Podcasts about Golden Gate Bridge

Suspension bridge on the San Francisco Bay

  • 780PODCASTS
  • 947EPISODES
  • 41mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Feb 7, 2023LATEST
Golden Gate Bridge

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about Golden Gate Bridge

Latest podcast episodes about Golden Gate Bridge

Wine for Normal People
Ep 460: Sonoma County, CA -- The Overview

Wine for Normal People

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 7, 2023 59:47


Map: Sonoma County AVAs. Sonoma County Winegrowers  Over the last 12 years we've done so much on Sonoma but I realized that we've never done a podcast outlining the areas of Sonoma to give form to this wine paradise that has 18 American Viticultural Areas (AVAs) and covers more than a million acres of land (405,000 ha) of which more than 60,000 acres are planted to grapes.   Sonoma is still full of small, family-owned vineyards. It's estimated that at least 85% of Sonoma County's vineyards are family owned and operated and 80% of vineyards are less than 100 acres (40% are less than 20 acres). The Sonoma landscape incorporates coastal ranges, valleys, mountains, flats, benchlands, and innumerable soils and microclimates, including a multitude of producers with different styles and ideas of what to grow.     In this show, we try to compartmentalize the areas of Sonoma, to help you figure out the big areas and their specialties.   Here are the show notes: We start with generalities… Climate: There are sunny days and almost no rain from May through September with most areas cooler near the coast and warmer inland. The Pacific Ocean/Petaluma Gap and San Pablo Bay serve as cooling influences for the western and southern regions of Sonoma County Land: Elevations and slopes slow ripening, provide poor soils with excellent drainage, and create complex wines. Wines from valley floors are simpler. Matching grape to site is important given soil, elevation, and climate diversity. Grapes: Everyone grows everything! You'll find dozens of varieties growing in Sonoma. Moon Mountain AVA, Sonoma. Credit: Sonoma County Winegrowers  Most of the show is spent detailing the valleys. Here is the quick and dirty on each area:   Sonoma Valley Sonoma Valley AVA: Centers on the Sonoma Valley in the southeastern part of the county. It gets cool air from the San Pablo Bay in the south, and protection from the cool influence of the Pacific in the west from Sonoma Mountain. There are dozens of different soils from very fertile on the valley floor, to well-drained and poor on the hills and mountains   Sonoma Valley has 4 AVAs within it: Moon Mountain, Sonoma Mountain, Bennett Valley, Carneros Moon Mountain District AVA is on the steep western slope of the Mayacamas Mountains. It has the famed Monte Rosso vineyard and specializes in Zinfandel and Cabernet Sauvignon. Sonoma Mountain AVA is at high altitude, with steep vineyards on eastern exposures. The vineyards rise above the fog line, allowing grapes to ripen more fully in the sunlight. Basalt soils make good Cabernet Sauvignon. Other grapes are: Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Semillon, Pinot Noir, Zinfandel   Bennett Valley AVA is Sonoma Valley's smallest AVA. It's a series of small vineyards in the slopes, hills, and ridges between Taylor Mountain, Sonoma Mountain, and Bennett Peak. In the moderately cool climate, with a long hang time, Rhône varieties do well as does Merlot, Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay, and grapes like Marsanne, Roussanne, Viognier with acidity. Pinot Noir acreage is increasing.   Los Carneros AVA straddles Napa and Sonoma counties. It hugs the San Pablo Bay, and is one of the coolest AVAs in the area, with moderately cool and windy days and early morning fog. The soil is compressed clay and very consistent, this and the weather limits vigor. Chardonnay is 50%, Pinot 43%. Merlot makes excellent wine on the clay soils. Bennett Valley AVA, Sonoma. Credit: Sonoma County Winegrowers  Town to stay in if visiting the area: Sonoma   ** Sonoma Valley is a discrete part of the larger Sonoma County. When producers use a general AVA for grapes from a combined region, it's Sonoma County. _____________________________________________  COASTAL APPELLATIONS (mainly Chardonnay and Pinot Noir areas)   Sonoma Coast AVA: Goes from the San Pablo Bay to the border of Mendocino County in the north. This appellation is too large to have meaning – it can be cold and rugged near the coast or warm and sheltered inland, producing very different styles of wine. The expectation is that the Pinot Noir and Chardonnay that have the “Sonoma Coast” label are actually from coastal vineyards, but that's not true. We tell the story of how this AVA got to be so muddled and then talk about the 3 AVAs that were set up to rectify the issue:   Petaluma Gap AVA: 25 miles north of the Golden Gate Bridge, the AVA runs from the Pacific Coast at Bodega Bay, southeast to San Pablo Bay, and has a mild Mediterranean climate. The defining feature is the wind gap in the coastal range, which funnels in cool coastal marine air bringing fog and cool afternoon breezes. The cool climate lower yields and help Pinot Noir (75% of plantings), Chardonnay and Syrah the grapes retain acidity. The West Sonoma Coast AVA (got it in 2022): Stretches from the Mendocino County border to the northern coastal border of the Petaluma Gap AVA. The area includes ONLY areas where coastal influence reaches – it is remote with cooler marine temperatures and much fog at elevation. Pinot Noir and Chardonnay are the main grapes. Fort Ross-Seaview AVA: Located on the outskirts of the Pacific Ocean, with major coastal influence, and high elevation, Pinot Noir and Chardonnay have excellent acidity.   Towns to stay in: Petaluma, Jenner, Bodega Bay West Sonoma Coast AVA,  Sonoma. Credit: Sonoma County Winegrowers    _____________________________________  RUSSIAN RIVER VALLEY AVA (Pinot Noir, but Rhône and Italian varietals are great too in certain regions)   Russian River Valley AVA is known for Pinot Noir. The constant cooling fog from the Pacific Ocean, coming from the Petaluma Wind Gap creates big diurnal swings, so grapes have a long growing season to develop flavor in the western part of the AVA.   The reality is that the Russian River Valley encompasses warm and cool areas. There are 5 Neighborhoods within Russian River Valley, which are used to discuss the cooler places that are more suited to Pinot Noir and Chardonnay (Laguna Ridge, Sebastapol Hills, parts of the Middle Reach) and those that are suited to warmer climate grapes like Rhône varieties, Zinfandel, and Italian varieties (parts of the Middle Reach, Santa Rosa Plains, Eastern Hills)   Green Valley of Russian River Valley SUB AVA of Russian River is in the southwestern part of the Russian River Valley, surrounded by Sebastopol, Forestville and Occidental. It is very cool, foggy, with heavy coastal influences and produces acidic, less extracted Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, and sparkling wines on its Goldridge (yellow, sandy) soil     Chalk Hill AVA is in the northeast part of Russian River Valley and has less marine influence and fog. It has rocky, chalk soils so they do grow Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc, but they also grow Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, and Merlot.   Town to stay in: Santa Rosa, Healdsburg, or Windsor    _______________________________________ DRY CREEK VALLEY AVA (Zinfandel central)   Dry Creek is the easiest valley to visit (2 roads, 5 stop signs!) and probably the easiest to understand. It is known for exceptional Zinfandel. It's in northern Sonoma County, 20 miles/32 km east of the Pacific Ocean. The Coastal Range blocks a lot of the cooler air from flooding the Dry Creek, giving it hotter days and slimmer diurnal swings at night. The vineyards lie on hillsides, benchlands, and the valley floor at different elevations and on different soils – from loam to clay to gravel. Zinfandel is 30% of plantings and is more elegant, and “old school” (especially from producers like Nalle or Peterson – friends of the pod!). The flavors are less like black fruit and more like raspberry, pomegranate with acidity and moderate alcohol. Other varieties grown are: Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay very good Italian and Rhone Varieties, Bordeaux varieties grown too     Rockpile (Dry-Creek Adjacent, great Zin!): On the northern part of Dry Creek Valley, at high elevations beyond the fog, the AVA is great for rich, dense reds – Zin especially is famed (Bruliam does a great job and a friend of the show!)   Town to stay in: Healdsburg or Windsor   Dry Creek AVA, Sonoma. Credit: Sonoma County Winegrowers    _______________________________________   ALEXANDER VALLEY (known for Cabernet Sauvignon) Alexander Valley AVA: In northeastern Sonoma County, north of Healdsburg, the Russian River flows through h the Alexander Valley. It gets some cool marine air from the Pacific Ocean, and wind can cool mornings and evenings. Daytime heat spikes will ripen the grapes, but the cool wind will preserve the acidity in the classic Cabernet Sauvignon, which is so coveted, that many Napa wineries grow Cab here for top cuvees.     Pine Mountain – Cloverdale Peak (Alexander Valley adjacent) AVA: This small area overlaps the northernmost portions of the Alexander Valley AVA. It is steep with high elevations and grows a number of grapes, including Cabernet Sauvignon.   Alexander Valley AVA, Sonoma. Credit: Sonoma County Winegrowers    _______________________________________ Less visit-able places (yes, I know that's not a word)…   Knights Valley AVA is right next to Mount St. Helena, and has well-drained soils, but very warm temperatures with no Pacific or San Pablo Bay influence. Elevation is the only cooling factor in this area that has volcanic and alluvial gravel and focuses on Cabernet Sauvignon (2/3 of plantings) and other Bordeaux varietals. Kendall Jackson owns most of Knights Valley.     Northern Sonoma AVA: Too huge for any meaning – most producers use Sonoma County AVA. It includes Chalk Hill, Knights Valley, Alexander Valley, Dry Creek Valley, Russian River Valley, and most of Green Valley.     Fountaingrove AVA (2015) – mostly growers, few wineries. Cabernet Sauvignon and Bordeaux varietals, some Rhône varietals – Syrah, Viognier, Petite Sirah plus smatterings of everything. It's too hot for Pinot and Chard except in a few key north-facing sites   So much to explore! Sonoma is a place you can need get enough of, but hopefully this episode gives some form to exactly what you want to do when you finally make it out there!    Some of my favorite people mentioned: @sonomawineguy on Twitter and other Social Media, Nalle Winery, Crux Winery, Bruliam Winery, Keller Estate, Inman Family, Kieran Robinson Wines, Truchard Winery, (and I forgot to mention...Longboard Vineyards in Russian River!).   _______________________________________________________________ Thanks to our sponsors:   I could not be happier to announce my partnership with Wine Access, once again. Wines Access is my go-to source for the best selection of interesting wines you can't find locally. Every box you get from Wine Access is meticulous -- tasting notes with food and wine pairing, serving temperature suggestions, and perfectly stored wine. It's no wonder that Wine Access was rated the best wine club by New York Times Wirecutter and is the official partner and wine provider of The MICHELIN Guide. Check out my favorite wines on the page at www.wineaccess.com/normal, sign up for their daily emails, and join one of their wine clubs...AND get 10% your first order!   If you think our podcast is worth the price of a bottle or two of wine a year, please consider virtually buying us some bottles by becoming a member of Patreon... you'll get even more great content, live interactions and classes!  www.patreon.com/winefornormalpeople   To register for an AWESOME, LIVE WFNP class with Elizabeth go to: www.winefornormalpeople.com/classes   Sources for this show: https://sonomawinegrape.org/scw/sonoma-county-territory/ www.sonomavalleywine.com https://petalumagap.com/ russianrivervalley.org www.wdcv.com www.greenvalley-russianriver.com www.bvgg.org www.carneros.com www.alexandervalley.org  

9021OMG
City by the Bay

9021OMG

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 49:15


Rice A Roni the San Francisco Treat!  What a treat this is when Brandon is reunited with Emily. Jason Priestley got to spend time in Northern California, on the Golden Gate Bridge, and on a Cable Car! Are we happy to see them reunited???  But, what's Emily's SECRET!!! Speaking of reunited...Andrea and Jesse are back together and getting flirty. Sears is sooooooo gross.  Steve is doing the right thing. And, Dylan...why did you say NO to Thanksgiving with Kelly but yes to Brenda!??!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Medicare For The Lazy Man Podcast
Ep. 442 - Health Industry ”journalists” find murderous racism everywhere!

Medicare For The Lazy Man Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 28:40


Two articles purport to show that Whitey is plotting to cause air pollution and lethal sleep deprivation in minority populations. On a lighter note we observe the 90th anniversary of construction commencing on the Golden Gate Bridge.  Contact me at: DBJ@MLMMailbag.com (Most severe critic: A+)   Inspired by: "MEDICARE FOR THE LAZY MAN 2022; Simplest & Easiest Guide Ever!" on Amazon.com. Return to leave a short customer review & help future readers. Official website: https://www.MedicareForTheLazyMan.com

Instant Trivia
Episode 697 - All Things Golden - Beverages - Lewis Or Clark - Quotes/ Magazines - Put On Your Disco Shoes

Instant Trivia

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 7:28


Welcome to the Instant Trivia podcast episode 697, where we ask the best trivia on the Internet. Round 1. Category: All Things Golden 1: In a fable, a farmer discovers that this bird lays golden eggs. a hen (or a goose). 2: The American Society of Civil Engineers chose this landmark as one of the 7 wonders of the modern world. the Golden Gate Bridge. 3: Happy golden anniversary! Congratulations on this many years of marriage. 50. 4: According to the AKC, in 2013 it was the third most popular breed of dog. golden retriever. 5: In Exodus 32 he fashions a golden calf. Aaron. Round 2. Category: Beverages 1: This brand's Cranberry Juice Cocktail first appeared in 1933. Ocean Spray. 2: Alpine mountains appear on the label of this ConAgra brand of hot cocoa. Swiss Miss. 3: Back in 1898 a guy named Edward created this biting "olde tyme" root beer. Barq's. 4: This juice brand calls itself "100% pure squeezed Florida sunshine". Tropicana. 5: This soft drink once used the slogan "It'll tickle yore innards". Mountain Dew. Round 3. Category: Lewis Or Clark 1: In 1982 Barney Clark got the first permanent, completely artificial one of these organs, the Jarvik-7. a heart. 2: Between 1981 and 1991 he won 65 consecutive long jump competitions. Carl Lewis. 3: In 1994 James H. Clark co-founded this company known for its Navigator web browser. Netscape. 4: Chemist Gilbert Lewis suggested that a chemical bond involves 2 atoms sharing a pair of these, as in a covalent bond. electrons. 5: This pen name was made by Latinizing the author's 1st 2 names, reversing their order and then translating them back to English. Lewis Carroll. Round 4. Category: Quotes/ Magazines 1: In a song by The Temptations: "Papa was a blank blank ". rollin' stone. 2: The movie "Network": "I'm as blank as hell, and I'm not going to take this anymore!". mad. 3: Ecclesiastes: "To every thing there is a season, and a blank to every purpose under heaven". time. 4: Alcuin: "The voice of the blank is the voice of God". people. 5: The mirror from Disney's "Snow White": "Lips red as the rose, hair black as blank ". ebony. Round 5. Category: Put On Your Disco Shoes 1: This group with a construction worker, cop, G.I., cowboy and Indian sang "San Francisco (You've Got Me)". The Village People. 2: "I'm Your Boogie Man" by KC and this group hit No. 1, but their "Boogie Shoes" could only dance to No. 35. the Sunshine Band. 3: To everything there is a season: the first Top 40 hit for this "Queen of Disco" was "Love To Love You Baby". Donna Summer. 4: The Trammps wanted to "burn that mother down" with this song from "Saturday Night Fever". "Disco Inferno". 5: Don't "Freak Out", but Queen's "Another One Bites The Dust" has a bass line similar to "Good Times" by this "stylish" band. Chic. Thanks for listening! Come back tomorrow for more exciting trivia! Special thanks to https://blog.feedspot.com/trivia_podcasts/

Transport Topics
Transport Topics (Jan. 6, 2023)

Transport Topics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 2:23


The Federal Highway Administration announced $2.1 billion in first-round grants to repair economically significant bridges. The Large Bridge Grants were dedicated to the Brent Spence Bridge connecting Cincinnati and northern Kentucky, the Golden Gate Bridge in California, the Gold Star Memorial Bridge in Connecticut and four bridges that cross the Calumet River on the south side of Chicago. The Biden administration also said it has plans to make available $40 billion in future years for improvements to thousands of bridges.

La Diez Capital Radio
Informativo (05-01-2023)

La Diez Capital Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 22:03


Informativo de primera hora en el programa El Remate de La Diez Capital Radio.Hoy se cumplen 317 días del cruel ataque e invasión de Rusia a Ucrania. Hoy es Jueves 5 de enero de 2023. Buenos días Ucrania. Día de la Nata Montada. La crema batida o también conocida como nata montada tiene su día en enero. Se celebra el 5 de enero, víspera de Reyes. Precisamente esta nata montada puede ser un ingrediente del riquísimo roscón de reyes que se consume por estas fechas. 1813: Las Cortes de Cádiz suprimen el Tribunal de la Inquisición tanto en España como en América. 1914: En Estados Unidos, la Ford Motor Company anuncia el horario de ocho horas laborales y el salario mínimo de 5 dólares diarios a cada trabajador. Tal día como hoy, 5 de enero de 1933, comienza a construirse en San Francisco (California, EE.UU.) el Golden Gate Bridge, cuya construcción finalizará en abril de 1937 y durante unos años se convertirá en el puente colgante más largo del mundo, con una longitud de 1.280 metros. Años más tarde, 5 de enero de 1945, con Japón perdiendo la guerra, nació una nueva generación de pilotos llamada kamikaze los cuales necesitaban poco entrenamiento y podían hacer un gran daño al tomar aviones llenos de explosivos y estrellarlos contra barcos. En Okinawa, hundieron 30 barcos y mataron a casi 5.000 estadounidenses. 1977: En España se suprime el Tribunal de Orden Público, se crea la Audiencia Nacional y se deroga el decreto ley sobre el terrorismo. 2002: En Japón, científicos anuncian la creación del primer ojo artificial. 2009: Se realiza en el Parque de Atracciones Tibidabo de Barcelona (España) el último viaje en la antigua montaña rusa, construida en 1961. Santos Telesforo, Eduardo, Apolinaria y Emiliana. Mapa de la guerra. El líder de Wagner reconoce que Bajmut está suponiendo un gran desgaste. Nueva ola de huelgas en el Reino Unido. De los ferrocarriles a la sanidad, el malestar se extiende. España exige el certificado COVID en origen a los viajeros procedentes de China. Las operadoras de transporte comprobarán que se dispone de este certificado en el embarque. A la llegada, serán los agentes sanitarios españoles quienes revisen que el viajero dispone de vacunación o prueba negativa. Ayer moría el sindicalista Nicolás Redondo, histórico líder de UGT, a los 95 años. El 18 de abril de 1976 fue elegido secretario general de la UGT en el 30 Congreso de la organización Redondo luchó por los derechos de las personas trabajadoras, la mejora del empleo y la igualdad en la sociedad española. El 35% de las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero se producen por desplazamientos en el interior de las ciudades, y sobre España ya pesa una condena del Tribunal de Justicia de la Unión Europea por incumplimiento sistemático de la norma de calidad del aire. En este contexto, desde el 1 de enero de 2023 todos los municipios de más de 50.000 habitantes deben contar con una zona de bajas emisiones (ZBE) que limite la circulación a los vehículos menos ecológicos. Comenzado el año, solo un puñado de ellos la tienen y varios ayuntamientos han denunciado dificultades en su aplicación. El Aiem cierra el año con una recaudación récord y diversos sectores exigen su revisión. Esta tasa, que grava los productos importados para proteger a la industria local, es, según los comerciantes e importadores, una de las razones del elevado precio de la cesta de la compra en las islas. Román Rodríguez culpa a las grandes superficies. Entre 2020 y 2022, el Aiem aportará a las arcas publicas del Gobierno de Canarias un 50% más de ingresos. A falta de los datos de noviembre y diciembre, se prevé que 2022 cierre con una recaudación récord, que rondará los 225 millones de euros frente a los 205 con los que cerró el año anterior. La Agencia Tributaria (AEAT) ha devuelto a fecha de este miércoles 4 de enero un total de 445 millones de euros de la Renta 2021 a 663.857 contribuyentes de Canarias, lo que supone un 1,17% más que en igual fecha de 2022. El Gobierno garantiza más agilidad tras asumir las competencias de Costas. La patronal turística se muestra «esperanzada» ante las transferencias y critica la «injerencia» del Estado desde 2018. Canarias, aún un 7% por debajo de los niveles preCOVID de llegada de turistas. 11 primeros meses de 2022 las comunidades que más turistas han recibido son: Cataluña (14,0 millones), Illes Balears (13,1 millones) y Canarias (11,1 millones). Las empresas del transporte escolar decretan un paro patronal y no atenderán las rutas a los centros públicos de Canarias el próximo lunes día 9. La huelga ha sido convocada por la Federación de Empresarios del Transporte (FET) en protesta por el retraso que atribuyen a la Consejería de Educación en los compromisos económicos que había adquirido con el sector. Canarias, una de las regiones que más dinero público da a sus universidades. El último informe de la Fundación Conocimiento y Desarrollo establece que el Archipiélago es la tercera región donde mayor esfuerzo público se realizó para financiar a estas instituciones académicas. «Antes del verano tomaremos medidas contra la subida de los precios aéreos». «Las guaguas gratis pueden costar 120 millones, en vez de 81, pero Madrid es consciente», asegura el consejero de Obras Públicas, Transportes y Vivienda. Solo cinco de cada cien canarios en riesgo de pobreza cobran la ayuda de inserción. El número de beneficiarios aumenta más de un 70% en la legislatura pero las Islas siguen en el furgón de cola. El Carnaval de Santa Cruz de Tenerife 2023: arrancará el 20 de enero. La gran fiesta chicharrera se alargará hasta el 26 de febrero. Disco publicado el 5 de enero de 1959 - FRANK SINATRA - 'Come Fly With Me'

La Diez Capital Radio
El Remate; hoy llegan los Reyes Magos (05-01-2023)

La Diez Capital Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 141:50


Programa de actualidad con mucha información, formación y entretenimiento con Humor británico, presentado y dirigido por Miguel Angel gonzález Suárez. www.ladiez.es - Informativo de primera hora en el programa El Remate de La Diez Capital Radio.Hoy se cumplen 317 días del cruel ataque e invasión de Rusia a Ucrania. Hoy es Jueves 5 de enero de 2023. Buenos días Ucrania. Día de la Nata Montada. La crema batida o también conocida como nata montada tiene su día en enero. Se celebra el 5 de enero, víspera de Reyes. Precisamente esta nata montada puede ser un ingrediente del riquísimo roscón de reyes que se consume por estas fechas. 1813: Las Cortes de Cádiz suprimen el Tribunal de la Inquisición tanto en España como en América. 1914: En Estados Unidos, la Ford Motor Company anuncia el horario de ocho horas laborales y el salario mínimo de 5 dólares diarios a cada trabajador. Tal día como hoy, 5 de enero de 1933, comienza a construirse en San Francisco (California, EE.UU.) el Golden Gate Bridge, cuya construcción finalizará en abril de 1937 y durante unos años se convertirá en el puente colgante más largo del mundo, con una longitud de 1.280 metros. Años más tarde, 5 de enero de 1945, con Japón perdiendo la guerra, nació una nueva generación de pilotos llamada kamikaze los cuales necesitaban poco entrenamiento y podían hacer un gran daño al tomar aviones llenos de explosivos y estrellarlos contra barcos. En Okinawa, hundieron 30 barcos y mataron a casi 5.000 estadounidenses. 1977: En España se suprime el Tribunal de Orden Público, se crea la Audiencia Nacional y se deroga el decreto ley sobre el terrorismo. 2002: En Japón, científicos anuncian la creación del primer ojo artificial. 2009: Se realiza en el Parque de Atracciones Tibidabo de Barcelona (España) el último viaje en la antigua montaña rusa, construida en 1961. Santos Telesforo, Eduardo, Apolinaria y Emiliana. Mapa de la guerra. El líder de Wagner reconoce que Bajmut está suponiendo un gran desgaste. Nueva ola de huelgas en el Reino Unido. De los ferrocarriles a la sanidad, el malestar se extiende. España exige el certificado COVID en origen a los viajeros procedentes de China. Las operadoras de transporte comprobarán que se dispone de este certificado en el embarque. A la llegada, serán los agentes sanitarios españoles quienes revisen que el viajero dispone de vacunación o prueba negativa. Ayer moría el sindicalista Nicolás Redondo, histórico líder de UGT, a los 95 años. El 18 de abril de 1976 fue elegido secretario general de la UGT en el 30 Congreso de la organización. Redondo luchó por los derechos de las personas trabajadoras, la mejora del empleo y la igualdad en la sociedad española. El 35% de las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero se producen por desplazamientos en el interior de las ciudades, y sobre España ya pesa una condena del Tribunal de Justicia de la Unión Europea por incumplimiento sistemático de la norma de calidad del aire. En este contexto, desde el 1 de enero de 2023 todos los municipios de más de 50.000 habitantes deben contar con una zona de bajas emisiones (ZBE) que limite la circulación a los vehículos menos ecológicos. Comenzado el año, solo un puñado de ellos la tienen y varios ayuntamientos han denunciado dificultades en su aplicación. El Aiem cierra el año con una recaudación récord y diversos sectores exigen su revisión. Esta tasa, que grava los productos importados para proteger a la industria local, es, según los comerciantes e importadores, una de las razones del elevado precio de la cesta de la compra en las islas. Román Rodríguez culpa a las grandes superficies. Entre 2020 y 2022, el Aiem aportará a las arcas publicas del Gobierno de Canarias un 50% más de ingresos. A falta de los datos de noviembre y diciembre, se prevé que 2022 cierre con una recaudación récord, que rondará los 225 millones de euros frente a los 205 con los que cerró el año anterior. La Agencia Tributaria (AEAT) ha devuelto a fecha de este miércoles 4 de enero un total de 445 millones de euros de la Renta 2021 a 663.857 contribuyentes de Canarias, lo que supone un 1,17% más que en igual fecha de 2022. El Gobierno garantiza más agilidad tras asumir las competencias de Costas. La patronal turística se muestra «esperanzada» ante las transferencias y critica la «injerencia» del Estado desde 2018. Canarias, aún un 7% por debajo de los niveles preCOVID de llegada de turistas. 11 primeros meses de 2022 las comunidades que más turistas han recibido son: Cataluña (14,0 millones), Illes Balears (13,1 millones) y Canarias (11,1 millones). Las empresas del transporte escolar decretan un paro patronal y no atenderán las rutas a los centros públicos de Canarias el próximo lunes día 9. La huelga ha sido convocada por la Federación de Empresarios del Transporte (FET) en protesta por el retraso que atribuyen a la Consejería de Educación en los compromisos económicos que había adquirido con el sector. Canarias, una de las regiones que más dinero público da a sus universidades. El último informe de la Fundación Conocimiento y Desarrollo establece que el Archipiélago es la tercera región donde mayor esfuerzo público se realizó para financiar a estas instituciones académicas. «Antes del verano tomaremos medidas contra la subida de los precios aéreos». «Las guaguas gratis pueden costar 120 millones, en vez de 81, pero Madrid es consciente», asegura el consejero de Obras Públicas, Transportes y Vivienda. Solo cinco de cada cien canarios en riesgo de pobreza cobran la ayuda de inserción. El número de beneficiarios aumenta más de un 70% en la legislatura pero las Islas siguen en el furgón de cola. El Carnaval de Santa Cruz de Tenerife 2023: arrancará el 20 de enero. La gran fiesta chicharrera se alargará hasta el 26 de febrero. Disco publicado el 5 de enero de 1959 - FRANK SINATRA - 'Come Fly With Me' - Sección de actualidad con Humor inteligente en el programa El Remate de la Diez Capital radio, con el periodista palmero y socarrón, José Juan Pérez Capote. - Entrevista en el programa El Remate de la Diez Capital radio al Portavoz adjunto del PP en el Cabildo de Tenerife, Manuel Fernández. - Entrevista en el programa El Remate de La Diez Capital radio a Rafael Zamora, director cientifico Fundación Loro Parque.Loro Parque Fundación ha conseguido salvar a dos nuevas especies de loro del peligro de extinción: el lorito de Fuertes, de Colombia, y la cotorra margariteña, de Venezuela. Así, ambos se unen a una lista que ya alcanzan las doce especies rescatadas de su desaparición. El lorito de Fuertes, originario de los Andes colombianos, y la cotorra margariteña, de las costas venezolanas, se encontraban en peligro crítico de extinción por la caza furtiva y la destrucción de sus hábitats. Loro Parque Fundación, junto a la organización Provita y la Fundación Vida Silvestre, han cambiado su categoría de la Lista Roja de Especies Amenazadas de la UICN. La entidad canaria ha apoyado técnica y financieramente la conservación del lorito de Fuertes con más de 950.000 dólares. Gracias al trabajo en Colombia con organizaciones de conservación y la alianza con Fundación Vida Silvestre, se ha logrado mejorar las condiciones del hábitat de este ejemplar, conocer mejor su biología y sensibilizar a las poblaciones locales en la protección del patrimonio natural. En Venezuela, las investigaciones realizadas con Provita, así como la presencia en el campo de ecoguardianes, ha permitido vigilar los nidos de la cotorra margariteña y poner freno a la acción de los cazadores furtivos. La implantación de nidos artificiales ha sido esencial para dar más oportunidades de reproducción a esta especie en las zonas deforestadas y aumentar sus poblaciones de forma exponencial.Desde hace más de dos décadas, Loro Parque Fundación reproduce esta especie con éxito, actuando como red de seguridad para la especie en la naturaleza y aportando ejemplares nacidos bajo cuidado humano que permiten erradicar su demanda. “La cría bajo cuidado humano, la protección del medio y concienciar a las poblaciones locales son la única vía para la protección de estas especies”, reivindica Rafael Zamora, director científico de Loro Parque Fundación. Con el rescate de estos ejemplares, Loro Parque Fundación ha conseguido añadir a su lista de especies salvadas a un total de doce especies de loros, entre los que también se encuentran el periquito pechigrís y el guacamayo de Lear. Este balance se presentó en la décima edición del Congreso Internacional Papagayos de Puerto de la Cruz, en Tenerife, donde se anticiparon nuevas líneas de acción como proyectos de campo, creación de nidos artificiales, labores de marcaje y actividades de concienciación. - Charlamos de lo humano y lo divino... en el programa El Remate de la Diez Capital radio con el independentista, Alberto Díaz Jiménez.

The Kitchen Sisters Present
205-Silent Echoes: Sound Artist Bill Fontana —The Bells of Notre Dame

The Kitchen Sisters Present

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 15:25


Since the devastating 2019 fire at Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, the ringing of the cathedral's bells has ceased. Sound artist, Bill Fontana, known for his sound sculptures of Golden Gate Bridge, temple bells in Kyoto, and trees in Sequoia National Forest, creates a new work giving voice to the silenced bells of Notre Dame. To create his new work, Silent Echoes, Fontana attached seismic accelerometers—sensors designed to detect vibrations—to each of its ten bells of Notre Dame. As the bells reverberate in response to the ambient sounds of Paris—rain, the calls of birds, the noise of the street—the live feed is transmitted to a series of speakers at the Centre Pompidou creating a haunting, immersive sound sculpture. Silent Echoes debuted at the Centre Pompidou in June, where, on the fifth floor terrace of the museum, visitors stood awash in the acoustics of the bells, with the towers of Notre Dame in view just across the Seine. Alisa Carroll of the podcast Alcôve interviewed Bill Fontana in San Francisco and Davia Nelson spoke with him in Paris before the opening of the exhibition. This story was produced by Jim McKee.  Sound design and mixing by Jim McKee. Special thanks to Alisa Carroll and Jim McKee for sharing this piece with The Kitchen Sisters Present. The Kitchen Sisters Present is produced by The Kitchen Sisters (Nikki Silva & Davia Nelson) with Brandi Howell and Nathan Dalton. For more info and stories visit kitchensisters.org The Kitchen Sisters Present is part of Radiotopia from PRX - a curated network of independent, creator owned podcasts.

The Steven Sulley Study Podcast
Suicide Survivor Kevin Hines On What It Takes To Come Back From The Darkest Moments In Life

The Steven Sulley Study Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 50:09


No one knows more about what it takes to pull yourself back from life's darkest moment. In 2000, Kevin Hines was moments away from death, after climbing the Golden Gate Bridge and jumping in order to commit suicide. Since pulling himself back from the brink, Kevin has devoted his life to helping others to realise their potential, acting as speaker and author, and instilling hope and healing to bruised souls around the world. In this very special episode, Kevin sits down with Steven to share his incredible story. KEY TAKEAWAYS No child should have to go through serious trauma and poverty. Those that do seem to spend a lifetime trying to overcome the scars of their pasts. not everyone is born resilient, but if you can learn to control the things within your grasp, and hold on to gratitude, even as the pain bites at you, then you can learn to survive. Being alive at all is such a wondrous elusive happenstance. When you're here, you should relish every moment and count yourself lucky. BEST MOMENTS 'I lost my mind at the age of seventeen and a half' 'Kool Aid, sour milk and Coca Cola was my first diet' 'If I can control it, and hold gratitude inside my pain, then I can survive it, and so can anyone else' 'To say that I am lucky to be alive is an understatement' VALUABLE RESOURCES The Steven Sulley Study        Kevin Hines - https://www.kevinhinesstory.com ABOUT THE HOST The Steven Sulley Study is my take on success. My view is you should have multiple focuses to be a well-rounded individual. Success shouldn't be just one thing like money, for example, it should also consist of a healthy fit lifestyle and thriving relationships. As a person who has made a success in life and also made huge cock-ups I feel I can offer suggestions and tips on how to become successful or at least start your pursuit. My 'Study' has taken resources from reading and education plus being around, my perception, of successful people and I, know a lot of successful people from all walks of life. My 'Study' coming from my experiences in business, investing, sales (my core background), training, boxing and education has enabled me to become well rounded and successful and I will help you in these key areas too. CONTACT METHOD InstagramSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dreaming Out Loud With Morgan T Nelson
175. Surviving The Golden Gate Bridge Suicide Attempt With Kevin Hines

Dreaming Out Loud With Morgan T Nelson

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 25:27


“Pain is universal and inevitable. Suffering is optional, it's a choice.” -Kevin HinesHave you ever thought about the very reason why people commit suicide?How can you assist someone you know who is seriously depressed?In this episode, we'll discuss with Kevin his wonderful story of hope, healing, and recovery, as well as how to create a stronger mind so that we may always be in charge of our thoughts and actions. He will also explain to us how the words we use to influence people can either make or break their lives.Kevin Hines is a storyteller. He is a best-selling author, global public speaker, and award-winning documentary filmmaker. In the year 2000, Kevin attempted to take his life by jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge. Many factors contributed to his miraculous survival, including a sea lion that kept him afloat until the Coast Guard arrived. Kevin now travels the world sharing his story of hope, healing, and recovery while teaching people of all ages the art of wellness and the ability to survive pain with true resilience. His compelling story has touched diverse, global audiences within colleges and universities, high schools, corporations, clergy, the military, clinicians, the health and medical communities, law enforcement organizations, and various industries. Thousands have communicated to Hines that his story helped save their lives. He has reached millions with his story. Kevin believes in the power of the human spirit and in the fact that you can find the ability to live mentally well. His mantra: “Life is a gift; that is why they call it the present. Cherish it always.”Check out these episode highlights:04:22 - What do people who commit suicide truly desire04:52 - What kind of pain is worse than physical pain05:53 - Why choose the Golden Gate Bridge06:48 - Animals have emotions12:08 - Why do people fear telling their truth14:33 - It's all about perspective when you get a suicidal thought17:18 - A small act of compassion can alter someone's course22:08 - How can we approach someone who is deeply suffering with greater awareness and better questionsKnow more about Kevinhttps://www.kevinhinesstory.com/Follow Kevin on Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/kevinhinesstory/Subscribe to his Youtube Channelhttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYZeM7MIkXtU_--r9BlDTQAJoin the Dream Out Loud Facebook Communityhttps://bit.ly/2RSBKVFFollow me on Instagram herewww.Instagram.com/morgantnelson

Redskins Talk
POSTGAME POD: Commanders get crushed by 49ers while Carson Wentz is subbed in late over Taylor Heinicke

Redskins Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 41:00


JP Finlay, Mitch Tischler and Pete Hailey have a blowout loss but, more crucially, a quarterback change to discuss. During their time together, the hosts give their reactions to Ron Rivera pulling Taylor Heinicke for Carson Wentz and, honestly, are mostly in agreement that it was the proper call. After walking through that major decision, they bounce between thoughts on the shellacking in San Fran, analysis on how Chase Young looked in his season debut and a conversation about whether Washington can revive its playoff hopes one more time. Lastly, JP talks to Terry McLaurin one-on-one, and in that interview, the star explains how he'll handle the QB change and also tells a charming story about something he did for a young fan pregame. If you like podcasts where JP educates Pete about the Golden Gate Bridge and there's a breakdown of Wentz's unique wardrobe, then this is the episode for you.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The DeMaio Report
The Golden Gate Bridge Project

The DeMaio Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 33:52


DeMaio on the outrageous rising cost on the Golden Gate Bridge suicide prevention net. It's now up to $400 million.

Outside Lands San Francisco
484: MacArthur Tunnel

Outside Lands San Francisco

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 40:00


Nicole and Arnold dig into the history of the MacArthur Tunnel, which connects the west side to the Golden Gate Bridge by running through the Presidio.

Spiritual Dope
Greg Wieting: A Healer For Those Who Can't Think or Talk It Out

Spiritual Dope

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 52:01


Greg Wieting is a healer who helps leaders and entrepreneurs heal the anxiety, depression, chronic pain, and trauma they can't think or talk their way out of. He is the founder of PRISMA – a framework overlaying trauma, neuroscience, and energy medicine with somatic and mindfulness-based practices. He developed this while healing his own anxiety, depression, and chronic pain rooted in trauma. This included unraveling a severe spinal curvature and standing three inches taller today! Over the last two decades, Greg has helped thousands heal through his one-on-one practice and has certified hundreds of healthcare professionals in his methodology. His new online course and community now make healing practical and accessible to all. www.gregwieting.com Introduction to this episode. 0:00 Introduction to Greg Whiting. 0:43 How the word “healing crisis” is often used to describe mental illness. 8:53 Mapping un-met needs. 13:10 When symptoms start to creep up, it's time to start paying attention. 19:25 Who am I? -. 23:25 The course is accessible to anyone that wants to commit to healing. 29:58 The process of mainstreaming healing in society. 33:54 The seven lessons of chaos and healing. 40:20 What does it mean to live in the present moment? 46:22 Intro Guy 0:00 Your journey has been an interesting one up to hear you've questioned so much more than those around you. You've even questioned yourself as to how you could have grown into these thoughts. Am I crazy? When did I begin to think differently? Why do people in general, you're so limited thought process Rest assured, you are not alone. The world is slowly waking up to what you already know inside yet can't quite verbalize. Welcome to the spiritual dough podcast, the show that answers the question you never even knew to ask, but knew the answers to questions about you this world the people in it? Most importantly, how do I proceed? Now moving forward? We don't even have all the answers, but we sure do love living in the question. Time for another hit of spiritual dub with your host Brandon Handley. Let's get right into today's episode. Brandon Handley 0:43 Hey there spiritual dope. I'm on here today with Greg Wieting. He is a healer who helps leaders and entrepreneurs heal the anxiety, depression, chronic pain and trauma they can't think or talk their way out of. He is the founder of Prisma a framework overlaying trauma, neuroscience and energy medicine with somatic and mindfulness based principles. He developed this while healing his own anxiety, depression and chronic pain rooted in trauma. This included unraveling a severe spinal curvature and standing three inches taller today. Over the last two decades, Greg has helped 1000s Heal through his one on one practice and AS certified hundreds of healthcare professionals in his method methodology, his new online course and community now make healing practical and accessible to all Greg, thanks for being on today. Greg Wieting 1:32 Hey, Brad, good to be here. Brandon Handley 1:35 Absolutely. So, you know, which Greg and I were talking a little bit he's out in San Francisco for those that have tuned into the podcast. That's that's why that's, that's where I was born. Right. So it's always it's always fun to talk to people in San Francisco. Greg, when you drove into San Francisco, like how cool is like that scene like when you see like all the houses up on the hills are all like different colors. It's just like an interesting, really, how fun was that? Greg Wieting 2:01 Yeah, my first trip to San Francisco was probably back in 99 2000. I was living in Seattle at the time and magical coming over the Golden Gate Bridge. It's nice before you even get into the city coming over the bridge, the way the city's lit up at the late afternoon. It almost looks all white kind of like flushed in the late day sun and it's so just looks like this like glowing city. And then yeah, once you get into the neighborhoods, you see all the vibrant colors. And yeah, just lots of character. Lots of charm. So much Brandon Handley 2:31 fun, so much fun. Well, Greg, I usually like to start this off with the whole idea that you and I are simply conduits for universal life energy, and it's expressing itself through us, hopefully, in this podcast for somebody's greatest and highest good. And it can only be expressed right now on this podcast in this moment, what's common through you today that you feel like you should be sharing? Greg Wieting 2:56 Yeah, well, I think, you know, I reached out because that's, that's the essence of how I work with my clients. And that's the essence, the foundation of just my own healing practice, really getting out of the getting out of our way, right, letting go fixed attachment to outcome, letting go of rigid agendas that are coming from kind of the limitations of the mind opening up to something more universal. I think that's where, you know, as much as I try to demystify healing, and make it really practical and grounded, you know, and we open up to that universal connection. That's where the magic happens. Brandon Handley 3:33 That's really cool. I love the idea, right? Have these rigid agendas, right, kind of letting go and letting it happen? Talk to me a little bit about that. Because that's the first time I've heard it pronounced that way. But as I kind of walk through and try it, and I struggle, sometimes talking with people, like, you know, you got to let go of like, the linearity and just kind of let it happen. And they're like, What do you mean by that? Like, I don't know, but that's how it works. So like, you know, the way you pronounce it, the way you announce it, though, rigid agenda is like, what's a rigid agenda? And how can we let go of that? Greg Wieting 4:08 Yeah. You know, and it's, it's a tricky, nuanced thing, because I think we probably come to healing because we want something right, we probably come to healing because we have some pain point that we want to resolve, or we have some question that we want answered. You know, and so there's there is this idea that perhaps there's something that needs to be fixed or resolved. So I want to honor that we, you know, sometimes that tendency to have a fixed rigid agenda is actually what gets us to a healing path in the first place. And it's also going to be what gets in the way. I guess I can just share, you know, in terms of, you know, the curve and my spine. You know, I don't actually practice yoga as much as I used to I've kind of do other things physically. We right now. But, you know, when I used to get on my yoga mat, and I felt like, Oh, I just want to get in like a deep back bends, because you know, I'm just really feeling the tension around the curve of my spine, you know, so if I had this fixed agenda to actually get into a deeper backbend to open my sign to unravel my, you know, that curve, you know, it was like me coming out my body for kind of a violent place, because I actually wasn't accepting my body where it was. So, you know, the core of how I work. And you know, what I try to impart to those I work with is just a deep acceptance of what is and then that deep acceptance of what is, is when things can actually start to change, but not necessarily according to the plan that we have made up in our minds. Because healing is pretty nonlinear. It's not a direct, it's not a direct shot. Brandon Handley 5:52 Yeah. So I mean, I love that idea to write coming out coming out, you're coming out yourself, like almost in a violent way. And it's like, you will obey everything I throw at you invited, like, Well, maybe not today. Right? And not in the way that you think that it's going to. And as we as we talk about, like, I guess, linearity and and, and healing, right, so Greg, if I come to you, and I'm in pain, and something's going on, and like, you don't heal me, in that, like moment, then how, like, you know, what is the linearity aspect of it? Because that's how, like, you know, we see things on a timeline most most of us, right? And we don't see this kind of everything that goes this holistic kind of 360 view. So what does that look like? Greg Wieting 6:42 Yeah, well, for me, before I actually would bring anyone on to work with, I'd have a conversation, to manage expectations, and to let folks know that that's just not how I work, although many of my clients and students are going to see some shifts that are pretty tangible, you know, from the get go pretty upfront. That's not That's not how it works for everyone. Right? And, you know, actually, I kind of look at my work as actually helping people be with their pain, because how much of our life we've been running from our pain, have we been suppressing our pain? You know, and so we may suppress the emotional pain that that comes out as physical pain, right? So, for me, managing expectations, and you know, the, Brandon Handley 7:29 what's it look like? If I come into by coming to you for an appointment? Right? You know, what's that? What's that call? Or even that appointment gonna look like? Greg Wieting 7:36 Yeah, well, the first call is letting folks know, I mean, for me, when right now, when I'm working with clients, it's a nine or 12 month arc of transformation, not to say it takes nine or 12 months to get out of pain. But the deeper work that I'm committed, helping my clients get at, you know, we're looking at kind of resolving, you know, the wounding of, you know, early attachment wounds, and, you know, trauma patterns that have kind of calcified in the body, right, the subconscious unconscious mind, take up residence in the body, and it takes time to kind of understand how that has imprinted upon us in our beliefs and our behaviors. And so, kind of reverse engineering that is a process. So that initial conversation is, you know, saying, Hey, this is gonna be a process. And we may not, you know, surface any major breakthroughs. You know, in the first few sessions, it may take time there, you know, I found myself on kind of a trauma informed approach, which is, you know, slow and steady, you know, and safe and sustainable. Because I look at a lot of, you know, I think in this world, I've heard the word like, healing crisis. And I kind of look at that more as healthcare mismanagement where people are trying to force things to move and shift and heal too fast too soon. But Brandon Handley 8:53 yeah, Greg, I mean, we're not we're not we're not ones that like to wait around, right? Like, we want it. We want it. You know, we want it like our Netflix, right? We want it like our gigabit gigabit download speeds, right. So yeah, I love I love that kind of healing, healthcare mismanagement. So he says, Greg Wieting 9:10 Yeah, I mean, I used to hear that word healing crisis tossed around a bunch. And, you know, it's like, well, what's happened is that we've overtaxed the system in trying to heal it and trying to change it, which has then yeah, created this crisis, which I think I've seen people use that word healing crisis as if it's a good thing. And it's like, no, that's fair mismanagement that's lacking a trauma informed lens, where you're trying to move the system through a process that it's not ready to move through. So, you know, I think when it comes to healing trauma, trauma is usually the effect of something that was too much too soon, too fast that overwhelmed the system so we didn't have the capacity or the resources to be with it and metabolize it. So healing It lowing all of that down. Brandon Handley 10:02 Right. So been studying a lot of breathwork, recently, this past year, and one of the things they talk about is, I guess, in the animal kingdom, that animals, they kind of they watch them to go through something, they shake it off, right, they get rid of that energy, they there's like an energetic release of, of whatever it was that they just went through. And humans don't necessarily do that. Right. So as you were talking about, right, like this, this, this trauma, it gets stuck in us. And I love that saying, you know, the calcified aspect of it gets stuck in us and we don't release it, we don't address it, and it kind of builds up, right. is, you know, is that is that kind of how you're seeing it too. Real similar to that? Is that along the right lines, of how trauma kind of gets trapped inside of us. And, you know, just as as we're talking about that, right, is there you know, what can we do to address trauma, like, sooner? Right? How can we recognize that we just had a traumatic moment? And what can we do in those moments to heal so that it's not calcifying? Greg Wieting 11:20 Yeah. And I love that I used that imagery shoe I saw, you know, on one of the nature shows that Gizelle being chased by a cheetah, and the moment that Gazelle realized it was no longer in danger, it just does this ritual shaking, and then instantaneously goes back to just eating grass and just, you know, without engineering, right, right. We don't do that. So learning how to do that, but really just normalizing because what if a lot of our trauma response, our stress response, which then turns into the anxiety and the depression, what if it's actually a healthy response to a pretty unhealthy world, right? I want to remove the stigma out of mental health. I don't even like the word mental illness, because mental illness is often treated as a condition without actually noticing the trauma beneath it. So if you just support and heal the trauma, then, you know, these conditions tend to kind of fade away. Or, you know, the trouble with mental illness, you know, diagnosis is then creating an identity around the illness. And we're not our illness, just like we're not our trauma. And so, yeah, I think removing the stigma and normalizing it. And I think conversations like this helping us realize that Wait, what if we can slow down to kind of feel the impact that life has had on us, you know, just rushing over experience? That's all we're doing is rushing from one experience to another? So how do we just build that in, you know, still, a lot of my friends are creatives and just like, how do we just even build in a day of space for nothing? Right, right, like, just just creating space for nothing, so then we can kind of tap back into that creative impulse or that universal impulse. So I think, you know, making that a practice carving out time, you know, I think, self care, you know, I think there's, I think there's some idea of self care, you know, like going to the movies, getting a pedicure or self care is like self inquiry, right? Self Care, you know, doing this deeper, emotional attunement to our unmet needs, right? And mapping that and acknowledging what's Brandon Handley 13:37 an exercise like that Great, that sounds great. Like, I mean, how can I do that? Like, what's that look like? Greg Wieting 13:43 You know, I I wish I could reverse engineer to like, have like, three bullet points, right. And I'm trying to do bullet points. Now I have a whole module in my course around mapping unmet needs, right? Because so often we normalize our unmet needs. And then when we feel the impact of having unmet needs, we then think that it's something's wrong with us, right. And then we start to feel pathological and these unmet needs. And then we believe that we're not even worthy of having needs much less being supported or asking to ask you for what we want. So, you know, really, I talked about grieving the loss of what never was. So in early development, if we didn't have, you know, reliable, consistent care and support, you know, trauma isn't just like, you know, violence and abuse, it's also neglect, right? And so that that comes at a cost. And when that's, especially in early development, we normalize that and then we assume that we're not getting what we need because something's wrong with us. So recognizing that maybe nothing's wrong with me. I didn't get what I needed that had an impact on me understanding what that impact is. And then, and then working through that emotional impacts processing that, which then makes us more available to, you know, take care of our own needs, but then also get our needs met relationally. Brandon Handley 15:17 Right. And fine. And Greg, let's, let's talk a little bit about how you found yourself in this space, if I understand correctly, like you found your way into this space through like Reiki and energy work. Right. And that kind of opened up, open. Open up the healing space for you. Was that right? And my tracking there? Greg Wieting 15:34 Yeah, I, you know, with the curve of my spine, I used to live in severe chronic pain, anxiety, depression, and I had a friend who was a massage therapist, she offered me a massage, physical touch at the time was painful. I turned down a massage from a friend. And she said, Well, what about Reiki which I had never heard of, but I have great trust in her. And she said, You know, I don't even have to touch her can be very light touch. And I realized I found something I didn't even know I was looking for, you know, I could just feel you know, and I didn't even know what the nervous system was at that time. Sure, sure. You know, my whole body, just take an exhale and just soften. Brandon Handley 16:13 So you reacted, you reacted. You responded very well, to the Reiki. Greg Wieting 16:18 Yeah. So that first session, and we were living two and a half hours apart, this was when I was living in Montana at the time, but I had down to Missoula pretty often. So you know, have some sessions, but within a year, I'd moved to Seattle. And that's when I started to study Reiki and, you know, really commit to the practice. And then that kind of led me to the mindfulness and the meditation and just kind of building that led to kind of trauma and neuroscience and kind of connecting all these pieces that, you know, I felt were the pieces that helped me heal without having to, like, think or talk my way through it. Because, again, just tapping into a deeper current of my body's wisdom and letting that organizational intelligence, you know, that consciousness repattern you know, we can do that through kind of an expanded field of awareness. Not with like, the limitation of, you know, the mind. Brandon Handley 17:17 Right, I'm a fan. I'm not a Hawkins, Dr. Hawk, you know, it was a David Hawkins, right, who talks about talks about that, right, you know, I guess, you know, kind of getting responses from your body as like, you know, yes, no, right kind of questions be like, hey, was, you know, your body's gonna respond to certain things. And, and it will be right. And that's really kind of your subconscious guiding you through like a, you know, tapping into a field that you just normally don't feel like you're tapped into, but you're tapped into it at all times. Is that, is that right? Is that kind of? Greg Wieting 17:55 Yeah, you know, if like, if we get a paper cut, there is a healing mechanism that sends platelets and proteins and orchestrates all these biochemical transmissions right, like, we're not, not we're not thinking our way through that there's, you know, a deep wisdom in chiropractic, they call that innate wisdom, right? I practice energy medicine called Body Talk, which was developed by an osteopath and chiropractor. And so were consulting with the body's innate wisdom, to guide us to kind of Yeah, what is the priority to restore internal communication? So because of trauma or stress, you know, where's the nervous system short circuited wherever these breakdowns in communication, you know, occurred that need to be restored. And so we can actually consult the body's innate wisdom to repair these pathways that communication. You know, I love the imagery of the body being a symphony orchestra. And so if every issue and cell and bone and memory and belief and hormone, and neurotransmitter are all just players in that Symphony Orchestra, you know, we're expressing health, there's this musicality of being, you know, we're in this harmonic resonance. But over time, yes, stress, trauma, overwhelm, environmental toxins, toxins in our food, intergenerational patterns just start to accumulate short circuit that communication. So then, yeah, we're starting to make more noise than music. And so then that's when the symptoms start to creep up. And so that's the other piece, we can start to look at our symptoms as the body's, you know, the body's cry for help. And if we start to pay attention to the systems before they're screaming, but they're just like gentle whispers, we can usually stay on top of them before it becomes you know, too much. Brandon Handley 19:47 Right, right now, I love that. I mean, what's the example that you you would say to somebody? Like, you know, when you're talking about the symphony, and I always think about like, yeah, maybe they actually My kids just were did a band rehearsal, I was watching a band rehearsal, and my youngest one, like he hit the cymbal too soon, right? And you could tell like it was just off, right? So when can you when as the body's going, right? How can you tell like somebody's hit your cymbal, you're you're hitting a symbol to send something is off, not aligned that you should pay attention to? Greg Wieting 20:25 I might not answer. You know, because I how I work is non diagnostic and non prescriptive. So I'm done thoroughly determining what's off so much as my work is to actually see the doorway of possibility. So I think that's a big shift in healing, too. I think in healing, we're so organized around the pain or the problem. And so I train my mind to focus on the possibility. So I'm not as concerned with what's out a tune, I'm just looking for what's what's the input of energy that can then support just the recovery and the new expression of harmony to come online? Brandon Handley 21:10 Is that kind of how you work through your, your, your curvature? Greg Wieting 21:15 Yeah, so the first you know, and that curve unraveled, you know, over many years, but I'd say the first time I felt a significant shift, probably of almost an inch within one healing session, I was receiving Body Talk and Reiki which is all energy medicine. And, you know, the practitioner was balancing some hormones, just some beliefs from early childhood, to I don't even remember what else but you know, an example and body Takus, we may balance a certain memory to a certain belief tied into a certain muscle tied into a certain hormone. And it's like, once we've identified these different vibrations, that wants to come into a new harmonic resonance, that's going to have ripple effects on the entire energy matrix of the whole body, right, because if my entire body is the consciousness, and we start to create new harmonic resonance within different parts, then the whole system is going to kind of refresh and update to a new harmonic understanding of itself. And so instead of treating the curve of my spine, we harmonize emotions, beliefs, and memories. And then the curve in my sign, got to have a new understanding of itself, you know, and I look at the connective tissue, and the fascia is what really holds the muscles and the bones together, and the connective tissue and fascia is also where we store memories, and traumas and beliefs. So like, as we help the system start to metabolize that, and then the identities right, because if we're carrying a trauma around, and then we're carrying this victim consciousness in our body, it's gonna, you know, that's gonna affect our posture, right? If you see, you know, and you can just see different people walking down the street that some people maybe are carrying, like a very relaxed and empowered posture. Others, you know, are kind of, you know, guarded and hunched over and protection or fear, you know, so it's like the body, you know, we're carrying these costumes and masks that we can start to repattern through, you know, all of these tools, you know, mindfulness, just helping to reorient. So it's like, oh, I'm actually not the victim that my trauma might otherwise believe me to be right. So well, then who am I that, and I think healing affords us the space to kind of explore that, and then live into that. Brandon Handley 23:42 Right? So rather than coming in and telling me that I've got some serious issues, right, you're like, alright, Brandon, we're gonna work through, you know, you're you are however you are right now. Right? How would you kind of like to be? Or is, you know, here's a vision or a possibility for you and your life? Would you like to work towards that? Right? Is that is that kind of how it works out? And then you, you know, you do your modalities? Right, but I gotta assumes I've got to be open to it for it to work. Greg Wieting 24:18 Sure. I mean, yes or no, yeah. So my initial call clients, I do I want to get to, I want to get to have an understanding of what their goals are with the vision they hold for their future. And I want to hold that vision. And I think mapping our desires very powerful. I think there's a lot of people from desire, that I think trauma can actually suffocate or mute. So we want to, you know, name that and then I want to hold the vision of helping, you know, the body's innate wisdom live in the fulfilment of that. And, and yet, each session, I say, well, all right, I see what your vision is. But now let's just see where your body is. And let's meet The body, mind and spirit where they are. And then let's see what new possibility wants to emerge from where you are now. So we're not forcing you to this destination, we're just supporting your system to kind of find the the most harmonic resonance that's optimal for it in this moment to lead it on that trajectory. And yes, and no, in terms of having to have a belief in the work. I mean, yeah, most people need to be open to some sort of alternative to explore my type of work. And a lot of folks, I mean, when they're at the end of their rope, you know, I had a client who came and they were $100,000 in medical debt, and couldn't get out of bed for two years. So they're finally willing to give something else to try. So I kind of worked with a lot of mystery illness as well, because it's like, you know, and I have a team and naturopaths, and a psychiatrist that refer patients to me where it's like that we've done the treatments, we've done the medications, nothing's working, because actually, the trauma is, you know, stagnating the system. So it's not responding to these treatments. So, like, come in and work with the trauma. But I've had a few skeptics over the years, you know, I had a client when I lived back there. And he said, You know, I think what you're, what you do is bullshit. But, you know, I, you know, my wife has just been asking me to come for, you know, for months or years, however long it was. So here I am, finally. And then he became, you know, a really close, committed client, because, you know, and I throw up when I'm teaching this work that, you know, don't believe in anything I share or teach. It's like, have your own experience. Right. So I don't, I don't believe in energy medicine, I have an experience of energy medicine. Brandon Handley 26:47 Sure, not. Yep, that's enough. Yeah. Sure. Sure. There's a knowing, right. The different a different sense. And that 100%. And, yeah, I love that. Well, let's talk a little bit about this, what you have created Prisma. Let's talk a little bit about that. Greg Wieting 27:06 Yeah. So, you know, my path was not a direct path that wasn't linear, it wasn't easy. I found that a lot of traditional approaches to therapy, which I'm not knocking, therapy therapy has been a huge piece of my journey, which has been great. But I have found a lot of approaches to therapy, were ill equipped to address the impacts of trauma that were stored in my body physically, right. So as much as therapy helped me develop a really good intellectual framework and shift a lot of my intellectual framework around my wounding, that kind of wasn't able to uncover and resolve what was happening, you know, physically in terms of the chronic pain, and still then the residue that was still creating the anxiety and depression in my body. So, you know, that left me on this search. And so yeah, prisma is kind of a fusion of all the tools that I found to be most relevant on my on my path. And so the course itself is an eight week course that I consider like a roadmap for healing. And then the seven prisoner pillars, which I found are kind of like the essential drop pins on that map. So, you know, because I think we can go to healers or therapists for years, but kind of still feel blindfolded. Like, we don't really know where we're going. And not that not that we're all going to the same place. But I think there are some universal themes and the path of healing. And so I think those dropped hints really guide people through kind of an arc of transforming pain into purpose, because I think that deriving a sense of place and purpose is really imperative to just having a deeper sense of self, in this world, especially as the world becomes increasingly, you know, uncertain. You know, we be certain of our place in an uncertain world. And I think that, that is really valuable. So that's like the trauma and neuroscience in that map. And then I offer somatic and mindfulness based practices, which are kind of embedded in the map, but then I offer guided meditations to help us put into practice. So that's the mind training that, again, is helping us shift our identity from pain to, you know, the truth of who we are, and shifting from pain to possibility. And then the energy medicine component is Self Care Foundation training. So that's like, you know, even the map to drop pins to the meditations are kind of the GPS and then I look at the energy medicine as the vehicle so then you have the the right type of vehicle that you need for a lifetime of healing. So it's, you know, the combination of all the tools I have kind of, you know, accumulated over the years and how I've kind of pieced them all together in a meaningful way that now I can kind of impart that to others. Brandon Handley 29:58 That's awesome. So I mean, you know, Um, throughout your journey, you've, you've found these things that that have worked for you and with your clients. And you've, as a kind of a holistic practice and manner, put this together in a way that's, you know, practical and applicable for would you say this is open to like a layperson? Or does somebody need to have some experience before they did tap into this course? What What's the Who's this? Who's this directed to? Greg Wieting 30:24 Yeah, I mean, the course is accessible to anyone that wants to commit to healing. Yeah, I, I do you know, the later the, the more advanced trainings are for folks that want to practice energy medicine in a more professional context, but even they people can, you know, take that path. But yeah, this is an introductory course that makes energy medicine, you know, Cymatics, and mindfulness, all very practical from the get go. It's just really giving you have a robust set of tools, and that are complementary to other practices, or tools or treatments that you may be, you know, going through. So just helping you feel well supported along the way while equipped. Brandon Handley 31:08 And I love it right? You know, here's, here's, one of the things I'm just going to call out is like a burst of healers, and, you know, traumatic healers, and all these other people have come onto the scene, especially through COVID. Right? But um, you know, you didn't just get started in this over the past few years, can you and I bring that up, just because I want to make sure that people understand that you, you're well versed, you don't just teach this, like out of a basement to like, you know, a bunch of people smoking weed, and whatnot, like you go and you know, you're, you're hanging out, you're teaching this to healthcare professionals, right, what's the response been from health care professionals. Greg Wieting 31:56 So I find that healthcare professionals are coming to me for a couple of reasons, either to become more well versed in trauma informed care, they can better support their patients, their clients with trauma, you know, because, you know, if they don't have tools to work with trauma, then they may feel kind of ill equipped to really support, you know, their patients or clients the way that they would like to. Or the other piece of that is, you know, caregiver fatigue, or secondary trauma where healthcare professionals are taking on their patients trauma, and so they're both related, because if you know how to hold space and support other people in their trauma, you're less likely to take it on. And so, yeah, and I think as caregivers, you know, I think the work too, I came to this work 20 years ago, just to heal myself, you know, I had my I was working a whole nother world in the nonprofit world. And, you know, this was not my plan. So when people come to this work, just to heal themselves and be one of my students last night, it was like, wow, I can, I can really see myself sharing this with other people in the future. So but yeah, I always had it, but it is interesting, because I have had some students who've, you know, started training with me, and before the training has even started, they have the agenda to become the healer. And I, I always take pause with that. And it's like, not, that's an agenda. Like, that's an agenda. So if you're, if you're in it for that, like you're, you're many steps ahead, right? There. So I find that most people who are coming in all sincerity to support their themselves and to heal themselves, usually become the greatest valuable resources to support others in their healing because they've taken the time to do the work for themselves. Brandon Handley 33:54 Right. Right. Then they've, they've had the actual, you know, they've gone through it and know what it feels like to go through the process. Right. Greg Wieting 34:04 I mean, and that's so jump in. Yeah, go ahead. Well, I, I think there there's a beautiful thing about having healing, so accessible. But you know, I've heard stories I've seen it, you know, someone comes back from, you know, South America after having a plant medicine ceremony and either had this like life altering experience, and then now they're here to change everyone else's lives. And it's like, well, you know, you've gotten a glimpse of let's say, God, if that's your context, you've gotten a glimpse of consciousness or spirit or oneness, whatever that is for you. But it's like now that now it takes years and years to like let that become seeped into each and every cell to become seeped into like a deeper synthesis and understanding of self. So I think that's that's an important process that I think many skip you know, we Brandon Handley 34:59 well, you know, Look, I mean, the, the awakening? Yeah, so some of those, some of those experiences, you know, and especially if you are, you're having those for the first time, you know, they're mind blowing, right? Like, everybody wants to go shout from the top of them out and write about it, but what you're talking about is, you know, kind of the integration piece, right, embodying that and really, really let that come in and do become it. Right versus, you know, after the novelty wears off, right, like, where are you then? Are you still in it? Is that still how you feel? Is that still true for you? And how have you integrated that into your life? It's, it's funny, right? Like, for me, it's funny, because I just, you know, seeing so much of it now. And you know, 20 years ago, it was, nobody's really talking about it. Right? And everybody's like, don't talk about it. Right? Are people gonna give you crazy eye looks? And like, you know, you shouldn't, you shouldn't be talking about that. And everybody's out there talking about it now. And I think that's great. But learn more about it. And like you're saying embody it and become it. You know, Greg helped me out here write something and trauma, like, everywhere now. Is it is is everything trauma? Can anything be trauma? Is the word being overused? Where are you at? With that? Greg Wieting 36:33 Yes, I'd say yes. And no, I mean, I just like, I think as much as there may be so many people who are moving into the healing space after just one awakening before there's integration. That's also part of maybe the process of mainstreaming this work in this consciousness, so it becomes, you know, more of the fabric of society. And so, yeah, with that, is there some, can some of that be problematic and troublesome? Sure. And yet, I think that's just part of how we have a growing awareness. Right. And, and then I think, over time, there does need to be a refinement of that awareness and a nuance and, and a deeper understanding as opposed to just a buzzword. Because yeah, I mean, it's definitely become a buzzword now. And. And so, yeah, I think we need to look at that. And I think it's important to then set out, you know, who we're doing this type of work with, you know, having trusted companions along the way. Brandon Handley 37:40 I mean, to your point, right, like, I mean, I'd rather, you know, people talk about it, then continue to repress it right, and not express it in some way. Right. So that there is an openness around. Trauma, period. Right. Greg Wieting 37:57 And I think, you know, I think with, let's say, the me to movement, and just a lot of you know, if we bridge it out into, like, the political in this larger social cultural world, we're just, we're just seeing a lot more of the woundedness of the world, right, it's hard to not see it, where I think, you know, a few decades ago, you know, that was less the case, it was still kind of Hush, hush, don't talk about that put on, put on, you know, your best face, you know, your best Sunday dress and, and so, I think the gift in that is that when we can see the wound, we can begin to heal it. And so, Brandon Handley 38:43 yeah, that's what do you think's allowing for that, Greg? Greg Wieting 38:50 I mean, I can only speak from my own experience, I just think as time evolves, I just think, you know, there have been so many social political movements where, you know, people are finding that they can take up more residence and who they are, and own, you know, their lived experience and their identity and the impact that the larger world has had on, you know, the individual. And so, and, I think, finding a sense of community in that. So I think, you know, I think the lie of trauma is that we can't, and that we're isolated, and that we're alone, and I think the truth of healing is that we can, and were connected. And, and that's a powerful force. But I think that the more that that, that more that people have, you know, I think there's been a wave, you know, since the 60s and 70s, of like, you know, healing and consciousness, you know, happening. And so I think that's been happening kind of on the periphery, and I think enough of that has happened now that it's creating a consciousness that anything that's not matching that is just bubbling to the surface I just think it's hard to deny, you know, what is at the stage and our, our evolution, if you will? Brandon Handley 40:10 Yeah, no, I love it. I was just gonna kind of curious what how you saw saw that, right? Because I think again, we can all we see a little bit differently. And I appreciate that perception of it right. Greg Wieting 40:26 And you know, there's days where, you know, I look at the news and it's like, oh my gosh, the world is just coming to an end. And, and yeah, it's like if I kind of Mac, you know, one book I have my students read is the seven lessons of chaos, I'm forgetting the names of the authors. But, you know, it's like, out of tremendous chaos comes new order. So if I look at, like, every chaotic incident in my own life, and in my own healing path, you know, as I gathered more tools and resources and support those breakdowns turned into breakthroughs, which yielded a whole new organizational intelligence within my body, my mind and my spirit, you know, a whole new vibrational intelligence more aligned to like my connection to Source, universal energy, whatever that is for each of us. So you have Brandon Handley 41:17 a Do you remember, like, what one of those scenarios might be or an example of that. Greg Wieting 41:23 I mean, for me, I'm just the hero of like, just a break up, I went through that, you know, at the time felt earth shattering, but it's like, you know, the life I live. Now, after that, you know, 10 years later, is remarkably different, and probably wouldn't be possible in that old paradigm I was living, but prior to that, I couldn't have imagined anything different, right. So that's what brings us to our knees, it's gonna bring us to our center, and like, Colin Monroe is self. And so that's, you know, so, I mean, there's been many other iterations of that, you know, micro macro and my own journey. But, you know, if I'm just then just just to map the fact that I no longer live with chronic pain, anxiety, depression, you know, I'm three inches taller today than I was 25 years ago. That's crazy. It's like, I know that we can mind the goal of unresolved trauma, and there's like, so much wisdom, and just so much, there's just such a gift that we can glean from the deepest pain. So I'm holding the vision that that's what, you know, we're, we're sorting through on a much more collective level. And I think, you know, there are no guarantees from seven life lessons to chaos, right? Chaos, can spit out a new organizational intelligence, or it can make a big mess of things. And I think, and I think healing, you know, there are no guarantees in life, right. And so even the thought of healing can feel risky, you know, I was having this conversation with students last night, because, you know, we've we've learned how to survive by often keeping so much suppressed and bottled up inside, and it could feel really life or death, if we start to, you know, let some of that out until we realize that we have the resource, the tools and the capacity to kind of let that wave flow through us and then kind of return back to ourselves. Brandon Handley 43:21 So sure, not all of that imagery to what, um, you know, you said, you've got your kind of referral network where people come through to you what's not like an example of someone who was not able to get healed, but has had through success through what you offer. Greg Wieting 43:39 Yeah, um, let's see. Well, I mean, that one woman that I mentioned, I mean, for her, it was a bunch of autoimmune stuff, which was then tied into chronic pain, which was tied into fibromyalgia, which was turned into some neuropathy. Also tied into insomnia and brain fog, you know, so digestive issues, gut health, all of this stuff that you know, she was going to all these different specialists to treat everything as if it's separate. And this like, actually, why don't we just clear up the trauma that's been creating the residue that's not allowing your lifeforce energy to flow. And as we do that, then, you know, the connective tissue, which was storing all of your trauma, when we were as clear the trauma that the connective tissue really is functioning as like an information superhighway. So information can communicate to each and every cell or all the tissue tissues. And so, she's a great example of someone who was at the end of a rope, you know, literally in terms of her health and financially hadn't been able to get out of bed for two years. She's a perfect example. Brandon Handley 44:55 So kind of mentioned, you know, she's up and running now. Right? Is that what you're saying? You know, she was able to clear clear all that out how she was able to to restore, I guess her bodily network? Is that how you would kind of say it? Yeah, Greg Wieting 45:09 I like that imagery. Yeah, I think that, you know, again, our emotions or thoughts or muscles or tissues or cells, you know, the physiology, the anatomy, the consciousness, this should be a unified field of information that are, you know, completely in, in constant communication, and the trauma kind of short circuits, those communication pathways, so then nothing's functioning in relationship to anything else. And that's a big look at it. relationally with trauma, there's usually a break where we no longer feel safe in relationship to others, that we no longer feel safe in relationship to ourselves. So then that starts to get replicated within our bodies, where it's like, you know, our liver and our hearts and our liver and our gallbladder should be in communication with one another, they should know what the other is doing at all times, and why. And, you know, the traumas, like these different body parts and start to turn their backs on each other. Right, still doing their job, but they've lost an awareness that they're on the same team. So I start be working in contradiction to one another. Brandon Handley 46:22 Gotcha. Gotcha. Well, no, it's all it's all awesome, right? And I love it. So you, you, again, you provide a course where people can learn a lot of this information for themselves and try to apply it for their own well being. So I think that that's, I mean, that's fantastic. And my guess is, you know, they can go deeper on this with you as well. If they're so inclined. Is that true? Absolutely. Awesome. Well, Greg, I I've little spot here that, um, you know, I look at this podcast is kind of like spiritual speed dating, right? Somebody's gonna tune in, and they're gonna be like, You know what, I've had enough of Brandon and I'm ready to move on. Right. And so I got a couple of questions I'd like to ask you is you could be somebody's next spiritual speed date. All right, let's do it. You go for it. Okay, once that was up on you, good. Okay. Well, let's see spiritual Bachelor Number one, what does it mean to live in the present moment? Greg Wieting 47:24 I love the idea of totality, like putting my total energy, with what with what is. And so you know, being here with you, right. But I also like the idea of choiceless awareness. So like, I'm here with you, but you know, what, there's a lot of noise out on the street. So I'm also here with that. So I'm not trying to block that out. Because that's also part of my experience. So I'm just being here in the totality of my time with you the noise on the street. And so just Yeah, being with a total total energy with what is Brandon Handley 48:01 got it, not trying to push any one thing away, it's just allowing for it all to be. Greg Wieting 48:09 Yeah, cuz if I were to try to push that noise on the street away, which I can't do, but if I were to try to do that, that would imply force, effort and tension, which really be, you know, the antithesis of kind of a relaxed alert awareness. And I think relaxed, alert awareness is what yields presence. Brandon Handley 48:32 I like it. Question number two, how would God the universe, whatever you want to call it, want us to respond to aggression and terrorism? Greg Wieting 48:46 I mean, I think first and foremost, try to get people to a place of safety. So if you're in the moment of a, you know, an immediate threat, try to get everyone to safety. I think, you know, understanding, I think this is where we look at like the perpetuation of wounds, you know, the intergenerational patterns that hurt people, hurt people. So we know, I think we need to take a step back and like, kind of understand why this harm is being perpetuated, and kind of, you know, not get caught in cycles of perpetrator and victim and, you know, like, stepping back from all of that, because I think in some respects, we all play our part in those roles based on the the messiness of our own lived experience. Sure, and if we can take a step back from you know, from that there's a lot more space for understanding. Brandon Handley 49:51 Got it, not appreciate it. Appreciate. Great, who would you say is like kind of like your ideal client like who should be reaching out to you Greg Wieting 50:00 I mean, I, in my heart of hearts, I'm just here to help anyone that's in pain. Anyone that, you know, that mostly looks like is anxiety, depression, chronic pain. I can help people with autoimmune stuff. But anxiety, depression, chronic pain are my main wheelhouse. With that said, I do work with a lot of leaders. I'm really committed to you know, helping leaders not lead from a trauma response and perpetuate more cycles of harm. So, I look at, you know, an opportunity that as leaders, we can become vessels of healing. And so that there's something about that intersection of leadership and healing that really speaks to me to kind of create kind of a new, a new evolutionary leader that's leading from heart leading from courage leading from consciousness, you know, a place of deeper consciousness. Brandon Handley 50:55 Awesome. Now, thank you for that. Where should we send people to connect with you? Greg Wieting 51:01 Prisma method.com is where folks can jump right into the course. Greg whiting which is WIET ing.com You know, people can find my one on one work and access to the course. I'm also on Instagram, Greg underscore Whiting. So, yeah. Brandon Handley 51:21 Thanks for being on here with us. They really appreciate you coming on and definitely appreciate the work that you're doing. Greg Wieting 51:27 Thanks, Brandon. My pleasure. Transcribed by https://otter.ai

The Bobby Keefe Podcast
Episode 117 - A Love Letter To The Bay Area

The Bobby Keefe Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 81:08


I'm really in love with the Bay and after only 5 days I can see why people don't leave this area, I could stay forever too!! But before we dive fully into the trip I want to mention a few visualization applications I left out from Episode 116 (5:40). Then we get into it, starting with the Record Of The Week (11:36), which is just everything Larry June has made, into our experience seeing the Golden Gate Bridge from Hawk Hill at sunset (30:33). After recapping some more Bay experiences I get into seeing the Warriors (54:54), and being in the presence of Redwoods at Armstrong Redwoods State Natural Reserve (1:03:22). All this and lots more tune in to hear the full story! Love yall!!   https://www.rarewaterstudios.com https://www.instagram.com/bobby.keefe https://www.tiktok.com/@bobby.keefe

Phil Matier
Golden Gate Bridge suicide net taking longer and costing more than expected

Phil Matier

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 2:36


Contractors hired to install a suicide net on the Golden Gate Bridge say the agency in charge of the span is to blame for its installation not only running behind schedule, but also costing more than twice what was estimated.  For more, KCBS Radio's Bret Burkhart spoke with KCBS Insider Phil Matier. 

Words of the Witches: A Charmed Podcast
Chapter 56: COMICS #8 - Oh Henry

Words of the Witches: A Charmed Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 65:06


Paige saves the infant of a dead woman, and takes him home, much to Henry's dismay! Neena and Rennek start a Whitelighter/Elder killing spree, which leads to a battle atop the Golden Gate Bridge.  Read along with us: https://readallcomics.com/charmed-008/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/wordsofthewitches/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/wordsofthewitches/support

Dan Karaty If I'm Being Honest
Kevin Hines: Motivational Speaker - Suicide Prevention Advocate

Dan Karaty If I'm Being Honest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 44:51


Wearing his emotions on his sleeve, Kevin recounts doing the impossible, surviving a jump off the Golden Gate Bridge.  From the moment his hands left the railing, he regretted the leap, and has dedicated himself to preventing others from ever getting to that point.  There's so much we can do, all of us, starting with not shying away from the conversation.  

The Families of Character Show
How to Avoid Family Fights Over the Holidays

The Families of Character Show

Play Episode Play 56 sec Highlight Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 25:34


Don't let the holiday season stress you out when it comes to family gatherings. This episode gives you a new perspective on handling difficult conversations so you can avoid getting tangled up in an argument or fight. Consider a new way of approaching the former “dreaded” get-togethers! We've got you covered! Bonus content: 5 Self Care Tips that are guaranteed to best prepare you for managing things that are out of your control!  When it comes to the holidays, there are staggering statistics about loneliness and suicide. Odds are, you or someone you love has been impacted by suicide. I'm urging you to listen to this podcast episode hosted by Ed Mylett where he interviews Kevin Hines. Kevin tried to end his life by jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge when he was 19 years old - a jump that kills virtually everybody who attempts it. Miraculously Kevin survived. Kevin's story and his message will SAVE LIVES! This may be one of the most meaningful messages I've ever heard. Please listen and share! Join our community of like-minded parents who also want the best for themselves and their kids. Go to the Thrive Community by Families of Character, our private group. We can't wait to see you there!Current email subscribers receive weekly FREEBIES that accompany each podcast episode. If you're not on the list, subscribe here.Ready to dial up connection on the regular by sharing a common goal with your family, each month? Check out our premier product, Adventure Into Character, and get started today. 

Tokyo Alumni Podcast
Tokyo Alumni Podcast - Episode 81 - Steve Harris (ASIJ Faculty 1997-2014) - Former Faculty

Tokyo Alumni Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 46:46


There is no way Steve Harris could have predicted he would spend 43 years in Japan. Born in San Francisco, California, on Halloween in 1958, his family would soon cross the Golden Gate Bridge to Marin County, where they settled in the city of San Rafael. His first encounter with foreign language learning consisted of two terrible years of middle school German, a language he chose because his mother's side of the family immigrated to the San Francisco Bay Area after fleeing Nazi Germany. His talent for foreign languages would emerge during his years of study of Spanish at San Rafael High School, where at the age of 16 he would also meet his future wife, a Japanese girl from Tokyo who happened to be studying there for one year. The relationship prompted him to begin studying Japanese upon entering the University of California at Berkeley in 1976. He enjoyed his Japanese studies so much that he declared Japanese as his major and took advantage of Berkeley' study-abroad program to spend a year at ICU in Tokyo during his junior year. Though he spent his last year back at Berkeley, the appeal of Tokyo was so strong for him that he decided to try to find work there right after graduation in the summer of 1980. This led to a 17-year stint as a freelance translator and interpreter and then a 17-year stint as a Japanese language teacher at The American School in Japan. He left ASIJ in June of 2014 and has since been freelancing from his home, which is walking distance from the ASIJ campus. TIMESTAMPS 0:00 - 2:18 - Introduction 3:47 - 4:33 - "17 years" 4:34 - 7:38 - Being an ASIJ parent vs ASIJ faculty / why ASIJ? 7:39 - 13:22 - Is sending a child to an international school worth the cost? 13:23 - 17:00 - Working at ASIJ from 1997-2014 / Leaving ASIJ 17:01 - 22:09 - Living in Japan for 40+ years - moving to Japan in the 1970s 22:09 - 22:36 - How to become bilingual 22:36 - 27:34 - Memories of ASIJ 27:35 - 36:49 - Soccer - ASIJ Soccer & working as a Japan Futsal Director 36:50 - 39:53 - Creating the ASIJ "Tama Cup" 39:54 - 44:12 - ASIJ Squad of 23 players (mid-2000s-mid-2010s team) 44:13 -46:47 - What is coming up next

DVC Newscast by My DVC Points
N098 More DVC Member events and a new discount announced

DVC Newscast by My DVC Points

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 29:39


Shannon, Pete, and Vicky discuss Disney Vacation Club's announcement of a third event at the Top of the World Lounge - this time, a themed party called Bound to be Bad. A new exclusive event at Disney's Hollywood Studios was also revealed called Holidays in Hollywood. Disney is now offering a 30% discount to Star Wars: Galactic Starcruiser. Additionally, Soarin' over California will return for a limited time during Disney California Adventure Food & Wine Festival in early 2023. N098 Season 8 of the My DVC Points Podcast was brought to you by: DVC Resale Market - Industry Leader in DVC Resales DVC Rental Store - DVC Point Rentals Monera Financial - Exclusively Financing DVC Contracts Patreon supporters in the My DVC Points VIP Producer Club. Third event added to Top of the World Lounge Another new exclusive DVC event called Bound to Be Bad has been added to the line-up at Bay Lake Tower. Eligible Disney Vacation Club Members can enjoy a fun-filled evening at Top of the World Lounge – a Villains Lair. Hosted by villain superfans deviously decked out in devilish dress, this event is full of Membership magic and includes a sinister spread of desserts, an open bar of cunningly crafted cocktails and a raven's-eye view of the nighttime fireworks at Magic Kingdom park. The event takes place on Wednesday nights from December 7, 2022 through January 25, 2023. Check-in starts 2 hours prior to the published fireworks time for Magic Kingdom park. The Bound to be Bad Party is $139.00 per person, plus tax. Source: Disney Vacation Club Website New DVC exclusive Holidays in Hollywood event On December 15 & 22, Disney Vacation Club will host an event for Members called “Holidays in Hollywood”. The event includes admission to Disney's Hollywood Studios starting at 4 PM including a park reservation and dinner at PizzeRizzo. The dinner is described as "more than just pizza, your festive feast includes delightful dishes inspired by holiday traditions around the world." Beer and wine is also included. There is no indication of any special access during the event, but it is on the same nights as the Extended Evening Hours, allowing ride access to guests at DVC resorts until 11:00pm. The cost for the event is $159 per adult or $129 per youth age 3-20. Registration opens at 11:00am eastern on November 29, 2022. Members must have a reservation at a Walt Disney World resort with points or cash. Link to event registration Source: DVCnews.com 30% DVC Discount on Galatic Starcruiser resort Eligible Disney Vacation Club Members can enjoy 30% off original Points Chart values on select 2-night voyages of Star Wars: Galactic Starcruiser. This offer applies to the following departures in early 2023: January 11 – 13, 2023 January 17 – 19, 2023 January 19 – 21, 2023 January 21 – 23, 2023 January 25 – 27, 2023 January 31 – February 2, 2023 February 12 – 14, 2023 February 28 – March 2, 2023 March 2 – 4, 2023 Points must be used to pay for at least one Member; a combination of Points or cash may be used to book additional Guests. Reservations must be made prior to the last four months of the Use Year for stays during that Use Year. Source: Disney Vacation Club Website Soarin' over California returns to DCA for a limited time Soarin' Over California will return for a limited time during the Disney California Adventure Food & Wine Festival. This beloved attraction celebrates the beauty and wonder of the Golden State, from San Francisco's iconic Golden Gate Bridge to the crashing waves in Malibu. Dates for the festival are March 3 through April 25, 2023. Source: Disney Parks Blog My DVC Points is an awesome community of DVC members. Our positive, respectful, and authentic conversations about Disney Vacation Club are designed to help people make informed and educated decisions about what's best for their families. Please join us to continue the conversations on our Facebook Group and YouTube channel. It takes an awesome community of DVC members to produce our content. We're always recruiting people to help research, produce, edit, or join our shows to share their stories. Thus far, we've had over 225 DVC members on our shows. If our content has been a blessing to your family, please consider supporting our show through our VIP Producer's Club at Patreon.com and join us for the Patreon After-Party from our live shows. Facebook admins and moderators of the My DVC Points Community Group: Sandy Symianick, Gina Grotsky, Shannon Ford, Caleb Allison, and Mary Anne Tracy. "Take Flight" music by Martinrowberry1 on Pond5.

My Wakeup Call with Dr. Mark Goulston
Ep 424 - Kevin Hines

My Wakeup Call with Dr. Mark Goulston

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 31:05


In this episode I interview Kevin Hines, suicide attempt survivor and suicide prevention advocate and featured star on, "Stay Alive," and "The Ripple Effect," who wakeup call was surviving jumping from the Golden Gate Bridge and dedicating his live to helping people with mental illness and preventing suicide. https://www.kevinhinesstory.com

THE ED MYLETT SHOW
Suicide Prevention w/ Kevin Hines

THE ED MYLETT SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 51:40


This is going to be DIFFICULT for some of you to hear. And that's all the more reason to LISTEN.Nearly 800,000 people die by suicide in the world EVERY year… and the number continues to rise.That means 800k+ of families and friends are impacted and left wondering, “WHY?”Odds are, you or someone you love has been impacted by suicide. And so I am URGING you to SHARE this week's episode with as many people as you can.My guest, KEVIN HINES, knows more about suicide than most.‌He tried to end his life by jumping off the GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE when he was only 19 years old.A jump like that kills virtually everybody who attempts it.  But miraculously, Kevin survived.  And today, YOU'LL GET TO HEAR HIS TRUTH.Kevin's story and his message will SAVE LIVES and this may be THE MOST meaningful discussions I've ever had. I can't think of a more important topic to talk about than this one.We're going delve into the PAIN AND FEELINGS that surround suicide, how that pain leads to ACTION, suicide PREVENTION tips, GENETICS, and dealing with OUTSIDE NEGATIVE FORCES.You'll also hear Kevin's THREE QUESTIONS you MUST ask if you think someone is NOT okay and may be thinking about suicide.*If you are having a mental health emergency call 911 or reach out to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline by dialing 988.Protect yourself and your loved ones. 

Nature Podcast
Molecular cages sift 'heavy' water from near-identical H2O

Nature Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 24:46


00:49 Separating heavy water with molecular cagesHeavy water is molecule very similar to H2O but with deuterium isotopes in the place of hydrogen atoms. Heavy water is useful in nuclear reactions, drug design and nutritional studies, but it's difficult to separate from normal water because they have such similar properties. Now, a team have developed a new separation method using tiny molecular cages, which they hope opens up more energy efficient ways to produce heavy water.Research article: Su et al.News and Views: A molecular flip-flop for separating heavy water07:23 Research HighlightsHow dancers can feel the beat even when they can't hear it, and how climate change might move desert dunes.Research Highlight: Dancers pick up the pace on a bass beat — even though it's inaudibleResearch Highlight: Desert dunes pose more danger as Earth warms09:25 Monitoring bridge health using crowd dataBridges are vital pieces of infrastructure but their structural health is hard to monitor, requiring either sophisticated sensors or intense surveying by human engineers. Now though, researchers have utilized large amounts of smartphone accelerometer data to check the health of the Golden Gate Bridge. They hope this new technique can be used to effectively and cheaply monitor bridges around the world.Research Article: Matarazzo et al.Communications Engineering special issue: Resilient Infrastructure17:00 COP27 gets underwayThis week the 27th UN Climate Change Conference began, with world leaders, scientists and activists coming together to continue negotiations aimed at reining in global warming. Jeff Tollefson, senior reporter at Nature, joined us to talk about what's been happening and what to expect, as the conference continues.News: Climate change is costing trillions — and low-income countries are paying the priceNews: As COP27 kicks off, Egypt warns wealthy nations against ‘backsliding'News: COP27 climate summit: what scientists are watchingSubscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Recalibrate with Milton
FROM THE GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE TO MOUNT CARMEL - overcoming fear with faith

Recalibrate with Milton

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 52:06


Prov 29:18 “Where there is no vision the people perish, but he that keeps that law happy is he” My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge (Hosea 4:6) Vision is a powerful God-given gift that many have forsaken. Sight is of the eyes but vision is of the heart. (Helen Keller - the only thing worse than being blind is having sight yet no vision) Vision is not a “name it and claim type thing- vision goes hand in hand with God's promise for you and your family.  People of great faith are able to envision God's promises coming to fruition in their lives (affirmation and declaration without action is the beginning of insanity) A vision that comes into alignment (vertical) with God's word will produce a blessed outcome, however, a skewed vision will produce undesirable results. Dysfunction creates a distorted perception of who God is and who we are in Him.   Amos 3:3: how can two walk together if they don't come into an agreement (breakthrough won't come for an undecided mind) Indecision is closely related to doubt and fear   Paul told the people of Corinth “for we walk by faith and not by sight” Our life is a matter of faith and not sight. Faith is the substance of things hoped for and the evidence of things not seen (Heb 11:1)… Corrie Ten Boom "Faith sees the invisible, believes the unbelievable, and receives the impossible.”  

Ancient History Fangirl
Sea of Trees: The Japanese Suicide Forest

Ancient History Fangirl

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 56:22


In this episode, we'll delve into the mystery of Aokigahara, known in Japanese as the Sea of Trees—and to the rest of the world as the Suicide Forest. After the Golden Gate Bridge, it is the second most popular suicide destination in the world.  The forest is over a thousand years old. It grew over lava floes laid down in a devastating volcanic eruption on the slopes of Mt. Fuji, a holy mountain believed to be a gateway to the spirit world. Perhaps this is why it's said to be the birthplace of the Yurei—a ghost in Japanese folklore created out of deep trauma.  It's no wonder Aokigahara is associated with death. But the forest is also filled with life and incredible natural wonders. Join us as we explore the haunting history and folklore of Aokigahara. Get ad-free episodes here: https://www.patreon.com/ancienthistoryfangirl Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

History Is Dank
Insane Engineering Of The Golden Gate Bridge

History Is Dank

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 43:46


Who isn't fascinated by feats of Civil Engineers? Dating back to the ancient Pyramids of Egypt all the way up this past weekend's game of Wizard Sticks with the boys... it's undeniably awe inspiring! So were the ingenious designs and insane work conditions that combined to build the World's most famous bridge.  Go to adultalyte.com and enter the discount code DANK35 and save 35% off today.  Go to DADGRASS.COM/DANK for 20% off your first order.  patreon.com/dank Sources: Youtube.com LESICS “Golden Gate Bridge The Crazy Engineering Behind It”, Youtube.com npatou “Building the Golden Gate Bridge (1933-1937), Original Footage!”, Pbs.org “Men Who Built the Bridge”, goldengate.org

Modern Architect Radio Show with Tom Dioro
Season 6 Episode 20: Annie Lowengart

Modern Architect Radio Show with Tom Dioro

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022


This episode's guest is Annie Lowengart, who founded her award-winning firm in 2000. Located just a few miles north of the Golden Gate Bridge, Ann Lowengart Interiors enjoys Marin County's stunning terrain as its backdrop.In 2021 Annie opened her second studio in tropical Palm Beach. While enjoying the inspirational beauty of both coasts, Annie and her team balance their designs with practicality.

The Running for Real Podcast
San Franscisco Together Run- Allbirds x Hellabae Event

The Running for Real Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 48:10


Join Tina for a run in San Francisco, next to the Golden Gate Bridge as she interviews people from the running community to share their stories. The run begins with Tina hosting a group body scan for this Allbirds x Hellabae Running event to celebrate the launch of the Silver Fern Tree Flyers. Then the group goes for a run starting at the Tunnel Tops. Hear from people who have battled cancer, worked through setbacks in confidence and belief, and come back to running for the first time in years. If you have struggled with motivation lately, this one will inspire you to find a group and get back out there. Tina mentioned Hellabae Running Through a monthly donation on Patreon. To sign up, click here. You can share on social media and let others know about what you are loving in these together runs. You can leave a review on iTunes.  Thanks for listening! We know there are so many podcasts you could be listening to, but we are honored you have chosen Running For Real. If you appreciate the work that we do, here are a few things you can do to support us: Take a screenshot of the episode, and share it with your friends, family, and community on social media, especially if you feel that topic will relate to them. Be sure to tag us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram  Leave an honest review on iTunes or your favorite podcast player Your ratings and reviews will really help us grow and reach new people Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe, you can find out here. Thank you for joining, we look forward to hearing your thoughts. Check out this episode!

Plane Talking UK's Podcast
Episode 429 - Premium Cabins and Twitter Spats

Plane Talking UK's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 121:23 Very Popular


Join Carlos, Nev and Matt for this week's show. In this week's show Ryanair has fun on Twitter, we look at another mid air fight & one rather large aircraft has a wheely bad time on take off.    In the military the US Air Force needs YOU to teach new pilots and what DOES happen to retired drone aircraft? We're excited to share with you our 4th part of our series with Captain Nick in conversation with Chris Burwell as they discuss his new book ‘Nine Lives'.  It's also lunchtime at the Jersey International Air Show; Carlos and Nev tell us more. Don't forget you can get in touch with us all at : WhatsApp +44 757 22 491 66 Email podcast@planetalkinguk.com or comment in our chatroom on YouTube. Here are the links for the stories we featured this week : COMMERCIAL Scottish airline Loganair goes on the market https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-scotland-business-63194336 Ryanair brutally mocks flier whose suitcase arrives at airport damaged https://www.mirror.co.uk/travel/news/ryanair-brutally-mocks-flier-whose-28217978 British Airways launch new Avios subscription plan where you can purchase Avios for under 1p each https://thepointsguy.co.uk/news/british-airways-avios-subscription/ Turkish Airlines Flight Forced to Make Emergency Diversion After Passenger Unleashes Violent Attack On Cabin Crew https://www.paddleyourownkanoo.com/2022/10/12/turkish-airlines-flight-forced-to-make-emergency-diversion-after-passenger-unleases-violent-attack-on-cabin-crew/ Ryanair holiday warning for Brits with flights next week https://www.thesun.co.uk/travel/20091889/ryanair-flight-warning-check-in/ 9 airlines with premium economy cabins worth splurging on https://www.cntraveller.com/article/airlines-with-premium-economy-cabins-worth-splurging-on Best places at Heathrow Airport to go plane spotting before your flight https://www.getsurrey.co.uk/lifestyle/travel/best-places-heathrow-airport-go-25240217 Shocking moment Boeing 747 loses a WHEEL moments after takeoff as smoking part hurtles towards runway https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/20079337/shocking-moment-boeing-loses-wheel-moments-after-takeoff/ Lufthansa Backtracks On AirTags Ban Following Regulatory Advice https://simpleflying.com/lufthansa-backtracks-on-apple-airtag-ban/ Boeing 777 flies low over Golden Gate Bridge for Fleet Week https://www.cbsnews.com/sanfrancisco/news/boeing-777-flies-low-over-golden-gate-bridge-for-fleet-week/ MILITARY Air Force Praises new training but struggles to find instructors https://www.airforcetimes.com/news/your-air-force/2022/10/11/air-force-praises-new-pilot-training-but-struggles-to-hire-instructors/ Air Force Acquires Australia's MQ-28 Ghost Bat Drone For Testing https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/air-force-acquires-australias-mq-28-ghost-bat-drone-for-testing How Repurposed Global Hawks Will Hugely Accelerate Hypersonic Testing https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/how-repurposed-global-hawks-will-hugely-accelerate-hypersonic-testing Report: Lockheed Skunk Works Darkstar Movie Prop to be At Edwards Air Show https://theaviationist.com/2022/10/07/darkstar-movie-prop-to-be-at-edwards-air-show/

Cleared Hot
Episode 254 - Jeb Corliss

Cleared Hot

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 200:35 Very Popular


In 20 + years, Jeb Corliss has made more than 2,000 jumps, from the likes of the Eiffel Tower, Golden Gate Bridge, Angel Falls in Venezuela, the Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and into a half-mile deep cave in China. He hasn't simply leapt off and pulled his parachute, though. To add an extra layer of challenge, push the bounds of his ability, and further slice the razor slim margin for error, he has performed acrobatic maneuvers – twists, somersaults, and gainers – during freefall. More recently he discovered the thrills and challenges of BASE-jumping with wingsuits, flying along some of the most stunning and dangerous mountain terrain. In the nearest approximation of human flight yet, wingsuits (which are more flying squirrel than bird or plane) allow the best pilots to trace the contours of cliffs, ridges, and mountainsides at high speed. All of which makes for an incredible spectacle: In July 2011, Corliss flew feet from the ground in the Swiss Alps, an event captured on camera and broadcast on ABC's 20/20. Two months later, in September, Corliss swooped through an arch in the side of China's iconic Tianmen Mountain, in front of a live television audience of millions. Corliss's stunts and his unyielding approach to life never fail to fascinate. He has been the subject of profiles published in The New York Times, Outside, Popular Mechanics, Smithsonian Air & Space, Men's Journal and Rolling Stone. He has been featured on television in the United States and abroad, including 60 Minutes in Australia, ESPN's E:60, Real Sports on HBO, Today, The Colbert Report, Good Morning America and Conan. Corliss has been featured in popular BASE documentaries such as A Year in the Life, Journey to the Center, Fearless, The Human Bird, Heavens Gate and The Flying Dagger to name a few. He also hosted the first season of Stunt Junkies on The Discovery Channel and was a technical advisor on the remake of Point Break. When he is not traveling the world, Corliss lives in Vista, California.

The Jim on Base Sports Show
Ultra Marathon Runner Dean Karnazes

The Jim on Base Sports Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 34:42


Ultra marathon runner & endurance athlete, Dean Karnazes, shared details on being attacked by a wild coyote while on a run near the Golden Gate Bridge recently & reflected on some of his incredible physical feats in promotion of his latest book, ‘A Runner's High: My Life In Motion.' Dean, also known as ‘Karno' is a New York Times Bestselling author for his first book, ‘Ultramarathon Man: Confessions of An All-Night Runner.' Visit Dean's website for more info on how to purchase his books & how to see a documentary film about his quest to run 50 marathons in 50 days: https://linktr.ee/ultramarathon Make sure to follow Dean on social media as well:Instagram - @ultramarathonTwitter - @DeanKarnazes

All Inclusive
Kevin Hines - Surviving & Thriving

All Inclusive

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 31:10


 **TRIGGER WARNING. This episode contains conversations about attempted suicide. If you are triggered or would like to talk to a confidential advocate, please dial the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline. If you want to learn more about mental health and find possible resources, please visit this Ruderman Family Foundation link. On September 24, 2000, 19-year-old Kevin Hines attempted to take his own life by jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco. Miraculously, he survived the 220 ft jump thanks to a series of contributing factors. Today, Kevin is an award-winning mental health activist, a best-selling author, and a documentarian with an inspirational motto of “#BeHereTomorrow and every day after that”. Join us for a special episode marking the upcoming World Mental Health Day as Kevin shares his remarkable story of hope, healing, and recovery. Please find a transcription of this episode here: https://allaboutchangepodcast.com/podcast-episode/kevin-hines-surviving-thriving/. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Three Questions, Three Drinks with Chris Mikolay
Ep. 57 - It's Times Like These You Learn To Live Again

Three Questions, Three Drinks with Chris Mikolay

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 106:12


In an episode as unusual as it is powerful, Chris sets out on a 600 mile road trip in a bright yellow 1973 Volkswagen Beetle with a man he hasn't seen in 27 years named Jerry Dorneker. Departing before sunrise from Jerry's home in Columbia, South Carolina, Chris and Jerry hope the Beetle's 60 horsepower engine can power them through the West Virginia mountains and ultimately, to the town in Ohio where they both grew up. As the journey unfolds, Jerry shares a deeply personal account of how he has dealt with the passing of his daughter, Morgan, who took her own life 2 ½ years ago at just 12 years old. Raw, honest and incredibly brave, this episode will leave you inspired by Jerry's message of love and hope, moved by Morgan's radiant soul, and ultimately, grateful you went along for the ride. EPISODE GUIDE(0:00) Introduction (7:28) Jerry Arrives in the '73 Beetle(9:19) History of the Volkswagen Beetle(16:13) Jerry's Background | Becoming a Coach(23:19) Chris Cornell | Fit People Go to the Gym | Jerry's Experience with Professional Therapy(29:43) God is Okay With Me Being Mad at Him(36:44) Everybody Has Mental Health | Trying to Understand Why (38:29) Jumpers at the Golden Gate Bridge (https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2003/10/13/jumpers) | There is Another Way(41:17) What Would You Tell Someone Having Suicidal Thoughts? | Warning Signs(48:46) 988 Mental Health Hotline | The Difference Between Knowing & Understanding(57:45) The Perfect Fountain Coke | Understanding Jerry's Grief(1:07.06) It's Who I Am | The Two Greatest Things You Can Be Called in the World(1:11.01) The Car Mirrored Our Experience | Morgan Was Always the Love in the Room (1:18.03) Butterflies & God Giving Comfort | Seeing Morgan Again | Finding Purpose in the Pain(1:25.29) What I Wish I Could Tell Morgan | Being Brave Like Jerry(1:35.02) Moments of Happiness | It's Times Like These We Learn to Live AgainIf you know someone in crisis, or if you need help: Call or text the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline by simply dialing 988. You can also contact the Crisis Text Line (text HELLO to 741741). Both services provide 24-hour, confidential support to anyone in suicidal crisis or emotional distress. There is help, there is hope. If you've been enjoying the 3Q3D podcast, please subscribe and consider giving us a rating, a review, or sharing an episode with a friend. Follow our social sites here:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/3drinkspodcast/?hl=en Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/3DrinkspodcastTwitter: https://twitter.com/3Q3Dpod

The Nonlinear Library
EA - "A Creepy Feeling": Nixon's Decision to Disavow Biological Weapons by ThomasW

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 31:44


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: "A Creepy Feeling": Nixon's Decision to Disavow Biological Weapons, published by ThomasW on September 30, 2022 on The Effective Altruism Forum. I wrote this paper for a class in December 2021. I had been meaning to put it up on the forum for a while, but only just now got around to it. I found this research useful for my own understanding of the kinds of events that can contribute to dramatic policy changes. At the end I mention the obvious relevance to autonomous weapons regulation, but I think that lessons learned apply to all kinds of regulation of dangerous technologies. In September of 1950, a ship sailed by the Golden Gate Bridge. It carried a stockpile of Serratia marcescens bacteria, which it released in a huge plume over the city of San Francisco. Those onboard hoped to expose as many people as possible to the bacteria. Their mission was a success, and most of the city's residents were exposed. The ship was not operated by a hostile foreign government or terrorist operatives, but by the United States Navy. Though Serratia marcescens is a “simulant” bacterium not known to cause harm, the test showed the potential for attacks with more deadly forms of bacteria. Despite the “benign” nature of the bacterium, Stanford University doctors reported several bizarre cases of urinary tract infections at the time, leading eventually to one death. The test was far from the only biological weapons test conducted in secrecy by the U.S. government from World War II until as late as 1968. On November 25th, 1969, President Richard Nixon gave a speech to the American public following a briefing to Congress. He announced the United States would renounce the use of biological weapons, destroy its stockpiles, and research only what was necessary to defend against possible attacks from enemies. He also voiced support for a United Kingdom initiative to ban biological weapons internationally, which would eventually become the Biological Weapons Convention. How did the United States go from biological weapons testing on its own population to leading the world in opposition to biological weapons? Historians have offered many possible explanations. One common argument is that public pressure forced Nixon's hand. In a 2002 paper, Jonathan B. Tucker, a CBW expert and then a researcher at the Monterey Institute of International Studies, specifically emphasizes television reports in early 1969 and their contribution to increased awareness of the weapons. Brian Balmer and Alex Spelling of University College London conducted a 2016 analysis of contemporaneous newspaper articles about biological weapons, finding that they routinely portrayed biological weapons as dangerous even if they presented mixed messages about their effectiveness. Robert W. McElroy, a prelate of the Catholic church, included a discussion of CBW in a 1992 book, stressing in particular the idea that the public viewed such weapons as morally repugnant. I will argue that public pressure was a significant factor behind Nixon's decision, but that it was not sufficient to convince Nixon that renouncing biological weapons would be safe. A second argument is that international pressure created an environment where the American position was untenable. James Revill, a research fellow at the University of Sussex, wrote in a 2018 article that international arms control was a major factor, while also suggesting that the renunciation may have been an attempt to deflect attention from the Vietnam War as well as a response to the advocacy of international organizations. McElroy also discussed international opposition, again from a moral perspective, and Tucker acknowledged it as well. I will argue that while international developments were important in shaping Nixon's decision, they were not his primary motivation. A third argument was ...

Expert CRE Secrets Podcast
What's It Worth Valuations with Bharat Kanodia

Expert CRE Secrets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 16:32


Bharat is the founder of Veristrat. He has been in business valuation since 2000 and has valued assets in real estate, industrial, personal property, and financial assets including some unique assets i.e., the Golden Gate Bridge, NYC subway system, Hartsfield Atlanta Airport, and Las Vegas casinos.Bharat has formerly worked with American Appraisal and Silicon Valley Bank Analytics. As an appraiser, Bharat has signed off on over 4000 valuation opinions with $800 billion in assets. Bharat holds an undergraduate degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Wisconsin and an MBA from Marquette University. He is a senior accredited member with ASA.In‌ ‌our‌ ‌conversation,‌ ‌we‌ ‌discussed:‌Valuating Assets in a highly appreciated marketplace.Biggest frustration on selling highly appreciated assetsExit Planning ProcessConnect with Bharat Kanodia:https://www.expertcresecrets.com/episode95Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share!Here's How »Join the Expert CRE Community today:expertCREsecrets.comeXpert CRE Secrets FacebookeXpert CRE Secrets Youtube

The Mark White Show
The Healing Place with Karen Grisham & Kevin Briggs Guardian of the Golden Gate Bridge

The Mark White Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 32:27


Tonight, we will once again be focusing on coping with loss, mental health, & suicide awareness. Joining me will be Karen Grisham with The Healing Place and Pivotal Points: Kevin Briggs, Guardian of the Golden Gate Bridge. I hope you listen to these very important conversations and share this show with others!

The Mark White Show
Make A Difference Minute: Kevin Briggs Guardian of the Golden Gate

The Mark White Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 2:43


On today's Make A Difference Minute, I'm highlighting Pivotal Points: Kevin Briggs, Guardian of the Golden Gate Bridge and his effort to inspire mental health and suicide awareness. Listen and share. Sponsor: Green's Dependable Hardware Russellville, AL

Giving Voice to Depression
221- Come Back. You Can Recover.

Giving Voice to Depression

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 15:40


If you or someone you know is having suicidal thoughts, please have them (or you) take 15 minutes to listen to Ken's story. It is a rare opportunity to speak with someone who survives an attempt, especially one from the Golden Gate Bridge, who can tell you they had instant regret when they started to fall, that all the things that seemed unsolvable in life suddenly didn't anymore, and that in the water below they begged for rescue and life. It is powerful and it is real.

Off The Lip Radio Show
OTL#691 - Catherine Breed

Off The Lip Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022


An incredible feat/swim by open ocean swimmer Catherine Breed who swam 27 miles in very dangerous waters from the Golden Gate Bridge to Half Moon Bay…

Mitlin Money Mindset
The Bridge Between Suicide & Life, Episode #99

Mitlin Money Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 33:17


Sergeant Kevin Briggs is the founder and CEO of Pivotal Points. Kevin is a retired highway patrol sergeant who spent many years patrolling the Golden Gate bridge. He encountered numerous individuals clinging to life by a thread. These individuals had lost hope and couldn't see a way out of their current situation.  They were ready to jump off the bridge to end their pain and hopelessness. One of the people Kevin Briggs saved was Kevin Berthia, a previous guest on the Mitlin Money Mindset™. Throughout his career, Briggs' compassion, gentle voice, eye contact, and innate ability to listen encouraged more than 200 individuals not to jump. Kevin earned the nickname, “Guardian of the Golden Gate.” Briggs retired early and has dedicated his life to promoting mental health awareness across the world through his organization, Pivotal Points. He trains people in suicide prevention, de-escalation, and negotiation techniques. Listen in for some great takeaways about how to listen to understand and Kevin's impact on the world.  You will want to hear this episode if you are interested in... Learn more about Kevin Briggs and why he founded Pivotal Points [3:33]  How his experience saving Kevin Berthia's life impacted him [5:54] How training for first responders has evolved over time [8:00] How family members reaching out to Kevin has impacted him [12:17]  Why Kevin cares so strongly about suicide prevention [13:41]  What Kevin wants people to know about suicide prevention [15:11]  How to identify if someone is struggling with suicidal ideation [16:06]  Kevin shares why it's so powerful to “listen to understand” [21:41] What you can do today to improve your mental health [24:27] The next big thing on the horizon for Kevin Briggs [28:19]  What brought Kevin joy and put him in the mindset for success [28:59] Resources & People Mentioned The reMarkable 2 Connect with Kevin Briggs The website On Instagram On Linkedin On Facebook Bio Briggs, a retired California Highway Patrol sergeant, spent many years patrolling the Golden Gate Bridge. While on patrol, he encountered numerous individuals clinging to life by a thread – individuals who had lost hope and could see no way out of their current situation - ready to jump off the bridge to what they assumed was a sudden death and ending of their pain and hopelessness.  Briggs, through his compassion, gentle voice, eye contact, and his innate ability of “listening to understand” encouraged more than 200 individuals over his career to not end their life, but to begin a new chapter. These challenging but rewarding efforts earned him the nickname “Guardian of the Golden Gate.” After spending 3 years in the United States Army, 3 years with the California Department of Corrections and 23 years with the California Highway Patrol, Briggs retired to dedicate his life to promote mental health awareness across the globe through Pivotal Points, an organization he founded.  Today, Briggs is mapping a movement as he speaks and trains others in suicide prevention, de-escalation, and negotiations. He shares his “Listening to Understand” skills followed up with key active listening points and discusses in depth his own personal mental health struggles.  Briggs spends the majority of his time speaking/teaching at conferences, community events and seminars worldwide. His first book, Guardian of the Golden Gate: Protecting the Line Between Hope and Despair, was released in July 2015. A series of Wellness workbooks are currently in production and will debut in 2022.  Guests on the Mitlin Money Mindset Show are not affiliated with CWM, LLC, and opinions expressed herein may not be representative of CWM, LLC. CWM, LLC is not responsible for the guest's content linked on this site. Connect With Mitlin Financial podcast(at)MitlinFinancial.com - email us with your suggestions for topics or guests https://mitlinfinancial.com  Follow on Twitter Follow on Instagram Subscribe on Youtube Follow on Linkedin Follow on Facebook Subscribe to Mitlin Money Mindset™ on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts

Giving Voice to Depression
220- Suicide Prevention-Noticing the Signs (remix)

Giving Voice to Depression

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 20:58


CW: If our goal is to "prevent suicide," it might help to understand what kind of thoughts a suicidal person is having. In an intimate and revealing conversation, we ask Ken Baldwin, one of the few survivors of an attempt from the Golden Gate Bridge, to tell us what was going through his mind when he headed there to end his life. It's a conversation we'd only have with someone who has had a lot of time to process his attempt and who is in a much healthier and stable place, which Ken is. He freely tells his story in an effort to let us know that even the things in our lives that feel irreparable and hopeless may look very different when viewed through healthier lenses.

Ninkas Detox
#130: NUTRITIONAL EATING DISORDERS, AUTISM MOM ANXIETY & DEPRESSION!

Ninkas Detox

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 64:03


This podcast episode is relevant to every autism mom out there. It's also a survival story.She shares the nutritional imbalances (now regulated) and biochemical challenges with you and your child. How she dealt with compulsive OCD, self-harm, binge eating and eating disorders, food OCD, anxiety, depression and obsessions is how you need to address these issues. It's a story about overcoming binge eating, diet OCD, anxiety, self-harm & suicidal thoughts. Experienced by someone who shares chemistry and nutritional imbalances with 90 % of autism moms and autistic children who learned how to regulate their biochemistry with food THE HARD WAY. Samatha Gilbert is an incredible woman, colleague and autism nutritionist. Dr Mensah saved her life after she's been considering ending it on Golden Gate Bridge several times after a long life of self-harm, anxiety, restrictive eating, binge eating, veganism (that made her feel worse) and depression. When she learned what undermethylation, pyrrole disorder, copper toxicity and a superfood/vegetable-based GF/DF diet did to her mental health and how she could eat herself well - she dedicated her life to helping families with children/young people with similar problems with her Eat For Life strategy. It wasn't that she wasn't health-focused or knowledgeable. Just like you - she was already an expert in functional medicine and holistic health. She was (like many autism moms who focus on recovery and Biomed) - from an outsider's perspective - extremely healthy. The problem with healthy eating, dieting and holistic health today is that it's making a massive group of people (especially autism families) WORSE. In this podcast, you'll learn: How body dysmorphia and binge eating on cupcakes started at age five for Samantha and why you need to understand the link to undermethylation and copper metabolism early and catch it.How untreated biochemical and nutritional imbalances escalated into starvation & binge eating, OCD, anxiety, extreme veganism and depression/suicidal thoughts and why it is something you MUST prevent for your child. The link between disordered eating (including picky eating), undermethylation, serotonin and dopamine. Non-purging extreme self-punishment (over-exercise and fasting and the consequences of that. Treating mental health issues should have a nutritional approach instead of solely focusing on the brain/behaviour/cognition and emotional therapy. It doesn't work. How Samantha lost her hearing at the well visit after getting the "you know what" at 15 months. Why autism families NEED MEAT in their diet to heal and thrive. Why getting healthy sometimes means gaining weight in the healing process. Especially if you've been dieting for years. The problem with folate/folic acid. How copper can drive someone to the edge and suicidal tendencies.Why "Root cause protocol" is a dangerous and harmful health trend in the autism recovery community. And so much more...

Mitlin Money Mindset
Finding A Reason To Live, Episode #98

Mitlin Money Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 35:56


Kevin Berthia is a suicide survivor and prevention advocate who was born with a genetic depression disorder. At age 22, he attempted to take his life by jumping from the golden gate bridge. It wasn't until 8 years later at the American Foundation for Suicide Preventions Lifesaver's Gala that he was reunited with the officer who talked him back to safety.  Since then, his story of hope has touched audiences around the world. He's shared his story with magazine outlets along with local and national news stations. His story was even featured on the Steve Harvey show.  Kevin points out that no one is more acutely aware of the darkness that surrounds suicide than those who have walked in its shadow. Listen in for some great takeaways about Kevin's life-changing event and how he is helping others who suffer in silence, giving them a voice of hope.  You will want to hear this episode if you are interested in... Learn more about Kevin and the Kevin Berthia Foundation [3:14]  The impact of Officer Kevin Briggs saving Kevin's life [6:54]  Kevin's words to those who are struggling and feel alone [10:57]  What is the mission of the Kevin Berthia Foundation? [17:20]  Why it's important for people to feel heard and understood [19:26]  How telling his story has impacted Kevin personally [24:10]  Easy things people can do to focus on improving mental health [26:10]  What's up next for Kevin Berthia, the next big thing? [29:50]  What brought Kevin joy and put him in the right mindset for success? [31:21] Resources & People Mentioned American Foundation for Suicide Prevention  The Confess Project Connect with Kevin Berthia The website On Instagram On Twitter On Linkedin On Facebook Bio Kevin Berthia is a suicide survivor and prevention advocate. Kevin was born with a genetic major depression disorder. In 2005, at the age of 22, Kevin attempted to take his own life by jumping from the Golden Gate Bridge. It wasn't until 8 years after his attempt that Kevin was reunited with the officer who talked him back to safety. Since then, Kevin's story of HOPE has touched a diverse group of audiences all around the world. Kevin has had the opportunity to share his story with several magazine outlets along with local and national news stations. Kevin's story was also featured on the Steve Harvey Show. The photo of him standing on the cord was front page of the San Francisco Chronicle and placed on the 75 most iconic photos of the 21st Century. Kevin believes that having attempted suicide plays a major role in the prevention of additional suicides. No one knows more about the darkness that surrounds suicide than those who have walked in its shadow. Mission: The Kevin Berthia Foundation was started and created to give those individuals that suffer in silence with both undiagnosed and diagnosed mental health conditions a voice of hope. Guests on the Mitlin Money Mindset Show are not affiliated with CWM, LLC, and opinions expressed herein may not be representative of CWM, LLC. CWM, LLC is not responsible for the guest's content linked on this site. Connect With Mitlin Financial podcast(at)MitlinFinancial.com - email us with your suggestions for topics or guests https://mitlinfinancial.com  Follow on Twitter Follow on Instagram Subscribe on Youtube Follow on Linkedin Follow on Facebook Subscribe to Mitlin Money Mindset™ on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts

P & A Podcast Express
P&A Podcast Express Septonber 6th, 2022

P & A Podcast Express

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 75:19


Recorded the day before Labor Day at the wonderful Blue Water in located in the 4-69!

Content Creatives Podcast
8 Best Photo Spots in San Francisco to See in a Weekend

Content Creatives Podcast