Podcasts about Hill House

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Best podcasts about Hill House

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Latest podcast episodes about Hill House

Say Podcast and Die!
S02E11 - Fright Camp (Goosebumps Series 2000 #8)

Say Podcast and Die!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 69:29


Andy and Alyssa read Goosebumps Series 2000 #8: Fright Camp. They discuss The Art of Goosebumps; cinema verité; McKamey Manor; sailing sunfish; meeting your maker; Basic Instinct; Marianne; The Amber Spyglass; unethical artists; In the Earth; The Haunting of Hill House; Scream 3; sadism; Funny Games; Haunt; real-life horror; Peeping Tom; No Escape; “The Hauntening”; A Serbian Film; candid cameras; The Jinx; imprisonment horror; V for Vendetta; Das Experiment; Shawshank Redemption; One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest; Bedlam asylum; The Duchess of Malfi; The Changeling; The Honest Whore, Part 1; surveillance horror; Vacancy; Caché; The Poughkeepsie Tapes; shoe loss; Big Fish; The Wizard of Oz; the interconnections of the Gooseverse cinema and summer camps scenes; when horror becomes comedy; Willy's Wonderland; & the ultimate hollowness at the core of what we love. // Music by Haunted Corpse // Follow @saypodanddie on Twitter and Instagram, and get in touch at saypodanddie@gmail.com

The Three Patch Podcast
Episode 124: Antici…….pation

The Three Patch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 159:07


In this anniversary episode, we ring in Sherlock Holmes' birthday (and ours) with a reaction roundtable for Power of the Dog, look back on BTS concert squee for their LA performances in 2021, bring you a spooky fandom of interest for The Haunting of Hill House (and Bly Manor), and more.

Read Around the Rosé
Ep. 60: The Haunting of Hill House

Read Around the Rosé

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 55:49


Dr. Montague was determined to find solid evidence of a haunting. Hill House was the perfect place to conduct his research due to its eventful past. Next, the doctor needed 3 willing candidates to stay with him at Hill House. Theodora, Eleanor, and Luke were all willing and absolutely perfect candidates. Theodora had psychic tendencies, Eleanor was familiar with poltergeists, and Luke was the heir to Hill House. Can all four house guests work together to prove that hauntings exist and survive? Or will the house consume them entirely? This week join the Rosé Girls as we read The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson. This classic 1959 book is a fantastic read! You can drink along with us as we drink a bottle of Fog Land Pinot Grigio. And...We Clink

Amongthestacks
Favorite Books We Read in 2021

Amongthestacks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 23:53


Jamie and Amanda mention The Book of Magic by Alice Hoffman, The Ten Thousand Doors of January by Alix E. Harrow, A Spindle Splintered by Alix E. Harrow, The Queen's Gambit by Walter Tevis, Quiet in Her Bones by Nalini Singh, Hamnet by Maggie O'Farrell, Every Bone a Prayer by Ashley Blooms, Greenlights by Matthew McConaughey, Our Sense of Place by Glen Conner, The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson and Laura Miller,  Anne Perry and the Murder of the Century by Peter Graham. 

Nighthawks' Podcast
Episode 128: Digression December 2021 - Checking in with The Nighthawks

Nighthawks' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 71:06


It was the best of Monstoberfests and it was the worst of Monstoberfests. The Nighthawks have been on an unanticipated hiatus and are back with a full episode update for you! Not only do we answer the burning question of “WTF?” we also let you in on our thoughts on some of the stuff we've been watching.Table of Contents below.Promoted in this episode:Children's Hospital Colorado (click here to donate)Back from the Borderline PodcastYou've Never Heard This PodcastEpisode Contents: 00:00:00 – 00:02:12 Cold Open 00:02:12 – 00:08:06 Catching up with Nighthawks hosts Trevor T. Trujillo and Matt Foster 00:08:06 – 00:17:32 Marvel's Hawkeye on Disney+ 00:17:32 – 00:25:35 Marvel's The Eternals 00:25:35 – 00:31:03 DUNE 00:31:03 – 00:33:58 Jodorowsky's Dune 00:33:58 – 00:38:52 Dark Star- HR Giger's World 00:38:52 – 00:47:30 CHUCKY on SyFy 00:47:30 – 00:48:56 You've Never Heard This Podcast 00:48:56 – 00:53:20 Back from the Borderline Podcast 00:53:20 –  00:57:15 The Haunting of Hill House on Netflix 00:57:15 -01:09:58 8-Bit Christmas on HBOMax 01:09:58 – 01:11:06 Blooper Reel (Santa put us on the Naughty List for these brain farts)

7 Days a Geek
Ep 75: True Story: The Haunting of Geppetto's House

7 Days a Geek

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 107:12


In this episode, your favorite Binge Watchers geek out about True Story, To The Lake, 14 Peaks, and 8bit Christmas. We're also re-watching The Americans, Seinfeld, and The Haunting of Hill House.  We bring back the Weekly Watch Party segment with Cole's pick of The Green Mile. Is it a perfect film? Are it's flaws worth complaining about?  Will it stand up to the other films this month?  The episode wraps up with news of Sylvester Stallone taking a lead roll for the first time on a a streaming show from Taylor Sheridan, the creator of Yellowstone. We also cover Hulu's upcoming series about Pam and Tommy and their infamous porn tape. Also, Disney Plus announces it's upcoming live action Pinocchio which causes Kyle to immediately shout out false accusations of the poor puppet's father. Just because he's got "Petto" in his name does not make him one.  Geek Out!  Find us on the socials!  Twitter:  Jason The Angry Gigner @S7evendaysageek Neighbor Cole @NeighborCole Not Producer Kyle @KyleMarieWrites  Official Show @7DagPodcast Official Facebook Page 7 Days a Geek  

House Guest by Country & Town House | Interior Designer Interviews
Episode 147: Jenny and Helen of Hill House Interiors

House Guest by Country & Town House | Interior Designer Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 22:06


Welcome to episode 145 of the House Guest podcast, where Country & Town House Magazine's Interiors Editor Carole Annett chats with experts from the world of interior design and decoration. This week's guests: interior designer duo Jenny Weiss and Helen Bygraves

Pop Culture Junkie
We Love 2018 & 2019

Pop Culture Junkie

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 43:39


The 2010s…what a decade, right? There were good times, probably, and bad times too, and pop culture was there to get us through it all. The Pop Culture Junkie Podcast is looking back at the halcyon days between 2010 and 2019 with a five-part series we're calling We Love the 2010s. This week, Alex, Hayley, Nicole and Shauna finish out the decade with a look at the years 2018 and 2019.In 2018, when we weren't eating Tide Pods, we were arguing whether we heard “Yanny” or “Laurel”. It was the year of Childish Gambino, Cobra Kai and Crazy Rich Asians, We said “Thank U, Next” to Drake memes, changing Stephen Crowder's mind and self-driving cars, but we loved The Haunting of Hill House, Bohemian Rhapsody and The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina and saying “Wakanda Forever!”2019 was the (merciful) end of the decade, and in the final year of the 2010s, we learned that “Midsommar” could be a verb, Cats could have boobs (and buttholes!), Aunt Becky from Full House would do anything to get her kids into a good school, and Sonic the Hedgehog had human teeth. Shudder. Other things sparked joy, like a Real Housewife arguing with a cat, Billie Eilish, Lil Nas X and Baby Yoda from The Mandalorian. And before you could say “Ok, Boomer,” the decade was over.Thank you to Olympus Games, the home of the Pop Culture Junkie Podcast.2018 SoundbitesBohemian Rhapsody | 20th Century FoxCobra Kai | Netflix“Experts Warn of Tide Pod Challenge” – CBS News“The Hidden Meanings Behind Childish Gambino's ‘This Is America' Video” – Inside Edition 
Crazy Rich Asians | Warner Bros.The Haunting of Hill House | NetflixChilling Adventures of Sabrina | Netflix2019 SoundbitesCats | Universal Pictures“The Meteoric Rise of Lil Nas X and the Song ‘Old Town Road' That Got Him There” – ABC News NightlineThe Mandalorian | LucasFilms/Disney“What Is 5G” – CNBC NewsKnives Out | LionsgateBillie Eilish – Saturday Night Live | NBCThe Masked Singer – Fox Alternative Media“Lori Loughlin, Felicity Huffman Charged in College Admissions Scheme” – TODAY/NBC NewsAladdin | Disney“‘OK, Boomer' – 25 year old lawmaker shuts down heckler during climate speech” – CBS NewsMidsommar | A24How to Organize Your Closets – Tidying Up with Marie Kondo | NetflixLinks:Get the Clubhouse app and get up in the house with your favorite Junkies.Apple Podcast:https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/pop-culture-junkie/id1536737728Spotify:https://open.spotify.com/show/7k2pUxzNDBXNCHzFM7EL8WWebsite: www.popculturejunkie.comFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/PopCultureJunkiePodcastTwitter: @PopJunkiesInstagram: @pop.culturejunkiesEmail: junkies@popculturejunkie.comAlex on Instagram: @alcasnunAlex on Twitter: @alcasnunAlex on Rapchat: @al-xHayley on Instagram: @thirtynerdythrivingHayley on Twitter: @thirtynerdypodHayley on TikTok: @thirtynerdythrivingNicole on Instagram: @nicole_eldridgeNicole on Twitter: @naeldridge14Nicole on TikTok: @nicole_eldridgeShauna on Twitter: @shaunatrinidadShauna on Instagram: @shaunatrinidad

Finders Keepers
EP 33: HOLIDAY BOPS AND SHOPS!

Finders Keepers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 45:49


Riley and Meredith discuss their holiday wishlists, winter time trends, and their favorite holiday tunes! Where to find us: Finders Keepers: @finderskeeperspod (instagram) Riley Phillips: @rileysgrotto (intagram/personal), @rileyphillipsart (instagram/art) Depop: @rileysgrotto Galaxy: galaxy.com/rileysgrotto Meredith Vaughn: @meredithlvaughn (instagram/personal) Depop: @merelily Etsy: FindersKeepersPod Credits: Editing/Producing: Meredith Vaughn Cover Art: Riley Phillips Music: Be Honest Edit by Krs. (https://soundcloud.com/producedbykrs/bhe) Episode Links: BalaBangles (@bala) Allbirds (@allbirds) Over the Moon (@overthemoon) Hill House (@hillhouse) Galaxy live stream Affiliate Links: Parade Underwear Discount Code: meredith-946 Girlfriend collective: http://rwrd.io/zuzyhsw to get $10 off your first purchase!

Friday Night Frights
Pandas Don't Like Macaroni, Liv.

Friday Night Frights

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 145:58


Hey gays and ghouls! We're going from our shortest episode ever to our longest episode ever with this week's take on The Haunting of Hill House (2018)! Snuggle up for a good long listen...just check to make sure that the room in which you're sitting actually exists. The opening quote is by an article in Rolling Stone by David Fear. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/fnfrightspodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/fnfrightspodcast/support

Radio Cherry Bombe
Paula Sutton Of Hill House Vintage Gets Ready For The Holidays

Radio Cherry Bombe

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 46:29


Paula Sutton was working in the fast-paced world of London fashion when she and her husband decided to move to the English countryside. As part of her new life, Paula found herself with an entire house to decorate on a small budget, so she began to frequent flea markets, antique shops, and boot sales. She documented everything on her blog, Hill House Vintage, and the rest is history. Paula joins host Kerry Diamond from her home in Norfolk, England, to talk about her brand new book, Hill House Living: The Art of Creating a Joyful Life, and her plans for the holidays.Thank you to Kerrygold for supporting this episode. Visit KerrygoldUSA.com for their special Holiday Calm program. Radio Cherry Bombe is recorded at Newsstand Studios at Rockefeller Center in New York City. Visit cherrybombe.com/radio-cherry-bombe for transcripts and past episodes.

Stacey Norman
Dan The Man wins R2,000 for local orphanage Summer Hill House

Stacey Norman

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 2:40


#StaceyNormansBigMusicChallenge has received a little bit of an upgrade courtesy of Suncoast! As per usual you can win R1,000 today if you get all 5 answers correct but if you get it wrong, don't worry because you won't leave empty-handed. You can spin and win a bunch of amazing Suncoast prizes.

Men's Bible Study
The G.O.A.T. | Part 1 | 11.30.2021 | Justin Hillhouse

Men's Bible Study

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 28:06


We are beginning a new series entitled, The GOAT, which means - The greatest of all time. Over the next several weeks, we will learn about what makes Jesus, the Greatest of all Time. Today will be lead by Dr. Justin Hillhouse as he showcases Jesus' character through the feeding of the five thousand.

Monkey Off My Backlog
Ep. 78 - The Straight Story, One Tree Hill, The Haunting of Hill House, The Outer Worlds w/Jarret

Monkey Off My Backlog

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 63:40


This week, we're joined by new friend of the pod, Jaret, for an episode of #monkeyfails, which is what happens when you intend to take one thing off your backlog but end up taking off something else. Jarret talks David Lynch's The Straight Story, Sam goes old-school teen soap with One Tree Hill, Andy and his dog Bard watch The Haunting of Hill House, and Tessa plays The Outer Worlds. 1:47 - The Straight Story 18:41 - Jarret on pop culture and listmaking 21:00 - One Tree Hill 39:51 - The Haunting of Hill House 50:47 - The Outer Worlds

Collider Conversations
Mckenna Grace Interview: How She Accomplished So Much at Just 15-Years-Old

Collider Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 28:44


Mckenna Grace is 15-years-old and already has dozens of credits and an Emmy nomination to her name. She broke out big starring opposite Chris Evans in Gifted, joined the Marvel Cinematic Universe playing a young Carol Danvers in Captain Marvel, is featured in the downright stellar Haunting of Hill House on Netflix, delivers a truly jaw-dropping performance in The Handmaid's Tale and now she's a key part of the future of the Ghostbusters franchise. Grace plays Phoebe in Ghostbusters: Afterlife. When her family is forced to move to Summerville, Oklahoma and into a creepy old farmhouse her grandfather left them, Phoebe comes to learn that he has quite the legacy. Her grandfather was a Ghostbuster. When Phoebe and her brother Trevor (Finn Wolfhard) come to learn what he was busy doing out there in Summerville, it becomes their responsibility to use the tools he left behind to help save the world. Having someone like Grace on Collider Ladies Night is a blessing and a curse. As you'll hear in the video at the top of this article, I'm a big believer she's one of the most talented actors in the business. Having the opportunity to discuss how she first discovered her passion for acting, how she scored her first Hollywood gigs, what it was like collaborating with other next-level creators like Octavia Spencer, Mike Flanagan, James Wan and more was the ultimate treat. The curse? Even with an extended interview slot, there isn't nearly enough time to highlight all of Grace's accomplishments. We did get to a whole bunch of them though! Check out this edition of Collider Ladies Night to hear all about Grace's experience on Gifted, The Haunting of Hill House, The Handmaid's Tale, her love of skating, working on Ghostbusters: Afterlife and so much more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Podcast Under The Stairs
The Podcast Under the Stairs - Bonus Ep 381 - Black Friday Review & Interview with Robert Kurtzman

Podcast Under The Stairs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 34:39


Join your host Duncan Under The Stairs discussing all things Horror on The Podcast Under the Stairs. Duncan got a chance to sit down and watch Black Friday which will be released via Screen Media in Theaters November 19th & On Demand November 23rd. If that wasn't awesome enough, Duncan also got to sit down and chat to the Robert Kurtzman who is known for his producing and/or special makeup effects in From Dusk Till Dawn (1996), Wishmaster (1997) and The Haunting of Hill House (2018). His team received an Emmy Award in 2001 for their work on the 2000 Sci Fi Channel miniseries Frank Herbert's Dune. They were awarded an Academy Award in 2006 for achievement in makeup for The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. He has worked on countless films over the years and has been nominated and awarded for his Make-up and Special Effects work. Intro - 0 - 3mins 50secs Promo - 3mins 50secs - 4mins 15secs Interview with Robert Kurtzman - 4mins 15secs - 21mins 45secs Black Friday Review - 21mins 45secs - 31mins 10secs Closing out the Show - 31mins 10secs - End The grading follows the Netflix rating style of 1 = Hated It, 2 = Didn't Like It, 3 = Liked It, 4 = Really Liked It & 5 = Loved It Black Friday: Duncan: 4 Our new RSS Feed: https://anchor.fm/s/13ba6ef0/podcast/rss BUY OFFICIAL TPUTS MERCH FROM http://tputscast.bigcartel.com Check out the show on Anchor, iTunes, TuneIn & on Stitcher Radio. Join our Discord Community. Please leave us feedback on iTunes, podcastunderthestairs@gmail.com and follow us on Facebook & Twitter.

Solid Six
Episode 78: Out of the Past

Solid Six

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 111:22


Brady, Josh and Alison take a drag with Out Of The Past - the 1947 film noir classic starring Robert Mitchum, Jane Greer, Kirk Douglas and directed by Jacques Tourneur.Plus!Nemesis, Psych Out, Dirty Marry, Crazy Larry, The Haunting of Hill House, Labyrinth of Cinema, Leave Her To Heaven, Dangerous Minds, The Friends of Eddie Coyle, stylized dialogues, cigarette jousting and seminars that keep us from doing weird stuff!Leave us a voicemail! We'll play it on the show. Letterboxd: Alison, Josh, BradyEmail us - podcast@solidsix.netFollow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts!

Cottonwood Creek Church: Worship
Don't Give Up, with Justin Hillhouse

Cottonwood Creek Church: Worship

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 42:30


Friday Night Frights
In the Night...in the Dark...

Friday Night Frights

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 80:26


Hey gays and ghouls! This week Sean and Katie are discussing two adaptations of Shirley Jackson's 1959 masterpiece, The Haunting of Hill House! You might want to keep the lights on for this one! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/fnfrightspodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/fnfrightspodcast/support

Cottonwood Creek Church: Worship
Let Us Not Grow Weary In Doing Good, with Justin Hillhouse

Cottonwood Creek Church: Worship

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 27:42


How To Love Lit Podcast
Shirley Jackson - The Lottery - Her Most Famous Short Story!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 47:25


Shirley Jackson - The Lottery - Her Most Famous Short Story!   Hi, I'm Christy Shriver, and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    And I'm Garry Shriver and this is the How to love Lit Podcast.  Today we are finishing up our series on Shirley Jackson.  Last week we concluded our discussion of her most famous book, the one that inspired the Netflix series by the same name The Haunting of Hill House.  Today we are going to read the short story that made her a household name, “The Lottery.”    It has had its share of movie inspiration.  Anyone who has seen the opening of The Hunger Games would not be shocked at the plot of “The Lottery.”  It's inspired a bunch of other stories and movies besides that one; I think you mentioned the Stephen King one last week.  I'm sure there are way more than that if we sat here and thought about it.    True, and maybe I shouldn't have been, but I was actually surprised as to how scandalous this story was when it was first published.  If we're talking solely about violence, by today's standards, it's mild.  There is no blood or gore, it's definitely no Squid Games.    I agree- and I believe that is why this story- so deceptively simple and relatively tame- is actually taught in the eight grade in many school systems.  It's disturbing for reasons beyond the fact that someone is killed at the end- kiiling a main character is just par for the course in a standard English curriculum- in fact, that's the big joke among English teachers- we don't teach a story if we don't kill someone at the end.  “The Lottery” reads and feels so simple.  And it is…so why the sensation?        Let's talk about the sensation, it's definitely worth noticing how big a stir it actually created.    For starters, the story generated more negative letters and subscription cancellations than anything the New Yorker had ever published.  Jackson herself received over 300 letters just the summer it was published.  In her own words she said this, “I can count only 13 that spoke kindly to me.”    I want to point out that her mother, the ever-inspiring Geraldine could be counted on for a comment.  She wrote her daughter with this to say, “Dad and I did not care at all for your story…it does seem, dear, that this gloomy kind of story is what all you young people think about these days.  Why don't you write something to cheer people up?”    Dear Ole' Geraldine- at least she's consistent.  But Jackson refused to explain the meaning of the story.  She did once tell a journalist, “I suppose I hoped, by setting a particularly brutal rite in the present and in my own village, to shock the readers with a graphic demonstration of the pointless violence and general inhumanity of their own lives, but I gather that in some cases the mind just rebels.  The number of people who expected Mrs. Hutchinson to win a Bendix washer at the end would amaze you.”      Ha!  Well, I don't know how pointless violence and general inhumanity could have surprised anyone in 1948 when it was published.  That was right after world war 2, especially the United States, had to stare the reality in the face that we had stood by and turned a blind eye for almost a decade to the atrocities committed by Hitler, and there was no one more cultured or sophisticated than the German people.     I guess that's true, but of course…for Americans that was always…over there…we, self-righteously could always claim we were not capable of such things...    we after all were the victorious winners in that struggle between good and evil. And yet, Jackson's simple story does seem to be pointing an accusing finger at someone.    Yes, I totally think it does, and I do want us to take a different direction than many people who read this story.  At first pass, and this is how I've most often heard this story discussed, this is a story that rails against tradition, against not questioning authority, specifically religious authority, against patriarchy…all very easy things to attack and very common in the American canon.     Well, not just in the arena of literature either.  We've been attacking cultural norms in one form or another since American invented baseball as its own American sports ritual over the sport of the British Empire- football or better known here as soccer.     HA!  I guess that's true.  We also have a  way higher tolerance for gore than this story evokes- I mean we were comfortable with the headless horseman and the tell-tale heart.  There was something personal about the Lottery that went beyond attacking traditions or killing an innocent victim.    I also don't think many of us would cancel our subscription to our favorite media streaming service (which would be the modern day equivalent), or take the trouble to dig up someone's personal address and write them a personal letter if we did not feel personally attacked.  “The Lottery” got under people's skins because it was personal.  So, that's the question I want to ask?  If this story is about pointless violence and general inhumanity, and if I'm offended because I feel personally accused, how?      So, let's start- Christy, we talked about if we should read the entire story and then discuss it or if we should stop and start.  We've decided to stop and start, but hopefully we won't stop and start too much to be confusing, but just enough to be helpful- a difficult balance to strike.        True- Garry- we may fail, but let's give it a go.  Let's start with the first three paragraphs and then we'll interrupt.     Paragraphs 1-3    What are your thoughts?    Well, the thing that strikes me here is tone.  Look at the imagery and word choice- it's summer, there is fresh warmth- there are flowers blooming- there's not just grass there's richly green grass- this is the language of birth and beauty.   There is also a deliberate attempt to characterize these people as organized and civilized- the lottery is annual, it takes less than two hours, they eat a noon dinner- the children don't gather, they assemble- assemble is a formal word.  There is a reference to school. They are being instructed and civilized so to speak deliberately – the word “liberty” is thrown around here.  And yet what are they doing, they are stuffing their pockets full of stones- even the very small children.  They assemble as family units, the very bedrock of civilization across time and culture- they stand together- united- and for a purpose that is upsetting to no one.    Let's read the next four paragraphs and learn about the culture and traditions of this place.    Next four paragraphs     One funny thing that Jackson does in this story is play around with names.  The names are all carefully selected- look at who's conducting all of this, a man by the name of Summers- such a happy name associated with youth, strength, growth, life, all of it.  But look at the other guy- Mr. Graves- he also is responsible for making up the slips of paper and putting the names in this black box.  It's a pun- a grave is a place where we put a dead body. It also means serious- like if you are in grave danger.  The black box one time spent a year in Mr. Graves barn, but that's not the only place it lives.  He is not solely responsible for this black box.  It's spent a year in the post office and also in a grocery store owned by Mr. Martin.      Another thing that people have pointed to is all the possible symbolism in this story.  It does seem that this box is a symbol, the three-legged stool is a symbol, the black mark is a symbol, even the stones are symbols.  But for what?  We should always annotate and follow the symbols, but I usually withhold judgement on what they mean until I've had time to think about the story as a whole.      And we've got more names- a lot of names actually.  One that showed up earlier, but we didn't address is name Delacroix- we're even told the correct pronunciation of this name-     Dela-Croix- as in French for of the Cross    Yep- except they mispronounce it- they don't say Delacroix like you're supposed to say it- they say delacroy- a corruption of the original.  And that sets up for me another a pattern that I see as you read through all these traditions.  Traditions are not fixed- like people think they are.      No, They evolve like everything else on planet earth.  We keep what we want and discard what we don't like.  On my wall, I have a poster that says all behavior is goal- directed- and that goes for entire cultures as well.  No matter what we say, our behaviors speak for us- and they are all goal-directed.  This is true for traditions as well- be it religious, ethical, or civic.    Jackson is very ambiguous about her relationship with religion here.  I want to point out that this is not a religious ceremony, and she could have very easily and understandably made it one.  Mr. Summers could have been Pastor Summers or Father Summers or Rabbi Summers, but he's not any of these, he's a businessman.  I want to suggest what I think here about-that three legged stool- I do think it represents what holds up society in general-  three aspects of societal authority or control- religious, civic and commercial- these three legs hold up the black box.  They are working together, but none is running the show exclusively.      Well, if we're going to guess at symbolism, I want to make a suggestion of my own.    Oh-okay- what do you want to suggest?    That black box.  It's power, it's control.  It's black because fear controls.  It's dynamic in that it moves.  It evolves over time, as power does.  It's cloaked in secrecy, it hides behind tradition, but we see that that isn't necessarily true- they went from chips to paper when they wanted to.  What they wanted to uphold was the black box of power.  I also want to point out that somehow Jackson subtly connects her ritual with this black box and three-legged stool to the harvest, which I found to be a particularly interesting connection.  It's a link to survival and it's at the heart of human existence.  The ancient Athenians, the Aztecs, the Incans on this side of the world just to name a few, but many cultures have connected human sacrifice to crop fertility. In fact, and this may be a point of irony, if you just look across human history from the Egyptians to the Chinese, what we see is human sacrifice correlates directly with a rise in a more sophisticated culture and social stratification than the other way around, contrary to what Old Man Warner suggests.      What do you mean by that?    I mean that we can see, historically, as societies got more sophisticated and organized, we saw more and more links to human sacrifice.     Well You're right  That is counter-intuitive- you would think it would be just the opposite.  Of course, closer to home, in the Judeo-Christian tradition, which is what Jackson was most familiar with and what is reflected most obviously in her story, there is a very deep tradition of sacrifice but not human.  This story is not a direct attack on Christianity by the way, but there is a lot of Christian imagery here- not just with the name Delacroix or delacroy.   There is also the connection with publicly sanctioned and even religiously sanctioned public stonings.  This is a ritual we see in the Old Testaman of the Bible, and one we see Jesus referencing directly in the New Testament in the Bible.  There is a particular story, one of the more famous stories in the New Testament from the 8th chapter of Saint John where a group of men want to stone a woman because they caught her in the act of adultery.  They take her outside; they all gather stones and are ready to murder her when Jesus intervenes.  He takes a stick and starts writing something in the sand which we are never told what they are,  but he famously says, “He who is without sin cast the first stone.”  The men slowly but surely as they read whatever he was writing, dropped their stones and went home.  Of course, we don't know what he wrote, I like to think it was the names of their paramours, but that's just me enjoying the irony.  The story ends with Jesus looking at the woman and asking where her accusers had gone because by that point there were none left.    So, you see that story connecting here-     Yep- I do.  There are more Christian references too- Mrs. Adams, that's the name of the first man.  There is an Eva- and then Old man Warner- his name isn't Biblical but there's a biblical connection.  Again, back to Jesus in the New Testament.   These Biblical references, btw, are not obscure- these are super-famous passages that every red-blooded American in 1950 would know.  In the New Testament there's another story where  a follower of Jesus asks Jesus how many times a person was responsible for forgiving another person- the follower offered a suggestion- he said, should we forgive a person seven times- something he finds to be generous- to which Jesus responded- you should forgive a person 70 times 7 – I think what is important about Old Man Warner is not his name but his age- and the link to this archetypal number.      What's the connection- I don't think this story is talking about adultery or forgiveness,  is it?    Not directly, it's talking about values and core values and hypocrisy for sure- and we'll flesh it out when we get to the end, but what I want to point out- is that people have somehow found their value in surviving this tradition.  Mr. Warner brags that he's survived 77 of these without getting picked- his importance comes from this.  Warner also makes a claim that is literally a great example of a post hoc fallacy- an error in logic which you believe that just because something comes before something it means that thing necessarily causes it- he is literally saying that the harvest comes as a direct result of the lottery.  He doesn't invoke any diety for believing this- he just throws it out there.    He's resistant to change because he's validated by this social order.    Well, I can see why lot's people think this story is about accepting things just because they have always been done.  Warner clearly makes that argument.    Of course, that's obvious and there- it's just not the heart of the story.  I want to bring up one more name before we finish and get to the punch line.  The name Tessie Hutchinson- if we look to history there is one Hutchinson woman who stands out- Anne Hutchinson- she showed up in chapter 1 of the Scarlet Letter too- btw- which has a connected theme to this story-     but anyway- tell us who this person is- for those less familiar with early American history.    Anne Hutchinson- we're going way back now- she was born in 1591- she was banished to the  colony of Rhode Island after being excommunicated from Massachusetts bay colony for teaching among other things that women should read and be in leadership but mostly her teachings about the Bible were considered heretical.   She ended up being murdered by Indians in 1643.  It's a sad ending.  She was definitely cast out of the group.      So, let's finish reading the story, and see where we land with all these ideas swirling around in our heads.      Finish the story    Well, Mrs. Hutchinson doesn't win a Bendix washer.  You know  the psychologist Carl Jung, as you know I like his work, stated that even more or less civilized people remain inwardly primitive.  We don't like thinking this, so we can justify with this “mass psyche”.  The group becomes the hypnotic focus of fascination and we can allow ourselves to fall into some sort of spell.- that's the word he used.  The group experience lowers the level of consciousness like the psyche of an animal so we don't have to take responsibility for our actions on an individual level.  It's not a murder if it's a ritual.  How could it be? It's sanctioned by the group.    And yet, it is murder, isn't.  And where I see all of Jackson's ambiguities emerge.  Her story can be interpreted so many different ways. For one thing, no one sees any moral conflict.  Any psychological explanation for that.  I mean they do this every year.    Talk aboou the Milgram experiment       It's a nameless village, full of tradition, likely corruption, so civilized, so warm, the people were so nice to each other…all the way until Mrs. Delacroix picks up the largest stone she could find with which to pelt her good friend Mrs. Hutchinson.      Jackson downplayed her story.  In an essay she wrote about it she had this to say, “I had written the story three weeks before being published.  The idea had come to me while I was pushing my daughter up the hill in her stroller- it was as I say, a warm morning, and the hill was steep, and beside my daughter, the stroller held the day's groceries- and perhaps the effort of that last fifty yards up the hill put an edge to the story, at any rate, I had the idea fairly clearly in my mind when I put my daughter in her playpen and the frozen vegetables in the refrigerator, and writing the story I foud that it went quicly and easily, moving from beginning to end without pause, I'll skip a little to we get to this line….it was just a story I wrote.”    Except it wasn't.  It was her lived experience in Bennington.  Everyone was so nice to each other; centered on civic contribution, religion, family structure- and yet ready to pelt each other with the largest stone they could find, given the psychological pass to do so with impunity.    And that's what made people angry.  We are nice people, but we're not kind people.  We are civilized, but we are not forgiving.  We are religious but our religion has been molded not out of the old sacred texts, but out of the box of power that sits on that three legged stool of our conveniently created social structures remolded over the years as it goes from house to house.  We are not good, we are what we always have been- ready not just to hurl that first stone, but ready to bring out children along, get them to fill up their pockets with stones, all on a beautiful summer day.      Wow!  That hurts.  Well, we hope you enjoyed our discussion of one of America's most famous short stories.  Next week, we will find the anecdote to such raw exposure to humanity through the writings of another American native son- Walt Whitman and selections from his wonderful masterpiece- Leaves of Grass.  We hope you stick around to see what that great American has to say.  As always, please support us by pushing us out on your social media- facebook, instsagram, twitter, tiktok and/or linked in.  Text an episode to a friend.  If you are a teacher, visit our website www.howtolovelitpodcast.com to find listening guides to all of our episodes.      Peace out     

KA-POW! The Pop Cultured Podcast
Ka-Pow the Pop Cultured Podcast #304 Nostalgia is a Powerful Drug

KA-POW! The Pop Cultured Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 65:28


Cliff is back from Disney World (reluctantly), and has a trip report on what's happening during the 50th anniversary of the park.  And visits to the movie theater are finally happening on a more regular basis, so we have reviews and recommendations on what we've seen recently, both streaming and on the silver screen.  So keep your hands and feet inside the ride at all times, because Ka-Pow the Pop Cultured Podcast is ready for takeoff! Length - 01:05:28 Language - PG-13.  (Contains mild adult language.) - 0:24:30 - MOVIE NEWS Initial thoughts on Marvel's cosmic-scale ensemble piece "Eternals," the long-awaited adaptation of sci-fi classic "Dune," "Last Night in Soho" presents the dark shadows behind the swinging sixties, Daniel Craig's final outing as Bond in "No Time to Die," watching the film version after reading Shirley Jackson's "The Haunting of Hill House," the Netflix western "The Harder They Fall" has an all-star cast and DC Fandome event drops new trailers, teasers and concept art.

Palaver: Unraveling Weird Lit
Episode 69: The Haunting of Hill House

Palaver: Unraveling Weird Lit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 98:50


Let's all address the elephant in the room...yes this is episode 69. It is our duty as mature adults to all come together and collectively say...NICE! Seriously though guys, this story that we are covering today is a classic in the horror world. The Haunting of Hill House puts off the perfect psychological horror vibes! When was the last time you were scared of things that went bump in the night?Be warned, there will be SPOILERS ahead in this episode. If you would like a spoiler free experience, check out Shirley Jackson's The Haunting of Hill House. Don't forget to come back and join our weird book club podcast once you've finished the story!Check out our social media and send us some feedback! We can't wait to hear from you constant listeners!Twitter: @palaverweirdlitInstagram: @palaverpodcastGmail: palaverweirdlit@gmail.comWe are looking for MORE listener suggestions to expand our bookshelves and use in upcoming episodes! If you are interested in sharing a book you love with us or our weird book club, share your listener suggestions through our gmail (palaverweirdlit@gmail.com). Share with us the title of your book, a spoiler free summary of the book/series, and why you love the book. If you would not like your name shared with your suggestion please let us know in the email. We look forward to hearing from you!Intro & Outro MusicWaltz Of The Skeleton Keys by WombatNoisesAudio | https://soundcloud.com/user-734462061Music promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.comCreative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en_USI Saw A Ghost Last Night... by Leonell Cassio | https://soundcloud.com/leonellcassioMusic promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.comCreative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unportedhttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en_US

Turn Me On
211 - Conflict: Two Animals Wanting to Murder Each Other

Turn Me On

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 96:13


Kat Nantz is a Somatic Pleasure & Relationship Coach. She coaches people and couples on reconnecting with pleasure and our bodies. Jeremie and Bryde talk with Kat about relationship anarchy, implicit and explicit boundaries, and why we sometimes want to annihilate our partners. Just the Tips includes watching Mike Flannagin's movies, specifically "Midnight Mass" and "The Haunting of Hill House", and checking out the "Stuff Mom Never Told You" podcast episode, "Women's Laughter: It's No Joke".HUMAN CONNECTION THROUGH TOUCH: a class for self-care and connection, will be led on November 14th at 11:30amET on Zoom. Bring a friend or partner or relative - someone you feel comfortable exchanging some platonic touch with, and we'll do an hour of loose movement and partner work. $15pp or $25/pair (FREE for Patrons). Email turnmeonpodcast@gmail.com to get the link!Thank you endlessly to all the Patrons of the podcast at patreon.com/turnmeonpodcast. $5+ PATRONS: check out the video version of today's aftercare! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Not A Bookclub
Episode 51 - Reading Round-up!

Not A Bookclub

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 61:34


Join Deb and Mindy as they discuss their reading month! Rig oils and affairs, horror and hauntings, (not)Great British Bake-off romance, and political fantasy BL romances! What a month! Support AAPI Black Lives Matter Shop Indie Bookstores Follow us: Instagram Twitter For inquiries, please email notabookclub.pod@gmail.com Books Discussed: Sea State: A Memoir by Tabitha Lasley The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson Rosaline Palmer Takes the Cake by Alexis Hall King's Maker by Haga, Kang Ji Young

Your Haunted Holiday
Episode 98: Hill House

Your Haunted Holiday

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 37:40


Happy Halloween everyone, this week we have a spooky one to celebrate with you all!  In this episode hear all about our encounter with a ghost on our recent trip to the Whaley House in San Diego, it was quite the experience we had to share!  You will also get the full scoop on the demons at the Hill House in Mineral Wells Texas.  

The Bourbon Bookshelf
Ep. 41: A Podcast Divided

The Bourbon Bookshelf

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 66:03


In this episode we discuss Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson, State of Fear by Michael Crichton, and Chasing the Boogeyman by Richard Chizmar. We also discuss the much anticipated Palo Duro Canyon Trail Run and the World Series. If you enjoy the show, please subscribe to and rate the podcast and tell your friends! This is the best way for us to grow. Also, don't forget to follow us on Instagram. Feel free to reach out to us anytime on Instagram or at contact@bourbonbookshelf.com, we make a genuine effort to reply to all inquiries. Lastly, after much adieu, our website is finally live! Go give it a look and tell us what you think. If you would like to read the books discussed in this episode, or any episode, please consider purchasing through the links provided on the website to help support the show. Patreon and merch coming soon! Enjoy! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bourbon-bookshelf/support

The One Beer In Podcast
Halloween Brewtacular 2021 | Ep. 330

The One Beer In Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 65:04


With Halloween just hours away, the brew ghouls talk everything from night terrors to local haunts and Mike Flanagan's fantastic horror shows (Haunting of Hill House, Haunting of Bly Manor, and Midnight Mass) on Netflix. Cheers to a Happy Halloween, Brewski! *Beer of the Week* Allagash White Belgian-Style Wheat 0:00:00 Beer Intro 0:03:58 Desert-Island Beer 0:10:20 Netflix Doubles Down On Horror 0:14:45 Mike Flanagan's Horror Trilogy is Awesome 0:23:29 Are Ghosts Real? 0:29:19 Local Haunted Attractions 0:35:48 Real Tales of Night Terrors 0:55:37 Cheers of the Week 1:01:24 Beer Review

How To Love Lit Podcast
Shirley Jackson - The Haunting Of Hill House - Episode 2 - Is Hill House Haunted Or Not?!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 48:17


Shirley Jackson - The Haunting Of Hill House - Episode 2 - Is Hill House Haunted Or Not?!   I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    And I'm Garry Shriver, and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.     Read the first paragraph of chapter 2.    That is the first paragraph of chapter 2 of The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson.  This is episode 2 as we explore this haunted space- and Christy, haunted it is.  Last week, we spent a lot of time talking about Shirley Jackson and her relationship with her mother.  It was our argument that a lot of the terror she creates springs originally from the dysfunction of living with a toxic mother.  We introduced the idea of reality versus illusion and the difficulty of knowing one from the other- especially in these toxic relationships.  We introduced the idea of feeling trapped and alone.  All of these feelings metaphorically expressing themselves not just in the characters who populate the story, but also in the physical space- the haunted house itself.      And Jackson borrowed from every gothic trope she could find to build for us a very relatable creepy house-  it's so stereotypical, we have to wonder if that in itself is part of her strategy- which of course, it very much is.   But, why?  What is she expressing? Of course, we know that haunted houses do express evil and fear and always have. We, also know that houses, in and of themselves, occupy a very important place in our psyche.  As people, we have an incredibly powerful psychological attachment to the physical spaces that populate our lives.  Physical spaces can bring us memories; as in favorite vacation destinations, they can be sacred as in a church, and they can also be haunted.  Let me quote Dr. Montague as he explained the origins of haunted houses to his assistants in chapter 3     Page 50-51    Jackson, herself, was always interested in houses- and for good reason.  Her grandfather had been a very important architect  in San Francisco, and she brought all of that family interest into her own life.  Jackson wanted to write a ghost story and then she set out to write Hill House, so, I guess it just made sense for her to research a bunch of different houses in order to create the one for her story.  She even enlisted her mother to help her get some research about a famous haunted house in San Jose, California, the Winchester Mystery House- one that still attracts millions of visitors visit every year.      I also happened to notice that Dr. Montague directly references this very famous house.  I wish I can say I had heard of it, but I hadn't, so I looked it up.  A woman by the name of Sarah Winchester inherited $20 million in 1881 from her dead husband and his family who had made their money selling firearms.  She was said to have moved to California to build a home for the spirits of the dead people who had been killed by the firearms made by her husband's family.  The Winchester house is really bizarre and worth Googling.  I can see why it has so many visitors.  It is enormous: 24,000 square feet; it has 10,000 windows, 47 stairways and fireplaces, 160 rooms, and 17 chimneys among other things.      It's weird looking too with all those turrets that remind us of what a proper haunted house should look like,  and Jackson studied it and her house has turrets, but Hill House isn't just one house, and it's not near as large as the Winchester House.  It's funny how many theories there are about what all inspired Hill House.  Stanley, Shirley's husband worked as a professor at a woman's college, I'm not sure we got to that last episode, but he worked at Bennington College in Vermont.  Well the Music building on campus is called Jennings Hall, and it is apart from the other buildings.  It's made from gray stone and stands against the hills, kind of like the opening of Hill House.   Lots of people see that connection. Ruth Franklin, Jackson's most recent biographer and probably the leading expert on all things Jackson, talks about a file she found in Jackson's archive at the Library of Congress when she was researching Jackson's life.  She found a collection of pictures and newspaper clippings about all these different places and events that inspired Hill House.  One was a newpaper article about a poltergeist incident in Long island, there were pictures of a couple of castles, there was the Winchester house stuff, but then she found one called the Edward H Everett Mansion- which is also in Vermont, and actually very near Bennington where Jackson and her family lived.  Franklin and her husband went there when she was researching for her book on Jackson and were basically shocked at how evil that house looked.  She and her husband both got chills just being on the property, so Franklin believes a lot of Hill House is inspired by that place.      At the end of the day, Hill House is the invention of Shirley Jackson's mind- not a specific place on earth.  It is also a creepy ole' metaphor for something- and when you're reading the book by chapter 4 where we go to in this episode - you don't know what it could be- but you intuitively feel it has to have something to do with a home- but definitely not a happy home- but maybe a place that should have been happy but is twisted, but maybe it is even a place that promised to be happy or to be something- but it lied about that.  I think when we read novels, especially the ones we like, sometimes we don't really know what we identify with- we just feel some sort of connection.  I think that's the big question in this book- especially at the beginning.  What am I supposed to make of this house?  Why am I compelled to read about it?   If it's so creepy why does Eleanor stay there?  What compels her to go inside? What's attracting her there?  Is it just that it's not her sister's house so anything is better than that?  Is she looking for a home?  As we read further on, we will come to understand that that is exactly what it is all about.  Of course, for all of us- having a home is important.  Wouldn't you agree, with Bing Crosby, Garry, that there's no place like home for the holidays?    Homes and thus families are important, there's a lot of psychological research to support that, of course.  But let's just narrow in on the idea of that physical space we associate with our home- where we currently are living and hopefully nesting.  For many of us, if we are going to make it our home- and not just a place where we sleep and maybe eat, a home is part of our self-definition- it is that physical space that expresses who we really are.  That's why decorating a home in your own way and making it beautiful to YOU is so important.  It's why I encourage people, even if you're wealthy enough to hire professional decorators, to be involved in that process in a personal way.  Most of us, however, don't have that problem, but we should make our home reflective of our interests, our passions, our tastes.  We should let it reflect OUR identity- in a positive way.  It's also true and I quote Robert Frost here, “Home is the place that, when you have to go there, they have to take you in.”  That's another very important idea.  It is a place where you feel safe, and you can be oriented in space and time.  It's a place where you can be vulnerable without being exploited.  But that's where the dangers reside, right?  If you are vulnerable, then by definition, you can be exploited- and of course, that happens, and it definitely happened to Shirley Jackson.    For me, a house really does has a spirit to it.  As strange as that sounds, especially if someone has lived in the same place for a while.  In some sense, a physical space has to develop its own energy and personality.  This is what I mean, Garry and I got married when my oldest daughter was a junior in college.  When she entered our new house- her new home, even though we put her things in a room, put her pictures on the wall, and tried to make her feel “at home”, she just didn't bond with the physical space.  She was living at college in a house of her own, and she was spending just a few days a year with us.  Her room at our house was nice; it was beautiful; but the house just wasn't her friend yet.  A full year later, we had a house fire, and I was in tears as things burned, thankfully just one room truly burned before we stopped the fire, but Anna was very stoic about the whole thing.  She just couldn't be sad.  She told me, point blank, I don't feel anything.  I don't feel like this is my space.  This isn't my home.  Of course this made me sad because I wanted her to feel at home there in our space with her sister and step-father, but it wasn't something I had any power to create.   There were no memories in that space for her at that time, and the only that that would ever change that is creating memories for that space in that space- of course, the fire ironically was a memory for us all- but it really is about the passing of time and what we do with the passing of time.  Living there- bringing friends there, filling up the air with the smell of food and the fire place, sharing meals together- playing games around the table- the house has had to develop a spirit of its own- and hopefully a positive safe and welcoming one and hopefully one that is still being developed.    Of course you're right.  That is why it's important to be intentional about that sort of thing because just as a space can be positive, it can also be negative.  And just as it can have a positive effect on a person, it can have a negative one as well- obviously.     William Sax, Professor of anthropology, says it this way: People and places where they reside engage in a continuing set of exchanges; they have determinate, mutual effects upon each other because they are part of a single, interactive system.”  Listen to what he means- people and places engage with each other- they interact with each other and have effects on each other- they are part of one single interactive system.  It's a very interesting way of looking at how we engage the world.  This is true.  It's originally a Southeast Asian concept, but it really nails a universal truth.     Of course it's that very idea that I also see Jackson taking and running wild with it in her book- physical space interacting actively with the people who occupy its space.      Reading here how Jackson plays around with the concept of this house is really a hyperbolized version of spaces interacting with people- and in her case, she builds an entire 80 year history of negative memories in this house.  Here, crazy enough, the house actually is a villain- although I know that's not totally obvious by the end of chapter 4- but even early on before the house spooks a single person when we read the history of the house, we can see how much negative emotions and hurt are a part of the spirit of this house.     For sure, Jackson makes Hill House into a literal character in the story.  This house has emotions.  She tells us explicitly this house is without kindness and has no concession to humanity- not unlike her own mother (as we saw last episode).  She goes on to say Hill house is not fit for love or for hope- that's how Jackson literally describes it.  But unlike a real house in the real world, what makes this fictional story creepy is that we are going to see that the house has agency- or it at least appears to.  The house does stuff- or maybe it does stuff- that's the big unanswered question.  Who's doing the stuff in the house.  Either way, Of course, this is all the opposite sort of things we want in our physical home, and I'm sure almost everyone would agree with that.   And let's be mindful here.  Shirley Jackson spent a lot of time thinking about her house.  She spent a lot of time, in fact, most of her time, thinking about her home.  She was first and foremost a homemaker. And she was extremely intentional about what she invested her time in.  She did a lot of cooking- and neglected a lot of cleaning opting to make her space a fun liveable one, contrary to popular standards and practices of her time.  She, probably better than most writers or any genre at any time, knew exactly how powerful a home was and could be and how a person could frame it.  Heck, she financed her entire life out of humorously discussing hers.  Her house was famously vibrant, full of life, full of energy, full of visitors- both celebrated literary friends of hers, as well as the dozens of childhood playmates that continuously bounced between the walls.  She clearly knew how to make a happy home, but here in this book, she strips all of that positive away and we see she also knew what a house without kindness could be like.       So interesting.  What's also interesting to me is that historically, this haunted house archetype goes back hundreds of years, well before Jackson came on the scene.  We all know this, I mean who hasn't seen pictures of those gloomy castles in old Gothic stories.  We all know those houses that wreaked havoc on Victorian readers, on Scooby Doo readers, on all of us.  I've read several of these to my own kids over the years, And now that I think about it, all these haunted houses kind of look like Hill House, they usually have two stories maybe a turret or tower, but for sure a black cat on a porch, bats coming out a window, and full moon somewhere behind it.      So true,  I think I've even mailed one or two Halloween cards with those very images on them, but literary haunted houses are slightly differently than the Scooby Doo thing.  In literary fiction authors use these Gothic tropes, and I'm going to put Jackson in this group, to create some sort of metaphor, to flesh out something moral or psychological- and this makes the inside of the house much scarier than the outside- as creepy as these pictures are.  The house represents something inside that is scary and that really exists in our world.  So the question is, what about this house scares us?  What are we really afraid of?  What are the ghosts?    And for me, although, I know this is totally a non-literature way of looking at things, to answer that question I find myself looking at Shirley Jackson as a person and the world she lived in.  Shirley Jackson was a woman of the 1950s, she was a writer and commentator and a deep thinker about that world.  She was a daughter, as we discussed last week, but she was also a mother herself.  And the definition of motherhood in the 1950s was very unique in American history because, and I talked about this a little last episode, but there was a giant shift after WW2 for the American family and especially for women.  Last episode, I talked about that second wave of feminism and Jackson as a professional woman may have looked at all of that, but today I want to bring up another important and that is this idea of the postwar rush to the suburbs and America's cult of the family- that is a very big distinctive historically about this time period. And it in fact, it is still very much a part of our American identity, even to this day.  After WW2, life changed for almost everyone in a positive way.  Life wasn't as hard as it had been before the war.  People could own a home; everyone seemed to want a family.  It was a status symbol.  We all wanted a particular kind of family- the nuclear family with a mom and a dad and children who were the product of that marriage.      That's not just an American thing- isn't that what everyone aspires to all over the world even today.      Of course- but for America, in this post World War 2 era, everything was changing and prospering in a new way and so this was not a pipe dream- it was attainable in a way that had NEVER been possible before.  Think about Of Mice and Men and how destitute things were during the depression.  That was all over.  Now- People had time to think about things like competitive living.  Before that we all were just trying not to starve.  We also had mass media that was projecting what prosperity looked like, or at least should look like.  This kind of atomic family was the picture of happiness.  This social framework was on the covers of all the magazines, in all the movies, in all the tv shows.  It was sanctioned by our churches, and how good or successful we were as humans depended on how well we created this particular family.  If your family wasn't this kind of family, we used the word “broken”.  You came from a broken home.  I know this very personally because this was my reality.  I was raised in a “broken” home.  My parents were divorced- although I'm not from the 50s, but even during my childhood this was a very shameful thing for a child- something was wrong with you, with your family, with your home.  Shirley Jackson's home wasn't physically broken at all- at least not in the way that mine was, but the appearance of perfection haunted her from her earliest memories.  Her parents were in hot pursuit of that perfection.  And as an adult when she was homemaking she was very aware of all of these family and social dynamics at work.  Almost all of her writings center around these ideas in one way or another, the fiction and the non-fiction.      So, back to Hill House, if we look at a home your way, as a place where individuals are supposed to belong- let's look at these characters from that perspective of why they might be showing up at Hill House.  Because the characters in this story are definitely not coming from that background.  They are all broken, if we pay close attention.  We see that Eleanor doesn't have a father or now a mother.  Theo is very vague about her identity, even about who she lives with- we don't even know if her roommate is a man or  a woman, the only thing she lets out in her introductory comments is about spending her vacations alone at boarding school which is kind of dark, and Luke will claim later on to not having a mother.  So, I guess, none of them really have a place to go for the holidays, to use the language from Bing Crosby's song.  When they get to Hill House, although the house itself is creepy, they seem happy to have found each other.  The lure of having what this house may be offering is greater than the risk of what could be scary about it being haunted.  The girls even wear bright colors to brighten up the dreary home; they run outside, the house is in a valley and kind of covered up, but they also claim it's a “place for picnics”, something happy families do- and of course, we'll see at the end of the book that this parody of the picnic will come back to haunt both girls. In the beginning, Eleanor and Theo claim to be cousins and the last sentence of chapter 2 is, “Would you let them separate us now?  Now that we've found out we're cousins?”.      When they meet Luke in chapter 3, Eleanor very quickly asks, “Then you're one of the family? The people who own Hill House? Not one of Doctor Montague's guests?”  Of course, she doesn't mean her own family- but for Eleanor- in some ways that is what she is fantasizing about- this notion of family- a place to call home.      Let me also point out that by this point in the story, even though, we're still in the very beginning, the house has already played a benign trick on Eleanor and Theo- there was an incident about a rabbit frightening them.  It's cute and funny but odd none the less.  Hill House, for Eleanor, although is obviously ugly, vile and haunted, is not an unhappy place.  It holds promise.  When they come in and meet Dr. Montague, he pours drinks for everyone and Eleanor comments, “Everything's so strange, I mean, this morning I was wondering what Hill House would be like, and now I can't believe that it's real, and we're here.”  She struggles to believe it, but as she sits with the other three and the thought she has is this and I quote, “I am the fourth person in this room; I am one of them; I belong.”    And of course, all of the conversation between the four of them is fun-loving.  They make jokes about what they do in the other world.  Almost all of it is non-sense.  Eleanor talks about being the talk of café's, Luke says he is a bullfighter, Theo claims to be clad in silk and gold.      Yes, and Dr. Montague assumes the role of a a traditional father-figure.  He calls them children and tells them stories.  Let's read that part.  They all sit around, and he tells the story of Hill House.    Page 54-      It's definitely a creepy story and the Crain family is definitely a miserable group of people, but getting to the current moment if Mr. Montague is the father-fugure, Luke, Theo and Eleanor are the kids, then in some sense the house is the mother- there's no one else.  But from the history of the house, there was never really a real mother that ever lived here.    Yes- and that brings me back to my discussion of the 1950s.  Before the 50s, life in the United States was more difficult.  Many people we're struggling to exist- mostly fighting mother nature on a farm or a ranch.  When wealth came to the United States in that post war era, like we already said forming an ideal family and an ideal home was at the heart of that- but at the heart of the home were the children.  A new word showed up in the Webster dictionary in 1958 that had never existed in English before- that is the word, “parenting”.  And whatever it meant, parenting was about the responsibility of making perfect kids or at least making a perfect growing up experience for kids, and how to do that was naturally- again in very American form- supercontroversial and divisive.  There was this book that came out in 1944 by a doctor by the name of Dr. Benjamin Spock.  This book took America by storm.  In his book, he claimed parents should not discipline their children.  They should be permissive.  The idea before this was that humans were evil, and children were humans, so they needed to be disciplined or tamed into doing right- if you indulged them you would “spoil” them- that was the word.  Dr. Spock took the opposite approach, his theory was that all of us are good and it is not possible to spoil a child.  A child who is loved will never be spoiled by things you give him/her or do for him/her.  If they had everything they needed, they didn't need to act out or misbehave.  In either case, no matter which side of the argument you fell on- one thing both camps had in common was the child was the center of the home. Everything was about the children.     And this was where Shirley Jackson, the mother, fit in.  Look at the titles of her two books of essays about her children, Life Among the Savages and Raising Demons. Jackson took seriously this debate about “parenting”.  In 1960 she wrote a book titled “Special Delivery, a Useful Book for Brand-New Mothers”.  Let me read a small quote from an essay in there called, “Whos' the Boss?”    “After Careful study it is going to be clear to the earnest mother that the enormous propaganda on child raising in books, magazins, and even adverstisments is being largely written by babies.  Baby is the boss, the articles point out flatly; first you are waiting for him, an dthe you are waiting on him.  Perhaps this is because 20 or 25 years ago the going rage in baby care was exactly the opposite.  Children who were allowed a little freedom of choice were going to be ‘spoiled' and the worse possible thing an anguished mother could do was pick up a crying baby. In our family there is a sharp division of opinion on the question of the authority of the child.  Our four children ardently support he cause of absolute indulgence, warmly seconded by their grandparents on both sides.  My husband and I, bolstering one another secretly with reminders that we are firm, righteous, fair, stem although impartial, band beyond all else the heads of the family, have managed to fight the issue to a standstill somewhere between the two camps.”    She is funny.      She definitely is, and even in Hill House, there are parts of the dialogue that are really funny- especially when we get to the parts about Mrs. Montague who is absolutely absurd.  But here's where I want to land.  Eleanor is our central character- no doubt.  We are wedded to her point of view.  There is no doubt that the allure of Hill House is also her desire for a family- to not be alone- one of the creepier elements for me in this book is Eleanor's constant revisiting the phrase “Journeys end in lovers meeting”.  I think it's repeated 14 times, maybe more than that.     Yeah- what is that about.    Well, of course, we never really know.  It's actually a quote from Shakepeare's play 12th Night.  Which is a comedy about a girl named Viola.  12th Night is very typical Shakespeare, I actually just watched it at a Shakespeare in the park this summer in Nashville.  It's a happy play and after a lot of misteps and misidentities Viola finds true love at the end.  The Journey for Viola ended in a lovers meeting.  But the way Jackson uses it isn't like the way Shakespeare uses it at all.  It really is not used in any kind of romantic sense.  Eleanor wants to meet love, but I'm not sure she's very particular as to the kind of love she meets.  It doesn't have to be sexual, for sure.  Although there's a little bit of flirtation with Luke, it definitely ends poorly. This is a very asexual book.  In fact, the most graphic sexual part has to do with the demented Hugh Crain and his abusive relationship with his daughters.  Eleanor is looking for a family- she wants to be the center of someone's world, and that is normal and understandable, but she's also a bratty kid in many ways.  She's judgmental of everyone else, we will see.  Jackson is going to create every member of this family of Hill House to be dysfunctional and self-orbiting.  Every member of the family is tyrranically trying to be in control- and notice that is what Dr. Montague pointed out in the history of the house.  Hugh Crain, who built the house, is a horrible father- he parented his daughters as we find out late in the book- through sheer terror.  The house is a horrible mother, it's oppressive and vile and deceitful- but the Crain kids were terrible too.  They were competitive and hurtful.  And now we get these “kids” – if that is what we're going to call Luke, Theo and Eleanor- are going to all three be portrayed as self-centered and competitive.  Dr. Montague in this playful exchange at dinner says this and notice Jackson's carefully chosen words, “You are three willful, spoiled children who are prepared to nag me for your bedtime story.”  Jackson uses the loaded language of her generation- words everyone in the 1950s would recognize.      So are you saying, Jackson is saying, children are tyrranical as well as mothers?  Is everyone tyrranical?      Well, I really don't know if I'm ready to comment on that yet but maybe.  I want to point out something though that IS interesting.  Both Theo and Eleanor were selected to come to the house because they supposedly have powers, Theo has telepathic power and Eleanor can create these poltergeist experiences where we can move things around- maybe subconsciously even.  This, I think is an important detail to include.  They are not powerless, and Jackson leaves room we will see to see both of them exercising their powers at various places in the book, maybe.      What do you mean by that?  That they may be using their powers or maybe they aren't, we can't be sure?    That's it exactly- and we're not even sure if they know if they are using their powers- they seem not to really understand that they have them. Now, let's go back and think about the HOUSE itself- As the story sets itself up in the exposition, four very different people have moved into the house.  The only thing they have in common is that they all have some sort of brokenness in the background, even Dr. Montague as we will find out when we meet his hideous wife, but they all are willing to move into a house that is supposedly haunted- but how and by whom?  And what are they going to do in the house.  Of course this question comes up in their evening together- their first bonding experience sharing food and drink together- and Dr. Montague confesses that he has no idea what will happen to them.  They will take notes, but that is all he can offer. They will drink brandy- as Luke points out- they are there to drink spirits- pardon the pun.  And they most certainly will.   Before they go to bed that first night, Theo and Eleanor share the stories of where they come from.  Let's read this part.    Page 64    What is interesting about that exchange is that we, as readers, already know Eleanor is lying.  None of what she just told them is true.  Things at Hill House are not what they appear to be.  In chapter 4 when they tour the house, Dr. Montague makes a point of pointing that out.      Page 77     Much of chapter 4 is describing the house- and the house is off- you can't see it at first- but it's off center.  There is a fairly large distortion because so much is off. There's also the marble statue of Mr. Crain, the veranda that's crooked, the cold spot in front of the nursery ironically which is symbolically in the middle of the house, and then the chapter ends with noises. This is the first really scary part in the book.  Eleanor apparently wakes up with someone calling her.  She thinks it's her mother at first before she remembers she's at Hill House.  When she goes to Theo's room Theo is scared out of her mind because she's heard someone knocking, plus it's terribly cold.  The noise gets louder until Eleanor shouts wildly, “Go away, go away!”  The door trembles and shakes against the hinges and ultimately they hear a little giggle and a whisper and a laugh before the Dr. and Luke get to them.    That is all very creepy and very definitely the stuff scary movies are made of.      Yes, and chapter 4 ends with Dr. Montague's observation.    - read  ending pg 99    Whatever is pressuring the house- is pressuring this little make shift family to break up.      But then again, no one ever knows what forces  are at work in any family dynamic. Do we?  What kind of subversive forces are at work in a house, in a home… in a home that is haunted?    Ha!  Good point Jackson.  I guess we often never do.      Well, that's terrifying enough for one episode.  We will pick up with chapter 5 next time and see just what exactly Jackson is doing with our minds.  Thanks for spending time with us as we explore the terrifying world Jackson has created at Hill House.  As always please tell your friends about us, push out an episode on your twitter account, or your Facebook account.  Text an episode to a friend.  If you're a teacher and want to use podcasts for instruction, go to our website and download a listening guide for your students to fill out as they listen.  We want to support learning around the world, and helping us share the world is how you can help us grow.  Thank you     Peace out.        

Books with Brookes
Book Club Discussion: The Haunting of Hill House

Books with Brookes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 34:25


One of the most iconic ghost-stories of all time: The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson was published in 1959 and has set the tone for every spooky story to follow. Beth joins the podcast to discuss this iconic haunted horror story.  Books with Brookes is produced by Mo Barrow with theme music by Jonathan Allen.  For sponsorship plans and more information, please email: admin@pressplaypodcasts.com | www.pressplaypodcasts.com

Nada Que Ver
Especial de Mike Flanagan: El nuevo maestro del cine de horror.

Nada Que Ver

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 41:17


El especial de esta semana está dedicado a Mike Flanagan: uno de los más destacados directores de terror de los últimos tiempos. Creador de La maldición de Hill House, La maldición de Bly Manor y Misa de medianoche, historias complejas, personajes espeluznantes y muchísimo espanto del bueno.

Don't Blame The Pilot
48 The Haunting of Hill House

Don't Blame The Pilot

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 52:32


To finish off our Halloween month we review Netflix's The Haunting of Hill House! So sit back, relax, and don't blame the pilot! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/dbtppodcast/message

That Scene with Dan Patrick
Carla Gugino Takes Us Back inside "Hill House"

That Scene with Dan Patrick

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 34:38


Actress Carla Gugino takes Dan Patrick inside "The Haunting of Hill House", specifically Episode 9, where the fate of Olivia Crain is finally revealed. She goes in-depth on how she interpreted her character's actions and explains some of the mysteries of the series, as well as revealing the scene in "Hill House" that was the most difficult for her to film. Carla also opines on why "Hill House" has resonated with so many different people all over the world. Finally, Carla looks back at some of the prior roles in her career and shares some life lessons she's learned along the way.Follow That Scene with Dan Patrick for new episodes and early listens on Amazon Music. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

There Might Be Cupcakes Podcast
Tangerines to Apples: House of Leaves: 73

There Might Be Cupcakes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 34:49


In which Carla continues to explore the Navidson Record of House of Leaves. This is the third episode; to begin, start with episode 68: Bone-Chimes and Primitive Spiders: https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/there-might-be-cupcakes-podcas-520320/episodes/bone-chimes-and-primitive-spid-85959021 then listen to episode 70: Ergodic: https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/there-might-be-cupcakes-podcas-520320/episodes/ergodic-house-of-leaves-70-94954631https://www.markzdanielewski.comHouse of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski https://bookshop.org/a/6560/9780375703768The Whalestoe Letters: From House of Leaves https://bookshop.org/a/6560/9780375714412The Cipher by Kathe Koja https://bookshop.org/a/6560/9781946154330The Willows by Algernon Blackwood, Illustrated Edition https://bookshop.org/a/6560/9798653366215Slade House by David Mitchell https://bookshop.org/a/6560/9780812988079Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll https://bookshop.org/a/6560/9781907523892Alice Through the Looking-Glass by Lewis Carroll https://bookshop.org/a/6560/9781909621572The House Next Door by Anne Rivers Siddons https://bookshop.org/a/6560/9781416553441Locke and Key vol. 1: Welcome to Lovecraft by Joe Hill https://bookshop.org/a/6560/9781600103841The Haunting of Hill House https://bookshop.org/a/6560/9780143039983The Haunting of Hill House Audible, narrated by Bernadette Dunne https://amzn.to/3jrA2VRWe Have Always Lived in the Castle Audible, narrated by Bernadette Dunne https://amzn.to/3GgBm7QReferenced works, sources, and recommended reading:Dante's Inferno https://bookshop.org/a/6560/9780141195872Rainer Maria Rilke: https://ronnowpoetry.com/contents/rilke/Orpheus.htmlVirgil's The Aeneid https://bookshop.org/a/6560/9780143105138M. C. Escher https://bookshop.org/a/6560/9783836529846Rikki-Tikki-Tavi Rudyard Kipling https://bookshop.org/a/6560/9781786750488Being and Time by Martin Heidegger https://bookshop.org/a/6560/9781438432762The Never-Ending Story by Michael Ende https://amzn.to/3jFl2Uchttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hermeshttps://www.britannica.com/topic/Orpheus-Greek-mythologyTheme song and stinger: “Comadreamers I” by Haunted Me, off their Pleasure album, used with permissionHow to Support Cupcakes:Audible: https://www.audible.com/ep/creator?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004RCare/Of Vitamins: https://takecareof.com/invites/chr4bwPatreon: https://www.patreon.com/m/theremightbecupcakesand please visit my lovely sponsors that share their ads on my episodes.Where to Find Cupcakes:Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/theremightbecupcakesFacebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/theremightbecupcakesTwitter: @mightbecupcakesInstagram: @theremightbecupcakes and @carlahauntedReddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/theremightbecupcakes r/theremightbecupcakesGoodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/804047-there-might-be-cupcakes-podcast-groupContact: carla@theremightbecupcakes.comComplete list of ways to listen to the podcast on the sidebar at http://theremightbecupcakes.com

Talk Me Into
Haunt Me Into: 3D

Talk Me Into

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 76:26


Boo! It's our third annual Halloween round table… Haunt Me Into 3D! This year Jeff is spooking us into The Batman vs Dracula on HBOMax, Jimmy is getting scary with The Haunting of Hill House episodes 1-3 on Netflix, and Dan is creeping us out with the first three issues of the Image comic book series Wytches by Scott Snyder and Jock.   Next week Jeff is milking the Marvel MCU cash cow by talking Jimmy and Dan into The Eternals! Check out the first three issues of Eternals Volume Three by Neil Gaiman and John Romita Jr.   Please remember to subscribe, rate and review or send us an email (talkmeinto@gmail.com) and we will read it on the next episode. For more Talk Me Into content become a patron! www.patreon.com/talkmeinto. Check out our merchandise here: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/talk-me-into?ref_id=24475.  For updates and generally joyful humor, follow the show (@talkmeinto) or the hosts (@sonnavafitch @danny_breakdown @JEFFFFF27) on Twitter. Artwork provided by Twitter user @wikirascals. Theme provided by Hostage Calm. Additional music provided by Disqualifier (https://disqualifier.bandcamp.com).   00:00 - Jimmy's Going To RetroWorldExpo 01:00 - Intro 04:05 - Talking Ourselves Into 12:45 - Pre-Haunt! 21:50 - Post-Haunt! 72:35 - Outro/Next Episode: The Eternals

They're Terrified & Tipsy
61. Midnight Mass (2021) - Episode 7

They're Terrified & Tipsy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 47:15


Hi Friends! Ok so we're starting something new! For the next few weeks, we'll be covering the new Netflix miniseries Midnight Mass! If you haven't seen it, get started so you don't miss any episodes!!For ad-free episodes a day early plus awesome exclusive content, shout outs, and to pick what movies we watch, head over to https://www.patreon.com/tipsypodVisit http://www.tispypod.com for all things Tipsy Pod!--https://www.imdb.com/title/tt10574558Directed by Mike Flanagan (The Haunting of Hill House, The Haunting of Bly Manor, Gerald's Game)An isolated island community experiences miraculous events - and frightening omens - after the arrival of a charismatic, mysterious young priest.--Part of the Slash 'N Cast Podcast Network: https://www.slashncast.network/Voice over work by Dustin Kind: https://www.dustinkind.comAll podcast links: https://www.bio.link/tipsypod

How To Love Lit Podcast
Shirley Jackson - The Haunting Of Hill House - Episode 1 - MeetThe Author And The Personal Issues That Created One Of The Best Horror Genre Books Of All Time!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 48:20


Shirley Jackson - The Haunting Of Hill House - Episode 1 - MeetThe Author And The Personal Issues That Created One Of The Best Horror Genre Books Of All Time!   `Hi, I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    And I'm Garry Shriver and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.  If you are listening to this in real time, we are well into the month of October and in the United States, the month of October means Halloween.  Halloween, as we've discussed before, is not Christy's favorite holiday.  Christy, why is that?    Because it's horrifying.  It's about death.  It's about being scared.  It's about demons.  I don't understand why we're celebrating these things.      And yet, I have seen you dress up as Wilma Flintstone; answer a door bell to a slew of terrifyingly dressed children, hand out candy and enjoy every minute of it.  For those of you who live in other parts of the world- that is what we do here in the United States on October 31st.  My son, Ben, and his wife Rachel live in a part of Memphis which is particularly serious about Halloween, so we, if we can, love to go down there on Halloween and get in on the party.      That's true- and it is wild. They have a neighbor whose yard literally looks like the set of a horror movie with graves, and ghosts and witches and everything.  It spooks me, but on the other hand,  I do love dressing up, and I love seeing all the kids dress up.  That part I'm cool with.    And yet, here we are reading a classic work described as Female Gothic or horror fiction- the work of the celebrated Shirley Jackson, perhaps her most famous novel The Haunting of Hill House.      True.  But I will say that Literary Horror is slightly different than Nightmare on Elm street.  Here's a little story about myself, so I had never watched a horror movie growing up.  My mother didn't allow it in our home, and back then these movies were rated R and the people at movie theaters really policed that sort of thing- so if you were a young child, obviously you could watch a rated R movie, but they didn't make it easy for you.  Well, anyway, when I was a sophomore in high school, this little school that I attended at the time took an overnight trip out of town to hike up this mountain, Pico da Bandeira.   After the hike, somebody pulled out the VHS of this move and we were going to watch it (I'm pretty sure it was a bootleg).  Anyway, I was so excited- most everyone in Brazil loves horror movies and Nightmare on Elmstreet was one of the most populat at the time.       Well, how did that go for you?    Not well, I'm not sure I got through 15 minutes.  I spent the rest of the night under the covers and with my hands in my ears.  I didn't even want to hear it.      HA!!  Well, what I find fascinating about Literary fiction is that it's scary for all kinds of different reasons, not the idea of someone jumping out and stabbing an unsuspecting girl.      Exactly. It's not some obvious caricature of a gore covered mummy walking around with a hatchet that defines it.  It's metaphorical; it's about the cost of seduction; it's about psychological disorders and it's very much about anxiety.      Well, you know I love it when we get psychological.  One thing I found interesting, and this is coming from the perspective that we just did an entire series kind of around women's issue with A Doll's House, but I expected Shirley Jackson's work to be more feminist than it is.  Also, the book has all this mother/daughter stuff in it.  I wasn't expecting that.    Yes- it very much has everything to do with mother/daughter relationships.  That motif starts on the first page and never lets up.  I got tired of counting mother references, and I never found an article that did the math, but there are reference to mothers endlessly- and something that drew my immediate attention- especially the first time Eleanor wakes up terrified in the middle the night yelling for her mother.  But that is just one way of looking at the book- although that's a great place to start and where we will start our discussion today as we attempt to make it all the way through chapter 1 of the book.    But in a more general sense, what Jackson was looking at was this imbalance of power that can exist in relationships between any two people.  She wants to express the seduction and betrayal of the powerless by the powerful. She expresses how one person uses the power in the relationship basically to crush another person.  And unfortunately, she understood this problem so well because it was her entire life story.  She had that experience with her mother, and then she turned around and had it again with her husband, and really she had it within the community at large of the 1950s.      And, of course, being written in the 1950s, many women of her generation quickly related to it.  In fact, in some ways, it reminds me a little bit of that very famous work by Betty Friedan, The Feminine Mystique, that became so important in American history but wasn't even going to be written for another ten years.    Yeah, I've heard of that book, but honestly, I don't know much about it.  What is the premise and why does it connect, in your mind to Shirley Jackson.    Well, I'll be upfront and tell you I have never read the book, so I'm speaking from second hand knowledge.  But, what I know about it from teaching and studying history is the impact it had on American culture because of the power of the argument Friedan makes in the book.     First of all I would like to point out she's interviewing women that attended Smith College, which is a very well to do private school in Massachusetts.  survey sample was not very scientific     Friedan, at her 15th college reunion, took a survey from her fellow colleagues, about how they felt about their lives.  The basic premise of her book is that society had created a myth that women were most fulfilled if they were taking care of children, staying at home,  supporting their husbands, and staying away from politics and business.  In the book, she claims that entire worldview for women is a myth- at least for many women.  I will never assume to speak for women and I certainly won't speak for all women.  But Friedan will, and she went after the 1950s stereotypical Leave it To Beaver kind of mom that had been the socially accepted lifestyle.  She said many women were absolutely miserable.  She claimed that society's pressure on women for women to succumb to what amounted to in many cases mindnumbing non-stimulating existences was causing depression.  She famously said it was a “problem that has no name”.   And whether you want to challenge her or agree with her, you have to respect that her idea absolutely resonated across America and really the entire world.  Her book was a best seller, selling over 3 million in her lifetime and has been translated into at least a dozen major languages around the world.  Many textbooks credit Friedan for sparking the second wave of feminism that was a key feature of the 60s, the kind of thing we see portrayed in movies like Forrest Gump in the character of Jenny.  This women's rights movement was not interested in voting rights; it was moving forward to the next level.  It was pushing for workplace equality, birth control, abortion rights, breaking the glass ceiling in academia and business.  Where I see it aligning with Jackson, who came much earlier, is that this book, The Haunting of Hill House is a metaphorical expression of everything Friedan wanted to say about women in the 1960s- the house is haunted, so to speak.  The house was crushing women.  It was making women crazy.     Well, you're starting to steal a little bit of my thunder –next week we are going to spend almost the entire episode discussing the house itself, but you are dead on about what Jackson is doing in her work…pardon the pun.  But, I want to say before all the men moan and groan and say, I'm turning this off if this is going to be another one of those feminist books- the book really is much more than a political commentary- in fact that's just one way of relating to it.  The metaphor most definitely can be read exactly as you have connected to the femininist movement of the 1960s, and many many people have read it just that way, but I'm not sure Jackson herself really did, although there's no doubt she was an advocate for many of the things you just enumerated. She, like Ibsen, would say her work is art and not a piece of political propaganda.  She would also likely claim, and I know I'm being presumptuous to speak for her, but I do think she would claim, that would be a very small way to understand her body of work, if that's all you thought it was. She was writing the emotions and then the reader found themselves in them.     I was also interested to see that Jackson, very much like Elizabeth Barrett Browning struggled fighting critics over the years.  Stanley Hyman, her husband and literary critic during their lives, in the preface for a book he published of her yet unpublished work after her death famously wrote, “For all her popularity, Shirley Jackson won surprisingly little recognition.  She received no awards or prizes, grants or fellowships; her name was often omitted from lists on which it clearly belonged, or which it should have led.  She saw these honors go to inferior writers.”    True, and Hyman, although I have trouble giving him credit for anything because of his and Shirley's relationship which we'll talk about in a different episode, but he predicted that Jackson's “powerful visions of suffering and inhumanity” and would be found “increasingly significant and meaningful.”  He truly always understood that her long form or serious work was more than pop fiction, or gory horror, and yet that was not the majority view of that time.    And part of that is somewhat understandable.  One thing I didn't know about her until we started reading up on her for this podcast series was that her acclaim during her day really came from two places- one was for the short story, “The Lottery”, but the other and this is what I didn't know- was her best-selling essay collection on domestic life titled Life Among the Savages.  I haven't read much of that, to be honest, but what I did read is really truly funny stuff stuff.  She was Erma Bombeck before Erma Bombeck.    Yes- and she was funny, and she was writing about her kids, house cleaning, being a mom, a member of a local community and all the craziness of middle-class life.  It was the stuff that people were living in their world, and she made it funny.  People didn't take seriously the psychological insights into issues of emotional isolation, rage, paranoia, and the fragmentation of the human mind- from a person who was a regular contributor to magazines like Good Housekeeping, Mademoiselle, McCall's and Ladies Home Journal.    No, it was just too different, and of course, you can't discount the condescension from the serious art community- I mean here was a woman writing in a genre that nobody took seriously about female protagonists- which was often not taken seriously- and was famous for cute anecdotes about the comedy of errors which is life as a house-mom raising four children in a small town.We must remember also, as a general rule, the 1950s are not that far removed from the time period where women didn't read literature at all- there was a thing called “ladies reading material” That's what women read.  Men read literature, but women writing for women was not elevated enough to actually be called “literature”- it was simply reading material for women.       Oh- well – I guess we shall make that distinction- although I will say, as a woman writing “ladies reading material” for money she did fairly well for herself.  Shirley Jackson made serious cash off of these stories- in fact, she outearned her husband- and it was the essays that were funding their lifestyles, not her novels. Her biographer Ruth Franklin, commented in an interview that she could make  over $2000 per essay which at the time was enough to fun to fund her Morris Minor collection.    Nice- well British Sports cars are always a fun thing to keep around the house.     I'll say.  But back to her legacy for a second, Jackson is like Elizabeth Barrett Browning in that her work, well after her death, found it's way into the canon and today is very much taken seriously.  In fact, we're teaching her right now to all the 11th graders at Bartlett High School, and almost all American students will at some point read  her short story “The Lottery”, the  famous short story that triggered more public outrage  in 1948 than anything published before or since by the magazine the New Yorker.  Hundreds of people cancelled their subscriptions and even more wrote the magazine totally exasperated.      Well, it's political and psychological and really even religious as well.  But back to the 11th graders at Bartlett, do you think your kids will be able to appreciate or enjoy the depth of the psychological analysis in her novel that today is the central hallmark of her work?    Yeah, I think many of them will get it.  I look forward to how they understand what she's talking about.  You know, students today live in such a different world and the ghosts and houses that haunt them look so differently than the ghosts and houses that haunted our generation or much less Shirley Jackson's.     I look forward to discussing some of these issues with them and see what fascinates them the most.      One of the things that fascinates me the most and I'm expecting to come out is Jackson's multiple direct and indirect references to the relationship between mothers and daughters.  It's clear in this book that whatever is going wrong in Eleanor's mind has something to do with her dead mother.  I have two daughters, and I really pray, I am not the kind of mother Shirley Jackson had or that my daughters ever express any of the feelings she expresses about mother/daughter relationships- nothing that would haunt and torment my children after I'm dead.      No, I'm sure none of us want to have that kind of legacy with our children.      And yet, there are women like Geraldine Jackson, Shirley's mother.  Geraldine was truly relentless in her cruelty towards her daughter.  She was cruel to her as a child and her passive aggressive disapproval was something she perpetuated all throughout Shirley's life right to her untimely death at age 48.      Yes and I think understanding Geraldine' cruelty really helps me see some of the things in Jackson's writing that I may have overlooked before.  And I know that an author's life cannot be used uncritically to explain an artist's work; obviously art speaks for itself, but maybe more than any other writer we've read together, Jackson uses her writings to express pain in artistic ways that were personal to her, but universal to many of us.  Geraldine's ruthless subtle and sometimes not so subtle demoralizing was something Jackson could not get out of her mind.  .  Geraldine's own personality disorder took a heavy toll on Shirley.    And it was always expressed with all the best of intentions- she was always so concerned.    Let's tell a little about their story and then people will know what you're talking about.     Okay, well the story starts when  Jackson was born in 1916 (although she lied about her age and claimed to have been born in 1919- which I think is funny), but anyway, she was born into an affluent family and up until she was 16 they lived in Burlingame, California.     Let me interrupt, just for context, Burlingame, to this day is one of the most expensive cities in the United States.  The median house in Burlingame costs over 2 million dollars- and I'm not talking mansions- this is the price range for what would be an average home that would cost a tenth of that in other parts of the US.  Every review on bestplaces.com talks about how unaffordable it is for most people to live in this Burlingame.     Yep, and Geraldine, Shirley's mom and her father Leslie, cultivated that cliché'd vision of the upper class  country club lifestyle.  They were into the production of this very sophisticated appearance of success and wealth, what was important was the appearance of things.   They were into competitive living, and that,  of course, still includes having perfect children.  Shirley's brother, I might add, was beautiful and competitive and made them proud, but unfortunately for Shirley, she was not- and this was just a huge disappointment for Geraldine.  She could not nor did she want to fit the mold.  Shirley was heavier than the other girls.  She didn't enjoy the same kinds of things as the other girls.  She didn't have that “All-American” barbie doll look like the other girls.  She wasn't into the deputante thing, and if she had been wasn't cute enough.    Yes, I read a couple of articles that called Jackson morbidly obese, so I googled images of her, it was true that she was heavier , but, in my mind, she falls way short of the criteria for morbidly obese by today's definition, especially in her youth. And I want to say something else about this 1950's lifestyle we've been discussing. After WW 2 there was a huge economic boom that doubled family incomes in the decade. It was the first decade of widespread middle class wealth. And one sign of that new middle class wealth was the ability to live on one income. Wives staying at home were a sign of wealth and prestige.     Maybe not, but she certainly wasn't the daughter Geraldine wanted nor could be proud of at a deputant ball.  In fact, truth be told, Geraldine was actually disappointed when she found out she was pregnant because she didn't want a child at that time.  But Geraldine's largest problem and obsession was with Shirley's weight- and her obsession with Shirley's weight never ended.  She made comments about her weight- all of the time.  They were gratuitous, just dropped in to remind her that she was fat.   Here are some quotes from a couple of Geraldine's letters to her daughter just to show you what I'm talking about. “Glad you're dieting.” “Excess weight is hard on the heart.” “You should get down to normal weight. Try non-fat milk.”  Even after the publication of what would be Jackson's final novel, Geraldine could be relied on to bring up her weight, “Why oh why do you allow the magazines to print such awful pictures of you?...I have been so sad all morning about what you have allowed yourself to look like.”      Yes, let me read the full quote for context.     If you don't care what you look like or care about your appearance why don't you do something about it for your children's sake— and your husband's. . . . I have been so sad all morning about what you have allowed yourself to look like. . . . You were and I guess still are a very wilful child and one who insisted on her own way in everything— good or bad.    This is a straight up narcissistic rant.     There was always the subtext that was no matter what Shirley did with her life, she could never live up to her mother's expectations- even if she was famous- Jackson wanted acceptance of who she was- but she wanted it on her terms, and she and wanted to prove to her mom that the way she was was a good way, and she could be good at life just by being herself- but that was never going to happen.  In fact, at one low moment, Geraldine actually told her daughter that she was a failed abortion.      Wow.  That is just hateful.  Geraldine wanted a girl in the image of what she wanted, and she was never going to compromise.  This is classically what people call today a “toxic mother”,  And this plays a terrible toll on girls who have toxic mothers.  These behaviors can destroy women's images of themselves.   And this is what seems to have happened with Jackson and her mother.        Let me just back  up and say, it's absolutely natural and healthy for a girl to look up to her mother; a mom is the original ideal of what a woman should be.  That's how we all learn to navigate in this world, and likely a mom and a daughter will have a lot in common for obvious reasons.  There is a lot of joy in that.  There is a special bond in that.  Over the years, though, as a little girl develops into a teenager, although at first she wants to be exactly like her mom, that desire kind of separates out.  In a normal relationship, as a girl transitions into a woman, she individuates.   She becomes her own person.  Some things of her mother she will keep; others she'll discard.  And healthy moms respect and encourage their daughters individuality.  A normal mom will do whatever she can to equip her daughter, make her bolder and stronger.  But as painful as it may be from a mom's perspective, healthy mom's accept daughter's choices- even the ones they think are mistakes.  That's just what they do, and if they end up being mistakes, it's okay.  We all get to live our own lives.  But in Geraldine's life, what Shirley did was a reflection on her, so she couldn't let the fact that her daughter was overweight go.      Well, how do you think she took it when Shirley told her mom she was marrying a Jew in 1940- or I should say that she had already married a Jew, she didn't even tell them she got married until several months later because they were anti-Semitic people,  I can imagine that didn't go well?        No, I'd say it probably didn't, but I really don't know.   I do want to say one other thing, Christy, don't get me wrong, I think it's pretty well-established that motherhood is by definition a lose/lose proposition- moms just can't win.  It's impossible to raise a perfect child, just like it's impossible to be a perfect person, so of course we can't raise a person in the most perfect of emotional environments.      Mom's will unrealistically be blamed for things that may or may not be their fault- the reality is no one can be perfect, we will hurt each other and there will insecurities that spring up because of the way we are raised, and that's kind of normal too- it's normal for dads; it's normal for moms.  But, that is not the same as being a toxic mom.  Geraldine was toxic.  Nothing was ever going to be good enough for Geraldine.  She was perpetually disapproving, and Shirley was never going to meet her standards.  Geraldine was also always very controlling- I read somewhere she made Shirley wear garters and high heels as a little girl.  She was constantly guilt-tripping Shirley.  She constantly made negative comments; she manipulated her emotions, and most of the time she did it passive-aggressively.  She did it under the guise of love.      And that seems to be in one sense what Jackson expresses in her writing- it's at least what lots of people have identified with in Hill House.   There is this sense that Shirley could never get her mom out of her head, and of course, she's not the only one who struggles with these kinds of things.  In Hill House,  the main character is a 32 year old young woman named Eleanor Vance. I want to add that 32 is not a young age.  She's not telling the story of a child and the abuses of a mother on a small child.  Eleanor is a fully grown adult who should be living her own independent life for quite some time.  But she hasn't.  She hasn't even had an opportunity to do so.  Eleanor has no friends and is alone. That's what we're told at the beginning and we will see all the way through to the end of the book when she tells Theo she has never been wanted, it's been how she's felt always.  We're also told Eleanor's mother is dead right here at the beginning, and that Eleanor has been taking care of her relentlessly since she was twenty years old.   Eleanor's mom is a constant presence in Eleanor's psyche, even beyond the grave.  She even buys clothes that she knows her mother hates- pants- just because her mom is dead and can't do anything about it.   Eleanor is being haunted before she ever gets to Hill House.    True, and this lack of self-esteem and then loneliness is what has resonated with so many women and men who read Jackson's stories.  It also is what directly led to a lot of the suffering Jackson experienced in her marriage to Stanley.      Stanley Hyman, there's a character.  Before I smear him, I guess I will say right off that bat that he, in many ways, was very supportive of Shirley professionally and admired her intellectually.  My problem with him is that he degraded her sexually- and that is the cruelest and most intimate and demeaning forms of degradation that there is.    For one thing he absolutely did not respect the sexual boundaries Shirley wanted in their marriage.  Besides having so many affairs with students at the school he taught but also really just anyone—he seemed to enjoy telling Jackson all about these trysts.  I've read a few of the letters he wrote about women he was sleeping with on various business trips, and I got the feeling it's almost like he was bragging a little bit.  I'd read a few quotes, but they're vulgar.  He talked about groping girls- giving details about what he had done. It's gross never mind hurtful.  And Shirley would get upset.  Although she was a free spirit and Bohemian in some ways, this was not okay with her.  She didn't want a open marriage where everyone just slept with whoever they wanted.  There are letters where she writes him and expresses how this behavior made her feel, but she never mailed these letters.  I don't even know why.  Maybe she didn't have the nerve.  Maybe she knew it made no difference.  Maybe she wanted her family and that was a price she was willing to pay.  I'm speculating.  We only know that  she just took it.  She wouldn't confront him, at least that there isa record of.  She just forced herself to accept it and moved on with her life.      And that is an indication of low self-esteem, obviously.  Jackson wouldn't have put up with that sort of thing like she did, if she didn't think, at some level, it was her fault or that she didn't deserve to be treated any better than that.  This is the legacy of a toxic parent.  Allowing people to treat you in a way that is lesser and that is not how you treat them is a direct result of low self-esteem, but I want to add that future abusive relationships is not the only symptom of low self-esteem and it isn't the only symptom of low-esteem we see in Jackson's life.   Behaviors that provoke self-harm  like over-eating, over-drinking, and pill-popping- all things Jackson did- are also a result of low esteem and indicate high levels of anxiety.  Feelings of sadness, depression, anxiety, anger, shame and guilt- are also things we see in Jackson's life.  She seems to have truly struggled emotionally.     True, but before we get too dark, Shirley was all of that, but she wasn't ONLY that.  She had a happy side too- an apparently tremendously happy side.  I say that from interviews I read that people did with her children.  When her kids write or talk about their homelife, the reports are glowing.  Her home was a happy place.  It was chaotic and topsy turvey at times, the kind of crazy that people love.  They didn't even see any tension between their parents.  For one thing, Stanley didn't have a whole lot to do with the family- lots of men didn't in the 50s, that was the mother's domain, but from the perspective of her children, her marriage to Stanley was a happy one, as was their home.  So, we see all of that going on.  Back to her biographer, Ruth Franklin, Franklin titled her biography about Jackson, “A Rather Haunted Life” kind of to reflect that idea- that she was haunted, but not entirely, just rather haunted.      Yes, and it was that dichotomy that leads to all kinds of cognitive dissonance.  I read in another article by a different biographer that Shirley, as a mother was deeply involved but also emotionally erratic.  “Her moods and anxieties colored her children's days.  No one could be more loving; no one could be meaner.”      Which brings me back to her as a writer.  One critic observed that out of over 110 different stories that Jackson wrote in her lifetime, most of them are about imperiled, divided or anxious women- and that is including both her scary and her funny stories.  And when we get to her final three novels- they are gothic completely about anxiety, entrapment and in the case of Hill House, a deeply troubled female with an inability to differentiate well between illusion and reality.      Understanding that really makes the famous first paragraph of The Haunting of Hill House  meaningful in a deeper way, at least it does to me. And I do want to emphasize this first paragraph is one of the most famous paragraphs in all of Jackson's writings:    No live organism can continue for long to exist sanely under conditions of absolute reality; even larks and katydids are supposed, by some, to dream.  Hill House, not sane, stood by itself against its hills, holding darkness within; it had stood so for 80 years and might stand for eighty more.  Within, walls continued upright, bricks met neatly, floors were firm, and doors were sensibly shut; silence lay steadily against the wood and stone of Hill House, and whatever walked there, walked alone.”    And what do you always say, when we start these books, that great writers will give their story away in the first sentence or two.    They almost always do.  This one in particular invites us to think about so much.  First of all, it starts with a negation- “no” but there are a lot of negative words here.  It's hard to understand, but something is telling us no- and when we get to the end of the book, that prophecy is fulfilled, although I won't spoil that just yet and tell you how.  But there's so much more.      Listen to the ideas she introduces-  there is the idea of being alive- of being sane- or not sane- another negative word- of standing in the darkness-in the silence- of being alone.  Of being in a house, but yet…being alone.   The alliteration highlights and brings together her key ideas- within walls- drawing attention to the idea of claustrophobia- sensibly shut; silence lay steadily I might add brings the silence and the claustrophobia together.  Then of course- whatever walked- walked alone- the w sound kind of swoshes in her head and haunts the end of that sentence.      All of her personal demons in one sentence.    Yes- and all of her personal demons getting ready to flesh themselves out metaphorically for all of us to understand and experience with her.      This assertion that she makes about absolute reality, of course is a religious or philosophical statement.  This idea that we absolutely just cannot know what is real, and if we did know what is real we would go crazy.  She's going to say that even little bird or crickets (a katydid is a cricket if you haven't heard that word yet, it's not very common)- Not even the simpliest organisms can handle a world without illusions.  We need them to protect our own sanity.    Yes- and the subtext here suggests because reality is dark; and the reality is you are alone in this world.  You can live – but perhaps you must accept a dream, perhaps an illusion that people have your back, people love you and will support you, but in reality- you are alone.  Perhaps you have to even create an entire fairyland- something to give you an escape from what you know to be true- the betrayal which is coming.  I'm speculating, obviously because I'm fleshing out what is implied with the subtext, at least implied to me-  but there is a sense that that is the direction she's leading us, and it certainly seems to be something we find in her personal story.     It's also kind of a religious statement because it speaks to the nature of reality and that is the essence of faith and walking through life not-alone.  Christy, what was her religious background.      Well, that's a very interesting question.  She was raised by members of the the Christian Science church, but later on she developed a real fascination with the occult and was even accused of being a witch.  Garry, what makes Christian scientists different from main stream Christianity?    Christian scientists, for those who are not familiar with Christianity, adopt many tenents of traditional Christianity but they break from it in a couple of ways that are obvious.  For one,  they do not accept the diety of Jesus Christ in the way traditional versions of Christianity do.  But the second is What most people know and that is the tension is the between The teachings of the Christian science church and their complicated relationship with the medical community.  They  encourage their members to pray for divine healings often perhaps instead of going to doctors.  And this has been controversial in some cases especially for family members outside of the faith.     That was certainly true for Jackson.  One time she and her brother were horsing around and her brother broke his arm, instead of going to the doctor Geraldine and her mother stayed up all night and prayed for his broken arm.  Her grandmother was a faith healer in the church and Jackson did not approve of this. So, she had this side of her, that would seem more secular- but then Jackson had her own sense of the spiritual.  She carried around tarot cards, tried to communicate with spirits later in her life, and flirted with all kinds of spiritual practices, like I said before, many accusing her of actually practicing witchcraft, ahtough I never found anything that really verified how serious she was about that.      So I can see why she might say something about absolute reality being somewhat unknowable or even a dark and lonely thing.      True, and at least in this book what we see in the the relationships that populate the lives  of the characters is that they are contrived.  In chapter 1 of The Haunting of Hill House, Dr. Montague, a title that is somewhat meant to mislead since he's really a ghost hunter, assembles a very select group of people to live with him for three months in a house that he thinks is probably haunted.  There are only four people that will be in this house- Dr. Montague himself, Luke, who is a member of the family who will own the house, Theodora who is selected because she may have extra-sensesory perspection abilities and Eleanor who as a child appeared to bring down a shower of rocks.      We will follow what happens to them from the point of view of Eleanor.  This story is written in the third person omniscient style, but it's way more akin to the free indirect discourse we saw Jane Austen create in Emma.  Laura Miller in the introduction to the book put it this way, readers "experience the novel from within Eleanor's consciousness, and however unreliable we know her to be, we are wedded to her".  And of course the farther into the novel you get, the more you understand how true this statement really is.  Most of the first chapter is really kind of a way to introduce us to Eleanor, and what we find out about her first is that she is 32, she genuinely and for good reason hated her mother until she died and now genuinely hates her sister.  Let's read this part…    Page 3    She's clearly alone and exploited by people who are supposed to be protect her.  This is further developed through the anecdote about her sister and their car.  Apparently they bought a car together but her sister never lets her drive it.  So, when Dr. Montague invites her to come to Hill House, she just takes the car and goes.  And while she's driving to Hill House, she imagines all sorts of things.  She imagines things that could never be real, like the road being an intimate friend or living in a house with a pair of stone lions and people bowing to her on the street because of these lions.  It's gives you kind of this crazy feeling- like how you would feel if you finally had escaped.    Yes, and that crazy feeling is going to intensify as the book progresses.  She's escaped her mother only to land sleeping on a cot in the nursery of a terrible sister.  She's not escaped her sister, but to go where.  At one point on her drive to Hill House she stops to admire a quarter of a mile of Oleanders.  Oleanders are beautiful flowers but they are also poisonous flowers.  She fantasizes about them about a castle with oleanders …then she gets back in her car and drives to a diner where she's going to watch a mother try to coax her daughter into drinking a cup of milk- and let me tell you know- these very same images that she sees on her drive in come back towards the end of the book as we, as readers, feel we are losing our grasp of reality.      But here in chapter 1, when she finally gets to the mansion, the care taker, Mr. Dudley flat out tells her, “You won't like it.  You'll be sorry I ever opened that gate.”    She looks at him and asks him to get away from her car…then she proceeds forward.  At the end of the chapter, we see her looking at this house and this is what she says, “The house was vile.  She shivered and thought, the words coming freely into her mind, Hill House is vile, it is diseases, get away from here at once.”      But of course she doesn't.    No, she doesn't.  That's the thing about haunting houses- they are dangerously tantalizing.  She was invited here by Mr. Montague and for better or for worse, she wants to be here.   I don't know if the Haunting of Hill House is the best example of this, but Jackson was absolutely fascinated with this- Jackson was fascinated with man's obsession with what Poe called the “imp of the perverse.”    Oh yes,  the urge to do something awful to someone and have pleasure in it.  I've seen this in kids, a kid just trips a stranger in the hall just because he can.  Paul Salkovskis, a psychology professor, suggests that it's evolutionary to have these kinds of intrusive thoughts as part of our way of problem solving for future problems.  But this idea that people have impulses to do mean things  or at least things we know we shouldn't and get joy from them.  Jackson was very interested in this idea.  So, are you saying that Dr. Montague is deliberately doing something mean.  Or that Dudley is?  Or Eleanor is?    Not really, in other stories she really demonstrates this much more poignantly, but the reason it comes to mind, besides the fact that I've been told to look for it in her writings, is that we are setting up relationships where we really can't trust each other to be there for each other.  Hill House looks like a place where you are really going to feel alone and exposed and that's where the terror comes from, but we will also see that it's soft and motherly and the people here at the beginning seem kind of exciting- it's seductive.      And I guess it does and has for many readers.  Let me just add one thing I didn't know until we started studying this book.  Horrornovelreviews.com claims that The Haunting of Hill House is the 8th scariest novel of all time.  And Paste magazine puts it into the unsorted top 30.      And so we open the gates to this terrifying place- Hill House- next episode we will look at the house itself, we'll look at the places where biographers think she got her inspiration for the house, we'll meet the other residents, explore the history of the house and begin to experience the ghosts- if that's what they are- as they manifest themselves to us through the eyes of Eleanor.                        

BEER MAN BEER
Episode 93 | The Haunting of Oak Hill House.

BEER MAN BEER

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 81:37


A Beer Man Beer special spooktacular episode.... Our Guests, Paranormal Investigators Chris Gilloren and Eric Vitale from the New England Society of Psychic Research. They are here to tell us all about their event “Warrens Seekers Of The Supernatural Paracon” (@warrens_paracon) taking place on Halloween weekend in Waterbury Connecticut. We hear stories of Connecticut's most famous Ghost Hunters Ed and Lorraine Warren. What brought Eric and Chris into the world of paranormal research, being touched by ghosts, performing Exorcisms and ghostly orbs. Find out what tools are used to locate ghosts and more. Learn how Chris's career as a police officer has helped him in the world of ghost hunting. We talk Eric's favorite Friday The 13th films and discuss what Horror movies had the best soundtrack albums. All while tasting beers from Witchdoctor Brewing Company (@witchdoctorbrewing), Fallen Timbers Brewing Co. (@fallen_timbers_brewing_co) and our good buddy Pesky from Industrial Mechanics Brewing Co. (@Industrialmechanicsbrewing). #Cannonball   A great Pre-Halloween beer blast with Eric and Chris.    For ticket info.....check out The Warrens Seekers Of The Supernatural Paracon on Instagram at (@warrens_paracon).

They're Terrified & Tipsy
60. Midnight Mass (2021) - Episode 6

They're Terrified & Tipsy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 47:05


Hi Friends! Ok so we're starting something new! For the next few weeks, we'll be covering the new Netflix miniseries Midnight Mass! If you haven't seen it, get started so you don't miss any episodes!!For ad-free episodes a day early plus awesome exclusive content, shout outs, and to pick what movies we watch, head over to https://www.patreon.com/tipsypodVisit http://www.tispypod.com for all things Tipsy Pod!--https://www.imdb.com/title/tt10574558Directed by Mike Flanagan (The Haunting of Hill House, The Haunting of Bly Manor, Gerald's Game)An isolated island community experiences miraculous events - and frightening omens - after the arrival of a charismatic, mysterious young priest.--Part of the Slash 'N Cast Podcast Network: https://www.slashncast.network/Voice over work by Dustin Kind: https://www.dustinkind.comAll podcast links: https://www.bio.link/tipsypod

Cover to Credits
The Haunting of Hill House

Cover to Credits

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 113:37


Lock your doors (not that it will help) because this episode things are are getting creepy with The Haunting of Hill House. This Netflix series, created by Mike Flanagan, shares only a ghostly resemblance to the source novel, written by Shirley Jackson, but both are full of interesting moments and chilling scenes worth discussing.

BingetownTV
E159 Midnight Mass Episode 7 Review! - Binge With Us!

BingetownTV

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 57:55


Welcome back to our “Binge With Us” series! Covering @midnightmassnetflix 

Collider Conversations
Victoria Pedretti Gets Emotional Revisiting Hill House and Discusses You Season 3

Collider Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 23:32


Victoria Pedretti is back on Collider Ladies Night for You Season 3! Back in October, we had an extended conversation about her journey in the industry thus far, but now it's time to dig a little deeper, play some games and also discuss what Love goes through in the new season of You. At the start of Season 3, Joe (Penn Badgley) and Love are married and have a baby. Hoping to create a safe life for their son, they move to the town of Madre Linda in Northern California. Even though they're eager to do what's necessary for baby Henry, we all well know that both Joe and Love have certain tendencies and patterns that make it a bit difficult for them to live the average suburban lifestyle. During this episode of Collider Ladies Night, we retrace her steps in the industry -- with a heavy emphasis on The Haunting of Hill House -- and discuss her approach to tackling Love's whirlwind of emotions and outbursts in You Season 3. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

They're Terrified & Tipsy
59. Midnight Mass (2021) - Episode 5

They're Terrified & Tipsy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 30:41


Hi Friends! Ok so we're starting something new! For the next few weeks, we'll be covering the new Netflix miniseries Midnight Mass! If you haven't seen it, get started so you don't miss any episodes!!For ad-free episodes a day early plus awesome exclusive content, shout outs, and to pick what movies we watch, head over to https://www.patreon.com/tipsypodVisit http://www.tispypod.com for all things Tipsy Pod!--https://www.imdb.com/title/tt10574558Directed by Mike Flanagan (The Haunting of Hill House, The Haunting of Bly Manor, Gerald's Game)An isolated island community experiences miraculous events - and frightening omens - after the arrival of a charismatic, mysterious young priest.--Part of the Slash 'N Cast Podcast Network: https://www.slashncast.network/Voice over work by Dustin Kind: https://www.dustinkind.comAll podcast links: https://www.bio.link/tipsypod

Freckled Foodie & Friends
Building Nap Dress Nation with Nell Diamond, Founder and CEO of Hill House

Freckled Foodie & Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 58:24


In this episode, I chat with the founder and CEO of Hill House, Nell Diamond. Nell talks about her career journey that started on Wall Street and included time at Yale SOM, the story behind Hill House, and the community formed around the Nap Dress. We discuss the lessons we've learned while working in finance, the anxiety within entrepreneurship, and the importance of setting boundaries when working for ourselves. We dive into life as a new mom and finding balance while caring for our children and working. Key Takeaway / Points: The story behind Hill House and where the idea came from How she built a community around an item of clothing (the Nap Dress) How working at large financial institutions shaped us for our later careers Anxiety and responsibility involved in entrepreneurship  Finding balance as a new mom    This episode was sponsored by Beam. Check out their new Beam Dream extra-strength and all of their other incredible products at beamtlc.com and use code FRECKLEDFOODIE15 for 15% off   Follow Nell Diamond:  Instagram: @nelliediamond @hillhouse TikTok: @hillhousehome Website: hillhousehome.com   Follow me: Instagram: @freckledfoodie Website: freckledfoodie.com TikTok: freckledfoodie Twitter: @freckledfoodie Youtube: Cameron Rogers / Freckled Foodie Pinterest: Freckled Foodie   This episode was edited by Tim Flanzbaum 

The Losers' Club: A Stephen King Podcast
Danse Macabre: Something Wicked This Way Comes

The Losers' Club: A Stephen King Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 143:12


Danse Macabre is a recurring feature of The Losers' Club that journeys through all the books that influenced Stephen King. (You know, as he listed in 1981's Danse Macabre. Ahem, hence the name of this series.) In the past, this feature has flipped through the pages of Shirley Jackson's The Haunting of Hill House and William Golding's Lord of the Flies. Today, however, the Losers find themselves in Green Town, Illinois revisiting Ray Bradbury's 1962 dark fantasy novel, Something Wicked This Way Comes. Join Dan Caffrey, Rachel Reeves, Mel Kassel, and Michael Roffman as they praise Bradbury's autumnal prose, lose themselves to bizarre Gene Kelly tangents, connect the dots to King's Dominion, and wrestle with the endurance of imagination.Follow us on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

First Draft with Sarah Enni
Arguably Achievable Perfection With Benjamin Dreyer

First Draft with Sarah Enni

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 62:37


First Draft Episode #327: Benjamin Dreyer Benjamin Dreyer, vice president, executive managing editor and copy chief of Random House, and New York Times bestselling author of Dreyer's English: An Utterly Correct Guide to Clarity and Style and Dreyer's English (Adapted for Young Readers): Good Advice for Good Writing. Links to Topics Mentioned In This Episode: “Meet the Guardian of Grammar Who Wants to Help You Be a Better Writer,” by Sarah Lyall in The New York Times Before and After the Book Deal: A Writer's Guide to Finishing, Publishing, Promoting and Surviving Your First Book by Courtney Maum (hear Courtney weigh in on the traditional publishing process in Track Changes: Publishing 101) #1 New York Times bestselling author and Pulitzer Prize winner Elizabeth Strout, author of Olive Kitteridge, Olive Again, and the recent release Oh William! Shirley Jackson, author of The Haunting of Hill House, The Lottery, and more

They're Terrified & Tipsy
58. Midnight Mass (2021) - Episode 4

They're Terrified & Tipsy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 45:54


Hi Friends! Ok so we're starting something new! For the next few weeks, we'll be covering the new Netflix miniseries Midnight Mass! If you haven't seen it, get started so you don't miss any episodes!!For ad-free episodes a day early plus awesome exclusive content, shout outs, and to pick what movies we watch, head over to https://www.patreon.com/tipsypodVisit http://www.tispypod.com for all things Tipsy Pod!--https://www.imdb.com/title/tt10574558Directed by Mike Flanagan (The Haunting of Hill House, The Haunting of Bly Manor, Gerald's Game)An isolated island community experiences miraculous events - and frightening omens - after the arrival of a charismatic, mysterious young priest.--Part of the Slash 'N Cast Podcast Network: https://www.slashncast.network/Voice over work by Dustin Kind: https://www.dustinkind.comAll podcast links: https://www.bio.link/tipsypod

They're Terrified & Tipsy
57. Midnight Mass (2021) - Episode 3

They're Terrified & Tipsy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 44:36


Hi Friends! Ok so we're starting something new! For the next few weeks, we'll be covering the new Netflix miniseries Midnight Mass! If you haven't seen it, get started so you don't miss any episodes!!For ad-free episodes a day early plus awesome exclusive content, shout outs, and to pick what movies we watch, head over to https://www.patreon.com/tipsypodVisit http://www.tispypod.com for all things Tipsy Pod!--https://www.imdb.com/title/tt10574558Directed by Mike Flanagan (The Haunting of Hill House, The Haunting of Bly Manor, Gerald's Game)An isolated island community experiences miraculous events - and frightening omens - after the arrival of a charismatic, mysterious young priest.--Part of the Slash 'N Cast Podcast Network: https://www.slashncast.network/Voice over work by Dustin Kind: https://www.dustinkind.comAll podcast links: https://www.bio.link/tipsypod#podcast

Jim and Them
Halloween Horror Nights Orlando - #697 Part 1

Jim and Them

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 104:52


COVID: What is the COVID cut off coming out of Orlando!? Are we in the clear?Halloween Horror Nights: We have live reactions from Halloween Horror Nights in Orlando, is Mike low key having a great time!?Haunting Of Hill House: Does Mike keep his promise of not entering the Haunting of Hill House maze!?BILLY THOUGHT OF THE FUNNIEST THING!, BILLY'S IN SCHOOL!, BILLY MADISON!, NORM!, BOYS ARE BACK IN TOWN!, GUESS WHO JUST GOT BACK TODAY!?, NEVER LEFT!, REAL ONE!, SADTHOR!, BHINSON53!, OGA'S!, ORLANDO!, SWEDISH DEATH METAL BAND!, JUNGLE CRUISE LINE!, BARTENDER!, WRESTLING!, THEME PARKS!, HAGRID'S!, JORDAN!, WHICH MEMBER TO FUCK!?, UNCLE JIM!, GET FUCKED!, JAKE SPRAGUE!, COVID CUT OFF!, WAWA!, MASKS!, ALL BARK AND NO BITE!, SANITIZER!, QUESADILLA!, VIDEO!, UNIVERSAL ORLANDO!, HALLOWEEN HORROR NIGHTS!, SCARY!, HAUNTED HOUSES!, REACTIONS!, STARCRAFT!, DAYTIME!, BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN!, TEXAS CHAIN SAW MASSACRE!, LEATHERFACE!, CHOP TOP!, JUMP SCARES!, CHAINSAW!, NOT HAPPY!, UPSET!, THE WORST ONE YET!, VINYL PLASTIC!, ALL THE BAD ONES!, TOUR GUIDE!, CASE FILES!, LEGENDARY TRUTH!, BROKE THE RULES!, ENDING SCARES!, SCAREY OHIO!, LORE!, ICONS!, WEREWOLVES!, PUSH!, GRAB!, SHAGGY!, DIAGON ALLEY!, KNOCKTURN ALLEY!, PUPPET THEATER!, WICKED GROWTH!, ONE STEP!, PUMPKIN LORD!, NOT MY KING!, ICONS!, PUPPET THEATER!, REVENGE OF THE TOOTH FAIRY!, VOLCANO BAY!, WATER SLIDES!, TRAPDOOR SLIDE!, WATER BOARDED!, DROWNING!, TURNS!, SERPENTINE!, HAUNTING OF HILL HOUSE!, BEETLEJUICE!, BITS!, CHARACTERS!, 10 FOR 10!, PIZZA FRIES!, HATE OUR GUTS!, CLOSING!, UNSURE!, HAGRID'S MOTORBIKE!, COASTER!, VELOCICOASTER!, EXTREME!, DROP!, DANI!, VIP TOUR!, JOHN CARPENTER!, UNIVERSAL STUDIOS!You can find the videos from this episode at our Discord RIGHT HERE!

Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast
The Haunting of Hill House (2018)

Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 175:49


Shirley Jackson's novel The Haunting of Hill House stood as a horror classic for nearly 60 years before director Mike Flanagan (Hush) expanded its walls into a 10 episode miniseries for Netflix. Nell, Luke, and Theo are now the children of house flippers, spending the summer of 1992 seeing ghosts in renovated basements and hallways. Should the Crain siblings blame spectres like Tall Man and Abigail, or their secretive father and crazy mother, for why their lives are so messed up in 2018? Now Playing invites you to settle in for a forever podcast. Listen now!