Big thank you to SWBTS and CSB for their generous support of our podcast. Be sure to check out the Ministry Now conference at: https://swbts.edu/ministry-now-conference/

Jorgenson's Soundbox
Chris Powers: Starting A Real Estate Empire at 17, Focus, Podcast Flywheels

Jorgenson's Soundbox

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 106:47


In the last episode, we discussed alternative assets, and in this episode, we take a deep dive into the career of Chris Powers, the master of one specific alternative asset: real estate. Chris began his real estate career when he was just 17 years old and has spent the last 17 years building Fort Capital, a real estate firm in Fort Worth, Texas. Chris was a hungry 17-year-old, just showed up at college, bought his first house with no money down in 2004. By the time he left college, he had 12 houses. Fast forward to 2021, just this year, along with investors, they purchased $500 million of industrial real estate in Texas. Throughout the episode, we discuss Chris's journey in real estate, investing, recruiting, and podcasting. We started the conversation by asking Chris who his heroes are. He shared the story of his father who went back to college to pursue medicine even after being a lawyer for 13 years. His dad taught him the valuable lessons that you only live one life and that money can only make you so happy. Chris bought his first house at 17 when he was starting college and got into real estate as a means to make money during his studies. He was driven by constantly waking up and feeling behind and wanting to do something. Before graduating, he bought more student housing, started a property management business, and started a leasing business. He graduated in 2008, during the economic collapse, and had no choice but to continue in real estate. From 2010 to 2015, Chris was doing a bit of everything related to real estate – he was building custom homes and spec homes, buying land, VC investing, and had a small team that he managed. Despite having some success, he realized he wasn't compounding his business the way he wanted. Reading Good to Great by Jim Collins motivated him to narrow the focus of his business. Chris talks about his need to be able to recruit and the importance of having a mission. We also discuss how flywheels can propel us forward, and for Chris, his flywheel is based on his podcast, Twitter, real estate business, and investors that create a virtuous cycle of growth. Recently, Chris has transitioned out of being the CEO of Fort Capital, and he is learning how to be an owner. He is also focusing on his VC Funds and building Powers Capital, which he says will function like a family office but also will function like private equity. We wrap up the conversation discussing when enough is enough and measuring impact; Chris says he's no longer in it for the money but rather to see what it is possible to accomplish during the one life he has.   Links:    Chris on Twitter: https://twitter.com/fortworthchris   The Fort Podcast: https://open.spotify.com/show/4dLKPVTiXWmrFwd43iN2LZ    Chris Powers & Pete Chambers Podcast: https://open.spotify.com/episode/2X8vKyUIQaIxV5Mr9J5KMv Good to Great by Jim Collins:  https://amzn.to/3yJV9Jc   Owned and Operated Podcast w/ Chris Powers: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/21-chris-powers-building-%24600mm-commercial-real-estate/id1560999545?i=1000527344852   Fort Ventures: https://www.fort-ventures.com/   On Deck: https://beondeck.com/   Token Economy - How the Web3 Reinvents the Internet by Shermin Voshmgir:  https://amzn.to/3mpmHi7 Topics:   (3:52) - Who are your heroes?   (7:56) - Chris' upbringing & his father's impact on him   (20:47) - Chris starting his career in RE at age 17   (26:17) - Reflecting on the '08 financial crisis   (35:02) - What was your next big inflection point after graduating college in 2008?   (41:02) - You can't scale when you're not clear on your path   (47:52) - The results of learning to focus   (59:22) - What's role does Fort play in your investor's portfolios?   (1:05:41) - How does an investor recoup their money?   (1:09:26) - Compounding business with online content and media   (1:13:20) - The divergence of focusing the mission of Fort Capital and the mission of Chris Powers   (1:19:31) - What is your day-to-day like now?   (1:25:00) - Chris' VC investing exposure   (1:31:11) - What's the end goal for you?   (1:42:27) - What is the most foundational principle you can offer all entrepreneurs? Additional Episodes If You Enjoyed: Mitchell Baldridge: Defeating Taxes, Crypto & Financial Planning   Codie Sanchez: Drug Cartels, Vanguard, and Goldman Sachs Nick Huber: How to Build Leverage, Buy Businesses, and Go Viral on Twitter   If you want to support the podcast, here are a few ways you can:  >> Buy a copy of the Navalmanak: www.navalmanack.com/  >> Share the podcast with your friends and on social media  >> Give the podcast a positive review to help us reach new listeners  >> Make a weekly, monthly, or one-time donation: https://app.omella.com/o/9Bufa  >> Follow me on Twitter: @ericjorgenson >> Learn more and sign up for the “Building a Mountain of Levers” course and community: https://www.ejorgenson.com/leverage  I appreciate your support!     Important quotes from Naval on building wealth and the difference between wealth and money:   How to get rich without getting lucky. - Naval Ravikant   Making money is not a thing you do—it's a skill you learn. - Naval Ravikant   I came up with the principles in my tweetstorm (below) for myself when I was really young, around thirteen or fourteen. I've been carrying them in my head for thirty years, and I've been living them. Over time (sadly or fortunately), the thing I got really good at was looking at businesses and figuring out the point of maximum leverage to actually create wealth and capture some of that created wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Seek wealth, not money or status. - Naval Ravikant   Wealth is having assets that earn while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   Money is how we transfer time and wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Ignore people playing status games. They gain status by attacking people playing wealth creation games.    You're not going to get rich renting out your time. You must own equity—a piece of a business—to gain your financial freedom.  - Naval Ravikant   The most important skill for getting rich is becoming a perpetual learner. You have to know how to learn anything you want to learn. The old model of making money is going to school for four years, getting your degree, and working as a professional for thirty years. But things change fast now. Now, you have to come up to speed on a new profession within nine months, and it's obsolete four years later. But within those three productive years, you can get very wealthy. - Naval Ravikant     Important quotes from the podcast by Naval on Leverage:   “Give me a lever long enough and a place to stand, and I will move the earth.”  —Archimedes    To get rich, you need leverage. Leverage comes in labor, comes in capital, or it can come through code or media. But most of these, like labor and capital, people have to give to you. For labor, somebody has to follow you. For capital, somebody has to give you money, assets to manage, or machines. - Naval Ravikant   Fortunes require leverage. Business leverage comes from capital, people, and products with no marginal cost of replication (code and media). - Naval Ravikant   Capital and labor are permissioned leverage. Everyone is chasing capital, but someone has to give it to you. Everyone is trying to lead, but someone has to follow you. - Naval Ravikant   Code and media are permissionless leverage. They're the leverage behind the newly rich. You can create software and media that works for you while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   If you can't code, write books and blogs, record videos and podcasts. - Naval Ravikant   Leverage is a force multiplier for your judgment. - Naval Ravikant   Apply specific knowledge, with leverage, and eventually you will get what you deserve. - Naval Ravikant   “We live in an age of infinite leverage, and the economic rewards for genuine intellectual curiosity have never been higher. Following your genuine intellectual curiosity is a better foundation for a career than following whatever is making money right now.” - Naval Ravikant   Important Quotes from the podcast on Business and Entrepreneurship   There is no skill called “business.” Avoid business magazines and business classes. - Naval Ravikant   You have to work up to the point where you can own equity in a business. You could own equity as a small shareholder where you bought stock. You could also own it as an owner where you started the company. Ownership is really important.     Everybody who really makes money at some point owns a piece of a product, a business, or some IP. That can be through stock options if you work at a tech company. That's a fine way to start.    But usually, the real wealth is created by starting your own companies or even by investing. In an investment firm, they're buying equity. These are the routes to wealth. It doesn't come through the hours. - Naval Ravikant

The FORT with Chris Powers
RE #188 BONUS: Chris Powers & Eric Jorgenson on Jorgenson's Soundbox

The FORT with Chris Powers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 106:47


Happy Holidays! We wanted to co-launch a special episode where Chris was interviewed by Eric Jorgenson (guest on episode #152) on Eric's show: Jorgenson's Soundbox. Enjoy!  In the last episode, we discussed alternative assets, and in this episode, we take a deep dive into the career of Chris Powers, the master of the specific alternative asset of real estate. Chris began his real estate career when he was just 17 years old and has spent the last 17 years building Fort Capital, a real estate firm in Fort Worth, Texas. Throughout the episode, we discuss Chris's journey in real estate, investing, recruiting, and podcasting. We begin the episode talking about some of the heroes that Chris looks up to including his dad who taught him the valuable lessons that you only live one life and that money can only make you so happy. Chris bought his first house at 17 when he was starting college and got into real estate as a means to make money during his studies. He says that he was driven by constantly waking up and feeling behind and wanting to do something. Before graduating, he bought more student housing, started a property management business, and started a leasing business. He graduated in 2008, during the economic collapse and had no choice but to continue in real estate. From 2010 to 2015, Chris was doing a bit of everything related to real estate – he was building custom homes and spec homes, buying land, VC investing, and had a small team that he managed. Despite having some success, he realized he wasn't compounding his business the way he wanted, and after reading Good to Great by Jim Collins, he decided to narrow his focus. Chris talks about his need to be able to recruit and the importance of having a mission. We also discuss how flywheels can propel us forward, and for Chris, his flywheel is based on his podcast, Twitter, real estate business, and investors that create a virtuous cycle of growth. Recently, Chris has transitioned out of being the CEO of Fort Capital, and he is learning how to be an owner. He is also focusing on his VC Funds and building Powers Capital, which he says will function like a family office but also will function like private equity. We wrap up the conversation discussing when enough is enough and measuring impact; Chris says he's no longer in it for the money but rather to see what it is possible to accomplish during the one life he has. Links:  Chris on Twitter: https://twitter.com/fortworthchris The Fort Podcast: https://open.spotify.com/show/4dLKPVTiXWmrFwd43iN2LZ  Chris Powers & Pete Chambers Podcast: https://open.spotify.com/episode/2X8vKyUIQaIxV5Mr9J5KMv Good to Great by Jim Collins: https://www.amazon.com/Good-Great-Social-Sectors-Business/dp/0977326403/ref=sr_1_4?hvadid=241662136256&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9027256&hvnetw=g&hvqmt=e&hvrand=7276001728265049979&hvtargid=kwd-362385377706&hydadcr=21909_10171323&keywords=good+to+great%27+by+jim+collins&qid=1639750831&sr=8-4 Owned and Operated Podcast w/ Chris Powers: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/21-chris-powers-building-%24600mm-commercial-real-estate/id1560999545?i=1000527344852 Fort Ventures: https://www.fort-ventures.com/ On Deck: https://beondeck.com/ Token Economy - How the Web3 Reinvents the Internet by Shermin Voshmgir: https://www.amazon.com/Token-Economy-Web3-reinvents-Internet/dp/3982103819/ref=asc_df_3982103819/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=459726176530&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=7985022662900678608&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9027256&hvtargid=pla-921536332012&psc=1 Topics: (3:52) - Who are your heroes? (7:56) - Chris' upbringing & his father's impact on him (20:47) - Chris starting his career in RE at age 17 (26:17) - Reflecting on the '08 financial crisis (35:02) - What was your next big inflection point after graduating college in 2008? (41:02) - You can't scale when you're not clear on your path (47:52) - The results of learning to focus (59:22) - What's role does Fort play in your investor's portfolios? (1:05:41) - How does an investor recoup their money? (1:09:26) - Compounding business with online content and media (1:13:20) - The divergence of focusing the mission of Fort Capital and the mission of Chris Powers (1:19:31) - What is your day to day like now? (1:25:00) - Chris' VC investing exposure (1:31:11) - What's the end goal for you? (1:42:27) - What is the most foundational principle you can offer all entrepreneurs?

gone cold podcast - texas true crime
Cheryl Henry & Andy Atkinson: The Houston Lover's Lane Murders Part 3

gone cold podcast - texas true crime

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 41:06


Part 3 of 3. The initial investigation into the slayings of 22-year-old Cheryl Henry and 21-year-old Andy Atkinson was meticulous, with no stones left unturned, but it resulted in virtually no breaks. Though DNA obtained as the result of the attacker raping Cheryl produced a strong profile, no one Detective Billy Belk and company could find was a match. Then, almost 20 years later, the biggest break in the case occurred when the DNA got a hit in CODIS. But there was a problem – the matched DNA also belonged to an unknown assailant. Underlying this story is another one: the story of advancements in DNA technology. Will new technology, i.e. forensic genealogy, finally give this story an ending? If you have any information about the Lover's Lane murders of Cheryl Henry and Andy Atkinson, please contact Houston area crime stoppers at 713-222-8477.Please visit EndTheBackLog.org and consider helping in their mission to hold accountable the perpetrators of sexual violence. Check out Southern Fried True Crime wherever you listen to podcasts or at southernfriedtruecrime.comYou can donate to law enforcement investigations that need funding or upload your DNA into a database used only for law enforcement investigations at DNAsolves.comIf you don't have DNA data from a consumer testing site, you can get a kit at connect.DNAsolves.comPlease consider donating to the Fort Worth Cold Case Support Group, a non-profit set up in hopes to fund the testing needed to give the families of Fort Worth murder victims justice. You can make an incredible impact on these folks' lives by donating. Please go to: https://haynow.appcapable.com/customerForm?paymentFormId=6169c6306671d56b5e215507&fbclid=IwAR2pnENlLwT7msIXDCF3Bot6fu0T4dLthEoMZOe4QFhDb8JClEv9KORAkv0You can support gone cold and listen ad-free at patreon.com/gonecoldpodcastFind us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by using @gonecoldpodcast......and on YouTube at: youtube.com/c/gonecoldpodcastThe Wilmington Morning Star, The Fayetteville Observer, The Houston Chronicle, KHOU 11, The Insight Network, The Transparency Project, The New York Times, The Charlotte News, EndTheBackLog.org, The October 2010 Citizens Against Homicide newsletter, and the book Survivors: The Forgotten Victims of Murder and Suspicious Deaths by Dennis Griffin were used as sources for this series. #JusticeForCherylandAndy #LoversLane #LoversLaneMurders #Houston #HoustonTX #Texas #TX #TexasTrueCrime #GoneCold #GoneColdPodcast #ColdCase #Unsolved #Murder #UnsolvedMurder #Homicide #UnsolvedMysteries #TrueCrime #TrueCrimePodcast #Podcast

The Shotgun Start
Year in Review Part 8, presented by Precision Pro Golf

The Shotgun Start

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 80:40


Andy and Brendan close out the week with a PUNCHY Year-in-Review episode covering the stretch from the Kokheads Colonial triumph through “Rahmbo's” U.S. Open title. There was a bounty of amusements and moments of whimsy from Fort Worth to Memorial to Olympic to Sectional Qualifying to Congaree. They review it all and close it out with the third men's major of 2021 at Torrey Pines, which provided ample material to laugh at here at the end of the year. This is the usual SGS approach to the year in review, focusing more on the amusing, inane, and extraordinary and it should FINISH over the next week, but can be enjoyed at your convenience during the holiday season. This year's series is brought to you by Precision Pro Golf, the official rangefinder of the Shotgun Start.