Podcast appearances and mentions of Jeb Bush

American politician, former Governor of Florida

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Latest podcast episodes about Jeb Bush

Post Corona
Mike Murphy on the Democrats' "Good Bad Night"

Post Corona

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 48:30


In this episode, we go deep on deconstructing the mid-term results. We try to understand the implications for both parties heading into 2024. (And Murphy even tries to draw a connection between Richard Nixon and Mahatma Gandhi). Mike Murphy has worked on 26 gubernatorial and US Senate races across the country, including 12 wins in Blue States. He was a top strategist for John McCain, Mitt Romney, Jeb Bush, and Arnold Schwarzenegger. He's a political analyst for NBC and MSNBC. He's co-host of the critically acclaimed "Hacks on Tap" podcast. Mike is also co-director of the University of Southern California's Center for the Political Future.

Fly on the Wall
Alex Lundry: "Being the Voice of Data"

Fly on the Wall

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 33:04


This week, the Pod interviews GU Politics Fellow Alex Lundry, Chief Analytics Officer for Jeb Bush for President, Director of Data Science for Romney for President, and Co-Founder of Tunnl. Lundry shares his experience as a data scientist and how data can inform strategy. Lundry also discusses the role of data in the midterms and provides some predictions. Take a listen now!

The Brian Lehrer Show
Brian Lehrer Weekend: NYC As a Refuge; Letters to Jeb Bush; Hybrid Gatherings

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 44:08


Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. NYC as a Refuge (First) | When Your Pen Pal is Jeb Bush (Starts at 20:00) | Gather Around with Priya Parker: Hybrid Gatherings (Starts at 37:45) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.

Rich Zeoli
Biden “Berates, Scolds, & Insults” Reporters: A Montage of His Angriest Moments

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 39:42


The Rich Zeoli Show- Hour 4: According to an NBC News report, Ron DeSantis could become the first Republican Florida Governor to win Miami-Dade County in over 20 years—since Jeb Bush in 2002. Miami-Dade is 70% Hispanic. The Atlantic's Jemele Hill wrote of DeSantis' support within the Hispanic community: "proximity to whiteness is a real thing. Also reminds me of an adage I heard a long time ago about how the oppressed begin to take on the traits of the oppressor.” On Monday, while speaking at the Democratic National Committee's headquarters in Washington D.C., President Joe Biden once again blamed Russian President Vladimir Putin for inflation and vowed to ban assault weapons. Fox News pieced together a hilarious montage of President Joe Biden “berating, scolding, and insulting reporters.” During a rally in Robstown, Texas on Saturday, former President Donald Trump stated he will “probably have to” run for president again in 2024. Contrary to narratives being pushed by many members of the national and international media, British Prime Minister Liz Truss' resignation should not be mistaken as a reason for American politicians to avoid tax cuts in the future. The Wall Street Journal Editorial Board explains: “She is being made the scapegoat for the economic policy blunders that the ruling Conservatives have made over 12 years in power, and especially since 2019 under previous Prime Minister Boris Johnson. Who Won Social Media? +Zeoli's Final Thought

Rich Zeoli
NY Times Op-Ed Calls for Property Destruction to Combat Climate Change

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 179:20


The Rich Zeoli Show- Full Show (10/24/2022): 3:05pm- According to the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), Pennsylvania and New Jersey student reading and math scores have decreased since 2019—indicating that pandemic school shutdowns have had an impact on childhood learning. 3:20pm- During a recent Board of Education meeting in Lawrence Township, NJ, one member suggested that parents have no right to determine what curriculum their children will ultimately end up learning in school. 3:45pm- According to a recent Wick Insights poll of likely voters, Republican Dr. Mehmet Oz now leads Democrat John Fetterman 49.1% to 44.6% in their race for the U.S. Senate seat being vacated by Sen. Pat Toomey (R-PA). 3:50pm- Senator Patty Murray (D- WA) told CNN's Dana Bash that even in hindsight, she does not regret school shutdowns during the COVID-19 pandemic. According to the 2022 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), student math scores in every state have declined sharply since 2019. 3:55pm- In a recent opinion editorial for the Wall Street Journal, Kimberley Strassel explained that Georgia's record-setting early midterm voting “exposes” the lie that election integrity laws adopted by the state would result in suppressing votes and amounted to “Jim Crow 2.0”. 4:05pm- According to a report from the Daily Wire, the U.S. State Department appropriated $20,000 for a drag show in Ecuador. 4:20pm- Mattel has announced the creation of its first “gender-neutral” doll—referring to it as a “doll for everyone.” Mattel's Cultural Expert Jess Weiner explained that the doll was created because “parents are concerned about genderizing toys.” 4:40pm- During Sunday's episode of “Face the Nation”, anchor Margaret Brennan spoke with a focus group consisting of Republican, Democrat, and Independent voters. Brennan was surprised by how much agreement there was between the voters on issues like the economy, crime, and “woke” ideology, despite their differing party affiliations. 5:05pm- Appearing on CBS's Face the Nation, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi stated that it's a misconception to say Democrats care more about abortion access than the economy—she also insisted that inflation is a “global phenomenon” and not the fault of President Joe Biden or Democrats in the Legislative Branch. 5:15pm- While speaking with Jake Tapper on CNN, Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) blamed over 50% of inflation on “corporate greed.” 5:30pm- Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) appeared on Monday's episode of the The View, with the appearance going about as well as you would imagine—filled with fiery exchanges over election denial, disruptions from the audience, and Ana Navarro reprimanding Sen. Cruz for speaking too loudly. 5:40pm- Another group of radical climate change protesters have targeted a beloved piece of art for desecration—this time it was “Grainstacks” by French Impressionist Claude Monet at the Barberini Museum in Germany. The activists splattered the $100 million painting with mashed potatoes. In an opinion editorial featured in the New York Times, Andres Malm—an associate professor of human ecology at Lund University and the author of “How to Blow Up a Pipeline: Learning to Fight in a World on Fire”—encouraged destructive behavior that targets the fossil fuel industry writing, “[a]s for the ethics of property destruction, it is not, in this case, very complicated. Fossil fuels kill people. If you disrupt the flow of such fuels and damage the machinery they impel, you prevent deaths. You stop the perpetration of harm. You may destroy an inanimate object.” 6:05pm- According to an NBC News report, Ron DeSantis could become the first Republican Florida Governor to win Miami-Dade County in over 20 years—since Jeb Bush in 2002. Miami-Dade is 70% Hispanic. The Atlantic's Jemele Hill wrote of DeSantis' support within the Hispanic community: "proximity to whiteness is a real thing. Also reminds me of an adage I heard a long time ago about how the oppressed begin to take on the traits of the oppressor.” 6:15pm- On Monday, while speaking at the Democratic National Committee's headquarters in Washington D.C., President Joe Biden once again blamed Russian President Vladimir Putin for inflation and vowed to ban assault weapons. 6:30pm- Fox News pieced together a hilarious montage of President Joe Biden “berating, scolding, and insulting reporters.” 6:35pm- During a rally in Robstown, Texas on Saturday, former President Donald Trump stated he will “probably have to” run for president again in 2024. 6:50pm- Contrary to narratives being pushed by many members of the national and international media, British Prime Minister Liz Truss' resignation should not be mistaken as a reason for American politicians to avoid tax cuts in the future. The Wall Street Journal Editorial Board explains: “She is being made the scapegoat for the economic policy blunders that the ruling Conservatives have made over 12 years in power, and especially since 2019 under previous Prime Minister Boris Johnson. 6:55pm- Who Won Social Media? +Zeoli's Final Thought

The Brian Lehrer Show
When Your Pen Pal is Jeb Bush

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 15:53


A few years ago, professional and personal lows left Adam Dalva, writer, editor and graphic novelist, in a hard place. When he didn't know who to vent to, he turned to an unlikely figure, never expecting a reply. Dalva joins us to discuss his unexpected correspondence with Jeb Bush. → Letters to Jeb Bush

Backbone Radio with Matt Dunn
Backbone Radio with Matt Dunn - October 23, 2022 - HR 1

Backbone Radio with Matt Dunn

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 39:08


Opening Monologues. Debating Joe O'Dea. The Colorado GOP candidate for Senate picks a strange, unnecessary fight with Trump. O'Dea tells CNN he will "actively campaign against Donald Trump" in 2024. Trump responds in kind to this "RINO character" in Colorado: "MAGA doesn't vote for stupid people with big mouths." What to make of all this? We open the floodgates to intense caller debate. Meanwhile, Jeb Bush endorses Ron Desantis for 2024. Plus, celebrating opening day of Ski Season in Colorado!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Ray Appleton
Biden Lashes Out At Reporter. Jeb Bush For Desantis. SCOTUS Rejects Student Loan Forgivenesss Lawsuit. Russian Threats Revive Nuclear Fears In Central Europe

Ray Appleton

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 34:28


President Biden lashed out at a reporter Thursday who asked why he's campaigned for so few Democratic midterm candidates this year — saying he'd appeared with 15 of them. Jeb Bush envisions Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) "will be a formidable" contender in 2024 should he throw his hat into the ring. Two stories beneath a modern steel production plant on Warsaw's northern edge lies an untouched Cold War relic: a shelter containing gas masks, stretchers, first aid kits and other items meant to help civil defense leaders survive and guide rescue operations in case of nuclear attack or other disasters.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hunk with Mike Bridenstine
CAR ARBYS & SAXOPHONE MOVES

Hunk with Mike Bridenstine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 91:05


Kristal Adams, Maddie Collins, Jared Logan, and Jon Durnell are on the panel to talk about Stephen King, 50 Shades, Billions, Frasier, Bros, butter boards, Twitter, Herschel Walker, Jeb Bush, 1997, and a LOT more. Extras are on www.patreon.com/brido.

Making Podcasts Great Again
Episode 243: Woke Aim Phoenix

Making Podcasts Great Again

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 38:55


This week The President of Mar-A-Lago and Tech Stuff Guy discuss H.W. Bush, Jeb Bush, Minden, Kanye, and more.We are also sponsored by BetOnline.AG for all your sports and casino gambling needs. Use Promo Code CLNS50 to receive a 50% Welcome Bonus on your First Deposit.

The Bill Press Pod
A Travelogue from the Republican Road to Hell

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 36:57


Tim Miller is an outspoken Never-Trumper. He writes like he talks and his recent book, Why We Did It: A Travelogue from the Republican Road to Hell is by turns engaging, enraging and, sometimes, just sad, as he explores the human wreckage caused by Donald Trump. Miller is an MSNBC analyst, writer-at-large for The Bulwark, and host of “Not My Party” on Snapchat. Tim was Communications Director for Jeb Bush's 2016 presidential campaign and spokesman for the Republican National Committee during Mitt Romney's 2012 campaign. He has since left the GOP.Today Bill shines a light on Congressman Tim Ryan who is running to flip a Senate seat in increasingly Red Ohio. While the GOP donors have recently poured in $30,000.000 to rescue JD Vance, the Democratic establishment has been stingy with support for Tim. This race is very winnable and at the moment, Ryan is slightly ahead of Vance in the polls. But he needs cash to finish strong. Please send what you can to TimForOH.com.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Beginning Of The End
Sex In A City: Sex And The City

Beginning Of The End

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 111:47


It's 2022 and Jeb Bush is president. And that's cannon! At least podcast cannon. Listen as we drag Carrie through the mud and actively despise Big. Do you think Phil is a Charlotte or Carrie? We have opinions!! Let us know who the heaven and hell you are at botepod@gmail.com

The Wolf Who Cried Women
Ep. 44 - A People's Guide to Psilocybin

The Wolf Who Cried Women

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 42:43


Ep. 44 - A People's Guide to Psilocybin Drugs. We've all done them (if you haven't, please don't talk to me). Today we hear tales from both Evan and Goblin's first experiences with "hard" drugs and a Becky from previous episodes returns as well. Whilst we're on this life-changing journey Willie and Gordon share hot tips for good drugs experiences and we conclude with a surprising appearance of special guests Jeb Bush and Jordan Peterson email: wolfwhocriedwomen@gmail.com

A Republic, If You Can Keep It
And the Voting Begins (Guest: Tim Miller)

A Republic, If You Can Keep It

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 67:47


Early voting is underway in Michigan. In the race for Governor, Tudor Dixon is finally campaigning, focusing on social wedge issues, but her campaign continues to lack money. She may get some help when the nation's #1 election denier, Donald Trump, brings his Big Lie Tour to Michigan this weekend to talk about himself and maybe help Tudor and the rest of the Republican statewide ticket. The polls are saying that, as of now, it could be a Democratic landslide at the top of the ticket in Michigan. With voting underway, these polling numbers are much more significant than before. The most recent come to us via EPIC/MRA. The company's CEO, Bernie Porn, talks with Mark and Jeff about his latest measure of the electorate.. Then we're joined by former GOP political consultant Tim Miller. He is best known for his role as communications director for the Jeb Bush 2016 presidential campaign and for being an outspoken Republican critic of former U.S. president Donald Trump. Miller was an Iowa staffer for John McCain in the 2008 Republican Party presidential primaries, and later served as national press secretary for the Jon Huntsman 2012 presidential campaign. During the Bush campaign, Miller drew notice as a "vocal critic" of Donald Trump. In 2020, Miller co-founded the advocacy organization Republican Voters Against Trump, which sponsored television and internet advertisements featuring lifelong Republicans explaining their decision to vote for former vice president Joe Biden instead of Trump, and served as its political director. He is now a contributing writer for The Bulwark and ROlling Stone, and a frequent guest commentator on MSNBC and CNN. Miller recently published the best-selling book Why We Did It: A Travelogue from the Republican Road to Hell. ________________________________________________ This week's podcast is underwritten by Practical Political Consulting and EPIC-MRA. We thank them for supporting "A Republic, If You Can Keep It."

The Daily Stoic
Tim Miller on Political Games and Building Integrity

The Daily Stoic

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 74:22 Very Popular


Ryan talks to political consultant and writer Tim Miller about his new book Why We Did It: A Travelogue from the Republican Road to Hell, the game of American politics, how to maintain integrity in your work, and more.Tim Miller is a former Republican communications operative who held moderate views and backed moderate candidates for years. But he says in practicing the arts of opposition research and planting negative stories about rival candidates, he worked with increasingly extreme right-wing media outlets and fed populatist outrage that would radicalize much of the Republican voter base. Tim examines this and considers why so many Republicans who thought Trump unfit for office nonetheless backed him, in his new book, Why We Did It. Tim is an MSNBC analyst, writer-at-large at The Bulwark, and the host of “Not My Party” on Snapchat. Tim was communications director for Jeb Bush's 2016 presidential campaign and spokesman for the Republican National Committee during Mitt Romney's 2012 campaign. He has since left the GOP and become one of the leaders of the “Never Trump” movement.

Post Corona
Mike Murphy on the Mid-Terms (& the madness of polls)

Post Corona

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 52:33


Between now and November, we will be taking a close look at the midterm election season, which -- for most voters -- is just kicking off now. If history is a guide, the first mid-term election cycle of a new president should result in the opposing party (the party not in the White House) scoring a wave of victories in Congress. How big will the wave be? New polls suggest that there may not be much of a wave for Republicans. But are these new polls missing something? To offer a masterclass in how to de-code the polls -- and a number of other dynamics in these midterms -- Mike Murphy returns to the podcast. Mike's worked on 26 gubernatorial and US Senate races across the country, including 12 wins in Blue States – something that's getting harder and harder to do for Republicans. He was a top strategist for John McCain, Mitt Romney, Jeb Bush, and Arnold Schwarzenegger. He's a political analyst for NBC and MSNBC. He's co-host of the Hacks on Tap podcast and newsletter. And Mike's also co director of the University of Southern California's Center for the Political Future. Pieces discussed in this episode: Mark Mellman: : https://tinyurl.com/3v74z3hp Nate Cohn: https://tinyurl.com/dzjrbc2m Can you add to show notes: Hacks on Tap podcast: https://tinyurl.com/55j5pe5k Hacks on Tap newsletter: https://tinyurl.com/yckkzrpx

Tipping Point with Kara McKinney
September 13, 2022: Kenneth Rapoza, Jim Nelles, Kalen D'Almeida, and Kristi Hamrick

Tipping Point with Kara McKinney

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 53:14


The Podesta bros are back and if the Uranium One scandal under Hillary Clinton at Obama's state department wasn't enough, John is back as Biden's latest climate czar to sell us out to China. Plus, the army tells soldiers to get on food stamps if they can't afford to eat because Ukraine needs our money or something. Finally, house speaker Nancy Pelosi has her own Jeb Bush "please clap" moment at today's White House garden party that I guess is celebrating the fact inflation went up instead of down.

Pro Politics with Zac McCrary
Tim Miller on Traveling the "Republican Road to Hell"

Pro Politics with Zac McCrary

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 47:01


Tim Miller had sterling credentials as a top GOP operative, working for the RNC, John McCain, Jeb Bush, Jon Huntsman and more...until he felt increasingly alienated as Donald Trump took over the party. In this conversation, he talks his path out of Republican politics - chronicled in his bestselling book WHY WE DID IT - and how the past several years of GOP politics led to the wholescale Trump takeover of the party. This is a great discussion with one of the most brutally honest observers of American politics, who's had a front row seat to the most important political phenomenon in decades.IN THIS EPISODE…Tim's path to working in politics…The early threads Tim saw of the Trump movement in the GOP…Tim talks his role helping write and promote the infamous post-2012 GOP autopsy…The moment Tim realized most of the GOP political class would throw in their lot with Trump…The Corey Lewandowski Theorem…Tim talks the rivalry between Jon Huntsman and Mitt Romney…Rumors of the negotiations of a possible 2016 Rubio / Cruz pact to stop Trump…Memories of Lindsay Graham's vitriolic anti-Trump sermons…The Breitbart Embassy…Tim talks the time he's spent around Steve Bannon…Tim best practices of placing political opposition research…Tim on the “ruthlessness” gap between the Democratic and Republican political class…The story of the Independent Journal Review as a glimpse into the GOP base...Tim's creative take on the various type of Trump apologists...Tim defines “nerd revengers”…Tim's level of optimism the GOP can pull back from the Trump brink…Tim's LSU football fandom…AND Greg Abbot, George Allen, amnesty, avatars, bags of hammers, Paul Begala, bets with Grandma, blocking and tackling, Dan Bongino, Bruce Braley, Buchaninites, the Bulwark, Jeb Bush, James Carville, Catalist, the Chicago Cubs, Bill Clinton, Hillary Clinton, cloak and dagger, Scott Conroy, the cool kids table, Council Bluffs, Daily Caller, Mitch Daniels, Death Valley, Ron DeSantis, Bob Dole, dorks and nerds, Matt Drudge, the Everglades, Alyssa Farah, Mark Hanna, hatchet men, Chuck Johnson, Brian Kelly, Ted Kennedy, Charlie Kirk, love children, John McCain, William McKinley, H.R. McMaster, meme culture, Mother Jones, mutual fund managers, National Review, Ralph Northam, Ed Orgeron, Bill Owens, Sarah Palin, plutocrats, Reince Preibus, Ronald Reagan, Todd Ricketts, Nick Saban, Mike Shields, Alex Skatell, Sean Spicer, squishes, Elise Stefanik, George Stephanopoulos, Stuart Stevens, Tea Party weirdos, John Thune, Tiger Island, traffic hoses, Sean Trende, unique psychopathy, Upworthy, Dick Wadhams, Scott Walker, the Wall Street Journal, the World Series, YOLO mode & more!

The Marchand and Ourand Sports Media Podcast
Episode 48: Joe Buck and Troy Aikman

The Marchand and Ourand Sports Media Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 68:00 Very Popular


ESPN's new Monday Night Football announcers Joe Buck and Troy Aikman join the pod to talk about how and why they moved from Fox to ESPN during the offseason. Aikman details his talks with Amazon and ESPN and discusses how much Tony Romo's CBS salary played into his decision to leave. Buck talks about his reasons for leaving Fox and why he's decided to give up the baseball booth. A UCLA alum, Aikman also addresses his school's move from the Pac-12 to the Big Ten.   Marchand and Ourand also discuss Amazon's exclusive NFL preseason game, the stunning strength of NFL TV ratings, the future of Sinclair's RSNs, Apple's Friday night MLB telecasts, ESPN's ACC contract and Pat McAfee's exit from SiriusXM.   Mentioned in the podcast this week: Tony Romo, Chris Russo, Pete Bevacqua, Chris Ripley, Katie Nolan, Hannah Keyser, Melanie Newman, Chris Young, Hunter Pence, Stephen Nelson, Fred Gaudelli, Al Michaels, Kirk Herbstreit, Charissa Thompson, Richard Sherman, Ryan Fitzpatrick, Jared Stacy, Marie Donoghue, Bob Kraft, Rupert Murdoch, Kevin Burkhardt, Alana Russo, Michael Nathanson, Burke Magnus, Jeb Bush, Tim Green, Thom Brennaman, Kenny Albert, Anthony Muñoz, Phil Dean, David Hill, Jimmy Pitaro, Eric Shanks, Michelle Beisner-Buck, Joe Davis, Jack Buck, Vin Scully, Richie Zyontz, Tony Kornheiser, Chris Kerber, Beverly Sills, Kevin Burkhardt, Greg Olsen, Tom Brady, Rick Sutcliffe, Brent Musburger, Wally Matthews, Derek Jeter, Robert Heymann, Pat McAfee, Peyton Manning, LeBron James, Charles Barkley, Stephen A. Smith, Jason Benetti, Casey Thompson, Isaiah Garcia-Castaneda, Tim Brando, Gus Johnson, Greg Olsen   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Democracy Group
Can We Fix the Rage Machine? Ft. Tim Miller | Politics is Everything

The Democracy Group

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 46:19


Tim Miller is an MSNBC analyst, writer-at-large at The Bulwark, and the host of "Not My Party" on Snapchat. Tim was communications director for Jeb Bush's 2016 presidential campaign and spokesman for the Republican National Committee during Mitt Romney's 2012 campaign. He has since left the GOP and become one of the leaders of the “Never Trump” movement. He is author of Why We Did It: A Travelogue from the Republican Road to Hell that aims to explain why Washington DC politicos who knew better went along with Trump and he joins us on Politics is Everything to discuss his book and what we can do to fix the rage machine he helped to create.Additional InformationPolitics is Everything PodcastMore shows from The Democracy Group

The DooDoo Diva's Smells Like Money Podcast

– The DooDoo Diva's Smells Like Money Podcast – S3 Ep9 Using I-Beams - Denver Stutler Denver Stutler, Jr.'s 30-year career includes a unique combination of both public and private sector experience in the wastewater infrastructure industry at an executive level. With a background in civil engineering, Denver gained a working knowledge of the regulatory framework and learned the ins and outs of the political arena. He then served on the executive staff for Governor Jeb Bush from 2003 to 2005, gaining important insight into the workings of government at the federal, state, and local levels. Listen to this latest episode of “The DooDoo Diva's Smells Like Money Podcast” where Denver Stutler talks about the “I-Beam” approach and how to be a champion who can influence the purse strings by using their knowledge,vision and understanding of the value of infrastructure, as it relates to the long term viability of a community. When you really understand the role underground and wastewater infrastructure plays in a community, it gains equal attention versus being viewed as a competing need. Denver also discusses the process of building or upgrading a wastewater treatment plant how investing in infrastructure helps a community. This episode covers: ● How Infrastructure Competes for Limited Resources ● How the health of Water or Wastewater Infrastructure Affects the Community ● How Wastewater Service Providers and Technology Providers can be Champions for their End-Users I hope you find this episode as informative and as exciting as we have. Please let us know your thoughts about the episode! Connect with Denver Stutler: U.S. Submergent Technologies | Sedivision® o: 941-216-0149 m: 8650-321-4337 dstutler@sedivision.com www.sedivision.com | www.ussubmergent.com Connect with Suzan Chin-Taylor, host of The DooDoo Diva's Smells Like Money Podcast: Website: www.creativeraven.com | https://thetuitgroup.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/creativeraven/ Email: raven@creativeraven.com Telephone: +1 760-217-8010 Listen and Subscribe here to your favorite platform : Apple Podcast - Google Podcast - CastBox - OverCast - Pocket Casts - Youtube - Spotify https://creativeraven.com/smells-like-money-podcast/ Subscribe to the Podcast: https://creativeraven.com/smells-like-money-podcast/ Be a guest on our show: https://calendly.com/thetuitgroup/be-a-podcast-guest Check Out my NEW Digital Marketing E-Course & Coaching Program just for Wastewater Pros: https://store.thetuitgroup.com/diy-digital-marketing-playbook-for-wastewater-pros

Paul Lisnek Behind the Curtain on WGN Plus
Former Republican strategist Tim Miller on his NYT Best Seller: ‘Why We Did It'

Paul Lisnek Behind the Curtain on WGN Plus

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022


On this podcast, Paul goes behind the curtain with Tim Miller, MSNBC analyst and writer-at-large at The Bulwark to discuss his new best-selling book, “Why We Did It: A Travelogue From the Republican Road to Hell.” Tim was a republican political operative who was the communications director for Jeb Bush's presidential campaign and the spokesman […]

Politics Is Everything
Can We Fix the Rage Machine? Ft. Tim Miller?

Politics Is Everything

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 46:11


Tim Miller is an MSNBC analyst, writer-at-large at The Bulwark, and the host of "Not My Party" on Snapchat. Tim was communications director for Jeb Bush's 2016 presidential campaign and spokesman for the Republican National Committee during Mitt Romney's 2012 campaign. He has since left the GOP and become one of the leaders of the “Never Trump” movement. He is author of Why We Did It: A Travelogue from the Republican Road to Hell that aims to explain why Washington DC politicos who knew better went along with Trump and he joins us on Politics is Everything to discuss his book and what we can do to fix the rage machine he helped to create.

The DooDoo Diva's Smells Like Money Podcast
S3 E6 An MRI for your Wastewater Structures

The DooDoo Diva's Smells Like Money Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 20:18


Denver Stutler, Jr.'s 30-year career includes a unique combination of both public and private sector experience in the water infrastructure industry at an executive level. With a background in civil engineering, Denver gained a working knowledge of the regulatory framework and learned the ins and outs of the political arena. He then served on the executive staff for Governor Jeb Bush from 2003 to 2005, gaining important insight into the workings of government at the federal, state, and local levels. Listen to this latest episode of “The DooDoo Diva's Smells Like Money Podcast” where Denver Stutler talks about how Sedivision's MRI for wastewater structures ultimately provides visibility for clients, giving asset owners accurate information so they can make informed decisions and plan accordingly Denver also provides an analogy when it comes to customers asking about wastewater and his career, where he compares the visibility of wastewater with a large swimming pool. As the metaphor goes, a swimming pool ends at visibility, because you can see through the bottom of the swimming pool but you can't see through the bottom of a wastewater tank. This episode covers: ● Denver Stutler on An MRI for your Wastewater Tank ● Detention time is the treatment function ● Our industry suffers mightily from out of sight, out of mind. ● Sedivision Technology was Vetted by ISLE I hope you find this episode as informative and as exciting as we have. Please let us know your thoughts about the episode! Connect with Denver Stutler: U.S. Submergent Technologies | Sedivision® o: 941-216-0149 m: 8650-321-4337 dstutler@sedivision.com www.sedivision.com | www.ussubmergent.com Connect with Suzan Chin-Taylor, host of The DooDoo Diva's Smells Like Money Podcast: Website: www.creativeraven.com | https://thetuitgroup.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/creativeraven/ Email: raven@creativeraven.com Telephone: +1 760-217-8010 Listen and Subscribe here to your favorite platform : Apple Podcast - Google Podcast - CastBox - OverCast - Pocket Casts - Youtube - Spotify https://creativeraven.com/smells-like-money-podcast/ Subscribe to the Podcast: https://creativeraven.com/smells-like-money-podcast/ Be a guest on our show: https://calendly.com/thetuitgroup/be-a-podcast-guest Check Out my NEW Digital Marketing E-Course & Coaching Program just for Wastewater Pros: https://store.thetuitgroup.com/diy-digital-marketing-playbook-for-wastewater-pros

Liberty and Leadership
Will Weatherford on Principled Leadership

Liberty and Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 34:51


This week, another exceptional TFAS alumnus joins us on the Liberty and Leadership Podcast: Will Weatherford '02, former Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives and current managing partner of Weatherford Capital. In this week's episode, Roger and Will discuss his meteoric rise to becoming the youngest presiding officer of any state legislative chamber in the United States, the ever-changing relationship between government and business, and leading Tampa Bay's efforts in its winning bid to host the Super Bowl. The Liberty and Leadership Podcast is hosted by TFAS President Roger Ream (https://tfas.org/podcast) and produced by kglobal (https://kglobal.com/podcast-studio). If you have a comment or question for the show, please drop us an email at podcast@TFAS.org.Support the show

The FCCMA Podcast
Episode #67: Monica Cepero – Discovering New Opportunities in your Career

The FCCMA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 31:18


Monica Cepero discusses the path that landed her as Broward County Administrator. From working for Jeb Bush to working for the City Manager of Tallahassee, she emphasizes going out of your comfort zone to maximize your career growth.

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Mark Leibovich: Donald Trump's Washington and the Price of Submission

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 68:23


The Republican Party used to stand for individualism, and according to journalist and author Mark Leibovich, it now largely answers to the whims of one man: former president Donald Trump. Tracing Trump's ascent to the top of a party that in the early months of his candidacy viewed him with contempt, Leibovich brings answers to the massive question of “what happened?” Mark Leibovich is an award-winning journalist and writer for The Atlantic. Called the “reigning master of the political profile” by Washingtonian magazine and named one of “Washington's 25 Most Powerful, Least Famous People” by The New Republic, Leibovich has decades of journalistic experience, including previously writing for The New York Times for 15 years.  In his latest book Thank You For Your Servitude, Leibovich retells how figures like Marco Rubio, Ted Cruz and Lindsey Graham went from vocal Trump critics to loyal soldiers. With shocking honesty from some of Trump's biggest supporters admitting they are “in on the joke,” Leibovich uses interviews, news media and an incisive, brutally honest investigation to tell how Trump remade the GOP in his own image—and how far his politicians are willing to go to stay relevant. Join us, as Leibovich recounts the transformation of the American political right, and how it gave hints of the events we see unfold today. SPEAKERS Mark Leibovich Staff Writer, The Atlantic; Former Chief National Correspondent, The New York Times Magazine; Author, Thank You for Your Servitude: Donald Trump's Washington and the Price of Submission; Twitter @MarkLeibovich In Conversation with Tim Miller Writer-at-large, The Bulwark; Political Analyst, MSNBC; Host, "Not My Party" on Snapchat; Communications Director, Jeb Bush 2016; Author, Why We Did It: A Travelogue from the Republican Road to Hell; Twitter @timodc In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on July 20th, 2022 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Southern Soil Podcast
A Look Back: Jeb Bush (no, not that one) and I talk about his time as Director of Forsyth Farmers Market in Savannah (Season 2: Episode 6)

The Southern Soil Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 36:55


In today's episode I catch up with Jeb Bush on his last day as Director of Forsyth Farmer's Market. Jeb started as Director of the market about the same time I was starting up Southern Soil and I've been able to see the market grow and flourish under his leadership. I know he will be missed by many but we wish him all the best as he moves on to a new position with Habitat for Humanity. Jeb and I talk about some of the high points of his time with the Forsyth Market and some of the changes that have occurred in the local food scene over the past five years. If you enjoy this episode, please leave us a rating and review. Also, be sure to check out our sponsors and give them a like as well! Morning Belle Farms Chelsea Green Publishing Savannah Hydroponics and Organics --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/southernsoil/message

Kings and Generals: History for our Future
3.6 Fall and Rise of China: Rise of the South Ming Regime

Kings and Generals: History for our Future

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 54:52 Very Popular


Last time we spoke, the Ming Dynasty had finally come to an end. After years of fighting, Li Zicheng had finally broken the Ming Dynasty and assumed the Dragon Throne, or sort of. As his rebel forces pillaged Beijing and Li Zicheng sought to establish his Shun Dynasty a rather large issue loomed, that of the Qing invaders. The Qing had bided their time waiting for the Ming Dynasty to rot from the inside before making their move. Li Zicheng took his army to go meet the foreign invader, but unbeknownst to him the remnants of the northern Ming military prefered to throw their lot in with the Qing rather than with him. Li Zicheng's army was smashed at the battle of Shanhai pass. Prince Dorgon took the dragon throne to serve as regent for the infant Qing Emperor Shunzhi marking the emergence of a new Dynasty over China, and they all lived happily ever after. Of course not.    Welcome to the Fall and Rise of China Podcast, I am your dutiful host Craig Watson. But, before we start I want to also remind you this podcast is only made possible through the efforts of Kings and Generals over at Youtube. Perhaps you want to learn more about the history of Asia? Kings and Generals have an assortment of episodes on the history of asia and much more  so go give them a look over on Youtube. So please subscribe to Kings and Generals over at Youtube and to continue helping us produce this content please check out www.patreon.com/kingsandgenerals. If you are still hungry for some more history related content, over on my channel, the Pacific War Channel where I cover the history of China and Japan from the 19th century until the end of the Pacific War.   #6 This episode is the rise of the South Ming Regime   So perhaps a short recap of the end of the last series of episodes. The bandit army of Li Zicheng believed after taking Beijing that their revolution had succeeded and that they could all “live happily ever after”. They did not consider the threat in the north that was the Qing invaders. They had committed the mistake of arrogance and it cost them their newfound Shun Dynasty, it also would have future political and military consequences. The first Qing emperor was titled Shunzhi, meaning “smoothly ruling emperor”, however Prince Dorgon would act as his regent as he was only 5 years old. Thus at the offset, Prince Dorgon ordered the Han chinese civilians to leave inner Beijing city so he could resettle it was Manchu bannermen and establish some sort of order. Exceptions were made of course, remember countless Han defectors aided the Qing conquest and many would take up titles and positions within the new government. The Qing rulers were not naive, they knew opposition would be fierce if they did not incorporate Han chinese within their new hierarchy and thus the loyal Han Bannermen became the great administrators that allowed for the transition to run sort of smoothly. Some of the greatest Han bannermen that would aid the new administration would be Kong Youde, a long time defector, Shang Kexi and Geng Zhongming, who both would play very crucial roles much further into this story. Until 1658 the Qing would intentionally not install any Manchu or Mongol governors so as to make sure the transition worked. Yet also at the offset, the Qing did ruffle some feathers with a particular decision. In 1645 Prince Dorgon issued the infamous head shaving proclamation. Basically he ordered all subjects in China to shave their hair in the style of the Manchu, which is that of a long braided queue. You probably have seen countless movies showcasing this hairstyle, usually the men have a hat on and you see the long braid trailing under it. Now he proclaimed the punishment for those who did not perform the head shaving as that of any other rebel to the Qing, a death sentence. Now a ton of Han chinese shaved their head immediately to curry favor with Prince Dorgon and the new Qing dynasty. They were showered with titles and positions and such.The policy was something of a symbolic submission to the new dynasty and helped the Manchu from telling who was friend or foe. It also evoked the Confucian notion that the subjects of the Dynasty were like the adopted children of the Emperor and that they should look like their adoptive father. Regardless for many Han Chinese the head shaving order was humiliating, some sources I read deemed it a “loss of their manhood”. So as much as it helped the Qing see friend or foe, it also would be used as a symbol of resistance by those who refused to submit. As you can imagine it was inevitable that anti-Qing struggles would break out. From June of 1644 to the end of 1646, the remnants of the Dashun army of Li Zicheng and the Daxi army of Zhang Xianzhong spearheaded anti-qing movements. But unlike the failed Ming state, the Qing Dynasty possessed a powerful army, with high morale.    Politically it made sense to go after Li Zicheng first, for one thing he was the closest. Hell Li Zicheng actually handed the Qing a great situation if you think about it, they could now avenge the regicide of Emperor Chongzhen and be seen as saviors. Thus from the get-go their top priority was to eradicate the Dashun army. Now I did briefly mention the fate of Li Zicheng in the last series, but I will need to reiterate it here again a bit so the story is cohesive. The Dashun army and Li Zicheng fled the west of the Beijing area and lost a ton of territory, but there was a deep anti-qing feeling in the population leading to overwhelming support for them. The Dashun army took up defensive positions in Taiyuan, Yan'an and Suide led by the commanders Chen Youngfu, Li Guo and Hao Yao respectifully. Li Zicheng retreated to Xi'an and decided to seize Hanchung, Gansu and Lanzhou to the south, ensuring the safety of the central Shaanxi area. From there he hoped to have a base of operations for anti-qing action. The Qing army went south along the Taihang Mountain range and occupied Pianguan where they planned to seize Taiyuan.The Dashun army resisted them and managed to defeat the Qing army in Jingjian, Xuanhua and Weizhou. But despite the Dasun army's valiant efforts, it had a problem. The peasant regime in various areas had destroyed much land and resulted in a logistical nightmare.    By November of 1644, the Qing army broke up into 2 forces, one was led by Prince Ajige who was appointed as the Jinyuan general, assisted by Generals Wu Sangui and Shang Kexi. Wu Sangui as you might remember is the man who literally opened the door to the Qing in order to defeat Li Zicheng and Shang Kexi was Ming general who defected and would prove to be quite the loyal ally. They marched through Datong enroute for Xi'an. The other force was led by Prince Dodo also known as Prince Yu assisted by Kong Youde and Geng Zhongming marched on Tonguan. Both armies planned to meet up at Xi'an  where Li Zicheng had fled and defeat his Dashun army there. Ajige's army managed to capture Taiyuan, Pingyan and other cities, but paid heavily for it. Prince Yu's army fought a vigorous battle with the Dashun in the area of Luoyang, Shaanzhou and Baoling until they reached the outskirts of Tongguan. The siege of Tongguan lasted a month with Li Zicheng commanding the troops personally, but to no avail. Meanwhile Ajige's army conquered Yan'an and Shaanzhou and as a result Xi'an became the focal point for the Qing army to produce a hammer and anvil attack. By february 9th, Li Zicheng had to abandon Xi'an running south for the mountains of Shangluo. The Dashun army experienced tremendous defeats at the hands of the Qing, but still hundreds of thousands came rallying to the cause of resistance. Dashun armies led by Li Guo, Gao Yigong and Hao Yaoqi were stationed in the areas of Jing and Xiang while Li Zicheng and Liu Zongmin took up positions in Chengtian. The Dashun army also held Wuchang and at this point Li Zicheng knew the north-east was unstable, but he could ill afford to allow the southeast to fall into disarray. Li Zicheng south to seize the eastern part of Zhoudong and the Xuan areas to establish a base of operations against the Qing armies. By the end of May as the Dashun armies prepared to leave, the Qing army suddenly surprise attacked them from both land and sea. As a result the Dashun army had to abandon Wuchang and run further south to Tongshan. The battle was a grave one and Liu Zongmin was severely injured before being captured and died in battle. Morale broke down for the peasants as more and more Han officials began to collude with the Qing against the peasants. The Dashun army faced enemies from all sides and the anti-qing movement was deteriorating. Then as I stated in the previous episode, by June of 1645, Li Zicheng was ambushed when he tried to cross the Jiugong Mountains. How Li died is not exactly known, some say he hung himself after being surrounded by some angry peasants. Others say peasants beat him to death looking for food. What is known is that his corpse was badly mutilated when it was found. Li Zichengs body was sent south to Ming authorities who decaptitied it.    Now Just a few weeks after Emperor Congzhen had committed suicide in Beijing, one of his Ming clasnmen Zhu Yousong known as Prince Fu arrived in Nanjing. Now there were a ton of Ming princes lying all about China, but it just so happened most of the surviving high court officials were in Nanjing and thus they began to debate who should take up the Dragon Throne. They eventually came to the conclusion Zhu Yousong would be best and asked him to step up. So with the support of Ming loyalist bureaucrats and generals, Zhu Yongsong proclaimed himself an Emperor in Nanjing with the reign title of Hongguang meaning “great light”. This marked the creation of what is known as the South Ming Dynasty. Now Zhu Yongsong was chosen mostly because of his bloodline rather than character or ability. He was the eldest son of Wanli's favorite son, a guy that Li Zicheng et al killed and ate if you remember rather gruesome stuff. His son Zhu Yongsong shared many of his fathers defects and he did not even really want the throne, he just happened to be in Nanjing and a prime candidate.   The original aim Hongguangs regime was to take revenge and suppress the bandit armies. Indeed Emperor Hongguangs court proclaimed the regime was formed to “ally with the Tartars to pacify the bandits”. Hongguang's new regime possessed quite a lot of military power. There was the grand secretary, Ma Shiying who  was the greatest pusher of Zhu Yongsong onto the throne and held a powerful war fleet. There was Shi Kefa the minister of war in Nanjing who further appointed the “sizhen” “Four guardian bastions” who would defend 4 territories; Huang Degong would defend Luzhou, Gao Jie held Sizhou, Liu Liangzuo held Fenyang and Liu Zeqing held Huan'an. All 4 were vested in titles of nobility, which would create a dangerous precedent for our entire story. Each man had an army of 20-30 thousands soldiers. All of this was established to protect the area of Nanjing from the Dashun armies. They also were preparing a northern expedition to eradicate the Dashun forces once and for all. The Hongguang regime seemed to not view the entrance of the Qing invaders as the main threat, most likely because the Qing went straight to work quelling the peasant rebels. In response to the Nanjing regime springing up out of nowhere, the Qing Dynasty chose to compromise for the time being while they consolidated further support for their own regime. They also quickly realized the Nanjing regime was extremely incompetent.    When the news spread of the death of Li Zicheng to Nanjing, the ruler proclaimed Wu Sangui as Ji lord protector. The Nanjing regime even sought to send Wu Sangui millions of taels of silver by sea as reward for “borrowing the Qing army” to defeat the peasant army, yes burrow. It seems the court of Nanjing thought that Wu Sangui could be bought back over to the Ming side. It is alleged that regent Dorgon proclaimed in July that the country should not belong to one person and thus the Hongguan regime made an imperial edict declaring its existence to Hebei and Shandong. They became known as the South Ming regime and they immediately began to send emissaries to Beijing for peace talks. They sent countless gold, silver as tribute and ceded territory to try and earn pledges that the Qing army would not march southwards upon them. They also strongly suggested cooperative action against the bandit armies.    The Hongguang regime was a product of conflict amongst big Ming warlords. There was a Zuo Liangyu bloc which began a campaign of suppression against Daxi bandit armies in Wuhan. Gao Jie, Huang Degong and Liu Liangzuo each held their respective areas north of the Yangtze River in the Jianghuai area. Each warlord had territory and an army, they began to snatch land from each other and this all hurt the common people. In each territory, 30 thousand soldiers needed to be drafted, 200 thousand kg's of rice handed over, 400 thousand liangs of silver turned in. The soldiers and civilians often fell into conflict with another, the civilians saw the military as thieves and the military saw the civilians as rebels, a vicious cycle. While some of the warlords proclaimed they were stamping out bandit armies, they were in truth attacking fellow warlords.    Meanwhile the South Ming regime was placing its entire hope in compromising with the Qing and only when messengers began to arrive who were sent to the Qing back, stating that peace talks were going nowhere and that a Qing army was preparing to march south did some officials begin to make other plans. Shi Kefa amongst many others began to realize that if peace could not be secured, warfare would be the only course of action. Emperor Hongguang for his part was nothing more than a puppet, being controlled by the warlords. He was busy drinking, eating and spending time with his harem without thinking too much about how to deal with the Qing threat seriously.    One serious problem Shi Kefa faced was the bickering amongst the warlords such as the 4 guardian generals. Shi Kefa went to Yangzhou in 1645 to try and smooth relations between the guardian generals. Yet as he began talks with them they did not stop their plundering of another's territories. Then in 1645 the Qing army began to move south occupying Tongguan and Xi'an forcing Dashun armies to flee south requiring the Ming warlord Zuo Liangyu to be dispatched out to suppress them. As the Qing kept moving, this pushed the Dashun armies, which Ming armies like Zuo Liangyu's would have to chase, and thus the Ming were further weakened. On top of this issue, Zuo Liangyu hated Grand Secretary Mu Shiying and for good reason the man was clearly using the emperor like a puppet and taking more power each day. Thus Zuo proclaimed he would get rid of Ma Shiying's influence in the court. All of this internal bickering is happening with the Qing literally pounding on the door of their regime.   Ming forces began to be attacked by the Qing as they marched south and many simply surrendered.The Qing sent Prince Yu to lead his army out of Xi'an to the east and his force soon captured Xuzhou, a strategically important Ming territory and word soon came to Hongguang. The court of Hongguang freaked out looking to their strongmen to resist the Qing invaders, but the warlords of the South Ming Regime were so corrupt and too busy attacking another to pay attention. Gao Jie who possessed the largest army out of the guardian generals was assassinated by another Ming general named Xu Dingguo who tricked him using the oldest trick in the book, a banquet. Xu Dingguo was planning on surrendering to the Qing and invited Gao Jie to a dinner, got him very drunk and using some very beautiful prostitutes managed to kill him during the night. The army of Gao Jie retaliated against the city of Suizhou, but by that time the army of Xu Dingguo had fled and surrendered to the Qing army. When word spread of Gao Jie's death, the other warlords stormed into his territory to divide up his army. In the meantime grand secretary Ma Shiying wanted to continue his dominance of the South Ming Court and was struggling against Zuo Liangyu for power. On may 8th, Zuo's army began a battle agaisn't Ma Shiying's in Anqing, while the Qing army crossed the Huai River and marched on Suizhou. The 2 warlords were shocked by the news and forced to flee south, leaving poor Shi Kefa with the untenable position of defending against the Qing.   You see, Shi Kefa early on had asked to be dispatched to the north to supervise defenses on the border. But due to the warlords fighting another, the Ming general was unable to establish a strong defense. Then Emperor Hongguang ordered, cough cough it is actually Ma Shiying, ordered Shi Kefa to divert his forces from the northern border which the Qing were about to attack, to instead go west and attack Zuo Liangyu. Ironically at this point Zuo Liangyu had died of illness unbeknownst to Ma Shiying, and his son Zuo Menggeng was engaging the enemy. Because of all this anarchy, the Qing saw the route was open to Yangzhou which was something of a bulwark for Nanjing and marched towards it.    Facing the Qing invaders completely alone, the Shi Kefa army was forced to retreat from their northern positions to Yangzhou. His army only made it within days of the city becoming besieged by Prince Yu's army on the 13th of april. Thus Yangzhou was besieged and Emperor Hongguang called on all his officials as to what should be done. Yet many of the officials were too busy attacking another. Some in the court said they had to send reinforcements to help Shi Kefa and pointed fingers at Ma Shiying for intentionally retreating his forces from the Qing areas to retaliate against Zuo Liangyu. It was at that moment that Allegedly Ma sent proclaimed that he would rather the Qing killed the emperor and all the Ming officials rather than they all be killed by the treacherous Zuo Liangui. Ma went on to make edicts that anyone who dared talk about guarding the Huai area would be sentenced to death by him. Apparently even the Emperor dared not speak up. Thus Shi Kefa who was pleading for help was completely ignored. The warlords continued their fight as the Qing were literally banging on the gates. Prince Yu sent a letter to Shi Kefa asking for his surrender, but Shi Kefa replied “My life is tied to the city. I would rather die than betray my heart”.  On April 24th the Qing army's cannons had broken the walls of Yangzhou and the city fell during the night. Shi Kefa attempted suicide by slitting his own throat, but failed to do so. It is alleged, he asked his subordinate Shi Dewei to kill him, but Shi Dewei refused even when Shi Kefa screamed “Im the military inspector Si, quickly Kill me!”. Thus Shi Kefa was captured by Prince Yu who tried to persuade him to surrender and serve him stating “we sent you a letter politely asking for your surrender, but you refused. Now that you've fulfilled your loyalty and righteousness, you should take on a new important responsibility, help me conquer Jiangnan”. Shi Kefa responded "I fall together with the city. My decision will not change. Even if I'm torn to pieces, my feelings will be as sweet as maltose. But do not harm the thousands of lives in Yangzhou!" Thus Shi Kefa was put to death, as his subordinate Liu Zhaoji led the rest of the soldiers and civilians of the city to resist the Qing, pelting them with arrows.   Prince Yu, furious about the heavy casualties his force took upon entering the city, ordered the entire city put to the sword. The tale of this is known as the Yangzhou massacre and according to an account given by the contemporary Wang Xiuchu, the event was a 10 day massacre in which up to 800,000 people were killed. Most modern scholars consider that number to be an exaggeration, but what is not an exaggeration is the hardship felt by the poor souls of the city. Here is an excerpt from Wang Xiuchu's account:   “Several dozen people were herded like sheep or goats. Any who lagged were flogged or killed outright. The women were bound together at the necks with a heavy rope—strung one to another like pearls. Stumbling with each step, they were covered with mud. Babies lay everywhere on the ground. The organs of those trampled like turf under horses' hooves or people's feet were smeared in the dirt, and the crying of those still alive filled the whole outdoors. Every gutter or pond we passed was stacked with corpses, pillowing each others arms and legs. Their blood had flowed into the water, and the combination of green and red was producing a spectrum of colours. The canals, too, had been filled to level with dead bodies. Then fires started everywhere, and the thatched houses...caught fire and were soon engulfed in flames...Those who had hidden themselves beneath the houses were forced to rush out from the heat of the fire, and as soon as they came out, in nine cases out of ten, they were put to death on the spot. On the other hand, those who had stayed in the houses—were burned to death within the closely shuttered doors and no one could tell how many had died from the pile of charred bones that remained afterwards” After the Qing were finished pillaging Yangzhou, they crossed the Yangtze River and captured Zhenjing which was one of the last gateway's to Nanjing. Apparently in the dead of night, a very drunk Emperor Hongguang then fled from Nanjing to Wuhu under the protection of Huang Degong, his chief general. This left the South Ming court in chaos, some officials fled, while others prepared to pay tribute and surrender to the Qing. Li Chengdong and Liu Liangzuo surrendered to the Qing early on, Zuo Liangyu and Gao Jie were both dead leaving 23,000 defenders to guard Nanjing without any real leadership.    The betrayal and deaths of the warlords handed over the entire northwestern zone of the South Ming regime to the Qing. Ma Shiying then brought to Nanjing troops from the western provinces made out of non-Han Chinese indigenous fierce tribal warriors called the "Sichuan" soldiers to defend Nanjing against the Qing. Rather ironically the tribal warriors were deemed "barbarians" and slaughtered by the Han Chinese citizens of Nanjing. Mind you the person who was in charge of defending Nanjing was Zuo Liangyu so as you can imagine he probably had a heavy hand to play turning everyone against Ma Shiyang. It also turns out Zuo Liangyu and many citizens of Nanjing had decided to peacefully defect and turn over the city to the Qing when Emperor Hongguang abandoned them. Allegedly the citizens screamed out "These are the son and daughter-in-law of the traitorous minister Ma Shiying!" while parading the daughter-in-law and son of Ma Shiying as they stormed Ma Shiying's house. Thus when the Qing marched upon the city of Nanjing the defenders mostly threw down their weapons and by June 8th the South Ming Regime of Emperor Hongguang had collapsed. Zho Menggeng surrendered to the Qing, Huang Degong was killed fighting the Qing and for all it was on paper, perhaps upto a million men strong, the regime simply fell to pieces. Liu Zuoliang who had surrendered to the Qing managed to capture the fleeing Emperor Hongguang and sent him under escort back to Nanjing. It is said the citizens spat on him and cursed him and even threw rocks at him as he made his way along the street. Emperor Hongguang would die a year later in Beijing. The South Ming regime of Hongguang had not even lasted a full year and made one of the most pitiful attempts at trying to resist the Qing army.  It also exploited its own people and caused a ton of suffering, which will be the main theme of this entire story.   Within a year of their new Dynasty, the Qing armies had defeated Li Zicheng and his Dashun armies. They had destroyed the South Ming regime of Hongguang and had taken over the northern  half of China. Yet this was just to be the beginning of the seizure of national power. The bloody suppression of the bandit armies, the plundering and killing, alongside the coercive policies led the Manchu people into a lot of conflict with the Han majority. As the Qing armies continued to march south many Han rose up in defiance still. The Qing had a powerful and skillful military, but even they could not hope to control all of China with just military force. Emperor Hongguang was not going to be the last guy to proclaim himself an emperor and try to rally the Ming to his cause, not by a long shot.   In July of 1645 Prince Lu established a power base in Shaoxing and even proclaimed himself a regent. From there he created his own regime that soon held control over Shoxing, Ningbo, Wenzhou and Taizhou. With the support of the local populace and taking advantage of the rough terrain of the Qiantang River, his forces led by Fang Guo'an and Wang Zhiren fought the Qing off. However they were merely defending their territory, not seeking to confront the Qing army.  So  unfortunately for Prince Lu, before he could even toss around any reign title or proclaim a new Dynasty, the Qing showed up to the gates of Shaoxing and he had to surrender.    Much like the warlords, Prince Lu was too busy actively fighting against imperial family members such as the Prince of Tang, Zhu Yujian. When the Qing captured Nanjing, Zhu Yujian had fled to Hangzhou and at the behest of many of his officials ascended to the Ming throne in Fuzhou proclaiming himself Emperor Longwu meaning “plentiful and martial”. Now neither Prince Lu nor Emperor Longwu were even aware of another at first, it just so happens they figured out their situation when Emperor Longwu had sent regency letters to Shaoxing. Upon hearing of the regency of Prince Lu, Emperor Longwu demanded he step down, but the court of Prince Lu demanded he stand up to the challenge. Now neither side actually sent armies to fight another, instead they simply bickered about who needed to step down. Regardless this meant they were not cooperating or coordinating with another and who benefits from that, the Qing ofcourse. Bickering against Emperor Longwu deeply impacted Prince Lu's forces capability at defending against the Qing and alongside this in July of 1646 because of a drought the Qiantang river became shallow allowing the Qing army to simply cross it and march on Shaoxing. The army of Fang Guo'an fled at the mere sight of the Qing and soon everything fell into chaos. Fang Guo'an and his forces surrendered to the Qing and Prince Lu tried to flee for his life, but the Qing literally got to his gates by that point. The quasi regime if you can call it that had not even existed for a year before its collapse.    Meanwhile Emperor Longwu held control over Jianning, Tianxing, Yanping, Xinghua, Zhangzhou, Quanzhou, Shaowu and Tingzhou. This was the region of Fujian and luckily for the new regime, its geographical position was on the margin of the Qing's empire, cut off from the heartland by several mountain ranges. His military sent 100,000 troops to defender the towns with another 100,000 set to suppress the enemy. Unfortunately for Emperor Longwu the military was not fully under his control. A large part of his military forces were loyal to the powerful warlord named Zheng Zhilong. Zheng also went by the name Yiguan, he used to be a pirate leader and was offered amnesty by the Ming dynasty. He had been a governor and military officer possessing up to 30000 troops while controlling significant maritime trade. Merchant ships coming and going from Japan and SouthEast Asia had to obtain his permission and pay taxes to him. This had made him the formidable warlord of Fujian by the time the Qing were spreading through China. The reason he chose to support the Longwu regime was because he wanted to take this opportunity to gain political influence and expand his own power further inland. So needless to say, Zheng Zhilong was not the most devout Ming loyalist. The Longwu emperor would have another ace up his sleeve, though like Zhen Zhilong not a very trustworthy one. A group known as the Loyal and True Brigades emerged. They were former Dashun leaders who had wandered leaderless after Li Zicheng died. They ran into the army of He Tengjiao who instead of simply smashing them, shared wine with the bandit leaders and asked them to join the Ming loyalists. They agreed to do so under his banner, greatly increasing his numbers, up to an estimated 200,000. He Tengjiao was showered with titles and gifts from Emperor Longwu for bringing so many to the cause, but as you can imagine taking in bandit leaders would have dire side effects. In reality, these bandit leaders and their armies were not really submitting under the Ming, nor were any really that loyal. It was just a means to an end, an allegiance and many of these bandit armies would simply go on to become bandits again. The precedent however was set, the South Ming Regime would continuously employ former bandit leaders, even installing some with titles which would hurt them further down the road.    While so many Ming loyalist armies fought the Qing armies on the border territory of Fujian and other areas, Zheng Zhilong made sure to hold back near the coast, despite having the most formidable force with abundant provisions. When the Qing armies approached Zhejiang and Fujian, Zheng Zhilong thought the Longwu regime could do him no more good. In order to maintain his power in Fujian and keep his tremendous wealth he decided to simply defect to the Qing. On top of this, something that is said all too often but gets disregarded occurred. Terrible weather led to terrible harvests which lead to starvation affected the troops and civilians alike.   Still in places like western Huguang the Loyal and True were unleashed upon the Qing invaders and they won several battles. But when the Qing crossed the Xianxia Mountains, Zheng Zhilong withdrew all his forces. The Qing army marched straight through the area encountering no defense and entered Fuzhou with ease. The civil and military officials of the Longwu regime fled for their lives or surrendered, no one really put up a fight. Zheng Zhilong shaved his hair for the Manchu queue and surrendered. He was sent to Beijing. A foreign missionary who witnessed the collapse of the Longwu regime stated “Emperor Longwu acted as if he was a cowardly sheep and fled with his mighty army. The word mighty here referred to the large number of the callous people. But his escape could not save his life. When the swift Qing army caught up with him, they shot these stupid sheep with arrows”. Longwu had no children and had adopted Zheng Zhilong's son Zheng Chenggong and when Zheng Zhilong surrendered and left for Beijing, this left his army to be inherited by Zheng Chenggong and his uncle. Zheng Chenggong goes by another name in the west, Koxinga and will play a crucial role in this story later.   In December of 1646 the little brother of Emperor Longwu, the new Prince of Tang, Zhu Yuyue, proclaimed himself Emperor in Guangzhou, his title of reign was Shaowu. When the Qing forces captured Fuzhou and killed the Longwu Emperor, Zhu Yuyue had fled to Guangzhou and several high officials pressured him to take the throne. Unfortunately for him just a few days later the Prince of Yongming, Zhu Youlang also proclaimed himself emperor at Zhaoqing taking the title of Yongli which means perpetual calendar. Zhu Youlang was the grandson of Wanli and held a stronger claim to the throne than Zhu Yuyue. The Ming provincial governor of Guangxi, Qu Shisi who had served under both Hongguang and Longwu, championed Zhu Youlang early on claiming he had “dragon countenance” and a great character for rule.  Yet,according to some surviving sources, Zhu Youlang was said to be quite weak of body and spirit, and even his own mother urged against his enthronement “My son is soft and benevolent and lacks the talent to bring order to chaos. I wish you could choose someone else” ouch, Jeb Bush much? But as usually occurs, bloodlines won out over merit.   Now of all the Ming Princes to take up the dragon throne, Yongli's tenure would be the longest during this period. Yet it was also characterized by the same problems as the rest, rampant factionalism, indecisive leadership and an overreliance upon warlord military figures whose interests would more often than naught trump over his own. One of Emperor Yongli's first actions was to put He Tengjiao in charge of military affairs hoping he could rein in the Loyal and True who were not full on looting the hell out of the country side, bandits will be bandits afterall. Emperor Yongli then went a step further and began instilling titles upon the former bandit leaders, most likely fearing if he did not persuade them to his side they would join Emperor Shaowu or the Qing. This precedent would further hurt his reign down the road.   As you can imagine both new regimes began claiming to be the legitimate successor to the South Ming Dynasty as a whole and inevitably fell into war with another. They would be so consumed by this that neither regime would do much of anything to thwart the Qing invaders. Well as the war between the 2 emperors raged, in only 40 days of proclamation, Shaowu's forces were completely smashed at Guangzhou by the Qing and Emperor Shaowu was captured in January and committed suicide. Thus to start off his new regime, just a month or so after taking the throne Emperor Yongli would flee, not a good start. The Qing who smashed Emperor Shaowu had marched onwards and entered Guangzhou, prompting Emperor Yongli to fear for his life and flee from Zhaoqing going 170 kilometers upriver to Wuzhou. Emperor Yongli was abandoned by many members of his court and I would say rightfully so given his cowardly actions. Would you know it, the Qing army simply kept marching, as one does closer and closer to Wuzhou and guess what Emperor Yongli did, yes he fled again, this time to Guilin and even more court officials abandoned him. It was at Guilin where he made a distant relative, Zhu Rongfan Vice Minister of War and vice censor in chief and supreme commander of Sichuan and Huguang, yes the old practice of tossing a ton of different hats onto a single person. In 1647 Zhu Rongan would soon declare himself regent and cause a ton of chaos in Sichuan.    The Qing having blown right through Guangdong with incredible speed were fast approaching Guilin, prompting, you guessed it, Yongli to flee now to Quanzhou. Many in Yongli's court had reasoned that Quanzhou was an ideal area to have better access to the war efforts of the Loyal and True brigades. But Qu Shishi repeatedly argued they should make a stand at Guilin. ““If you want to defend Yue, you should stay in Yue. If you abandon Yue, then Yue will be imperiled. If we take one step forward, then the people will take one step forward. But if we flee far away in a single day, the people will also flee far in a day. If we run, then we cannot defend [territory]. How can we attract people to our cause?”. Qu Shishi believed they needed a stable base of operations in order to attract troops for more broad based support. He also kept arguing the previous south Ming regimes had all abandoned bases too swiftly and thus undermined their causes. We will come back to this, but now we need to look at another large aspect of the war for unification, the problem of the bandit armies and how suppressing them causes further problems. This is sort of a more micro look at how at the more local levels, certain groups of people would rise up to fight off the Qing invaders.    The Qing army scored a series of victories south of the Yangtze River and the southeast coastal regions. They defeated quite a few South Ming regimes and Dashun and Daxi armies. But with each victory came cities being burned, plundering, murder all contributing to the further suffering of the common people. With so many people suffering came more and more revolts. People south of the Yangtze and southeast coast regions continued to resist the Qing. Peasant revolutionary organizations which had developed even before the Qing were growing exponentially. In august and september of 1646, 20,000 strong peasant armies from Liyan, Jintan and Xinghua began to cooperate with the South Ming regime to besiege Nanjing. This was quite an incredible feat, it was the secondary capital after all. The peasant armies launched several attacks causing quite a lot of anxiety for the Qing rulers, but they never managed to take Nanjing. These anti-qing actions however spread like wildfire to the Taihu area. There under the leadership of Zhang San, a mass of poor farmers, and fishermen began an organized insurrection. They kidnapped the children of rich families, hid them in the mountains and began demanding ransoms which they took to pay for soldiers and provisions. This type of uprising then sprang in the area of Suzhou and Songjiang encouraged more and more people to struggle against the Qing rule. One Taihu peasant army that participated was named the “White Head Army”, because they wore white headcloths. They managed to overthrow Wujiang, attacked Haiyan, Zhejiang and Jiashan gaining considerable fame. But like so many, they were eventually smashed by the Qing armies and their leader Wu Risheng was killed. Still under the overall leadership of Zhang San, farmers and fishermen of Taihu continued to fight and captured Yixing and fought forces in Suzhou and Changzhou. The Qing kept defeating their forces again and again, but more kept springing up and thus the White Head Army became a banner of resistance in the area south of the Yangtze River.   When the imperial edict was given out by the Qing government that everyone should style their hair in the Manchu fashion it was stipulated that in 10 days of the edict that all should comply. The order was basically “keep your hair or your head”. Several anti-qing forces rose up claiming they would rather die than shave their heads and they began a campaign of anti hair shaving. Movements were seen in countless cities, but the anti-shaving movement became most violent in Jiangyin. Jiangyin was a prosperous city with 3 rivers and 5 lakes. It was also the gateway to Suzhou, Songjiang, Zhejiang, Fujian and Nanjing. Yan Yingyuan, a low level Ming official and a historical grapher was appointed as a commander of a rebel army in Jiangyin. Yan organized the army and deployed a pretty effective defense. The Qing sent up to 240,000 soldiers to fight the rebels, but peasants from over 18 miles away were coming to the city to fight and when they did they abandoned their farm work, hurting the overall agriculture production of the area. The peasants were quite disorganized and many times had no idea what they were doing, but they did not give up, and the Qing began to seriously worry about this.  Jiangyin held out against about 10,000 Qing troops for 83 days during a fierce siege. When the city wall was finally breached on 9 October 1645, the Qing army led by the northern Chinese Ming defector Liu Liangzuo, was  ordered to "fill the city with corpses before you sheathe your swords," It is estimated his army massacred a entire population, of  between 74,000 and 100,000 people. Despite the brutality, local people in nearby areas did not stop. The city of Jiading which was southeast of Jiangyin had a large scale anti hair shaving revolt rise up led by Huang Chunyao and Hou Tongzeng. The Jianding people firmly guarded their city from 3 successive Qing attacks. At Songjiang armies led by Chen Zilong and Xia Yunyi began to rebel. Both cities would see similar massacres like Jiangyin. More uprising sprang up in Kunshan, Maoshan, Huizhou and countless other places. The Qing dynasty hated these revolts because the outcome was always going to be the same thing, dead potential subjects, ruined cities and devastated agricultural production.    So as you can see, local level organizations, IE: rebel uprisings were honestly Dynasty breaking mechanisms if they were allowed to continuously grow. Perhaps you as the Qing dynasty, smash a few of these before they get too big, but what happens if one does get too big? As the Qing quelled more and more peasant uprisings and moved further south of the Yangtze river, an old enemy of the Ming was becoming more and more powerful. As a result of Li Zicheng's death, the Qing brutal suppression of peasants and the incompetent disorganized state of the South Ming Dynasty, many peasants fled into the arms of Zhang Xianzhong.    I would like to take this time to remind you all that this podcast is only made possible through the efforts of Kings and Generals over at Youtube. Please go subscribe to Kings and Generals over at Youtube and to continue helping us produce this content please check out www.patreon.com/kingsandgenerals. If you are still hungry after that, give my personal channel a look over at The Pacific War Channel at Youtube, it would mean a lot to me.  Alrighty so we've gotten a taste of the situation right after Beijing fell to the Qing, things did not go so “happily ever after”. Yet the Qing smashed Li Zicheng and quite a few self proclaimed Emperors to the new South Ming Dynasty. The fleeing emperor Yongli was still kicking, but who next could possibly hope to challenge the Qing at this point? One of the arguably most evil men in history could, just you wait.  

In Trump's Shadow: The Battle for 2024
Understanding the Great Revolt

In Trump's Shadow: The Battle for 2024

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 39:56


To understand the long shadow that the former president continues to cast, we go back to the people that put him in the White House in the first place. Is it something the voters saw in Donald Trump that they really liked - or is it something they saw in the other candidates (such as the darling of the establishment, Jeb Bush) that they simply disliked? In 2018 Republican consultant Brad Todd teamed with the Washington Examiner's Salena Zito to explain the Trump phenomena and to try to define the forces at work in The Great Revolt. The book has been out for years, but the lessons for 2024 are still relevant. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Tim Miller: Inside the New Republican Party

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 74:44


From 2000 to 2022, one thing is certain: What it means to be Republican has changed. To former Republican political consultant Tim Miller, the GOP started down a path to disaster in the early 2000s. Lack of strategic decision making within the Republican Party at that time set the stage for Donald Trump to take over the party Miller once loved. He now seeks to answer a simple question: “Why did normal people go along with the worst of Trumpism?” Tim Miller is an author, activist and consultant who has held many positions within Republican campaigns. He has served as co-founder and political director for the advocacy group Republican Voters Against Trump and director of communications for Jed Bush's 2016 presidential campaign. During his time in the Republican Party, he served in a variety of positions, including co-founder and executive director of the opposition research firm America Rising and “forensic analyst” for Mitt Romney's failed 2012 presidential campaign. In his new book Why We Did It, Miller cuts through the past two decades of political shifts, compromises and decisions made by the GOP that he says set it on a collision course with Trumpism and led to the events of January 6. Giving an honest look at his own work in the Republican Party, Miller uses raw interviews, forgotten history and personal accounts in a biting, darkly satirical retelling of the transformation of the GOP, leading up to his eventual departure from the party in November 2020. Join us as Miller recounts the roadmap of how we got here, and what the story of one of the greatest party shifts in American history can tell us about the future of the nation. SPEAKERS Tim Miller Writer-at-large, The Bulwark; Political Analyst, MSNBC; Host, "Not My Party" on Snapchat; Communications Director, Jeb Bush 2016; Author, Why We Did It: A Travelogue from the Republican Road to Hell; Twitter @timodc In Conversation with Dan Pfeiffer Co-host, "Pod Save America"; Author, Battling the Big Lie: How Fox, Facebook, and the MAGA Media Are Destroying America; Twitter @danpfeiffer In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded on July 11th, 2022 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

After Words
Betsy DeVos "Hostages No More-The Fight for Education Freedom and the Future of the American Child"

After Words

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 63:08


Former Education Secretary Betsy DeVos talks about her time serving in the Trump administration and offers her thoughts on education reforms to fix schools.  She's interviewed by Jeb Bush, former Governor of Florida. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

in Piazza
Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush

in Piazza

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 36:34


In this episode of our "Best Of" series, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush joins InPiazza as he shares his thoughts on a wide range of topics with Jeanne and Michael — from COVID-19's impact on schools and getting America back to work, to how he got started, his journey and the state of free speech today. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/inpiazza/support

The Florida History Podcast
Episode 162- Florida GOP 2000-2022

The Florida History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 33:36


In part two of our look back at the Florida GOP's evolution we cover the years from Jeb Bush to Ron DeSantis.

Post Corona
The Coming Political Crack-Up — with Mike Murphy

Post Corona

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 48:42


What have we learned so far about this election cycle, and what does it tell us about what's likely to happen in the midterm elections of 2022, and the Democratic and GOP primaries for president in 2024? Historically, California has often served as a movie trailer on our national political future -- 'coming to a theater near you.' Richard Nixon started there, turning the Cold War threat into an election theme in his early political campaigns; Ronald Reagan transformed what we now think of as movement conservatism during his two terms as governor; and Proposition 187 was a California state ballot issue in 1994, before immigration became a national political issue (it helped get then-Governor Pete Wilson re-elected on the issue of immigration). Celebrity candidate Arnold Schwarzenegger got elected governor there a year before the first season of The Apprentice. The state's size and diversity make it a political country within a country: a population of 40 million people, the fifth largest economy in the world, and a whopping 22 million registered voters. Long-time GOP campaign strategist Mike Murphy has been on the front lines – and often the mastermind – of some of these California campaigns, as well as plenty of national campaigns too. He's been thinking about what, if anything, President Biden and the Democrats can do to turn around their near-term electoral headwinds. Mike's view on the political crack-up is sparked by the breakdown in quality of life for his fellow Californians, and Americans almost everywhere. He also has some analytical insights on everything from the impact of inflation to the future of 'Roe vs Wade'. Mike has worked on 26 gubernatorial and U.S. Senate races across the country, including 12 GOP wins in Blue States – something that's getting harder and harder to do. He was a top strategist for John McCain, Mitt Romney, Jeb Bush, and Arnold Schwarzenegger. Murphy is a political analyst for NBC and MSNBC. He's co-host of the Hacks on Tap Podcast, and he also pens a political newsletter (The Hacks On Tap Newsletter). Murphy is co-director of the University of Southern California's Center for the Political Future.

Hardball with Chris Matthews
Federal grand jury indicts former Trump adviser Peter Navarro

Hardball with Chris Matthews

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2022 42:03 Very Popular


In this episode of The ReidOut, Joy Reid brings you a major development on the Jan. 6 front. On Friday, a federal grand jury indicted former Trump adviser Peter Navarro, who ignored a subpoena from the January 6 committee. Navarro has not been shy about divulging his role in the plot to overturn the election. He wrote a book, and talked to pretty much anyone with a microphone about it. He's now the second Trump ally indicted on contempt of Congress charges. But first, Joy leads the program with Rep. Mondaire Jones of New York continuing to speak out on the GOP apparently choosing guns over kids. Then joining us from Uvalde, María Teresa Kumar, president and CEO of Voto Latino, shares about attending the funeral of one of the victims of the mass shooting. She also brings us details on her hosting a call to action in San Antonio on Saturday, June 4, called "Stand With Uvalde." Then we turn to a chilling New York Times report details how the Proud Boys have infiltrated the formerly normcore Miami-Dade Republican home of Jeb Bush. Finally, Joy and friends end the show on a positive note with "Who Won the Week?!" All this and more in this edition of The ReidOut on MSNBC.

Hot Dog City
GO LAND CRABS!

Hot Dog City

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 59:29


Jojo and Ivin break down the week that was. We discuss the uncompromising comfort of a smart pair of slacks. Monkeypox is the new Orange. First F-bomb at 6:25!! Jojo is creating a TikTok..still waiting on that one...Ivin is compelled to discuss how the latest Better Call Saul episode has changed how he views Jimmy and Kim. It wouldn't be HDC without the boys shitting on Disney/Marvel. Jojo outs himself with how much he spends on Fortnite. The hombres talk about Better Call Saul, Episode 8: RICO. Check that out at the 21:00 mark.Ivin feels his age and talks about getting a will and they get real grim, mother trucker...Can they keep this S under an hour???? Jojo by Boz Skaggs on iTunes hotdogcitytime@gmail.com Said in our Jeb Bush voice: "Please follow us on Twitter.." @hotdogcitytime --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/hotdogcitytime/message

Neil Rogers Show
Neil Rogers Show (November 4, 1998)

Neil Rogers Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 64:05


10 to 11 The day after the election of Jeb Bush, Neil is back on in Ft. Meyers. Last day of taping for WAMI, and Phil Hendrie calls.

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Francis Fukuyama: Liberalism and Its Discontents Show editorially warning

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 65:59


When noted political scientist Francis Fukuyama predicted the "end of history," it seemed that the Western form of traditional classical liberalism and democracy—rule of law, equal treatment, individualism, and political freedom—was on the march in countries around the world, and that a new political order would be established around the globe. However, as the Russian attack on Ukraine shows, the battle between autocracy and classic liberalism will continue to shape global relations in the present and the future, and as history it will tell the story of this complicated period in world history. In his latest book Liberalism and Its Discontents, Fukuyama explains the troubled history of the American realization of classical liberalism here in the United States, and the challenges from both sides of the political spectrum arising in recent decades. With the right demanding economic freedom above all else, and the left making its core ideal the elevation of identity above the universality of humanity, Fukuyama argues that both approaches miss the mark in grasping classical liberalism, and the consequences can be disastrous both at home and around the world. At this critical time, Fukuyama proposes a bold new defense of classical liberalism, and explains that failing to do so will continue to fragment America's civil society, and will influence global pushback on democracy itself. Join us as Fukuyama engages in a critical and timely discussion on classical liberalism, why it remains one of the most influential political ideologies of the past millennium, and why battles around it will determine the path of the 21st century for the United States and the world. NOTES This program is presented in collaboration with the USC Dornsife Center for the Political Future SPEAKERS Francis Fukuyama Olivier Nomellini Senior Fellow, Stanford University's Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies; Author, Liberalism and Its Discontents; Twitter @FukuyamaFrancis Tim Miller  Founder, Light Fuse Communications; Contributor, The Bulwark; Communications Director, Jeb Bush 2016; Author, Why We Did It (Forthcoming); Twitter @timodc—Moderator In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on May 16th, 2022 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Pro Politics with Zac McCrary
The NYT's Alex Burns & Jonathan Martin, Authors of THIS WILL NOT PASS

Pro Politics with Zac McCrary

Play Episode Play 57 sec Highlight Listen Later May 10, 2022 46:41


You no doubt know that Alex Burns and Jonathan Martin, both of the New York Times, recently released their new book THIS WILL NOT PASS…chronicling the last few years of our politics…including Trump's time in office, the 2020 election and aftermath, the January 6 insurrection, and the first phase of the Biden Administration. In this conversation, they go deep on many of the stories in their book – including some background and asides not fleshed out in the book and stories you won't have heard from them amidst their recent media blitz. IN THIS EPISODE…Does Donald Trump really think he won the 2020 election or is this all subterfuge to refuse to acknowledge he lost?Which US Senator was prescient in anticipating exactly how Trump would cast doubt on the results post election?Why hasn't President George W. Bush been more vocal against Trump?One Republican Senator who typifies the GOP establishment's difficulty managing Trump?How many Republicans would've impeached and removed Trump were it a secret ballot?Inside Mitch McConnell's decision to back Trump on impeachment…Whose hold on his caucus is more tenuous…Mitch McConnell or Kevin McCarthy…The conventional wisdom of what a post-Pelosi Democratic caucus looks like…Inside the Biden VP process…Inside GOP attempts to woo Senator Manchin to switch parties…Weighing in on rumors Trump flirted with dumping Mike Pence from the 2020 ticket…The backbench Republican Congressman who captured the House GOP sentiment to give Trump a pass for January 6…The Democratic Governor who was one of their favorite interviews…The failed GOP Senate recruit who shows the changing of the guard in the Republican Party…The interview with the House Republican that demonstrates “the beauty of reporting…”…The two colleagues they specifically mention in the acknowledgements…The Southern influence on the New York Times…Off-the-beaten-path political book recommendations from both Alex and Jonathan…AND Air Force One, Lamar Alexander, Don Bacon, Howard Baker, Dean Baquet, Beau Biden, John Boehner, Josh Bolton, Rick Bragg, Mo Brooks, Jeb Bush, Robert Caro, Turner Catledge, Liz Cheney, Chris Christie, Katherine Clark, Hillary Clinton, colonoscopies, the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, convenient self-justification, Bob Corker, defied admonitions, difficult truths, Dixiecrats, Duck Run, Tammy Duckworth, Dwight Eisenhower, Facebook, Fox News, Jeffrey Frank, Maggie Haberman, Kamala Harris, Bill Haslam, the House Steering Committee, Sasha Issenberg, Pramila Jayapal, Hakeem Jeffries, Bill Johnson, Jim Jordan, John F Kennedy, Michelle Lujan Grisham, Patrick McHenry, Mt Rushmore, musical chairs, Richard Nixon, Kristi Noem, normie Republicans, Robert Novak, the Progressive Caucus, Howell Raines, real damn Democrats, red carpets, Reservoir Dogs, Campbell Robertson, Karl Rove, Steve Scalise, Brian Schatz, Adam Schiff, Ted Strickland, Gay Talese, Harry Truman, useful fig leaves, JD Vance, Gretchen Whitmer, Roger Wicker, Steve Womack, worry-mongering, Jeff Zients…& more!

Billy Newman Photo Podcast
Billy Newman Photo Podcast | 212 Work Bench Knife Sharpening

Billy Newman Photo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 49:02


Donate to the podcast directly with the links below. ⚡️Donate any amount from a Bitcoin Lightning wallet ( including Cash.App ) to Billy Newman https://strike.me/billynewman ⚡️Donate $5 from a Bitcoin Lightning wallet to Billy Newman https://yr.link/lightningpay5 ⚡️Donate $11.11 from a Bitcoin Lightning wallet to Billy Newman https://yr.link/lightningpay11 ⚡️Donate $50 from a Bitcoin Lightning wallet to Billy Newman https://yr.link/lightningpay50 If you feel you are getting value from this, please help by becoming a supporter and send some sats. *New* You can send a Bitcoin Lightning payment direct from the Cash.app Get a Bitcoin Lightning wallet for free instant transfers https://breez.technology https://muun.com https://bluewallet.io Value streaming payments system enables listeners to send Bitcoin micropayments to podcasters as they listen, in real-time. Start streaming value! It's easy to remember: http://value4value.io/ newpodcastapps.com I use https://fountain.fm If you're looking to discuss photography assignment work, or a podcast interview, please drop me an email. Drop Billy Newman an email here. If you want to look at my photography, my current portfolio is here. If you want to read a free PDF eBook written by Billy Newman about film photography: you can download Working With Film here. If you get value out of the content I produce, consider making a sustaining value for value financial contribution, Visit the Support Page here. You can find my latest photo books all on Amazon here. 0:14 Hello, and thank you very much for listening to this episode of The Billy Newman photo podcast. This is an image that I made a black and white from the wildflower mountains. Really beautiful spot out Northeastern Oregon. It's really one of my favorite spots in Oregon. But I probably said that about a lot of these photographs. And all of these places have been, this was a really special one I was here I think this is one of the furthest theories in the background that I've been in the allow mountains. And maybe for a lot of people that are more experienced with it, it wouldn't seem like that far. But that's one thing I really love about backpacking and about traveling outdoors and taking photographs is getting to a spot that's really interesting. And then staying kind of local to that spot for a couple days, or three days, four days, something around 70 to 200 hours or so. And I've heard that from other photographers in the past as well the ones that have bigger careers than I do where they really want to stay there for about three days. And after that that familiarity familiarity that they get from their experience is what really allows them to communicate the story of what's going on in that area, through their photographs in the most interesting way. So that I've heard about portfolio building in the past but I love that about this of getting the stay there and see the sunrise and sunset sunrise again, in the same location and kind of work it out and feel what the different moods of that environment look like during different times of the day. But I love how crisp and clean kind of the the mist the fog that's coming up on top of the lake is it's mirrored is really cool. It's such a dramatic landscape always been one of my favorites. 1:51 You can see more of my work at Billy Newman photo comm you can check out some of my photo books on Amazon. I think you can look at Billy Newman under the authors section there and see some of the photo books on film on the desert, on surrealism on camping, and cool stuff over there. So last time I was on the podcast, I was talking about knives I was talking about pocket knives I was talking about steel is talking about different types of steel that you can use in your pocket knife, or that pocket knife makers use in the pocket knives that they sell you, I suppose is what I meant. And I kind of wanted to continue on with some of that stuff today. And then I don't know maybe the other everyday carry kind of stuff that comes around that I've been thinking about a little bit too, but I was thinking about the couple knives that I have. So it's kind of going deep into like, well there's this dabish steel, there's this type of steel and this doesn't rust and this is hard and whatever that is, but I was gonna kind of jump in and just kind of go to the knives that I have. So I mentioned the Gerber Gator, I was gonna mention three knives. I think that'd be good. These are kind of the three that I'm into right now. But I was going to mention the Gerber Gator that's that like three and a half inch blade, you can get that real inexpensive, it's probably like 40 bucks tops at most places I picked mine up a biomart a couple years ago, it's held up great the coating on it sort of a rubberized coating that's held up great with the ozone stuff and they probably were out over a number of years, that's really fine with me and it's a sharp knife, it's D two steel, it works really well for most of the stuff that I do, but in a lot of ways it's kind of my cutting around knife. So I have in my my side pocket. When I'm doing some outdoor stuff, I can kind of carve on a tree, I can chop on some stuff, I can put a you know, like put an X in the tree when I'm marking my campsite or something like that's fun, I can kind of chop up whatever if I need to I can open a box, I can do all those kinds of things. And I feel pretty good about its length and its use as durability in the outdoors. So that when I kind of carry on me when I'm doing a little bit more outdoorsy stuff, I'm actually kind of going out for a bit, but that's sort of the end the pocket knife. And really when that extends it's about eight inches, and it's got like a pretty solid bit of grip to it. So it really feels like there's something in your hand and it really feels like there's a big thing in your pocket too. So that's kind of why I only carry it around when I'm actually kind of stepping out into into doing some real camping stuff. But the thing that I have with me every day now is this little like two and a half inch or two and a quarter inch Spyderco knife. I really liked this one. There's some smaller ones. There's some bigger ones. They're all kind of like a basic design. They've got sort of a, I guess it got a broad shaped blade. This one's kind of that it's a Scandi blade, I think it's a flat grind. And then sporadic coaster to know for these big finger holes or you know like on the blade. There's like this big circular hole that you kind of put your thumb into and use that to kind of whip out the blade as your your unfolding. This has got that locking back design as soon as that Gerber Gator too. I like that locking back folding design and then in addition to that I've got a really inexpensive phone Tang knife that he used for some of that baton and kind of whacking around stuff and data keep over in an ammo can that I have in my truck here when I'm out camping and stuff and maybe I'll throw that onto a backpack clip on the side so that I have it there but that's like a full thing. I think it's a four inch blade with about a four inch handle for as usually as a little more than that but so it ends up being about nine inches or so. And it's kind of based off the the the SA five p knife I think is what it would be you can look that one up cool knives I really liked those that's actually when I want to get the future this is sort of like a Chinese knockoff version of that. So I kind of break out the prices and a little bit but but uh yeah, if you look up those nicer like the rat three I think it's kind of pretty similar in style to that. But this one's made by SEMA. Sema is a Chinese company I don't know they even really exist as anything more than that but I found them online I found them on Amazon, they have a few different cheap knife options as it's printed on the blade they use a higher end steel at least in comparison at its price point. So I think this way that I have is a seven car blade which is okay. But it was like $20 for this full tang knife and that's really a lot with a micarta handle 6:24 and a she like a kydex sheath. So it's a great knife to kind of keep on the side over here. I've been using it like when I was saying I go out on the shun trail picking days you know have like have a camera bag on my side. I've emptied the camera out of it and then I've got like a just like a little shopping bag like a little plastic sack in there. And then as I'm walking around in the forest and stuff, I've got that full thing nice I'll pop that out as I find a Shawn trail I'll cut the base of it and then throw it in my bag pop the knife back in and then kind of carry on so I'm using it for like a lot of like kind of basic harvesting stuff like that it's just kind of been easy, easy side access and stuff for me while I've been kind of hunting around, he was forging stuff but really a lot of the time it stays in the car and it works really well and for that kind of knife and kind of for as often as I've been using it for some stuff it's sort of like a cool camp knife to kind of like whittle on stuff you know that are you know, kind of like dig and whittle and stuff whack on stuff. That's sort of the bushcrafting knife like last time I was talking about bushcraft and you know like petani through I want to insure it to interesting stick or something like that. Trying to make a What is it like a tent or a type hanger or like an A frame for a type or a frame for like boiling water and getting stuff ready for your fire or whatever is it mostly I just kind of use it to like backup smaller kindling sticks for firewood or feather sticks feather sticks are cool. I don't really think that this bushcraft knife is really been sharpened for it I kind of like the Spyderco knife a little bit more for some of the smaller, smaller feathering stuff but but when you really have like a sharp blade, it makes it so much easier sharpening something I want to get into too. But for these feather sticks, it's cool you get like a piece of kindling right like just kind of a long like foot long piece of dry wood that's sort of an inch or half inch thick around maybe a little thicker than that. 8:11 And then what you do is it takes a lot of skill to kind of get used to but you do this, this kind of long and thin car like if you were like grading if you're gonna like great just like a little fillet off of that one inch round stick and then you got all the way down to the end of the stick like the last like inch or centimeter and then you pulled up on your cut and then left that little last bit there. And when you get if you get it thin enough is that wood will kind of naturally curl up like a little piece of ribbon or something but it'll kind of curl up and it's going to be this dry, thin wisp of wood that's sort of curled up at the end of your branch there and that holds them and then you repeat that cut another nice thin thin little paper thin carve of wood off down to the bottom down in the last centimeter leave it there and then you sort of work your way around the whole stick there and then you kind of work around again a layer up and as you do that, if you put enough time into it, it really does take a good bit of processing but if you do that you can make out in the woods you can make these feather sticks, which are kind of cool. A lot of the time you have the tools on you to build a fire or to build a heat source without going into this much labor to try and produce some sort of tool to facilitate this for you but it is cool to know about if you're working in some conditions that are a little bit more difficult to get a fire gun but you get these these feather sticks set up you probably have to get a handful of them and then once you get your kindling set up, you can lay that you can get your your kindling or you can get just your your starter going. If you're able to like use like one of those fire rods is Ferro rods, you're able to strike that with your knife, throw the sparks down onto whatever you have is your fire starter if you can get that to the Kindle up into a flame. Then you put these feathers sticks right over it. Then you're able to because you kind of cut those those filets down into it, the the air is able to get in between the cuts of the wood that are so thin there. And as it's dry wood, it'll catch fire quickly the SAP and little burn. And then it'll really take off almost like it's a piece of paper, but it has that sustaining quality of being a real piece of wood. So you get a flame, and you get some embers to start burning off of it. And that's a good way to get a flame to build up quickly, then you're able to also have the kind of thicker pieces of wood attached to it there. So you're able to get kind of a stronger build of the kindling a little earlier on, it's kind of a cool way to do it. But I think really, in a lot of ways, man, it's a lot of preparatory work to get those, those pieces ready, if you're trying to build a fire in sort of a mobile situation, you know, if you're kind of setting up a base camp or setting up some, some sort of, you know, location where you're going to be, you're going to be and that's what your stuff is, and for whatever reason, you didn't bring any technical gear with you, that might be something that you run into to try and do. Or if you're trying to set up a fire in conditions that are wet, or like a little bit damp, or in some way, you know, more challenging to get a fire going. I think these are these are kind of good ways to do that, if you're stuck, but really the trick is to not get stuck. I think like that's kind of the big thing of a lot of the wilderness stuff that I've learned is that was sort of man, it was a couple channels of it, there's a whole bunch of stuff that you'd kind of think to worry about. As you know, like I need to start a fire and then there's sort of a whole complicated series of things you can do to naturally start a fire. If you want to go down that route, good skills to have good things to learn about. There's also sort of another route where you know about the modern world, you know about some of the tools you can get ahold of, and you can kind of cut down the time and the way and the expense or the expense on yourself that it takes the resources that you have to give up to get a fire going to get a thing going when you're out in the woods and if you kind of traveling light and trying to travel fast and not really staying in the same locations a lot. It's almost a greater expense of your energy and time to try and build a camp with wood and a knife every time you get somewhere than it is to just have a cup of pieces that you can bring in and then utilize quickly and then in a clean way you can kind of pull out you don't really risk injury or risk any loss of time. And you get kind of a lot of the benefit out of it a one I guess are kind of particularly dropping into that would be like a jet boil, or specifically for fire starting stuff. I guess it's kind of staying there. Jeb Bush is sort of one of the fancier ends of that. Really the most simple way is get cotton swabs and scoop up a bunch of petroleum jelly, you know like Vaseline, that kind of stuff. You can test this before you go out too but because some things are like a little different, but the petroleum jelly i think is supposed to light up pretty well so if you have a cotton ball, and a little petroleum jelly one, it's a cosmetic so you can use that as like a lip balm if you go out which is that I've been wracked with before when I go out and kind of quickly changing drier or higher elevation or colder climates than the one my skin and pores we're kind of used to before man I get burns and stuff in the cold. It's weird how that can be or chaps you know, like chapped lips but lips that sort of stuff. But the Vaseline can help a lot for that but if you have like a little Ziploc bag and some Vaseline, cotton swabs and then just like a regular pocket lady, you can light those up as your Firestarter release without having to hunt down dry moss and bark on the south side of a tree out in the woods somewhere while you're cold and trying to get a fire going. So you kind of pop one of these out. You hit that with your lighter or you hit that with your ferro rod if you don't have a ladder but really I say bring the lighter you have the yeah the Flint with you if you need it, you got the butane you can have a ferro rod as a backup if you like it, but for a lot of the kind of lighter just a few day kind of things. It's tricky man if you get a lighter that goes bad but I haven't really heard of like hunters are kind of longer term 14 plus day outdoorsman. going out with things that are way different than even just like a regular big lighter. The Ferro rods are cool though they seem to help a lot but I think there's some some cool stuff that you can do or there's the reliability of a lighter that I've had for a long time is kind of always helped me out or been fine for a lot of stuff that I've done for the shorter periods of time that I've been out but yeah, you can hit that fire starter and then put that under some kindling so you can get a fire gun pretty easy. In a lot of ways, I haven't really jumped into doing a lot of cold weather camping this year or cold weather kind of remote camping the man having a fire is great, but also sometimes not having a fire is sort of the way to go to like I've been talking about I've been using a like this portable propane heater with me a lot of the time and that's a lot lighter and a lot cleaner for some of the more simple stuff that you want like a little fire a little heat source from like if I'm going fishing down at the Bank of a lake and this has kind of come up just like a week or so ago when I went out to a spot but but yeah efficient down on the side of a lake he wants some heat there something and it's kind of nice to give you want to catch a fish throw a throw a casting skill down and like you know make it up there on the side of the bank but but if if you're out and yeah, just kind of carrying that real light kind of two pound or three or four pound 15:25 little box down with you hooking the propane up to it and then yeah, boom, you got heater right there, you throw in your cast and you can kind of kind of manage temperatures that go down a lot more so it makes just kind of the simple things a lot more comfortable that sort of for the car camping based stuff, I wouldn't really ever pack that out with me. But But even for when I pack it out, I sort of noticed that if I go with a lighter bit of stuff, it really ends up being okay, a lot of the time so sometimes it's cool, especially at night to have the big fire and stuff but even for like a lot of the cooking stuff that I do or a lot of the midday stuff that I do if I'm taking a break, I really want to just pull out the Jetboil from my backpack, through the fuel canister on it filled out, catch up with water, make a tea and make a coffee or something like that or make a soup or whatever kind of kind of backpacking meal might be in there. That That kind of thing is or even just like as the Jetboil is like a source of heat is pretty cool. And then if you had the the dry wood and kindling sources around, you can use that as a as a fire starter tool too. But which has happened a couple times it's kind of an off label use i don't i don't really recommend this stuff. But even just having a quick little jet boil, punch that on, get some water hot, heat up your hands and stuff and then kind of rely on your jackets and your waterproof gear to keep you warm through at least most of the daylight hours and stuff but that's kind of kind of how I've tried to avoid some of that stuff. Yeah, the nice stuff. It's been pretty cool. I like yeah working with that Gator. The spider co dragonflies kind of a smaller pocket knife every day and then yeah, that bigger Sema knife has been pretty cool been been digging that for some of the bigger kind of bushcraft and stuff that I got to do. 17:10 sharpeners sharpeners are pretty important I think sharpening also don't sharpen very much and so that's kind of one of the things is I'm sort of probably most notably a an irresponsible knife owner at least in the sense of trying to keep them sharp so I'm normally more likely to just buy a new $15 knife you know go from one night to the next night to the next step to the next knife as as I noticed that the blade on it goes dull you know like I buy that's how it was for the longest time especially the kind of early on is you know, I kind of afford a cheaper knife that was cool. I thought at the time I didn't really know much about it, but you know, hey, this is great, it's a it's a step up from my, my Victorinox that I used to carry around so this is cool, you know, easy folding blade knife or whatever it is I'll use this and then by the time it gets dull or it gets kind of shaky in the handle or whatever it is they end up just kind of tossing a knife and I don't even really ever worry about tooling the knife or sharpening the blade and the knife and really a lot of time it's not been a quality of blade to really bother to invest that much into so in some parts, that's my fault from the very beginning. But the thing I'm trying to do now more responsibly is even if it is like a less expensive knife train tool that knife to keep it in good shape, but also kind of select a knife that's going to be a fine knife for a longer period of time. I don't think they all have to be brilliant, you know, state of the art knives you know there's like 30 or 40 year old buck knives that are made out of 316 steel that people have had around as their hunting knives forever. So I think that's really cool and that's really I think I was talking about a bit last time on the podcast I'll bring it up again this time to a knife is really a cutting tool you know it's supposed to be just like a sharp blade and so so it's cool to kind of use that as just that tool and kind of work that that blade down to be a sharp piece for you when you're out in the woods and stuff but for a lot of time. If it's not like a specialized knife that I'm using for like something a little bit more specific that I'm trying to bring it in for and it's just kind of my cutting around knife. It really ends up cutting on all that stuff which could be sticks or wood or it's just sort of like a tool knife that I used to you know like cut fishing line or or wrap up rope or get something ready on the truck or get something rigged up on my backpacker or whatever it is you know so it's kind of like a lot of occupancy and that puts a lot of like wear damage on the blade. And for as little as I'm saying I sharpen it. The blade is really often pretty dull. Like I don't know if it's really like practice to just do an easy slice through a lot of stuff. We were really like take advantage of that cutting edge on it so so yeah sharpening stuff is cool. There's a couple brands that do sharp things out there you can get them in a lot of places. I think the one that I see often is Smith's as a sharpener. They do a lot of kitchen stuff, they do a lot of pocket Mike's knife stuff, you can get them a Walmart you can get them up by Mart, I'm pretty sure the one I prefer Though is the brand work sharp workshop you can find a lot of places to. They're available online also and if you're an Oregonian, I think it's a company based at Ashland Oregon I had no idea until I was looking at the pamphlet and trying to figure out which pieces I should get but workshop they have a number of different sharpening tools and I guess the reason I kind of elevate them above the Smith stuff, at least for for some of the things that I'm kind of interested in their tools are just like similarly priced but like a little bit more robust on the on the work sharp side so specifically is this this electric belt sharpener that I'm looking at that sharpener has way more flexibility way more robustness way higher horsepower, just kind of machining to it the other Smith's kind of knockout version of it is much more limited much thinner component pieces, kind of plastic component pieces. Nowhere near the same kind of quality or longevity would be expected in that as a tool. There's other pieces sort of like oh, that's like you know, that's like a power tool sort of what you're looking at there. Also in addition to that the workshop stuff has I guess it's like a sharpening bench you would call it I think it's like a field sharpener. I'm actually pretty interested in this but I think it's a field sharpening pieces sort of like a little flat piece that you you bring with you in your your backpack or in your truck when you're going out on a trip and you'd have in your camper, you'd have it with you and to sharpen up a knife and it really takes more time than I thought it did you know you kind of look at a quick video or something and you look at a guy kind of do a quick wax on a sharpener and then Nick Yeah, there you go. Cutting the hair off my arm in no time but really for a lot of this stuff after I've kind of been on a knife for a bit. It takes like a half hour to kind of work the two sides of a knife on a whetstone and grind it down with an electric sharpener man it's like you know a past two passes or whatever it is to kind of re re angles that that grind immediately that if you just kind of rub in that blade against the stone it takes a long time to sort of work in the sharpness to it you know and really level up that knife to a higher level but but yeah, this workshop 22:06 sharpening bench is pretty cool it's kind of a little little platform it's got these angle guides on as you can put the knife on that angle and then cut across that flat surface and then kind of put the right angle grind in on your your cutting knife then on the side of it I think it has like ceramic alignment rod you guys seen those in your kitchen or something to you know you rent your kitchen knife or you seen a chef or something before they they get going on a piece of meat or their vegetables or whatever you see little chef video and they kind of run the chef knife across this this sort of solid rod they put down to the table Oh shrink, shrink, shrink shrink, and then they they align the blade by kind of coming in on the right cut and then the left cut of the blade from the I guess from the hilt is that by your the top of your hand there when you grab it but sort of from the hilt end to the point yeah. And then it kind of I guess it pushes the atoms it pushes the blade you know whatever little kind of microscopic warbles you'd have those little meanders that you'd have and what you'd want it to be a real straight fine aligned blade there I guess those kind of those kind of quick slices on that piece of steel they align that and then bring that into a sharper piece there's also like a leather strap I've never gotten into leathers butter strap I should probably that's sort of a part of that I really don't understand yet. I was like working the leather strap I've seen people use their belts that sort of made the most sense to me if you have that around but really like as as the thing I'm going to bring out back with me I haven't really brought that back out but but yeah you're in the knife backside across the leather and that's supposed to I guess do even more to sharpen it but at a point it's like man it must be some sharp knife Have you seen the test like that you know when they put it up to their arm hair or you know like guys do that a lot I've seen chefs do that but they put it up to the hair and then they kind of do just a real light little just hardly whispering across the the hairs that stand up on the wrist and there's a knife blade is easily able to just kind of cut right through that without a real hesitation or kind of bending it over and knocking it down and dragging it out. That's supposed to be a sharp knife that's like your your litmus test for it is almost razor sharp. That's what it seems like you know, sharp enough to shave with it seems so I've seen people like work their axes down to that sharpness, right? You see people with an axe head and grind that down to such a sharp net that they can take, take that axe and cut the hairs off their wrist or I guess shave off their face with a hatchet. You know, that's a little more. That's a little more lumberjack that I'm willing to do. I'm kind of just hanging out trying to take some pictures trying to stay warm, trying to keep the heat going to keep a knife sharp. So kind of cool stuff. But yeah, thanks for talking about knives and sharpening. 24:59 You can check out More information at Billy Newman photo comm you can go to Billy Newman photo.com Ford slash support. If you want to help me out and participate in the value for value model that we're running this podcast with. If you receive some value out of some of the stuff that I was talking about, you're welcome to help me out and send some value my way through the portal at Billy Newman photo comm forward slash support, you can also find more information there about Patreon and the way that I use it if you're interested. Or if you're more comfortable using Patreon that's patreon.com forward slash Billy Newman photo. 25:39 I've been working on a few photos, putting out a couple. And it's been going okay. I don't know I last week, I tried to put out a bunch of stuff, which was, which was good. That's cool. I've been trying to go through like a bunch of the photographs that we had. There were leftover from our September trip. Hey, yeah. And I had a blast going on, like a big, big trip around Eastern Oregon and the backup to Eugene. And we got a bunch of photos from it. But I haven't really been able to cut through most of them. Since we've gotten back. 26:06 You know, it's really been true for me, too. Yeah, I've been busy. I've been editing other work photos, like wedding photos since we got back from that trip. So I know you've been working. It's really in this last couple of weeks that I've finally barely lightly started getting into that editing. 26:25 I'm trying to do it when I'm at work, and yeah, pull up the files and I go through and I'll edit a couple and I'll probably try to edit a couple that'll try and post. And that's been a good way to go through it. Or I'm just kind of chipping at it. A little bit at a time. But it's been pretty, pretty useful so far. But yeah, I think the first one was a follow up today. I put up an older photo as a Facebook ad. I think I'll talk about that in a minute was the other one that I put up. I don't even remember. I think I put a picture. Oh, I put up the picture of the alvord at sunrise that we were talking about and I think we put up the other day on the Facebook page. Hey, that was a cool one. I liked it. Yeah, I like this photo that we have for the billing name and photo podcast cover out in the alvord sunrise the cool day, like hanging out or we did a bunch of stuff on the onboard morning but it was so much colder this time. It was different it was only like a week later in the year than the you know time we'd gone Yeah, yeah, I mean I know that was early September and a mid September is really almost a different season. But man Yeah, it was a bit cold that day we had like a bunch of I think it was the day we left there was a lot of clouds up in the air. Up in the higher elevations you can see like a lot of texture in the clouds. And then you saw that dust storm kind of Yeah. Yeah, the center there it is cool. It's really cool. Yeah, it's strange how, how big it is out there. You know, you look out and there's this big wall, a dust bowl and a grass. But you don't realize that that's just like miles away from you. And it goes on for miles of dust inside of that, but it's just not where you are. And it's so flat. You just see up to that. That change and whether that's up there. It was really weird seeing that. 28:09 It was weird. Yeah, it was interesting driving around it and seeing Yeah, cuz you're because your perception of like, where it is and how, what the size of it actually, is really it's difficult to 28:20 Yeah, I thought it was just a weird thing. You think it's closer than it is? Yeah. It's very strange. Yeah, that's cool, though. It's cool drab enough to it. Then you're just like, wow, this is like a whole big, foggy, thick weather system. You know, it's very strange. It was just really weird and kind of surreal to like, see it? But it was cool. to spot that. 28:41 Yeah, it was interesting being out there a second time. Oh, yeah. 28:45 I dug it. I thought it was cool. We went to the fields store. Oh, yeah. So last time we were out there was 2014. And then and then there's, you know, 2015, and then 2016. And now in 2017. We went back we went out to fields. And you can get like a milkshake and get a burger out there and get gas out there. I think you can get like a little motel stay out there if you want to. And it's kind of near the border by Nevada before you get into the niaa. And it's the nearest thing to get any resources outside of the alvord. And it was cool. When we went down there. I think we looked at the there's this sort of post that they have for the years past and it shows like how many burgers they sold. And then and then like how many milkshakes they sold. And like, I think it was the 2013 it was like 5230 something like that it was kind of close to for the years before that. And 2014 it was about that. The year that we went and then the year after we went It was like 6200 it was like 1000 Gold jump or something. Yeah, and then it was like 6500 the next year so you're like wow, I bumped up like so much there's a 20% increase in traffic through the alvord area just since the time that we saw Are you coming here? Yeah, I really didn't see that jumping in the period before. 30:03 No, no, it was really consistently. Like about that same number. Yeah, yeah, 30:08 it was like the 4000s or something like that. So hamburger sales. That's my metric to the traffic through the outboard area. But it was interesting. 30:18 It was really interesting. Cool. 30:20 I was kind of surprised. Now think about it. I want a milkshake. And I want a cheeseburger master. I think we might have tried this podcast at Bain a few. I think we'll do that. But But really, there really needs much 3d emotion. It was fun, though. Going out there to fields. Yeah, seeing that, but seeing kind of the influence of how much how many people are out there and alvord now Yeah, it seemed like there are way more campers out there. Oh my gosh, just kind of doing different projects and different kinds of things. Lots of photo projects. 30:57 Yeah, that was so interesting to see. 30:59 I was surprised to see that. Yeah. A couple models with little people assisting a little bounce cards and stuff, trying to throw some light onto them and little breezy. pieces of fabric. 31:11 Yeah. Yeah, it was cool. Seeing like a few other people set up out there for photoshoots. 31:16 Yeah, yeah. And a bunch of campers kind of put out, you know, on the on the farther perimeter. It seemed like there's a lot of people that were kind of kept posted up out there. And it didn't seem like there was any particularly big event or something going on. I 31:28 just know, I think that it's just more well 31:31 traveled. Yeah. So our Instagram posts, we gotta say, yes, it's 31:38 been 31:39 fun. Yeah. Yeah, it's fun. It was so cool. Going out there the first time shoot. Yeah, it was. Yeah, it was a blast. But it was kind of fun spotting that stuff and going out there second. That was really cool. We spent a couple days out there in the truck and attempt but yeah, windier cold air much 31:55 when you're Oh my gosh. I yelled up the sand during the day. There was no way to avoid it. That's a 32:03 little ply that stuff. Yeah, it was weird. Yeah. Just comes in up on the sleeping bags and stuff just kind of blown about. Yeah, it's a really weird thing. How it comes together. 32:12 I must be what Burning Man is closer to the first time we were in the airport. It was not as windy. Anywhere dusty, definitely. But our stuff was much easier for me to clean. 32:23 Yeah. Before I remember that. Yeah, it was it was definitely easier. Way difficult. It was frustrating. But 32:30 it was. It was cool. Seeing a different kind of water system kind of moving through there having to be more stormy. 32:37 I did like that. Yeah. Heavier cloud. Yeah. I missed out on having a couple good sunsets. I 32:42 missed that. I was disappointed with a couple of the nights because there wasn't a sunset. It was sort of strange almost disappeared was behind the cloud, which was behind the mountain. Yeah. Yeah. It just went to just gray. Gray right away. Yeah. But there wasn't any color in the sky. It was really strange. 33:00 I was thinking that yeah, it was partly cloudy. I thought it was broken up enough that we get a couple of good sunsets or, you know, some some good textures as it was fading off. But yeah, we really missed most of it. And yeah, just definitely dropped to gray and blue pretty fast and wasn't really quite what I was looking for. But some of the textures on that last day, they were kind of interesting, listening a little bit more stormy. And it was cool on that drive out. I think I had a couple of those posts. This last week on that day that we drove out on highway 78 to go to crane and then up into burns. And I think we pulled over a couple times I took a couple photos. But those are some others that I put up on Instagram. And pretty recently, I've been trying to do a bunch on Instagram, I've been trying to do a bunch of like, reaching out and direct messaging stuff. I've been trying to do like a little bit more networking stuff overall, too, which has been working a bit and I've been trying to work on my story too. Like the Instagram story. I think you've been noticing a little bit like I put up each of the posts that I put up in the day, I try and copy those in Instagram and then and then post them over into the story also. And then I've also been messing around with adding like your location to your story and tag to it. Which is something you can pull out from the filters, if you swipe up on the on the thing when you're making it. And you can add a couple of things. But that like puts it into a location it tags it there. And I think if you do a search for stories, like there's one that was put in, like Eugene, and there's like a bunch of people that that hit it throughout the day, just because it was tagged with a location. So I'm going to try and do that more with some of the location stuff and use that a little bit more interestingly, to try and get people to see some of those posts. 34:35 That's really cool. I didn't know that was a feature I have I need to get into the Instagram story stuff. 34:40 There's a lot you can think of Yeah, yeah, I don't really understand it well enough either. But there's a good bit of traction similar to like how Snapchat, you just kind of like keep watching the video keeps moving. I think it's really visual. So I like a lot of that stuff. And you really get into see what people are doing in sort of a really late way, like what snapshots use for now and really what snapshot was part of what Instagram was, like years ago back in 2010 2011. When I first got on, it was it was really like a lightweight thing where you just take take a picture of anything was sort of you take, take a picture of your food, take a picture of a drink, take a picture, just some silly place that you're at sort of thing, but it wasn't really any kind of highfalutin level of professionalism or edited posts that would go up. There was just, you know, a square only, right, yeah, there's only the really rough filters that you could apply from your cell phone photos. So yeah, I remember I remember those days that Instagram too, and it's weird to kind of see how it's progressed a little bit. But similarly, like the stories are a really lightweight way of just kind of showing anything that you're doing or kind of expressing like the the moments of your life, like Snapchat, everybody's kind of familiar, I guess, with the, the language of Snapchat nowadays. But it's cool. There's a lot of distribution on the Instagram stories. Like there's, there's a good bit of people that it shows do see a lot of the the content that you put up there. So that's kind of fun to be messing around with. And yeah, I'm trying to like, take those little like snapshots. Yeah, like screenshots on my phone of the Instagram app showing like the the photo that I'm featuring on that day, and then I throw that in there. And I put the location and a hashtag or something with it. And that's been a cool way to test some stuff out. And, yeah, I'm trying to mess around with that. But try to keep that for I think they kind of heard from marketing stuff that like you want to try and put in about six a day. Which seems like a lot. Yeah, it's like a lot of stuff. But yeah, like every couple hours, you're trying to get like some one or two second thing up. And that's why I try and like kind of punch it up with a few of the photo posts or screenshots. So that those are like remarketed. And if I do like a podcast or something like that, I try to put up some kind of notifier in there. And then like a couple of posts to the photos and working on my day, the camera I'm using or something like that. We should do something of podcasts. Yeah, it would be cool. But yeah, thanks for sure. Do it like a bunch more podcasts? 36:55 I'm so happy to be doing it. Yeah, I really like being project smart audio stuff is really cool. 37:01 Audio is going to explode in the next year or two. 37:06 Yeah, you really write about it, it's totally going 37:09 to be like, the thing of the future. old radio is gonna be the new future. So I think it was like really, the thing that's gonna be like, taken off. And it's what I've been thinking about for years, or you know, like audio podcasting. So it was cool. 37:22 Yeah, you really been on top of it. Oh, but 37:26 I need to be doing more stuff with it. You know, radio is a weird thing, like radio and like, and like college atheists. That's really weird. Getting into podcasting is sort of a strange thing at the beginning, but just like getting in and doing it, you know, it feels like a strange thing. I don't know if it's felt like that for you a little bit. 37:41 It is really difficult to adjust to. You're a really good speaker to begin with, I'd say and I'm not No. Thank you. 37:51 I appreciate you doing. 37:52 Thanks for doing it with me for a few years now. I should be a little bit better. 37:57 A lot better. And I remember like a couple of my first ones. It's like a muscle that you build. I've heard other people talk about it that way. But speaking in a mic. You got to do it for like 100 hours. And then it's like, you're still bad, but you can kind of do it a little. It's a weird thing. Yeah, I don't. But that's what I want to try. I'm still under 100 hours, right? So do another little short podcast. Yeah, 38:22 I think it's gonna be great. I think it's gonna be cool in the show every night. 38:26 No, it'll be it'll be great practice for us. And in 24 months, if we kind of keep doing podcast stuff, like we want to. Yeah, yeah, that's really gonna develop into something that we're proud of. Yeah. But yeah, I think we started doing this billion one photo when like in 2015. That's when I first started setting up some microphones and like, this laptop is an audio podcast and thing. So it's cool to have it go through a couple different iterations and sort of develop it and get to use the studio more and get to develop it more. I think it's gonna be cool. Put up more stuff and using like this, on our website, on iTunes, and on YouTube, on Facebook. 39:02 Everywhere. Yeah, I 39:04 think it's really cool. Thanks for being my producer. 39:06 Yeah, thanks for training me to be a podcast producer. I'm so excited. Yeah, I want to get into some sound clips with you later. 39:13 Oh, yeah. Let's cut in. That'd be a cool idea. We should go for with that. This week. We should try to find some cool sound stuff and try and settle on some stuff. 39:22 Yeah. Next week this week. Pick some sounds ferocious. 39:25 Ooh. Yeah, we got to get fresh sounds. I want to do more. Yeah, that's what I'm talking about. I'm gonna do just a little bit body just a little production. 39:33 Yeah. I'm so excited about it. I really, I needed sleep. I like that part. So yeah. 39:38 I love it. Yeah, I like it. All the other podcasts that we hear with, you know, pre production elements to come in, you know, that makes it's great. I dig it. So it'll be fun for us to kind of do some of the same stuff with it. I think along with all the content that I've been putting up, like on Instagram, like the content that I'm putting up, we've been just now I'm starting to mess around with boosting posts. I was working with Facebook, and the Facebook page system and the advertising system. I think I've been learning a lot from that just in the last two weeks or so. 40:10 Yeah, I think it's so cool and valuable that you've been getting into that. 40:15 Oh, yeah, I think it's definitely super valuable. And it 40:17 seems like it's really effective. It's really effective, like, 40:21 for the day and date for the age that it is right now, for the attention that Facebook has, like for the population that Facebook has, using it constantly. Twitter, Twitter is not the deal. Facebook is facebook is great, every Grandma, every dad, everybody hits Facebook one time a day, or a couple of times a day, really, the data shows a lot of times. And so there's just so many opportunities for an impression of your ad to be seen, or for your content to get promoted to the right audience. And there's so many abilities for you to target people with the data that Facebook has. So you can really get down and find audiences that you couldn't have before. Even just friends of friends, so everything, that's a great audience for me to start with. But just being able to like put your put your stuff in there and get your content promoted to your entire audience. That's a new thing. or not, well, it's a new thing for me, I suppose. But it's an because Facebook once allowed you to promote that much content to your entire social feed, you used to get a lot of engagement. But now because of the algorithm, it kind of tailors unpaid content back a lot, right? In the fee, if it's not being shared attentive, it's not super interesting. And then now to get it to get it higher ranked in the feed, then you know, you pay this $5 amount and you get you know, a value of that for your impressions that you buy. That's cool. It's a good advertising system for boosted posts. And there's there's other stuff that I'm not really sure about that I want to try and talk to more people about to put some of those pieces together of trying to understand some of the ideas around working like an advertising campaign. So there's boosting posts, which is just the content that you would you would post regularly into your feed. I'm trying to do that with like, like portfolio level photographs that we have. Or just other other fun photo content that we can put up like the most successful one so far was one of the first ones I did have a cabin in the woods up in the wallowa Mountains beautiful spot beautiful little kabaneri up next to a really cool kind of Alpine looking mountain. And so I get why it was kind of an attractive photo to be advertised. But it was interesting. Yeah, like how effective it was, it was cool to kind of see how much of an audience it could get to if it was promoted a little bit. And it's interesting too, if you put a good bit of money behind even a single post that really delivers it to a really large audience. And if that audience like appreciates what you're doing, like you do get a drawback of people interacting with the content and people liking your page. And all of that kind of eventually turns into the value of a larger brand or a larger network. And there is like a lot of value in that that I think we can build maybe over the next 24 or 36 months. Yeah, well it's still good it's still gonna be a good deal you know, like Google AdWords now it's not really as good as it was back in like 2002 1000 we should we should do Google AdWords, but like 2017 we should try and do a bunch in these Facebook advertisements, Facebook boosted posts. I'm really excited for it. I think it's a good way that we could build a cool part of our content media photo business. 43:20 Yeah, I love it. I think it's so cool being able to because this is something we talked about being the challenge of being able to actually find an audience Yeah. And it's really cool being able to actually reach more people who would want to see our stuff 43:34 Yeah, there's there's some math to do on it but like paying for distribution is really worth it like absolutely it is cheaper. If you think about it for time, like say it would take 10 years to build an audience that would be an equivalent size that you can make some money on but like you would make a lot more money if you made that audience in two years and then worked that audience for eight years. That makes sense it's like some kind of like compound math of how big something I don't really understand it but maybe there's a salesman talking about it. But it seems like it seems like the benefit of it would be now like working faster now and I'm really excited for I think it's cool I've been trying out like a couple different ads and different promoted pieces and stuff and it's kind of interesting figuring out like what works better where to target stuff. And I got to figure out more stuff about that but it's definitely something just to research. I wish I knew more about it intuitive or you know, just like from the start but there's definitely some stuff that we should try. I wish I could afford it is really the thing I want to try and put you know like $50 $100 behind like each of these more impressive posts are more than the things that seem to like catch on better with people Sure. Yeah, and I want to try to like put like a bunch behind it and then try and like get a better market demographic selected so that new people get to see some of this work or see some of these photographs. And then you know, like come on or you know, join or communicate. And then I also want to do some stuff like when we transition into selling more photo packages to like generating leads with Facebook advertisements, or generating like contacts. There's an option to like, have people like schedule a meeting with you? Oh, right. All sorts of things, of calls to actions that you can you can use in in some of these advertisement systems. So there's a lot of things that you could pay for, that you could probably really generate some business with, which is a cool thing. 45:20 Yeah, I think it's really interesting to be getting into more. Yeah. 45:24 It's interesting to get into it, for sure. And it's fun, like, as a photographer, as people trying to do media stuff, just the, the different opportunities, just kind of some of the things you learn about 45:33 it. So yeah, I think it's really cool. It's really paying Facebook. 45:37 But it's cool. I think, you know, getting average. It's like it's real. 45:43 Yeah, yeah. No, because it is Israel. I love that it works. 45:47 Yeah, we got to buy some marketing stuff. And it's been coming together. I think it's been really cool. 45:51 That's cool. So you're, you've been doing the Facebook ads, and you've also checked out the Instagram ads. But 45:58 I've been trying more Instagram ads. And it's interesting with the Instagram ads, like I ran promotions, it's interesting how it's set up, because Facebook owns Instagram. So somebody that's connected, I've been trying to do a bunch from the phone. The phone's been great, and just trying to like develop more, more systems for that and how it worked. But you can do promotions just from Instagram, which works pretty well, if you'd like to do that. I think we started at $3. And it's probably like a $5. CPM, I think it's a cost per 1000, which is pretty similar to how it is on Facebook. But what I've been doing is using like the Facebook pages app, and the Facebook ads app that you can get for your iPhone. Yeah. And I've been trying to like manage the advertisements from those two apps. For both Facebook and Instagram, there's a there's an option where you can like simultaneously run this ad on Instagram, that you have just from just from your Facebook ads program. Yeah. And so when you're creating an ad for your Facebook page, you can click just slide this lever over, it says, simultaneously run this ad on Instagram. And I think you know, it kind of picks the market and sends it out. And it seems like it's a pretty effective way to do it. If Instagrams information about the demographics of the person that correct what I've noticed sometimes is that you put some money into it, and it doesn't really seem quite as effective on Instagram, given the amount of attention that's on Instagram. So there's probably some tricks around advertising on Instagram. I think maybe it's like a little bit more. I don't know, I just don't really have the keys to it, but it seems like just because they were separate social networks. It seems like Instagram maybe doesn't know as much about a person. Like how old they are or like should they see the ad that I'm promoting to them? Yeah, seems like it gets a little a little wishy washy. Sometimes Facebook is really tight. And what that means is that your cost per impression is lower so it's more effective for your money, I think is I think a little bit of what I've been understanding but I'm not really sure I'm just kind of experimented twice so I've tried to figure out some stuff around it but it's been really cool kind of getting close to thanks a lot for checking out this episode of The Billy Newman photo podcast. Hope you guys check out some stuff on Billy Newman photo.com few new things up there some stuff on the homepage, some good links to other other outbound sources, some links to books and links to some podcasts like this. A blog posts are pretty cool. Yeah, check it out at Billy numina photo.com. Thanks a lot for listening to this episode and the back end. Thank you Next

Doc Washburn Show
Doc Washburn Show, May 2, 2022-episode 142

Doc Washburn Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 63:39


The plot behind the “pronouns”, Biden sending $33 billion to Ukraine for “Pensions” and “Social Security”?, Asa Hutchinson attempting to be the “Jeb Bush” of 2024

Jupiter Farms Residents Podcast
Rainy Season 2022: What YOU need to Know

Jupiter Farms Residents Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 31:56


New land owners, this one is for you!If you're new to the area, haven't experienced a heavy rainy season before and aren't sure what to expect in a reclaimed swamp area with no sewer system, do yourself a favor and listen to this podcast.On this month's edition of the Jupiter Farms Resident Podcast, Matty, Jillian, Kristen and producer David sit down with Mike Dillon, manager of operations of SIRWCD. What is this group? Who is this guy? Before you call him when you discover your shed has flooded, we've got you covered.The daily operations of the South Indian River Water Control District are overseen by the Manager of Operations who manages a crew of ten skilled operators that maintain the roads, canals and swales with graders, back hoes and other heavy equipment.Michael Dillon has worked for the South Indian River Water Control District for twenty years and was named Manager of Operations in March of 2011. He moved to Florida from Chesapeake, Virginia, in 1991 and was Supervisor of Field Operations for C&L Hawthorne from 1991-1996. In 1996, Mr. Dillon came to work for SIRWCD and in 2000 was promoted to Shop Supervisor. Three years later, he advanced to Operations Superintendent and worked closely with the General Manager on the day-to-day operations of the District.Mr. Dillon was instrumental in establishing the District Safety Program and headed the Program from 1998-2011. In 2000, he was appointed by Governor Jeb Bush to sit on the Board of Supervisors of the North Palm Beach Heights Water Control District and was then elected for a two-year term through 2003. Mr. Dillon completed the Florida Institute of Government Management Development Program in 2002. He has been a board member of the Loxahatchee River Management Coordinating Council since 2010.Mr. Dillon maintains a working relationship with South Florida Water Management District, the Safety Council of Palm Beach County, FEMA, and the National Resources Conservation Service, as well as various departments of Palm Beach County, including the Sheriff's Office, Road and Bridge, and the Department of Environmental Resources Management.ONLINE: https://www.sirwcd.org/index.html The District is open from 8:00 am to 4:30 pm Monday through Friday. Landowners are welcome to visit or call 561-747-0550 during office hours or email: sirwcd@sirwcd.org Support the show (http://www.jupiterfarmsresidents.com/donate-to-jfr/)

The Must Read Alaska Podcast
Living legend Donna Arduin talks working with Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jeb Bush and many others.

The Must Read Alaska Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 34:13


Donna Arduin is one of the nation's most successful veterans of state budget management and tax reform, and, as Budget Director/Deputy Director, led toward responsibility the budgets of Michigan (Governor John Engler), New York (Governor George Pataki), Florida (Governor Jeb Bush) and California (Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger). She established a reputation for long-term policy planning linked with fiscally conservative budgeting.    Click here to get your free book on Rich States/Poor States    Show is sponsored by "Paid for by Charlie Pierce for Governor P.O Box 408 Soldotna, Alaska, 99669" 

Using the Whole Whale Podcast
3 Steps to Talking Politics Without Tearing Your Hair Out | Kamy Akhavan

Using the Whole Whale Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 58:31


Have we lost the ability to have conversations with folks on “the other side”? Kamy Akhavan is debunking how to have polarizing discussions that are actually productive. Making connections with people from opposing views is hard to do but it's very powerful when we do get through to each other.   With 20 years of experience bridging divides, Kamy's work has helped people fight polarization, master essential skills for the modern workplace, and start and grow successful nonprofit organizations.    3 Steps to Bridging the conversation Gap 1. Be curious and listen to the other side 2. Ask pointed clarifying questions to learn more and build trust 3. Bring the heat down and find the larger common ground, what Kamy calls Superordination.     About Kamy   Kamy Akhavan, former CEO of ProCon.org, the nation's leading source of nonpartisan research on controversial issues, now leads the Center for the Political Future (CPF) at the University of Southern California.With more than 20 years of experience in bridging divides at national levels, Kamy's work has served more than 200 million people, including students at more than 12,000 schools in all 50 states and 100 countries. Kamy writes and speaks on numerous topics including the origins of and solutions to political polarization, improving interpersonal communication, the awesome power of debate, nonprofit leadership, digital marketing, civics education, and how to teach controversial issues.     Rough Transcript [00:00:00] Today on the whole well podcast, I am [00:00:27] incredibly excited to invite Kami Ahkavan. the former CEO of procon.org, a leading source of nonpartisan research on controversial issues that I'm a boy lot to get into there. And currently he is the executive director, executive director of the center for the political future at university of Southern California. [00:00:51] Kamy. It's great to see you at least over zoom. [00:00:55] Yeah, that's right. Well, great to see you too, George. It's been a while. I'm a big fan of your company and a [00:01:01] view, so it's a [00:01:02] Oh, thank you. Well, I mean, I just, I have to start [00:01:06] with I know that a few years ago, I believe you left as the CEO of pro con maybe we can just sort of start there. Inspired that transition. Cause it wasn't at all a politically heated moment at all three years ago because I blacked out what happened. [00:01:23] I started at ProCon in 2004. I was hired as a managing editor and then became president and then became CEO. the [00:01:31] reason that I fell in love with that organization is because it was the only one in the country that was focused on presenting extensive research on both sides of [00:01:40] controversial issues and doing it in a [00:01:42] very accessible way. [00:01:44] This is not for policy wanks or super motivated politicos. This is for soccer moms and for people like my, my neighbors and my parents and my, my siblings that I wanted everybody in the country to be able to understand both sides of controversial issues so they can make their own informed judgment and make their own informed opinions on these very tough issues. [00:02:11] Most people didn't have the time. They didn't have the wherewithal and they frankly didn't have the balanced media diet that would give them access to all those perspectives. So when I leaned into that organization and find out that it wasn't just me, who wanted to have both sides represented really well and understand what all the viewpoints were on issues like, should we legalize marijuana? [00:02:37] Should the death penalty remain legal? Should abortion be legal? Should you spank your children? Should felons be allowed to vote? Should we put up a border wall? All these controversies, it turned out that tens and tens of millions of people also cared a lot. We ended up reaching an audience of over 300 million people over the course of my 14 years there. [00:02:58] But to answer your question, 14 years is a long time to be doing anything. And after a while, I just started looking for the eggs. Over the course of my time at con I had worked with over 13,000 schools in all 50 states and nearly a hundred different countries. One of those schools was USC university of Southern California and at one of our events, and this is a true story. [00:03:23] We were hosting. Remember Anthony Scaramucci, the mooch was going to go on stage with, with a guy named Mike Murphy, who was. The campaign manager for Mitt Romney and Jeb Bush and John McCain and Arnold Schwartzenegger big deal. Republican guys. They went on stage and then the current executive director said, Hey, comedy, you want my job? [00:03:46] I'm going to be moving. And I said, well, I'm super interested because I'm 14 years in a pro con. What, tell me more. And then she told me more. I ended up applying, ended up getting the position and it's been three years since. So even though I'm a two time UCLA graduate, I'm a proud Bruin. I am now a Brogan Brogan because I can now put up my two fingers and say fight on because USC pays my bills. [00:04:14] It's a fabulous university. I've always had great respect for USC as well as for UCLA, my, my Alma mater. So happy to be here at USC and pro-con meanwhile, lives on and has since been acquired by encyclopedia Britannica and they run it. That was part of the exit strategy. Was to make sure that it lived on. [00:04:34] So they great content is still widely available to millions of millions of people. I couldn't be more proud of that operation and what it has done. And we can talk a little bit more about the impact that it has made. I know impact is your, is your currency. And, and I'm very proud of that. And an eager to talk about as well. [00:04:54] What's going on here at USC and in all the side [00:04:57] projects that I'm involved in and you're involved [00:04:59] in. [00:05:00] It's so interesting because you go from this really immersive. You know, 300 million type level impressions and over a decade of work, which is certainly I would, classify as a mile-wide and that's just the nature of a mile wide reaching many, many at a very top level to now it's looking like you're going a mile deep, a mile deep with the ability to craft and look at an educational experience in a very fraught, political time full of, as you mentioned , media, bubbles media, bubbles that are doing the work of getting and keeping attention. [00:05:40] I want to actually just pull back though to that moment. You said I started, you know, 14 years are [00:05:46] people listening and I'm also kind of, we had a recently Greg Baldwin on who is announced that he is moving on from volunteer mattress. a lot of I think, changing, changing of the guard, [00:05:58] like. What is that first initial moment. [00:06:00] And then from that moment of , it's time, , what about that [00:06:05] gives you that like, all right, now I need to put [00:06:08] this in place. And what is putting this in place? Look like. [00:06:12] Yeah, it's, it's a profound question and a lot of ways, because it has so much to do with the sense of purpose in life in general. So for me, my purpose professionally and personally had been as a bridge builder. I was bringing people together sometimes against their will on issues so that they can discover that the [00:06:36] people that they thought [00:06:37] were opposite from them, that they considered enemies, not just opponents, but enemies, but those people were actually quite rational and that those people got to their viewpoints based on. [00:06:49] Reasons and education and moral guidance and family values and things that were deeply, deeply reasonable, and they were not caricature. So for liberals they might read or watch Tucker Carlson and think, oh, conservatives, they don't know anything. Or conservatives might watch Rachel Maddow and think, ah, she's such an extremist. [00:07:20] The reality is that most of us are somewhere in the middle and those viewpoints were not being represented because as you know, for example, 90% of tweets come from 20% of its users. The people who'd speak. The loudest are the ones who are hurt. And most of the time, most of us are kind of in the middle. [00:07:43] are not extremely. So to answer your question about the, that moment. For me, the moment came when I realized that my personal and professional mission of bridging people, I had been doing it digitally, virtually reaching large audiences. But when I would have conversations offline with friends or family or colleagues, sometimes those conversations got heated. [00:08:08] And sometimes those conversations went sideways and got ugly. And I thought that's, I'm the master of bringing people together and getting people to recognize their common humanity and recognize the merit in each other's viewpoints. And yet I'm not able to do it on an interpersonal basis. Why is that? [00:08:28] And there was a new challenge. I thought this is a different kinds of challenge. It's very different. W