Podcasts about inverting

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  • 88PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about inverting

Latest podcast episodes about inverting

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Slovenia 2 Ukraine 1, 1999

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 47:37


On this week's Greatest Games, Jonathan Wilson and Marcus Speller are joined by Dave Farrar to review the Euro 2000 play-off first leg between Slovenia and Ukraine in 1999. Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He's contributed to numerous publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others. Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan. Dave Farrar is a football commentator and writer, who covered the finals of the European Championships in 2000 and 2004. Listen to every episode of Greatest Games: theblizzard.co.uk/podcasts/greatest-games Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: theblizzard.co.uk Twitter: twitter.com/blzzrd Facebook: facebook.com/blzzrd Instagram: instagram.com/theblizzard__

Next Wave Leadership Podcast
Dave Yawman, a Partner at Cresco Partners and Former EVP and Corporate Secretary at PepsiCo: On Ethical Leadership at a Global Company, Why Leaders Must Carry a Badge and a Mirror, and Inverting the Leadership Paradigm

Next Wave Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 35:47


David (Dave) Yawman is a leader, legal expert, and Partner at Cresco Partners, Inc. Cresco is a management consulting firm that helps both leaders and teams grow through mentorship and strategy with their brand of leadership development. Before Cresco, Dave worked for PepsiCo for over 20 years, where he developed his expertise in global markets and public policy. While there, he filled multiple crucial roles including EVP, General Counsel, and Corporate Secretary. He also served as an Associate at Fried Frank on Wall Street. In this episode… Why is being a great leader so difficult? We all have thoughts on how things can be improved or how we would lead if we were in charge, but how many of us excel when we're finally in that position? Leadership is complicated—and it's especially difficult when you don't even know yourself. After all, how can you lead others when you don't know your own tendencies and biases? This is why Dave Yawman says self-reflection is crucial for leading others. He has had the opportunity to lead employees at PepsiCo and has discovered firsthand what it means to set an example. In addition, he has led the ethics of the company, knowing when to bend and when to stand firm. There's no one-size-fits-all solution to leadership, but if anyone knows what it takes, it's Dave. In this episode of the Next Wave Leadership, Dov Pollack speaks with Dave Yawman, Partner at Cresco Partners, Inc., to discuss leadership and how to be self-aware. They dive into topics of ethics across cultures, inverting the leadership paradigm, and what it means to carry a badge and a mirror. They also discuss Dave's long career and how his family and early years at Wall Street helped shape who he is. Check out this episode to hear all this and more!

For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture
Sameer Yadav / Gratitude Is Not a Debt: Giving, Receiving, and Sharing Thanks

For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 36:17


Happy Thanksgiving! We often misunderstand gratitude as either a means to our subjective well-being or as an obligation of debt to a giver. So what is the emotion of gratitude? Sameer Yadav (Westmont College) joins Ryan McAnnally-Linz to reflect on a better way to understand gratitude than owing it, being in debt to another person, seeing gratitude only through the dry indifference of a receiver's economic indebtedness to a giver. Gratitude as indebtedness creates problems especially when thinking about gratitude to God, and the two consider instead on a conception of gratitude based in sacrament and creatureliness, mystical shared witness, the meetness and rightness of thanks and praise, and a joyful recognition of the gifts in our lives. This understanding of gratitude would have truly seismic consequences for how we see the world. Thank you cards would no longer feel obligatory, and gratitude lists wouldn't have to be hacked for my subjective well-being, it would simply follow from the glad, mutual sharing in the gift of life from God, and the presence of being what we are to each other.This episode was made possible in part by the generous support of the Tyndale House Foundation. For more information, visit tyndale.foundation.Show Notes"A debt of gratitude": Is it helpful for Christians to think about gratitude?What do we owe to one another?Obligations tied up with debtsGratitude is historically tied up with political economyRobert C. Roberts, Spiritual Emotions: A Psychology of Christian VirtuesDebts of gratitude as deeply problematic because of (1) the dynamics it presents for human relationships and (2) Christian understanding of the emotionDavid Graeber, Debt: The First 5,000 YearsDebt, calculation, equivalenceOwing money vs owing favorsForcibly severing us from our contexts: Abstraction from relationships and dependencies"The Labor that Pays My Salary" (Isaac Villegas, The Christian Century)Seneca on gratitude—internal attention on giftThomas Aquinas on gratitudeImmanuel Kant on gratitude: You can never do enough as recipient, since you're only ever a respondent; the giver always acts firstAristotle on gratitude: Not a virtue for the magnanimous person, since you'd have to owe someone, and self-sufficiency is better than dependence—better to be a giver than receiverThe role of social hierarchy and the economic image of gratitudeGratia vs GratitudoModeling "gratitudo" on social superiority/inferiorityGratitude as an "unfortunate necessity"Apostle Paul: "For who sees anything different in you? What do you have that you did not receive? And if you received it, why do you boast as if it were not a gift?" (1 Corinthians 4:7)Affirmation of dependence as essential to the human condition; staunch independence as sinful pride"Why not just be happy with indebtedness?"Inverting the values of debt obligationIndebted to GodArgument by analogy: Aquinas's distinction between gratitudo and gratia: Everyone has equal indebtedness to God. A bad analogy when you do it on economic terms.Jeremy David Engels, The Art of GratitudeChristianity and the cancellation of debtChristian mystical tradition—Howard Thurman and the divine sharing with creationGod's life extended in creaturesRather than benefactor or beneficiary relationships, God is a transcendent, holy other ..."We're a witness and channel for God's holy presence."Gratitude as joyful recognition offered to GodPraise and GratitudeHoward Thurman: Gratitude as a sacramentAbraham Joshua Heschel: Gratitude as a windowReflecting light back to its sourceDavid Graeber: "What could possibly be more presumptuous, more ridiculous than to think it would be possible to negotiate with the grounds of one's existence? Of course it isn't. Insofar as it is indeed possible to come to any sort of relation with the absolute, we are confronting a principle that exists outside of time or human scale entirely, therefore as medieval theologians correctly recognize when dealing with the absolute, there can be no such thing as debt."Debt as a category mistakeJacob's Ladder: "You give me everything, and I'll give a tenth back to you.""God isn't dealing with losses and gains here."TransfigurationIntrinsic relationalityEucharistic prayer: "Let us give thanks to the Lord our God. / It is meet and right so to do."Glad, mutual sharing in the gift of one another to one anotherIntrinsically egalitarian dimension to sharingEugene McCarraher, The Enchantments of Mammon: How Capitalism Became the Religion of Modernity: "without faith in the sacramental nature of the world, we anchor ourselves in the illusionary and inevitably malevolent apparatus of domination."Eucharist = "thanks"Introduction (Evan Rosa)This is the obligatory gratitude podcast for the week before Thanksgiving. Thank you. You're welcome. But in all seriousness: Here's to hoping that you're listening to this in the peace and rest and warmth of family and loving community.But I have to be honest about something; I'm not very good at thank you notes. Don't get me wrong, I try my best to communicate verbally my gratitude for the people and gifts in my life, and I'm ever—often painfully aware of my dependence on others, my need for them, my profound linkage to them. But I feel pretty bad that when it comes to writing the note and formalizing the payment of my debt of gratitude, I falter.Part of the problem, I gauge, besides the grossness of my narcissism, is that I feel so indebted, so obligated to do it, like my gratitude to you just doesn't count if I don't write the note, or that it's less about the giver and more about the card or the transaction. There's something wrong there.But I'm equally tempted to err in another way: Ever since I learned from positive psychology that I could hack my own thankfulness for happiness, I tend to exploit gratitude just to feel better.Our episode today will correct me on both counts, both for thinking of gratitude as something to be exploited for my personal well-being and for thinking of gratitude as an obligation.Today on the show Sameer Yadav, a theologian at Westmont College, joins Ryan McAnnally-Linz to reflect on a better way to understand gratitude than owing it, being in debt to another person, seeing gratitude only through the dry indifference of a receiver's economic indebtedness to a giver. Gratitude as indebtedness creates problems especially when thinking about gratitude to God, and the two consider instead on a conception of gratitude based in sacrament and creatureliness, mystical shared witness, the meetness and rightness of thanks and praise, and a joyful recognition of the gifts in our lives.This understanding of gratitude would have truly seismic consequences for how we see the world. Thank you cards would no longer feel obligatory, and gratitude lists wouldn't have to be hacked for my subjective well-being, it would simply follow from the glad, mutual sharing in the gift of life from God, and the presence of being what we are to each other.And I would be remiss if I didn't take the opportunity to thank each of you, our listeners and subscribers, for joining us each weekend for these conversations. It's our joy to produce them for you, and I don't even feel obligated to say that. Not in the least. So I guess remiss was the wrong word there cuz that means faulting a duty. Aye! That's why we need this episode.So, how about this: Thanks for sharing in the gift of making this podcast. Enjoy.Production NotesThis podcast featured theologians Sameer Yadav and Ryan McAnnally-LinzEdited and Produced by Evan RosaHosted by Evan RosaProduction Assistance by Martin Chan, Nathan Jowers, Natalie Lam, and Logan LedmanA Production of the Yale Center for Faith & Culture at Yale Divinity School https://faith.yale.edu/aboutSupport For the Life of the World podcast by giving to the Yale Center for Faith & Culture: https://faith.yale.edu/give

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Spurs 3 Manchester City 2, 1981

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 53:49


On this week's Greatest Games, Jonathan Wilson and Marcus Speller head back to 1981 with Steve Tongue to review the FA Cup Final Replay between Tottenham Hotspur and Manchester City. Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He's contributed to numerous publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others. Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan. Steve Tongue is an author and former sports journalist who has covered nine World Cups - his latest publication is a book on the history of football in the West Midlands called West Midlands: Turf Wars. Listen to every episode of Greatest Games: theblizzard.co.uk/podcasts/greatest-games Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: theblizzard.co.uk Twitter: twitter.com/blzzrd Facebook: facebook.com/blzzrd Instagram: instagram.com/theblizzard__

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Chelsea 0 Sunderland 3, 2010

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 44:34


On this week's Greatest Games, Jonathan Wilson and Marcus Speller are joined by Nick Barnes to discuss Sunderland's surprise victory over Carlo Ancelotti's Chelsea at Stamford Bridge. Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He's contributed to numerous publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others. Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan. Nick Barnes is a commentator for Sunderland at BBC Radio Newcastle. Listen to every episode of Greatest Games: theblizzard.co.uk/podcasts/greatest-games Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: theblizzard.co.uk Twitter: twitter.com/blzzrd Facebook: facebook.com/blzzrd Instagram: instagram.com/theblizzard__

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Borussia Dortmund 1 Bayern Munich 2, 2013

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 52:44


On this week's Greatest Games, Christoph Biermann joins Jonathan Wilson and Marcus Speller to discuss the all-German Champions League final of 2012/13 between Borussia Dortmund and Bayern Munich at Wembley. Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He's contributed to numerous publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others. Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan. Christoph Biermann is a reporter for 11Freunde in Berlin and author of Football Hackers: The Science and Art of a Data Revolution. Listen to every episode of Greatest Games: theblizzard.co.uk/podcasts/greatest-games Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: theblizzard.co.uk Twitter: twitter.com/blzzrd Facebook: facebook.com/blzzrd Instagram: instagram.com/theblizzard__

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Crystal Palace 3 Liverpool 3, 2014

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 48:29


On this week's Greatest Games, Ben Bailey Smith joins Jonathan Wilson and Marcus Speller to remember the infamous Crystanbul night at Selhurst Park. Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He's contributed to numerous publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others. Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan. Ben Bailey-Smith is a comedian, actor, screenwriter, voiceover artist and producer. Listen to every episode of Greatest Games: theblizzard.co.uk/podcasts/greatest-games Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: theblizzard.co.uk Twitter: twitter.com/blzzrd Facebook: facebook.com/blzzrd Instagram: instagram.com/theblizzard__

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Celtic 2 Leeds United 1, 1970

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 42:19


On this week's Greatest Games, Jonathan Wilson and Marcus Speller are joined by Rob Bagchi to discuss the 1970 European Cup semi-final between Celtic and Leeds United. Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He's contributed to numerous publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others. Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan. Rob Bagchi is the co-author of The Unforgiven, True Grit, Determined, Hooked and author of The Biography of Leeds United. Listen to every episode of Greatest Games: theblizzard.co.uk/podcasts/greatest-games Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: theblizzard.co.uk Twitter: twitter.com/blzzrd Facebook: facebook.com/blzzrd Instagram: instagram.com/theblizzard__

Perfectly Acceptable Podcast by Comics Place
Tedd Lass-Bro's Ep. 06: Inverting The Pyramid of Success

Perfectly Acceptable Podcast by Comics Place

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 80:55


Oh my goodness gracious! Season 2 comes to a close! Are you also having Lasso-Withdrawals? We are too… But we're here for you! Will & Jeff gather to talk at length about the finale, and listen… next week, when you find yourself without a new episode of Ted Lasso? Well, we'll keep putting out new episodes about OLD episodes, prediciton episodes, Keeley episodes, Sudekis episodes, WHO KNOWS!? But we'll be here for you. Enjoy!Also, obviously, SPOILERS! We're gonna be talking about the insides and outside of these episodes. So definitely watch the episode first!Subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you like to get your podcasts.Also, check it out! Will scored us quite the email address! Email in questions at TedLassBros@gmail.com ! We love hearing from you and there's a good chance we will read it on air!You can also join the Comics Place Discord here: https://discord.gg/rW8EBftHx8

Ray Taylor Show
Ted Lasso S2E12 “Inverting the Pyramid of Success” - Episode Recap - Ray Taylor Show

Ray Taylor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 33:17


Ted Lasso S2E12 “Inverting the Pyramid of Success” - Episode Recap - Ray Taylor ShowSubscribe: InspiredDisorder.com/rts Binge Ad Free: InspiredDisorder.com/Patreon @TedLassoShow topic: Despite the public fallout from the news of his panic attack, Ted receives the full support of Rebecca and the team. He focuses his attention on the season's final match, which would determine Richmond's promotion back into the Premier League. Keeley is informed the VC that supported Bantr want to finance a PR firm for her to operate. While Keeley celebrates the news with an overjoyed Rebecca, they learn Rupert has bought West Ham United. Roy forgives Jamie and Nate for showing their affections towards Keeley, but tells the Diamond Dogs he is worried she will no longer need him. During the match, Richmond are down 2–0 at half-time. Nate tries to abandon the false 9 tactic he implemented, but the players decide to stick with it. Ted asks Nate why he is upset with him, to which Nate tearfully responds that Ted continuously neglected him since joining the coaching staff. He believes the team will lose and that Ted would have been fired long ago if it weren't for him. In the final minute, Dani scores an equalizing penalty to secure Richmond's promotion. The team and supporters celebrate, but Nate walks off dejected. Sam decides to stay at Richmond, which Akufo does not take kindly. Through Ted, Sam tells Rebecca he made his decision not because of her, but rather to benefit his own personal journey. Ted runs into Trent Crimm, who says he no longer works at The Independent because his superiors found out he revealed an anonymous source. Roy tries to take Keeley on holiday, but an already overworked Keeley encourages Roy to go himself. Sam is seen leasing a building, which he will use to start a Nigerian restaurant. Two months later, at West Ham's training session, Rupert greets the newest member of his coaching staff: Nate.Sponsored By:Patreon.com/InspiredDisorder $3 membership.*Binge full week of Ray Taylor Show (audio+Video)*Massive discount code for The Many Faces*Download raw photoshop filesInspiredDisorder.com/tmf The Many Faces - Original abstract ink portraits by Ray Taylor. Code: RTS for 25% OFF. StationHouseCoffee.com and @StationHouseCoffee on Instagram for premium small batch, single source coffee.InspiredDisorder.com/Ting $25 CREDIT! The best carrier. The best coverage.Same low rates, now with three coast-to-coast networks.Daily Podcast: Ray Taylor Show - InspiredDisorder.com/rts Daily Painting: The Many Faces - InspiredDisorder.com/tmf SUPPORT ON PATREON: Patreon.com/InspiredDisorder More links: InspiredDisorder.com/links

Screaming in the Cloud
Changing the Way We Interview with Emma Bostian

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 40:30


About EmmaEmma Bostian is a Software Engineer at Spotify in Stockholm. She is also a co-host of the Ladybug Podcast, author of Decoding The Technical Interview Process, and an instructor at LinkedIn Learning and Frontend Masters.Links: Ladybug Podcast: https://www.ladybug.dev LinkedIn Learning: https://www.linkedin.com/learning/instructors/emma-bostian Frontend Masters: https://frontendmasters.com/teachers/emma-bostian/ Decoding the Technical Interview Process: https://technicalinterviews.dev Twitter: https://twitter.com/emmabostian TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Jellyfish. So, you're sitting in front of your office chair, bleary eyed, parked in front of a powerpoint and—oh my sweet feathery Jesus its the night before the board meeting, because of course it is! As you slot that crappy screenshot of traffic light colored excel tables into your deck, or sift through endless spreadsheets looking for just the right data set, have you ever wondered, why is it that sales and marketing get all this shiny, awesome analytics and inside tools? Whereas, engineering basically gets left with the dregs. Well, the founders of Jellyfish certainly did. That's why they created the Jellyfish Engineering Management Platform, but don't you dare call it JEMP! Designed to make it simple to analyze your engineering organization, Jellyfish ingests signals from your tech stack. Including JIRA, Git, and collaborative tools. Yes, depressing to think of those things as your tech stack but this is 2021. They use that to create a model that accurately reflects just how the breakdown of engineering work aligns with your wider business objectives. In other words, it translates from code into spreadsheet. When you have to explain what you're doing from an engineering perspective to people whose primary IDE is Microsoft Powerpoint, consider Jellyfish. Thats Jellyfish.co and tell them Corey sent you! Watch for the wince, thats my favorite part.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Liquibase. If you're anything like me, you've screwed up the database part of a deployment so severely that you've been banned from touching every anything that remotely sounds like SQL, at at least three different companies. We've mostly got code deployments solved for, but when it comes to databases we basically rely on desperate hope, with a roll back plan of keeping our resumes up to date. It doesn't have to be that way. Meet Liquibase. It is both an open source project and a commercial offering. Liquibase lets you track, modify, and automate database schema changes across almost any database, with guardrails to ensure you'll still have a company left after you deploy the change. No matter where your database lives, Liquibase can help you solve your database deployment issues. Check them out today at liquibase.com. Offer does not apply to Route 53.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. One of the weird things that I've found in the course of, well, the last five years or so is that I went from absolute obscurity to everyone thinking that I know everyone else because I have thoughts and opinions on Twitter. Today, my guest also has thoughts and opinions on Twitter. The difference is that what she has to say is actually helpful to people. My guest is Emma Bostian, software engineer at Spotify, which is probably, if we can be honest about it, one of the least interesting things about you. Thanks for joining me.Emma: Thanks for having me. That was quite the intro. I loved it.Corey: I do my best and I never prepare them, which is a blessing and a curse. When ADHD is how you go through life and you suck at preparation, you've got to be good at improv. So, you're a co-host of the Ladybug Podcast. Let's start there. What is that podcast? And what's it about?Emma: So, that podcast is just my three friends and I chatting about career and technology. We all come from different backgrounds, have different journeys into tech. I went the quote-unquote, “Traditional” computer science degree route, but Ali is self-taught and works for AWS, and Kelly she has, like, a master's in psychology and human public health and runs her own company. And then Sydney is an awesome developer looking for her next role. So, we all come from different places and we just chat about career in tech.Corey: You're also an instructor at LinkedIn Learning and Frontend Masters. I'm going to guess just based upon the name that you are something of a frontend person, which is a skill set that has constantly eluded me for 20 years, as given evidence by every time I've tried to build something that even remotely touches frontend or JavaScript in any sense.Emma: Yeah, to my dad's disdain, I have stuck with the frontend; he really wanted me to stay backend. I did an internship at IBM in Python, and you know, I learned all about assembly language and database, but frontend is what really captures my heart.Corey: There's an entire school of thought out there from a constituency of Twitter that I will generously refer to as shitheads that believe, “Oh, frontend is easy and it's somehow less than.” And I would challenge anyone who holds that perspective to wind up building an interface that doesn't look like crap first, then come and talk to me. Spoiler, you will not say that after attempting to go down that rabbit hole. If you disagree with this, you can go ahead and yell at me on Twitter so I know where you're hiding, so I can block you. Now, that's all well and good, but one of the most interesting things that you've done that aligns with topics near and dear to my heart is you wrote a book.Now, that's not what's near and dear to my heart; I have the attention span to write a tweet most days. But the book was called Decoding the Technical Interview Process. Technical interviewing is one of those weird things that comes up from time to time, here and everywhere else because it's sort of this stylized ritual where we evaluate people on a number of skills that generally don't reflect in their day-to-day; it's really only a series of skills that you get better by practicing, and you only really get to practice them when you're interviewing for other jobs. That's been my philosophy, but again, I've written a tweet on this; you've written a book. What's the book about and what drove you to write it?Emma: So, the book covers everything from an overview of the interview process, to how do you negotiate a job offer, to systems design, and talks about load balancing and cache partitioning, it talks about what skills you need from the frontend side of things to do well on your JavaScript interviews. I will say this, I don't teach HTML, CSS, and JavaScript in-depth in the book because there are plenty of other resources for that. And some guy got mad at me about that the other day and wanted a refund because I didn't teach the skills, but I don't need to. [laugh]. And then it covers data structures and algorithms.They're all written in JavaScript, they have easy to comprehend diagrams. What drove me to write this is that I had just accepted a job offer in Stockholm for a web developer position at Spotify. I had also just passed my Google technical interviews, and I finally realized, holy crap, maybe I do know what I'm doing in an interview now. And this was at the peak of when people were getting laid off due to COVID and I said, “You know what? I have a lot of knowledge. And if I have a computer science degree and I was able to get through some of the hardest technical interviews, I think I should share that with the community.”Because some people didn't go through a CS degree and don't understand what a linked list is. And that's not their fault. It's just unfortunately, there weren't a lot of great resources—especially for web developers out there—to learn these concepts. Cracking the Coding Interview is a great book, but it's written in backend language and it's a little bit hard to digest as a frontend developer. So, I decided to write my own.Corey: How much of the book is around the technical interview process as far as ask, “Here's how you wind up reversing linked lists,” or, “Inverting a binary tree,” or whatever it is where you're tracing things around without using a pointer, how do you wind up detecting a loop in a recursive whatever it is—yeah, as you can tell, I'm not a computer science person at all—versus how much of it is, effectively, interview 101 style skills for folks who are even in non-technical roles could absorb?Emma: My goal was, I wanted this to be approachable by anyone without extensive technical knowledge. So, it's very beginner-friendly. That being said, I cover the basic data structures, talking about what traditional methods you would see on them, how do you code that, what does that look like from a visual perspective with fake data? I don't necessarily talk about how do you reverse a binary tree, but I do talk about how do you balance it if you remove a node? What if it's not a leaf node? What if it has children? Things like that.It's about [sigh] I would say 60/40, where 40% is coding and technical stuff, but maybe—eh, it's a little bit closer to 50/50; it kind of depends. I do talk about the take-home assessment and tips for that. When I do a take-home assessment, I like to include a readme with things I would have done if I had more time, or these are performance trade-offs that I made; here's why. So, there's a lot of explanation as to how you can improve your chances at moving on to the next round. So yeah, I guess it's 50/50.I also include a section on tips for hiring managers, how to create an inclusive and comfortable environment for your candidates. But it's definitely geared towards candidates, and I would say it's about 50/50 coding tech and process stuff.Corey: One of the problems I've always had with this entire industry is it feels like we're one of the only industries that does this, where we bring people in, and oh, you've been an engineer for 15 years at a whole bunch of companies I've recognized, showing career progression, getting promoted at some of them transitioning from high-level role to high-level role. “Great, we are so glad that you came in to interview. Now, up to the whiteboard, please, and implement FizzBuzz because I have this working theory that you don't actually know how to code, and despite the fact that you've been able to fake your way through it at big companies for 15 years, I'm the one that's going to catch you out with some sort of weird trivia question.” It's this adversarial, almost condescending approach and I don't see it in any other discipline than tech. Is that just because I'm not well-traveled enough? Is that because I'm misunderstanding the purpose of all of these things? Or, what is this?Emma: I think partially it was a gatekeeping solution for a while, for people who are comfortable in their roles and may be threatened by people who have come through different paths to get to tech. Because software engineer used to be an accredited title that you needed a degree or certification to get. And in some countries it still is, so you'll see this debate sometimes about calling yourself a software engineer if you don't have that accreditation. But in this day and age, people go through boot camps, they can come from other industries, they can be self-taught. You don't need a computer science degree, and I think the interview process has not caught up with that.I will say [laugh] the worst interview I had was at IBM when I was already working there. I was already a web developer there, full-time. I was interviewing for a role, and I walked into the room and there were five guys sitting at a table and they were like, “Get up to the whiteboard.” It was for a web development job and they quizzed me about Java. And I was like, “Um, sir, I have not done Java since college.” And they were like, “We don't care.”Corey: Oh, yeah, coding on a whiteboard in front of five people who already know the answer—Emma: Horrifying.Corey: —during a—for them, it's any given Tuesday, and for you, it is a, this will potentially determine the course that your career takes from this point forward. There's a level of stress that goes into that never exists in our day-to-day of building things out.Emma: Well, I also think it's an artificial environment. And why, though? Like, why is this necessary? One of the best interviews I had was actually with Gatsby. It was for an open-source maintainer role, and they essentially let me try the product before I bought it.Like, they let me try out doing the job. It was a paid process, they didn't expect me to do it for free. I got to choose alternatives if I wanted to do one thing or another, answer one question or another, and this was such an exemplary process that I always bring it up because that is a modern interview process, when you are letting people try the position. Now granted, not everyone can do this, right? We've got parents, we've got people working two jobs, and not everyone can afford to take the time to try out a job.But who can also afford a five-stage interview process that still warrants taking vacation days? So, I think at least—at the very least—pay your candidates if you can.Corey: Oh, yeah. One of the best interviews I've ever had was at a company called Three Rings Design, which is now defunct, unfortunately, but it was fairly typical ops questions of, “Yeah, here's an AWS account. Spin up a couple EC2 instances, load balance between them, have another one monitored. You know, standard op stuff. And because we don't believe in asking people to work for free, we'll pay you $300 upon completion of the challenge.”Which, again, it's not huge money for doing stuff like that, but it's also, this shows a level of respect for my time. And instead of giving me a hard deadline of when it was due, they asked me, “When can we expect this by?” Which is a great question in its own right because it informs you about a candidate's ability to set realistic deadlines and then meet them, which is one of those useful work things. And they—unlike most other companies I spoke with in that era—were focused on making it as accommodating for the candidate as possible. They said, “We're welcome to interview you during the workday; we can also stay after hours and have a chat then, if that's more convenient for your work schedule.”Because they knew I was working somewhere else; an awful lot of candidates are. And they just bent over backwards to be as accommodating as possible. I see there's a lot of debate these days in various places about the proper way to interview candidates. No take-home because biases for people who don't have family obligations or other commitments outside of work hours. “Okay, great, so I'm going to come in interview during the day?” “No. That biases people who can't take time off.” And, on some level, it almost seems to distill down to no one likes any way that there is of interviewing candidates, and figuring out a way that accommodates everyone is a sort of a fool's errand. It seems like there is no way that won't get you yelled at.Emma: I think there needs to be almost like a choose your own adventure. What is going to set you up for success and also allow you to see if you want to even work that kind of a job in the first place? Because I thought on paper, open-source maintainer sounds awesome. And upon looking into the challenges, I'm like, “You know what? I think I'd hate this job.”And I pulled out and I didn't waste their time and they didn't waste mine. So, when you get down to it, honestly, I wish I didn't have to write this book. Did it bring me a lot of benefit? Yeah. Let's not sugarcoat that. It allowed me to pay off my medical debt and move across a continent, but that being said, I wish that we were at a point in time where that did not need to exist.Corey: One of the things that absolutely just still gnaws at me even years later, is I interviewed at Google twice, and I didn't get an offer either time, I didn't really pass their technical screen either time. The second one that really sticks out in my mind where it was, “Hey, write some code in a Google Doc while we watch remotely,” and don't give you any context or hints on this. And just it was—the entire process was sitting there listening to them basically, like, “Nope, not what I'm thinking about. Nope, nope, nope.” It was… by the end of that conversation, I realized that if they were going to move forward—which they didn't—I wasn't going to because I didn't want to work with people that were that condescending and rude.And I've held by it; I swore I would never apply there again and I haven't. And it's one of those areas where, did I have the ability to do the job? I can say in hindsight, mostly. Were there things I was going to learn as I went? Absolutely, but that's every job.And I'm realizing as I see more and more across the ecosystem, that they were an outlier in a potentially good way because in so many other places, there's no equivalent of the book that you have written that is given to the other side of the table: how to effectively interview candidates. People lose sight of the fact that it's a sales conversation; it's a two-way sale, they have to convince you to hire them, but you also have to convince them to work with you. And even in the event that you pass on them, you still want them to say nice things about you because it's a small industry, all things considered. And instead, it's just been awful.Emma: I had a really shitty interview, and let me tell you, they have asked me subsequently if I would re-interview with them. Which sucks; it's a product that I know and love, and I've talked about this, but I had the worst experience. Let me clarify, I had a great first interview with them, and I was like, “I'm just not ready to move to Australia.” Which is where the job was. And then they contacted me again a year later, and it was the worst experience of my life—same recruiter—it was the ego came out.And I will tell you what, if you treat your candidates like shit, they will remember and they will never recommend people interview for you. [laugh]. I also wanted to mention about accessibility because—so we talked about, oh, give candidates the choice, which I think the whole point of an interview should be setting your candidates up for success to show you what they can do. And I talked with [Stephen 00:14:09]—oh, my gosh, I can't remember his last name—but he is a quadriplegic and he types with a mouthstick. And he was saying he would go to technical interviews and they would not be prepared to set him up for success.And they would want to do these pair programming, or, like, writing on a whiteboard. And it's not that he can't pair program, it's that he was not set up for success. He needed a mouthstick to type and they were not prepared to help them with that. So, it's not just about the commitment that people need. It's also about making sure that you are giving candidates what they need to give the best interview possible in an artificial environment.Corey: One approach that people have taken is, “Ah, I'm going to shortcut this and instead of asking people to write code, I'm going to look at their work on GitHub.” Which is, in some cases, a great way to analyze what folks are capable of doing. On the other, well, there's a lot of things that play into that. What if they're working in environment where they don't have the opportunity to open-source their work? What if people consider this a job rather than an all-consuming passion?I know, perish the thought. We don't want to hire people like that. Grow up. It's not useful, and it's not helpful. It's not something that applies universally, and there's an awful lot of reasons why someone's code on GitHub might be materially better—or worse—than their work product. I think that's fine. It's just a different path toward it.Emma: I don't use GitHub for largely anything except just keeping repositories that I need. I don't actively update it. And I have, like, a few thousand followers; I'm like, “Why the hell do you guys follow me? I don't do anything.” It's honestly a terrible representation.That being said, you don't need to have a GitHub repository—an active one—to showcase your skills. There are many other ways that you can show a potential employer, “Hey, I have a lot of skills that aren't necessarily showcased on my resume, but I like to write blogs, I like to give tech talks, I like to make YouTube videos,” things of that nature.Corey: I had a manager once who refused to interview anyone who didn't have a built-out LinkedIn profile, which is also one of these bizarre things. It's, yeah, a lot of people don't feel the need to have a LinkedIn profile, and that's fine. But the idea that, “Oh, yeah, they have this profile they haven't updated in a couple years, it's clearly they're not interested in looking for work.” It's, yeah. Maybe—just a thought here—your ability to construct a resume and build it out in the way that you were expecting is completely orthogonal to how effective they might be in the role. The idea that someone not having a LinkedIn profile somehow implies that they're sketchy is the wrong lesson to take from all of this. That site is terrible.Emma: Especially when you consider the fact that LinkedIn is primarily used in the United States as a social—not social networking—professional networking tool. In Germany, they use Xing as a platform; it's very similar to LinkedIn, but my point is, if you're solely looking at someone's LinkedIn as a representation of their ability to do a job, you're missing out on many candidates from all over the world. And also those who, yeah, frankly, just don't—like, they have more important things to be doing than updating their LinkedIn profile. [laugh].Corey: On some level, it's the idea of looking at a consultant, especially independent consultant type, when their website is glorious and up-to-date and everything's perfect, it's, oh, you don't really have any customers, do you? As opposed to the consultants you know who are effectively sitting there with a waiting list, their website looks like crap. It's like, “Is this Geocities?” No. It's just that they're too busy working on the things that bring the money instead of the things that bring in business, in some respects.Let's face it, websites don't. For an awful lot of consulting work, it's word of mouth. I very rarely get people finding me off of Google, clicking a link, and, “Hey, my AWS bill is terrible. Can you help us with it?” It happens, but it's not something that happens so frequently that we want to optimize for it because that's not where the best customers have been coming from. Historically, it's referrals, it's word of mouth, it's people seeing the aggressive shitposting I engage in on Twitter and saying, “Oh, that's someone that should help me with my Amazon bill.” Which I don't pretend to understand, but I'm still going to roll with it.Emma: You had mentioned something about passion earlier, and I just want to say, if you're a hiring manager or recruiter, you shouldn't solely be looking at candidates who superficially look like they're passionate about what they do. Yes, that is—it's important, but it's not something that—like, I don't necessarily choose one candidate over the other because they push commits, and open pull requests on GitHub, and open-source, and stuff. You can be passionate about your job, but at the end of the day, it's still a job. For me, would I be working if I had to? No. I'd be opening a bookstore because that's what I would really love to be doing. But that doesn't mean I'm not passionate about my job. I just show it in different ways. So, just wanted to put that out there.Corey: Oh, yeah. The idea that you must eat, sleep, live, and breathe is—hell with that. One of the reasons that we get people to work here at The Duckbill Group is, yeah, we care about getting the job done. We don't care about how long it takes or when you work; it's oh, you're not feeling well? Take the day off.We have very few things that are ‘must be done today' style of things. Most of those tend to fall on me because it's giving a talk at a conference; they will not reschedule the conference for you. I've checked. So yeah, that's important, but that's not most days.Emma: Yeah. It's like programming is my job, it's not my identity. And it's okay if it is your primary hobby if that is how you identify, but for me, I'm a person with actual hobbies, and, you know, a personality, and programming is just a job for me. I like my job, but it's just a job.Corey: And on the side, you do interesting things like wrote a book. You mentioned earlier that it wound up paying off some debt and helping cover your move across an ocean. Let's talk a little bit about that because I'm amenable to the idea of side projects that accidentally have a way of making money. That's what this podcast started out as. If I'm being perfectly honest, and started out as something even more self-serving than that.It's, well if I reach out to people in this industry that are doing interesting things and ask them to grab a cup of coffee, they'll basically block me, whereas if I ask them to, would you like to appear on my podcast, they'll clear time on their schedule. I almost didn't care if my microphone was on or not when I was doing these just because it was a chance to talk to really interesting people and borrow their brain, people reached out asking they can sponsor it, along with the newsletter and the rest, and it's you want to give me money? Of course, you can give me money. How much money? And that sort of turned into a snowball effect over time.Five years in, it's turned into something that I would never have predicted or expected. But it's weird to me still, how effective doing something you're actually passionate about as a side project can sort of grow wings on its own. Where do you stand on that?Emma: Yeah, it's funny because with the exception of the online courses that I've worked with—I mentioned LinkedIn Learning and Frontend Masters, which I knew were paid opportunities—none of my side projects started out for financial reasonings. The podcast that we started was purely for fun, and the sponsors came to us. Now, I will say right up front, we all had pretty big social media followings, and my first piece of advice to anyone looking to get into side projects is, don't focus so much on making money at the get-go. Yes, to your point, Corey, focus on the stuff you're passionate about. Focus on engaging with people on social media, build up your social media, and at that point, okay, monetization will slowly find its way to you.But yeah, I say if you can monetize the heck out of your work, go for it. But also, free content is also great. I like to balance my paid content with my free content because I recognize that not everyone can afford to pay for some of this information. So, I generally always have free alternatives. And for this book that we published, one of the things that was really important to me was keeping it affordable.The first publish I did was $10 for the book. It was like a 250-page book. It was, like, $10 because again, I was not in it for the money. And when I redid the book with the egghead.io team, the same team that did Epic React with Kent C. Dodds, I said, “I want to keep this affordable.” So, we made sure it was still affordable, but also that we had—what's it called? Parity pricing? Pricing parity, where depending on your geographic location, the price is going to accommodate for how the currency is doing. So, yes, I would agree. Side project income for me allows me to do incredible stuff, but it wasn't why I got into it in the first place. It was genuinely just a nice-to-have.Corey: I haven't really done anything that asks people for money directly. I mean, yeah, I sell t-shirts on the website, and mugs, and drink umbrellas—don't get me started—but other than that and the charity t-shirt drive I do every year, I tend to not be good at selling things that don't have a comma in the price tag. For me, it was about absolutely building an audience. I tend to view my Twitter follower count as something of a proxy for it, but the number I actually care about, the audience that I'm focused on cultivating, is newsletter subscribers because no social media platform that we've ever seen has lasted forever. And I have to imagine that Twitter will one day wane as well.But email has been here since longer than we'd been alive, and by having a list of email addresses and ways I can reach out to people on an ongoing basis, I can monetize that audience in a more direct way, at some point should I need them to. And my approach has been, well, one, it's a valuable audience for some sponsors, so I've always taken the asking corporate people for money is easier than asking people for personal money, plus it's a valuable audience to them, so it tends to blow out a number of the metrics that you would normally expect of, oh, for this audience size, you should generally be charging Y dollars. Great. That makes sense if you're slinging mattresses or free web hosting, but when it's instead, huh, these people buy SaaS enterprise software and implement it at their companies, all of economics tend to start blowing apart. Same story with you in many respects.The audience that you're building is functionally developers. That is a lucrative market for the types of sponsors that are wise enough to understand that—in a lot of cases these days—which product a company is going to deploy is not dictated by their exec so much as it is the bottom-up adoption path of engineers who like the product.Emma: Mm-hm. Yeah, and I think once I got to maybe around 10,000 Twitter followers is when I changed my mentality and I stopped caring so much about follower count, and instead I just started caring about the people that I was following. And the number is a nice-to-have but to be honest, I don't think so much about it. And I do understand, yes, at that point, it is definitely a privilege that I have this quote-unquote, “Platform,” but I never see it as an audience, and I never think about that “Audience,” quote-unquote, as a marketing platform. But it's funny because there's no right or wrong. People will always come to you and be like, “You shouldn't monetize your stuff.” And it's like—Corey: “Cool. Who's going to pay me then? Not you, apparently.”Emma: Yeah. It's also funny because when I originally sold the book, it was $10 and I got so many people being like, “This is way too cheap. You should be charging more.” And I'm like, “But I don't care about the money.” I care about all the people who are unemployed and not able to survive, and they have families, and they need to get a job and they don't know how.That's what I care about. And I ended up giving away a lot of free books. My mantra was like, hey if you've been laid off, DM me. No questions asked, I'll give it to you for free. And it was nice because a lot of people came back, even though I never asked for it, they came back and they wanted to purchase it after the fact, after they'd gotten a job.And to me that was like… that was the most rewarding piece. Not getting their money; I don't care about that, but it was like, “Oh, okay. I was actually able to help you.” That is what's really the most rewarding. But yeah, certainly—and back really quickly to your email point, I highly agree, and one of the first things that I would recommend to anyone looking to start a side product, create free content so that you have a backlog that people can look at to… kind of build trust.Corey: Give it away for free, but also get emails from people, like a trade for that. So, it's like, “Hey, here's a free guide on how to start a podcast from scratch. It's free, but all I would like is your email.” And then when it comes time to publish a course on picking the best audio and visual equipment for that podcast, you have people who've already been interested in this topic that you can now market to.This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking databases, observability, management, and security.And - let me be clear here - it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build.With Always Free you can do things like run small scale applications, or do proof of concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free. No asterisk. Start now. Visit https://snark.cloud/oci-free that's https://snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: I'm not sitting here trying to judge anyone for the choices that they make at all. There are a lot of different paths to it. I'm right there with you. One of the challenges I had when I was thinking about, do I charge companies or do I charge people was that if I'm viewing it through a lens of audience growth, well, what stuff do I gate behind a paywall? What stuff don't I? Well, what if I just—Emma: Mm-hm.Corey: —gave it all away? And that way I don't have to worry about the entire class of problems that you just alluded to of, well, how do I make sure this is fair? Because a cup of coffee in San Francisco is, what, $14 in some cases? Whereas that is significant in places that aren't built on an economy of foolishness. How do you solve for that problem? How do you deal with the customer service slash piracy issues slash all the other nonsense? And it's just easier.Emma: Yeah.Corey: Something I've found, too, is that when you're charging enough money to companies, you don't have to deal with an entire class of customer service problem. You just alluded to the other day that well, you had someone who bought your book and was displeased that it wasn't a how to write code from scratch tutorial, despite the fact that he were very clear on what it is and what it isn't. I don't pretend to understand that level of entitlement. If I spend 10 or 20 bucks on an ebook, and it's not very good, let's see, do I wind up demanding a refund from the author and making them feel bad about it, or do I say, “The hell with it.” And in my case, I—there is privilege baked into this; I get that, but it's I don't want to make people feel bad about what they've built. If I think there's enough value to spend money on it I view that as a one-way transaction, rather than chasing someone down for three months, trying to get a $20 refund.Emma: Yeah, and I think honestly, I don't care so much about giving refunds at all. We have a 30-day money-back guarantee and we don't ask any questions. I just asked this person for feedback, like, “Oh, what was not up to par?” And it was just, kind of like, BS response of like, “Oh, I didn't read the website and I guess it's not what I wanted.” But the end of the day, they still keep the product.The thing is, you can't police all of the people who are going to try to get your content for free if you're charging for it; it's part of it. And I knew that when I got into it, and honestly, my thing is, if you are circulating a book that helps you get a job in tech and you're sending it to all your friends, I'm not going to ask any questions because it's very much the sa—and this is just my morals here, but if I saw someone stealing food from a grocery store, I wouldn't tell on them because at the end of the day, if you're s—Corey: Same story. You ever see someone's stealing baby formula from a store? No, you didn't.Emma: Right.Corey: Keep walking. Mind your business.Emma: Exactly. Exactly. So, at the end of the day, I didn't necessarily care that—people are like, “Oh, people are going to share your book around. It's a PDF.” I'm like, “I don't care. Let them. It is what it is. And the people who wants to support and can, will.” But I'm not asking.I still have free blogs on data structures, and algorithms, and the interview stuff. I do still have content for free, but if you want more, if you want my illustrated diagrams that took me forever with my Apple Pencil, fair enough. That would be great if you could support me. If not, I'm still happy to give you the stuff for free. It is what it is.Corey: One thing that I think is underappreciated is that my resume doesn't look great. On paper, I have an eighth-grade education, and I don't have any big tech names on my resume. I have a bunch of relatively short stints; until I started this place, I've never lasted more than two years anywhere. If I apply through the front door the way most people do for a job, I will get laughed out of the room by the applicant tracking system, automatically. It'll never see a human.And by doing all these side projects, it's weird, but let's say that I shut down the company for some reason, and decide, ah, I'm going to go get a job now, my interview process—more or less, and it sounds incredibly arrogant, but roll with it for a minute—is, “Don't you know who I am? Haven't you heard of me before?” It's, “Here's my website. Here's all the stuff I've been doing. Ask anyone in your engineering group who I am and you'll see what pops up.”You're in that same boat at this point where your resume is the side projects that you've done and the audience you've built by doing it. That's something that I think is underappreciated. Even if neither one of us made a dime through direct monetization of things that we did, the reputational boost to who we are and what we do professionally seems to be one of those things that pays dividends far beyond any relatively small monetary gain from it.Emma: Absolutely, yeah. I actually landed my job interview with Spotify through Twitter. I was contacted by a design systems manager. And I was in the interview process for them, and I ended up saying, “You know, I'm not ready to move to Stockholm. I just moved to Germany.”And a year later, I circled back and I said, “Hey, are there any openings?” And I ended up re-interviewing, and guess what? Now, I have a beautiful home with my soulmate and we're having a child. And it's funny how things work out this way because I had a Twitter account. And so don't undervalue [laugh] social media as a tool in lieu of a resume because I don't think anyone at Spotify even saw my resume until it actually accepted the job offer, and it was just a formality.So yeah, absolutely. You can get a job through social media. It's one of the easiest ways. And that's why if I ever see anyone looking for a job on Twitter, I will retweet, and vouch for them if I know their work because I think that's one of the quickest ways to finding an awesome candidate.Corey: Back in, I don't know, 2010, 2011-ish. I was deep in the IRC weed. I was network staff on the old freenode network—not the new terrible one. The old, good one—and I was helping people out with various things. I was hanging out in the Postfix channel and email server software thing that most people have the good sense not to need to know anything about.And someone showed up and was asking questions about their config, and I was working with them, and teasing them, and help them out with it. And at the end of it, his comment was, “Wow, you're really good at this. Any chance you'd be interested in looking for jobs?” And the answer was, “Well, sure, but it's a global network. Where are you?”Well, he was based in Germany, but he was working remotely for Spotify in Stockholm. A series of conversations later, I flew out to Stockholm and interviewed for a role that they decided I was not a fit for—and again, they're probably right—and I often wonder how my life would have gone differently if the decision had gone the other way. I mean, no hard feelings, please don't get me wrong, but absolutely, helping people out, interacting with people over social networks, or their old school geeky analogs are absolutely the sorts of things that change lives. I would never have thought to apply to a role like that if I had been sitting here looking at job ads because who in the world would pick up someone with relatively paltry experience and move them halfway around the world? This was like a fantasy, not a reality.Emma: [laugh].Corey: It's the people you get to know—Emma: Yeah.Corey: —through these social interactions on various networks that are worth… they're worth gold. There's no way to describe it other than that.Emma: Yeah, absolutely. And if you're listening to this, and you're discouraged because you got turned down for a job, we've all been there, first of all, but I remember being disappointed because I didn't pass my first round of interviews of Google the first time I interviewed with them, and being, like, “Oh, crap, now I can't move to Munich. What am I going to do with my life?” Well, guess what, look where I am today. If I had gotten that job that I thought was it for me, I wouldn't be in the happiest phase of my life.And so if you're going through it—obviously, in normal circumstances where you're not frantically searching for a job; if you're in more of a casual life job search—and you've been let go from the process, just realize that there's probably something bigger and better out there for you, and just focus on your networking online. Yeah, it's an invaluable tool.Corey: One time when giving a conference talk, I asked, “All right, raise your hand if you have never gone through a job interview process and then not been offered the job.” And a few people did. “Great. If your hand is up, aim higher. Try harder. Take more risks.”Because fundamentally, job interviews are two-way streets and if you are only going for the sure thing jobs, great, stretch yourself, see what else is out there. There's no perfect attendance prize. Even back in school there wasn't. It's the idea of, “Well, I've only ever taken the easy path because I don't want to break my streak.” Get over it. Go out and interview more. It's a skill, unlike most others that you don't get to get better at unless you practice it.So, you've been in a job for ten years, and then it's time to move on—I've talked to candidates like this—their interview skills are extremely rusty. It takes a little bit of time to get back in the groove. I like to interview every three to six months back when I was on the job market. Now that I, you know, own the company and have employees, it looks super weird if I do it, but I miss it. I miss those conversations. I miss the aspects—Emma: Yes.Corey: —of exploring what the industry cares about.Emma: Absolutely. And don't underplay the importance of studying the foundational language concepts. I see this a lot in candidates where they're so focused on the newest and latest technologies and frameworks, that they forgot foundational JavaScript, HTML, and CSS. Many companies are focused primarily on these plain language concepts, so just make sure that when you are ready to get back into interviewing and enhance that skill, that you don't neglect the foundation languages that the web is built on if you're a web developer.Corey: I'd also take one last look around and realize that every person you admire, every person who has an audience, who is a known entity in the space only has that position because someone, somewhere did them a favor. Probably lots of someones with lots of favors. And you can't ever pay those favors back. All you can do is pay it forward. I repeatedly encourage people to reach out to me if there's something I can do to help. And the only thing that surprises me is how few people in the audience take me up on that. I'm talking to you, listener. Please, if I can help you with something, please reach out. I get a kick out of doing that sort of thing.Emma: Absolutely. I agree.Corey: Emma, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Emma: Well, you can find me on Twitter. It's just @EmmaBostian, I'm, you know, shitposting over there on the regular. But sometimes I do tweet out helpful things, so yeah, feel free to engage with me over there. [laugh].Corey: And we will, of course, put a link to that in the [show notes 00:35:42]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. I appreciate it.Emma: Yeah. Thanks for having me.Corey: Emma Bostian, software engineer at Spotify and oh, so very much more. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an incoherent ranting comment mentioning that this podcast as well failed to completely teach you JavaScript.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Spain 0 Northern Ireland 1, 1982

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 42:39


On this week's Greatest Games, Jonathan Wilson and Marcus Speller are joined by Michael Taylor to discuss Northern Ireland's win over Spain at the 1982 World Cup. A win or a 2-2 draw is what Northern Ireland needed if they were to progress through to the second round of the tournament. However, they had never beaten Spain in their history and the tournament hosts has qualification aspirations of their own. Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He's contributed to numerous publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others. Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan. Michael Taylor is a historian and author whose book The Interest: How the British Establishment Resisted the Abolition of Slavery was shortlisted for the 2021 Orwell prize for political writing. Listen to every episode of Greatest Games: theblizzard.co.uk/podcasts/greatest-games Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: theblizzard.co.uk Twitter: twitter.com/blzzrd Facebook: facebook.com/blzzrd Instagram: instagram.com/theblizzard__

The Outlaw Nation Podcast Network
TED LASSO SEASON 2 FINALE REVIEW - Ted Confronts Nate, Sam Makes A Decision, Roy & Keeley Break Up?

The Outlaw Nation Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 52:55


The Outlaw John Rocha welcomes fellow Geek Buddy and avid Ted Lasso fan Shannon McClung to review Episode 12 of Season 2 titled "Inverting the Pyramid of Success". The hit series from Apple TV+ stars Jason Sudeikis, Brendan Hunt, Hannah Waddingham, Juno Temple, Jeremy Swift, Brett Goldstein, Phil Dunster, Nick Mohammed, Cristo Fernandez, and special guest Sam Richardson. The series is created by Bill Lawrence, Jason Sudeikis and Brendan Hunt. Richmond gets their final chance to win promotion as Ted deals with the fallout of Trent Crimm's painfully honest exposé. Chapters: 0:00 Introduction and Overall Thoughts 4:58 Ted Lasso Confronts the Mental Health Reveal 15:16 Roy and Keeley Test Their Relationship 24:16 Sam Makes A Decision to Stay at Richmond 36:44 NATE QUITS RICHMOND TO TAKE WEST HAM JOB 48:43 Final Thoughts, Wrap UP and Social Media PLugs #TedLasso #AppleTV #Review #JasonSudeikis #HannahWaddingham #BrendanHunt #BrettGoldstein #JunoTemple #BillLawrence #TVReview #AFCRichmond Join The Outlaw's Patreon at: https://patreon.com/JohnRocha Follow The Outlaw John Rocha on Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheRochaSays Follow The Outlaw John Rocha on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/therochasays/ Follow Shannon McClung on Twiiter: https://twitter.com/Shannon_McClung Follow Shannon on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/shannonthegeekbuddy/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-outlaw-nation-network/support

On Last Week's Episode
Ted Lasso Recap: Episode 12 - Inverting the Pyramid of Success

On Last Week's Episode

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 76:56


Season 2 of Ted Lasso is officially in the books! There were a lot of loose threads to tend to: The tiki-taka between Keeley, Roy, and Jamie, Sam's decision, Ted dealing with the "anonymous" source, and Richmond FC fighting for promotion. Does "Inverting the Pyramid of Success" deliver? Check out our recap to see what we think. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-kids-wear-crowns/message

Post Show Recaps: LIVE TV & Movie Podcasts with Rob Cesternino
Ted Lasso | Season 2 Episode 12 Recap: ‘Inverting the Pyramid of Success'

Post Show Recaps: LIVE TV & Movie Podcasts with Rob Cesternino

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 105:00


This week, Josh and Antonio recap "Ted Lasso" Season 2 Episode 12, "Inverting the Pyramid of Success. The post Ted Lasso | Season 2 Episode 12 Recap: ‘Inverting the Pyramid of Success' appeared first on PostShowRecaps.com.

Ted Lasso: A Post Show Recap
Ted Lasso | Season 2 Episode 12 Recap: ‘Inverting the Pyramid of Success’

Ted Lasso: A Post Show Recap

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 105:00


This week, Josh and Antonio recap "Ted Lasso" Season 2 Episode 12, "Inverting the Pyramid of Success. The post Ted Lasso | Season 2 Episode 12 Recap: ‘Inverting the Pyramid of Success' appeared first on PostShowRecaps.com.

The Lasso Personal Dilemma Squad: A Ted Lasso Recap Podcast

It's here. It's there. It's the final episode of season 2 and we take a little extra time breaking down this emotional rollercoaster of a season finale. Link to our website and to listen to all our shows for free - http://damshow.co/ (http://damshow.co)

Superfeed! from The Incomparable
Football is Life 22: "Inverting the Pyramid of Success" (S2E12)

Superfeed! from The Incomparable

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 95:28


It’s the big finale of season two. On the field, Richmond tries to return to the Premier League. Off the field, things are falling apart. Sam, Keeley, Nate, and Trent Crimm make big moves. Higgins plays with puppies. Roy visits the Diamond Dogs. Jamie shows growth. Dani seeks redemption. Jan Maas speaks the truth. And Ted cites the work of a triple wizard. Onward to season three—after we spend the length of a football match breaking this one down. (Thanks for being with us the last 22 weeks. And join us next week for a special season-wrap episode of Football is Life!) Host Jason Snell with Casey Liss, Kathy Campbell, Jean MacDonald and James Thomson.

Entertainment Talk
The American Coach: Ted Lasso 212 ‘Inverting the Pyramid of Success’

Entertainment Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 53:32


By Matthew Nemeth Welcome To The American Coach for Ted Lasso on Apple TV Plus, this is for Ted Lasso 212 ‘Inverting the Pyramid of Success’ Click here for a list of our iTunes feeds. Information matthew@entertainmenttalk.org Please rate and Read More

The Movie Podcast
Ted Lasso Season 2 Finale Review (Inverting the Pyramid of Success)

The Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 26:17


Daniel and Shahbaz leave it all on the pitch in their review of Ted Lasso's Season 2 Finale. Spoiler warning. Stream Seasons 1 and 2 of Ted Lasso now on Apple TV+.Listen now on all podcast feeds and on TheMoviePodcast.caContact: hello@themoviepodcast.caJason Sudeikis is Ted Lasso, an American football coach hired to manage a British soccer team—despite having no experience. But what he lacks in knowledge, he makes up for with optimism, underdog determination...and biscuits. Seasons 1 and 2 of Ted Lasso Season are streaming now on Apple TV+ FOLLOW USFollow Daniel on Twitter, Instagram, and LetterboxdFollow Shahbaz on Twitter, Instagram, and LetterboxdFollow Anthony on Twitter, Instagram, and LetterboxdFollow The Movie Podcast on Twitter, Instagram, TikTok, Discord, and YouTubeThe Movie Podcast is on a mission to hit 200 Apple Podcast reviews, click here to head over to our show page on APPLE PODCASTS and leave us a 5 STAR review!ABOUTThe Movie Podcast is one of Canada's top film and review podcasts. Every week you'll hear film lovers Daniel, Shahbaz, and Anthony discuss the biggest movie news, talk trailers, what's coming soon, ponder a unique topic of show, and speak to special guests from across the film industry. Catch a new episode of The Movie Podcast every Monday and watch out for Review episodes on all the latest movies and series.

Peanut Butter and Biscuits - A Ted Lasso Fancast
Ted Lasso Season 2 Episode 12 - Inverting The Pyramid of Success

Peanut Butter and Biscuits - A Ted Lasso Fancast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 84:20


Hello fellow Lasso-holics! It's big match time as Richmond is one game away from being promoted back to the Premiere League. But before the team gets to its biggest showdown on the pitch, the personal relationships of the team and staff come to a head. Ted has to deal with knowing of Nate's betrayal and make a fateful choice about how to deal with it, Keeley gets a huge opportunity that may change things between her and Roy and Sam finally makes his decision about staying in Richmond or playing for Akufo at Boca Casablanca. It's time for the Season 2 FINALE! It's the best part of your week, it's Lasso time! Come along with us as we break down Season 2 Episode 12 "Inverting The Pyramid of Success". FEATURING: Jeremy Goeckner, Craig McFarland & Courtney Enlow Email the show at frontrowlasso@gmail.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/craig-mcfarland0/support

Oddly Incorrect
83: Food, Change Management, and Inverting Maslow's Pyramid

Oddly Incorrect

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 59:31


Facebook Goes Down / Mexican Food Loop Other countries food is monocultural / Neuroscientists Running Jeopardy Partner Vs Husband or Wife / Dehumanization / Redefinition of Words Win As Much As You Can / Changing The Parameters of the Test The Dead Internet Theory / Used to be Full of Useful Information Details Are Not Brought To The Table For Decisions / Goal Directed Teleology vs Etiology Is Change Management an HR Feel Good Program? Details are being Eliminated Knowledge Is Power But Power Trumps Knowledge Low Hanging Fruit and "Quick Wins" We Don't Want To Make the Hard Decisions and Fix Whats Broken Self-Actualization is not the Pinnacle of Achievement Invert Maslows Pyramid - Once You Have Attained a Level can you share your boutny with those below you?

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Estonia 2 Russia 1, 2002

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 42:14


On this week's Greatest Games, Jonathan Wilson and Marcus Speller are joined by Aet Süvari to discuss Estonia's win over Russia in 2002. Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He's contributed to numerous publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others. Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan. Aet Süvari is a broadcaster for ERR, Estonia Public Broadcasting. Listen to every episode of Greatest Games: theblizzard.co.uk/podcasts/greatest-games Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: theblizzard.co.uk Twitter: twitter.com/blzzrd Facebook: facebook.com/blzzrd Instagram: instagram.com/theblizzard__

Rebel Performance Radio
Ep 93: How to Sequence Your Training for Massive Results in Record Time

Rebel Performance Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 56:12


How do you go about sequencing your training? Joining me on the show today is Keiran Halton and Ryan Patrick. The three of us dive into what it means to sequence your training and how you can produce massive results by doing so. We constantly see athletes struggling to produce the results they want in a short period of time, and a lot of that comes down to how we are appropriately lining up our training elements to continuously build strength. The big question we see athletes face is whether to focus on work capacity, hypertrophy, strength, or power and the specific order these training blocks and phases should go in. We also see athletes struggling to know how often to switch up their main lifts and accessory work. The three of us go into detail on when the perfect time to have a phase change is and how changing up your training blocks can help your PR numbers skyrocket. The back end of the episode is surrounding the benefit of inverting your set and rep scheme in your training. From a strength and skill standpoint, inverting your reps allows for better skill acquisition and ultimately helps ensure high quality reps over poorly executed reps. Tune in to discover how you can sequence your training to unlock massive results in record time. What You'll Learn in This Episode:  [08:20] Perfect time to have a phase change [11:27] Two things competing in sequencing [15:10] The diamond approach [18:48] How often you should be changing exercises [21:25] The purpose of your accessory work [24:30] Using the different seasons to choose training phases [30:36] Developing skill by understanding myelin [31:30] Inverting your set and rep scheme  [42:25] The importance of the complexity and variability line [45:11] Choosing the right exercise variation for you [46:15] Potential barriers  Links: Explore our free training samples here: https://www.rebel-performance.com/training-templates/ (https://www.rebel-performance.com/training-templates/) Explore our free Performance Nutrition Manual here: https://bit.ly/34x0jKk (https://bit.ly/34x0jKk) Follow Keiran Halton here: https://www.instagram.com/halton_performance/ (https://www.instagram.com/halton_performance/) Follow James Cerbie here: https://www.instagram.com/jamescerbie/ (https://www.instagram.com/jamescerbie/) Follow Ryan Patrick here: https://www.instagram.com/coachryanpatrick/ (https://www.instagram.com/coachryanpatrick/) Want to learn more about the Rebel Performance Training Team? Click here to chat with our team: http://m.me/rebelperf (http://m.me/rebelperf) PLUS: Whenever you're ready... here are 4 ways we can help you find your peak performance (and live up to your true potential): 1. Get 21 FREE program samples. Tired of second-guessing and overthinking your training? https://www.rebel-performance.com/training-templates/?utm_source=website&utm_medium=super_signature%22%20%5Ct%20%22_blank (CLICK HERE) to get 5 months of free workouts to help you unlock total package performance, physique, and athleticism. 2. Buy a pre-made program. Looking for an expertly crafted training program minus the coaching and camaraderie? Then https://shop.rebel-performance.com/?utm_source=website&utm_medium=super_signature%22%20%5Ct%20%22_blank (GO HERE). 3. Join the Total Package Athlete Challenge. Want to work directly with me to hit a PR in your squat, bench, deadlift, vertical jump, broad jump, or 8-minute assault bike within the next 6 weeks? Then https://www.rebel-performance.com/challenge?utm_source=website&utm_medium=super_signature%22%20%5Ct%20%22_blank (GO HERE). 4. Join the Rebel Performance Training Team. Want to work directly with me and my team to unlock total package performance, physique, and athleticism (so you can start living at your physical peak)? Then https://www.rebel-performance.com/?utm_source=website&utm_medium=super_signature%22%20%5Cl%20%22offers%22%20%5Ct%20%22_blank (GO...

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Aston Villa 10 Burnley 0, 1925

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 45:15


David Owen joins Jonathan Wilson and Marcus Speller to discuss the immediate ramifications that the 1925 offside rule change had on English football. Villa were keen to impress their fans after a disappointing 1924-25 campaign, and the squad selection had its doubters. But this thumping of Burnley would quell those fears and prove football administrators right who had hoped to bring some much-needed entertainment back to the game following a cagey footballing era post-WW1. Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He's contributed to numerous publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others. Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan. David Owen is a freelance sports journalist, an author and former sports editor of the Financial Times. Listen to every episode of Greatest Games: theblizzard.co.uk/podcasts/greatest-games Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: theblizzard.co.uk Twitter: twitter.com/blzzrd Facebook: facebook.com/blzzrd Instagram: instagram.com/theblizzard__

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Oldham Athletic 3 Arsenal 1, 1989

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 40:32


On today's Greatest Games, Jonathan Wilson and Marcus Speller are joined by Mike Keegan to remember a classic League Cup upset. Joe Royle and Oldham Athletic's 'pinch-me season' saw the side reach the FA Cup Semi-Finals for only the 2nd time in their history, and the Final of the League Cup –  the club's first-ever appearance at Wembley. When Arsenal, the First Division champions, rocked up to Boundary Park they hadn't a clue what was about to hit them. About the panel: Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He's contributed to numerous publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others. Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan. Mike Keegan is the author of This Is How It Feels – An English Football Miracle, Sports News Correspondent and Sports Agenda Editor for MailSport. Listen to every episode of Greatest Games: theblizzard.co.uk/podcasts/greatest-games Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: theblizzard.co.uk Twitter: twitter.com/blzzrd Facebook: facebook.com/blzzrd Instagram: instagram.com/theblizzard__

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Koln 0 Nottm Forest 1, 1979

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 49:18


On this week's episode of Greatest Games, Nick Miller joins Jonathan Wilson and Marcus Speller to discuss the second leg of the 1978-79 European Cup semi-final between Koln and Brian Clough's Nottingham Forest. About the panel: Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He's contributed to numerous publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others. Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan. Nick Miller is a football writer for The Athletic and editor of the Totally Football Yearbook. Listen to every episode of Greatest Games: theblizzard.co.uk/podcasts/greatest-games Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: theblizzard.co.uk Twitter: twitter.com/blzzrd Facebook: facebook.com/blzzrd Instagram: instagram.com/theblizzard__

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Italy 3 West Germany 1, 1982

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 43:40


On this week's episode of Greatest Games, Matthew Lorenzo joins Jonathan and Marcus to discuss the 1982 World Cup final. About the panel: Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He's contributed to numerous publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others. Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan. Matthew Lorenzo is a TV presenter and producer for Bo66y. Listen to every episode of Greatest Games: theblizzard.co.uk/podcasts/greatest-games Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: theblizzard.co.uk Twitter: twitter.com/blzzrd Facebook: facebook.com/blzzrd Instagram: instagram.com/theblizzard__

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Spurs 2 Manchester United 1, 2017

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 51:04


On this week's episode of Greatest Games, Jack Pitt-Brooke joins Jonathan Wilson and Marcus Speller to discuss the final home game to be played at the old White Hart Lane. As another high-flying season for Pochettino's Spurs began to wrap up, a performance that epitomised the Argentine manager's reign over the club spoiled the fans on an emotional day in North London. Jack, Jonathan and Marcus ponder over just how Pochettino could make Spurs purr, what it is that makes Harry Kane so good, how the opposition's goalscorer that day appears in Jonathan's dreams and much more. About the panel: Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He's contributed to numerous publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others. Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan. Jack Pitt-Brooke covers Tottenham Hotspur and England for The Athletic. Listen to every episode of Greatest Games: theblizzard.co.uk/podcasts/greatest-games Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: theblizzard.co.uk Twitter: twitter.com/blzzrd Facebook: facebook.com/blzzrd Instagram: instagram.com/theblizzard__

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Real Madrid 1 Atletico Madrid 2, 2013

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 53:46


This week we're celebrating 100 episodes of our weekly podcast, Greatest Games! To celebrate, we've got back the guest from our very first episode, Ian Hawkey. This time, Ian's picked the 2013 Copa del Rey final at the Bernabeu which provided Diego Simeone with silverware to cap off his first full season as manager of Atletico Madrid. About the panel: Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He's contributed to numerous publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others. Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan. Ian Hawkey is a writer for The Sunday Times, previously as their European football correspondent based in Spain for 12 years. Ian is the author of several books including The Feet of the Chameleon: The Story of African Football and Di Stefano, the Real Madrid legend. Listen to every episode of Greatest Games: theblizzard.co.uk/podcasts/greatest-games Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: theblizzard.co.uk Twitter: twitter.com/blzzrd Facebook: facebook.com/blzzrd Instagram: instagram.com/theblizzard__

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Crystal Palace 3 Manchester United 3, 1990

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 55:17


This week on Greatest Games, John Brewin joins Jonathan Wilson and Marcus Speller to remember the 1990 FA Cup final between Crystal Palace and Manchester United. The Eagles and the Red Devils had only managed to finish 15th and 13th respectively in the First Division, but after being on the right side of a pair of memorable semi-finals, both sides would provide the Wembley crowd with an FA Cup final classic. About the panel: Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He's contributed to numerous publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others. Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan. John Brewin is a football writer and contributor for the Guardian. Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: https://www.theblizzard.co.uk/  Twitter: http://twitter.com/blzzrd  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/blzzrd  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theblizzard__/

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Barcelona 3 Manchester United 1, 2011

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 44:06


On this week's episode of Greatest Games, Simon Kuper joins Jonathan and Marcus to look back on the 2011 Champions League final between Barcelona and Manchester United.  Over the decade preceding this final, Barcelona's fabled academy La Masia was quietly assembling the greatest generation of footballing talent to be produced at one time by a single club. It was in this final when that crop of talent – which included Xavi, Lionel Messi, Andres Iniesta, Sergio Busquets and Gerard Pique along with the addition of extraordinary imports Dani Alves, Eric Abidal and David Villa – best applied their abilities to Barcelona's Cruyffian tactics and decimated the Premier League champions on European football's grandest stage. Recorded on Tuesday 3 August, just ahead of the news regarding Lionel Messi's departure from Barcelona. About the panel:   Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He's contributed to numerous publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others.   Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan.   Simon Kuper is a columnist for the Financial Times and author of many books, including Soccernomics, Ajax: The Dutch, The War and most recently Barca: The Inside Story of the World's Greatest Football Club released this week. Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: https://www.theblizzard.co.uk/  Twitter: http://twitter.com/blzzrd  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/blzzrd  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theblizzard__/  

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: France 0 Senegal 1, 2002

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 41:42


Jonathan Wilson and Marcus Speller discuss Senegal's famous win over France at the 2002 World Cup on this week's episode of Greatest Games alongside James Copnall.     About the panel:   Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He's contributed to numerous publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others.   Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan.   James Copnall is the presenter of Newsday on the BBC World Service and author of A Poisonous Thorn in Our Hearts, a book about the two Sudans. Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: https://www.theblizzard.co.uk/  Twitter: http://twitter.com/blzzrd  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/blzzrd  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theblizzard__/

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Újpesti Dózsa 2 Newcastle United 3, 1969

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 59:16


On this week's episode of Greatest Games, Jonathan Wilson and Marcus Speller are joined by Matthew Watson-Broughton to discuss the 1969 Inter-Cities Fairs Cup final second-leg between Újpesti Dózsa and Newcastle United.    About the panel:   Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He's contributed to numerous publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others.   Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan.    Matthew Watson-Broughton is the author of The Amazing Journey: How Newcastle Conquered Europe, he's also worked for Uefa, the LOCOG, FINA and is currently the English-speaking editor for the Hungarian Football Federation. Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: https://www.theblizzard.co.uk/  Twitter: http://twitter.com/blzzrd  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/blzzrd  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theblizzard__/

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Nigeria 4 Brazil 3, 1996

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 50:16


On this week's episode of Greatest Games, Colin Udoh has chosen to discuss Nigeria's 1996 Olympic Games semi-final win over Brazil with Jonathan Wilson and Marcus Speller.   For Brazil, Olympic gold continued to elude them, hence the strength of the squad they boasted for this tournament – Dida, Roberto Carlos, Ronaldo and Juninho all started this match, Rivaldo would come off the bench. It wouldn't be until they hosted the Olympics in 2016 when they finally won their first Men's final.    Meanwhile, many of Nigeria's Dream Team were already established names after their enthralling appearance at the USA '94 World Cup, having been knocked out by two extremely late goals from Italy's Roberto Baggio. However, no one would have anticipated what they'd achieve at the 1996 Olympics, especially with the calibre of opposition – and the players chosen for those sides – in front of them.   About the panel: Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He's contributed to numerous publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others.   Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan.   Colin Udoh is a journalist from Nigeria, a contributor to ESPN, The Blizzard an many more outlets and was previously the press officer to the Nigeria national team. Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: https://www.theblizzard.co.uk/  Twitter: http://twitter.com/blzzrd  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/blzzrd  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theblizzard__/

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Liverpool 2 Everton 0, 1987

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 55:42


Dion Fanning joins Jonathan Wilson and Marcus Speller for this week's episode of Greatest Games to remember a First Division meeting between the two Merseyside rivals. Last season's champions v the would-be champions of the 1987-88 season. About the panel: Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He's contributed to numerous publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others. Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan. Dion Fanning is a journalist and broadcaster previously as the Sunday Independent covering the Premier League and the World Cup, currently of the Currency. Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: https://www.theblizzard.co.uk/  Twitter: http://twitter.com/blzzrd  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/blzzrd  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theblizzard__/

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Sampdoria 0 Barcelona 1, 1992

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 52:28


Tim Vickery joins Jonathan Wilson and Marcus Speller for this week's episode of Greatest Games to relive the 1992 European Cup final at Wembley. About the panel: Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He's contributed to numerous publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others. Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan. Tim Vickery is a long-time contributor to BBC Sport, ESPN, World Soccer and can be seen on-screen regularly in his country of residence, Brazil. Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: https://www.theblizzard.co.uk/  Twitter: http://twitter.com/blzzrd  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/blzzrd  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theblizzard__/

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Italy 0 Netherlands 0, 2000

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2021 42:42


On this week's Greatest Games, Jonathan Wilson and Marcus Speller are joined by Brian Oliver to discuss the Euro 2000 semi-final between Italy and the Netherlands. Both nations had gotten the group stages and a quarter-final with little to worry about up to this fixture. The co-host, Netherlands, were spurred on by a 34th minute Gianluca Zambrotta red card and seemed destined to advance to the final of their own tournament. However, a triumphant display of Catenaccio values deployed by Dino Zoff's Nezzuri ensured Italy were headed for a meeting with the world champions in Rotterdam. About the panel: Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He's contributed to numerous publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others. Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan. Brian Oliver is a sports journalist having covered many international tournaments, former sports editor of the Observer and author of The Commonwealth Games: Extraordinary Stories Behind The Medals. Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: https://www.theblizzard.co.uk/  Twitter: http://twitter.com/blzzrd  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/blzzrd  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theblizzard__/

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Netherlands 1 Russia 3 (aet), 2008

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2021 48:48


Michael Yokhin is our guest on this week's Greatest Games, joining Jonathan Wilson and Marcus Speller to discuss the 2008 European Championship quarter-final between Russia and the Netherlands. The Netherlands blitzed through their group with convincing wins over Italy, France and Romania – leading many to think that perhaps Marco van Basten had returned total football to the Dutch national side. However, Russia, galvanised by the Dutch coach Guus Hiddink, also looked promising after group stage wins against holders Greece and Sweden. The match signalled the start of two polarising eras for the two national sides. About the panel: Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He's contributed to numerous publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others. Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan. Michael Yokhin is a freelance football writer for the BBC, the Guardian, FourFourTwo, ESPN, among others and regular contributor to The Blizzard.Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: https://www.theblizzard.co.uk/  Twitter: http://twitter.com/blzzrd  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/blzzrd  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theblizzard__/

The Johnny King Show
The Symbolism Behind The Becoming Kings Logo

The Johnny King Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 16:42


Episode 204: In this episode you'll learn about…Looking for a symbol. (1:18)What's truly important? (3:46)The “Valknut.” (6:42)The Germanic People & Vikings. (9:13)Inverting the “Valknut” into a crown. (12:02)Lions wearing crowns. (14:31)

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: HJK Helsinki 3 Athletic 3, 2012

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2021 38:38


On this week's Greatest Games, Jonathan and Marcus are joined by Eero Laurila to discuss what it's like to spy on Marcelo Bielsa and the state of football in Finland via the 2012 Europa League qualifier between HJK Helsinki and Athletic. At the time Athletic were led by the influential Argentine coach Marcelo Bielsa, whilst their hosts had former Finland national team manager Antti Muurinen in charge. The Finnish side were to lose 9-3 on aggregate but the occasion proves to be a perfect platform to discuss advances made in Finland over the past 20 years up to qualification for the current European Championship.  About the panel: Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He's contributed to numerous publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others. Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan. Eero Laurila is a former football correspondent covering the Premier and Football League, now back in his native country, Finland, coaching third-tier side Espoon Palloseura and runs the football website brittifutis.com.Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: https://www.theblizzard.co.uk/ Twitter: http://twitter.com/blzzrd Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/blzzrd Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theblizzard__/

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Peñarol 1 América de Cali 0, 1987

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021 44:22


On Greatest Games this week, Jonathan Wilson and Marcus Speller are joined by David Diaz Bejarano to discuss the 1987 Copa Libertadores final decider between Penarol and America de Cali. America de Cali were heading into the tie having already lost the 1985 and 1986 Libertadores final and hoped to break a long-standing curse on the Colombian club. Penarol, managed by Oscar Tabarez, were already giants of South American football and aiming for their fifth Libertadores triumph.  About the panel: Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He's contributed to numerous publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others. Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan. David Diaz Bejarano is a political scientist and founder of Pinceladas de Fútbol, a Colombian-based journalistic project which envisions football as a social and cultural phenomenon.Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: https://www.theblizzard.co.uk/ Twitter: http://twitter.com/blzzrd Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/blzzrd Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theblizzard__/

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Dundee 2 Dundee United 1, 1987

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2021 39:53


On this week’s Greatest Games we remember a Skol Cup Dundee Derby at Dens Park in 1987 with Alan Patullo. Following football in Dundee is unlike no other city such is the close proximity between the two sides, whose stadiums reside just a matter of yards away from each other. Alan remembers the history of this rivalry throughout the early years of his life and the atmosphere at this League Cup fixture that’s lost in time as the game wasn’t broadcast.  About the panel: Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He’s contributed to a number of publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others. Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan. Alan Patullo is a football writer for the Scotsman and a Dundee fan.Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: https://www.theblizzard.co.uk/ Twitter: http://twitter.com/blzzrd Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/blzzrd Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theblizzard__/

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Serbia 0 Albania 3, 2014

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2021 49:11


On this week’s Greatest Games, Nick Ames joins Jonathan Wilson and Marcus Speller to share his story from the abandoned Serbia v Albania 2016 European Championship qualifier.Eyebrows were raised when the draw placed these two nations in Group I in February 2014. Political disagreements regarding Kosovo, which culminated during the Kosovo War, meant that tensions were bound to be high when the sides came to meet. In Belgrade, when a drone flew into the Partizan Stadium carrying a nationalist flag depicting a map of ‘Greater Albania’, the Serbian crowd responded in fury – forcing the match to be abandoned by referee Martin Atkinson.If you can ever spare the time to leave a review wherever you get your podcasts from, it could really help. Thanks for your support!About the panel: Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He’s contributed to a number of publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored  Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others. Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan.Nick Ames is a football reporter for the Guardian.Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: https://www.theblizzard.co.uk/ Twitter: http://twitter.com/blzzrd Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/blzzrd Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theblizzard__/

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Spurs 3 Manchester United 5, 2001

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2021 48:57


Vithushan Ehantharajah re-joins Jonathan Wilson and Marcus Speller this week to discuss an eight-goal thriller at White Hart Lane – Spurs 3 Manchester United 5. Goals from Richards, Ferdinand and Ziege raced Spurs into a three-goal lead at half-time against the champions but an infamous Alex Ferguson three-word half-time speech was all that was needed to inspire an exhilarating second-half performance this Man United side – a vintage comeback. If you can ever spare the time to leave a review wherever you get your podcasts from, it could really help. Thanks for your support! About the panel: Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He’s contributed to a number of publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored  Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others.  Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan. Vithushan Ehantharajahis a sportswriter for the Independent and IndySport as well as being a part of The Football Ramble.Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: https://www.theblizzard.co.uk/ Twitter: http://twitter.com/blzzrd Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/blzzrd Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theblizzard__/

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Portugal 1 Iceland 1, 2016

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2021 46:35


Steve Crossman joins Jonathan Wilson and Marcus Speller on this week’s Greatest Games to discuss the Euro 2016 Group F opener between eventual champions, Portugal, and the tournament’s surprise package, Iceland.The Nordic nation had never featured at a major tournament finals before but were unfazed by going toe-to-toe with the 2004 finalists, captained by the mercurial Cristiano Ronaldo. The result, and the remainder of the tournament, would catapult Iceland out of footballing obscurity and capture the hearts of football fans across Europe.If you can ever spare the time to leave a review wherever you get your podcasts from, it could really help. Thanks for your support!About the panel: Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He’s contributed to a number of publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored  Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others. Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan.Steve Crossman is a Five Live presenter and producer/presenter of The Hurricane Tapes podcast.Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: https://www.theblizzard.co.uk/ Twitter: http://twitter.com/blzzrd Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/blzzrd Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theblizzard__/

The Rational Reminder Podcast
Investing in Happiness (EP.148)

The Rational Reminder Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2021 61:56


Today we dive deep into the connection between happiness and money, looking at a host of theories and studies that have examined the important factors in this discussion. The main material referenced is the fascinating, The Happiness Hypothesis by Jonathan Haidt, and during the episode, we get to look at a great selection of the findings and claims in the book. To kick things off, we consider the broad ideas around how money can stimulate happiness, as well as its addictive aspects, before examining a few of the most prominent lenses used for measuring different kinds of happiness. Talking about the ideas of Hedonia and Eudaimonia, the influence of forecasting and the future, and the effects of different kinds of spending, we see the common threads as well as the distinctions between these models of measurement. Ultimately all of this material should hopefully enable us to live out a better life with this information in mind, and we spend some time reflecting on some of the key takeaways that seem to come to the surface in the happiness debate. To finish off, we field some listener questions on avoiding spending, and returns on investment, before diving into this week's bad advice featuring a video starring Warren Buffett, Charlie Munger, and Mark Cuban!   Key Points From This Episode: A great book recommendation for getting to grips with branding and building relationships with consumers. [0:03:52.2] The interesting statement released by IIROC regarding conflicts of interest. [0:07:14.7] Barry Ritholtz's interview with Jack Brennan and their perspectives on index funds. [0:10:44.1] Books and studies on the subjects of happiness, finances, and addiction. [0:12:21.4] Different theories for the largest determining factors for happiness. [0:20:21.3] Hedonia and Eudaimonia; two different types of pleasure and their measurement. [0:24:47.6] Experienced happiness and experienced unhappiness; statistics from around the world. [0:32:04.1] Spending and happiness and the debate around the human ability to accurately forecast. [0:40:21.7] Designing a happy life based on all the research in the field. [0:44:48.8] Inverting the goal-setting process and working backward from what you don't want! [0:47:33.9] Love and work as the two most crucial ingredients for human happiness. [0:49:47.3] Avoiding the temptation of spending when aiming to save money. [0:51:15.6] Examples of investments that have paid off for Cameron and Benjamin. [0:52:31.1] Bad advice of the week; Buffett, Cuban, and Munger on diversification. [0:54:03.7]

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Northern Ireland 1 Yugoslavia 0, 1975

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2021 41:12


This week on Greatest Games, Michael Walker joins Jonathan Wilson and Marcus Speller to remember Northern Ireland’s return to Windsor Park after three and a half years of international football exile.The Northern Ireland national team had been playing their “home” games up and down England since their last Windsor Park international in October 1971 against the Soviet Union. This game against Yugoslavia brought Northern Ireland out of football isolation. If you can ever spare the time to leave a review wherever you get your podcasts from, it could really help. Thanks for your support!About the panel: Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He’s contributed to a number of publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored  Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others. Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan.Michael Walker is a football reporter for The Athletic, the Irish Times and the I and an author of Up There: North East Football Boom and Bust and also Green Shoots: Irish Football Histories.Listen to every Greatest Games podcast ever, here. Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: https://www.theblizzard.co.uk/ Twitter: http://twitter.com/blzzrd Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/blzzrd Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theblizzard__/

Dan Snow's History Hit
Football, Money and the European Super League

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2021 33:48


The attempt to create a new European Super League might have been short-lived with the attempt to form a breakaway competition collapsing in the face of widespread protests and denunciations from fans, but what led to this point? In this episode, Dan is joined by Jonathan Wilson of the Guardian Football Weekly and author of Inverting the Pyramid. Jonathan takes us from the origins of the sport over a hundred years ago through to the big business of the modern game. This historical perspective helps to shed light on what might have caused clubs to try and break away. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.