Podcasts about Enron

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Enron

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Best podcasts about Enron

Latest podcast episodes about Enron

From There to Here
Dream Big and Take Chances with Dave Blake

From There to Here

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 26:09


I really enjoyed my chat with Dave. We talked about everything from growing up in a large family to his experience working at Arthur Andersen during the Enron scandal. We also dove into his thoughts around balancing out being a compassionate leader with what are at times difficult decisions that need to be made and much much more. 

Today's Prey
EP. 45: Jake Skipped Civil War Class

Today's Prey

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 67:30


Poppy educates Jake about the civil war,  and the guys discuss their fathers. Closed by a massively controversial take on Seth organ and zach Enron's dads. This is Today's Prey!

AUDIT 15 FUN
Episode 16 - Andy Fastow - Former CFO of Enron - Legal Fraud

AUDIT 15 FUN

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 25:18


In this episode, I had the chance to interview Andy Fastow and talk about the concept of Legal Fraud. Andy shared his perspective from his time at Enron, and red flags Internal Auditors can use today to identify problems at a company. I hope you enjoy it!

FLIPPING THE BARREL
“The Reward is in the Risk” with Gabriel Rio- CEO of Milestone Environmental Services.

FLIPPING THE BARREL

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022


LISTEN NOW!! Gabriel is one of those Individuals who didn't follow the typical path, he paved his own. When he started his career he had little aspiration to become CEO. One decision led to another and brought him to where he is today as CEO of Milestone; focused on carbon sequestration and sustainably managing energy waste streams. Gabriel grew up immersed in the chemical Industry, both his father and grandfather worked for Dow Chemical.Gabriel had a love for music and found himself having to decide which direction he wanted to take his life. He quickly came to realize he wasn't going to be the next rockstar but his love for math and science proved to be a more realistic path for him. He talks about following your passions all while figuring it out as you go, at times your passions might change but you only know till you try. Gabriel decided to pursue chemical engineering and dive headfirst into the business world. At 24 years old, right after 9/11 and the Enron collapsed , Gabriel packed up his bags and left Houston to move to New york. He struggled to find a job, he was in a new state during a recession and had a few months of savings left. Instead of leaving New York he kept pushing forward, 8 months later he landed a position in investment banking. Throughout Gabriel's story you can find where he connects each change in his life to the next movement in his career. While working in investment banking he learns about the oil and gas industry, particularly on the environmental waste management side of the business. He found himself learning more about the business while working at Three Cities Research. At this firm he was very hands on in helping companies grow to their full potential. Here is where his story changes, where he went from working as a partner to stirring up his own plans to start a business. Gabriel talks about calculated risks and how he applied this strategy throughout his career to becoming CEO of Milestone today. He shares the biggest lessons he learned along the way and the challenges he faced. He gives us his best advice and the impact his relationships have had on his success. Gabriel said, “ Develop strong relationships with the people that you work with and hang around, as you continue to build your career. I have found that my career has been built more off of the people that I've worked with rather than the companies that I've worked for and that's what carried me and a lot of people I know, through our careers”. Gabriel has over a decade of experience in the oil and gas environmental services industry. He is currently the President and CEO of Milestone Environmental Services, LLC. Prior to leading Milestone, Gabriel worked as an Operating Partner with Intervale Capital, now known as Amberjack Capital, an oilfield-focused private equity fund with $1.2 billion in assets under management, and a key investor in Milestone. He was previously the Executive Vice President of Strategy and Business Development for R360 Environmental Solutions, Inc., a national provider of environmental services to the E&P industry. At R360, Gabriel orchestrated the strategy and mergers and acquisitions work which led to the formation and rapid growth of the company, and directly managed Williston Basin operations. After R360 completed a $1.3 billion sale to Waste Connections, Inc., Gabriel assumed work with the buyer to help with the integration of the R360 business into Waste Connections. Prior to R360's formation in 2010, he was an investment professional with Three Cities Research, Inc., a mid-market private equity firm, where he was principally responsible for US Liquids of LA, LP, a regional oilfield waste treatment and disposal provider in Louisiana and Texas.Earlier in his career, Gabriel worked as an Associate Equity Research Analyst covering the global chemical industry at UBS Investment Bank, as a Petroleum Practice Fellow with McKinsey & Company a global strategy consultancy, and as an Associate at Purvin & Gertz, a Houston-based oil and gas consultancy. Gabriel holds a Bachelor's degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin.Gabriel lives in Houston with his wife Mona, two daughters, and two Great Danes. He also is an elected member of the Advisory Board of the Energy Workforce & Technology Council (EWTC) and the Texas Oil & Gas Association (TXOGA) Board of Directors. Come hang out with us:Download on Apple Podcast——>> ClickDownload on Spotify———>>ClickConnect with Maisy and Jamie:Connect with Massiel Diez: Instagram | LinkedInConnect with Jamie Elrod: Instagram | LinkedInFollow FTB on Instagram | LinkedInJoin FTB NationIf your interested in working with us, please contact : flippingthebarrel@gmail.com To find out more about our mid-roll audio sponsor TechnipFMC please visit: TechnipFMCTo find out more about our pre-roll audio sponsor Varel Energy Solutions please visit: Varel EnergyTo find out more about website sponsor Nextier Energy Solutions please visit: Nextier Oilfield Solutions

The W. Edwards Deming Institute® Podcast
Kevin Cahill's Reflections on Dr. Deming and the Deming Institute (April 2022)

The W. Edwards Deming Institute® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 66:11


Kevin Cahill, President and Executive Director of the Deming Institute, reflects on growing up with Dr. Deming, learning about his grandfather's impact on the world, and his own Deming journey. Kevin also describes The Deming Institute's origins, the DemingNEXT initiative, and using Deming in the real world. (Please note: the punctuation errors in this description are due to Libsyn's system.) SHOW NOTES Books mentionedThe New Economics and Out of the Crisis, both by Dr. Deming (available via www.deming.org) Transform Your Business with Dr.Deming's 14 Points, by Andrew Stotz 0:00:36 Growing up in the Deming family 0:04:29 Watching If Japan Can, Why Can't We? with my grandfather 09:07 Kevin's own Deming journey 14:21 The origins of The Deming Institute 21:35 Why Deming, why now   39:14 Introducing DemingNEXT 46:06 Andrew's Deming journey 53:34 Deming in the real world TRANSCRIPT You can download the complete transcript here. Andrew Stotz: My name is Andrew Stotz, and I'll be your host as we continue our journey into the teachings of Dr. W. Edwards Deming. Today, I'm here with featured guest, Kevin Cahill. Kevin, are you ready to share your Deming journey? Kevin Cahill: Absolutely, Andrew. Excited to be here, looking forward to it. AS: Yeah. Well, I think we gotta kick this off by introducing you. Tell us what is your connection to Dr. W. Edwards Deming. KC: Well, I'm very fortunate to be his grandson, and also very fortunate that as I grew up in the Washington DC area, I got to spend a tremendous amount of time with my grandparents, my grandfather, Dr. Deming, and his wife, Lola Deming, who also assisted him in his work for many, many years, and got to know them growing up. And so, it was absolutely fascinating to see this man that I knew as a kindly, gentle, soft-spoken man who worked out of the small basement of his house in Washington DC, not in a big office, this little, tiny basement that used to flood in the rainy season and was just very, very small. And I always wondered what he did because everything that I saw was just figures and numbers and all this stuff, and he never talked about work. When we were together with him on Thanksgivings and Christmases, he was always talking about family and what it was like with my mother and her sisters growing up. So, a very different perspective of who this man was. That all changed at one point in my life but growing up, it was a very different kind of relationship. AS: You know, my first connection with your grandfather was when I was like 24, and I was just in awe, but I was also in terror because I watched him pretty strict, pretty tough when he was dealing with people that just had nonsense questions in some cases, or had the wrong idea, and he really needed to straighten them out in one way or another. And it's kind of surprising, but now that I think about it, in our families, we don't bring that toughness necessarily into the family. Is that the case? KC: That was the case. We never noticed that. He would sit at the dining room table, and he would just be quiet at the head of the table, and occasionally he'd pull this little notebook out and make some notes. I always wonder what he was writing. I found out later. Something came to mind, and then, occasionally, in the middle of the dinner, he would say... He would have this great story about my mother or something that he had. He would tell us growing up, and he just burst into this fantastic laughter of his, and it was so much fun. And we really didn't know what he did. We knew he traveled, and we knew that... Like I said, growing up, we would get scrap paper from his office, and it always just had sheets of numbers on the one side, and my brother and I would always joke that, man, "I'll tell you the one thing we don't wanna do in life is grow up and do what he's doing." [chuckle] AS: That's tough stuff, whatever it is he's thinking about. And I'm just curious. What was his relationship with his wife, Lola? KC: Oh, she was just this terrific lady. They met, and they actually worked together. I believe was at the Fixed Nitrogen Lab in Washington DC, and they co-wrote some papers together. She had a master's degree in mathematics at a time, early in the last century, when women just didn't have advanced degrees, and she helped him for decades with his work. And I remember seeing a lot of photos of her traveling with him to Japan and around the world. That was absolutely fascinating. She was just a brilliant woman in her own time, and with what she was able to do in terms of helping him. And she doesn't get enough credit for what she did to assist him. AS: And before we get into the Institute, I just wanna understand your own personal journey in life. You developed... You saw that stuff, and you thought, "I'm not gonna study that." But tell us just a little bit about your own personal journey in your education and in your work life. KC: Sure. So like I said, I didn't really know much about what he did. But when I was a freshman in college, my family had moved away from the DC area to Los Angeles, and I came back for the summer for a job that I had. I called my grandfather, grandmother, and said, "Hey, you have an extra little, tiny room in your house. Is there any chance I could stay there for the summer?" And they, of course, said, "Yes." So, I stayed there for the summer. And in June of 1980, my mother called me and said, "Your grandfather travels around and has been to Japan. They're doing a show on NBC on June 24th, 1980 called, 'If Japan Can, Why Can't We?' And your grandfather is gonna be mentioned in that show for some of the work he's done in Japan." You can imagine how excited. This was at a time when there were three networks, ABC, NBC, CBS. There was no cable. There was nothing. KC: And this was gonna be on prime time. And so she said, "Just make sure your grandfather watches it." And so, that night of 1980, I had to go downstairs and get him in the office and say, "We've gotta go upstairs and watch this show." And so, we all traipsed up to the third floor and sat down on his couch, and my grandfather, my grandmother, and then my grandmother's sister, who was also living at the house, we all sat down to watch the show. And a few minutes into it, you saw my grandfather who was, at the time, almost 80 years old, and he had about a 15-second part in the show, and I just remember being so excited, "Oh my god. That's you. It's so cool." KC: And then there was nothing. That was it. And for the longest time... And you could tell my grandfather was getting very fidgety. He was ready... He mentioned something... He was unhappy with a few things they were saying in the show that he thought were off-base, and he was kind of mumbling a little bit about that. And he was getting ready to leave and go back down and do some work. And then they started talking about a man who was considered the... Helped transform Japan and was considered the key person in that Japanese transformation. And at that point, I looked over to my grandfather, 'cause I hadn't said anything in about 20 minutes, and I said, "Do you know who that is?" KC: And the announcer, he said, "It's Dr. W. Edwards Deming." And it was just this disconnect. This is the man I know, who I grew up with, and the Emperor of Japan has given you credit for the Japanese economic miracle. I still get goosebumps when I think about that moment. I just could not believe it. And then we watched the rest of the show in just stunned silence. And of course, he had some comments, and at the end, they talked about the National Paper Corporation and how he had helped them, and I just remember thinking, "This is gonna change everything." KC: And you know what, Andrew? I was actually a little bit sad because I thought, "He's 80 years old, almost 80. He's probably..." People are gonna call him, but he may not work for more than another year or two. And then I can tell you, it was astounding because, like I said, his office was in the basement, and my grandmother and my great-aunt and I would stand at the top of the stairs, 'cause my grandfather used a speaker phone, and his assistant would say, "Dr. Deming, you've got Don Peterson, the chairman of Ford Motor Company, on the phone. You've got the head of Xerox on the phone." You've got the head of all these different companies, and we're hearing him talk on the speaker phone, and it was just astounding. It was an amazing, amazing period. KC: So at that point, I knew things were gonna change in my life. I just didn't know what or how or anything like that. And as I moved through college and then graduated, I was just amazed that my grandfather was continuing to work and just being quoted on news articles and everything like that, and on TV shows, just continuously. And as I got into the business world in a media business, I knew a little bit about my grandfather's philosophy, some things like how important systems are and understanding that and operational definitions. KC: And there were some of the elements of the 14 points that I understood, breaking down barriers within the organization. And so even as an assistant, what it did, my grandfather's philosophy, even though I couldn't impact anything at the top, what I was able to do within my own sphere of influence was extraordinary in terms of how it helped me move up through the organization at a much, much, much more rapid rate than I would ever have been able to do. And so... AS: And what would you say were the core... What was the core things if you say, you didn't know all of the different things that he said, but there was those core things that really stuck with you. What would you say was the one or two core things, particularly thinking about the listener or the viewer out there who's thinking, "Wow, I would like to be able to make that impact, and I'm not sure how quickly or how much time I have to learn everything." KC: That's a really interesting question. I would say one of the key things that I did was making the system visible that we were actually working in. So, we were a media company that was selling advertising time on TV stations around the country. And we had all this workflow that we had to do, and nobody was making it visible what that flow was. And I remember when I was trained, and I was started off as an assistant to an assistant, and they were training me, all the training was done by memory that somebody else did it. So, a lot of times they were teaching me things that were erroneous that I was trying to do and so, as I got into that position, I made sure that I put that process down so that when I moved up, and I could hand it off to somebody else, they could see what that process was. And some of it was visual, and some of it was work instructions. Other things were like operational definitions of... Somebody was saying, "Hey, can you get this done for me?" "Well, by when?" "By the end of the day?" "By the end of the week?" "By the end of the month? KC: So, there were a lot of little things like that that made a difference in terms of the way, I thought, that helped the other people within the organization, that really made a difference, and helped me move up very quickly within that organization. AS: And then, how did you go from your career to now, The Deming Institute? Maybe you can talk to us about that and tell us about The Deming Institute and the aims of The Deming Institute. KC: As I continued to move up and took on greater roles and responsibilities within this media organization, again, my grandfather and... I would call him and ask him questions about things that I needed help on. I remember one time, in particular, I had an assistant who could not get a particular job done, and we worked on it and worked on it, and I tried to make it visible. I tried to do different things, and I called my grandfather one day. I asked him a question, and I said... And he gave me some page numbers in one of his books to read. He didn't give me the answer; he gave me some page numbers. And it was fantastic because the way I was explaining it to her what needed to be done was the way I understood how it needed to be done and the way I learned. It was not the way she learned. And so, once we had her learn and express this in a different manner, we never had another issue with the job going forward. All this gave me the understanding after I went to one of my grandfather's seminars and continued to read the books. It gave me a sense that I could go out and start my own business. KC: And so, I did with a colleague of mine, and he and I co-founded a software company that provided the sales systems to these companies like I worked for. And without having my grandfather's knowledge, I would never even begun to start a company like that. So, a startup is at such an incredible advantage if you understand the Deming philosophy. Because at the time we started it up, there were two companies that had about 90 share of the market on two different ends of the market. But when we were doing this in 1999, the internet was just starting to hit. And there were, I remember, about 15, 20 different companies that all were trying to get into the same space. Within two years, they were all gone except for two of us. They didn't have the value of understanding what my grandfather had taught, that I had learned from him. And then my partner had in the terms of the way we ran and operated the organization. So, to fast forward, we kept the company for a while, merged it with another company, and then ended up selling it to a big publicly traded company. And in retrospect, I almost wish we hadn't. KC: But by doing that, I ended up at The Deming Institute. And then what was fascinating was I spent two years of what I call penance, staying at that company because of the contract. And Andrew, that was when I saw in just... What I experienced and what we had to put people through, because of the way they looked at things and the way they operated, was just extraordinary in terms of how much it hurt me, how much I knew it was hurting the people that worked for me in the business units that I was running. And I couldn't wait to get out of there. And when I did, I spoke to my mother, Dr. Deming's daughter, Diana Deming Cahill, who founded the Institute with her father and her sister. And I said, "This is an opportunity for me to give back what I have learned from my grandfather," to take an organization that's an all-volunteer organization, that was really focused on maintaining and gaining as many of my grandfather's assets as possible without really saying, "Well, what are we gonna do with all these things now that we have all the videos?" And they did a phenomenal job of getting the videos and articles, and all these different things in getting the organization started. And so, that was kind of the continuation of my journey, was to move into this role and to be one of the leaders in the organization in terms of helping move it forward. AS: So, let's talk about... What you've described in some ways is something that I think anybody that gets deeper into Deming realizes, is that it's really a management philosophy rather than... Like a lot of times for people that don't know much about Deming, but they've heard his name, they go, "Oh yeah, quality, statistical quality control" or something like that. And they miss the whole aspect that it is a way of thinking, it's a way of managing, it's a way of interacting with other people. Like you said, the idea of trying to put yourself in the other person's shoes to make sure... The job of the senior management is to make sure people are trained to the level that they need to be. Maybe you can just talk about the Institute, generally, and that concept of what it is. What is Dr. Deming's teachings? And what is the Institute about? KC: So the Institute, the aim of the Institute, excellent question, is "Enriching society through the understanding of the Deming philosophy." And that can take all sorts of different directions that you might be able to go in. And so what we try to do is, we look at, "Okay. Here's what the aim is; by what method can we achieve that aim? which is what my grandfather always talked about. And we also understand that people out there, like I just mentioned earlier, learn differently. Some people are auditory learners, some people are visual learners, and there's different ways of creating learning environments for people. That's one of the things that I think is great about this podcast, and I'm so thrilled that we're getting back into it and doing that 'cause many people learn by listening to podcasts like this and gain something out of it. Other people need to be in an environment where they're physically there to actually gain something. Others can do it online. Others can do it through webinars, so there's so many different things. So, I believe our responsibility is to utilize what he has given us in a manner that can reach the broadest number of people and have the greatest impact so that they have that yearning for new knowledge. And then when they have that yearning, we have a means by which that they can continue to learn, understand, and apply it. AS: Maybe you can just talk about what's going on with the Institute, but also before you do that, I think for... Not everybody can understand. What is an institute? Is it for-profit? Is it not-for-profit? Are there 100 employees? Is it a few people? Is there a board? Are they volunteers? What is the Institute? KC: Well, I can tell you. I'll talk a little bit about it, but one of the best things I would say, Andrew, is go to www.deming.org, and they can learn a little bit more. But when my grandfather and my mother formed the Institute, they decided to have it be a nonprofit. And I know there was a lot of questions about that because a for-profit organization, there's a lot of things a for-profit organization can do, but there's a lot a nonprofit can do, and I think it was important for my grandfather and my mother that this be something that is a nonprofit, a 501 [c], not-for-profit organization because it also opens a lot of doors. KC: When my colleagues and I and other board members call people, and we're calling from The Deming Institute, a lot of times they'll take that call 'cause they know we're not calling to sell them something and try to sell them a whole bunch of expensive services and things like that. We're calling to help and make a difference. And so, while sometimes there are constraints with the nonprofit that we can and can't do, as you start to look at them, you realize it also opens up a tremendous number of opportunities that we might not also have as a nonprofit. KC: So, we're a nonprofit organization. We have a board that has a number of family members on it besides my mother. My brother is on it. He's vice chairman, my mother is the chairman, and then I'm on it. And then we have several other board members who have been terrific in terms of supporting us. Paula Marshall is on there, Steven Haedrich is on there, Keith Sparkjoy is on there, Kelly Allan. So, we have this fantastic group that provides guidance for us and support for the organization and helps me... I'm also on the board and serve as the president of the board. And we just have this fantastic group. We also have just a outstanding staff right now that has helped propel this forward, whether it's the online learning that we're launching, whether it's our communication, whether it's our administration or fund development, all these different things that we have responsibilities for as a nonprofit. We've just got an unbelievable team, and they all operate virtually. We don't have a single office. We also have this advisory council. We have a Deming fellow and Dr. Ravi Roy who's out there. We have an emeritus trustee board. So, we have a lot of people that worked with my grandfather, and then a lot of others who have this just belief in this philosophy, in these principles, and they know they need to get out there, and they're helping us get it out there. AS: So, before we go on, I think it's kind of important to talk about, "Why Deming? Why Now?" And I'm curious to hear your idea about that. There's all kinds of new books out there. There's all kinds of gurus. There's all kinds of people talking about all kinds of things, "Come on, Kevin, this is old stuff. The world has moved on." Tell us, "Why Deming. Why now?" KC: Andrew, I get that all the time that... Hey, I remember hearing about this guy that helped Japan after World War II, "We're closing on past 75 years on that. Why do we need this guy now? Why do we need this philosophy now?" And what I can tell you is it has worked. Every time it is used in an organization, as they begin that journey and continue down, I never hear that it doesn't work. Now, there are some companies who've tried it, and they're already too far gone to be able to even come back from the abyss that they've already gotten in. As my grandfather put it, "the pit they've already dug themself in," and sometimes you just can't do that. KC: But when these organizations do use this, and we have so many of them that do, it is astounding how it works. And so, the books that you're talking about and all these, what we call, oftentimes, "flavors of the month" that you hear about, just wait five years and see, does anybody really using them anymore, or have they moved on to the next flavor of the month and the next flavor of the month? You go back 20 years and look, a lot of those things are gone, or they've morphed into something completely different where they may have kept the name, and now they've kind of combined a few things to try to keep it going. But the one constant is Deming works and works, and the research shows that it makes a difference. And to me, in this world right now, where we are seeing all these issues with supply, with polarization, with the need to break down barriers, whether it's between countries or within different organizations, there is an answer. Deming, my grandfather, provided that answer, and he showed that pathway. How do you do it, and then how do you get to that next step that, all of a sudden, leads to resolution of these issues that we're facing right now? AS: Yeah, it's a great point, and there's so much there... KC: What do you think? AS: Yeah, it's interesting 'cause I was thinking... The question that we often get, I often get too, I'm sure you get it, it's like, "Well, why isn't this everywhere? Why isn't his teachings everywhere?" And I was thinking about it, and my answer to that is, one of the most powerful things in this world is probably meditation. If you could meditate properly for 30 minutes a day, it would probably calm your mind, and it would make the world a better place and all that. But how many people actually do it? Very few. And I would say that my answer to that is that what Dr. Deming talked about was a transformation. And how many people are ready to make a transformation in their life? It's easier to pick up the flavor of the month and say, "Oh, let's do that, and let's do that," But what he's talking about is moving to a whole other level of starting to think of things as a system. And you and I have talked about caring for the elderly folks in our lives. And nowadays, doctors get more and more specialized, and they can't see the bigger picture. And everything operates in a system, and it's difficult to think in that way. AS: And so, part of what I feel like is that what he's challenging, the challenge that he has put before us, is to start to transform our thinking, to understand statistics, to understand systems, to understand how to acquire knowledge, and to bring this together into something that can really make a difference. And that's not easy. That's a journey. KC: No, it's not easy, and I think you hit it right on the head, Andrew. And I think part of the challenge is, if you're leading an organization, and you came out of, whether it's business school or you moved up through a certain way, well you are leading that organization because you learned how to do it a certain way. Well now, all of a sudden, your organization is having trouble. Because I can tell you right now, and I think it was a Rob Rodin, who worked with my grandfather, said this, "Somebody right now around the corner, around the world, believes they can do what you're doing better, cheaper, and faster than you." KC: And they're just looking at you as an opportunity because you can't innovate as fast anymore. You can't do this as much. I can build a better this, better mouse trap, and all that type of stuff. But the challenge is, is that you've now... If you're leading that organization, you've gotten there. You have gotten to this point by doing it a certain way. Well now, all of a sudden, you're being asked to learn to do something differently, and I think that was... One of the big challenges my grandfather had was that in... When that program aired on June 24th, 1980, there were companies who were in crisis. Don Peterson, who was the Chairman and CEO of Ford when I met with him, when he spoke at one of our conferences at University of Michigan, and he said... KC: One of the things he said to me was, he said, "We were two billion dollars in debt, and we were close to going under, and two years before," I believe it was two years before, "I was named 'CEO of the Year' in the U.S." And he said, "But even for me," he said, "It was so hard for us to change because we'd always done it this way. We always had these already systems in place, and now you're asking us to do these different things." And so, I think sometimes it gets rejected. The other thing that I would say, Andrew, is in 1980, while these companies did Deming at that point, they were in a crisis. And oftentimes, it's not until you're in the crisis that you end up saying, "Hey, I need to do something." And you can listen to podcasts by Paula Marshall and Steven Haedrich, who are on our board, where they were in deep crisis when they came to Deming and now, all of a sudden, they're huge advocates 'cause it not only pulled them out, but it made their organization successful. So oftentimes, it takes a crisis to have people say, "Hey, it's worth looking at something else." AS: It reminds me of one of his quotes, "Learning is not compulsory, neither is survival." And I was thinking, when you were talking about, "Hey, your competitors are learning this," think about the transformation. When we were young, if you saw "Made in Japan" on a product, it meant low quality. And there was a transformation that happened and, all of a sudden, Japan became high quality. Now, think about China. Everything that most people have seen in the, let's say, past 20, 30 years, China, "made in China," was low quality. But they are moving up the quality ladder so fast. And I would argue that, in fact, they haven't really even gotten to some of the Deming teachings of taking that to a real transformation where you start to really bring the quality into the brands and all of that. And there is a possibility that China could go through that transformation, or at least some Chinese companies, just like the Japanese companies did. And then, "ho-hum," I'm sitting in middle America, and I'm realizing, "Whoa, wait a minute. They're transforming. What about me?" And I think that that's a lesson that you're talking about, too, is this idea that, "If you don't wanna learn, other people are learning around you, and by implementing this, you can protect yourself." KC: You make a really good point. That's a very salient point. That's really key that if things are going well for you... And a lot of companies we're looking at before, for example, COVID hit, everything was going well. They weren't planning on a COVID hitting. They weren't... Supply chain was not an issue, and now, all of a sudden, people are having to rethink how they run and operate their business. And I'll tell you, it's fascinating, my colleague, Kelly Allan, and I have... A matter of fact, you went through one of the seminars that he put on, I believe, in Hong Kong if I remember correctly. And when he and I were traveling through the Asia-Pacific region, Singapore area, and we were going to a lot of different companies, one of the questions we would ask... And it happened to me when I started my business, my start-up, and we were struggling for a while, and we sat down at the table one day, there were only about 12 employees in the company, and we were really having a hard time. And we sat down and we talked about, "Does everybody understand what the aim of the business is?" And of course, they knew that... We had put some Deming ideas, and we were using Deming in there, they were like, "Oh yeah, yeah, we know that, Kevin. That's really important that we all know the aim of the business." KC: So, we all wrote down the aim of the business. Well, guess what? All 12 people, including myself, wrote down different aims. So, we were working hard and giving our best efforts towards different aims. Can you imagine how much money, time, energy, and effort were being wasted because, Andrew, you were working for... You thought the aim was this, Kevin thought it was this, somebody else thought it was this. We saw the same thing in these companies as we traveled all around the country and around the world, and we would ask them, "What is the aim?" And these people, it wasn't from lack of... They were all working hard and giving their best efforts, but they all had a different understanding of the aim. Can you imagine how much more efficient and effective you'd be if everybody understood what the aim was? Just that alone... We have never once... Kelly and I together, going into different organizations and talking, never once have we seen one, unless they were a Deming organization, where everybody in that room understood what the aim was, had the same understanding of what the aim was, put it that way. AS: They all had an aim. KC: They all had an aim. Somebody thought it was making money, somebody thought it was selling more products, somebody thought it was... So... AS: It reminds me of this... After many years of myself in the financial world, and I'm advising companies, and I'm... And I had these two clients and... Individually, the CEOs were fascinating and smart and all that. And individually, each member of the team, from both of these companies of the management team, were highly qualified, very experienced in their areas. And one of those companies was doing really well, and the other was doing really poorly. And I just remember thinking about that, and I thought to myself, "Number one, success is, you gotta have the right CEO." And the right CEO or the right leader, let's say, has gotta set the right direction. But more importantly, that's not enough. You can have a great guy, a man or a woman that's great, and they've set the direction. But if you let people fight against each other, you're never gonna get there, so it's that coordination amongst the management teams that's like, that's the magic. And you can't get coordination if everybody doesn't know what's the aim that we're working towards, so that coordination is kind of the systems-thinking aspect of Dr. Deming that I learned. Let's talk about the aim of the podcast. Here we are, and I'm just curious, what are your thoughts on where this podcast goes and what's the purpose? KC: So what I see, the aim of the podcast is also tied into what listeners can expect, and that aim... What I see as the aim of the podcast is raising awareness and understanding of the Deming philosophies and teachings by presenting stories, sharing knowledge of the Deming philosophy, in a variety of different voices and from a variety of different types of organizations. And I think we look to do this by providing real-world examples of what makes Deming such a ground-breaking, unique, and unrivaled successful approach, which we just talked about a little while ago. I think we... We're also going to... And you and I've talked about this, is explore why is Deming different and so much more valuable than the wide variety of improvements and improvement programs and flavor-of-the-months out there? And I think with this podcast, it's really valuable for us to explore the Deming advantage in all of those type of organizations, how it's been implemented in different types of industries and businesses. Because one of the things, Andrew, and you and I have spoken about this before, is a lot of people think, "Well, I'm not gonna do Deming. That's manufacturing. When your grandfather was alive, he focused on manufacturing. It was Ford, it was General Motors, it was Xerox, it was... And all manufacturing companies, and if he wanted it for more than manufacturing, why didn't he spend time?" KC: Well, the thing I would say on that is, that's where the greatest need was at that time, was in the manufacturing. But he spent time; he knew it was important to have this in education, in nonprofit, in government. He started to work, towards the latter part of his life, with Congress several times, trying to get them, as you can imagine how polarized they are, they all wanna help the country, but they all see, "We gotta do it this way or this way. And it's my way or the highway." How do you get to work together, think together, learn together, act together? And so, for us, if we wanna explore that, how it's been implemented in different types of organizations and businesses and industries, and what that transformation is like for these individuals, what challenge... Because it's not all a piece of cake, as you know. What "aha moments" did they have? What challenges were along the ways? Impacts and benefits? And then, talk to people at different stages of their Deming journey. KC: We've got a couple of people that you and I've talked about that are on... That have been doing this... Like Paula Marshall who is the CEO of Bama Companies. She worked with my grandfather. I think she is the only one who not only worked with my grandfather, but has been the CEO all the way through to this day and is still implementing it within her organization. And so, I think the last thing I'd say is we believe that by providing people information and inspiration, they're gonna yearn to learn more, and they're gonna wanna delve deeper into Deming and hopefully apply it in their lives and organizations. And what could be better? AS: Yeah, yeah. And I just wanna highlight that one word. One of the first words that you said is "stories," and this is a great podcast or a great platform for telling stories. We're not gonna go into super technical details about things. We've got great resources, we've got great books, we've got all that stuff. But the stories, and importantly, as you just said, to chronicle the stories of the people who knew Dr. Deming at the time while we have that opportunity, but also all the other people that are going through... And I think the other word that I like is the "journey" and the "transformation," and highlighting that journey and transformation. That's very exciting. So, how do people get the podcast? KC: So, there's a couple of different ways that you can get the podcast going forward. For those of you.. There's many of you that have listened to the podcast in the past. We've had almost 1.6 million podcast... What would you call it downloads or listens? AS: Yeah, downloads. KC: And so, what we're gonna do is we're still gonna make that available just like we always have. But in one of our newer programs, which is called DemingNEXT that we're just launching right now, that program is a subscription program, DemingNEXT. We're gonna put the podcast in there with the video that you and I are talking right now, through Zoom that we're using, so that it will be in there with the video, audio, and then the transcript. And then our producer on the programs, in DemingNEXT, is also putting it in a different format so that you're not just watching a video with the words right next to it, it's in a very, very nice format. I think you saw a sample of that that I sent you the other day, and it's gonna be really cool how it's gonna be accessible through that mechanism so that within that subscription service, you'll be able to see it. But for those who aren't in the subscription, they'll still be able to hear it, just like they always have. AS: So, if somebody is listening to it, let's say they've never really heard that much about Dr. Deming, they're listening and thinking, "This is good stuff. I like what I'm hearing on the podcast." Where do you want them to go so that they get that? Is it... Tell us the website and tell us where they should start. KC: So, what I would suggest is you go to www.deming.org. And then from there, depending upon what you're looking to do, as an individual or with your organization, you're going to see that we have this online program, DemingNEXT, that we're just launching. We have workshops, in-person that we're gonna hopefully going back to soon, seminars in-person. We also have virtual workshops, webinars, some conferences coming up. So, there's a whole different, wide variety of ways that you can learn. But I think one of... The big thing that I would say is the launch of our DemingNEXT program which is an online learning program. It's a blended learning program where we're building in all sorts of webinars into it as a part of it. So, it's not just online. KC: That opens us up to a whole different world that, as you know. You attended a seminar in person in Hong Kong, and I wanted to talk about that in a few minutes, but I don't know how many people were there, maybe 40, 50, 60, whatever that is. It's not 400, 800, 600, that we need to get that pivotal number of people that are learning this stuff, understanding, and applying it. So, the DemingNEXT online is a mechanism for us to be able to do that around the clock, around the world, at any time, with organizations of different sizes where they can use these in their own learning management systems. They can use it in our learning management system. They can use it in working with their consultants who they're... Who are advising. There's all sorts of different ways to do that. AS: So, if someone is listening and think, "My goodness, I need my management team to get, to understand, some of these things," they can use the resources that DemingNEXT, just directly and say, "Hey, you guys, I want you to... Everybody to listen to this particular module," or that type of thing. Or if there's a consultant out there that's helping people implement, they could say, "Wow, why don't I use that as a tool within my toolbox?" So, it sounds like... It's really gonna be something that can be implemented across a company without having to go to a seminar if they can't or whatever. KC: You hit it right on the head because what we have is that... We'll oftentimes have CEOs and executives come with their management teams to a workshop or seminar like the one you went to. Well, then they come to us afterwards and say, "This is fantastic. We're gonna start to implement it, but I've got another 200 people in my company. I don't have the ability to send them to the seminar, or have you bring the seminar to us." Some companies are doing that, but others are saying, "We don't have the ability to do that, yet I want everybody within the organization to have an understanding of the common language, what we're talking about when we talk about a special cause, a common cause, an operational definition, system, system of profound knowledge, understanding variation theory of... Just a basic understanding." KC: And so, that was one of the things that pushed us to develop this DemingNEXT is, to not only have it available for leadership and management, but for all levels of the organization to be able to understand, learn, and apply it, and not to push back. Because that was one of the things, again, going back to Don Peterson and Ford was, even though they sent hundreds of people every month, sometimes thousands, he had 150,000 people around the world, they couldn't send everybody through. And the people that didn't go through were the ones that were a challenge. Not because they wanted to be a problem, but because they didn't understand what was being talked about when management was saying, "Hey, we need to look at our suppliers differently." KC: Well, no, that's not how we do it. And so, it's hard. You know what it's like. When you push against somebody, they push back. They always do. So, what you need to do is provide them a level of understanding, and then it's accepted, and then they're not pushing back and fighting you. They're actually embracing it. And so, that's one of the advantages of using this approach, is that it can be blended learning. It can be done at your own and, like you said, with consultants. We already have a number of consultants that have their own specific external portal tied into our DemingNEXT where they're working with clients in a completely different environment to help support what they're already teaching them. AS: It's exciting. That's a whole other level. When you think about my own Deming journey, I think about, there was limited resources. There are some books, and I found what I could find and that type of thing, but you kinda had to piece it together. And so, I think I'm really excited, and I feel like the journey going forward, it's so important to get this message out. But the ability to get it out now is really there, and so I would say that's really accomplishing the main aim of the Institute. KC: You're right, and for those who are listening who know about it, a lot of my grandfather's videos, writings, case studies, articles, things like that that he did, they're also in there. But we've spent a lot of time using subject matter experts, some of whom worked directly with my grandfather, to help us develop specific courses that are tied into the way adults learn. Adults, a lot of times, don't wanna sit and watch my grandfather go through the red bead experiment for an hour and the lessons of the red beads on a video recording that is 40 years old. The audio is not that great, the video is not that great, but you know what's interesting, Andrew, what we have found is once they go through some of the developed courses that we've worked on, then all of a sudden they wanna learn more. They then go and watch it. They'll spend the hour watching my grandfather do the red beads and lessons of the red beads or talk about the 14 points in these long-form video formats that were acceptable back in the '80s and early '90s. But we need to get them there to be able to say, "I wanna learn and go ahead and do this." AS: Yeah, it's... The method of learning has changed so much. But it's so fun to watch those old videos 'cause you see his reactions, and you see the way he's berating people and making... He was also a very funny guy at times. He would really have some great cracks. [chuckle] KC: Yeah. He really did. Let me ask you a question if you don't mind. How did you come to know about my grandfather, and what was kind of your Deming journey? You and I came across each other years and years ago, but I'd love for the audience to also hear that. AS: So, I was a young guy, studying finance at Cal State Long Beach in Los Angeles, and I got a job at Pepsi in operations in Los Angeles. And Pepsi was also kind enough to pay for my MBA if I got good grades, and I did. And basically, I worked in operations, and I just saw all of these troubles. Now, I happened to be... It was 1989 when I went to work for Pepsi. And I had learned how to use a computer so I could make charts and graphs, and I started charting stuff and putting stuff up on the walls. And I had this habit I've had all my life, is I just chart performance of different people and put it up there, and then I don't say anything about it. And then, I just let people go and look at it, and then they start asking questions. And then you start getting information from that, and so that was kind of where I... And then there was a manager at Pepsi, he's like, "Oh, you're really into statistics." I wasn't necessarily into statistics, but he thought I was, and he said, "You ought to go to listen to this guy." AS: And so, Pepsi flew me in 1990, in October of 1990, to George Washington University and to take the instituting Dr. Deming's methods for management of productivity and quality. And I got 1.44 continuing education credits for it. But I remember... KC: Wow, you got some CEUs. AS: Yeah, I remember going to this event. It was a huge room. I was 23, maybe 24. I was a young guy, all the older people in there. And I just thought, the only thing I'm gonna do is, I'm just gonna go to the front row. And I just sat in the front row listening, and it just... Everything was blowing my mind. I had been working for a year or so in Pepsi, and I'd seen all of the problems we had in the factory, and then here was the solution. And so, I really caught on to that, and I went back and I started to try to implement that. And then, I started to realize what he was talking about. Change has to happen from the top because a young guy trying to make an impact, you can do something, but you can't make a huge impact. And that was kind of my first beginning. And then I got Dr. Deming's book, "Out of the Crisis." I still have the one he signed at that time, and I got a great picture of me with him at that time. AS: And then I went back, and my roommate, Dale, and I used to read chapters and discuss them in my apartment, in our apartment where we lived in L.A. And then another time in 1992, he had a seminar done by quality... What was it called? A quality enhancement seminar. Yes, that was 1992. And so, I got a double dose, and I listened to him and was blown away. I just kept learning. And then I eventually moved to Thailand, and I was a young guy teaching finance, and I went to work in finance. But the point was, my best friend, that he and I were reading those chapters of Dr. Deming's teaching. Dale came, and we set up a company called CoffeeWORKS here in Thailand, and we just really wanted to implement Dr. Deming's teaching. We weren't fanatical about control charts or anything like that. We were operating in pretty much chaos here on the outskirts of Bangkok, but we definitely tried to implement ideas like systems thinking and treating people with respect and dignity and trying to get out fear in the workforce. That's a little bit of my journey. KC: So, how is the company doing? AS: Well, we've survived, and we've survived COVID, that's for sure. And basically, we've been in operation about 28 years. And so, we have about roughly 100 employees, and we're growing, and we're profitable, and we've learned a lot. I would say that also operating in a foreign country has always been a challenge. But I would say we're doing okay, and our objective is to try to make sure that we are making an environment where employees really enjoy their work and feel trust and feel cooperation in particular. KC: And with you saying that, we're hearing in the States, and you're experiencing it, how many... So many companies seem to take it for granted that, hey, the employees are gonna stay because this is really their only job opportunity here, and that has been just spun completely out of control with the advent of COVID. And now, all of a sudden, people are saying, "Wait a second. I wanna be at a company where I feel I can make a difference, and I enjoy being there because I've now realized that life can be pretty darn short, and I need to have, as my grandfather always talked about, joy in work." And we would talk to executives in organizations in years past, a lot of times, we would never bring up joy in work because they didn't see it that way. It was just "grind it out," have these people just work. And now, all of a sudden, there's this realization how important that is, and I think that's another... Once you implement that Deming philosophy, it has an enormous impact on employee retention, on joy in work which is keeping people there, that they wanna stay. They wanna be a part of something where they enjoy being there, and I think that's just one more reason why the Deming philosophy, we talked about it earlier, is still even relevant today, and more so than ever. AS: And that's part of driving out fear, is making a trusting place and Dale's... Now, it's interesting situation in my case. I never worked as an employee in my own company. Dale is the managing director, and we own it equally. But we decided in Thailand, it would be better if I focus my efforts on building my career in the world of finance. AS: Now, this is where I think my experience with Dr. Deming becomes interesting. The first part is that I felt like I really wanted my employees in the coffee business to understand it, and that's the reason why I started taking notes about the 14 points and thinking about how would I explain this. The way he talked, I don't think it's gonna translate very well into Thai language and for Thai people. How do I simplify that? And that's when I started writing the book, "Transform Your Business with Doctor Deming's 14 Points," and ultimately translated it into a Thai language so that the employees would be able to get some access to this and understand it, and that was my only real goal. I did put it up on Amazon. But the main thing was how do I bring this teaching to these people who really didn't know anything about it? KC: Oh, that's interesting, I didn't know that was really the basis for the book. I know there's some companies that we've mentioned already today who actually have purchased your book and use it as kind of a book club type thing that they do with their team members as they go through the one that you wrote. So, that's pretty interesting. I didn't realize that about... With you about the 14 points. AS: Now, the other angle that I think it's been interesting because one of the things that Dr. Deming talked about was the idea of "don't be focused on quarterly results," but isn't that the whole financial world? KC: Well, it's funny 'cause I was just about to ask you. With all your focus on finance and understanding it, you've gotta run up that... Even if you're not a publicly traded company, we talk to organizations that are always focused on that. One of the suppliers that we work with at the Deming Institute, we literally left them about six months ago because you could always tell it was it... I'd always look, and I'd go, I'd start getting the phone call going, and if I hadn't thought about it, it's gotta be the end of the quarter 'cause, man, they're just trying to sell me something now. And they were always trying to gain their numbers, do something by the end of the quarter. And I said, "You know what, I'll let you watch it, as my guest, go through some of the DemingNEXT stuff because as long as your management will do it because you have no idea the impact you're having," and we left them because... KC: And we ended up going with a different vendor because we could see this happening, and it was getting worse and worse. And we were told there was a new CFO that had come in. There was a real focus on, "we've got to get the numbers up." And so, what they ended up doing was cutting customer support because that was an easy one. People like us already had a contract with them for a certain amount of time, and they figured they might be able to get us to renew it. But the impact... Stop. I can keep going on and on. AS: Well, maybe I'll just explain it. I grew up as an analyst in the stock market in Thailand, and I was eventually voted the number one analyst in Thailand. And I was the head of the CFA Society for Chartered Financial Analysts which was an honor of a lifetime. And I had seen, maybe... I've met with maybe a thousand fund managers, and I've taken them to meet with a thousand CEOs. And a CEO asked me, "What would be your advice from everything you learned?" And I just said, "Never listen to analysts. They don't know about your business. They don't know how to run your business, and you have to be very careful. All they wanna do is set a fire of quarterly earnings." Which brings me to, having taught finance all my career, when I walk into a finance class nowadays, I tell the students, the first thing I tell them is, "Finance adds no value." And that puts their head in a spin, particularly, 'cause they're studying that topic, and I said, "What adds value?" AS: And we have a long discussion about what adds value in a business, and I say, "Ultimately it's the products and the service, and finance is a support function just as human resources. And the purpose of finance is to operate as a mirror to reflect management's decisions to help us see the consequences, short term and long-term, of management decisions. And it's when finance starts being the head of the business that you get into trouble." Never make, as I say, "Never make the right finance decision over the right business decision." AS: Always make the right business decision over the right finance decision. So, I've come at finance from a very, very different perspective, and that's allowed me also to help my clients improve their profitability and help them really think about profit very differently than a lot. And that's where I think the combination of my experience with Dr. Deming, as well as my finances, bring me to a place that I really enjoy talking about the finances of a business. KC: Yeah, and I think what you said is really important because if the focus of the company is on... is solely on making a profit, they may make a profit to the detriment of the organization that eventually puts it out of business. I always loved what, I think it was Isaacson's book on Steve Jobs, where he was talking to Jobs about what was really the... I don't think they use the word aim, but what was the aim of the organization? And it wasn't to make money. Apple wasn't there to make money. It was to make insanely great products that help people. And then, the money was a byproduct of it. They sure did well taking that approach. Now, you look at somebody like Enron, for those of you that remember Enron. Well, their goal was to make money. Well, that didn't work out so well. And you can see that the finance, like you said, if that's where it becomes the focus on is how do we just make money, and every decision is based on making money, eventually that is going to bite you big time. And the companies that focus on that are usually gone at some point within a certain amount of time. AS: Yeah, and that's one of the reasons why I feel like Deming is such a critical tool, or critical knowledge, that people need to have now because we're slipping into an era of data. And we are very fast, quickly slipping into this era where a young person graduating from university today may think that their job is setting key performance indicators and tracking them, and you can almost imagine the ideal job... I have a cartoonish picture in my head of a young manager these days with a bunch of screens in front of them and KPIs going. And then they've got this button that sends an electrical shock to the employee who's not hitting their KPIs, and then that's it. There's business and there's management, and I fear that a lot people are feeling like being tough on KPIs is what good management is, and they're lost on that. KC: Well, and I can say if they come in and start to learn Deming, whether it's using DemingNEXT, whether it's using other resources or videos or books or things like that that we have, if their focus is on solely on KPIs, I encourage you. Come in and read and go through and learn some of this, whatever the best way for you to learn is, because it will open up a completely new world in terms of understanding what the impact of those on the organization. KC: And it's usually a detrimental impact. And what the potential is by looking at things a little bit differently, or a lot differently, depending upon where you are, but you're right. There's so much stuff, and you hear about big data all the time, and we've all seen so much. So many journalists, and I always feel bad for them because they're looking at these data figures, whether it was COVID or other different things, and they make interpretations that are oftentimes erroneous. And we see it all the time. Andrew, it must drive you crazy when you see, "Well, the stock market was down yesterday, it must mean this is happening." Two days later, "Well, the stock market is up because this is happening." Talk about not understanding variation and special and common cause and reacting to a common cause as a special cause. It's unbelievable. But once you understand it, you start to see things, and it opens up a completely different world for you. AS: And one part of my business is managing people's money. And for that part of my business and investing, it's so critical what I learned from Dr. Deming about that they're ultimately... What I say is that we can understand the variation and the randomness of a flip of a coin or at the roulette wheel. We understand these core principles of randomness and variation, but we then kind of abandon all that when we go into life, and we don't... We miss that there's this subtle thing happening below the scenes and the outcomes of things that we're seeing. There is a portion of those outcomes being driven by randomness and variation. And if we don't have awareness of that, we will get misled, and it will happen all the time to amateurs in the stock market that will assign special causes to different things. And they get all excited about things, and they miss the whole randomness and variation. And that is a carryover from the world of what Dr. Deming taught in statistics into the world of the markets and investing. KC: Yeah, it's a big problem. I talk to people all the time. And that treating a special cause as a common, you know, common variation as special variation, and vice versa, ends up being huge. And the thing is, we already know it in our lives. We know to get to the grocery store is gonna take us between 9 1/2 minutes and 11 minutes, and the average is, whatever, 10 minutes. But we know we're never gonna arrive there exactly at 10 minutes. We know. And when you ask people, "Why is it?" Well, because there's variation in there. It's 9 1/2 to 11 minutes to get there. Yet they go in their companies and they teach. They, all of a sudden say, "Well, I got there in 9 1/2. Oh my gosh. I got there really quickly." That's great. Okay. Well then, the next time when you get there at 10 1/2, "What did I do wrong?" And they try to fix that instead of understanding that, "Well, wait a second. I know how this works when I go to the store. Why do I not apply the same concepts when I'm in the business?" AS: And every now and then, they come home, and they say, "It took me two hours to go to the store." Oh, what happened?" "Well, I had a flat tire, or there was a fire, and there was a..." And all of a sudden, you start to understand special causes. Now, I think I would like to wrap it up at this point and ask you, do you have any parting words for the audience? What would you like the audience to understand about what's going on at the Institute? What's going on with the podcast? Let's leave them with something exciting. KC: Well, I don't know how exciting this is, but one of the questions that I get right now, Andrew, is what would your grandfather say about DemingNEXT? Because it's completely different. It's not always using just him because there's people out there that tell me, "Unless you're using Deming's exact words, then it's wrong." And I'm like, "No, no." My grandfather, when I look through his books, quoted people all over the place, whether it was Don Wheeler, whether it was Ed Baker, Joyce Orsini, he was always learning. Bill Scherkenbach. He was learning from everybody. KC: And I would say the one question I get a lot now is, what would your grandfather think about DemingNEXT? And I gotta tell you, I believe he would be absolutely thrilled because he would see that as another means, another way that we have done a PDSA Plan-Do-Study-Act where we have tried to improve the means for us to get his message out to a broader audience. And I think he would be absolutely thrilled with what we've done, how we're doing it, why we're doing it. And I believe he would be very excited about what that impact is to get that message out. Because I know when he departed from this earth, I think the thing that probably bothered him the most was he didn't have more time to get his message out. He knew that he was running out of time as he got older, and he formed this organization to get that message out. And I think that, to me, is an important thing, is by what method are we getting this message out that will accommodate the needs of how people learn, understand, interact within their own organizations? AS: Well, ladies and gentlemen, you've heard it from the man who probably is the closest to understanding the ultimate aims of Dr. Deming. Kevin, I wanna thank you for this great time together and sharing your personal experiences, as well as divisions, and the opportunities that I see at the Institute and what you're doing. That concludes another great story from the worldwide Deming community. Remember to go to deming.org, as Kevin has told us, to continue your journey. This is your host, Andrew Stotz, and I will leave you with one of my favorite quotes from Dr. Deming, "People are entitled to joy in work."

Machine learning
Why should large banks be broken up to prevent financial corruption

Machine learning

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 16:17


The article says to break up the banks is "political demagoguery" and "embraces a dubious 'too big to fail' doctrine " It's a bunch of baloney The "too big to fail" doctrine was created by the banks themselves in their lobbying to deregulate the financial system It's the opposite of "dubious " It was one of the biggest lies ever told by the bankers They made it up to get the Congress and the President to repeal the New Deal system of regulation The repeal of Glass-Steagall was the most important of the deregulations that the banks pushed for It allowed the banks to create the most destructive financial crisis in history, which they then used as an excuse to get the government to bail them out That's why they lied and said they were "too big to fail " The banks are not now, nor were they then, "too big to fail " They were too big and too politically powerful to be held accountable for the damage they did The government would have had no problem breaking them up and letting them go bankrupt That's what it did in the 1980s when it broke up AT&T The government has no problem breaking up companies for far less damage than the banks did For example, it took apart Enron for a tiny fraction of the damage caused by the banks What the banks want is to be "too big to jail " That's what the "too big to fail" doctrine is all about It's not "dubious " It's pure evil It is so evil that the government went along with it and made it the official policy of the United States President Obama, who could have done something about this when he was elected, instead gave his blessing to the banks by appointing as his Secretary of the Treasury Timothy Geithner, who was one of the people who created the "too big to fail" doctrine while he was working at the NY Fed The media has been part of the conspiracy While the banks have been getting more and more concentrated, the media has been promoting the lie that they are not The New York Times is the most to blame It has a huge amount of influence It could have changed the course of history But instead it has chosen to help cover up for the banks --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/david-nishimoto/message

Charter Cities Podcast
Seeding the Future 01: Philanthropy for Policy Change with John D. Arnold

Charter Cities Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 49:44


Welcome to Seeding the Future, a podcast from the Charter Cities Institute, where we explore how giving and philanthropy are changing as wealth is created in new industries, at younger ages, and by more diverse demographics. In this inaugural epode, we hear from John Arnold, American philanthropist, former Enron executive, and Founder of Arnold Ventures, about philanthropy for policy change. John hit it big trading natural gas in the 1990s and 2000s, going on to found one of the most successful energy trading hedge funds, Centaurus Energy, after leaving Enron. He now ranks as one of the world's richest people, with a net worth well over a billion dollars, and runs Arnold Ventures (formerly the Laura and John Arnold Foundation) with his wife, an organization doing groundbreaking work in criminal justice reform. Today, John shares how education reform, system design, and public policy inform his giving and some of the challenges he has encountered in advocating for policy. We discuss political polarization, crypto wealth, and their impact on philanthropy and John shares his interesting perspective on nonprofits as third parties that can solve problems in areas that governments and the private sector can't, plus so much more! Make sure not to miss this conversation with the billionaire philanthropist taking on criminal justice reform, John Arnold. Key Points From This Episode: •   How education reform, system design, and public policy have informed John's philanthropy. •   What his strategy for impact entails when it comes to advocating for policy. •   Major changes John has witnessed in philanthropy, including a shift to ‘giving while living'. •   Bridging the gap between founders and the nonprofit world with patience and commitment. •   Why John believes nonprofits need to be more direct with donors. •   Challenges that come with advocating for policy, particularly in the criminal justice space. •   Political polarization and philanthropy; what role nonprofits can play in voting reform. •   How decentralized crypto wealth will impact the philanthropy of the future. •   Global conflict resolution efforts and why organizations have lost momentum in this area. •   Finding problems that philanthropy can solve by looking in areas that are too politically or financially risky for the government or the private sector. •   John's thoughts on the disconnect between philanthropic intent and philanthropic action. •   The inherent flaws of donor-advised funds that the ACE Act seeks to solve. •   Why John is impressed by philanthropic efforts in the climate change space. •   Why he encourages founders, philanthropists, and nonprofits not to wait until tomorrow. •   How to address the issue of connecting nonprofits with donors and vice versa.   Links Mentioned in Today's Episode: https://twitter.com/JohnArnoldFndtn (John D. Arnold on Twitter) https://www.arnoldventures.org/ (Arnold Ventures) https://ssir.org/articles/entry/against_big_bets# (‘Against Big Bets') https://chartercitiesinstitute.org/ (Charter Cities Institute) https://www.linkedin.com/in/skye-lawrence/ (Skye Lawrence on LinkedIn)

Zonebourse
283: Perdre $300 millions ... avec le sourire

Zonebourse

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 8:11


Perdre $300 millions, c'est rare ... mais réussir à finir l'année en surperformant son indice de référence, c'est exceptionnel! Retour sur la perte de Bill Miller dans Enron en 2001.

White Collar Crimes
Enron- The Biggest Company That Didn't Exist

White Collar Crimes

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 22:46


In the 1990's, Enron seemed to have it all. They were perceived as a giant in the energy industry. But it would soon be discovered to all be a facade built on illegal and shady accounting practices among other illegal activities. Sadly, thousands lost their livelihood from this scam. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ryan-christopher-horn/support

White Collar Crime and Fraud Podcast
Season 2 Episode 5 - "Sir" Robert Allen Stanford

White Collar Crime and Fraud Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 31:39


Unfortunately, Enron is not the only major financial scandal to be part of the history of Houston. Robert Allen Standford, once knighted and known as "Sir" Allen Stanford, perpetuated one of the largest Ponzi schemes and financial fraud in the history of the United States - second only to Bernie Madoff. Stanford was convicted for his crimes and is now serving a 110 year sentence. We examine Allen Stanford's unique Ponzi scheme using an offshore bank that he himself owned. Opening and Closing Music: Penguin music - ModernChillout - Background Music [NCS Release] --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/gene-tausk/message

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast
TIP435: Why the Youngest Billionaire Walked Away from Wall Street w/ John Arnold & Michael Faye

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 57:33


IN THIS EPISODE, YOU'LL LEARN:02:57 - John's relationship with money and experience with philanthropy.07:48 - John's experience as an early employee at Enron, becoming the head of their natural gas trading desk. His early career that led him to become the youngest billionaire in the US in 2007.15:48 - John's journey in founding his own hedge fund. 51:17 - What led Michael to cofound GiveDirectly. 52:44 - How GiveDirectly operates and why it's important to start your own philanthropy efforts today.And a whole lot more!*Disclaimer: Slight timestamp discrepancies may occur due to podcast platform differences.BOOKS AND RESOURCES:ArnoldVentures.org.AccelerateCharitableGiving.org.John on Elon's recent $5.7B DAF contribution.GiveDirectly.org/WSB - listeners get their first gift to people in extreme poverty matched up to $1000Michael's op-ed on Foundations / DAFs.John Arnold's Twitter. Michael Faye's Twitter.Arnold Ventures' Twitter.Give Directly's Twitter.Trey Lockerbie Twitter.Preston, Trey & Stig's tool for picking stock winners and managing our portfolios: TIP Finance Tool.New to the show? Check out our We Study Billionaires Starter Packs.Invest in the $1.7 trillion art market with Masterworks.io. Use promocode WSB to skip the waitlist.Confidently take control of your online world without worrying about viruses, phishing attacks, ransomware, hacking attempts, and other cybercrimes with Avast One.Find Pros & Fair Pricing for Any Home Project for Free with Angi.Get access to some of the most sought-after real estate in the U.S. with Crowdstreet.Take advantage of a free mortgage review and learn about custom loans that can save you big money with American Financing.Find joy in comfort with Faherty. Use promo code WSB to snag 20% off all your new spring staples!If you're a sales professional, get every real-time advantage you can get with Sales Navigator. Enjoy 60 days of free trial today.Protect your online activity TODAY with ExpressVPN, the VPN rated #1 by CNET and Wired, and get an extra 3 months FREE on a one-year package.Send, spend and receive money around the world easily with Wise.Yieldstreet allows you to invest beyond the stock market with an evolving marketplace of alternative investments. Create your account today.Get in early on medical technology, breakthroughs in ag tech and food production, solutions in the multi-billion dollar robotic industry, and so much more with a FREE OurCrowd account. Open yours today.Canada's #1 employee benefits plan for small businesses! The Chambers Plan evolves with the way you work and live while keeping the rates stable. Opt for the simple, stable, and smart choice for your business.Reclaim your health and arm your immune system with convenient, daily nutrition. Athletic Greens is going to give you a FREE 1 year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase.The interval fund, a breakthrough innovation. Only at Mackenzie.Live local in Melbourne and enjoy $0 Stamp Duty*!Gain the skills you need to move your career a level up when you enroll in a Swinburne Online Business Degree. Search Swinburne Online today.Browse through all our episodes (complete with transcripts) here.Support our free podcast by supporting our sponsors.HELP US OUT!Help us reach new listeners by leaving us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts! It takes less than 30 seconds, and really helps our show grow, which allows us to bring on even better guests for you all! Thank you – we really appreciate it!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Lance Roberts' Real Investment Hour
Will the Fed Hike Rates Eight Times?

Lance Roberts' Real Investment Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 47:55


(3/31/22) "The Smartest Guys in The Room," the story of Enron and Video streaming juxtaposed with the launch Tuesday of CNN+; why a market correction is needed to work off excesses. It's a good time to be an agnostic: Neither Bull or Bear. So how many times will the Fed raise rates (before something gets broken)? The Carbon Credits scam and "green gas premiums; the adverse consequences from the quest for "green" energy. How to capture pig gas (ew).Market fundamentals & Valuations; buying value stocks now. SEG-1: Enron to CNN+, Market Commentary: Correction Needed SEG-2: Markets Move into April: A Good Time to Be Agnostic SEG-3: It's Not Easy Being Green: The Carbon Credit Scam SEG-4: Market Fundamentals & Buying Value Stocks Now Hosted by RIA Advisors' Chief Investment Strategist Lance Roberts, CIO, w Portfolio Manager, Michael Lebowitz, CFA -------- Watch today's show on our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XDzMYWFn4kI&list=PLVT8LcWPeAugpcGzM8hHyEP11lE87RYPe&index=1 -------- Our Latest "Three Minutes on Markets & Money: Will Markets Continue Their Bullish March?" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9OezBEZymMI&list=PLVT8LcWPeAujOhIFDH3jRhuLDpscQaq16&index=1 -------- Our previous show, "The Biggest Risk to markets Now" is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhDFG8PrOM0&list=PLVT8LcWPeAugpcGzM8hHyEP11lE87RYPe&index=1&t=2s -------- Articles mentioned in this podcast: https://realinvestmentadvice.com/fed-liquidity-drain-is-coming https://realinvestmentadvice.com/bear-squeeze-or-return-of-the-bull/ https://realinvestmentadvice.com/bailouts-and-the-demise-of-capitalism-and-free-markets/ -------- Get more info & commentary: https://realinvestmentadvice.com/newsletter/ -------- SUBSCRIBE to The Real Investment Show here: http://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealInvestmentShow -------- Visit our Site: www.realinvestmentadvice.com Contact Us: 1-855-RIA-PLAN -------- Subscribe to RIA Pro: https://riapro.net/home -------- Connect with us on social: https://twitter.com/RealInvAdvice https://twitter.com/LanceRoberts https://www.facebook.com/RealInvestmentAdvice/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/realinvestmentadvice/ #MarketCorrection #Inflation #Quarter_End_Selling #Enron #CNN+ #CarbonCredit #Markets #Money #Investing

The Real Investment Show Podcast
Will the Fed Hike Rates Eight Times?

The Real Investment Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 47:55


(3/31/22) "The Smartest Guys in The Room," the story of Enron and Video streaming juxtaposed with the launch Tuesday of CNN+; why a market correction is needed to work off excesses. It's a good time to be an agnostic: Neither Bull or Bear. So how many times will the Fed raise rates (before something gets broken)? The Carbon Credits scam and "green gas premiums; the adverse consequences from the quest for "green" energy. How to capture pig gas (ew).Market fundamentals & Valuations; buying value stocks now. SEG-1: Enron to CNN+, Market Commentary: Correction Needed SEG-2: Markets Move into April: A Good Time to Be Agnostic SEG-3: It's Not Easy Being Green: The Carbon Credit Scam SEG-4: Market Fundamentals & Buying Value Stocks Now Hosted by RIA Advisors' Chief Investment Strategist Lance Roberts, CIO, w Portfolio Manager, Michael Lebowitz, CFA -------- Watch today's show on our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XDzMYWFn4kI&list=PLVT8LcWPeAugpcGzM8hHyEP11lE87RYPe&index=1 -------- Our Latest "Three Minutes on Markets & Money: Will Markets Continue Their Bullish March?" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9OezBEZymMI&list=PLVT8LcWPeAujOhIFDH3jRhuLDpscQaq16&index=1 -------- Our previous show, "The Biggest Risk to markets Now" is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhDFG8PrOM0&list=PLVT8LcWPeAugpcGzM8hHyEP11lE87RYPe&index=1&t=2s -------- Articles mentioned in this podcast: https://realinvestmentadvice.com/fed-liquidity-drain-is-coming https://realinvestmentadvice.com/bear-squeeze-or-return-of-the-bull/ https://realinvestmentadvice.com/bailouts-and-the-demise-of-capitalism-and-free-markets/ -------- Get more info & commentary: https://realinvestmentadvice.com/newsletter/ -------- SUBSCRIBE to The Real Investment Show here: http://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealInvestmentShow -------- Visit our Site: www.realinvestmentadvice.com Contact Us: 1-855-RIA-PLAN -------- Subscribe to RIA Pro: https://riapro.net/home -------- Connect with us on social: https://twitter.com/RealInvAdvice https://twitter.com/LanceRoberts https://www.facebook.com/RealInvestmentAdvice/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/realinvestmentadvice/ #MarketCorrection #Inflation #Quarter_End_Selling #Enron #CNN+ #CarbonCredit #Markets #Money #Investing

The ROI Podcast
How this algorithm predicted the downfall of Enron | Ep. 210

The ROI Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2022 28:07


Enron. A name synonymous with fraud, greed, and what NOT to do as a leader. And in the wake of the downfall, it was Kelley School of Business Accounting Professor Daniel Beneish who predicted their company was cooking the books with his M-Score financial model. Even still to this day, Professor Beneish's model remains the most viable means of predicting corporate fraud. On this episode, we sit down with Professor Beneish who shares the inner workings of how his model works while exploring ways to make sure our organizations operate in an ethical manner. ---- Do you have a question? Looking to get help on a business decision? Know a great guest for our show? Email roipod@iupui.edu so we can help your organization make better business decisions. ---- Ready to take your next step? Find out if a Kelley MBA is right for you: https://bit.ly/35cLVqy

99% Invisible
483- Grid Locked

99% Invisible

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 49:38


In February 2021, it began to snow in Austin, Texas, which was unusual, and exciting for some, at least until the power dropped out for millions of people. To many, this came as a shock – how could a state known for its energy production have such widespread, prolonged power outages? To understand the situation, one has to look at the history of the grid, and how Texas came to be what we call an “energy island.” It's the only state in the lower 48 that operates its own independent electric grid.For more on the Texas grid by Mose Buchele, be sure to check out The Disconnect.Grid Locked

99% Invisible
483- Grid Locked

99% Invisible

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 49:38


In February 2021, it began to snow in Austin, Texas, which was unusual, and exciting for some, at least until the power dropped out for millions of people. To many, this came as a shock – how could a state known for its energy production have such widespread, prolonged power outages? To understand the situation, one has to look at the history of the grid, and how Texas came to be what we call an “energy island.” It's the only state in the lower 48 that operates its own independent electric grid.For more on the Texas grid by Mose Buchele, be sure to check out The Disconnect.Grid Locked

Video Game Newsroom Time Machine

Nintendo of America loses its President EA drops its online plans IBM gets out of the PC biz These stories and many more on this episode of the VGNRTM This episode we will look back at the biggest stories in and around the video game industry in February 2002. As always, we'll mostly be using magazine cover dates, and those are of course always a bit behind the actual events. Mads from the Retro Asylum is our cohost for this ep. You can also find him on these amazing podcasts: http://retroasylum.com and https://playthroughpod.com/ Get us on your mobile device: Android: https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly92aWRlb2dhbWVuZXdzcm9vbXRpbWVtYWNoaW5lLmxpYnN5bi5jb20vcnNz iOS: https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/video-game-newsroom-time-machine And if you like what we are doing here at the podcast, don't forget to like us on your podcasting app of choice, YouTube, and/or support us on patreon! https://www.patreon.com/VGNRTM Send comments on twitter @videogamenewsr2 Or Instagram https://www.instagram.com/vgnrtm Or videogamenewsroomtimemachine@gmail.com Links: 7 Minutes in Heaven: The Fish Files (GBC) Video version - https://www.patreon.com/posts/64113628 https://www.mobygames.com/game/gameboy-color/fish-files https://www.mobygames.com/game/gameboy-color/scooby-doo-classic-creep-capers https://www.mobygames.com/game/new-addams-family-series Corrections: January 2002 Ep - https://www.patreon.com/posts/62708089 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nintendo_Entertainment_System https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PlayStation_2 https://www.ign.com/articles/2000/11/04/gamecube-versus-playstation-2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2EsPup-RxIA https://gta.fandom.com/wiki/GameCube https://kotaku.com/the-famicom-s-built-in-microphone-was-wonderfully-weird-1840887609 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LaserScope https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ingress_(video_game) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neo_Geo https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_3DO_Company https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trip_Hawkins Jerry Jewell Interview - https://www.patreon.com/posts/57602735 2002: Sony sues over Mod chips https://retrocdn.net/index.php?title=File%3AMAN!AC_DE_2002-02.pdf&page=45 https://www.cnet.com/tech/tech-industry/sony-wins-case-against-seller-of-mod-chips/ https://quade.co/ps2-modchip-guide/ Sony launches budget line in Japan https://www.kultboy.com/index.php?site=kult/kultmags&km=show&id=4469 pg. 12 https://www.ign.com/articles/2001/11/14/sce-declares-playstation-2-mega-hits https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Essentials_(PlayStation) EA drops ea.com https://archive.org/details/Computer_Gaming_World_Issue_211/page/n35/mode/2up https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GameSpy https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pogo.com Gordon Walton Interview Part 1 https://www.patreon.com/posts/52644122 Gordon Walton interview Part 2 https://www.patreon.com/posts/53726080 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ultima_Online https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sims_Online TV is getting interactive Edge 107, pg. 10 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interactive_television https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXlALQW6bgQ Street Fighter II is coming to mobile Edge 107 pg. 13 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_QiU1IQKuaw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=69v1CDn_Fds Edge magazine profiles game consultancies Edge 107 pg. 15 https://blog.ihobo.com/ King of Fighters goes Online Edge 107 pg. 17 https://www.gamezone.de/SNK-Firma-15741/News/Viele-neue-Infos-zu-SNK-Playmore-906269/ https://web.archive.org/web/20031204111223/http://www.kofworld.com/KOFOnline.asp SNK is back! Hobby Consolas 125 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SNK Minoru Arakawa steps down Edge 107 pg. 12 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minoru_Arakawa Nvidia takes Enron's place on S&P https://archive.org/details/GDM_February_2002/page/n3/mode/1up https://www.slickcharts.com/sp500 IBM exits Desktop business https://www.thefreelibrary.com/IBM+and+Sanmina-SCI+sign+agreement.-a0108597731 https://archive.org/details/MicromanaTerceraEpocaSpanishIssue85/page/n22/mode/1up https://archive.org/details/MicromanaTerceraEpocaSpanishIssue85/page/n23/mode/1up Rumors suggest Microsoft to buy Take 2 https://archive.org/details/pcgames200202/page/n9/mode/1up Wizardry 9 cancelled https://archive.org/details/pcgames200202/page/n11/mode/1up https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir-Tech Paul Neurath Interview - https://www.patreon.com/posts/54857109 They Create Worlds - https://www.theycreateworlds.com/transcripts/tcw114 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wizardry Joel Billings Interview - https://www.patreon.com/posts/36827469 Germany cracks down on Wolfenstein https://archive.org/details/pcgames200202/page/n9/mode/1up https://archive.org/details/pcgames200202/page/n11/mode/1up https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_Department_for_Media_Harmful_to_Young_Persons https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-45142651 Las Malvinas son Argentinas... Edge 107 pg. 18 https://web.archive.org/web/20070315004353/http://www.malvinas2032.com.ar/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IcpMduHPKh0 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falkland_Islands Recommended Links: The History of How We Play: https://thehistoryofhowweplay.wordpress.com/ Gaming Alexandria: https://www.gamingalexandria.com/wp/ They Create Worlds: https://tcwpodcast.podbean.com/ Digital Antiquarian: https://www.filfre.net/ The Arcade Blogger: https://arcadeblogger.com/ Retro Asylum: http://retroasylum.com/category/all-posts/ Retro Game Squad: http://retrogamesquad.libsyn.com/ Playthrough Podcast: https://playthroughpod.com/ Retromags.com: https://www.retromags.com/ Sound Effects by Ethan Johnson of History of How We Play.

Dragonproof eCommerce
Doing the Right Thing

Dragonproof eCommerce

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 21:48


Human-centric decision-making can create incredible tailwinds for a business - and the opposite is also true. Rick examines the downstream effects of values-based leadership decisions, and how to harness them for the best results.

Beyond Reproach
S4 Ep47: A Way Around Bribery: Episode 47 (The Crédit Mobilier Scandal)

Beyond Reproach

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 65:38


In this episode we are drinking a Locomotive, a vintage obscure wine based cocktail thickened with egg and spiced with clove. This creamy (surprisingly delicious) mulled wine-like concoction ties into the era and theme of TUX's scandal!

The Unusual Suspects Podcast
Episode 85 - Penron: The Most 90's Girl In The Room

The Unusual Suspects Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 84:15


This week, Andy has a Suspects fever dream, Pen watches some suspicious documentaries, and Dan becomes a Jackass. Plus, we get scary with our Film From The Hat, 'The Frighteners' 6:20 - Andy Has A Weird Podcast Dream 15:20 - The Tinder Swindler 19:49 - Penny's Obsession With....Enron? 21:44 - Inventing Anna 26:30 - Jackass Forever 34:09 - Death On The Nile (2022) 36:08 - The Frighteners Welcome to The Unusual Suspects Podcast - Where three film fans talk about movies of varying quality. Some are great. Some are dreadful. Some are absolutely fine. Join us as we journey through tangents, shambles, and absolute rubbish. Listen to the podcast here ► Spotify - https://open.spotify.com/show/5DCVar9YPPayLTL15xBjHR ► Apple Podcast - https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/the-unusual-suspects/id1520080657 ► Anchor - https://anchor.fm/unusual-suspects ► YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFtwSl3e_1NShxV0IqiaW9Q ► Google Podcasts - shorturl.at/pFLMS ► Overcast - https://overcast.fm/itunes1520080657/the-unusual-suspects ► Pocket Casts - https://pca.st/05ndn02p ► RadioPublic - https://radiopublic.com/the-unusual-suspects-WwRk95 ► Breaker - https://www.breaker.audio/the-unusual-suspects Socials ► Twitter - https://twitter.com/unusualpodspect ► Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/unusualsuspectspod/ ► Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/unusualsuspectspod ► Penny - https://twitter.com/Penny_Photopit ► Andy - https://twitter.com/Joicers21 ► Dan - https://twitter.com/DanTalksALot Don't forget to leave us a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get this podcast, it's much appreciated. We love you long time. Main Banner Artwork by Lisa O'Reilly - https://animonink.ie/ Music by Andrew Stanton - 'Laugh It Up Fuzzball'.

We Go There Podcast
S4 | E37 All About Endometriosis with Filmmaker Shannon Cohn, JD

We Go There Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2022 38:16


Endometriosis is the most common disease that no one really understands. Every year, countless women are forced to leave careers they love, abandon dreams of having children, watch their personal relationships suffer and live in unspeakable pain. We spoke with filmmaker Shannon Cohn about her documentary Endo What and discussed the following:  1.What is Endometriosis? How common is it? Symptoms? Risk Factors? 2. Shannon's journey. Why she created a film & how it's been received. 3.  What are some common misconceptions about endo? 4. What are some of the medical ways of treating endo? 5. Advice for anyone experiencing symptoms? 6. Where should they go for accurate information? Shannon Cohn, JD, is a filmmaker, lawyer and activist. Her work has appeared on PBS, Nat Geo and Discovery Channel in over 70 countries around the world. She produced and directed Endo What, a feature documentary on endometriosis hailed as "film of the year" by The Guardian and "the first step in a plan for change" by Newsweek. Her upcoming film, Below the Belt, which approaches endometriosis as a social justice issue, will premiere in 2022. Before becoming a filmmaker, Shannon practiced international law and was part of the legal team that prosecuted Enron. Shannon is a Board Member of the Foundation of AAGL (American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists) and All Kings, a New York-based non-profit dedicated to empowering people affected by the criminal justice system.   For more of Shannon Cohn, please visit www.endowhat.com on the Web www.instagram.com/shancohn/ on Instagram http://www.facebook.com/EndoWhat on Facebook For more of We Go There Podcast, please visit https://www.instagram.com/wegotherepodcast/ on Instagram https://wegotherepodcast.podbean.com/ on the Web *Warning- this podcast is completely unfiltered. If you are around young children, we suggest headphones.* *Disclaimer: All opinions of our guests are their own and in no way represent that of Lexi Miles Corrin and or Nikki Bergen.*

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 1 - EXCLUSIVE: Top Feds Tell Paine Durham is COVERING UP Crimes of Hillary Clinton & the Details Are Shocking; Moderna CEO Dumps Million$ in Stock As Bill Gates' Pharma Play Continues on Path of New Enron Plus Much More

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2022 42:30


Part 1 - EXCLUSIVE: Top Feds Tell Paine Durham is COVERING UP Crimes of Hillary Clinton & the Details Are Shocking; Moderna CEO Dumps Million$ in Stock As Bill Gates' Pharma Play Continues on Path of New Enron Plus Much More  Sign up for Hot Wire on Paine.tv and Get the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere Else Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 2 - EXCLUSIVE: Top Feds Tell Paine Durham is COVERING UP Crimes of Hillary Clinton & the Details Are Shocking; Moderna CEO Dumps Million$ in Stock As Bill Gates' Pharma Play Continues on Path of New Enron Plus Much More

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2022 40:46


Part 2 - EXCLUSIVE: Top Feds Tell Paine Durham is COVERING UP Crimes of Hillary Clinton & the Details Are Shocking; Moderna CEO Dumps Million$ in Stock As Bill Gates' Pharma Play Continues on Path of New Enron Plus Much More  Sign up for Hot Wire on Paine.tv and Get the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere Else Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 3 - EXCLUSIVE: Top Feds Tell Paine Durham is COVERING UP Crimes of Hillary Clinton & the Details Are Shocking; Moderna CEO Dumps Million$ in Stock As Bill Gates' Pharma Play Continues on Path of New Enron Plus Much More

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2022 40:36


Part 3 - EXCLUSIVE: Top Feds Tell Paine Durham is COVERING UP Crimes of Hillary Clinton & the Details Are Shocking; Moderna CEO Dumps Million$ in Stock As Bill Gates' Pharma Play Continues on Path of New Enron Plus Much More  Sign up for Hot Wire on Paine.tv and Get the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere Else Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 4 - EXCLUSIVE: Top Feds Tell Paine Durham is COVERING UP Crimes of Hillary Clinton & the Details Are Shocking; Moderna CEO Dumps Million$ in Stock As Bill Gates' Pharma Play Continues on Path of New Enron Plus Much More

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2022 35:27


Part 4 - EXCLUSIVE: Top Feds Tell Paine Durham is COVERING UP Crimes of Hillary Clinton & the Details Are Shocking; Moderna CEO Dumps Million$ in Stock As Bill Gates' Pharma Play Continues on Path of New Enron Plus Much More  Sign up for Hot Wire on Paine.tv and Get the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere Else Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 5 - EXCLUSIVE: Top Feds Tell Paine Durham is COVERING UP Crimes of Hillary Clinton & the Details Are Shocking; Moderna CEO Dumps Million$ in Stock As Bill Gates' Pharma Play Continues on Path of New Enron Plus Much More

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2022 40:20


Part 5 - EXCLUSIVE: Top Feds Tell Paine Durham is COVERING UP Crimes of Hillary Clinton & the Details Are Shocking; Moderna CEO Dumps Million$ in Stock As Bill Gates' Pharma Play Continues on Path of New Enron Plus Much More  Sign up for Hot Wire on Paine.tv and Get the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere Else Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Human Risk Podcast
Jared Bibler on Iceland's Secret

The Human Risk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 18, 2022 64:50


Why is something that happened in Iceland in 2008 still of relevance today? The answer is revealed by my guest Jared Bibler. He's the author of a book called 'Iceland's Secret: The Untold Story of the World's Biggest Con'.Having started his career working for a Wall Street Bank, Jared moved to Iceland in 2004, supporting the Icelandic pension funds' foreign investments. He resigned from his job at a leading Icelandic bank days before the 2008 Icelandic financial crisis and was subsequently hired to head a special investigation team at the Icelandic markets regulator. Jared and his team referred more than 30 criminal cases to the Special Prosecutor of Iceland, including the largest stock market manipulation cases to be prosecuted globally.In our discussion, we talk about Jared's career and what he learned while working on both sides of the regulatory fence. This is a tale of Human Risk on an epic scale — I thought I knew a lot about the Icelandic story, but what Jared reveals in his book is mindblowing!We also discuss Jared's motivation in writing the book and the response he's had both in Iceland and elsewhere. As you'll discover, there are many parallels between what happened in Iceland in 2008 and what is going on in other contexts today.For more on Jared and his book, visit https://icelandssecret.com/To learn about Iceland's history - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_IcelandMount Ejsa which dominates Reykjavik - https://visitreykjavik.is/city-areas/mosfellsbaer/mount-esja#The collapse of Lehman Brothers - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bankruptcy_of_Lehman_BrothersBethany Maclean, the reporter who broke the Enron story - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bethany_McLeanJolabokaflod the Icelandic tradition of giving books for Christmas - https://www.countryliving.com/life/a46204/jolabokaflod-iceland-christmas-reading-tradition/Jared's webinar with Transparency International (in Icelandic) - https://www.facebook.com/watch/live/?ref=watch_permalink&v=434772941474117Russell Napier - https://russellnapier.co.uk/

Video Game Newsroom Time Machine

Microsoft and Nintendo battle over launch numbers Cell phones make gaming pervasive SNK is dead These stories and many more on this episode of the VGNRTM This episode we will look back at the biggest stories in and around the video game industry in January 2002. As always, we'll mostly be using magazine cover dates, and those are of course always a bit behind the actual events. Peter is on vacation so we have the pleasure of Mads from the Retro Asylum to join us. http://retroasylum.com and https://playthroughpod.com/ Get us on your mobile device: Android: https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly92aWRlb2dhbWVuZXdzcm9vbXRpbWVtYWNoaW5lLmxpYnN5bi5jb20vcnNz iOS: https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/video-game-newsroom-time-machine And if you like what we are doing here at the podcast, don't forget to like us on your podcasting app of choice, YouTube, and/or support us on patreon! https://www.patreon.com/VGNRTM Send comments on twitter @videogamenewsr2 Or Instagram https://www.instagram.com/vgnrtm Or videogamenewsroomtimemachine@gmail.com Links: 7 Minutes in Heaven: Video version - https://www.patreon.com/posts/62682389 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Typing_of_the_Dead Corrections: December 2001 Ep - https://www.patreon.com/posts/60827058 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Understanding_Comics https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Final_Fantasy:_The_Spirits_Within https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BioWare https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neo_Geo 2002: Microsoft and Nintendo both claim victory in dual launch battle Edge 106 pg. 9 Edge 106 pg. 11 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_best-selling_game_consoles https://www.mobygames.com/game/luigis-mansion https://www.mobygames.com/game/halo-combat-evolved Playstation 2 price drop in Japan Edge 106. pg. 11 Sony Prez says Microsoft is new rival https://archive.org/details/NextGen85Jan2002/page/n15/mode/1up https://www.mobygames.com/game/ghostbusters-the-video-game__ https://www.mobygames.com/game/ghostbusters-the-video-game Yamauchi establishes Fund Q Edge 106 pg. 11 https://www.consolewars.de/news/1958/yamauchi_spricht/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Final_Fantasy_Crystal_Chronicles_(video_game)#Development https://www.ign.com/articles/2002/03/08/more-specifics-on-final-fantasy-announcement http://www.nintendoworldreport.com/news/7103/nintendo-and-square-settlement-details May 2001 Jump - https://www.patreon.com/posts/52306821 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Final_Fantasy_XI Trip Hawkins bails out 3DO https://archive.org/details/GDM_January_2002/page/n3/mode/1up https://www.kultboy.com/index.php?site=kult/kultmags&km=show&id=5708 pg. 35 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_3DO_Company Bioware cancels publishing deal with Interplay Edge 106 pg. 13 https://www.kultboy.com/index.php?site=kult/kultmags&km=show&id=5708 pg. 35 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neverwinter_Nights https://www.mobygames.com/game/fallout-brotherhood-of-steel https://www.mobygames.com/browse/games/blizzard-entertainment-inc/offset,75/so,1d/list-games/ https://www.mobygames.com/game/flashback-the-quest-for-identity Sony introduces voice controls https://www.devuego.es/pres/revista/hobby-consolas/124 pg. 15 https://www.play-asia.com/dekavoice/13/7022k https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fS0T4lUBYuE Edge 106 pg. 19 https://www.kultboy.com/index.php?site=kult/kultmags&km=show&id=5708 pg. 34 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AIBO House of the dead goes cellshaded https://archive.org/details/NextGen85Jan2002/page/n19/mode/1up https://www.mobygames.com/game/house-of-the-dead-iii Eidos causes panic with text message https://archive.org/details/PC_Zone_111_January_2002/page/26/mode/1up https://www.mobygames.com/game/commandos-2-men-of-courage https://www.mobygames.com/developer/sheet/view/developerId,184101/ https://www.polygon.com/22924209/americas-army-proving-grounds-shutdown-servers-sunset-pc-ps4 Amstrad is buying up Spectrum game rights Edge 106 pg. 13 http://www.computinghistory.org.uk/det/7697/Amstrad-E-Mailer-Plus/ https://manualzz.com/doc/o/hv01i/alchnews-z88-user-and-issue-38--march-2002-amstrad-emailer-plus https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZX_Spectrum#Amstrad_models https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinclair_Research#Amstrad_acquisition_of_assets https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinclair_C5 Pogo is bringing the internet to the palm of your hand Edge 106 pg. 13 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pogo_Mobile_and_nVoy https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opera_Mini Pervasive gaming hits mobile phones https://web.archive.org/web/20020802072853/http://www.itsalive.com/ https://web.archive.org/web/20050224025131/http://www.itsalive.com/page.asp?sa=0&id=1069 https://www.gamespot.com/articles/mobile-games-are-alive/1100-2688599/ https://www.wired.com/2002/02/have-cell-phone-will-shoot/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BotFighters https://archive.org/details/Computer_Gaming_World_Issue_210/page/n49/mode/1up https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Niantic_(company) Segway revolutionizes human transport Edge 106 pg. 16 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Segway Bleem! is dead https://archive.org/details/gamestar-magazine-issue-01-2002/page/9/mode/1up https://www.devuego.es/pres/revista/hobby-consolas/124 pg. 15 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bleem! EA.com sees massive layoffs https://archive.org/details/GDM_January_2002/page/n3/mode/1up Gordon Walton Interview - https://www.patreon.com/posts/53726080 SNK ceases operations https://archive.org/details/GDM_January_2002/page/n3/mode/1up https://archive.org/details/NextGen85Jan2002/page/n15/mode/1up https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neo_Geo_(system) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neo_Geo NextGen is no more https://archive.org/details/NextGen85Jan2002/page/n7/mode/2up https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Next_Generation_(magazine) Thalamus is back! https://www.kultboy.com/index.php?site=kult/kultmags&km=show&id=5708 pg. 36 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thalamus_Ltd Scott McCloud foreshadows the Metaverse https://archive.org/details/Computer_Gaming_World_Issue_210/page/n54/mode/1up https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scott_McCloud https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metaverse https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enron https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enron_scandal https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1016268/?ref_=fn_al_tt_3 https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0392439/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1 https://frandallfarmer.github.io/neohabitat-doc/docs// Recommended Links: The History of How We Play: https://thehistoryofhowweplay.wordpress.com/ Gaming Alexandria: https://www.gamingalexandria.com/wp/ They Create Worlds: https://tcwpodcast.podbean.com/ Digital Antiquarian: https://www.filfre.net/ The Arcade Blogger: https://arcadeblogger.com/ Retro Asylum: http://retroasylum.com/category/all-posts/ Retro Game Squad: http://retrogamesquad.libsyn.com/ Playthrough Podcast: https://playthroughpod.com/ Retromags.com: https://www.retromags.com/ Sound Effects by Ethan Johnson of History of How We Play.

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 1 - Paine in the Morning - FEB 15- EXCLUSIVE: Top Feds Tell Paine Durham is COVERING UP Crimes of Hillary Clinton & the Details Are Shocking; Moderna CEO Dumps Million$ in Stock As Bill Gates' Pharma Play Continues on Path of New Enron Plus Much

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2022 42:30


Part 1 - Paine in the Morning - FEB 15- EXCLUSIVE: Top Feds Tell Paine Durham is COVERING UP Crimes of Hillary Clinton & the Details Are Shocking; Moderna CEO Dumps Million$ in Stock As Bill Gates' Pharma Play Continues on Path of New Enron Plus Much More Sign up for Hot Wire on Paine.tv and Get the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere Else Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 2 - Paine in the Morning - FEB 15- EXCLUSIVE: Top Feds Tell Paine Durham is COVERING UP Crimes of Hillary Clinton & the Details Are Shocking; Moderna CEO Dumps Million$ in Stock As Bill Gates' Pharma Play Continues on Path of New Enron Plus Much

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2022 40:46


Part 2 - Paine in the Morning - FEB 15- EXCLUSIVE: Top Feds Tell Paine Durham is COVERING UP Crimes of Hillary Clinton & the Details Are Shocking; Moderna CEO Dumps Million$ in Stock As Bill Gates' Pharma Play Continues on Path of New Enron Plus Much More Sign up for Hot Wire on Paine.tv and Get the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere Else Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 3 - Paine in the Morning - FEB 15- EXCLUSIVE: Top Feds Tell Paine Durham is COVERING UP Crimes of Hillary Clinton & the Details Are Shocking; Moderna CEO Dumps Million$ in Stock As Bill Gates' Pharma Play Continues on Path of New Enron Plus Much

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2022 40:36


Part 3 - Paine in the Morning - FEB 15- EXCLUSIVE: Top Feds Tell Paine Durham is COVERING UP Crimes of Hillary Clinton & the Details Are Shocking; Moderna CEO Dumps Million$ in Stock As Bill Gates' Pharma Play Continues on Path of New Enron Plus Much More Sign up for Hot Wire on Paine.tv and Get the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere Else Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 4 - Paine in the Morning - FEB 15- EXCLUSIVE: Top Feds Tell Paine Durham is COVERING UP Crimes of Hillary Clinton & the Details Are Shocking; Moderna CEO Dumps Million$ in Stock As Bill Gates' Pharma Play Continues on Path of New Enron Plus Much

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2022 35:27


Part 4 - Paine in the Morning - FEB 15- EXCLUSIVE: Top Feds Tell Paine Durham is COVERING UP Crimes of Hillary Clinton & the Details Are Shocking; Moderna CEO Dumps Million$ in Stock As Bill Gates' Pharma Play Continues on Path of New Enron Plus Much More Sign up for Hot Wire on Paine.tv and Get the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere Else Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 5 - Paine in the Morning - FEB 15- EXCLUSIVE: Top Feds Tell Paine Durham is COVERING UP Crimes of Hillary Clinton & the Details Are Shocking; Moderna CEO Dumps Million$ in Stock As Bill Gates' Pharma Play Continues on Path of New Enron Plus Much

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2022 40:20


Part 5 - Paine in the Morning - TUES - FEB 15 --EXCLUSIVE: Top Feds Tell Paine Durham is COVERING UP Crimes of Hillary Clinton & the Details Are Shocking; Plus Moderna CEO Dumps Million$ in Stock As Bill Gates' Big Pharma Play Continues on Path of New Enron Plus Much Much More Sign up for Hot Wire on Paine.tv and Get the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere Else Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Ramble by the River
Love in the Time of Covid-19 with Melissa Nesbitt

Ramble by the River

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2022 131:26


This is a special episode. Today we celebrate Valentine's Day with an intimate evening with the Nesbitts. Melissa Nesbitt makes her much-anticipated return to Ramble by the River, and she brought with her a Valentine's Day couples quiz, an old Highschool yearbook, and a bottle of wine. Jeff and Melissa take their time going through the couple's quiz and discussing the answers. The audience will enjoy a peek behind the curtain as Jeff is able to let down his guard and truly have a fun and relaxing time as the host. They have a lot of laughs, talk about a ton of important issues in the world today, and only brag about their kids a little bit. There is a lot of local shout outs in this episode, so if you hear us talk about you, say hi back! Thank you to my wife Melissa, not only for being the guest this week, but for supporting me while I make this podcast week-after-week. In fact, as I type this, she is inside wrangling kids and keep everything in order, as she does. Have a happy Valentine's Day everybody. ...................................................................................................................... Ramble by the River Links: ·      Website: http://ramblebytheriver.com/ (Ramblebytheriver.com) ·      Business: ramblebytheriver@gmail.com ·      Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jeff.nesbitt.9619/ (https://www.facebook.com/jeff.nesbitt.9619/) ·      Instagram: https://instagram.com/ramblebytheriver (https://instagram.com/ramblebytheriver) ·      Twitter: https://twitter.com/rambleriverpod (https://twitter.com/rambleriverpod) ·      Podcast host: Ramblebytheriver.captivate.fm ...................................................................................................................... introversion; extroversion; sensory overload; Autism; Asperger's; theory of mind; introversion; extroversion; social norms; dinner parties; dichotomy; social needs; loneliness; hedonic adaptation; negativity bias; attachment; neurobiology of attachment; National Boards; travel; Facebook; Valentine's Day; coaching; flirting; infatuation; Holiday Friends; grandparents; San Juan Islands; skiing; driving; speeding tickets; Western Oregon University; competitiveness; darts; ping pong; horse shoes; Podmatch.com; antidepressants; SSRIs; Zoloft; Prozac; Dopamine; food; happiness; sadness; unicycle tricks; retirement; Himalayan salt lamps; Amazon.com; Prime Day; Tesla Cyber Truck; Jeep; September 11th; Eagle Crest Resort; George W. Bush; Vladimir Putin; anthrax; American Airlines flight 587; ENRON; Apple Computers; Concord jet; Sketchers; Mountain Code Red; Blockbuster Video; Napster; Harry Potter; George Harrison; O Brother, Where Arty Thou?; Frank Ocean, Post Malone; Michael Jordan; Washington Wizards; Tom Brady; Giselle; Barry Bonds; Kobe Bryant; Venus and Serena Williams; Ilwaco friends: CJ Hawkinson;  Laura Schott; Alex Mack; Kyle Herzog; Brian Marteeny; Tara Hankins; Mooch Smith. ......................................................................................................................................... Music: ·      Dancing With The Devil, Bonkers Beat Club ·      Never The Less, She Persisted, Bonnie Grace ·      Through The Hourglass, No Thanks ·      One More Day (without you), King Sis ·      Still Fly, Revel Day. 2022 copyright Ramble By The River LLC

Crossnerds
SCI-FI SHOWDOWN | It's a triomph

Crossnerds

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 13, 2022 75:11


Well, well, well, if it isn't our favorite puzzlemaker/film critic/bowl made with love and erotic spirits, Kameron Austin Collins! Buckle up for Rebecca, Brooke, and Kam taking down the last week of New York Times crossword puzzles (1/31/22 - 2/6/22, which includes Kam's 2/5 stunner of a puzz). Discussed: Wereproblems -onyms Tasers (Batman Returns stun gun scene) ENRON clues Kitchen items (PARERs,  peelers, mashers, bowls) The art of appearing effortless High beams in NJ: literally everybody, all the time And continued PSA: RiRi is still only worth 25 points. Enjoying "Crossnerds"? Give us five ⭐️s in Spotify and comment in Apple Podcasts! @ us on Twitter! Support us on Patreon! Or just keep listening. Or all. Ideally all. But we'll take any. Please and thank you!

Kauppalehti
Tutustu jaksoon: Enron oli "maailman johtava yhtiö” joka taiteili tappiot tuotoiksi

Kauppalehti

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 9, 2022 1:00


Kuuntele Enronin villi, opettavainen ja kallis tarina kokonaisuudessaan Kauppalehden sovelluksessa tai podcast-sivuilla kl.fi/truecrime

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 1: Former Blackrock & Hedge Fund Guru Edward Dowd Joins Paine and Intel Flies: Moderna and mRNA Companies Could Suffer the Fate of Enron; Plus is Big Insurance Prepping to Square Off With Big Pharma Over Payouts Linked to VAX? Don't Miss This On

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 5, 2022 36:47


Part 1: Former Blackrock & Hedge Fund Guru Edward Dowd Joins Paine and the Intel Flies, Warning Moderna and mRNA Companies Could Suffer the Fate of Enron; Plus is Big Insurance Prepping to Square Off With Big Pharma Over Life Insurance Payouts Linked to the VAX? Don't Miss This One. Sign up for Hot Wire on Paine.tv and Get the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere Else Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 2: Former Blackrock & Hedge Fund Guru Edward Dowd Joins Paine and Intel Flies: Moderna and mRNA Companies Could Suffer the Fate of Enron; Plus is Big Insurance Prepping to Square Off With Big Pharma Over Payouts Linked to VAX? Don't Miss This On

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 5, 2022 36:48


Part 2: Former Blackrock & Hedge Fund Guru Edward Dowd Joins Paine and the Intel Flies, Warning Moderna and mRNA Companies Could Suffer the Fate of Enron; Plus is Big Insurance Prepping to Square Off With Big Pharma Over Life Insurance Payouts Linked to the VAX? Don't Miss This One. Sign up for Hot Wire on Paine.tv and Get the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere Else Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 3: Former Blackrock & Hedge Fund Guru Edward Dowd Joins Paine and Intel Flies: Moderna and mRNA Companies Could Suffer the Fate of Enron; Plus is Big Insurance Prepping to Square Off With Big Pharma Over Payouts Linked to VAX? Don't Miss This On

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 5, 2022 36:51


Part 3: Former Blackrock & Hedge Fund Guru Edward Dowd Joins Paine and the Intel Flies, Warning Moderna and mRNA Companies Could Suffer the Fate of Enron; Plus is Big Insurance Prepping to Square Off With Big Pharma Over Life Insurance Payouts Linked to the VAX? Don't Miss This One. Sign up for Hot Wire on Paine.tv and Get the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere Else Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Insurance Guys Podcast
Sliding Into The Future with Bruce Lucas

The Insurance Guys Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2022 59:20


In this episode, Bradley and Scott sit down with Bruce Lucas, founder and CEO of Slide Insurance. The guys talk about the future of insurance, emerging tech, defending Enron, and much more! ///////////// Sponsor: GloveBox A seamless all-in-one platform connecting clients to your agency and their carriers. Maximize the client experience with both Agency and Carrier self-service features. Check them out here >>> Get the CoverWallet Insurance Guys Deal Here >>>

Working It
The reality of whistleblowing at work

Working It

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2022 18:53


This week on Working It we take a step back from day-to-day workplace life and explore the issue of whistleblowing. What drives people to speak up against their employers - and what happens to those staff? Does it necessarily end your career in that company? Isabel talks to Siri Nelson, executive director of the US National Whistleblower Center. Siri has devoted her professional life to protecting the rights of those who speak up. She offers advice for listeners who have seen something wrong and want to report it (first step: get a lawyer). Siri and Isabel discuss some of the whistleblowers who have changed history - including Sherron Watkins. In 2001 she was a popular member of staff at US energy giant Enron, but when she spoke out about corruption in the company, it made her an outcast at work. Her efforts were not in vain, though - and Watkins ended up testifying at government hearings. Plus, Isabel gets some insights from the FT's whistleblowing expert, Brooke Masters, our chief business columnist. What sorts of staff decide to report wrongdoing? And how can managers ensure that our corporate cultures encourage honesty - and can deal with internal problems before it is too late? Want to read more? National Whistleblower Center [US] - lots of advice and resources https://www.whistleblowers.org/Whistleblowers UK -British campaigning group https://www.wbuk.org/ Brooke Masters on why whistleblowers deserve our thanks - and protection https://www.ft.com/content/7e89bfa8-25d5-11e8-b27e-cc62a39d57a0The corruption of cronyism in workplaces - and a whistleblower's experience of calling it out https://www.ft.com/content/98fdcde8-eba1-45b3-98a6-eceb5269e07cAndrew Hill on the business lessons learned from Enron, 20 years after its collapse https://www.ft.com/content/4676e3e2-bdaa-4c78-8011-49508279c9eaWe love to hear from you. What do you like (or not)? What topics should we tackle in 2022? Email the team at workingit@ft.com or Isabel directly at isabel.berwick@ft.com. Follow @isabelberwick on Twitter Subscribe to Working It wherever you get your podcasts - please listen, rate and subscribe!Presented by Isabel Berwick. Editorial direction from Renée Kaplan. Assistant producer is Persis Love. Sound design is by Breen Turner, with original music from Metaphor Music. Produced by Novel. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Booknotes+
Ep. 47 Bethany McLean on Elizabeth Holmes & Theranos

Booknotes+

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2022 66:51


In early 2001, Bethany McLean, at the time a reporter for Fortune magazine, asked the question in an article: "How does Enron make its money?" McLean's reporting, and the reporting of others, led to inquiries that were put to the Enron management. Within a few months, the company was bankrupt. Bethany McLean's subsequent book, "The Smartest Guys in the Room," became a bestseller and a successful documentary. In January 2022, she wrote about her reaction to the Theranos saga. In an essay about the trial of Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes, she wrote, "For those who believe she was guilty of a great crime, it's a disappointing verdict." She joined us to talk about it.    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

iilluminaughtii
Tyco: Mini Enron, or framed for fraud? | Multi Level Mondays

iilluminaughtii

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2022 29:44


Go to http://hellofresh.com/mlm16 and use code mlm16 to get 16 free meals and 3 gifts! Go to http://mintmobile.com/mlm to cut your wireless bill to $15 a month. Go to http://purple.com/mlm and use code mlm to get 10% off any order of $200 or more. Welcome to Multi Level Mondays, a weekly series all about multi level marketing, pyramid schemes, and ponzi schemes. Connect With Me: https://linktr.ee/iilluminaughtii This episode was edited and mixed by: G. Thomas Craig   Album cover art created by: Betsy Primes Intro Song Credits: Last to Fall- Will Van De Crommert Outro Song Credits: Sacred and Profane- Nicholas Rowe Ad Music Credits: Tango de Manzana by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4460-tango-de-manzana License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Backbay Lounge by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3408-backbay-lounge License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license

Bloomberg Law
Twenty Years Since The Enron Collapse

Bloomberg Law

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 18:34


December marks twenty years since energy-trading giant Enron filed for bankruptcy. Ed Hirs of the University of Houston details the company's rise and malpractice. Leslie Caldwell, a partner with the law firm Latham & Watkins and who also led a team of investigators and prosecutors in the US Justice Department's Enron Task Force, discusses investigating Enron. Hosted by Joe Shortsleeve. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Atomic Show
Atomic Show #293 – Robert Bryce – Journalist and Bird Watcher

The Atomic Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 74:20


Robert Bryce talking about Power Hungry Robert Bryce is an admired journalist, book author, filmmaker, public speaker, Congressional witness and podcaster who has focused on energy, power and its implications for mankind's prosperity. In his free time, he loves to watch birds. He recognizes that electricity is the lifeblood of modernity. He is saddened by knowing that there are billions of humans on Earth who have such limited access to electricity that their consumption each year is less than an average American refrigerator. Starting with Pipe Dreams: Greed, Ego and the Death of Enron in early 2004, Robert has published six books on energy with the latest being A Question of Power: Electricity and the Wealth of Nations. He wrote that last book while he was also recording and producing Juice: How Electricity Explains the World. He would like everyone to watch his movie and has made it freely available through several outlets. He also asks that people buy his books – he excuses everyone from reading the books as long as they buy them. In June of 2020, Robert started the Power Hungry podcast and continues to release new episodes with fascinating guests at a furious pace. Robert and I talk about his work, his passions, and the difficulty of writing a book and creating a movie at the same time. We talked about his recent testimony at Congressional hearings about the growing fragility of our energy system due to what our mutual friend, Meredith Angwin, has labeled the fatal trifecta of energy policy decisions – oo much reliance on imports, too much reliance on gas and too much reliance on renewables. I think you will enjoy this discussion. Please leave a comment and engage in discussion about the important points that Robert made. PS - there is a point in the show when Robert turns the tables and begins to interview me about recent progress at Nucleation Capital. We are bullish about the growing recognition that nuclear energy is a vital tool and that advanced nuclear energy development is an enormous opportunity for solving many sticky problems.

The Ethics Experts
Episode 100 - Sherron Watkins

The Ethics Experts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 64:25


In this episode of The Ethics Experts, Gio and Nick welcome Sherron Watkins, former Vice President of Enron Corporation who alerted then-CEO Ken Lay in August 2001 to accounting irregularities within the company, warning him that Enron ‘might implode in a wave of accounting scandals.'.

Amanpour
Amanpour: Jack Straw, Robert Draper, John Emshwiller, Rebecca Smith, Vaitea Cowan, Christiana Figueres and Ramsey Green

Amanpour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 55:26


Jack Straw, Former British Foreign Secretary, reflects on the passing of Colin Powell, the former U.S. Secretary of State and four star general. Journalist Robert Draper talks about Powell's legacy as a giant of American military and politics. John Emshwiller and Rebecca Smith, co-hosts of the "Bad Bets" podcast, discuss the fall of Texas energy giant Enron and the ensuing scandal, 20 years on. Christiana Figueres, member of The Earthshot Prize Council, and Vaitea Cowan, co-founder of Enapter and one of the winners of the Earthshot Prize, talk about finding solutions to combat the climate crisis. Walter Isaacson talks with Ramsey Green, New Orleans' Chief of Infrastructure, about how he's re-defining the way cities respond to extreme weather.  To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

The AMM Dividend Growth Podcast
035 - Sell Intuit (INTU) Because of the Stadium Indicator?

The AMM Dividend Growth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 11:40


Adelphia, Worldcom, Enron all went bankrupt after entering stadium naming rights deals. Intuit just announced a stadium naming rights deal with the LA Clippers for their new arena. It will be called the Intuit Dome. Based on the Stadium Indicator we should now sell Intuit? In this episode, Glenn looks at the behavioral bias that feeds this heuristic trading rule and what are the actual returns to publicly traded companies that do stadium naming right deals. Subscribe to the AMM Email List Links Concinnus Financial Research Report: Do Stadium Naming Rights Align With Shareholder Best Interests? A Stadium by Any Other Name: The Value of Naming Rights AMM Books AMM Dividend Letter Vol. 1 AMM Dividend Letter Vol. 2 AMM Dividend Letter Vol. 3 Wisdom on Value Investing Fact Sheet AMM Dividend Growth Strategy Q2 2021 Learn more about American Money Management, LLC. www.amminvest.com Contact Glenn Busch (858) 755-0909 gbusch@amminvest.com Schedule a call with Glenn

Let's Appreciate
Cambrian Explosion 2.0

Let's Appreciate

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 20:27


There are a lot of questions left to answer, and web3 seeks to solve a lot of them - but in the meantime - It's still about the story. Stripping it all away, we are seeking for the story, for the building of the ecosystem, for understanding our MAIN OBJECTIVE. And the ecosystem in which these stories are being told is growing, flourishing, and we are nearing some sort of Cambrian Explosion of content. We have the apps, the infrastructure, the tools - and we are still the singular-celled organisms trying to figure out how to use it all. We can't be the Apple or the Enron - because we haven't even become animal phyla yet. It's still really early. The world has evolved before we did, and we are just now catching up to it.

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast
John Arnold on Oil and Gas Startups

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2021 85:44


When we started the Oil & Gas Startups Podcast in a closet a few years ago, we made a wish list of people we'd like to get on the show. On the top of that list was the energy trading legend that is John Arnold. What makes this even more special is that John rarely gives interviews or does podcasts. Our goal with this episode was to simply answer the question "Who is John Arnold?". We dove into his rejection from all of his dream Wall Street jobs led him to take a job at Enron that would change his life. How we quickly rose through the ranks to run the largest trading desk in America at the age of 28. Why he started his own firm energy trading firm, Centaurus Advisors, and why he ultimately hung it up as a trader to focus all of his energy on philanthropy. Thank you to our sponsor: Datagration. Download the latest paper from Datagration, “Improving Unconventional Asset Evaluation by Automating Data Analytics“ https://www.datagration.com/improving-unconventional-asset-evaluation