Podcasts about outside magazine

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Best podcasts about outside magazine

Latest podcast episodes about outside magazine

The Caring Economy with Toby Usnik
Steve Fechheimer: CEO of New Belgium Brewery

The Caring Economy with Toby Usnik

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 5, 2023 34:38


Steve Fechheimer has been Chief Executive Officer of New Belgium Brewery since 2017 where he oversees New Belgium's executive team, short-term strategy, industry leadership, and day-to-day operations. He joined New Belgium from Beam Suntory, the world's third-largest premium spirits company where he was Chief Strategy Officer. What's remarkable about New Belgium is that it is recognized as one of Outside Magazine's Best Places to Work and one of the Wall Street Journal's Best Small Businesses. The brewery is a Platinum-level Bicycle Friendly Business as designated by the League of American Bicyclists, and one of World Blu's most democratic U.S. businesses, and a Certified B Corp. Prior to Beam Suntory, Steve served as Chief Operating Officer of Sierra Club Green Home, and also as a consultant at The Boston Consulting Group and Marakon Associates. Steve holds an MBA from the University of Chicago and earned his undergraduate degree from The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania ============ Fechheimer's expertise at strategy development and execution in the high-end world of spirits, coupled with New Belgium's quarter of a century of solid brewing and branding, is a perfect setup for the kind of dynamic future New Belgium is executing. His peers say Fechheimer is smart and driven while also being approachable, and makes for the ideal cultural and business fit for New Belgium. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/toby-usnik/support

THE TRAVIS MACY SHOW
Ep. 97 Not Quite a Genius: Nate Dern on Writing, Podcasting, Gaming, Acting, Running, Dadding, the Metaverse, and Teenage Mutant Runner Travis

THE TRAVIS MACY SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 82:14


Nate Dern is the lead writer of 1047 Games, the indie video game developer that makes Splitgate, a sci-fi arena shooter with portals. Nate's book “Not Quite a Genius” is a collection of comedy essays and stories that The New York Times called “very thoughtful, smart and funny.” Here are some other jobs he's had: Staff Writer for The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, Head Creative of Comedy Central's Creators Program, Senior Writer at Funny Or Die, and Artistic Director of the UCB Theatre. His freelance writing has appeared in the New Yorker, Outside Magazine, The Atlantic, The New York Times, McSweeney's, Vice, New York Magazine, and elsewhere.Nate lives with his wife, daughter, dog, and cat in Los Angeles, California.  He hosts the podcast, Try! with Nate Dern.Join two old friends in this wide-ranging conversation that promises to be not quite as poignant as it is funny.In This Episode:Nate Dern Website | Instagram | Try! Podcast | BookTravis Macy Instagram | WebsiteMace on InstagramThe Feed Instagram | Website- - - - - - - - - - -If you like this podcast, please consider our book, A Mile at A Time: A Father and Son's Inspiring Alzheimer's Journey of Love, Adventure, and Hope*30% off with discount code MACESubscribe: Apple Podcast | SpotifyCheck us out: Instagram | Twitter | Website | YouTubewww.AMileAtATimeBook.com

The You Project
#1057 The Science of Heartbreak - Florence Williams

The You Project

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2023 48:43


After 32 years of being together and 25 years of marriage, Florence Williams discovered her husband was in love with another woman when he handed her his phone with the wrong email open (by accident). For Florence, the subsequent break down of her marriage was (as is often the case) traumatic, painful and heartbreaking. This was a broadly relevant and super-interesting chat with a woman who went on a significant journey to truly understand the experience and science, of heartbreak. Her recent book is called ‘Heartbreak: A Personal and Scientific Journey' is super-popular and has been critically acclaimed. In this chat we talk about managing stress, rejection, nervous system and immune system responses to threats (real or perceived), social pain and physical pain responses in the brain, her use of psychedelics (fascinating) as therapy, her month in the wilderness to find herself and a myriad of other healing ‘therapies' she explored. Enjoy.   *Bio: Florence Williams is a journalist, bestselling-author, and podcaster. She is a contributing editor at Outside Magazine and a freelance writer for the New York Times, New York Times Magazine, National Geographic, The New York Review of Books and numerous other publications. florencewilliams.comSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Chef AJ LIVE!
Performance, Health, & Well - Being Interview With Brad Stulberg

Chef AJ LIVE!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 62:52


Brad Stulberg researches, writes, coaches, and speaks on health and human performance. He is an award winning author of the books The Passion Paradox and Peak Performance and he is host of the Growth Equation Podcast. He has written for The New York Times, Wired, New York Magazine, Outside Magazine, Sports Illustrated, NPR, and other national and international outlets. In his coaching practice, he works with executives, entrepreneurs, and athletes on their mental skills and overall well-being. You can follow Brad on Twitter @bstulberg and learn more at his website: www.bradstulberg.com

U2FP CureCast
Psilocybin & SCI: Thinking Outside the Box (Episode 70)

U2FP CureCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 84:04


Jason and Matthew interview Jim Harris, a wilderness photographer who was injured in 2014. Jim was recently featured in Outside Magazine regarding his experience with psilocybin and its connection to some restored mobility. This conversation is a follow-up to our previous podcast with Dr. Jessica Nielson on the potential use of psilocybin after SCI. However, in this episode, we specifically focus on one of our community member's direct experience with exploring the use of psychedelics and his advocacy to decriminalize their use in Colorado. Guest Bio Before sustaining a spine injury at the end of 2014, Jim Harris made his living from hard days in the mountains. Following six years of teaching wilderness mountaineering courses, Jim began shooting photos, video, and writing for clients like National Geographic, Camp 4 Collective, Powder Magazine, and outdoor brands. His work reflects a deep firsthand expertise of wilderness travel and DIY adventure. Since being paralyzed, Jim has pushed towards a remarkable recovery and is finding fresh opportunities to be involved in adventure storytelling. More Resources - Jim Harris' Website: https://perpetualweekend.com/ - Check out this survey on psychedelics and spasticity from the Miami Project: https://umiami.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_2lf8kbdV7ogHxjg

The B.rad Podcast
Alex Hutchinson: Exploring The Limits Of Human Athletic Performance

The B.rad Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 72:03


Welcome to a fast-moving and interesting conversation with Alex Hutchinson, author of the book Endure. Alex is a popular columnist for Outside Magazine, covering topics related to sweat science, and is an expert on the scientific aspects of peak performance and human limitations, especially relating to endurance. He recounts his extraordinary story at the start of the show, sharing the amazing breakthroughs he's made in his career as a middle distance runner in college, and you won't believe some of the memorable insights he presents, many of which I'm still thinking about today. In this episode, we get into all kinds of topics like the popular Central Governor Theory, promoted by Dr. Timothy Noakes, who proposed that the brain is the true limiter of peak performance, not fatigue, talk about the ultimate limits of human performance, and much more!   TIMESTAMPS: The brain is the true limiter of peak performance, not fatigue. [00:46] Alex has an amazing story of how he became a 4-minute distance runner. [03:59] His progress was at an unheard-of pace. [15:56] It is hard for endurance athletes to buy into the idea that our mindset is holding us back. [20:06] What is the ideal competitive disposition? The cocky “I can win” and the “I don't belong here” are at both ends of the spectrum. [24:38] Alex thinks genetics had very little to do with his ability as a runner. [35:45] Is there such a thing as fear of success in these athletes? What you say to yourself makes a big impact. [40:55] It is difficult to distinguish between the discomfort or pain of effort and the discomfort of an injury. [48:14] Do the coaches need to do something different when an athlete gets injured? [51:58] No one is going to break records by large amounts. [58:43] Alex is moderately optimistic on doping. [01:02:34]   LINKS: Brad Kearns.com Brad's Shopping page Endure SweatScience   Join Brad for more fun on: Instagram: @bradkearns1 Facebook: @bradkearnsjumphigh Twitter: @bradleykearns YouTube: @brad.kearns TikTok: @bradkearns   We appreciate all feedback, and questions for Q&A shows, emailed to podcast@bradventures.com. If you have a moment, please share an episode you like with a quick text message, or leave a review on your podcast app. Thank you! Check out each of these companies because they are absolutely awesome or they wouldn't occupy this revered space. Seriously, Brad won't promote anything he doesn't absolutely love and use in daily life. Mito Red Light: Photobiomodulation light panels to enhance cellular energy production, improve recovery, and optimize circadian rhythm. Email me for special B.rad 10% discount and 60-day free trial! NutriSense: Continuous glucose monitor and 1:1 expert support to help optimize diet choices and lifestyle behaviors. $30 B.rad discount! Marek Health: Comprehensive lab testing and expert tele-health support for peak performance. Use code “BRAD” for 10% discount! LMNT Electrolyte Drink Mix: Tasty, sugar-free, scientifically formulated electrolyte drink mix with everything you need and nothing you don't. Free sample pack, just click the link! B.rad Whey + Creatine Superfuel: Premium quality, all-natural supplement for peak performance, recovery, and longevity Male Optimization Formula with Organs (MOFO): Optimize testosterone naturally with 100% grassfed animal organ supplement Brad's Macadamia Masterpiece: Mind-blowing, life-changing nut butter blend Online educational courses: Numerous great offerings for an immersive home-study educational experience Check out the my Favorites page for discounts on other great products!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Drunk Dietitians Podcast
EP142: Kids on Weight Loss Drugs?!

Drunk Dietitians Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 55:27


SURPRISE EPISODE RELEASE! Hear our unfiltered opinions about the newly released nutrition recommendations for kids from the American Academy of Pediatrics as nutrition professionals and moms. The implications of these are HUGE and you should be informed! Christine Byrne, MPH, RD, LDN, is a registered dietitian and longtime journalist. She takes a non-diet approach to health, and believes that everyone can and should have a peaceful relationship with food. She owns a private practice in Raleigh, NC, helping folks recover from eating disorders and disordered eating. She's a regular contributor for national outlets like Self, Outside Magazine, and Food Network, and she's published over a thousand articles about food and wellness over her ten-year media career. She's also a nutrition communications consultant for various companies and brands. Right now, she's working with Amazon on a nutrition content initiative that's accurate, inclusive, and actually helpful. This episode is timely as we discuss the new scary recommendations for childhood “obesity”, why bariatric surgery is dangerous, and insight from a successful nutrition journalist Find her on IG @christinejbyrne

The Rhody Strength Podcast
#56 Kelly Starrett: PT, Strength Coach & NYT Best Seller of "Becoming a Supple Leopard"

The Rhody Strength Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 62:03


Had an awesome time chatting with Kelly about a variety of topics. We talk about his new book "Built to Move", his thoughts on manual therapy, PT's on instagram, CrossFit Health and more. Hope you guys enjoy as much as I did! Kelly's short bio: Dr. Kelly Starrett is a coach, physical therapist, two-time New York Times & Wall Street Journal bestselling author, speaker, and co-founder of The Ready State, the world's most comprehensive collection of guided movement, mechanics, and mobility instructional videos.  Guest: Kelly Starrett Instagram - @thereadystate - https://www.instagram.com/thereadystate/?hl=en Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/thereadystate/ Twitter - @thereadystate - https://twitter.com/thereadystate?lang=en YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnnB4zDBqZHhQ4uLTAX8eYA  Host: Matt Sweeney: Instagram - @mattsweeney.dpt - https://www.instagram.com/mattsweeney.dpt/ Instagram - @strengthandsport - https://www.instagram.com/strengthandsport/ Website: www.strengthandsportpt.com Shout out to our awesome local sponsors: Joro Protein: Use Code: JoroRhodyStrength2022 for 30% off your order at https://www.joroprotein.com/ Follow them at @joroprotein Phaze CBD: Use Code SSPT20 for 20% off at https://phazesports.com/ Follow them at @phazesportswellness Kelly's full Bio: Kelly Starrett, DPT is a coach, physical therapist, author, and speaker. Along with his wife Juliet, Kelly is co-founder of The Ready State. The Ready State began as Mobility|WOD in 2008 and has gone on to revolutionize the field of performance therapy and self-care. Kelly received his Doctor of Physical Therapy degree in 2007 from Samuel Merritt College in Oakland, California. Kelly's clients include professional athletes in the NFL, NBA, NHL, and MLB. He also works with Olympic gold-medalists, Tour de France cyclists, world-and national-record-holding Olympic lifting and power athletes, CrossFit Games medalists, ballet dancers, military personnel, and competitive age-division athletes. Kelly is the author of the New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestsellers Becoming A Supple Leopard and Ready to Run. He is also co-author (with Juliet) of the Wall Street Journal bestseller Deskbound. His latest book, Waterman 2.0, offers water-sport athletes a comprehensive guide to optimized movement and pain-free performance. Kelly and his work have been featured on 60 Minutes, The View, The Joe Rogan Experience, CBS Sports, Outside Magazine, Men's Health, Men's Journal and dozens of other podcasts, magazines, and books — including Tim Ferriss' The 4-Hour Body and Tools of Titans. On top of co-founding The Ready State, Kelly and Juliet also started San Francisco CrossFit and StandUpKids together. Founded in 2005, San Francisco CrossFit was the 21st CrossFit affiliate in the world. And StandUpKids is a non-profit dedicated to combating kids' sedentary lifestyles by bringing standing and moving desks to low-income public schools. To date, StandUpKids has converted 95,000 kids from sitting to standing. Earlier in their careers, Kelly and Juliet also co-founded a kayaking camp for children with HIV called Liquid. In his athletic career, Kelly paddled whitewater slalom canoe on the US Canoe and Kayak Teams. He lead the Men's Whitewater Rafting Team to two national titles and competed in two World Championships. In his free time, “KStar” likes to spend time with his wife, Juliet, and two daughters, Georgia and Caroline. He also loves to mountain bike, paddle, and sauna. And while Kelly claims to only “tolerate” the ice bath, according to Juliet he actually likes that, too. 

Fit Mom University - The Podcast
Episode #261 - Who is the observer of your life?

Fit Mom University - The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 59:52


Jason Latas of Quantum Body Performance Coaching has been an adventure guide and quantum wellness coach for 3 decades. He has personally guided many fortune 500 CEOs and major business owners on custom adventures across the globe. He also personally coaches many traveling entrepreneurs to help them stay mentally and physically fit while traveling and running their businesses. He enjoys helping people feel good in their skin again and perform better in their personal and business lives. Jason has been featured in The New York Times, The L.A. Times, Spa Magazine, Modern Bride, Conde Naste, Outside Magazine, The Outdoor Journal, as well as on ESPN, The Travel Channel, ABC, Ford Adventure Outfitters, Planet X TV and many other national and international venues. Many of these videos can be seen on You Tube https://jasonlatas.com/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/shutupandgrind/support

U2FP CureCast
Taking a Trip with SCI (Episode 69)

U2FP CureCast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 57:26


The research of psychedelics as a therapeutic for anxiety, depression, and PTSD has gained a lot of traction over the last decade. Given their potent effects on the nervous system, what are the unique benefits and possible side effects of psychedelics for the SCI population? And further, what is their potential to elicit functional recovery? If you ask the community, it doesn't take long to find anecdotal evidence that the benefits go beyond just the psychological realm. Read Jim Harris' account in Outside Magazine, as an example (https://www.outsideonline.com/outdoor-adventure/exploration-survival/psychedelics-research-paralysis-treatment-jim-harris/). In this episode, Matthew and Jason speak with Jessica Nielson to explore the potential psychedelics may hold for the SCI community. Jessica is an SCI and Bioinformatics researcher at the University of Minnesota. She is also the Executive Director of Psychedelic Society of Minnesota. They discuss psychedelic research and where it could cross paths with spinal cord injury. They also discuss the hypothesized mechanism of psychedelics and whether they might or might not bring about some of the range of changes that SCI self-experimenters have reported. Guest Bio Jessica Nielsen is a tenure-track Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, and Core Faculty in the Institute for Health Informatics at the University of Minnesota, and is the Executive Director of the Psychedelic Society of Minnesota. Jessica completed doctoral training in the lab of Dr. Oswald Steward at UC Irvine focusing on animal models of spinal cord injury, and did postdoctoral training with Dr. Adam Ferguson at UCSF, where she developed a preclinical database of SCI studies that seeded the Open Data Commons for SCI. During her time at UCSF, she began conducting research on the psychedelic tea, ayahuasca, to investigate whether it might be an alternative treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). She is currently conducting computational psychiatry research to identify more precise phenotypes of PTSD from large clinical data repositories, and is Principal Investigator of the first psilocybin clinical trial at the University of Minnesota. She is currently co-developing a new survey study around how people with SCI respond to psychedelics, to inform the community about risks and benefits to promote harm reduction as the hype around psychedelics reaches a broad range of patient populations interested in using psychedelics to alleviate suffering.

Book Dreams
Ep. 129 - The Science Behind Heartbreak, with Florence Williams

Book Dreams

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 33:45


Why, exactly, do we feel so shattered when someone we love leaves us? What is the science behind the physical changes we experience during heartbreak, such as weight loss and anxiety, and why do so many of us stop behaving rationally? In this episode of Book Dreams, we talk with acclaimed science writer Florence Williams about her latest book, Heartbreak: A Personal and Scientific Journey, in which she explores questions like these within the framework of a heartbreak of her own and its aftermath. In her conversation with Julie and Eve, Florence discusses the brain science behind our responses to this kind of loss; the potential impact of loneliness and feelings of abandonment on our immune systems; why some of us bounce back from heartbreak faster than others; what advice she gives to everyone struggling to recover from heartbreak; and so much more. Florence Williams is a journalist, podcaster, and the author of Heartbreak: A Personal and Scientific Journey. Her first book, Breasts: A Natural and Unnatural History, won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize in Science and Technology, and was named a notable book by The New York Times. She's also the author of The Nature Fix: Why Nature Makes us Happier, Healthier, and More Creative. Her writing has appeared in The New York Times, National Geographic, The New York Review of Books, and many other outlets, and she's a contributing editor at Outside Magazine. One more thing: Book Dreams Inc.—a nonprofit that Julie and Eve founded that provides books to kids who lack them—is co-hosting a holiday event for students at the Monarch School, which serves homeless children in San Diego. They're covering the cost of filling a bookmobile with books for all 300 students. The bookmobile will arrive at the school, and each child will be able to choose a book for themselves, just in time for the holidays. If you'd like to help, go here and click on the yellow donate button. No amount is too small, and any extra funds will add books to the school library. All donations are tax-deductible. And as a thank you, the Book Dreams podcast will send you a list of book recommendations from more than 50 Book Dreams guests, some of whom are probably among your favorite authors. Find us on Twitter (@bookdreamspod) and Instagram (@bookdreamspodcast), or email us at contact@bookdreamspodcast.com. We encourage you to visit our website and sign up for our newsletter for information about our episodes, guests, and more. Book Dreams is a part of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate network, a company that produces, distributes, and monetizes podcasts. For more information on how The Podglomerate treats data, please see our Privacy Policy. Since you're listening to Book Dreams, we'd like to suggest you also try other Podglomerate shows about literature, writing, and storytelling like Storybound and The History of Literature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
Caley Fretz - The Challenges (& Opportunities) Facing Cycling Journalism

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 62:39


In this week's episode, cycling journalist and former CyclingTips Editor-in-Chief Caley Fretz joins Randall to discuss cycling's changing media landscape, the economic headwinds facing professional journalists, emerging models for supporting quality reporting and story-telling, and how the meaning of cycling changes as one pedals through life. Also: press-fit bottom brackets, hookless road rims, and too-stiff components and frames. Episode sponsors: Thesis Bike and Logos Components  Support the Podcast Join The Ridership  Links to Caley's work: The Road to Nairo's House: https://cyclingtips.com/2018/01/the-road-to-nairos-house/ The Teaching Toe Strap: https://www.velonews.com/news/road/the-toe-strap/ Tales From The Tour: The Rest Day Pose: https://cyclingtips.com/2018/07/tales-from-the-tour-the-rest-day-pose/ Automated Transcription, please excuse the typos: [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: Hello and welcome to the gravel ride podcast. I'm your host Craig Dalton. This week on the show, I'm handing the microphone off to my co-host Randall Jacobs. Who's got veteran cycling journalists, Kaylee frets on the pod. To discuss some of the challenges and opportunities facing cycling journalism. You may know Kaylee from his work as editor in chief, over at cycling tips. And prior to that over at Velo news, both publications have undergone some downsizing of late. The economic headwinds facing professional journalists. Our strong, particularly in the cycling world. If we want to have quality reporting and storytelling. A new model needs to emerge. I don't know where this is all gonna end up, but I was super excited that Kaylee agreed to join Randall on the podcast. To just get his perspective and to get into some good old fashioned by geekery. Before we jump in we need to thank this week sponsors from thesis and logos components As many of you know, I'm a long time it's thesis. OB one rider for a limited time thesis is offering $500 off a thesis, OB one with access custom wireless shifting, and your choice of high-end carbon wheels. It's a bike that I can personally attest, stands up to every other carbon bike out there on the market at a really great price. One of the things that I've always appreciated about thesis is that they allow. A unique level of customization. So if you want size appropriate cranks down to, I think 160 or 165 millimeters, you can do that. You can get your stem size, you can customize everything. Based on a free one-on-one consult. So go check out thesis.bike, or contact. Hello at thesis stoplight to get started. I also want to give a shout out to logos components. Logos just receive huge recognition from bike packing.com and was awarded the gear of the year award for the wheelset category in 2022. You might recall an episode. We did a while back on how to choose a gravel wheel set, where Randall went through detail by detail on the design considerations When constructing a carbon wheelset I encourage you to listen to that as it provided a lot of riders with reflection on what they were looking for and what all the different things were, all logos wheels are built on proven open standards with non-proprietary components and with a manufacturing precision. That rivals anybody in the industry, the wheels are backed by Logus is five-year warranty, lifetime at-cost incident protection. And a US-based warehouse and support team to keep you rolling for many years to come. So head on over to logos components.com and use the code community free shipping all one word to take advantage of a free shipping offer. With that business behind us I'm going to pass the microphone back over to randall and his conversation with kaylee frets [00:03:06] Randall R. Jacobs: It's been quite a bit. I think I last saw you at Sea Otter. How have you been? What's going on in your world? [00:03:11] Caley Fretz: Well, I'm unemployed as of November 15th. I mean, yeah, let's just, we can get that one right outta the way. Right. I was part of the layoffs at Outside Inc. To be somewhat differentiated from Outside Magazine for anybody out there. I mean, outside Inc. Does own outside magazine, but it also owns lots and lots of other things. Yeah, myself the editor-in-Chief of Venu as well and two of the CT staff, two really core CT staff. Matt, our managing editor, and Dave Rome, one of our tech editors and, and kinda a legend in space. We're all let go on the same day on November 15th. So I am currently super fun employed and I think after we chat today, I'm probably gonna go skiing cuz it's snowing up in the mountains right now. And so I'm, I'm somewhat enjoying myself. But, you know, fun employment brings with it some level of stress as well, . So that's, that's how I'm doing right now. Yeah. [00:03:59] Randall R. Jacobs: Well, and I appreciate you sharing. I think last we rode together. You were still living in Boulder and you've since moved to beautiful Durango. When was that move? [00:04:07] Caley Fretz: That was shortly after we had our, our first child. My wife grew up here and, and we have grandparents here to help with childcare and all the rest. And we just wanted to get off the front range. No offense to the front range. There's too many people and there's fewer people here. And I can go skiing 18 minutes from here, from my door, and I can't really complain about that. [00:04:27] Randall R. Jacobs: Housing costs are probably a little bit less bonkers out that way as well. I was in Denver and particularly Boulderer lately, and it is nuts. [00:04:34] Caley Fretz: it's a little bit better here, although not as, Not as good as it was four or five years ago. It, it, it's a zoom town, right? So in the last couple years it has, it's gone up like 28% or something ridiculous in, in 2021. We love it here. It's amazing. Durango, the bike community here is, is unbelievable. The mountain biking is unbelievable. And there's nobody that, you have not as many people to share all the trails with. So I, we like that bit of it as well. [00:04:59] Randall R. Jacobs: Very, very cool. And so let's just dive into, cuz, cuz I've been curious share a bit about your background. So I, I've only known you as, you know, in your role as, as a journalist and editor at Cycling Tips. But how do you end up on this path? [00:05:13] Caley Fretz: Oh I mean, how far back do you want to go? I, I, I started racing mountain bikes at 12 or 13 years old. My dad was a cyclist. My dad was, I think one of the founding members of the Penn State cycling team, collegiate cycling team back in the day. So I grew up around bikes and I grew up around bike racing and watching the tour and all these things. And yeah, started racing when my family moved to Burlington, Vermont back in the day at Catamount Family Centers. Anybody who, yep. Very, very northeast connection. That's where I, that was all my youth. Yeah. Any, any any new [00:05:45] Randall R. Jacobs: and, and your dad is still in Vermont, if I recall [00:05:48] Caley Fretz: Yeah, yeah. He he actually just retired, but he, he used to run a small like sort of children's museum aquarium thing called Echo on the, on the waterfront in Burlington. And yeah so, so grew up, grew up racing, grew up around bikes, and went to school out here in Colorado. Mostly to ride by bike to, to ma major in bike racing, pre primarily . Much to my parents chagrin, I would say. And let's see what it, what would've been like junior year, summer in between junior and senior year of, of college. Shout out to a friend of mine, Brian Holcomb, who's still in, in the bike world basically came to me and was like, Hey, you should, you should be an intern at Be News. And so I did that and I, and I, I became an intern at Bean News and worked the summer there. And Ben Delaney was the editor-in-chief at the time, and Ben was, Ben was kind enough to bring me on in a, in a kind of part-time capacity that fall. and then it kind of just went from there. So, so yeah, a couple folks who were still floating around the bike world, I, I owe a lot to at this point. Ben and, and Brian and Zach Vest, who was sort of one of my first mentors and has been a, a marketing manager at Niner and a other, a Scott and a couple other places recently. Math yeah, and just kinda worked from there. So I was a tech editor at sort of tech writer at Be News for a couple years, tech editor at Be News for a couple years. And then kinda worked my way into bigger and broader beats basically, and, and kind of stepped into the racing space a little bit more. Became, I think it was like think it was senior editor or whatever the title was at the end of my, my Bella News tenure which was 2017 which is when Wade Wallace got in touch from cycling tips and he was actually just looking for a person to fill a somewhat similar role, kind of like a features writer do a bit of everything kind of writer. And I loved the idea. I loved cycling tips. I loved the brand. I loved everything that stood for, I loved the fact that it was kinda an up and comer and I had been at Villa News long enough that I was just was looking for a change basically. And so I, I jumped ship from one to the other, from Helen News to ct. Remained really good friends with lots of folks at, at vn particularly guys like Andrew Hood who had done a bunch of Tour de France with and things like that. It's like no hard feelings in that, in that jump. Just wanted something new. And within about a year of that for a number of different reasons Wade had promoted me to editor-in-chief at ct. So that was around 20, mid middle of 2018. And it was an interesting time kind of from a business perspective cuz it was near the end of a period when, when CT was owned by bike Exchange in Australia and we were about to be purchased by Pink Bike. And with all of that happening and then in particular with the purchase from Pink Bike we got a bunch more resource and really could expand into what I think most people probably know, cycline tips as now or maybe we'll say six months ago what they knew it as up, up until quite recently. And yeah. I'm trying to think this, there's not my time. My my time as EIC of, of CIP is, is obviously I think what most listeners out there would probably know, if not of me, then you at least know CIP and you know what we were trying to do there. [00:08:52] Randall R. Jacobs: I know how much grief there is out there for, that core team having been broken up. A lot of people, myself included, who value the perspective that you bring to the industry. It's not simply you know, flipping press releases which, you know, there's a place for like, there's, you know, some people that's, they wanna see what the press releases are but doing really interesting journalism. One of your colleagues Ian tralo, he's done some interesting pieces on Central Asian despots in their role in cycling and on the Afghan women's cycling team. And the controversy with how the UCI was prioritizing getting certain members of that team and the organization out of Afghanistan when the US was backing out. Like, this is not your standard bike industry journalism. And that's an angle that I think is going to be very much missed in the vacuum that's created by your departure and the departure of others from that team. [00:09:42] Caley Fretz: Yeah. It's a sad thing. I think the overwhelming emotion for a lot of us is, is just sadness because we spend a lot of time building this thing and a lot of time and energy and effort and, and yeah. No blood, but probably some sweat and tears in there. And yeah, and it feels that's just sad. You know, I. I enjoyed my time there tremendously. I enjoyed working with people like Ian, with James Huang, with Dave, who got laid off alongside me. It was just a really, I can't say it was massively surprising giving a number of things that I can't actually talk about. But I I, oh, I am still very saddened by it. Yeah, I mean, it's not gonna be what it was because a bunch of the people are gone like that, that, that I can say . Yeah. [00:10:28] Randall R. Jacobs: Yeah. Now, remind me, when did James join the team? Because he, he's someone I've admired for years [00:10:33] Caley Fretz: yeah. He, he joined a, I think about 18 months before I did. So when, when bike exchange, when, when Wade first sold a, a large portion of cycling tips to bike exchange that was sort of the first. Let's say capital infusion that, that the company got. And a lot of that was used to pick up kind of high profile folks, particularly in the United States which is what's sort of their next, the next market that, that Wade wanted to go after. So that was, they picked up James and they picked up Neil Rogers in the us as well as some other folks like, like Shane Stokes in the uk or Ireland, I believe he is right now. Yeah, so, so that was all a little bit before I got there. And part of my, sort of what they asked me to do, what Wade asked me to do when, when I became editor in chief was to figure out exactly how to best use people like James, who do phenomenal work. I mean, I, I, I maintain to this day that the three-person team, the three-person tech team that, that we had at Zeman Tips over the last year which would be James and Dave Rome and Ronan McLaughlin in Ireland as well. Was the best anywhere in cycling media? There's no, there's no question in my mind about that. And so basically trying to figure out how to steer that talent was one of the big things that I was tasked with doing over the last three, four years. [00:11:44] Randall R. Jacobs: Well, and you know, when you read a review from any of those team members that you're, you're getting it straight you know, for better or for worse for the brands that are at the mercy of, of that team. But honestly, it keeps the industry honest. And I recall early in my career in the bike particularly James' writing be being something that I referenced constantly. And in fact, when I was at one of the big players, if I needed to make an argument, I would oftentimes grab an article from someone like him to bring to the argument like, no press fit is not acceptable. And we're gonna spend the extra money and add the weight, and we're gonna tell a story about how a two piece thread together is a better solution. And honestly, it's a solution to fix what was broken when you went, you know, but that's, that's a, that's a, a hobby horse that I think we've all been riding for some time. [00:12:29] Caley Fretz: love hearing that though. I, I genuinely love hearing that because I mean, oh, first of all, James would also love hearing that. He'd be very proud of that fact. I think and yeah, like we, we know that that was the case, right? I mean, we, we the three of us have been making a, a podcast called Nerd Alert for, for, for the last year and a half or two years or whatever. And I got a fair number of, of Less than pleased emails off the back of, of that podcast. Cause we were quite honest in our assessment of what we thought was happening in the industry. And in particular, like I haven't been a tech editor for. Eight, nine years. I'm just a cyclist at this point. But Dave and James are so deep inside it and think they spend so much of their lives thinking about that stuff that yeah. You, you can't ignore their opinions, right? You absolutely can't ignore their opinions. And I think that's, that's a testament to one, the fact that they do their research. And two the fact that they've been right a number of times. And like over the years, I would say that CT is, was known as the anti press fit media outlet, right? Which is like, there are worse things to be associated with, I think, than hating on creaky bottom brackets. Like, who, who wouldn't wanna hate 'em? Creaky bottom brackets. That makes perfect sense to me. [00:13:33] Randall R. Jacobs: Well, and it, and it's deeper than just a creaky bottom bracket. It's detracting from this experience that we are all so passionate about. And so, I think that having someone out there who has influence saying no, this is not the way it should be. Hear the arguments and, and, you know, let a case be made. Hey, you know, come on the podcast and talk about why you think press fit is, is the best way to go about it if you really wanna make that case. But yeah, it's an approach that I, you know, I, I'll take you up on it, but I, I'd probably be on the same side with you on more or less every issue with the exception of maybe a few nuances here and there. But yeah, actually let's have some fun with this. Other stuff other than press fit bottom brackets that would be your hill to die on. [00:14:15] Caley Fretz: well. So actually Dave Ro and I so reminder, Dave Ro and I were both just recently laid off. And so our free, we, we are free to do whatever we want. I don't have a non-compete or anything like that. Right. So, we've kicked, we've kicked off a little podcast and. [00:14:28] Randall R. Jacobs: What is it called? [00:14:29] Caley Fretz: It's called, [00:14:29] Randall R. Jacobs: do people find it? [00:14:30] Caley Fretz: well at the moment it's called the redundant placeholders because we have no idea what to call it. So if you search it, I think any of the, any of the podcast platforms, if you search redundant placeholders, able to find it, you can also find it on, on any of my social channels. I'm at K Fretz on everything cause I'm the only person on the planet with my name. So that's very handy. Anyway David and I were talking about like, okay, so if we were actually literally talking about this yesterday, which is why it's funny that you bring up bottom brackets. Like if, if the bottom bracket the anti press fit bandwagon was the one that we were leading before, what's our, what's our new thing that we get to hate on? And we've actually decided that one of the things that we're most interested in pushing, and if you listen to the episode from this week, you would, you would hear this is bikes that are too stiff and just stuff that's too stiff. So specifically Dave, this, this week brought up the topic of of handlebars that are just like, Way too stiff. Right? Just, just ridiculously stiff. We were talking about the, the 35 mill trend on in mountain bikes, which I hate. And like, I've got a, you know, I've got a giant, I've got a giant trail bike with 170 Mill fork, and then I wanna stick like a, just a two by four in my hands. I don't really understand why I want to do that. And I've ended up with like, like more sort of hand cramp and hand pain on this bike than I've ever had previously. And it's got more travel than any bike that I've, I've had previously. So that, those two things don't really line up in, in my head, right? And, and so Dave and I were basically talking about pushing, pushing back on this need for for stiffer and stiffer and stiffer and stiffer all the time. And the fact that a lot of us don't need that, or really don't want it either. Not only do we not need it, we really don't want it because it makes the broad experience worse. I told a little story about how one of the best bikes I've ever ridden was a not particularly expensive mazzi steel frame, steel fork, steel frame. Then I put a pair of zip 3 0 3 carbon wheels on, so nice, nice light stiff wheel set with a somewhat flexi bike, flexi fork, flexi flexi frame. But it rode like an absolute dream, you know, 27 2 post it might have even had, it might have even not had oversized bars. I can't remember. This is, this is like eight, nine years ago now. And I loved it. I absolutely loved this bike. It, it, it got up and went when I asked it to, and I think the wheel set made a huge difference in, in that. But then it, it cornered like an absolute dream and it was comfortable and it was, it was just beautiful. And it was a, a not particularly expensive steel mozzie, right? Like . So that's, that's, that's the that's the high horse upon which we find ourselves now. The fight for less stiff. Bicycles, I think is what we're gonna go after next. [00:17:06] Randall R. Jacobs: Well, and you can kind of take that a step further, talking about steel frames, for example. If you get a steel frame, even a, a pretty decent steel frame at say o e m cost is going to be quite a bit less than a monocot carbon frame. And you don't have all the tooling costs and everything else, and you can change the geometry if you need to without having to retool. And those bikes are gonna be inherently more affordable at the same time. And unless you're an elite racer who's having to sprint off the line or so on, you know, you either spend less money for an equivalent bike that suits your needs well and is comfortable, or you spend the same money and you put it into say, better wheels. You don't get the cheap out wheels with the three Paul hubs that fall apart and in a year and what have you. Yeah, that's one I'll join you on. [00:17:46] Caley Fretz: So that, so [00:17:47] Randall R. Jacobs: right. So I'm joining the battalion. What? [00:17:50] Caley Fretz: That's what we're pushing from [00:17:51] Randall R. Jacobs: I've got another one for you. And, and this, this one I don't think you'll disagree with cuz we talked about sea otter hooks, bead hooks. So bead bead hooks on any real wheels that are marketed for use with road tubeless. [00:18:05] Caley Fretz: I, yeah. I, I don't feel like I am, I, I like having this conversation with James or Dave around because they know the actual technical reasons. You, yourself probably in the same boat. You know, the actual tech technical reasons why this is, this is a, a terrible idea or a good idea, I guess if, if you're talking other direction. I just know that as a, essentially, like I am kind of just a consumer these days, right? Like I said, I, I, I have not been a tech editor. It has not been my job to follow. Bicycle technology for close to a decade now. So I'm basically just a, a, a heavily invested consumer who pays, you know, quite close attention, right? And as a heavily invested consumer, I cannot figure out if my wheels and tires are going to kill me at the moment. And I think that that is not really an acceptable way forward. I don't , I don't think that that should be allowed in the cycling space. And I, and I, every single time I say that, I get a bunch of hook list aficionados coming back at me saying that, oh, it's quite easy. This works with this and this. I'm like, yeah, but I, I, as a person who does not want to go through a bunch of like charts to figure out what tire to run, I don't want that. Just put hooks back on my rims. I don't care about the 40 grams or whatever. It's, I just don't care. [00:19:14] Randall R. Jacobs: Well, would you like some more ammo for those arguments when they come up? [00:19:17] Caley Fretz: give me more. Am. [00:19:18] Randall R. Jacobs: All right. So, so first off the, it used to be the case that it was a substantial, you know, a reasonable weight penalty and higher cost that is substantially mitigated by new forming techniques for the bead hooks and mini hooks that you can create that have the same impact resistance as hook list, add about five, maybe 10 grams per rim at the high end. And cost, yeah, the cost is a little bit higher, but, you know, insurance premiums aren't cheap either. And if you have a single incident, that's gonna be a problem. So, you know, it was an obvious investment when we made that choice for any wheel that we're marketing for use with anything, say smaller than a 34. Plus you get the compatibility with non tules as you well know. But the other part is you think about the fact that there are compatibility charts that exist, right? [00:20:05] Caley Fretz: I don't want [00:20:06] Randall R. Jacobs: that [00:20:06] Caley Fretz: in charts. [00:20:08] Randall R. Jacobs: yeah. It, it's like if that is the case, then maybe the tolerances are too tight and it, it's actually, I'll tell you from the inside, it, it's actually worse than that because any good company is going to check every single rim for its bead seat circumference, right? So those are pretty easy to get within spec. And then the tires, the tires are not all checked. To my knowledge. They're kind of randomly checked. So, okay, now you, now you could have a variation. You only need one. That's not to tolerance, but let's say both of those are in are intolerance. Well, now you have the. and if the tape is too thick or too thin, or someone puts two layers on, they replace the tape or whatever. Maybe it was intolerance initially, but, and then you change it and you know, you do two layers. Now the bead is too tight, it wants to drop into the channel and then pop over the edge of the, of the hook. And so it's just not good. It's just all sorts of not good [00:21:03] Caley Fretz: I hate it so much. It's just, yeah. Yeah. I mean, I, I, I always, I was cognizant when, back in, when we were making the Nerd Alert podcast that, you know, we didn't just want to complain about things. Right? Like, we didn't just want to tell the industry that it was, it was doing things wrong. Cuz most of the time this industry does great things and they build lots of amazing bikes that I love to ride. There's just a couple things like this that are like, what, what are we doing? Like, is, is this, is this the beam counters? Is it the gram counters? What counters are, are causing ? This particular, it must be the bean counters at this point. But I hate it either [00:21:42] Randall R. Jacobs: Bean counter. And then, then also the, the marketing hypers. Right? So there's a new thing. Hopeless is a new thing. Car, car wheels don't have hooks. Why do bicycle school wheels have hooks? Well, you know, because it's 110 p s i that people are sometimes putting in there. That's why [00:21:57] Caley Fretz: car wheels have 33 Psi . Yeah. It's like a mountain bike tire. Yes. Well, I, we agree on that point. And I, I think that that is one that we will continue to complain about. And I will just continue to be annoyed that I, that I can't feel confident in what I'm writing without doing a bunch of, of searching and Google searching, and I don't want to have to do that. [00:22:15] Randall R. Jacobs: Nor should your average rider need to rely on that in order to be safe like that. That's the part that I find kind of, kind of bonkers. [00:22:23] Caley Fretz: Average rider doesn't even know to do that. That's the problem. [00:22:26] Randall R. Jacobs: yeah. True. And the la the last part of that is why do the tire pressure recommendation charts kind of go to 70 proportional with the weight and then they just kind of taper off. You know, that that also kind of tells you something about the confidence in this you know, particular combination of tire and rim and, and pressure and so on. But all right. Should we, well, I guess we hop off this high horse then. That was good fun. I could do this all day. So you mentioned Ben Delaney, and he's an interesting person to bring up because he's a, a mutual acquaintance. Also somebody who's writing, I've been reading since my early days in the industry and also somebody who has been trying to figure out how to navigate the changing landscape in cycling media, which the business model for, for media in general has undergone a dramatic shift. And in his case, he's has his new YouTube channel and is doing freelance work for certain publications and is making a go of it that way. But how would you describe the industry dynamics as having changed during your time in the media side? [00:23:29] Caley Fretz: Oh, I mean, I would say I was relatively insulated from it personally for a long time. And until I kind of reached a, a, a level of management, so to speak, that it became my problem , I didn't spend a whole lot of time thinking about it. Yeah, Ben was unfortunately the, the, the, the victim of a, an outside layoff a, a while ago. So he's been making a solo go of it since I think May or June of, of, of last year. Or this year, 2022. And yeah, like his, his he's experimenting and, and it's, it's good to, I like watching him trying to figure this out, right, because I feel like he's kind of doing it for all of us at the moment and, and trying to figure out exactly, you know, various ways to, to make this thing work and. He is, got his, his YouTube channel's. Great. I mean, I watch it all the time. I'm actually gonna be on it sometime soon. I just, just recorded a thing with him picking our favorite products of the year. I think I went in a slight, I think I went in a slightly different direction than, than probably most of his guests. Cause my favorite product was bar Mitz for my cargo bike. So slightly different place than, than probably a lot of folks he's talking to. But the, the media as a whole, I mean, it's rough out there. It's rough out there, right? Like I have spent an inordinate amount of time thinking about this and trying to figure this out over the last couple years as has like weighed my former boss at C T E before he left over the summer. As is everybody, I mean, frankly, like as is Robin Thurston the CEO of outside, right? Like he is genuinely trying to make this thing work. And at the moment as layoffs kind of. It's hard, right? It's really, really hard to, to get people to pay for something that they haven't had to pay for historically, you're, you're trying to put the genie back in the bottle, right? That's what we are trying to do. And it's really, really, really difficult. And then, frankly, it's one of the things we were most proud of at Cycline Tips is that we did have this core, hyper engaged audience that was willing to pay us for, for what we did. And not only just pay us for like, the content that they had access to, but pay us for the whole community that we had built. Right. I mean there, there's a, there's a Velo Club, which is the, the sort of membership program. Atip, there's a Slack group for Velo Club which I, which I'm concerned about right now. But that group of people, couple thousand people not, it's not the entirety of the membership. It's, it's like sort of the most hardcore of the membership, I would say. And it's a couple thousand people. It's sort of like its own little private forum, right? And, and they support each other and they ask each other questions, and they ask us questions asked, past tense, asked us questions. You know, when, when, when they had a tech question, they, they, they ping James and they had a racing question. They, they would, they would ping me or they would ping Matt e or something like that. And they would also just answer each other's questions. And they've built this, this incredible community there. That for me, underpins any successful, particularly sort of niche media or, or, or, or vertical media business. Because those are the people that not only are they giving you money to, to keep lights on, but they're, they're your, they're your biggest advocates, right? They're your, your most important advocates in the space. They're the people that, that tell their friends. They're the people that get other people signed up. They are, they're more important than any marketing spend you could, you could ever possibly utilize. Right? So that, that was one of the things we were really proud of the last couple years. And I think that that is a model in some ways for, for, for going forward. So, you know, like I said, I'm, I don't have a non-compete. I can start anything I want right now and, and I, and to be, to be very blunt, like I fully plan to I think that, [00:26:54] Randall R. Jacobs: think you absolutely should at this. You clearly have an audience that that misses your voice and that values what you brought to the table. [00:27:00] Caley Fretz: Yeah. And, and I would say it like, honestly, it's, it's even, it's less my voice and it's more like Dave Rome and Matt and like the rest of the crew because I, I, I do like to put, you know, put the folks that that were writing day, day in, day out for ct, like, well ahead of anything that I was doing. But I, I did spend more time than they did thinking about how to, how to build a media business. And so, yeah, I, you know, we wanna, we wanna, we wanna do something here. That there's it's only been a couple weeks since we were, we were. Let go. So we're still figuring out what the details are. But like I said, you know, we've already kicked off a little podcast. We know that there's a lot of people out there that are kind of waiting for this. And we will, we will just try to give them what they want, I guess. I mean, my, in my mind, the, ideal sort of media entity of the future and I, I've used this term a couple times with, with Dave in, in talking about these things is, is essentially an aggregation of niches or niches if, depending on which pronunciation you prefer. So rather than try to go really broad and talk about a little bit of everything, which, which tends to be kind of the model across most of cycling media, I prefer a concept where you, you essentially allow editors to. To dive into their, their interests and their strengths. Right? You know, you take, you take Dave Rome and you say, Dave, you love tools. You're real weirdo about it. But we appreciate your weirdness and we, we, we embrace it and, and do it. Like, tell me everything you can possibly tell me about tools, because I'm pretty sure there's an audience there. And even if it's not that big, even if it's a couple thousand people, if they are hyper engaged with you, a couple thousand people in a recurring membership model, recurring revenue model is enough to pay Dave plus some, right? And then you sort of, you take that concept and you, and you expand it out. And yeah, it's, it's, it becomes the basis by which you can build a, a, a media entity. That I think is, is sustainable. Not none, nothing I'm saying here is wholly original, right? Like this is the broadly the direction that a lot of different media entities are going. Anybody sort of follows that world. There's, there's like, there's a new politics site called S four that is essentially the same rough concept, right? You, you dive headlong into, into particular beats. You provide a ton of depth in those beats. You hit the, the audience, people who, who really care about that particular topic, and you pull that group in and then you do the same thing over here and you pull that group in, you do the same thing over here, and you pull that group in. And there's for sure people that care about more than one obviously. But you really, like, you focus really deep on each one of these things. And that's the, that's the, if I could build something and, and I, you know, like I said, I, I intend to try, that's the concept. I think that that makes the most sense to me from a. from a business perspective, from an editorial perspective, from from every perspective I can, I can think of, basically. [00:29:59] Randall R. Jacobs: Yeah, so I've had folks like Russ Roca from PathLessPedaled. On the pod. He has a YouTube channel you may or may not be familiar with, but that's become his livelihood, right. And he has sustainers through Patreon. He doesn't do endorsements and things like that. I don't think he's doing any sort of sponsored episodes or anything of that sort. And he's been able to make a living. And there are obviously plenty of YouTuber influencer types who may have less scruples about promoting things and things of that sort. But who I'm curious, either within bike or, or outside a bike what projects do you see succeeding in the model that you could imagine emulating or building upon? Because I've seen a bunch of attempts at it and it's, it's a really tough nut to [00:30:43] Caley Fretz: it's a tough not to crack. I, I would say that the biggest and most obvious is the athletic, which was just purchased by the New York Times for something like, I think it was 425 million. Now, so the sort of caveat around that is that that's probably less than they were actually hoping for. This is a, a VC funded media entity that, that primarily covers ball sports. And their whole thing was you take, you, you, you essentially apply the beat reporter model of like a local newspaper. You know, you, you, the, the, the Denver Post for example, will have a Broncos beat reporter. Then all they do is talk about the Broncos, right? And, and they're even allowed to kind of be fans of the Broncos a little bit. They take that and they apply it to every single ball sport. So both types of football, you know, baseball, basketball, all the rest. And they apply a beat reporter to every major team. And sometimes more than one beat reporter to, to really big teams. You know, like if we're talking English, English Premier League you know, Manchester United has a couple different writers on it. Aston Villa has probably won, right? So, but, but, but even so, if you're a massive Aston Villa fan and you just want your Aston Villa News, you can go, you know that the athletics gonna have it cuz they have a person who is dedicated to your team and nothing else but your team. So you can also get like, okay, well I want some broader, I want World Cup news, I want, I want the Manchester United news. I want the Ronaldo news, but I really want my Aston Villa guy, right. That is essentially the same model that I'm talking about where like, I believe that people really want Dave Rome's tool. They probably also care about lots of other things that, that we will write about. But they really want Dave room's tool stuff. And that's probably the thing that's actually gonna get them across the line from a, from a membership perspective, right? Is that deep, deep, deep love of this one thing that a content creator they like is talking about. That's the kind of thing that, that, that moves the needle in. So yeah, the athletic is, is kind of the biggest, most obvious example of this kind of working. They made I think some strategic areas early on in the way that they pulled staff together that made it quite an expensive organization to run. And I think that's part, probably part of the reason why they didn't get quite as much cash for it as they thought. But still building a media a media entity from nothing in the last, I think it started five years ago or so. I remember sitting at a Tor de France press buffet with some of the. The British. So at the time it was, you know, sky Era. A lot of big name British sport writers, sports writers were coming over the tour, and a couple of those guys were talking about job offers from the athletic and actually like how insanely well paid they were going to be So I think [00:33:13] Randall R. Jacobs: And the, these are full, full-time positions. We're not [00:33:15] Caley Fretz: oh, yeah, yeah. [00:33:16] Randall R. Jacobs: Just shifting everything to freelance. Like so [00:33:18] Caley Fretz: No, no, no. These are, yeah, [00:33:20] Randall R. Jacobs: models Do. [00:33:21] Caley Fretz: no, I mean, I don't, I mean, perhaps they're contractors or something, but like, you know, the, the, these individuals are writing a, a story a day most of the time about the particular beat that they're talking about. A story every other day, depending on the, on the, on the writer probably. But anyway, yeah, about about five years ago. So you see, you know, you've got a media entity that's only about five years old and just sold to the New York Times for half a million or whatever it was, or sorry, half a billion. [00:33:43] Randall R. Jacobs: Yeah. [00:33:43] Caley Fretz: a pretty, that's a success story in my mind. And shows that the. The model can work, I think. There's no guarantees and that's a scale that I don't really have any need, want, or desire to come anywhere near. But I do think that the core essentially value proposition of membership that they, that they showed worked, can work elsewhere. It can work in cycling, can work across endurance media, I think. [00:34:12] Randall R. Jacobs: Well, and again, with my kind of very cursory understanding of the space, they were required by the New York Times, which itself went through its own economic model crisis and had to make the switch to a paywall. And the quality of the content was sufficient that they're, they're making such large acquisitions, so they must be doing something right. They're, they're not the failing New York Times. As some folks called them a few years ago. I think there's also something to be said for consolidating quality and having the interaction of the sort that you did at at cycling tips, not just through Velo Club but also just the comments section. It, it was a very unique space and your team was in there. Interacting and the, the nature of the communication that I saw, the way that your readers were engaging there, it didn't seem hierarchical at all. It was a conversation with, with you and your team and that that was very, very cool to see. And that was something quite special that I think is more a consequence of the people involved than of the particular platform as special as cycling tips was. And I was one of the early readers that was, those are my racing days when it was literally just the blog and it was pointers on how to train. It was the cool thing at the time. And. Actual cycling tips. Yeah. That name was, was a direct, directly correlated with the contents. But I don't know if I've shared this with you, but in addition to the podcast, which is founded by Craig Dalton we also started this Slack community called the Ridership, which also is bit over a couple thousand members, and also has these like healthy dynamics. We call it a, a community of Rogers Helping Riders. And that was directly inspired by what you guys do at Velo. like saw what you were doing over there was just something that wanted to emulate, found inspiring saw a place for. And I'd be curious one of the things that Craig and I have talked about, is some form of shared platform that's somehow democratically governed. Where content creators and those who are engaging with their content who wanna support them and so on, can all meet and having that be something centralized in the sense that it's all meeting in the same place, but decentralized in terms of the governance structure, and then maybe even set up as a non-profit. I'm curious if you've had any thoughts around that sort of thing. [00:36:35] Caley Fretz: Yeah, I've actually sort of played around with similar ideas. We, yeah. In this, well, and again, in the sort of couple weeks that I've been thinking about, really thinking about this now we thought through, so, so ironically, one of the things that. There's been a fair number of complaints around with outside was was essentially like web three and, and NFT stuff. However some of that technology would actually make something like what you're talking about potentially work quite a bit better. Again, I haven't spent, we, we didn't go too far down this, this, this rabbit hole cause we feel like getting something off the ground relatively quickly is, is, is a priority. But I agree that, that something platforms work, right? Like that's essentially, that, that's all YouTube is, is just a platform for other people to, to, to put content on. They monetize it over top. They give you a cut, they take most of it. That's a, it's a pretty good business actually. So like could you do that for endurance sports, perhaps? Probably. Are there enough? Are there enough really high quality individual content creators out there to make that work? Probably, maybe like, are, are there enough Ben Delaney's, who would love to probably work with a platform that, that increased their visibility? But, you know, in, in exchange for a cut of whatever he's making, probably. I mean, that's essentially the, the deal that he's made with YouTube, right? Like we were saying. I think there's something there. I don't, I think it'd, I think it'd be incredibly difficult to, to get off the ground and would almost have to be quite organic and you'd have to be kind of willing to, to sit on it and let it grow for quite some time or, or sit on a bunch of investment money and, and do it that way. Which I don't necessarily have the time for at this point in time, but I like the idea. I really, I like, I genuinely, you know, I've, I've had a lot of conversations with other people in, in bike media over the last couple weeks because for obvious reasons, people giving me a ring. They're saying a lot of 'em are saying basically like, Hey, I'm sorry just checking in on you. Stuff like that. And we, and we get to talking about this sort of thing. And one of the things that keeps coming up is this desire to stop competing so directly with each other as bike media, right? Like the space is too small. We all do our own thing. We talk to maybe the same audience in general, but we talk to them in very different ways. And you know, like I I I, I, I've been on the phone with editor in chiefs of, of, of a couple different major bike outlets in the last week and all have said something along those lines. And I think that some sort of collective would, would hit the same. Yeah, it would hit, it would hit the same. there, right? Of a, of a desire to provide a space for everybody to just create really good work that they actually get paid for. Cuz that's the hard thing again, you're still talking about putting the genie back in the bottle. You're still talking about trying to get people to pay for, for something that they historically haven't paid for, or you're running an advertising based model, which is incredibly difficult. And in part, and this particular moment is very, very difficult. I mean, you know, Robin, the CEO of outside mentioned that specifically in the letter that came along with with these layoffs is like the advertising world out there right now, particularly in endemic media, like cycling is bad. It is bad news. You know, they're, they're looking into 2023 and seeing and seeing steep drop-offs in the amount that that is being spent. So you've run up against kind of similar problems, I think with that model. But it is certainly something that is The incentives to me feel like they're lined up for creators in a, in a model like that, right? Because they, if done right, they would directly benefit from their, their work. Whereas, you know, something that's always kind of frustrated me in this space is like, the value of myself and, and, and editorial teams have increased the value of entities tremendously o over my career. And then they get sold and I see none of it And so like that, that the incentive, [00:40:24] Randall R. Jacobs: and [00:40:25] Caley Fretz: structure is not, is not great within most of bike media [00:40:29] Randall R. Jacobs: Yeah. It's bad enough in the tech space where there are stock options, but generally to the founder goes most of the spoils. Even though and I say this as a founder, I don't create most of the value, right? Nothing that, that I could do would get off the ground without all the other people who make it happen. And so, it's only right that there be a distribution of ownership and a sharing of the rewards if there's success, which in turn incentivizes success. In the case of cycling tips, in reading the comments it's very clear that the readership knows it. They're not there for cycling tips. Cycling tips is the bander under which all the people whose perspectives they valued. It's where those people are. And so, your standalone brand and that of your colleagues, has value and has value in particular, if it's brought in a single place where people can interact with you as, as they had in the past it's a terrible thing to lose. And you know, whatever the reasons for it, obviously there are economic headwinds. But it's, it's unfortunate. But there's a saying that I, I live by that seems to apply, which is change happens when the fear of change is less than the pain of staying the same. [00:41:36] Caley Fretz: Hmm. [00:41:37] Randall R. Jacobs: And there's nothing quite like a radically changing economic model or layoffs or things like that that make staying the same, really painful. And so whether the fear has changed or not, time to take the leap and people like yourself and Ben and others have been making that leap. I wonder you mentioned that some sort of platform would have to. Either be funded by a bunch of VC money, which honestly I don't, if you wanna end up with a small fortune, start with a big one. Throwing VC money at things is a really good way to end up with Juicero. I don't know if you recall that [00:42:10] Caley Fretz: Oh, yes. [00:42:11] Randall R. Jacobs: 130 or 160 million of Sandhill Road money lit on fire for a a glorified electric press for If anyone's curious, look this up. It is. It'll, it'll make you feel that yeah, it, it'll make you question the judgment of, of Silicon Valley in a way that I have learned too from the inside over the years. But the organic piece let's, let's unpack that cuz I, I have a couple of ideas that I'd like to bounce off of you. So platforms like YouTube, I suspect it's gonna be very hard for somebody who has an audience on YouTube or who wants to build an audience to leave YouTube. But having a platform that is essentially an a. So if you're a content creator, wherever your content is, this is the one place where you can find all of it along with, categorized content from other players. So you want to learn about tools you have, Dave Romes YouTube videos about tools. You have his podcast about tools. You have other content creators content there. And then it becomes kind of platform agnostic like you can be anywhere, but this is the place where you go to find it. And this is the place where you go to interact. Cuz the YouTube comments, that's not an interaction space that's largely a trolling space or, or it's a largely one directional sorts of conversation happening. Even, even the healthiest version of it is still not a conversation. But if you have a YouTube video embedded in a a community, [00:43:27] Caley Fretz: Mm-hmm. [00:43:28] Randall R. Jacobs: Now all of a sudden people are in digital community together and not just over say Dave and his tool-based content or his tool focused content. Not to say that's all he does, but using that as an example, but also Dave in community, in his local chapter, right. In his local riding community. And in the context of a place where people are also going for, James' bike reviews and you know, your Twitter de France coverage and, and things like this that's one model that I've wondered, like if there was such a platform. [00:43:59] Caley Fretz: how, how, how do you monetize it? Is it, is it pay? Walled, [00:44:03] Randall R. Jacobs: That's a big question, right? [00:44:04] Caley Fretz: Well, so, so, the reason I ask is because I, I, like, I would see a couple different options, right? And, and we're getting into real sort of media theory here, but , [00:44:11] Randall R. Jacobs: This, this was actually part of the conversation I wanted to have with you long before all these changes. And it's something we've discussed on the pod before as well with other content creators. [00:44:19] Caley Fretz: I, I think So I, I'll say that first and foremost that I'm, I'm not anti paywall. I know some of the, some others are in, in the media space, but I fundamentally believe that if done properly you're essentially only targeting. So, so, so I'm, I'm a big advocate of what, what we call meter paywall, which is basically you get a couple free stories in a given amount of time whatever the number is, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, whatever you want. And then at some point you, you pay right? Now, the nice thing about that is that you know, if we, if we take a, let's take a hypothetical cycling media outlet with somewhere in, you know, we, we'll call it, we'll call it 2 million unique users a month, right? You've got 2 million people showing up at a website every month. The number of people who are actually gonna get to the paywall that are gonna go to enough stories to get to that paywall is probably something in the neighborhood of like, Less than 5% of those people. It's a tiny, tiny, tiny number because a huge number of those people are coming in from Google. They're, they're, they're seo, they're coming into SEO stories, they're coming into, you know, how to bet in my disc brakes. And they're, they're in and they find out how to do that and they're out. Right? And that's the only interaction you have with them. And they're useful from a page view perspective if you're monetizing that. But they're not particularly useful from a membership perspective cuz who's gonna pay to get one story, right. That, that's, that doesn't make any sense. So you're really only trying to monetize your super users. So your super users are that 5%, the people that actually end up hitting paywall. And part of the reason why I'm not anti paywall is because those people that, that, that small group of people that is coming back day after day after day after day, they value you. And if they truly value you, they should pay for you. , like, I don't have any problem with, you know, we put a ton of time and energy and effort into this and it is our jobs. And we need to get paid. And if people, if people appreciate what we're doing enough to come back every single day and they're not willing to pay for that, then as far as I'm concerned, they need to look at themselves and, and, and ask why. Right? Like, all I'm asking for is, is, you know, eight bucks a month or whatever to continue doing so that, so that you can do something that you do every single day that you enjoy, that you, that you gain information and entertainment from inspiration from even. I think that that's a pretty reasonable trade off. I don't really have any problem asking the super user to do that. I think that there are other paywall versions of a paywall that, that I, that I don't agree with, sort of philosophically, I don't agree with paywall in a hundred percent of content. I also think that that just ruins your discoverability and it, it, it doesn't allow anybody [00:46:49] Randall R. Jacobs: was, I was gonna say, is [00:46:50] Caley Fretz: Yeah. Then nobody, [00:46:53] Randall R. Jacobs: thing or is it more just practically like, you're, you're gonna cut off all the channels for discovery? [00:46:58] Caley Fretz: Both. Yeah. I, I, it, it realistically, yeah. Like I said, your discoverability goes to zero. People can't tell that you make good content. I have kind of a similar issue with the, the like premium content model. So you, you know, you give away your, your crappy stuff for free and the really good stuff you gotta pay for, like, I don't like that either. Cause why then anybody's strolling around your website, it's gonna be like, well, it's the only thing is I can read are crap. So why would I pay for the, i, I don't know that [00:47:23] Randall R. Jacobs: poor, it's a poor pitch. [00:47:24] Caley Fretz: It's a bad pitch. So, so I have issues with that. I also just like philosophically, you know, the, the sort of fully hard pay wall that you can't read anything without paying beyond the discovery of discoverability problems. I just kinda have issues with that because like if we do write a, how to bet in your disc brake so they don't make noise story. Like, I want people to be able to access that, right? Like, then I don't have to listen up. people's loud disc breaks. You know, like people, I, I have no problem sort of providing that much content to somebody for free. And I think that the fully pay well in that is, is, is isn't great. But again, I I'm not against paywalls in general. Meter paywalls I think work quite well. They yeah, we know that they're effective. They can be incredibly effective, particularly if you have this sort of requisite essentially story volume to make them work and, and sort of audience size to make them work. So given that like the, the sort of concept that you are talking about, paywall seems like a, like a, a, a good way forward because again, you're sort of avoiding the avoiding the need to, to chase advertising dollars constantly. And this is, this is gonna be somewhat a reflection of what I'm thinking for, for. For myself going forward, obviously you're avoiding, you're, you're avoiding chasing advertising dollars incessantly, which, you know, I'm not against advertising either. I think the right advertising partners can be, can be crucial, right? They provide lots of actually value to an audience at some point, right. You know, the fact that you get bikes to test the fact that you have a good relationship there. Those, those are all valuable things. So not, not anti advertising either. I'm just more anti, constantly chasing every single cent you can possibly get out of advertising. And the, and the sort of the, the, the extra resource that, that very concept requires. And so yeah, some sort of like membership driven thing lines up with the sort of ethos of what you're talking about, which is very community driven. We know communities are willing to invest in their own space where they can be a community. And so that would make sense as well. And if you start to do things like add too much advertising to something like that, then you do the incentives start to shift. Cuz you start working for the advertisers instead of working for the community. And that I think goes against the whole ethos that you're talking about of the sort of communal thing. So that would be my, that would be my 2 cents on, on, on how to build something like that. Like I said, it is a concept that, that we played around with and I've played around with in my head for, for some time actually. I personally, again, it's more of a, more of a time issue for me than anything. Not that I don't think it could be cool and don't think it could work. I just think that the, to build that community would take quite a bit of time. And also figuring out the precise method of paying. So the other roadblock that I, that I came across when I was thinking through this was the precise method of paying content creators in that scenario, it's quite complicated. Cause are you paying them? Are you paying them by page view? Are you paying them? Is there a tip jar? Is there some sort of, of, you know, rank voting system when people sign up, like, I like these three creators and I don't like these three, and so the top three get, get my money. And the, and the other three don't. That starts to create some perverse incentives toward bad content as well, right? And, and essentially that's the, that is the YouTube problem. The YouTube problem is that YouTube is incentivized for clickbait. It's incentivized for garbage content, , because that's, that's the stuff that gets picked up. And think about, think about your average, like YouTube headline or YouTube sort of, title card. Versus what you would find on a, a site like cycling tips these days. Right. It's a dramatic difference. Like we, we would have to change headlines depending on whether it was going on YouTube or going on on the site back in the day. Cuz YouTube is incentivized to be like all caps and exclamation points and somebody crashing in the title card and all these things that we kind of hate because that's what you end [00:51:25] Randall R. Jacobs: Kaylee, Fritz destroys X, Y, [00:51:27] Caley Fretz: Exactly. So after the monetization question, how do you actually split up that money with the content creators? It's a, it's a, again, I like, I love the, the idea, I love the concept, but the sort of those particular decisions. Be crucial to success and crucial to it actually working for the people that, that you, that you know, that you want, want, would want it to work for. And it'd be hard. It'd be really hard. I I don't have the solution to those questions, which is why I, again, thought through a lot of this and, and thought through a similar concept, not, not identical but a similar concept and, and basically came to the conclusion that in the near term, a a slightly more traditional model is not the worst thing in the world, right? Like, build really good content, pay people for it make people pay for it. , that's essentially the, that's the, the, the three part business plan of most membership driven media entities these days. Does that all make sense? I feel like I went in a bit of rant there. [00:52:31] Randall R. Jacobs: Not at all. Not at all. And in fact, it's a conversation I'd like to continue cuz I have a few ideas that probably we, we don't want to dedicate a whole episode to just this conversation. But certainly appreciate you pulling back a curtain on the sorts of questions that you as an editor in the space and an editor for one of the most respected publications in the space and for good reason, providing that perspective in the sorts of things that you are thinking about from this new Vantage point is very much appreciative. So thank you for that. I wanna go in a completely different direction. What are the pieces that you've written that you most enjoyed or found most challenging, or that were most meaningful for you as a writer? [00:53:08] Caley Fretz: Hmm. Internally at cycling tips. We called them riddles. It was a, it was a coin, a term that I intro coined for his little, the little essays. Right. There's a couple of those that I, that I really enjoyed writing and, and liked writing. It's just sort of the pure act of, of, of sort of language, basically like playing with language. Which is still fundamentally like why I started doing this to begin with is cause I really enjoyed doing that. And the last couple years have stepped away from writing almost entirely. Not entirely, but almost entirely. And, and so when I did get a chance to write, it was always, it was always meaningful and I, and I liked it. That tended to be at things like the Tor de Frances where, you know, I would essentially send to myself cuz I, I wanted to go cover the to Frances again. I had plenty, plenty, plenty of, plenty of talented, talented writers that, that reporters that could have gone instead of me. But at some point you pull the boss card and I'm like, I'm gonna the tour So, so yeah, there's a couple pieces on that front. Actually one of the first pieces I ever wrote for segment tips it's, it was called The Road to Niro's House. And it was about a trip that my wife and I and two friends took to Columbia. And it, it, like half the photos are broken on it now. It's, it's, it's from like 2017 like 6,500 words of a trip around Columbia and all the sort of things that, that riding in Columbia. Particularly in 2017 meant sort of keeping in mind that that, you know, a relatively large and disastrous war there only kind of wrapped up around the 2010 mark depending on who you ask . So I, I, I really enjoyed that piece. And then, yeah, like these, these little riddles, you know, there's a couple that I've written over my career that I that you tend to write them in 20 minutes, right? Because something just hits you in the head and, and you just, I mean, you just get it out, but it, because of that, it's, they're very pure. I think. I wrote one about the toe strap that my dad would use to attach a sock full of Tube tire, co2, you know, flat fixing implements underneath his saddle. Right? And he would, he would strap this thing underneath his saddle with a, with a strap, like a tube sock underneath his saddle with a, with a, with a tow strap, like a leather tow strap. And, and I, and I wrote this story about how, like, you know, I just remember when I was 12, 13 years old. And you know, my dad is obviously a much stronger cycl cyclist than me at that point. And just like, you know, trying to stay on his wheel with this like, toe strap dangling in front of me as like the, you know, I'm just, I'm just, I just need to stay on the tow strap. Wrote a piece about that at some point that I, that I ended up, I, I really liked. And it was meaningful to me because of my, my relationship with my dad is like very tied into my relationship with cycling because we grew up doing it together and, and still ride together when we can and things like that. There was one about eating Castle and Carcassone during a rest day, Tor de France that I liked. Again, these, you know, [00:55:59] Randall R. Jacobs: Castle in Per, [00:56:01] Caley Fretz: Castle is is like a, [00:56:03] Randall R. Jacobs: I'm, I'm, I'm not so [00:56:04] Caley Fretz: is like, is like a meat, like a meaty stew thing you know, white beans and, and, and some, some meat. And Carcassone is a town in southern France with a big kind of world heritage site castle over top of it. And it's always hot as hell there. They often have restage there at the torque. It's always hot as hell. And I have yet to find a hotel or an Airbnb there that has air conditioning. So you're always just like baking, you know, second rest day of the Tor De France. You know, I, I think I was sitting in a cafe. And I had a couple roses like you do and, and eating a castle, which is also hot. So I'm like, I'm hot eating a hot castle and just watching the world kind of go by like the sort of Tor de France rest day world go going by and, you know, like Greg Van Ama coming up and, and stopping at a red light. I'm this, I've wrote the story a while ago and I'm trying to remember what I even talked about. You kn

Chasing Edges
Brian MacKenzie | Human Performance Coach/Author: PSYCHOLOGY IS UNRESOLVED PHYSIOLOGY, BREATH WORK & PRO SPORTS, STRESS & ANXIETY, THE CASE TO EXPERIENCE LIFE, IDENTITY & CHANGE, THE VALUE OF TIME.

Chasing Edges

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 101:29


Brian MacKenzie is the Founder & Creative Director of SHIFT, Co-Founder and President of The Health and Human Performance Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to researching how breath and innate tools can optimize and help health and human performance. He is also the co-founder of The Art of Breath, a division of SHIFT that teaches a principles-based approach to breath & performance. Brian has also co-authored the book Power Speed Endurance, The New York Times Best Seller UnBreakable Runner, and UnPlugged, which assesses the integration of emergent technology and human performance. He has voluntarily integrated and run his program at San Quentin State Prison with tremendous success. His programs have been featured in Outside Magazine, Men's Health, Runners World, Triathlete Magazine, Men's Journal, and periodicals such as The Economist. Brian and his protocols have been featured in 2 of Timothy Ferriss' New York Times bestselling books, including: “The 4-Hour Body” and “Tools of Titans” and Scott Carney's New York Times best-seller “What Doesn't Kill Us.” Brian is himself a highly accomplished practitioner. He completed the Ironman (Canada, 2004) and completed the Western States 100-mile and The Angeles Crest 100-mile runs using adapted training protocols he developed to improve performance.Brian on IG : @_brianmackenzie &  @shift_adapt & @hhpfoundationBrian on TwitterL @brianmackenzieCompany Website: shiftadapt.com. Personal Website: Brianmackenzie.com 

About That Outdoor Job
Entrepreneur and Founder of Alpine Parrot, Raquel Vélez

About That Outdoor Job

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 28:44


Welcome to ⟪About that outdoor job⟫ podcast where host Charlaine Jannerfeldt has conversations with those who've made the outdoors their living, so you can too. We'll share their insights, observations, tips and why not a few of their best adventure stories.In this episode she talks with with Raquel Vélez, outdoor apparel entrepreneur and founder of Alpine Parrot who was named one of Outside Magazine's Outsider of the Year 2021. Raquel shares how her love for the sport of skiing, which she only picked up in her late twenties, was the catalyst for her entrepreneurial journey into the world of outdoor apparel. Though she always knew she'd start her own company some day, doing so in the outdoor industry was not on her radar. Let alone the apparel industry. Raquel openly shared the challenges and difficulties she's face in a still "male and pale" sector but also what has made a difference in succeeding. Much of her great advice isn't only for the outdoor apparel industry but for anyone considering an entrepreneurial journey.⟪About that outdoor job⟫ podcast is hosted & produced by Charlaine JannerfeldtVisit Aboutthatoutdoorjob.com and follow us on InstagramYou can listen on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify and Google Podcasts.Music by Olexy from PixabayResourcesFeatures in this podcast: Raquel VélezInstagram: @alpineparrotWebsite: www.alpineparrot.comOur Audience Poll"Start With Why" by Simon SinekOutdoor Retailer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Inside with Brett Hawke
#290 Ryan Moss discusses surf photography, breaking back in Oahu

Inside with Brett Hawke

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 33:29 Very Popular


Ryan Moss is a charismatic award winning photographer and filmmaker with a one-track mind to inspire the world by sharing his passion and love of nature through the images he creates. Some of his clients include National Geographic, Red Bull, and Outside Magazine (just to name a few). A self-educated visual artist, he draws his inspiration from the ocean, mountains, people, and travel that play such an important role in his life. When he isn't traveling, he can be found in Hawaii, sipping an almond milk dark chocolate latte while scanning the horizons for his next adventure. Enjoy! 00:00 Bratter PA, Immigration Law 00:05 Hello Ryan Moss 00:35 AnyQuestion 02:30 Surfing 03:45 Shooting landscape 06:15 Growing up 07:50 How'd it start? 09:35 Aligning with surfers? 14:10 100K cameras? 16:30 Motion vs. Still 18:36 Beine Wellness 19:24 Swim Angelfish 20:00 Swim training for a photographer? 23:15 Coordinating with surfers 26:00 Breaking his back 32:45 SwimTraxx Our Sponsors: BRATTER PA IMMIGRATION LAW: Exclusive immigration representation of athletes, entrepreneurs, artists, investors, and entertainers. SWIM ANGELFISH: Receive the tools and skills needed to teach swimmers with autism, physical disabilities, anxiety, sensory and motor conditions with Swim Angelfish, the global leader in adaptive swim. Get certified online today! BEINE WELLNESS BUILDING: Individualize your nutrition with genetic testing and personalized plans. Eat, supplement, and recover based on your genetics. SWIMTRAXX: Swimtraxx One is the smartest swim specific tracker. Track your time, heart rate, and stroke rate all from the same device. INTL SWIMMING HALL OF FAME: Help preserve swimming history by joining the 1 in 1000 Club! VASA: Essential dryland for stronger, better, faster swimmers. Save 10% using the code "brett" at checkout! DESTRO SWIM TOWERS: Save $150 per double swim tower by using the code "brett" at checkout! SWIMNERD: Big and small digital pace clocks, virtual scoreboards, and live results. Subscribe to the Swimnerd Newsletter. #surfing #surfphotography #photography

The Emotional Eating (and Everything Else) Podcast
Real Talk About Intuitive Eating, with Christine Byrne

The Emotional Eating (and Everything Else) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 55:44


Giving up dieting is a scary process for people. Regardless of all of its numerous problems, dieting very often feels safe. You've done it before, you know what to expect. And when you're dieting, someone else is telling you what to do.  They're telling you what to eat, when to eat, how much to eat.  They're taking on all of the responsibility so you don't have to. And that feels fantastic!  We all have too much responsibility as it is--it's feels amazing to hand some of it over.   So when we think of no longer dieting, we get really nervous.  Which makes a lot of sense.  Thanks to diet culture, we've come to believe that we have no idea how to feed ourselves without following a "plan."  If left to our own devices, we'll just wander aimlessly around our kitchens having no idea what to do. But none of that is true.   We absolutely can learn how to eat in nourishing ways that don't involve dieting.  And we can do that with a principle of Intuitive Eating called Gentle Nutrition. Gentle Nutrition is the Tenth Principle of Intuitive Eating (IE).  Within that principle, the creators of IE talk about basic nutrition on which all of us can focus, if we choose.  It's NOT a diet, it's NOT restrictive, and it's NOT rigid (hence the word "gentle").  It's just an overall approach to nutrition.  And it's based on sound science. Now sure, Gentle Nutrition isn't going to just flat-out tell you what to eat.  It's more of a guideline than anything.  And sure, it takes some practice and some getting used to.  But it's doable.  And it's what we're talking about on this week's podcast. In this week's episode, I had the pleasure of interviewing Christine Byrne, MPH, RD, LDN.  Christine is an anti-diet dietitian and longtime journalist. She owns an eating disorder-focused private practice in Raleigh, North Carolina, and has written over a thousand articles for various media outlets, including Self Magazine, Food Network, Outside Magazine, and Bon Appetit. In both her writing and her nutrition counseling, she takes a weight-inclusive approach to health and encourages people to define wellness for themselves. Christine and I had a wonderful conversation that covered multiple topics related to Intuitive Eating, but we really focused on the concept of Gentle Nutrition.  And Christine made the point that ok, it's not easy, but it is doable.   Christine emphasized maintaining realistic expectations about gentle nutrition, which I really appreciate.  We both agree that IE can be presented as an easy-peasy process (it's not) that leaves people feeling like failures when it doesn't work.  She says: “The truth is that Intuitive Eating does get easier. It can really change your life in pretty profound ways but it takes time. It's not magic." In addition to Gentle Nutrition, Christine and I also talked about: Her career change from journalism to dietetics Her experience with her own eating disorder Staying in the grey area between diet and anti-diet culture The positive and negative impact of social media on our relationship with food I hope you enjoy this conversation as much as I did.  Christine's energy is really infectious, and she obviously loves what she does.  Take a listen! Where to find Christine: Instagram TikTok Website Blogger Christine mentioned: The Lazy Genius Where to find me: Website Instagram Facebook page TikTok

Better Known
Duncan Larkin

Better Known

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 28:40


Duncan Larkin discusses with Ivan six things which should be better known. Duncan Larkin has covered the sport of running for more than a decade. He's a certified Army Master Fitness Trainer and was a top-300 American marathoner back in 2006. He has won the Himalayan 100-Mile Stage Race and the Mohawk-Hudson Marathon. His first books include Run Simple and The Thirty-Minute Runner. Duncan writes about fitness for Outside Magazine, Competitor Magazine, Runner's World, ESPN, and Running Times. Find out more at https://roadsmillslaps.tumblr.com/ and at https://www.instagram.com/dunlar/. How the last-place finisher of the NYC Marathon feels in the last mile https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9YrlVSOB4-s Silas Soule and Mochi https://www.colorado.com/life-chronicles-sand-creek-massacre The concept of cognitive dissonance https://www.healthline.com/health/cognitive-dissonance-examples Time will Reveal by DeBarge https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_988-cpiG94 Keith Douglas' poem Vergissmeinnicht https://interestingliterature.com/2017/08/a-short-analysis-of-keith-douglass-vergissmeinnicht/ The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce https://www.nybooks.com/articles/2012/05/10/ambrose-bierce-one-americas-best/ This podcast is powered by ZenCast.fm

THE TRAVIS MACY SHOW
Ep. 89 Dr. Stacy T. Sims: NEXT LEVEL, ROAR, Menstrual Cycles, Lifting Heavy Shit, Why Women are Not Small Men–and Why Men Should Learn and Care About This Stuff

THE TRAVIS MACY SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 71:19


STACY T. SIMS, MSC, PHD, is a forward-thinking international exercise physiologist and nutrition scientist who aims to revolutionize exercise nutrition and performance for women.She has directed research programs at Stanford, AUT University, and the University of Waikato, focusing on female athlete health and performance and pushing the dogma to improve research on all women.With the unique opportunities, Silicon Valley has to offer, during her tenure at Stanford, she had the opportunity to translate earlier research into consumer products and a science-based layperson's book (ROAR) written to explain sex differences in training and nutrition across the lifespan. Both the consumer products and the book challenged the existing dogma for women in exercise, nutrition, and health. This paradigm shift is the focus of her famous "Women Are Not Small Men” TEDx talk.Her contributions to the international research environment and the sports nutrition industry has established a new niche in sports nutrition; and established her reputation as the expert in sex differences in training, nutrition, and health. As a direct result, she has been named:One of the top 50 visionaries of the running industry (2015) by DMSE Sports.One of the top 40 women changing the paradigm of her field (2017) by Outside Magazine. One of the top four visionaries in the outdoor sports industry (2017) by Outside Magazine - Genius Issue (no electronic version but here is the proof).One of the top four individuals changing the landscape in triathlon nutrition (2017) by Triathlete MagazineDr. Sims has published over 70 peer-reviewed papers, several books and is a regularly featured speaker at professional and academic conferences, including those by USOC and USA Cycling. Stacy currently holds a Senior Research Associate position with SPRINZ- AUT University, supervises PhD students, writes academic papers, and is on the advisory board of some cutting edge companies including Tonal Strength Institute, WILD.AI, and EXOS.  She also has her own business (www.drstacysims.com) where she creates and delivers online learning material focused on women training with their physiology across the lifespan. She currently resides at the beach in Mt. Maunganui, New Zealand with her husband and young daughter. Her latest book is NEXT LEVEL.Travis and guest host Becca Jay of the You are a Big Deal Podcast talk with Dr. Sims about why women are not small men, including: ROAR, NEXT LEVEL, what to talk about with our kids and students and when to do it, menstrual cycles, lifting heavy shit, and more.  Buckle up, folks, because this is an inspiring and educational discussion with a true leader in her field.

The Professional Failure Podcast
EP 67: Kerry Siggins | Lost Without Purpose to Top CEO, The Positives of An Overdose, Generational Work Ethic, Honest Communication, Authentically Coming Home, Telling Yourself Alternative Stories, and Unwavering Support of Your Spouse

The Professional Failure Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 39:12


Story of failure: Spraying my nephew in the face with an old can of silly string.Kerry Siggins is the CEO of StoneAge, Inc. a fast-growing manufacturing company based in Colorado. She was fortunate enough to be named a Top Influential CEO in 2021 and was a finalist for Colorado's CEO of the Year in 2017. StoneAge is recognized as a top 100 company to work for by Outside Magazine. Kerry sits on several boards and is a member of Young's President Organization (YPO). She delivers keynotes on how to create employee-centric cultures where it's safe to speak up and show up as your whole self. Kerry hosts several podcasts, including the wildly popular podcast Reflect Forward. She is an author, blogger, and contributor to Forbes, Entrepreneur, Authority Magazine, and BIC Magazine, and myblog is visited by thousands of readers each month.  Finally, but most importantly, I am the mother of an amazing kiddo named Jack, and the wife of Ryan Siggins, a serial entrepreneur whose latest adventure is SoCo Wood & Windows, a where we sell windows, doors, and high-end custom millworks.In today's episode Kerry talks about:growing up as a child and her dad leavinggetting attention through positive and negative waysdad telling her she wasn't smart enough to graduategetting a softball scholarshipbeing lost without purposeoverdosing after collegemom loving but being tough on herher mom being her biggest supporternot going to be that person with dad issuesfeeling unlovable and working through thatdoing everything with gustoa high functioning addictnot being able to go to work after the overdoesbelieving in yourself and reflecting on herselfbeing a driven human beingseeking attention through being the life of the partythe self-destructive personaher mom being the hardest working person she knowsinstilling work ethic in Kerryher mom being uncomfortable pushing backneeding more boundaries as a teenagerwhy coming home to her mom meant so muchhaving an authentic conversation with her momher mom giving her unconditional love“If I'm not failing, I'm not living.”not being scared of failing and putting herself out therestory of her marriage almost failing because of honesty“Everyday there's something you can better.”never having a problem expressing herselfthe consequences of hurting your spouse and not taking feedbacknot wanting a failed marriage like her parentswhat she learned working through her marital issuescracking open her marriage through honest communicationher son Jack and how he understands people as a 10-year oldadult conversations with her sonnot carrying other people's baggageher son Jack wanting to play professional baseballplaying softball and coaching her son's teamit's all about mindsettelling yourself alternative storiesforcing yourself to consider different possibilitiesworking through discouragement with exercisewriting her stories down“Just because you think it doesn't mean it's true.”there can be two truths at the same timechallenging herself with alternative storiesa million different ways things can play outhow do you be empathetic?setting a goal of creating a thousand millionaires, and reaching a billion in evaluationthe intimidation of big goalshaving to stay focused on the bigger picturehow do I get to my next double?chunking goals down to not being overwhelmingwanting to look back and be a good momwhy she wants to spend her time righthaving a husband entrepreneur and how to balanceconnecting every single day over making dinnercommunicating wins and challengesunwavering support of each otherher husband sacrificing for Kerry and believing in herhonoring and respecting each other through individual decisionsliving your life by design instead of just living$100,000 in credit card debt after overdosingsetting goals for yourself and designing your lifeone small step at a timewww.kerrysiggins.com Instagram - @kerry.sigginsLinkedIn - Kerry SigginsReflect Forward Podcast Reflect Forward Podcast - Justin Skinner www.stoneagetools.com

303Endurance Podcast
Eric Larsen Adventurer

303Endurance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 68:21


This week's guest interview is with Polar adventurer, expedition guide, dog musher and educator, Eric Larsen. Eric has spent the past 15 years of his life traveling in some of the most remote and wild places left on earth including Antarctica, the North Pole, Everest and the biggest challenge of them all - cancer.   Show Sponsor: UCAN Generation UCAN has a full line of nutrition products to fuel your sport. UCAN uses SuperStarch instead of simple sugars and stimulants to fuel athletes.  UCAN keeps blood sugar steady compared to the energy spikes and crashes of sugar-based products. UCAN also has hydration products focused on giving you the sodium you need when hydrating, including several clean and light flavors. Steady energy equals sustained performance and a faster finish line!   Use UCAN in your training and racing to fuel the healthy way, finish stronger and recover more quickly!  Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co   In Today's Show Feature Interview Eric Larsen Adventurer, Guide and Educator Endurance News Bermuda World Triathlon Series Race Results El Tour de Tucson, November 19 Ironman Arizona, November 20 What's new in the 303 Victoria Brumfield Now Chief Executive Officer of USA Triathlon You Get What You Give, Ask Primal Why Videos of the Week 2022 World Triathlon Championship Series Bermuda   Feature Interview: Eric Larsen Polar adventurer, expedition guide, dog musher and educator, Eric Larsen has spent the past 15 years of his life traveling in some of the most remote and wild places left on earth.   In 2006, Eric and Lonnie Dupre completed the first ever summer expedition to the North Pole. During this journey, the duo pulled and paddled specially modified canoes across 550 miles of shifting sea ice and open ocean.   Eric successfully led his first expedition to the South Pole in 2008, covering nearly 600 miles in 41 days. Eric is now one of only a few Americans in to have skied to both the North and South Poles.   In November 2009, Eric returned to Antarctica for the first leg of his world record Save the Poles expedition. This time he completed a 750-mile ski traverse to the geographic South arriving on January 2, 2010.   Two short months later he was dropped off at northern Ellesmere Island for a winter-style North Pole Journey. The international team reached the North Pole 51 days later on Earth Day - April 22, 2010.   He completed the Save the Poles expedition by reaching the summit of Mt. Everest on October 15th, 2010 becoming the first person in history to reach the world's three 'poles' within a 365-day period.   In March 2014, Eric Larsen and Ryan Waters set out to traverse nearly 500 miles across the melting Arctic Ocean, unsupported, from Northern Ellesmere Island to the geographic North Pole. Despite being one of the most cold and hostile environments on the planet, the Arctic Ocean has seen a steady and significant reduction of sea ice over the past seven years due to climate change. Because of this, Larsen's and Waters' trip—dubbed the "Last North Expedition"—is expected to be the last human-powered trek to the North Pole, ever. Eric Larsen (explorer) - Wikipedia Eric Larsen Explore   Kindred spirits indeed 3 day Gunnison Spring bar tent Camp stove Grew up in Wisconsin Read books about explorations; fascinated by Alaska Taught Environmental Education In January 2021, Eric was initially diagnosed with Stage 4 colorectal cancer, but upon further biopsies was categorized as Stage 3b. After a year of intensive chemotherapy, radiation and surgery, he is currently still in treatment. Cancer journey a lot like an explanation   News Sponsor Buddy Insurance: Buddy Insurance gives you peace of mind to enjoy your training and racing to the fullest. Buddy's mission is simple, to help people fearlessly enjoy an active and outdoor lifestyle.    Get on-demand accident insurance just in case the unexpected happens. Buddy ensures you have cash for bills fast.  Go to buddyinsurance.com and create an account.  There's no commitment or charge to create one.  Once you have an account created, it's a snap to open your phone and in a couple clicks have coverage for the day.  Check it out!   Endurance News: 2022 Bermuda World Triathlon Championship Series Flora out of the water second Raining on bike On the 3rd loop of bike joined by maya kingma Knibb was more than 40 back at the start of the bike but in 3rd place by t2 (45 seconds)   Vincent Luis led from swim to finish The front 7 gave an impressive t2 performance all coming it as a pack and dismounting in unison Blummenfelt and Yee were in a second pack   Results: Elite Women | 2022 World Triathlon Championship Series Bermuda • World Triathlon Pos First Name Last Name YOB Country Start Num Time Swim 1500m T1 Bike 40km T2 Run 10km 1 Flora Duffy 1987  BER 1 02:01:26 00:20:15 00:00:42 01:05:26 00:00:26 00:34:39 2 Taylor Knibb 1998  USA 7 02:03:04 00:20:46 00:00:47 01:05:32 00:00:32 00:35:28 3 Beth Potter 1991  GBR 2 02:03:17 00:20:47 00:00:42 01:06:45 00:00:24 00:34:41 4 Laura Lindemann 1996  GER 4 02:04:00 00:20:35 00:00:44 01:06:56 00:00:27 00:35:20 5 Taylor Spivey 1991  USA 3 02:04:05 00:20:42 00:00:44 01:06:47 00:00:26 00:35:27     Results: Elite Men | 2022 World Triathlon Championship Series Bermuda • World Triathlon Pos First Name Last Name YOB Country Start Num Time Swim 1500m T1 Bike 40km T2 Run 10km 1 Vincent Luis 1989  FRA 4 01:49:37 00:19:01 00:00:45 00:58:06 00:00:25 00:31:22 2 Antonio Serrat Seoane 1995  ESP 6 01:49:45 00:19:43 00:00:39 00:58:19 00:00:23 00:30:43 3 Roberto Sanchez Mantecon 1996  ESP 24 01:49:54 00:19:51 00:00:42 00:58:07 00:00:25 00:30:52 4 Jelle Geens 1993  BEL 1 01:49:59 00:19:49 00:00:41 00:58:05 00:00:21 00:31:06 5 Alex Yee 1998  GBR 2 01:50:04 00:19:40 00:00:38 00:58:21 00:00:26 00:31:01 6 Kristian Blummenfelt 1994  NOR 51 01:50:06 00:19:37 00:00:43 00:58:14 00:00:24 00:31:10   Tucson Bikes for Change to give out over 500 free bikes TUCSON, Ariz. (KGUN) — Tucson Bikes for Change is giving out more than 500 bicycles for children in need, before the start of El Tour de Tucson.   These special children will receive a bicycle, a helmet, lock and t-shirt at certain locations, along with a free Tour de Tucson Kid's Fun Ride registration.   "This year, Serve Our City is excited to Partner with El Tour de Tucson and their Tucson Bikes for Change program by helping to provide volunteers at seven locations throughout the city to assemble 500 bikes provided by a host of great sponsors for children in need," said Outreach Pastor Robin Blumenthal.   “What a great way for so many partners to join forces and give Tucson kids the chance to experience the joy of riding a bike in our beautiful city," expressed Blumenthal.   TUCSON, Ariz. (KGUN) — As El Tour de Tucson draws closer, drivers in the Tucson and surrounding areas will want to take note and prepare for upcoming road closures the day of the race, Saturday Nov. 19.   An anticipated 7,000 cyclists will navigate the Old Pueblo and surrounding areas beginning at 8 a.m. Multiple variations of the El Tour route are planned:   The Century - 102-mile route; 7 a.m. start The Metric Century - 62-mile route; 9 a.m. start The Half Metric Century - 32-mile route; 10:15 a.m. start The FUN Rides! - 10, 5, and 1-mile routes; 8:00 a.m. start   All routes start and end around the Tucson Community Center (TCC), with live music, food, beer garden and other exhibitors in the Eckbo Plaza, 260 S. Church Ave.   “It's important we let the Tucson community and its surrounding areas to the south – Green Valley & Sahuarita – know what roads will be closed during El Tour on November 19," said El Tour Executive Director TJ Juskiewicz.   "We want to make sure everyone is prepared for our road closures as they plan their day. Our ride begins at 7 a.m. and goes to 4 p.m. with roads being closed at various times. Those times are listed on the list we've sent," added Juskiewicz. Organizers suggest parking in one of the two garages at the TCC, or any number of the city, county or private surface lots in the area.   Bike valet services will be available at the finish line and is included as part of the registration for riders.   Mark Allen's brother Gary and his wife Michelle Allen   From Arizona to Bahrain – Five races still to look forward to in 2022 10 Nov 2022 by John Levison We may be approaching the middle of November and the racing calendar is indeed winding down for 2022, but there are a still several notable events to look forward to. Some stellar start-lists, high-quality races – and a very significant World Championship title showdown – still remain.   We've done a little forward planning and picked out five of our highlights to look forward to in the Pro triathlon world between now and the end of 2022.   IRONMAN Arizona: 20 November With live coverage of the event from Tempe, IRONMAN Arizona offers a $100,000 prize purse, four Kona qualifying slots (2MPRO / 2WPRO) and a pretty impressive start list, should the majority of these athletes all show.   For the men those names include Joe Skipper (fifth in Kona), the full-distance debut of Ben Kanute (second at the 70.3 World Champ), Mr Yo Yo Yo, Sam Long, IRONMAN Des Moines winner Matt Hanson, Chris Leiferman (fourth at the IRONMAN World Champs, St George), Kristian Hogenhaug (2021 World Triathlon LD Champion) and INEOS rider, Cameron Wurf. Lots of fast athletes on a historically fast course. What's not to like?   joe-skipper-kona-2022-bike Joe Skipper – Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images for IRONMAN The women are headed by Skye Moench (fourth in St George), Sarah True and Great Britain's IRONMAN Lanzarote champion, Lydia Dant.     What's New in the 303: Victoria Brumfield Now Chief Executive Officer of USA Triathlon COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — Victoria Brumfield today was announced by USA Triathlon Board of Directors Chair Joel Rosinbum as the Chief Executive Officer for the National Governing Body.   Brumfield, who has served as USA Triathlon's interim CEO since early September, becomes the organization's first female CEO in its 40-plus-year history.   Brumfield has been a highly impactful executive within the organization for more than four years, serving as an innovative and results-driven leader for the sport and organization. Her vision and leadership led the development and implementation of USA Triathlon's most recent strategic plan – Elevate 2028 – that sets the path for the organization through the LA 2028 Olympic and Paralympic Games.   “I'm honored to lead USA Triathlon during such an important time, and I want to thank Joel, the USA Triathlon Board of Directors and members of the hiring committee for the opportunity,” Brumfield said. “Multisport is transformative, unifying and empowering, and I am proud and ready to wake up every morning and bring this sport and community to more people. I look forward to working closely with our constituents and team to continue to spread the virtues of our sport far and wide, serve our community in a way that enables everyone to prosper, build on the development programs for youth and junior athletes, and celebrate our sport and community every day.”   A trailblazer and advocate throughout her career, Brumfield was hired as the first female member of the USA Triathlon's Executive Leadership Team. Brumfield's leadership has elevated and empowered female leaders within the organization at every level of the organization. Additionally, Brumfield has been a staunch proponent of diversity, equality, inclusion and access (DEIA) during her time at USA Triathlon and worked to make DEIA a focal point of the organization's long-term strategic plan, annual priorities and hiring processes, among other areas.   Brumfield has helped transform USA Triathlon's approach to service and the constituents it serves, most notably race directors, clubs, coaches, officials and age-group athletes. She has instilled a focus on building meaningful relationships with community members across the United States and emphasized the need for both resource development and initiatives and programs that drive value at the grassroots level.   Prior to her appointment as interim CEO Brumfield most recently served as USA Triathlon's Chief of Staff and Chief Business Development Officer. She led the turnaround of USA Triathlon from a transactional entity to an organization celebrated for its service leadership by fostering a culture of collaboration both internally and externally. With a people-first approach, Brumfield helped USA Triathlon earn best-place-to-work recognition by Front Office Sports, Outside Magazine, and Colorado Springs Gazette.   In 2020 Brumfield was named the Chief Business Development Officer, in addition to her Chief of Staff role, and led business development and partnerships. Under her leadership,U USA Triathlon led unprecedented commercial growth and strategic partnerships, even while navigating the Covid-19 pandemic.   In her role as Chief of Staff, Brumfield was responsible for directing strategic planning, managing and streamlining the organization's operational plan, and overseeing cross-functional projects with large-scale organizational impact. She also directly oversaw business administration including human resources, finance, and information technology (IT), for three years.   Brumfield currently serves on the World Triathlon Audit Committee and was a member of the SportsBusiness Journal “Game Changers: Women in Sports Business” 2020 Class.   Prior to USA Triathlon, Brumfield worked in the endurance sports industry for nearly 20 years across a number of roles that gave her both a broad understanding of the business of the sport and the opportunity to grow and inspire triathlon communities at the local level. Most recently, she was a founding member of the Virgin Sport start-up in Sir Richard Branson's global Virgin Group. Before Virgin, Victoria's roots were deeply embedded in triathlon as the former Event Director for the New York City Triathlon, IRONMAN US Championship, 2003 ITU World Cup in New York City, 2005 ITU Age Group World Championships in Hawaii, and 2004 USA Olympic trials for Triathlon, among others.   Brumfield is a passionate amateur short and long-distance triathlete and endurance athlete. She studied finance and earned a Master of Business Administration from the NYU Stern School Of Business. She currently resides in Colorado Springs, Colo.   You Get What You Give, Ask Primal Why By Bill Plock Nov 6, 2022–Denver  In 1998, The New Radicals released the song, “You Get What You Give” and it seems to have resonated strongly as a business mantra with premier cycling apparel manufacturer Primal of Denver.   As I looked around the room at the Four Seasons conference room during the PrimalBike 2022 gathering a couple of weeks ago, it dawned on me that between all of the rides represented here, well over $150 million is raised each and every year for a variety of causes; cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, college scholarships, community causes and so much more.   Between the rides, tens of thousands of riders explore roads in every corner of America. The reason they were all in Denver? Primal, a thirty-year-old company supplies cycling clothing for all of these rides and the cyclists who spend hours raising money and a lifetime rolling on roads.   Thirty years ago, Dave Edwards made some cool cycling t-shirts and sold them out of the back of his car in Moab. They were a hit and one thing has led to another and thousands upon thousands of designs later Primal has evolved into one of cycling's top brands of cycling wear.   Each year, Primal invites some of their top customers to meet and discuss the “state of the union” in cycling events and ponder the future, and share ideas on how to improve events and the sport of cycling. This year's attendee's included leaders from MS, RAGBRAI, Bike New York, Pan-Mass Challenge, Outside, and many others. All of the organizations attending, some for-profit and most non-profits, raise enormous money, but so does Primal.   Since its inception, Primal has given away over 12 million dollars. Says founder, President/CEO Dave Edwards about the gathering, “the most meaningful part is making connections and sharing knowledge and experiences. We're privileged to work with incredible partners, and we wanted to provide an opportunity for them to get together in a setting that inspires learning, conversations, and relationship building that makes their events even better while getting more people on bikes.”   The Pan-Mass Challenge, in particular, raising $63million in one ride for cancer research leads the peloton of charity. Said President, Jarrett Collins, “Primal is a great partner for the Pan-Mass Challenge because they support many of our teams with high-quality kits, AND they give back to the fundraising efforts of those teams, all in the service of defeating cancer!”   The group had break-out sessions focused on discussing a variety of topics ranging from sustainability to trends such as gravel, or as Jarrett Collins termed, “unpaved”. Steve Schulz from Cycle Oregon gave us a peek behind the curtains of their Community of Giving (COG) program and the impact their ride has on its communities and how it helps build everything from community centers to improving community relationships.   The group took to the streets and rode bikes to further build camaraderie and consider ideas aimed at getting more people on bikes and raising more money.   Ken Podziba, President of Bike New York holds the largest one-day ride in the United States, the Five Boro Bike Tour with over 32,000 riders (303 articles about the ride HERE) and said of the conference, “the conference, which was interesting, engaging, informative, and entertaining, provided an opportunity to learn from and collaborate with some of our country's top bike event organizers.  I left Denver with a much greater knowledge of Primal's creative and managerial processes, learning things we can apply to our events, and making some awesome new friends – now that's a successful conference!”   If you measure yourself by the peers you attract, Primal has attracted many of the best of the best when it comes to top cycling events and raising money for good causes. You Get What You Give seemed more than obvious at PrimalBike 2022.   Aspen unicyclist left his mark on famed Iron Horse Bicycle Classic It's only fitting that Aspen's Mike “Pinto” Tierney is going out “No. 1” in the Iron Horse Bicycle Classic.   Not “No. 1” as in the fastest in the famed race and recreational ride between Durango and Silverton. Nor did he log the most years riding in the event, which celebrated its 50th anniversary this year on Memorial Day Weekend.   Instead, he is the guy who has turned heads for tackling the grueling 47-mile ride over two mountain passes exceeding 10,000 feet on one wheel.   In Aspen, Tierney is famed for working 40 years on the exalted Aspen Highlands Ski Patrol and for ­regularly riding his unicycle up Independence Pass and Maroon and Castle Creek roads — and even on a ­variety of mountain bike trails in the Roaring Fork Valley.   In Durango and Silverton, he's known as the crazy dude who rides a one-wheeled cycle with no brakes up and down some of the most challenging passes in Colorado.   “A 63-year-old unicycling 50 miles from Durango to Silverton sounds a little crazy. I don't mind being called crazy,” Tierney said.   This year's event was his eighth and final Iron Horse. “I was the only unicyclist to do it, ever,” he said. Others started, none finished. He heard of a unicyclist from Cortez who rode the route, just not during the Iron Horse.   Unicycles weren't allowed in the event prior to 2005. Rules changed and Tierney jumped at the opportunity — and promptly got humbled. Six unis started. The other riders dropped out along the route. Tierney started with the two-wheeled riders and was quickly left in the dust. One restaurant hung a sign on the door saying, “Free food to Lance Armstrong and any unicyclist that finishes.” By the time Tierney finished, the restaurant was closed for the day because all riders had long since finished.   He changed strategy the next time he rode it in 2015. He started an hour early and got the flats north of Durango out of the way. In that and subsequent years, he got used to the racers sweeping by him on lower Coal Bank Pass, then the recreational riders catching him higher up the major ascent. He completes the ride between 6 and 6.5 hours.   It's not about finishing fast. It's about finishing on one wheel. Other cyclists marvel at how he can tackle the steep ascents and hair-raising downhills on a cycle with one speed and no brake. He rides a 36-inch wheel. He grinds up with 170mm crank arms and swaps them out to 140mm for the downhills.   Over the 45 years since he started riding a unicycle, he's learned to seek the slow cadence of pedal strokes on the downhill. If he cannot maintain it and gets going too quickly, he's got to jump off. He's never had to do it in his eight Iron Horses. While bicycle riders get to coast on the downhills, Tierney still has to work.   For Tierney, it was particularly humbling to get accolades in a couple of notable celebrations of the Iron Horse's 50th anniversary. There is a section about him in a book marking the anniversary, “Fiftieth Anniversary, Looking Back Racing Forward” by John Peel. His accomplishments also are included in a special exhibit at Fort Lewis College's Center of Southwest Studies. The exhibit, “Looking Back, Racing Ahead: 50 Years of the Iron Horse Bicycle Classic and Durango Cycling Culture,” is on display until spring 2023.     Invitation to TriDot Pre Season Project The Preseason Project® is a triathlon research initiative that helps TriDot quantify and enhance the performance gains that TriDot's Optimized Training™ delivers over training alternatives. Welcome to the 2023 TriDot Preseason Project (PSP) application.      Submit this 2-minute app to qualify for 2 FREE months of optimized triathlon training with the TriDot Mark Allen Edition.   PSP is an annual R&D initiative that helps triathletes reach their true performance potential through optimized preseason training. It also quantifies the substantial performance gains that TriDot's Optimized Training delivers over training alternatives.   You qualify for the FREE training if you meet the following criteria: Planning an Olympic, Half, or Full triathlon for 2023 season Train using a device with GPS and/or power Have not used TriDot in the last 6 months Not a professional triathlete Enthusiastic and motivated to get a jump start on your season! * Applications are reviewed and accepted on a first-come basis and must be fully completed to be considered.    Register For Free   Video of the week: 2022 World Triathlon Championship Series Bermuda: Elite Women's Highlights   2022 World Triathlon Championship Series Bermuda: Elite Men's Highlights   Closing: Thanks again for listening in this week.  Please be sure to follow us @303endurance and of course go to iTunes and give us a rating and a comment.  We'd really appreciate it! Stay tuned, train informed, and enjoy the endurance journey!

covid-19 united states america ceo director community president new york city master guide olympic games americans change ms colorado planning partner tour south chief cancer class hawaii north train stage camp memorial day mt alzheimer's disease invitation gps mount everest waters buddy chief executive officer state of the union bike esp parkinson applications antarctica thirty elevate great britain business administration world championships richard branson tucson steady colorado springs grew organizers adventurers triathlon north pole polar maroon moab larsen fra primal r d four seasons kona cortez in today psp raining lance armstrong tempe south pole poles st george durango colo world champs paralympic games enthusiastic blumenthal outside magazine tcc yee ineos ariz arctic ocean usa olympic mark allen john peel silverton event director chief business development officer virgin group iron horse gbr ucan new radicals el tour yo yo yo front office sports multisport usa triathlon brumfield deia dave edwards ragbrai sam long executive leadership team fort lewis college you get what you give ironman arizona unicycles earth day april national governing bodies eric larsen roaring fork valley pan mass challenge colorado springs gazette matt hanson flora duffy old pueblo fiftieth anniversary ellesmere island sarah true superstarch ben kanute ironman world champs ironman lanzarote alex yee joe skipper cameron wurf ryan waters taylor knibb virgin sport independence pass new york city triathlon bike new york tridot
Marathon Talk
E3: Edna Kiplagat

Marathon Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 53:48 Very Popular


In any sport it's ideal to learn from the very best, and as a two-time Marathon World Champion and three-time Abbott World Marathon Majors series winner, it's hard to find better than Edna Kiplagat. Labelled the ‘Queen of Persistence' by Outside Magazine, the strength of her mindset is equalled by her consistent success throughout the years. On Marathon Talk this week, we hear what drives Edna's stunning performances, round up the recent Valencia Half Marathon and upcoming NYC Marathon, and share AWMM's exciting initiative to support 2,000 runners on their 6 Star journey! In this episode of Marathon Talk: 0:00 - Rounding up news from Toronto, Frankfurt, and the blisteringly fast Valencia Half Marathon 23:00 - The incredible Edna Kiplagat on the preparation, motivation, consistency and persistence behind her continued success 50:00 - 6 questions with featured 6 Star Finisher Martin Cauldwell 51:10 - Closing out with a look forward to New York, and training plans to suit the winter season

She Explores
How Do We Spend Time Alone? Creative Fuel

She Explores

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 42:01 Very Popular


Enjoy listening? Rate & Review She ExploresFeatured in this episode: Florence Williams and Alexandra de SteiguerHosted & Produced by Gale StraubA production of Ravel MediaSponsored by DannerJoin the She Explores Podcast community on FacebookVisit She-Explores.com & Follow Us on InstagramHead over to CreativeFuelCollective.com for more creative inspiration, prompts, online workshops and a robust creative community.Creative Fuel is Hosted by Anna BronesCreative Fuel is Co-Produced by Anna Brones & Gale StraubTheme Music is by cleod9 musicFeaturing: Alexandra de Steiguer: Alexandra de Steiguer is a photographer, writer and musician who spends every winter as the caretaker of Star Island in the Isles of Shoals. Nine miles off the coast of Maine and New Hampshire, this rocky, windswept place provides great inspiration for her creative endeavors. She is drawn to the solitude and beauty of the deserted islands, and captures the environment in stunning black and white photographs, personally printed in her traditional darkroom. She is a two-time artist fellow of the New Hampshire State Council on the Arts and the author of Small Island, Big Picture: Winters of Solitude Teach an Artist to See.Links:Alexandra de SteiguerFlorence Williams: Florence Williams is a journalist, author, and podcaster. She is a contributing editor at Outside Magazine and a freelance writer for the New York Times, New York Times Magazine, National Geographic, The New York Review of Books, Slate, Mother Jones and numerous other publications. She is also the writer and host of two Gracie-Award-winning Audible Original series, Breasts Unbound and The Three-Day Effect, as well as Outside Magazine's Double-X Factor podcast. Her public speaking includes keynotes at Google, the Smithsonian, the Seattle Zoo, the Aspen Ideas Festival and many other corporate, academic and nonprofit venues. She is also a fellow at the Center for Humans and Nature and a visiting scholar at George Washington University, her work focuses on the environment, health and science. Her books include The Nature Fix: Why Nature Makes us Happier, Healthier, and More Creative and Heartbreak: A Personal and Scientific Journey.Links: Florence WilliamsResources Mentioned & Places to Learn MoreHeartbreak: A Personal and Scientific Journey by Florence WilliamsThe Nature Fix: Why Nature Makes Us Happier, Healthier, and More Creative by Florence WilliamsBig Picture: Winters of Solitude Teach an Artist to See by Alexandra de SteiguerLearn more about Alexandra's time on Star Island in the short film Winter's Watch and the documentary WildLife: the Quiet Island of Alexandra de SteiguerStar IslandHow Social Isolation, Loneliness Can Affect Heart Health, Cognitive AbilitiesProlonged Social Isolation and Loneliness are Equivalent to Smoking 15 Cigarettes a DayRestore Your Brain with Nature // David StrayerThe 3-Day Effect: How Nature Calms Your Brain audio seriesCan Solitude Make Your More Creative?The Science of Silence: How Solitude Enriches Creative Work

The HAPPY HEALTHY STRONG PODCAST
Episode 64 - Dr. Kelly Starrett - THE READY STATE

The HAPPY HEALTHY STRONG PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 61:14


Kelly Starrett, DPT is a coach, physical therapist, author, and speaker. Along with his wife Juliet, Kelly is co-founder of The Ready State. The Ready State began as Mobility|WOD in 2008 and has gone on to revolutionize the field of performance therapy and self-care. Kelly received his Doctor of Physical Therapy degree in 2007 from Samuel Merritt College in Oakland, California. Kelly's clients include professional athletes in the NFL, NBA, NHL, and MLB. He also works with Olympic gold-medalists, Tour de France cyclists, world-and national-record-holding Olympic lifting and power athletes, CrossFit Games medalists, ballet dancers, military personnel, and competitive age-division athletes. Kelly is the author of the New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestsellers Becoming A Supple Leopard and Ready to Run. He is also co-author (with Juliet) of the Wall Street Journal bestseller Deskbound. His latest book, Waterman 2.0, offers water-sport athletes a comprehensive guide to optimized movement and pain-free performance. Kelly and his work have been featured on 60 Minutes, The View, The Joe Rogan Experience, CBS Sports, Outside Magazine, Men's Health, Men's Journal and dozens of other podcasts, magazines, and books — including Tim Ferriss' The 4-Hour Body and Tools of Titans. On top of co-founding The Ready State, Kelly and Juliet also started San Francisco CrossFit and StandUpKids together. Founded in 2005, San Francisco CrossFit was the 21st CrossFit affiliate in the world. And StandUpKids is a non-profit dedicated to combating kids' sedentary lifestyles by bringing standing and moving desks to low-income public schools. To date, StandUpKids has converted 95,000 kids from sitting to standing. Earlier in their careers, Kelly and Juliet also co-founded a kayaking camp for children with HIV called Liquid. In his athletic career, Kelly paddled whitewater slalom canoe on the US Canoe and Kayak Teams. He lead the Men's Whitewater Rafting Team to two national titles and competed in two World Championships. In his free time, “KStar” likes to spend time with his wife, Juliet, and two daughters, Georgia and Caroline. He also loves to mountain bike, paddle, and sauna. And while Kelly claims to only “tolerate” the ice bath, according to Juliet he actually likes that, too. Where to Find The Ready State & Kelly on Social: Instagram - @thereadystate - https://www.instagram.com/thereadystate/?hl=en Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/thereadystate/ Twitter - @thereadystate - https://twitter.com/thereadystate?lang=en YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnnB4zDBqZHhQ4uLTAX8eYA

Silver On the Sage
Betsy Teter - Girl Ranger

Silver On the Sage

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 41:30


Girl Ranger, Betsy Teter, joins the show to share her experience as a part of the very first expedition of all-female youth that trekked Philmont, in June of 1973."The Lost Legend of the Girl Rangers," by Outside Magazine.Philmont Experience:1973 - Trek participantNotable Mentions:Ryan RaddatzGeorge WithersLisa ShinglerMaggie MillerAnn AltmanMissy JohnstonFelicia CharlesLucy Lyles Henner Dennis GilpinRoger RowlettEd JensenSupport the show

OAK PERFORMANCE RADIO
Episode #82 w/ Dr. Kelly Starrett - THE READY STATE

OAK PERFORMANCE RADIO

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 61:40


Kelly Starrett, DPT is a coach, physical therapist, author, and speaker. Along with his wife Juliet, Kelly is co-founder of The Ready State. The Ready State began as Mobility|WOD in 2008 and has gone on to revolutionize the field of performance therapy and self-care. Kelly received his Doctor of Physical Therapy degree in 2007 from Samuel Merritt College in Oakland, California. Kelly's clients include professional athletes in the NFL, NBA, NHL, and MLB. He also works with Olympic gold-medalists, Tour de France cyclists, world-and national-record-holding Olympic lifting and power athletes, CrossFit Games medalists, ballet dancers, military personnel, and competitive age-division athletes. Kelly is the author of the New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestsellers Becoming A Supple Leopard and Ready to Run. He is also co-author (with Juliet) of the Wall Street Journal bestseller Deskbound. His latest book, Waterman 2.0, offers water-sport athletes a comprehensive guide to optimized movement and pain-free performance. Kelly and his work have been featured on 60 Minutes, The View, The Joe Rogan Experience, CBS Sports, Outside Magazine, Men's Health, Men's Journal and dozens of other podcasts, magazines, and books — including Tim Ferriss' The 4-Hour Body and Tools of Titans. On top of co-founding The Ready State, Kelly and Juliet also started San Francisco CrossFit and StandUpKids together. Founded in 2005, San Francisco CrossFit was the 21st CrossFit affiliate in the world. And StandUpKids is a non-profit dedicated to combating kids' sedentary lifestyles by bringing standing and moving desks to low-income public schools. To date, StandUpKids has converted 95,000 kids from sitting to standing. Earlier in their careers, Kelly and Juliet also co-founded a kayaking camp for children with HIV called Liquid. In his athletic career, Kelly paddled whitewater slalom canoe on the US Canoe and Kayak Teams. He lead the Men's Whitewater Rafting Team to two national titles and competed in two World Championships. In his free time, “KStar” likes to spend time with his wife, Juliet, and two daughters, Georgia and Caroline. He also loves to mountain bike, paddle, and sauna. And while Kelly claims to only “tolerate” the ice bath, according to Juliet he actually likes that, too. Where to Find The Ready State & Kelly on Social: Instagram - @thereadystate - https://www.instagram.com/thereadystate/?hl=en Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/thereadystate/ Twitter - @thereadystate - https://twitter.com/thereadystate?lang=en YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnnB4zDBqZHhQ4uLTAX8eYA - - - - - - - - - - - Many thanks to POWER ATHLETE for sponsoring this episode of OAK PERFORMANCE RADIO! POWER ATHLETE is the premier resource for training athletes, educating coaches, and nutrition! POWER ATHLETE's goal is to provide world-class solutions for real-world athletes & coaches. POWER ATHLETE has worked with thousands of athletes around the globe and have taken them to the highest levels of performance! Check them out at: https://powerathletehq.com/ @powerathletehq

Brass & Unity
#132 -Andrew Ryzebol - Freediving Master Instructor, 7.5 minute Hold and Extreme Cold Water Diving

Brass & Unity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 82:46


Andrew is an expert ice freediver who can hold his breath for 7.5 minutes. He began freediving in the frigid Great Lakes in 2013. Over the years, he has developed expertise on local Ontario dive sites and how to navigate the extreme winter weather conditions. His breathtaking images captured by his buddy Geoff Coombs under the ice, has been featured in tv productions and magazines around the world including: Outside Magazine, Canadian Geographic, Redbull Illume, CBC and many more. @androopr https://www.youtube.com/c/AndrooprFreediving https://www.ontariofreedivers.com Watch on YouTube: https://bit.ly/3opNURn - - - - - - - - - - - - SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS H.V.M.N - 20% off with code BRASS20 - https://hvmn.com/pages/home Combat Flip Flops - 25% off with code UNITY - https://combatflipflops.com Brass & Unity - 20% off with code UNITY - http://brassandunity.com Daisy May Hats Co - 15% off with code BRASS - https://daisymayhats.com American Yogi - 15% off with code BRASS15 - https://liveamericanyogi.com Mid-Day Squares - 15% off with code KELSIE15 - https://www.middaysquares.com Good F*cking Design Advice - 10% off with code UNITY - www.gfda.co - - - - - - - - - - - - - SHOP B&U Jewelry & Eyewear: https://brassandunity.com - - - - - - - - - - - - - Follow #brassandunity - - - - - - - - - - - - - CHARITY Honour House - https://www.honourhouse.ca Vet Solutions - https://vetsolutions.org Heroic Hearts - https://www.heroicheartsproject.org Warrior Angels Foundation - https://warriorangelsfoundation.org All Secure Foundation - http://allsecurefoundation.org Defenders of Freedom - http://defendersoffreedom.us The Boot Campaign - https://bootcampaign.org

Beer Mile Podcast
Ep103 - Episode for the Degens. 21+ Only — Beer Mile After Dark Ep7

Beer Mile Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 79:19 Very Popular


The behind-the-scenes debauchery at beer mile worlds, weed in Amsterdam, suing Flotrack, clurbing in Belgium, and other cancellable remarks. Get the full version on Patreon: https://patreon.com/beermile ----------- The 2022 Beer Mile World Classic made headlines across Outside Magazine, Runner's World, Food & Wine, and Women's Running for a number of reasons. For starters, Corey Bellemore set a new Beer Mile World Record with cans in 4:49. Elizabeth Laseter also set a new world record on the women's side — or rather, she would have but was disqualified for drinking outside of the chug zone. Watch the men's race here: https://youtu.be/VU6pdURPTGs Watch the women's race here: https://youtu.be/PTsIFQCSL_M ------------ Use code BEERMILE20 for 20% Off at Athletic Brewing Beer Use code BEERMILEPOD for 20% off at KNOCKAROUND.COM Get uncut/uncensored and bonus content, plus show your support for the show by joining us on Patreon: https://patreon.com/beermile Merch: https://thebeermile.org/collections/beer-mile ------------ Help us grow the show: Sauce us a 5-star rating on Apple Podcasts and Spotify Join our Patreon for exclusive, uncut and uncensored content + big giveaways: https://www.patreon.com/beermile Subscribe to Beer Mile Media on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/beermilemedia Social Follow Beer Mile Media on Instagram Follow Beer Mile Media on Facebook Follow Beer Mile Media on Twitter Follow Beer Mile Media on TikTok Join the Beer Mile Strava Club --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/beer-mile-media/support

Beer Mile Podcast
Ep102 - Beer Mile Worlds Controversies & Recap: Elizabeth Laseter discusses DQ after setting World Record; Newcomer Melanie Pozdol wins world crown; Corey Bellemore sets new WR with cans

Beer Mile Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 74:48 Very Popular


The 2022 Beer Mile World Classic made headlines across Outside Magazine, Runner's World, Food & Wine, and Women's Running for a number of reasons. For starters, Corey Bellemore set a new Beer Mile World Record with cans in 4:49. Elizabeth Laseter also set a new world record on the women's side — or rather, she would have but was disqualified for drinking outside of the chug zone. Elizabeth joins us today to talk through that DQ. Thanks to the fastest chugging in the field, Melanie Pozdol took the women's title in 6:41 and joins the show today to share her experience competing on the world stage for the first time. The cans vs bottles debate is getting its time in the limelight as this was the first-ever beer mile world championship requiring the use of cans due to the host facility restricting glass. The use of cans also made this a throwback to beer mile origins where cans were always used instead of bottles. This is a fun conversation with Elizabeth and Melanie taking you behind the scenes of the beer mile world champs and all the partying, glory, and tomfoolery that go along with it. Watch the men's race here: https://youtu.be/VU6pdURPTGs Watch the women's race here: https://youtu.be/PTsIFQCSL_M ------------ Use code BEERMILE20 for 20% Off at Athletic Brewing Beer Use code BEERMILEPOD for 20% off at KNOCKAROUND.COM Get uncut/uncensored and bonus content, plus show your support for the show by joining us on Patreon: https://patreon.com/beermile Merch: https://thebeermile.org/collections/beer-mile ------------ Help us grow the show: Sauce us a 5-star rating on Apple Podcasts and Spotify Join our Patreon for exclusive, uncut and uncensored content + big giveaways: https://www.patreon.com/beermile Subscribe to Beer Mile Media on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/beermilemedia Social Follow Beer Mile Media on Instagram Follow Beer Mile Media on Facebook Follow Beer Mile Media on Twitter Follow Beer Mile Media on TikTok Join the Beer Mile Strava Club --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/beer-mile-media/support

Dad the Man
062 KELLY STARRETT | Raising Daughters, Feelings Meetings, and Helping Your Kids Start a Business

Dad the Man

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 56:21


OIN THE DAD THE MAN FACEBOOK GROUP --> https://www.facebook.com/groups/dadtheman/permalink/761745981911761/?comment_id=764127341673625¬if_id=1657804196154805¬if_t=group_comment&ref=notif (CLICK HERE)

Strange on Purpose
Alison Mariella Désir of Running While Black

Strange on Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 22:34


Running saved Alison Mariella Désir's life. At rock bottom and searching formeaning and structure, Désir started marathon training, finding that it vastlyimproved both her physical and mental health. Yet as she became involved in thecommunity and learned its history, she realized that the sport was largely builtwith white people in mind. To help make running more inclusive and welcomingto people of color, Désir founded Harlem Run, an NYC-based running movement,and Run 4 All Women, which has raised over $150,000 for Planned Parenthoodand $270,000 for Black Voters Matter.Désir is currently co-chair of the Running Industry Diversity Coalition, a Run Happy Advocate for Brooks Running,and an Athlete Advisor for Oiselle. A graduate of Columbia University for her bachelor's and two master's degrees,including a master's of education in counseling psychology, Alison has been published in Outside Magazine,contributed the foreword for Running is My Therapy by Scott Douglas, and founded the Meaning Thru MovementTour, a speaking series featuring mental health experts and fitness professionals. Running While Black is her firstbook. Alison Mariella Désir currently lives with her son, Kouri Henri, and partner, Amir Muhammad Figueroa,outside of Seattle.

The Hotshot Wake Up
Podcast: Outside Magazine Suggests Firefighter Suicides Are Due to Climate Change. I Discuss the Actual Reasons. Defensible Space. Get Together, Get it Done and Don't Be a Lazy Landowner.

The Hotshot Wake Up

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 63:48 Very Popular


On Today's Show: Outside Magazine suggests that suicide in the wildfire community is driven by longer fire seasons due to climate change. I set the record straight. We also discuss the items they get right in the article. Defensible Space: San Diego is putting together defensible space workshops in their community. It's a group effort. Make it a neighborhood project. We talk Structure triage and more. Full operational Update. Plus more. THE HOTSHOT WAKE UP - Thank you to all of our paid subscribers. It allows us to generously donate to firefighter charities and supports all the content we provide. You also receive all of our Monday morning workouts, article achieves, more podcast episodes, recipes, and more. https://thehotshotwakeup.substack.com/

Providence College Podcast
Writers Write - Alison Espach, MFA '07

Providence College Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 47:43


On the heels of the release of her buzzworthy novel, Notes on Your Sudden Disappearance, Alison Espach joins the PC podcast to discuss writing about loss and teaching emerging writers at Providence College. Espach first found success with her debut novel The Adults, a New York Times Editor's Choice. She has written for McSweeney's, Vogue, and Outside Magazine among others, and her short story series "In-Depth Market Research Interviews with Dead People" is currently available as an Audible Original.Subscribe to the Providence College Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Play, and YouTube.  Visit Providence College on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Snapchat, and LinkedIn.