Podcast appearances and mentions of candy crush

Free-to-play match-three puzzle video game involving matching candies

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Best podcasts about candy crush

Latest podcast episodes about candy crush

Free Beer and Hot Wings: Free Clip of the Day
Is Anyone Still Playing Candy Crush?

Free Beer and Hot Wings: Free Clip of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 2:15


On today's show, Hot Wings had something passionate to say about those of you who still play Candy Crush. Listen and find out why he's so not on your side. For the whole podcast, as well as a ton of other exclusive perks, sign up to be a Fancy Idiot at FreeBeerAndHotWings.com! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Nick's Nerd News
Episode 245: Cubicle of 10k layoffs

Nick's Nerd News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 54:39


The Ranveer Show हिंदी
Kaun Banega Gaming Se Crorepati? Yeh Dekho! ft. Piyush Kumar | Rooter | The Ranveer Show हिंदी 133

The Ranveer Show हिंदी

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 39:09


Download the Rooter app or login here: https://bit.ly/3HeqtWq Follow Piyush on: https://bit.ly/Twitter_Piyush; https://bit.ly/Linkedin_Piyush नमस्ते दोस्तों! The Ranveer Show हिंदी के 133rd Episode में आप सभी का स्वागत है. आज के Podcast में हमारे साथ जुड़ चुके हैं Piyush Kumar जो Delhi के रहने वाले है। ये Rooter के Founder और CEO हैं। Rooter एक ऐसा Gaming और E-Sports Content Platform है जहाँ आप जो भी Games खेल रहे हो वो Live Stream कर सकते हो और India के Top Gaming Streamers को भी देख सकते हो। इस Podcast में हम बात करेंगे ढ़ेर सारी बातें Gaming Industry की शुरुआत, PUBG का Craze, Olympics में E-sports, Mukesh Ambani का Gaming में Interest, Candy Crush, Casual Gaming का मतलब, Females Interest In Gaming, Ludo King और Battle Games के बारे में। साथ ही साथ हम बात करेंगे Valorant Game का Interest, Battlegrounds Mobile India, Modiji का Gaming में interest, Government Updates, America के Gamers, India के Mobile Gamers, Gaming Industry में Career, Income Sources और India में Scope के बारे में और भी ढ़ेर सारी बातें। मैं आशा करता हूँ कि ये Video आप सभी Viewers को पसंद आएगा। खास तौर पर उन सभी को जिन्हें Gaming Industry के बारे में जानने में Interest है। Valorant, Gametion की Progress, Carrom Related Games और India में Gamers का Career जैसी चीज़ों के बारे में हम Discuss करेंगे इस Hindi Podcast में सिर्फ और सिर्फ आपके Favourite BeerBiceps Hindi Channel Ranveer Allahbadia पर। (00:00) : Introduction (02:49) : Gaming Industry की शुरुआत (06:20) : Mobile पर Game Streaming (12:55) : Roblox क्या है? (20:48) : कितना कमाओगे Gaming Industry से? (25:58) : Web 3.0 में Games (31:01) : खुदका Game Develop करो। (33:28) : Games कौनसे Device पे खेले? (37:20) : Episode की समाप्ति

ProjectME with Tiffany Carter – Entrepreneurship & Millionaire Mindset
Breaking Habits, Addictions, & Toxic Patterns with Melissa Paige, Recovery Advocate

ProjectME with Tiffany Carter – Entrepreneurship & Millionaire Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 62:09


My addiction is embarrassing and I'm ready to share it. This will be proof to you of how deep and intertwined our bad habits, compulsions, and behaviors can be. For the record, EVERYONE ends up addicted to something at some point.  It's not just drugs and alcohol. You can be addicted to work, exercise, external validation, negative excitement, procrastination, sugar, male attention, shopping, and your phone….I even have a friend in my support group that is addicted to the game Candy Crush.  Here's how you know if this habit of yours has escalated into an addition: If it comes with a negative cost to your physical health, emotional well-being, your spiritual connection, goals, your finances, or your relationships.  No one has ever said that “Salad is ruining my life.” As a great leader, I know in order to best help you; I have to be vulnerable first.  Hi, I'm Tiffany and I'm an ice cream addict. You may have just laughed, and that's ok it does sound silly….but here's when I knew it was a deeper problem. I started to NEED it. If I didn't have a pint of ice cream in the freezer, I would get anxious.  Then I started to feel shame when I would eat it, like “WTF is wrong with me, why do I have to have this?!” Although I didn't binge eat the ice cream, I would eat enough to where my stomach would hurt or it would be so much sugar that it would affect my sleep. Even knowing this, I STILL kept eating it. (insert more shame) I would wake up feeling like crap with a sugar hangover while watching my abs lines slowly disappear, and be replaced with full body inflammation (as a results form the dairy + sugar).  YET, I still kept eating it almost every night. It was my dirty secret.  Secrets like this keep us stuck in it because it fuels the shame.  Everything shifted for me in the last week, after I followed these steps. Listen to this life-changing episode, as my remarkable guest Melissa Paige, shares openly about addictions to food, alcohol, drugs, and nicotine. Melissa is 12 years sober from drugs and alcohol, and now two years free from smoking and vaping nicotine. Time to quit, and stay quiet so you can be FREE.  Connect with Melissa: Instagram: @themelissapaige Podcast: The Getting Soulfit Podcast Plus colored pens & stickers.  (LAST CHANCE to work with me 1:1 for a long time!) WINTER APPLICATIONS ARE OPEN for my famous 2-Month Private Business Coaching program: Private Coaching Application (I only take 6 clients at a time) YOUR Season of Abundance Walk: Guided Meditation Series Click here to get it for FREE!! projectmewithtiffany.com/seasonofabundance Welcome to ProjectME the Podcast with your host Tiffany Carter, who takes the mystery out of making BIG money. A former NBC and CBS TV journalist, turned multi-millionaire entrepreneur, teaching you all things wealth, health, worth, and business. You can follow Tiffany on Instagram @projectme_with_tiffany  on Facebook @projectmewithtiffany and watch her TV episodes on ProjectME TV with Tiffany Carter on YouTube. Subscribe to Tiffany's FREE weekly digest, The Secret Posse, and get exclusive content you won't find anywhere else: millionaire mindset exercises, custom weekly abundance affirmations, and her best money-making tips.

halftone.fm Master Feed
Vertical Slice 195: «A decent brand»

halftone.fm Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 104:21


Κενά των γιορτών καλύπτονται, απορίες για Game Pass με διαφημίσεις παραμένουν, αλλά —κυρίως— πάθαμε CES χάρη στη Sony. Το παρόν επεισόδιο φτάνει σε εσάς με την υποστήριξη της: LEAP Get in touch: Email | Twitter Ι Facebook Group Hosted by: Elias Pappas - Facebook | Twitter | Instagram Manos Vezos - The Vez | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram Ι Apple Music FU: Epic Games / FTC COMPLAINT FOR PERMANENT INJUNCTION, CIVIL PENALTIES, AND ) OTHER RELIEF M&A Gearbox snags Captured Dimensions | GamesIndustry.biz Private Division Fund Private Division launches new developer fund | GamesIndustry.biz Private Division Development Fund reaffirms label's small-scale push | GamesIndustry.biz Bloober Team Private Division and Bloober Team announce partnership to publish new survival horror IP - Gematsu Square Enix για 2023 A New Year's Letter from the President Wizards Of The Coast Wizards of the Coast reportedly cancels "at least" five games | GamesIndustry.biz Αλλαγή για το Hitman 3 HITMAN 3 to become ‘World of Assassination' - IO Interactive Xbox / Activision Blizzard FOSS Patents: Microsoft's response to FTC lawsuit feels like Candy Crush, Activision Blizzard King's filing more like Call of Duty as deal parties challenge Federal Trade Commission's merger complaint on law, facts, constitutionality Microsoft claims it has no idea when Call of Duty came out - The Verge Chile approves Microsoft Activision Blizzard merger | GamesIndustry.biz CMA extends deadline for Microsoft/Activision Blizzard investigation | GamesIndustry.biz Xbox Game Pass με διαφημίσεις Is Microsoft exploring a cheaper ad-supported Xbox Game Pass 'Lite'? Πολιτική YouTube Report: New YouTube policy leads to increased demonetisation of games content | GamesIndustry.biz Sony @ CES CES® 2023 Press Conference|Sony Official Πωλήσεις PS5 Sony στο Twitter Project Leonardo Introducing Project Leonardo for PlayStation 5, a highly customizable accessibility controller kit – PlayStation.Blog The Last Of Us How The Last of Us Plans to Bring the Zombie Genre Back to Life – The Hollywood Reporter

Politically Asian! Podcast
63. This Week in Asian American Politics: Cali Indian Tech Workers Protest, More Boba Guys Union Busting, SE Asian Prisoner Deportation, End of KPOP and Blockbuster, Debt Cancellation Pause, Microsoft

Politically Asian! Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 50:38


This week in Asian American politics! - Indian tech workers protest in California over H1B visas and green card restrictions. Currently, Indian tech workers have to wait 150+ years for green card approval. - Boba Guys close their original shops in SF after union busting their workers. - Shocking stories of Southeast Asian prisoners in California who are at risk of being deported by ICE. - End of Kpop on Broadway, and Koreans on Netflix's Blockbuster series. - Joe Biden's debt cancellation is put on hold - Microsoft tries to buy Activision, creator of Candy Crush and many other games. They're being sued by the FTC (Asian-led) and a group of 10 gamers. -- WHAT'S POLITICALLY ASIAN PODCAST? Two Asians talking about politics and the Asian American community to get more Asians talking about politics! Join comedians Aaron Yin (he/him) and Gerrie Lim (they/them) for 45 minutes-ish each week as they discuss current topics and events related to Asian Americans through the lenses of history, class, and advocacy. Think John Oliver's show, but there's two of us, and we're Asian. -- CHECK US OUT ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Our memes are so good Asian people will mention them when they meet us in real life. ➤ Instagram: https://instagram.com/politicallyasianpodcast/ ➤ Twitter: https://twitter.com/politicasianpod ➤ Website: https://politicallyasianpodcast.com -- INQUIRIES: politicallyasianpodcast@gmail.com -- SUPPORT US ON PATREON (currently fundraising for episode transcription services and a video editor): https://patreon.com/politicallyasian -- MUSIC by Clueless Kit: https://soundcloud.com/cluelesskit Song title: live now -- ALGORITHM? Chinese American Politics, Korean American Politics, Japanese American Politics, South Asian politics, Asian American politics, AAPI politics, Asian American Political Alliance, Asian American leader, Asian American Protests 1960s, Asian American policy, Asian leftist, Asian American leftist, Asian American leftist podcast

Occultae Veritatis Podcast - OVPOD
Case #195:Blizzard; World's Worst Gaming Company

Occultae Veritatis Podcast - OVPOD

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 135:44


Ft Guest Host @Papa_BrayD   Activision Blizzard, the gaming company behind Overwatch, World of Warcraft, Call of Duty, Candy Crush, Diablo and more, became infamous in 2021 when accusations of employee abuse and exploitation went public. Drunk executives raiding employee workstations, the theft of breast milk, systematically underpaying women, and that's just to start. Hear the entire infuriating story, today, on ovpod!   -Sponsored by-Our Patrons at http://www.patreon.com/ovpod   https://www.ovpod.ca/

Recode Media with Peter Kafka
A n00b's guide to the Microsoft / Activision deal the FTC wants to stop

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 44:15 Very Popular


The FTC wants to (candy) crush Microsoft's acquisition of Activision Blizzard, Inc., the makers of games like Call of Duty, World of Warcraft, and Candy Crush. Meanwhile, Microsoft, the maker of Xbox, assures Call of Duty players they'll still be able to shoot Nazi zombies on rivals' consoles. For an overview of the gaming business in general and this acquisition in particular, Recode's Peter Kafka talks to Bloomberg's Jason Schrier, co-host of the podcast Triple Click and bestselling author of the books “Press Reset” and “Blood, Sweat, and Pixels.” Pro tip: If you input the Konami code while listening to this episode, you'll get 30 extra lives. Featuring: Jason Schreier (@jasonschreier), Reporter at Bloomberg and Co-Host of Triple Click Podcast Host: Peter Kafka (@pkafka), Senior Editor at Recode More to explore: Subscribe for free to Recode Media, Peter Kafka, one of the media industry's most acclaimed reporters, talks to business titans, journalists, comedians, and more to get their take on today's media landscape. About Recode by Vox: Recode by Vox helps you understand how tech is changing the world — and changing us. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

99Vidas - Nostalgia e Videogames
99Vidas 545 – Hall da Fama dos Gêneros: Puzzle

99Vidas - Nostalgia e Videogames

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 98:56


Jurandir Filho, Felipe Mesquita, Evandro de Freitas e Bruno Carvalho batem um papo sobre os melhores jogos de puzzle! O que vai um bom jogo desse gênero? O celular hoje é a casa desses tipos de jogos? Nos primórdios, quem mandava? Falamos sobre Tetris, Portal, jogos de quebra-cabeça, Lemmings, Catherine, Limbo, Angry Birds, Cut the Rope, Candy Crush e muito outros!! Essa é a mais uma edição da nossa série Hall da Fama dos Gêneros! 

WashingTECH Tech Policy Podcast with Joe Miller
DC AG lawsuit: Amazon stole Flex drivers' tips; White nationalists are back on Twitter -- Tech Law & Policy This Week

WashingTECH Tech Policy Podcast with Joe Miller

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 6:06


Groups file flurry of Section 230 briefs with the Supreme Court   What's going on? Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act shields platforms like Google and Twitter from liability for content posted by internet users. Republicans and Democrats want the rule changed. It's important to note that Section 230 protects only publishers of information. The central question here is – at which point do platforms lose their status as publishers and actually become creators of content? Once they're deemed to be creators, they would lose protection under Section 230. Generally, Republicans like Josh Hawley say platform liability should be a state issue because they think tech companies lean progressive and that seeking to ban harmful content discriminates against conservatives. Democrats argue that Section 230 doesn't hold platforms accountable enough, especially in the context of how marketers target children. How are politicians trying to change the law? The Supreme Court is set to decide Gonzalez v. Google in which the family of a young woman killed in the 2015 Paris Terror Attacks argues that Google should be liable for aiding and abetting the attack by hosting terror-related videos on YouTube. There are 2 parts to this –  one is whether Google should be held liable for merely hosting terror-related videos the family alleges groomed terrorists involved. Google is arguing that hosting the videos simply makes them publishers and thus they would still be entitled to protection under Section 230. The other is whether recommending content – converts platforms to content creators – in which case the Gonzalez family argues Google should be held liable since Section 230 wouldn't apply to instances in which people predisposed to terrorism-related content puts Google in the position of being a content creator, in which case Google wouldn't be shielded from liability under Section 230. How does this affect you? Keep an eye on what your state is doing to change the way content platforms moderate content. For example, Texas and Florida passed statutes preventing platforms from discriminating against so-called “anti-conservative bias.” This has a direct impact on what people see and hear, which directly impacts elections since a scourge of harmful content, such as Trump's tweets leading up to the Capitol Hill insurrection, have dominated our politics for many years. Big name advertisers are showing up in white nationalists' Twitter feeds again   Why are white nationalists on Twitter? Elon Musk fired Twitter's entire content moderation team and reinstated the accounts of white nationalists. Which companies showed up in white nationalist's accounts? Ads for Uber, Amazon, Snap, and even the US Department of Health and Human Services showed up in these accounts. But the Washington Post reports that it saw some 40 advertisers showing up next to content posted by reinstated white nationalists. What are the policy implications? White supremacist content is an example of the type of content Republicans in states like Texas and Florida think internet platforms shouldn't be allowed to ban. Right now, only advertisers have the ability to discipline Twitter by removing their ads on the platform. What are the real-world effects of white supremacists online? The Department of Homeland Security issued a report in late November expressing urgent concern about the fact that antisemitism online, and in the real world, are  reinforcing each other, leading to an increase in hate crimes.   DC Attorney General is suing Amazon over driver tips   What's going on? DC Attorney General Karl Racine filed a consumer lawsuit on Wednesday alleging that Amazon basically stole tips from its Flex drivers by hiding from drivers the amounts they were getting in tips and pocketing them. And then Amazon hid the fact that they were doing this from its customers. What is Amazon saying? Amazon is saying it built the tips into drivers' hourly compensation, which it says is above DC's minimum wage of $16.10 per hour. What happens next? We'll see. The DC Circuit Court of Appeals will review Racine's complaint and that process will start early next year.   –   In other tech law & policy news …   Women are suing Elon Musk for discrimination against them in layoffs.   Staten Island Union organizer lost his lawsuit against Amazon for race discrimination. The court says he was fired for exposing co-workers to COVID during the pandemic lockdowns.   The Senate Banking Committee appears likely to subpoena Sam Bankman-Fried after he ignored a request to testify regarding the implosion of crypto-currency exchange FTX.   The FTC is suing to prevent Microsoft's acquisition of Activision, the maker of Modern Warfare and Candy Crush, as well as Facebook's acquisition of virtual reality firm Within.   Apple announced that it will fully encrypt iCloud data, raising alarm from law enforcement officials. States are now joining the federal government in banning government employees from downloading TikTok on their phones because TikTok's parent company, ByteDance, is based in China. Officials are concerned China will gain access to sensitive data.

The Bear & The Beard
Nerdy Gamer Talk: Vol 3

The Bear & The Beard

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 83:35


Whether it's swiping those matches in Candy Crush on our phones, dropping into all the popular Battle Royals on our consoles, our immersing ourselves into Virtual Reality, we have endless ways to game in this amazing age of gaming. This week, yet again, our Nerdtastic Duo will be diving back into some Nerdy Gamer discussions. The games that started that sparked their love for gaming, their first games, the games they are emotionally connected to and more.  So put on your headset and plug in your controllers cuz its time for Nerdy Gamer Talk Vol 3!Enjoy!Gamer Tags:Bear- Xbox- N3rdy B3ar             PSN- N3rdy_B3ar89Beard- Xbox- BeardedBrianGuyKaty- Twitch/ Steam/ Xbox- katybeas                PSN- katy.beasTyler- PSN- Barakamann              Xbox- gaukel             Steam- tylergaukelSupport the Show!:Patreon:  https://www.patreon.com/TheBearandTheBeardSpring Store: https://bearded-bear-store.creator-spring.comTalk Nerdy To Us!:Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/thebearandthebeard/Website: http://thebearandthebeardpodcast.com/Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/user/Bearded-Bear-Pod/Nerd-line: (769) 208-4079Email: thebearandthebeardpodcast@yahoo.comAnd for Video episodes find us on YouTube:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCO-sZG3PG1hiexmZxKKoDbg**DISCLAIMER: WE DO NOT OWN THE RIGHTS TO THE SOUND OR VIDEO BITS USED IN THIS EPISODE. ALL RIGHTS BELONG TO THEIR RESPECTIVE PRODUCTION COMPANIES OR ORIGINAL CREATORS. THESE SOUNDBITES ARE TAKEN FROM YOUTUBE VIDEOS  OR OTHER SOURCES AND THEN ADDED IN FOR ENTERTAINMENT PURPOSES ONLY**

Film Fights
#042: Uncle Buck vs The Great Outdoors [Candy Crush]

Film Fights

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 78:24


Still reeling from overload of Halloween horror movies, we turn to the next best thing about yesterday's holiday: Candy!  But what kind of candy?  The best kind - John!  It's a tale of two Johns in this case as the Film Fighters Kon 'n Jon discuss the John Hughes / John Candy films Uncle Buck and The Great Outdoors.Tangents include Konrad's Superlatives, Modern Buck, Erick Merrick's Bones, Film Fights Pancakes Packages, Name Brand Cereal, Lollygagging Alligators, Getting Away With Not Getting Caught, Prayer Limit, Trading Places Shared Universe.Intro/Outro Theme by Math the Band.

Deconstructor of Fun
TWiG #210 - Blizzard & NetEase Break Up / 10 Years of Candy Crush

Deconstructor of Fun

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 63:30


Eric, Eric and Laura are joined by guest David Nelson, former head of the experimentation group at King, to discuss the last 10 years of Candy Crush Saga and the Blizzard and NetEase divorce. Seufert shares his experience at Slush last week in Helsinki and Kress blames the switch hardware for the lackluster performance of the otherwise interesting new Pokemon game, Scarlet and Violet. And lastly, it wouldn't be an TWIG episode without at least 1 mention of Netflix. Until next week. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/deconstructoroffun/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/deconstructoroffun/support

Talk to the Internet
Sony Rejects 10 Years of Call of Duty - Inside Games

Talk to the Internet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 17:04


Play World of Warships for free today — https://gsght.com/c/u4lrks #ad Support Inside Games! Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/insidegamesYT YouTube Membership: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFHQlasvjQ0JMOHoKOz4c0g/join Hosted by: Lawrence: http://twitch.tv/sirlarr | Bruce: http://twitch.tv/brucegreene | Yami: http://twitter.com/idsanty Edited by: Matt Peake | http://vimeo.com/mattpeake Written by: Lawrence Sonntag & Brian Gaar | https://www.twitch.tv/briangaar Sources -- [Windows Central] Xbox's Phil Spencer: We need Candy Crush, not Call of Duty - https://bit.ly/3Vjapa6 [NYTimes] Can Big Tech Get Bigger? Microsoft Presses Governments to Say Yes. - https://nyti.ms/3tRiQ0K [The Verge] Call of Duty's next three games will hit PlayStation despite Microsoft's Activision deal - https://bit.ly/3U2AMjt [GamesIndustry.biz] PlayStation: Xbox's Call of Duty offer was "inadequate on many levels" - https://bit.ly/3QvBB2K [PlayStation Lifestyle] Sony Concerned About Call of Duty's Potential Microsoft Exclusivity - https://bit.ly/3GHaPTM [TweakTown] Brazilian regulators: Sony would be harmed by Call of Duty exclusivity - https://bit.ly/3Oxsorl [Twitter, Tom Warren] https://bit.ly/3XtRSda [The Verge] EU opens ‘in-depth investigation' into Microsoft's Activision Blizzard acquisition - https://bit.ly/3EWtolp [New York Times] Amazon's Antitrust Antagonist Has a Breakthrough Idea - https://nyti.ms/3EzaS10 [BusinessWire] A Letter from CEO Bobby Kotick Regarding Activision Blizzard's Merger With Microsoft - https://bwnews.pr/3V0oeKF [Forbes] Why Sony Is Never Going To Take Any ‘Call Of Duty' Deal Xbox Offers - https://bit.ly/3tWDix2 [Wall Street Journal] Sony Expects Microsoft to Keep Activision Games Multiplatform - https://on.wsj.com/3nH6PrN Music — Switch It Up - Silent Partner https://youtu.be/r_HRbXhOir8 Get Back - Silent Partner https://youtu.be/iQYmgOrPEvs Kula - Topher Mohr and Alex Elena https://youtu.be/0bywp0qTVNo Funk Down - MK2 https://youtu.be/SPN_Ssgqlzc

Hitbox!
Pokemon Scarlet and Violet bug report

Hitbox!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 102:13


Justin and Peter discuss Pokemon Scarlet and Violet bugs, Dark Pictures Anthology: the Devil in Me, the closure of Activision Blizzard servers in China, Xbox's plans to own Candy Crush, Yuji Naka being arrested, God of War: Ragnarok, and more!Follow us on Twitter @HitboxPodJoin our Discord server!https://discord.gg/unmGxETX3USupport us on Patreon!https://www.patreon.com/hitboxpod@peterspittech and @JustinMatkovichMetacritic Roundup games:Dark Pictures Anthology: Devil in MePokemon ScarletPokemon VioletMade possible by our wonderful Deluxe Podcast Patreon producers:Dave ParkerJ KnolThe intro and outro of Hitbox! is by ali_ontheguitar, check out their work right here:https://www.fiverr.com/aliontheguitar?source=gigpageBlizzard games set to be pulled in China after dispute with NetEase over license // VGC // Andy Robinsonhttps://www.videogameschronicle.com/news/blizzard-games-set-to-be-pulled-in-china-after-dispute-with-netease-over-license/Sonic creator Yuji Naka arrested in insider trading scandal // the Verge // Jess Weatherbedhttps://www.theverge.com/2022/11/18/23465956/sonic-yuji-naka-arrested-insider-trading-scandal-game

Notnerd Podcast: Tech Better
Episode 363: Reverse Upgrade

Notnerd Podcast: Tech Better

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 32:00


Candy Crush turns 10, MrBeast is the top YouTuber, Ticketmaster isn't great, and FTX really isn't great. That and so much more to get you caught up on the world of tech, so you can get out there and tech better! Followup:  FTX is worse than we thought (00:30) https://twitterisgoinggreat.com/ (01:55) Bird overstated its revenue for two years (05:20) iPhone 14 Emergency mode goes live (06:25) New iCloud on the web - iCloud issues (07:25) Microsoft November 2022 Patch Tuesday (10:00) Dave's Pro Tip of the Week: iPhone Volume (11:30) Takes: Candy Crush turns 10 (13:40) MrBeast takes over top YouTube spot from PewDiePie (15:10) Ticketmaster scrutiny after Taylor Swift ticket issues (17:40) Atari 50th anniversary collection (20:00) Apple prepares to get chips made in USA (21:15) Bonus Odd Take: Hipster Star Wars (22:00) Picks of the Week: Dave: Digital Giza (23:15) Nate: Notpicks.com! AILKIN 56W PD USB C Car Charger, Type-C Super Fast Power Charging Block 3-Port USB A & USBC Auto Cargador Carro Lighter Adapter for iPhone, iPad, Samsung Galaxy, LG, Google Pixel, Moto, USB-C&A Port (24:40) Find us elsewhere: https://www.notnerd.com https://www.youtube.com/c/Notnerd https://ratethispodcast.com/notnerd https://www.tiktok.com/@notnerdpod https://www.twitter.com/n0tnerd/ https://www.instagram.com/n0tnerd https://www.facebook.com/n0tnerd/ info@Notnerd.com Call or text 608.618.NERD(6373) If you would like to help support Notnerd financially, mentally, or physically, don't hesitate to get in touch with us via any of the methods above. Consider any product/app links to be affiliate links.

P3 Spel
81. Game Awards-nomineringar och svensk spelmusik

P3 Spel

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 31:20


Det råder oenighet om vilket spel som kommer bli den stora Game Awards-vinnaren. Victor har kört "Warzone 2" hela natten och "Candy Crush" firar tio år. Vi gästas av ett gäng svenska spelkompositörer. Candy Crush, A Little to the Left, Metal: Hellsinger, Valheim, Call of Duty: Warzone 2

Geek Forever's Podcast
Geek Monday EP156 : กรณีศึกษาทศวรรษแห่งความสำเร็จของเกม Candy Crush โดย King.com

Geek Forever's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 10:16


Candy Crush Saga ได้รับการดาวน์โหลดมากกว่า 3 พันล้านครั้งนับตั้งแต่เปิดตัวในปี 2012 กลายเป็นเกม Puzzle ที่มีการดาวน์โหลดมากที่สุดตลอดกาล เกมดังกล่าวได้กลายเป็นปรากฏการณ์ระดับโลกที่ดึงดูดผู้เล่นหลายร้อยล้านคนจากทั่วโลก  ด้วยจำนวนด่านมากกว่าห้าล้านล้านด่านนับตั้งแต่เปิดตัว มีการเล่นในเจ็ดทวีปรวมถึงแอนตาร์กติกา ด้วยผู้ใช้งานมากกว่า 200 ล้านรายต่อเดือน แฟรนไชส์ ​​Candy Crush  จึงเป็นแฟรนไชส์เกมที่ทำรายได้สูงสุดในร้านแอพของสหรัฐฯ ในไตรมาสที่สามของปี 2022 ซึ่งครองตำแหน่งมาแล้วเป็นเวลา 21 ไตรมาสติดต่อกัน เลือกฟังกันได้เลยนะครับ อย่าลืมกด Follow ติดตาม PodCast ช่อง Geek Forever's Podcast ของผมกันด้วยนะครับ ========================= ร่วมสนับสนุน ด.ดล Blog และ Geek Forever Podcast เพื่อให้เรามีกำลังใจในการผลิต Content ดี ๆ ให้กับท่าน https://www.tharadhol.com/become-a-supporter/ ——————————————– ติดตาม ด.ดล Blog ผ่าน Line OA เพียงคลิก : https://lin.ee/aMEkyNA ——————————————– ไม่พลาดข่าวสารผ่านทาง Email จาก ด.ดล Blog : https://www.getrevue.co/profile/tharadhol ——————————————– Geek Forever Club พื้นที่ของการแลกเปลี่ยนข้อมูลข่าวสาร ความรู้ ด้านธุรกิจ เทคโนโลยีและวิทยาศาสตร์ ใหม่ ๆ ที่น่าสนใจ https://www.facebook.com/groups/geek.forever.club/ ========================= ช่องทางติดตาม ด.ดล Blog เพิ่มเติมได้ที่ Fanpage : www.facebook.com/tharadhol.blog Blockdit : www.blockdit.com/tharadhol.blog Twitter : www.twitter.com/tharadhol Instragram : instragram.com/tharadhol TikTok : tiktok.com/@geek.forever Youtube : www.youtube.com/c/mrtharadhol Linkedin : www.linkedin.com/in/tharadhol Website : www.tharadhol.com

Character Reveal
Geekly 215: "I am thou, thou art Mr. Brightside"

Character Reveal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 94:46


We recorded this episode  about two weeks ago, and things changed a bit...but! We've got the news and commentary! We talked some politics and rough situations, but then we did get into some fun. We recapped our Halloweens, did some Vtuber chat, the 1776 musical, some kdramas, and the Weird Al movie. Also, some game chatting happened, including Overwatch 2, some Final Fantasy controversy, and the Candy Crush drones? Whew, let's see what the next week brings.Check it out!Explicit language on this one.We're partnered with Grinding Coffee Co!Follow our link: https://grindingcoffee.co/?ref=CHARACTERREVEAL and use Offer Code: CHARACTERREVEAL for a discount!"Showdown At The Buttercups Hallway Throne Room" (RobKTA ft. Glenntai - https://soundcloud.com/robkta/showdown-at-the-buttercups-hallway-throne-room-ft-glenntai-undertale-remix)Find the show on iTunes, Google Play Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and Simplecast.fmFind the show on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6QoHk8iEsVGTpd2qdTlH-gFollow us @CharacterRev on Twitter and find us on Facebook!We're on Instagram @characterrevealDom is @brothadom on the tweets and the tumbles and generally on the netSteph is @captainsteph on Twitter, @hella_steph on Instagram, and @thesnowqueer on TumblrEric is @TindiLosi on Twitter and the internet as a wholeFind everything at: https://linktr.ee/characterreveal

Fletch, Vaughan & Megan on ZM
Fletch, Vaughan & Hayley Podcast - 21st November 2022

Fletch, Vaughan & Megan on ZM

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 82:45


Candy Crush turns 10  Tauranga's Search History  Top 6: Neighbours  Community Notices!  Vaughans Romantic Weekend!  Fact of the Day Day Day Day Daaaaay!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

XoneBros: A Positive Gaming & Xbox One Community
Xbox Purchased Activision For CANDY CRUSH!

XoneBros: A Positive Gaming & Xbox One Community

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 80:19


Phil Spencer said that Xbox purchased Activision for Candy Crush. We discuss! As always we also talk all things Xbox with the most positive gaming community on the planet! Whether you like your video games on the Xbox Game Pass, Game Pass for PC, or Game Pass Ultimate, this podcast is for you. Join this channel to get access to perks: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1H1n2Z3V-EA1gYZAIFqZrA/join Discord - https://discord.com/invite/tQ6sVWq Subscribe on itunes - http://bit.ly/1txm2WP Website - http://www.xonebros.com/ Who are the XoneBros? We are your exclusive Xbox Series X & Game Pass weekly podcast. We are more then just a podcast though, we are a positive gaming and Xbox community. We are a group of friends who love gaming, comics, fantasizing about super powers and making lame jokes. We strive to bring you news, informative discussion and rockin good times on a weekly basis all while discussing the world that is Xbox. We are the brothers you never had and the sisters you always wanted... we are the XOneBros.

Morgonpasset i P3
Kodjos trauma, robotnedslaget i Polen och rättegången mot Theodor Engström

Morgonpasset i P3

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 93:55


Kodjo Akolor delar med sig av sitt trauma, David Druid har blivit utsatt för ett hatbrott och Margret Atladottir kommer med breaking news om den ständigt aktuelle Pete Davidsson. Vi pratar med Malena Britz, forskningschef på Försvarshögskolan om säkerhetspolitiken i Europa efter robotnedslaget i Polen. Effie Karabuda firar att Candy Crush firar 10 år och Linus Lindahl på P3 Krim har varit på rättegången mot Theodor Engström. Programledare: David Druid, Kodjo Akolor och Margret Atladottir

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

Despegó Artemisa 1 / Todo el mundo quiere un escritor fantasma / Lucha de robots... judicial / 10 años de Candy Crush / Sorpresa con el Snapdragon 8 Gen 2 / Apple cambia su pantalla siempre encendida Patrocinador: Si estás buscando un vehículo eléctrico para tu negocio, pásate por los DTS Business Days de Citroën Pro. Del 7 al 21 de noviembre, tendrás ofertas exclusivas de leasing con financiación adaptada a tu negocio, o renting completo con todos los servicios de mantenimiento. — Descubre todo en profesionales.citroen.es, o en tu concesionario Citroën más cercano. Despegó Artemisa 1 / Todo el mundo quiere un escritor fantasma / Lucha de robots... judicial / 10 años de Candy Crush / Sorpresa con el Snapdragon 8 Gen 2 / Apple cambia su pantalla siempre encendida

Pass The Pop Culture
Will Netflix choose Dave Bautista? Phil Spencer wants Candy Crush and more!

Pass The Pop Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 35:33


Dave Bautista needs to be cast for Gears of War! Or will Netflix ruin another name? Phil Spencer talks about what he really wants, will Sony fight for Call of Duty? Some Thunderbolt news and Xbox Game pass game releases! 

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
Phil Spencer really wants you to know that native Call of Duty will stay on PlayStation

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 65:19


Phil Spencer, CEO of Microsoft Gaming, is in charge of Xbox and all the game studios that Microsoft has acquired over the years. Phil came to talk to us hours before the European Commission announced an in-depth investigation into Microsoft's proposed 68.7 billion dollar acquisition of Activision Blizzard, which makes the enormous Call of Duty series, as well as Candy Crush on phones.  So I had the chance to ask Phil: Will he make the concessions that regulators want in order to close this deal? And is the deal really just about Call of Duty, or something else? Is Microsoft committed to keep Call of Duty available on Playstation? Phil's a candid guy. He's been on Decoder before. I always enjoy talking to him, and this was a fun one. Links: Microsoft's Phil Spencer on the new Xbox launch - The Verge Microsoft to acquire Activision Blizzard for $68.7 billion - The Verge Why Microsoft bought Bethesda for $7.5 billion Microsoft announces big, multistudio push to create more Xbox exclusives Bethesda's Starfield and Redfall have been delayed to 2023 Tech antitrust pioneer Lina Khan will officially lead the FTC Sony says Microsoft's Call of Duty offer was ‘inadequate on many levels' Microsoft: Xbox game streaming console is ‘years away' This is Microsoft's Xbox game streaming device Google is shutting down Stadia in January 2023 - The Verge Razer's Edge is one sharp-looking cloud gaming Android handheld Logitech G Cloud Gaming Handheld review: terminally online Steam Deck review: it's not ready Steam Deck, one month later Tech Leaders Discuss the Metaverse's Future | WSJ Tech Live 2022 Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella on the business of Windows Microsoft partners with Meta to bring Teams, Office, Windows, and Xbox to VR EU opens ‘in-depth investigation' into Microsoft's Activision Blizzard acquisition Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23223230 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. It was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Editorial Director is Brooke Minters and our Executive Director is Eleanor Donovan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Sekulow Brothers Podcast
Teachers Union to Parents: You Don't Know What's Best For Your Kid

The Sekulow Brothers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 35:56


Today on the show, Maricopa County election officials are STILL counting votes, a teachers union thinks it knows what's best for YOUR child, Jay Leno is rushed to the hospital... and who's cooler: people who play Wordle… or people who play Candy Crush? Or… neither.  Topics Discussed:  Maricopa County election results  Teachers union and parents  TikTok/China  Wordle vs Candy Crush  Amazon layoffs  How Floyd Mayweather saved Christmas?  Logan: good MMA weekend  Logan Paul  World Cup teams  CenturionLabs.com/bros Jay Leno rushed to hospital    Find out more about Lear Capital by visiting learbros.comSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Stack of Dimes
SOD #434: Candy Crush

Stack of Dimes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 65:54


Roden and Thunder dig through their Halloween candy bags and wash it down with some fast food. 

Behind the Numbers: eMarketer Podcast
The Weekly Listen: Early Changes at Twitter, Stores Within Stores, and a Drone Candy Crush Ad | Nov 10, 2022

Behind the Numbers: eMarketer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 45:41


On today's episode, we discuss what to make of the early changes at Twitter, whether stores within stores really work, what to expect now that Netflix Basic With Ads is here, a drone Candy Crush ad in the sky, Sainsbury's playing the loyalty long game, an explanation of the ways US consumers cut costs, how much Americans love cheese, and more. Tune in to the discussion with our director of reports editing Rahul Chadha and analysts Suzy Davidkhanian and Max Willens.   For sponsorship opportunities contact us: advertising@insiderintelligence.com For more information visit: https://www.insiderintelligence.com/contact/advertise/ Have questions or just want to say hi? Drop us a line at podcast@emarketer.com    © 2022 Insider Intelligence   Connected TV makes television advertising a whole lot easier. With precision targeting and accurate measurement, brands can drive performance and tap into TV's impact and prestige. MNTN makes it even easier—and more effective—with a self-serve, performance-driven marketing solution.   Get started today.

Grumpy Old Geeks
577: Self Driving Twitter

Grumpy Old Geeks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 79:27 Very Popular


A two-factor pain; Jason hops on Brian's soapbox; the self-driving Twitter crash; Meta ditches human-curated newsfeed; verification has always been a joke, but this is really hilarious; Amazon pauses corporate hiring; Google buys an AI startup to compete with... TikTok?; Adobe's Pantone, Figma issues; the Peripheral; the Witcher renewed, recast; the Machine; drone swarms for Candy Crush; Playstation VR2; Instagram plans NFT minting; Captain EO, amusement parks and mixed media theater; sharing iPads.Show notes at https://gog.show/577/Sponsors:Kolide - Kolide can help you nail third-party audits and internal compliance goals with endpoint security for your entire fleet. Learn more here.Hover - Go to Hover now and grab your very own domain or a few of them at hover.com/gog and get 10% off your first purchase.FOLLOW UPFact Check-CNN did not report Trump died on Nov. 1, 2022IN THE NEWSTwitter has removed 1,500 accounts following coordinated trolling campaignMeta to ditch human-curated Facebook News stories globallyElon Musk's First Grand Plan for Twitter? Charging $8 Per Month for a Blue CheckmarkElon Musk wants to make Twitter's edit button free for everyone, report saysElon Musk reportedly wants Twitter to bring back VineAmazon Pauses Corporate Hiring on Economic UncertaintyGoogle buys an AI avatar startup to take on TikTokDOJ takes aim at Adobe's $20 billion dealMEDIA CANDYThe PeripheralNetflix renews 'The Witcher,' recasts Liam Hemsworth as Geralt of RiviaThe Machine Teaser TrailerAPPS & DOODADSA swarm of 500 drones will plague New York City with advertising tomorrow$550 PlayStation VR2 launches on Feb. 22, 2023Meta's Instagram Plans NFT Minting, Trading ToolsSECURITY HAH!The CyberWireDave BittnerHacking HumansCaveatControl LoopNational Theater LiveThe Met: Live in HDWhite Snake ProjectsOptimizing Apps for Shared iPadGordon Ramsay Fish & ChipsHoly Chicken Ship! The full-length "Captain EO" is more brilliant than you can possibly rememberStar ToursCLOSING SHOUT-OUTSBoot Up with JasonSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Rewild - Simple Business, Simple Living
How to Stop Procrastinating & Get Work Done - #074

Rewild - Simple Business, Simple Living

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 8:47


Are you in need of rest or are you just procrastinating? It can be hard to know when to let yourself lay on the sofa and binge Love Is Blind and when you're really just putting off The Work.  I totally get it. My knee-jerk response when I'm feeling overwhelmed, unsure of what to do, or don't know where to start is to watch TV, go on Instagram or play Candy Crush. Since the pandemic, I've noticed I procrastinate a lot more than before and my ability to focus is a lot worse than it used to be. Maybe you can relate? If you can then I want to invite you to listen to this episode! In it, I'm sharing 1 little strategy I've been implementing to cut down on procrastination and get work done. 1:1 COACHING Would you like to work together 1:1? I'm in the process of putting a  private coaching container together and I'm only working with 4 new clients per quarter. If you'd like to be one of them and you want to learn more, join the waitlist here to be the first to know of availability and details. Or DM me the word COACHING on Instagram. I'm @neshawoolery!   COURSES Organize & Automate: Streamline and organize your business in just 14 days on the side of your regular routine Simple Sales School: Learn how to book clients consistently and start scaling your business to $5k months   LINKS MENTIONED FREE masterclass: 10 Steps To Go From Overwhelmed To Organized   SUBSCRIBE & LEAVE A REVIEW Don't forget to subscribe to this podcast so you don't miss future episodes! And if you enjoyed this episode, please leave a 5 star rating and review on Apple Podcasts or Spotify. I really appreciate it! FREE masterclass: 10 Steps To Go From Overwhelmed To Organized Free marketing roadmap: Starter Kit for Booking Clients Consistently My courses Instagram: @neshawoolery

NDR 2 - Wir sind die Freeses
Wir sind die Freeses: Der Candy-Crush-Effekt

NDR 2 - Wir sind die Freeses

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 3:36


Svenni will Geburtstag feiern – mit 50 Leuten! Man kann ja nicht den einen einladen, die andere aber nicht!

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News
EP298 - Amazon Q3 Earnings

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 41:07 Very Popular


EP298 - Amazon Q3 Earnings Episode 298 is a recap of Amazon's Q3 2022 Earnings Report. Episode 298 of the Jason & Scot show was recorded on Friday October 28th, 2022. http://jasonandscot.com Join your hosts Jason "Retailgeek" Goldberg, Chief Commerce Strategy Officer at Publicis, and Scot Wingo, CEO of GetSpiffy and Co-Founder of ChannelAdvisor as they discuss the latest news and trends in the world of e-commerce and digital shopper marketing. Transcript Jason: [0:23] Welcome to the Jason and Scot show this is episode 298 being recorded on Friday October 28 2022 I'm your host Jason retailgeek Goldberg and as usual I'm here with your co-host Scot Wingo. Scot: [0:38] Hey Jason and welcome back Jason Scott show listeners Jason wouldn't be a Jason Scott show if we didn't have a Little Star Wars talk I have a confession, I'm really digging and or I think the rest of the Star Wars universe is out there hating on it but I'm really enjoying it I really I liked the character from Rogue one and it's been fun seeing kind of a slower more character-driven Star Wars so have you had a chance to watch that at all. Jason: [1:07] I have I have and I'm with you now I'm not sure I was with you at the beginning it took me a little while to warm up to it. But definitely the last three or four episodes have been a lot more engaging so now I'm eager for the next episode to come out. Scot: [1:24] Yeah and then when I haven't seen it it's getting a lot of buzz those tales of the Jedi which this is kind of from the right before A New Hope ERA with and or and then tells of the Jedi goes back to the prequels so talking about some of the characters there and then clone wars and stuff so that's on my list of things I'm going to do this weekend. Jason: [1:41] Fun I watch the first episode of that this won't be a problem for you but we're like oh cool another animated Star Wars series this would be great to watch with our seven year old and it's. A little dark it's a little it's a little adult for a seven-year-old. Scot: [1:57] Had to fast forward some places. Jason: [1:59] Yeah we had to be ready. Scot: [2:01] Well thanks for joining us everyone we wanted to talk to this is the you know we're in this critical part of the retailgeek calendar where we're barreling towards Halloween we got Q3 behind us and we're were basically into the holiday season so we wanted to update everyone on some of the releases that came out here from the big companies specifically Amazon we're going to take a deep dive into that but I always think it's interesting to kind of see the setup longtime listeners will remember that one thing I think both Jason are proud of is we identified at Apple's changed privacy called IDF a some people call it a TT I'm just going to call it I DFA to keep it simple as this huge problem that no one was willing paying attention to and we are still feeling the ripples for that. What's been Jason two years now two years later 18 months. Jason: [2:51] Yeah it's crazy. Scot: [2:52] Yes so it's gotten it's gotten really crazy so so this the lead up to Amazon started with Snapchat as if we clean does and I say this I've said this for the last three quarters. Horst the so not only do their you know they had this period of time where they felt like they had stabilized but it's very clear the management team has no idea what's going on with idea if a they don't have a solution in Wall Street has kind of lost all. All hope and then their quarterly calls are just total Bedlam like it's a nothing I've ever seen before so. [3:24] If you're an entrepreneur and want to see what a reason not to go public go to listen to one of the Snapchat Wall Street colors they do not go well. [3:33] And then so that was that was kind of a bit of a train wreck but not surprised that this kind of like the third Trainwreck so you're kind of used to it I think the one thing that started the spook Wall Street was Google came out on the 25th and they basically their results were below expectations and they YouTube specifically they have their segments we talked a lot about the Amazon segments but they have a they have a search segment a third-party search segment like a first party search didn't call this but they have the I guess they call it the network which is Google off of Google so that would be like the Apple search experience that they have the Google search experience than they have the YouTube and all these other things within the alphabet family well the YouTube one is under a lot of pressure and it's not really clear it feels like it's duly suffering from idea of a problems like advertisers are not being able to track the efficacy of those YouTube videos anymore but then also The Tick-Tock you know so you would know better than I do I only have one 16 year old and a ten-year-old nice to reference but seems like everyone under a certain age and even over, even creeping into our age group is just spending hours of looking at Tick-Tock videos so that has become a huge problem for YouTube because there's only so many hours in the day and if you're looking at Tik-Tok videos during all of them you're not watching YouTube do you have any insights into the tick tock world. Jason: [4:57] Yeah no I actually think it might be interesting to explore a Tick-Tock deep dive in an upcoming episode because it it really is the social platform that feels like it's grabbing all the oxygen right now I thought the audience engagement is way up there's you know there's been a bunch of interesting Evolutions about segments of the audience that are using Tik-Tok is their primary search engine which is interesting and surprising I think to a lot of people Google is certainly trying to position Tik-Tok search is a viable competitor to Google which you know might have be true have be. Antitrust and then. Also true that we have been on these recent studies recently that a lot of Millennials are using Tick-Tock primary as their primary source of news so that's another. You know Factor but it's just winning a lot of entertainment minutes right now. Which also by the way means it's winning a lot of advertising dollars because the advertisers want to go where the engaged eyeballs are. That's been a big thing. Scot: [6:06] Yeah the other thing that's interesting and I didn't put this in the show notes just occurred to me both Android and Apple are seeing softness in their App Store revenues. [6:16] Specifically in the game segment so there's two schools of thought there one is there's so one of it is the idea of a his rippled into that where the games are not getting as many new customers because they're not running as much advertising because they can't measure the efficacy of it this one's interesting because this could be an indication apple shot themselves in the foot with IDF a most impact we've talked about on this show have been beneficial to Amazon where you know crushing Facebook or hurting Google that's obviously kind of you know those are the Nemesis nemus I the Nemesis of of Apple but this is one where you're starting to see it actually impact them in I think they called their services Revenue so that's one school of thought the other school of thought is in a yeah I don't give us enough data on this is that know it's Tick-Tock because people are just sitting there watching so many technical games it's replaced deployment of casual games so people aren't paying playing these addictive little Candy Crush type games and Clash of Clans there they're watching The Tick-Tock videos so so it's interesting to watch these consumer behaviors are changing very quickly in this post covid World in interesting ways and it's hard to tease out exactly what's going on but there's definitely you know some some big changes out here that I think will Ripple into our listeners in the retail e-commerce world as well. Jason: [7:38] Yeah it is I do think both of those things are factors I also think there's another interesting. Thing happening with the the game revenue from the app store's I feel like their history is repeating itself a little bit, if you're super old-school like you and I you remember all the old console-based Wars right like Nintendo vs. Sega and Atari and in television and one of the themes that played out on those platform things is. Often one of the platforms would be super open and invite a bunch of Publishers to make it really easy to publish titles and so there would. Bi huge dearth of titles but they would mostly be of low quality and then another platform would make it really hard to publish titles which would really restrict the. The amount of titles that were available but they tended to be better and over the history of video games the latter strategy has always won, that way when you have too many crappy titles eventually like the audience is get disenfranchised and they leave the platform. Does feel a little bit like that is what's like the App Store Revenue became so lucrative for these guys that they made it super easy for everyone to bring titles there's no more discovery on the platform because there's the signal-to-noise ratio is so poor that the only way you would discover a new game title would be via. A Facebook ad which no longer works right I can sew it all of this is kind of coming to roost it feels like. Scot: [9:03] Got it yeah the and then so that got everyone kind of wonky and then Facebook / meta did their release and that was just that was that went from their last Q2 was kind of concerning and then this was kind of a train wreck so there expenses are running rampant they are spending a lot of money on virtual reality and they're seeing no revenue from that that revenue is way off where it should be they are announcing they announced like did you see this the pro headset which is like twelve hundred dollars and it can track your your arms and feet and even your facial expressions or something it's super fancy but. You know they're not seeing any engagement from people buying the Oculus I guess they don't call that anymore buying the devices and. [9:52] The Medical West buying the medic West or any of that kind of stuff so then you would think they would get on there and say alright Q3 was rough we're going to we're going to moderate this going into the queue for they're like nope we're going to double down and it's got actually get worse in Q4 so that that freak people out Jim Cramer on CNBC MSNBC Junkie, he had the previously days he said that you know he predicted they would come to their senses and do a little layoff and this kind of thing and it was the opposite and he got on TV and apologize to the viewers and got kind of emotional there so that was that was interesting and you know day there they seem, totally distracted by the metaverse and not really didn't really have much commentary around ads it's off a fair amount they're due to IDF a as well and then. A bright spot was then yesterday morning so this is Thursday morning Shopify announced and they had a little bit of positive news what did you see there Jason. Jason: [10:51] Yeah yeah they actually had a meet and beat all around, the you know revenue is up 22 percent. You know there's a bunch of different metrics at Shopify these days because they have like the recurring Revenue they have the attachment sales attachment sales were are particularly interesting in this is, how many of the various Shopify Services each Merchant uses so are they using shop pay are they using Shopify fulfillment the the POS system all these things in the the attachment rate went way up which is encouraging for Shopify and the Marquee number is probably total gmv going through their system and that was up by 11% so it was 46 billion dollars for the quarter, um and you know the Shopify is really been beaten up the last few quarters in and you know had a lot of down quarters and a lot of it was like, e-commerce got overhyped and Shopify overbuilt and now that reality setting in they're getting creamed and so they're the the guidance was pretty low and Shopify had a pretty solid quarter and sailed by it so I think their stock has had a nice little boost as a result of that. Scot: [12:12] In shopify's coming out liar because they do this pre-market announcement which is kind of the new fashion because there's so many companies that do aftermarket that you don't get the analysts that you want on your call so they've moved to kind of a morning, announcement so they did Thursday morning and then that set up Amazon it wouldn't be a Jason Scott show without. Marker 01 Jason: [12:31] Amazon news your margin is there opportunity. Scot: [12:43] Well that other way the way I would characterize this one is a missing lower so from a Wall Street perspective they're always kind of thinking how did you do against our expectations for the current period and then how did you do for our forward-looking expectations so so Amazon missed current and then actually lowered kind of missed the future as well. Let's dig into it there's mostly mostly a lot of headwinds which does not bode well for an e-commerce or retail holiday here in the fourth quarter but let's dig into it and there are some there are some positives in here that will pick out so also as we record this the stock's down 10% which you know Amazon is one of the largest capitalized stocks out there at over a trillion dollars so 10% is a hundred billion dollars in so a lot of a lot of money sloshing around and it was. Jason: [13:33] It's like two Twitter's. Scot: [13:34] Yes yeah it is. [13:36] Good enough and if it's down to Twitter's today and it was down as much as 20 percent in after-hours trading so so really really kind of a tough report here the other caveat before we dig in is I don't know if most people track this because unless you went on an international trip or had some international business you would know but one theme we're going to talk a lot about is Europe so your how's the. Geopolitical issues with the Ukrainian situation there and then they have an energy problem because they get most of their energy from Russia so they're having energy, it also are suffering from similar inflation trends that we're seeing there's a worse because the energy is orders of magnitude worse than we see here in United States that has created a currency fluctuation very unusual so so it used to be that. You know dollar was worth euros worth of many dollars and now that is inverted or like parody there and the pound is these currencies are at. Multi-year multi-decade lows versus the dollars so the problem when you're like Amazon and you have a pretty big chunk of your Revenue coming from International entity like that when you compare your periods it creates a financial Exchange headwind. I will report all these numbers without that but it is created you know the absolute dollars of Revenue and whatnot are off even more due to that currency headwind that that's out there. [15:04] So let's look first it Revenue. Revenues came in at 120 7.1 billion Wall Street was expecting a hundred twenty seven point four billion so that point three billion was the myth that's three hundred million dollars that's. Into to that Ridge retailer that's pretty cataclysmic that's actually pretty small from a personal standpoint and you know I think if you looked at the financial exposure and whatnot it largely can be explained there the one of the bright spots will talk about is North America Revenue so this could actually bode well for listeners that are have almost just pure United States exposure the revenues were up 20 percent year over year which is pretty impressive in an acceleration from last Q which was 10% now they did have a this right Jason they had a prime day that that was that was an October 1. Jason: [15:54] Yeah I think that's going to be in the queue for numbers. Scot: [15:56] Yeah okay so that's without. Jason: [15:57] And and we don't call it Prime day we call it early Prime axis. Scot: [16:00] Yes the thing that we will not be called printing the artist previously known as permanent so so that was good and then you tracked e-commerce data closer than I do that that's got to be. Pretty significantly above the Census Bureau data right. Jason: [16:16] It's it slightly above that so we don't have Q3 e-commerce data yet so we only have that non store. Sales data and it's it's in line with an OnStar sales data but the e-commerce data is usually a little lower so next month will get that and I do have a feeling that. Amazon's Q3 is going to outperform the the industry's e-commerce. Scot: [16:42] Yep and then where is retail where did retail end. Jason: [16:46] Pretty high also the this I'm going to buy time while II. Pull up my number but this is kind of the so year-to-date retails up 9.1%. So I didn't I didn't do a Q3 breakout but. Overall spending in North America by consumers has remain robust which like has shown up in the Amazon earnings and shown up in the. The Shopify earnings which is you know I think somewhat surprised a lot of people because with all the the economic news people are kind of expecting that consumers would tighten their belt and it seems like they've changed what they spend on but they're continuing to spend so far. Scot: [17:34] Yeah yeah so that's that's right spot and then to kind of pair that in with a dark spot International revenues were down 12 percent and that's when you take out the impact of foreign currency so Europe is definitely in what I would call an e-commerce / retail recession you know have a lot of empathy for folks their power bills are just surging and they're having to decide you know do I do I pay my for my heat or do I buy a pair of shoes online or whatever it is so so I think we're going to have really rough q4q on here for anyone that has exposure to Europe now Amazon to their credit did manage their expenses and beat on the bottom line here so it was less they were able to kind of take this downward Trend and manage their expenses and so it wasn't a. Double A Miss Revenue Miss profit so it was a Miss on Revenue lower Revenue than expected but then also they kind of made it up Bob with efficiencies that being said you know it's a this is pretty interesting so so FedEx is one of the first companies kind of say hey we think we're heading into a global recession then everyone else said we don't see it and then so this is another data point that kind of says yeah there's something really going on and we're really starting to see it in the data here so Jason: [18:50] And you know there was a Jeff Bezos tweet like a week or two ago that was like kind of his own POV and I think it was batten down the hatches. Scot: [19:00] Yeah yeah so you'd imagine being on the board he sees the other thing that's interesting with these big companies as they get a fair amount of time to do this you know so we're. You know they've got another month of data that they're looking at so that we'll talk about the fourth quarter so there's reading the body language it feels like it's getting worse so we'll talk about that but on the bottom line so all that was the top line and kind of the interior parts of Revenue let's look at the profitability operating income came in at 2 .5 3 billion versus 2.94 billion so that's a point for billions of 400 million which again isn't isn't a massive number but percentage-wise it's about a 15 to 20 percent Miss so that. [19:42] Really big percentage Miss on the bottom line of expectations so yeah so that's the you know it was a Miss on the top line Miss on the bottom line so so overall Miss and then we'll talk about the lower I did see a couple interesting details the two I picked out that I'll kick it over to you Jason third-party unit so this is a metric that's near and dear to my heart hit a new high of 58 percent of units so one of the things I I in my mind that Amazon has a sliver that they can pull and send more dual s1p and more 3p if they want to drive profit over Revenue so that there's a trade-off there higher they have a high margin high margin low Revenue high margin business High Revenue low margin business and they can kind of like dial between those and it feels like that pulled that dial over towards the 3p side that could also be supply chain issues there's a million things that go on there the thing that was interesting is Amazon goes through these what I would call invest in Harvest cycles and during covid they invested a major amount they almost doubled their fulfillment for, and today they signaled the Wall Street in Q2 that they were going to go through kind of a harvesting phase where they were going to stop adding capacity in fact they've actually. [20:56] You know they've shut down somewhere houses they sold some so that they've actually started this this kind of, harvesting mode from all that investment where that's reflected is in the symmetric they release called shipping expenses which they measure as a percentage of online store revenues it was 37.2% and that's an improvement this quarter over last quarter's 37.9% so that's pretty impressive especially you know the sales grew through there so so to be able to grow the 20% we're talking about and reduce expenses is very impressive on the call they said that they were able to squeeze out a billion dollars in operation Improvement in the quarter and that they were pretty excited about that but they actually felt like they had missed their tear internal goal by 500 so we're going to do 1.5 billion and they came out with a billion so I suspect we'll see some of those things come in the fourth quarter they did say that that thing that we will not call Prime day cause I was a little bit of a challenge because you know they are so you're sitting there and you're like putting the screws to things and you're really figuring out and then suddenly you have this day where you have a record number of orders come through and it that makes it hard to do so they that was a speed bump in that, any other little tidbits you saw in the big picture before we dive into some of the other pieces. Jason: [22:11] Yeah mine we're probably a little more frivolous frivolous than yours but we always talk about you know how Amazon hates the profitability metric and they you know they talk about Gap profitability not being. Like that relevant and how much more that Jeff Bezos likes free cash flow well another example of that hitting home for me was in this earnings call they kind of talked about the last couple quarters of, of their profitability and what a huge impact, the value of the rivi on stock was on it and it like literally was like the most influential thing in whether you know they they were profitable or not, and so you know rivi on had a better quarter this time than last quarter and so that that materially changed Amazon's profitability. So it's just it's funny because they're they're not solely owned by Amazon but the Amazon is a major investor like that that's a. Kind of X Factor and their earnings that may have been previously obvious to you but then the way more important one. So you know the their first season of rings of power wrapped up two weeks ago and everyone in the entertainment industry has noted that they really haven't come out and bragged about any audience measure metrics from that show. And we know Amazon likes to brag about its winds so the assumption is that it was a little underwhelming from a performance standpoint and then in this earnings. [23:40] They reference that they got nearly a hundred million viewers for the show so that probably means they got less than 90 million viewers or they would have just said 100 million but well, generously say they got a hundred million views eight episodes of the show that means they averaged about 12.5 million viewers per episode and to put that in perspective HBO has said they got to north of 29 million. Views per episode of House of the Dragon so. You know compared to a normal TV show those are all good numbers but these are you know the world's most expensive TV show so it does seem in this first season that HBO is better at getting an audience for their. Their Blockbuster TV shows then then Amazon is so far. Scot: [24:29] I've heard better I haven't watched either I'm saving them for a holiday binge but I've heard more positive Buzz of from House of dragon than the rings of power but I don't know. Jason: [24:40] Yeah I mean I think both are totally watchable I enjoyed both there's this weird don't you know there's people that have such a love for the the. Both Worlds that you know the TV shows fall fall short of people's expectations and so I like I have a feeling for like huge. Um you know Cannon lovers of Lord of the Rings that like you know they might have been a little extra disappointed but if you kind of just come into it cold and say hey is this a good. Piece of of fantasy fiction and is entertaining to watch I thought it was pretty good. [25:16] And then the last thing and you alluded this little bit the early Prime access is not in the Q3 numbers but they do reference it in the earnings and. It was a a successful event like it's very clear that it did not. Come close to approaching the level of success that Prime day typically has or even that the prime day in October a couple years ago had. Um and you know so there's been a lot made a lot of media has written about oh it's a failure because it's not another huge. Spike like Prime day I'm not actually sure that was the bar or the goal you know Amazon like every other retailer has a lot of imperfect inventory at the moment and I'll and it seems like they got a chance to sell through a lot of that at this event and so like you know I think. How you judge that event has a lot to do with what you think the success criteria of the event was but that that's another sort of tidbit like they certainly didn't come at you know if it had been a home run it would have been one of the top Six Bullets at the at the beginning of their their earnings press release and it was not. Scot: [26:30] Yeah this this kind of goes to the changing consumer Behavior another thing that didn't chat with you before we prepped his again I watch a lot of CNBC. Jason: [26:40] Audience members are going to be surprised to find out that we ever prepped. Scot: [26:43] Are very light prep the both CEO of hurts United and of think it was American or Delta Airlines they'll talk about these new patterns they're seeing and travel wear and then there's not a great name for it yet but what's happening is people will go on a personal or a business trip and they're staying longer and because so many people are working working you know remote they'll go and do they'll go on like let's say you had a business trip somewhere you and your significant other could go to that and then have fun and then stay three more days into the next week so what used to be like little snack size trips like two or three-day trips both for personal and business have turned into these six eight ten day type trips. Jason: [27:29] Yeah it's work Leisure I'm naming it but yeah. Scot: [27:32] Yeah there you go so you know so then people are spending a lot more money on that which I think could be part of you know people only have so big a wallet and whatnot so yeah so it's gonna be interesting to see how this holiday sets of it's going to there's so many changing behaviors I it's going to be a lot to pick out of this one. Jason: [27:54] Yeah no for sure I do think. Again you know people are talking about all these economic headwinds you ordinarily that slows consumer spending way down so far we haven't in North America seeing, consumer spending slowdown but what they've spent on has toy changed a your point it is still more. Sort of like experiences and pent-up demand for things that people weren't able to do, during the height of the pandemic and it is you know they're spending more of their wallet on on needs instead of wants as the needs have gotten more expensive due to inflation so write to me the most common story we're hearing is. Revenue looks pretty strong but profitability really sucks because we're we're selling the wrong stuff and we don't have enough of the right stuff in stock. Scot: [28:42] Yeah nursing will you dug into the AWS and adds what did you see there. Jason: [28:49] Yeah well you you mentioned up front that the stock the Amazon stock really took a hit after the earnings and it feels like that was two things. Their guidance that we'll talk about in a minute but also. I think the street was really spooked by the kind of slowing rate of growth of AWS you know for a long time a device has been the crown jewel of Amazon. In terms of you know a big Revenue number that's growing super fast and is wildly profitable, so AWS sales for the quarter where twenty point five billion which is a big number that's up 27 percent or 20 percent of you adjust for currency which again. Like. In most cases you go to someone and say hey you've got a highly profitable twenty billion dollar quarter business in a grew by 27 percent this year from last year how do you feel about that, you feel pretty good but wall Street's expectations were that they would grow by more than 32 percent. And so it was like a significant Miss and if you know you look at the recent history of growth of AWS I mean you go back to 2021 it was. Thirty-seven percent growth 39 percent growth 40% growth 3733 and now 28 this is the first time it's dropped into the 20s and so I think there's a real fear on the part of investors that like. [30:11] Is the law of large numbers finally starting to catch up with this business and do you know do investors have to reset expectations about. What a WS can contribute to the pot going forward. Scot: [30:25] You lot of people have been predicting a slow down there because of the larger law of large numbers but it's always sad when it happens. Jason: [30:32] Yeah yeah and I don't know what the answer is because I'm on one hand it seems totally intuitive that it would slow down it's such a big business. That there is a strong argument that as much money as that generates it is shocking what a small percentage of the world's compute is. Cloud still and so it doesn't there it's easy to craft an argument. That we're still in the first inning of the world migrating to the cloud and so a hypothesis is not that like. The fast run rate for these cloud services is over but that businesses spending to move to the cloud has slowed down because of the economy right and that you know as as. The there's more economic dark clouds you know Amazon has certainly cut back and and tried to contain cost every other company in the world is doing that and often that means, that migration to the cloud project that they were planning you know has to take a backseat so so some of that could be in there as well. Scot: [31:35] Yeah and I saw. In the called excited energy cost so AWS also had some pressure on the bottom line and they cited energy cost and then I got to imagine this European recession you know the a lot of the the energy around a WS comes from startups and startup formation as always. Low during recessionary period step yes so if we do get a global recession it's going to be under pressure but I think the long-term addressable market for it's just massive so we'll see. Jason: [32:06] Exactly but the good news for Amazon is they secretly have a better business than in the US which which is the bloody ads business right and so we've talked about this for a couple quarters you know this used to be buried and other that you know a couple of quarters ago they had to disclose it for the first time. Um and you know so it was another good quarter. For the ads business it grew 25% 30% of you adjust for currency. So they sold 9.5 billion dollars worth of ads this quarter. Which is not as big as a WS but the margins for ads are way better than the margins for AWS because you mentioned you know the cost of goods for an ad is essentially zero. But there's very expensive electricity required for each unit of compute that a WS cells. So you add up the last four quarters of the ads business and it's now a 36 billion dollar business. [33:11] Which is another remarkable business I've done the math of a foreign of you kind of you know impute income from from AWS and ads ads has already surpassed AWS in terms of total. Income contribution. One slight wrinkle for our listeners in the world of retail and commerce right now like one of the top topics that keeps coming up over and over again as retail media networks every, every retailer has seen this Amazon business and they're launching their own version of it call the retail media Network and investing heavily in it. And every brand is struggling with how to deal with all these retail media networks and if they're a good investment and how to deal with them so that. It's a huge topic right now and I would just point out that well. [34:02] The bulk of Amazon's ad business is a retail media Network Amazon is bigger than a retailer right and so. The ads Revenue the Amazons talking about does include. Thursday night football and Lord of the Rings and you know at which in a lot of other things that Target does not have right so I just. Want to remind people that it's not really apples-to-apples to compare. You know Amazon's you know kind of 40 billion dollar annualized run rate against. You know and say that gosh if if they're getting you know this many dollars per. / retail gmv dollar than everyone else should be getting the same because it's not really Apples to Apples. Scot: [34:54] On the Amazon ads I saw this interesting article was titled Google's pain is Amazon's gaining which I thought was cute and it talked about how if you annualize that you know this is a 40 billion dollar line for Amazon which makes it a third the size of Facebook now and a sixth the size of Google so we've we've we've on the show we've been talking about this and I remember when it passed Snapchat and then Twitter so it's really there's a day where it could close in on Facebook because it's, the Amazon site is growing very rapidly Facebook seems kind of lost in the jungle focused on virtual reality and not fixing their core business so those lines could cross pretty quickly which would give us this new duopoly of Google and Amazon as which three years ago if we had said that people would have thought were crazy. You think we're crazy but yeah it's crazy. Jason: [35:48] It totally could I would say one caveat here there is a big difference at the moment between Amazon's ad business and like meta and Google's ad business. The Amazon still gets a lot of traffic by buying ads on Google, so you know that that the other big ad platforms are all organically earning their traffic and then they're monetizing it Amazon does kind of by eyeballs at wholesale from Google and then sell them retail to two brands on Amazon so there is a bit of Arbitrage that's happening there now as they create more, loyal Amazon Prime customers and more you know viewers of all their Entertainment Properties that you know it'll be more apples to apples but and I haven't looked this quarter but last quarter you know they you know on a or a quarter ago it on an annual basis they spent about 17 billion dollars on ads so. The the bottle out of traffic that they then result. Scot: [36:50] Cool so that that kind of wraps up our Q3 highlights so then let's zoom out and at the top I mentioned you know that Am That Wall Street looks at kind of the current quarter in the future quarter so that was Q3 so it's kind of a miss and then the whenever a public company like this updates the current quarter they also update our outlook for the future quarter which in this context would be fourth-quarter calendar fourth quarter so Amazon guided to 142 148 billion for the quarter so that would imply about it 4.8 percent year over year growth at the midpoint, now they don't give us guidance on North America international so there's imagine inside of there you would still see North America growing. [37:32] Fifteen to twenty percent and then you know the non North America they called the non-domestic business having a headwind and that's where you get this 4.8 would be the Delta there. But what's really bad about that is Wall Street prior to this report had thought they would do 155 billion so let me say those numbers clearly Wall Street thought that Amazon would do 155 billion in in fourth quarter and now they're saying basically 144 so so that was a pretty big lowering of expectations and then also on the bottom line Wall Street thought that would do five billion of operating income and Amazon said well 024 the midpoints to that's a change of three billion dollars so Wall Street didn't like that but you know if you're if you're you know jassy and you're running this thing you want to lower expectations because it makes it easier to beat them in the long run if you part of the Amazons DNA is to be a much longer thinking kind of company so you, typically if that's how you think you'll take some short-term pain for long-term gain so you know some folks feel like, maybe the kitchen sink this thing and they knew third quarter wasn't going to meet what everyone wanted say thought this is a great time to go ahead and rip the Band-Aid off and really lower into the fourth quarter other people look at that body language like I mentioned and they say wow. [38:48] You know it maybe it got worse especially in Europe in the fourth quarter and maybe that's what caused them to really kind of Ratchet this down we won't sadly we won't know until January February when they release their results but you can count on us here at the Jason Scott show we're going to be tracking the holiday we have some really great content planned for you this is when we kick into overdrive and really track things going on so we have a lot of content there but it's not a great set up heading into the holiday would you agree with that Jason. Jason: [39:15] Yeah I definitely think this is a strong warning sign for people that are bullish on the the holiday, I do you know kind of overall I looked at this whole thing and I say you know as an interesting earnings call. Not a heck of a lot in this earnings call was. A result of internal stuff going on in Amazon that like it very much reflects the macroeconomic trends that. That are happening to Amazon and those same macroeconomic trends of course. Happened to everyone else as well so it's interesting you know Amazon has become a very useful sort of. Indicator for where the economy is going and you know the economists have been arguing quite a bit about where it's going so it's interesting to see some data. [40:14] Yeah so this is where we will leave it today if this was valuable for you we certainly would love it if you jump on. To iTunes and leave us that five-star review make sure you've got your podcast player dialed in to download our new episodes because you're not going to want to miss. Some of the the play-by-play of holiday. Scot: [40:39] Thanks for joining us everyone we hope all of your holiday Q4 results exceed your expectations and. Jason: [40:46] Until next time happy Commercing.

Chef AJ LIVE!
CANDY CRUSH: Simple Tips for Overcoming Sugar Addiction with Sara Levite

Chef AJ LIVE!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 81:55


Sara Levite, MS, LCPC is a licensed psychotherapist and wellness coach in private practice for over 30 years helping individuals, couples and groups experience more meaningful, satisfying lives. She utilizes her extensive professional experience and integrates her passions for health and emotional well-being when working with her clients. Whether they come to her with issues of health challenges, depression, anxiety, relationship challenges, addictions or stress management, she strives to help them feel heard without judgment, supported without minimizing and guided with real-life tools to use when they are not in her office. In addition to her clinical work, she has been interviewed on several podcasts and offers virtual and live workshops internationally. Link for website: http://www.saralevitecounseling.com/ email:SaraLeviteConsulting@gmail.com Food, Feelings and Family virtual workshop: Food, Feelings & Family Virtual Presentation: http://www.saralevitecounseling.com/workshops

De Universiteit van Vlaanderen Podcast
484. Word je dommer van gamen?

De Universiteit van Vlaanderen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 15:00


Er is al veel gezegd en geschreven over de al dan niet heilzame effecten van games. Sommigen beweren dat je ze beter links laat liggen omdat je er dom, lui of zelfs agressief van wordt. Anderen beweren dan weer dat games niets dan goeds te bieden hebben. Dr. Rowan Daneels is game-onderzoeker aan de Universiteit Antwerpen en komt je uitleggen dat het antwoord waarschijnlijk ergens in het midden ligt.Zie het privacybeleid op https://art19.com/privacy en de privacyverklaring van Californië op https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Sub Club
How Consumer Subscriptions May Perform in a Recession — Eric Crowley, GP Bullhound

Sub Club

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 50:34


On the podcast we talk with Eric about the largest consumer marketplace that's ever existed, the growing exit opportunities for Consumer Subscription Software businesses, and why the CSS industry may be relatively recession-proof.Top Takeaways

Sound & Vision
David Scanavino

Sound & Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 94:58


David Scanavino (b. 1978, Denver, Colorado) lives and works in Providence, Rhode Island.  A graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design (BFA Painting 2001) and the Yale University School of the Arts (MFA Painting 2003), Scanavino has shown widely in the past 15 years in New York, across the country, and internationally.  He has had solo museum exhibitions including "Imperial Texture" at the Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield CT (2014), "Candy Crush" at the Pulitzer Foundation of Art in St. Louis, MO (2014), and “Repeater” at the Moody Center for the Arts at Rice University in Houston, TX (2017).  He has permanent public commissions installed in the Columbus Metropolitan Public Library in Columbus, Ohio and the King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia.  Scanavino has had multiple solo gallery exhibitions with Klaus von Nichtssagend Gallery in New York, as well as solo and group exhibitions at Michael Benevento, Los Angeles; Marlborough Gallery Broome Street, New York; Team Gallery, New York; Bureau Gallery, New York; Marianne Boesky, New York; and Derek Eller Gallery, New York. His work has been reviewed in Art in America, ArtReview, The New York Times, and the New York Observer, along with numerous other publications, and is held in public collections including the RISD Museum, The Cleveland Clinic, The Progressive Art Collection, the The Pizzuti Collection and the Rice University Art Collection.  Scanavino is a faculty member of the Rhode Island School of Design.

Morgenshowet - NRJ Norge
28 000 kroner på Candy Crush

Morgenshowet - NRJ Norge

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 35:42


Kristines verden går under pga Bent Høies skilsmisse. Episoden kan inneholde målrettet reklame, basert på din IP-adresse, enhet og posisjon. Se smartpod.no/personvern for informasjon og dine valg om deling av data.

Filthy Casuals with Tommy Dassalo, Ben Vernel and Adam Knox
Episode 362: The Last Of Us TV Teaser, Playdate Review, Shovel Knight Dig Review

Filthy Casuals with Tommy Dassalo, Ben Vernel and Adam Knox

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 70:15


"You know, Ellie, we really are The Last Of Us TV Teaser reactions from Tommy, Ben and Adam from the Filthy Casuals podcast where they also review the cool little video game handheld called the Playdate, the latest Shovel Knight game where the little guy actually digs for a change, as well as chatting the new Nier: Automata anime, Jetpack Joyride 2, Ben's enormous Candy Crush journey, and a whole bunch more." - Joel Miller, The Last of Us Part I.Arya Talking To Me is back! Listen to Adam and Ben talk Game of Thrones spin-off House of the Dragon here.Patreon - weekly bonus episodes and secret Filthy discord and FB groupBandcamp Premium EpisodesYouTube - including live streams and Let's PlaysTwitch Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Trying To Figure It Out
Figuring Out Nutrition with a Registered Dietitian: Intuitive Eating, Diet Culture, and Social Media

Trying To Figure It Out

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 34:10


This week on TTFIO we bring on registered dietitian and nutrition therapist Stefanie Boone to answer alllll your questions on nutrition. Stefanie shares her own relationship with food and her journey to heal it through intuitive eating. We get into what makes it so hard to listen to our hunger cues and how social media feeds into the harmful diet culture – spoiler alert: Not even Candy Crush is immune. Tune in to learn all about intuitive eating and to debunk some common food myths. Enjoy! Follow me on TikTok! https://www.tiktok.com/@allypetitti?lang=en Follow me on Instagram! https://www.instagram.com/allypetitti/ Stefanie's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/stefanieboonenutritionist/ Stefanie's website: http://stefanieboonerd.com/ Learn more about intuitive eating: https://www.intuitiveeating.org/ Al P's Three: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/27My1AtDVYwrb7kM0Ilqm2?si=2a70434127aa4519&nd=1

Compliance That Makes Sense
103 - How AML and Other RegTech Tools Became the Candy Crush Office Game for the Compliance Department

Compliance That Makes Sense

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 10:48


Adding more features, data, and analytics capabilities to your RegTech tools may sound like a worthwhile effort, but it actually does more harm than good in the FinTech world. Tune in today to hear why this trend is more like a Candy Crush office game than an effective business strategy.  If you found value in this episode, I would really appreciate if you could leave a review! My mission is to help and support as many FinTech startups as possible, and when you leave a positive review, more people can find this podcast and help their companies! If you are on Apple, just click here to review, select “Ratings and Reviews” and “Write a Review” and tell me what your favorite part of the podcast is.    Today's episode: [01:02] The dangerous trend that is taking place in the RegTech industry.  [01:41] How RegTech companies are trying to differentiate themselves.  [02:35] The main purpose of compliance tools.  [02:49] Why I don't think the strategy that RegTech companies are using is going to work.  [03:13] One of the biggest compliance inefficiencies within FinTech companies.   [05:15] Why compliance professionals often incorrectly believe they need more data. [07:54] The mission of most RegTech companies.  [08:27] Why adding unnecessary data is like a Candy Crush office game for compliance teams.  [09:21] Advice for founders who are thinking about adopting additional RegTech tools. [10:03] Let me know about your experiences with this topic!    Show links: Interested in FinTech compliance? - consider investing in the FinTech Compliance Self-Starter Package!   I would love to invite you to sign up for my newsletter. If you are interested, please click here.  

Veterinary Viewfinder Podcast
How to Dress (and Act) at Veterinary Continuing Education Events - Does It Matter?

Veterinary Viewfinder Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 29:08 Very Popular


With the fall veterinary CE season ramping up, we thought we'd discuss what to wear and how to act at CE events. Yes, we had to go there. Listen and you'll learn why. Hosts Dr. Ernie Ward and Beckie Mossor, RVT share some of their tales of attire and attitudes at the scores of vet med events they've attended. From flip flops and tank tops, to feet propped up on chairs, to lecture hall Candy Crush marathons, our duo dish on some of the more interesting personal choices they've observed, and why it matters. Viewfinders, this conversation is about much more than the clothes we wear at CE events. It's about our attitudes and behaviors and getting the most out of our precious educational opportunities. This is an episode you really need to listen to before you comment. We'd love to hear your thoughts on what to wear (or not) to CE and what behaviors you think are a distraction (or helpful!). Thanks for listening!

Mercedes In The Morning
MITM # 1693 The “Candy Crush Cheat” One

Mercedes In The Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 108:42


  *6:00: Waste of Money *7:00: Beat Mercedes for a $2,400 diamond pendant, Mercedes at Allegiant Stadium *8:00 First Concert Ever, Macklemore, Show Comes Up In Your Life *9:00: J.C.s Jerk or Justified: Dad Walking Down The Aisle

The Born Stupid Show
Episode 175 - Hi-anus

The Born Stupid Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 57:43


Back after a two week break, make sure you flush cut your zip ties, cookies between the butt cheeks, John and Mica finally try the Little Debbies ice cream, pooping and playing Candy Crush and hungry belly buttons. Also, getting Ross aroused, putting car remote chips in your body, loud thumping sounds and gotta get the skeet out. All that and more on this episode of The Born Stupid show.

My Therapist Ghosted Me
MTGM EXTRA! "Lie back, relax & play Candy Crush..."

My Therapist Ghosted Me

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 19:40


The emails keep rolling in by their hundreds and this week, it might be yours! Vogue & Joanne delve into sleep recordings, unsuccessful waxing and an unfortunate comment on a work do. If you'd like to get in touch, you can send an email to hello@MTGMpod.comFor more information about Joanne's gigs, just visit www.joannemcnally.comThank you!

Real Estate Survival Guide
Stop Saying You Don't Have Time

Real Estate Survival Guide

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 12:16


Summary: On today's episode, I want to talk about the excuse people use about not having enough time. I recently was helping and coaching a Realtor, and they told me, "Oh, well, I'd love to build my business, but I don't have time." I was frustrated because I think "I don't have time" is a cop-out for why you can't do stuff. One of the things I've really learned here in my just about three years in real estate is that there is always a reason to not do something. All these different things we've talked about on the show, you have time to do those things. Build Your Business When You Don't Have Much TimeIt's very easy to say, "I don't have time." But I've learned to do little things in the 15-, 20-, or 30-minute gaps, and you need to do that, too. Between meetings, for example, it'd be really easy to go get a snack, turn on the TV, watch ESPN for 30 minutes or an hour. But I've had to say, "Okay, no, this is time where I could get that social media post done. Maybe send a couple text messages that need to be sent." Whatever it is that needs done. In this episode, I tell the story that I shared with this realtor to illustrate this. I want you guys to think about where you're doing this in your real estate business. Where do you maybe have these blocks of time where you're sitting there playing Candy Crush on your phone rather than getting some work done? Now I want to make it very clear. I enjoy relaxing. You need to relax, right? You can't be doing real estate, or podcasting, or whatever it is that you do, 24/7. You need some margin and balance. Definitely schedule that. It all has to be balanced out. Podcast editing is provided by Kenny Carfagno. Show notes and blog posts are created by Jennifer Harshman and brought to you by RealtorEmails.com. John Schuchman is a licensed REALTOR® in Lancaster, PA with Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Homesale Realty and a part of the Andrew Welk Group. The opinions shared on this show represent the opinions & values of John Schuchman and do not necessarily represent the opinions & values of Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Homesale Realty. The opinions & ideas shared in this podcast do not guarantee or promise any results of success to the listener. 

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch
20VC: How to Build Anti-Fragile Venture Portfolios Today | Why Diversification is Overrated in Portfolio Construction | How to Think Through Sizing Investments, Market Sizing and Pricing in Today's Environment with Mike Chalfen @ Chalfen Ventures

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 57:10


Mike Chalfen is a solo GP with Chalfen Ventures and one of the most respected and successful early-stage investors in Europe over the last two decades. Among Mike's incredible portfolio includes the likes of King.com (makers of Candy Crush), Houzz, Tipalti, Snyk, and Tray.io, to name a few. Some incredible facts on Mike, he has a 15x career track record, he has a portfolio value of over $40BN+ and he joined the venture industry, the year of my birth! In Today's Episode with Mike Chalfen You Will Learn: 1.) Entry Into Venture and The Broken Customer Experience of VC: How did Mike make his original entry into venture way back in 1996? What does Mike mean when he speaks of the difference between "managing your career vs the money you invest"? What does Mike believe are some of the greatest challenges of venture partnerships today? What does Mike believe that the customer experience in venture partnerships for founders is broken today? How did seeing the prior booms and busts impact Mike's investing mentality today? 3.) Portfolio Construction 101: How does Mike think about portfolio construction today? With 9-10 core positions, why does Mike disagree with the traditional notion of "diversification"? How does the decision-making framework for Mike change when considering new investments vs re-investments? Does Mike believe that pro-rata is a lazy notion? What does Mike need to see on the upside to re-invest? How does Mike feel about the importance of temporal diversification? Why did Mike increase the cadence of his investing in 2021? Does he regret the increased speed? 3.) The Market 101: How does Mike think about the importance of market sizing? If we always underestimate the size of our winners, is this market sizing exercise not destined for failure? Why does Mike believe so many over the last few years have poorly sized markets they invested in? How does Mike assess market timing risk? What market risk is he willing vs not willing to take? What have been some of Mike's biggest mistakes when analyzing markets in the past? How did it change his perspective? 4.) Boards 101: How would Mike describe his style of board membership today? How has it changed over time? Why does Mike believe that boards at seed are not valuable? When do they become valuable? What is the single biggest mistake Mike sees so many young board members make today? What is his biggest advice to young board members? How does Mike advise founders on preparing for boards? What does he want to see? What are the biggest mistakes founders make when conducting board meetings? Items Mentioned in Today's Episode with Mike Chalfen: Mike's Favourite Books: Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood, Days Without End Mike's Most Recent Investment: Opply

The Come Up
Adam Rymer — CEO at OpTic Gaming on 1980's Internet Nerds, Adapting to Napster, and the Future of Esports

The Come Up

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 62:25


This interview features Adam Rymer, CEO of OpTic Gaming. We discuss what he learned from running Harvard's campus store, adapting to Napster at Universal Music, why entertainment doesn't value innovation, being on Universal Pictures' greenlight committee, scaling Legendary Digital and working alongside Chris Hardwick and Amy Poehler, how to create communities for gamers, why he plays Fornite with his son, and how to follow your own roadmap.Subscribe to our newsletter. We explore the intersection of media, technology, and commerce: sign-up linkLearn more about our market research and executive advisory: RockWater websiteFollow us on LinkedIn: RockWater LinkedInEmail us: tcupod@wearerockwater.com Interview TranscriptThe interview was lightly edited for clarity.Chris Erwin:This week's episode features Adam Rymer, CEO of OpTic Gaming. So Adam was born in Fort Lauderdale and was a self-described '80s internet nerd. That meant hanging out on internet bulletin boards and attending internet meetups at bowling alleys. His online passions paid off and he ended up going to Harvard after writing an admission essay, comparing entertainment dollars versus grocery store dollars. Adam's early career included Universal Music where three months after beginning his new role Napster was launched. And Adam had to figure out questions like, "What now? And who do we sue?" After rising up to the exec ranks at Universal Adam then struck out on his own to co-founder production company that worked on projects like the Rover and sci-fi hit arrival. He then became president at nerd and legendary networks where he helped build a multi-platform media business alongside stars like Chris Hardwick and Amy Poehler today. Adam is the CEO of OpTic Gaming, where he is helping to grow and scale one of the world's most exciting companies operating at the intersection of gaming and entertainment.Chris Erwin:Adam, thanks for being on The Come Up Podcast.Adam Rymer:Great to be here, man. Good to see you.Chris Erwin:Yeah. So where are you calling in from?Adam Rymer:I am in Dallas, been here about two years now.Chris Erwin:Are you in the Envy offices right now?Adam Rymer:We are. I moved here in the middle of COVID and we've been, believe it or not, working mostly in the office since I got here.Chris Erwin:Like to hear that people getting back to the office environment. Well, we're going to talk about Envy more, but actually want to rewind a bit, Adam. So going back a few years here, I want to hear about where you grew up and a little bit of what your childhood was like to see if there's any kind of glimpses into this media and digital executive that you've become.Adam Rymer:I am a Florida man. I grew up in Fort Lauderdale. Born in Miami, grew up in Fort Lauderdale, '70s and '80s which whatever anybody thinks about Miami and south Florida now is not what it was like when I was there. It was retiree paradise. And then the occasional spring break debauchery but of course, I was too young to really understand and appreciate any of it. So I just saw all these college kids coming in and thinking that would be awesome. And then by the time I was actually old enough to enjoy spring break, that it all gotten kicked out of south Florida and moved to Daytona and Cancun and wherever else. So missed out on all the benefit of all of it. But Florida was an interesting place to grow up in the '70s and '80s. Left at 17, never really went back, but definitely helped shape my desire to stay someplace warm for the rest of my life.Chris Erwin:Okay. So I have to ask you, what was your household like growing up? Were your parents into the same things that you're into now, media entertainment, digital gaming, gaming, what that looked like back in the day was very different, but what did your parents do and what were some of your early inspirations?Adam Rymer:My dad was a physician. He was an immigrant. My mom helped run the household. I had a younger sister who was six years younger than I. And so we were not overly close partially because of the age difference. And partially because we were just into different things, I was probably what you would call a quintessential nerd back in the day when it was very, very uncool to be a nerd. I got an Apple 2e when I was, I don't know, probably like eight or 10 years old and was goofing around on that with floppy discs and playing Zork and all the text base games and whatever else I could get my hands on. I remember connecting to BBSs back in the day. That was how I spent a lot of my free time.Chris Erwin:But BBS?Adam Rymer:Yeah. BBS was a bulletin board system. It was the modern, the old precursor to, I guess what you'd call like a social media network today. It was dial-in multi-communication platform where you could type and talk to other people and play games with people online, text-based games for the most part and south Florida, believe it or not, was actually the hub of some of the biggest BBS companies in the .country every now and then we'd go to meetups with people who were on these, these services, but you'd get online and play trivia and you'd play just chat with each other. And I guess back in the day, you'd consider it pretty weird. And today you just call it WhatsApp.Chris Erwin:So question, you said we would go to meetups. How old are you and who is we? Are you going with your parents or friends?Adam Rymer:Yeah. I was like 13, 14, and I'd have friends that would drive me around. We'd meet at like bowling alleys and family entertainment centers like arcades and mini golf places. And there'd be people from 14 to 40, but everybody was just connected through these online environments of being... At the time, I guess we were outcast and ostracized. And like I said, we were big old nerds.Chris Erwin:Were your parents supportive of some of your interests here with these meetups and the BBSs?Adam Rymer:Yeah, I mean, they didn't really know what was going on. For me, it was just a way to meet people and make friends and met some really interesting folks. Met some really odd, strange folks through it. Some people went on to greatness and do some pretty cool things. Some people faded off into obscurity. I think it definitely helped define and set my career in motion from being part of something that was just on the cutting edge of interactivity and technology. And 'cause there was a lot of steps to it, right. We had to, you had to get a 300-baud modem. You had to connect a phone line to it. You had to pay for time on the service by dropping off some money at a house or sending something in somewhere else. And I mean, it was really complicated, but we made it work. It was a weird time. It was like during the days of war games, if you remember the movie War Games, it was like that sort of universe.Chris Erwin:I've known you for years now. This is the first time I've really asked about your upbringing in your childhood. And within one minute, learn something completely new, but it makes sense. Everyone nowadays talks about how do you build community? How do you build fandom amongst different media brands, participants, creators, and users, et cetera? And you have now three to four decades of experience of building fandom on the internet. It's all becoming much more clear. So as you go to high school and then you're applying for college, what did you think that you were going to do?Adam Rymer:It's funny so we used to go to Disney World a lot in Florida, right? Because it's only about two-hour drive from where I lived. And I was always, I guess, kind of a weird business-focused kid at a certain level. I remember writing my college essay about Disney, but not about the cool entertainment factor of Disney about the business of Disney and how I found it super interesting that when you would go to someplace like Disney World, that you would be totally open to spending $8 on a Mickey bar ice cream that if you were just at a grocery store, you would totally freak out about highway robbery. You would just never spend that kind of money. And, I wrote my essay about like entertainment dollars being different from regular dollars. I did, I guess-Chris Erwin:So precocious.Adam Rymer:... I was a weird kid and at the time I was like, "I want to be Michael Eisner." Michael Eisner was my idol at the time not knowing a whole lot about anything, but knowing Disney and seeing how that was working, I was like, "That's my aspiration." Right? So went off to college. And at the time I was focused on engineering because as a nerd, geeky kid, I thought I was going to be an engineer, but within a year of college, I shifted over to being an economics major and really focusing more on business and really put most of my efforts into pursuing kind of game theory and business and economics.Chris Erwin:You went to Harvard up in Cambridge, right?Adam Rymer:That's the one. Yeah.Chris Erwin:So your essay must have been something special to get into that school. Right?Adam Rymer:God. To this day, I don't know how I got in. I'll tell you, I mean, it's my 25th reunion this year. I look around and I see other people from my class and I see kids today and I mean the quality of students and applications is just phenomenal. And to this day I count my lucky stars that I went there and got in there and survived. It was the hardest experience in my life. I can't even tell you, I felt overwhelmed half the time, lucky half the time. I mean, it was something.Chris Erwin:Well, if you're going to a reunion, my dad, I think is Harvard '70. And I think he's going to his reunion this year as well. So maybe you guys can bump into one another there. So you're at Harvard, you're feeling overwhelmed, but feeling lucky and grateful. And do you think you get more clarity on what you want to do when you're graduating?Adam Rymer:Yeah. Well, look, while I was there, I had my first real work experience. So we had this thing called Harvard Student Agencies. And what that is a bunch of student-run businesses on campus that are sanctioned by the university. And they let students sort of operate businesses through a platform that the university puts together. And I started out running something called the Campus Store, which basically sold futons and refrigerators and class rings and all the stuff you need for dorm rooms. And then my second year I became vice president of the organization. And one of the things that organization also did was produce the Let's Go Travel Guides, which might be a sign of another era, but it was books that you would use to go travel abroad and low-budget travel through Europe and other places around the world.Adam Rymer:And it was a team of hundreds of students that would write these books and go out and travel and run these businesses. And I did that for two and a half years of my time at school. And I found my time working and helping to run these businesses to be maybe the best education that I got over my time there. So by the time that I was graduating, I was pretty dead set on being in the business world, operating, trying to figure out some way to be an executive in some way, shape or form. Didn't necessarily know exactly what type of business to run. So I ended up going into management consulting, coming out of school because to me that seemed like the best landing spot, where I could get a sense of a bunch of different industries, bunch of different businesses, try to solve some problems for different companies and then figure out what I wanted to do from there. Or just do that for the rest of my life. Because from what I heard, that was a pretty cool thing to do.Chris Erwin:Got it. You go to L.E.K. Consulting in the late '90s. Was the experience what you expected it to be?Adam Rymer:So, so late '90s, I got to take you back a minute. I mean, at the time computers were still relatively, they weren't new, but they were not as useful as they are today. Everything was hard. The internet was slow. The amount of data that you had access to wasn't quite there, Google wasn't quite there. So I was building a lot of financial models. It was hard to do the research. We were printing things out on overhead projector slides for client presentations. PowerPoint was not as user friendly as it is today. I think I, when I started there, we were using Lotus 1-2-3, not even Excel. I was working probably 80 to 100 hours. I found the work interesting. I found the rigor interesting. I found the type of things we were doing interesting. I did not find the clients. I was working on overly exciting, and that was a big epiphany for me.Adam Rymer:I found it really hard to stay focused working for industries that I didn't have a passion for. At one point I was no joke... People say these things as jokes, I was working for a vacuum cleaner manufacturer, literally a company that made vacuum cleaners and I was helping them reallocate their sales force across the country. It was just hard. I was on the road and I was looking through maps and I was looking at different DMAs and I was trying to help them figure this out. I also spent a lot of time working in the biotech space, trying to look at different drugs that were coming to market and how they should be priced and talking to a lot of doctors and physicians about whether they would use the product and whether they would get approved by the FDA.Adam Rymer:And look, it wasn't my background. I mean, I purposely stayed away from anything pre-med I don't think I took any biology classes past ninth grade. The work was fun. The hours were rough, but not being passionate about the day to day subject was a real challenge for me. So about a year in, I was trying to figure out what was next.Chris Erwin:I hear you. I mean, I was a banker, right when I graduated from school undergrad. I think from like 2005 to 2010. And yeah, we were able to pull down 10-Ks and SEC filings, from the internet and able to get a bunch of financial information using Excel to create models. And I just remember all my MDs being like, "We used to have to get the 10-K's physically mailed to us." They didn't have Excel and they were doing modeling by hand on paper or in these really basic computer systems. And I was like, "Either that sounds terrible or it was better because you could just focus and do less." Where when you have access to technology your bosses just expect, "Well, you can work on five assignments at the same time." Right? You're equipped. But anyway, I digress.Chris Erwin:So then, okay, you do that for a couple of years and then I think you make a decision that instead of being an advisor and consultant, you want to go work for a company. You go to the line, quote, unquote, "some people say." And you go to Universal Music. So how was that transition for you?Adam Rymer:I mean, it was a magical transition for me. I mean, it was a happenstance lucky break for me and my career and the whole rest of my career, to be honest with you. And it goes down in something I think about still on a regular basis is having been a nerd. I mean, this goes back to the BBS story is I had built a PC. I was living in Cambridge. I was downloading the first MP3 files off the internet from really obscure search engines, like web crawler and LICOs. And I bought the first MP3 player that was ever made. And I would take this MP3 player to the gym and the use case for a portable MP3 player I found fascinating. The other options available at the time were a Walkman with a tape that you had to make a mix tape for, or a CD player, which for those who don't remember them, trying to get a CD player not to skip when you're at the gym or on a treadmill is almost impossible.Adam Rymer:And so I, part of me just realized like this digital music universe is going to be the way to go. This is just going to completely take over the future as the technology gets better. And I went to the consulting company I was at, and I said, "Look, we should sell a project to the music business and help them figure out the future of digital music, because there's no doubt in my mind that this is going to change the whole face of how the music industry works." To their credit they let me help work on selling that project and they successfully did sell the project. To not their credit they didn't let me work on the project.Chris Erwin:You can be the idea, the inspiration, create the pitch. And then it's like, "And you're off the team."Adam Rymer:So I left and that was the impetus for me leaving. I applied for a job at Universal and I was very fortunate to get an interview and then ultimately get hired to go join the strategy group at Universal Music in New York in, I think it was 1999, early 1999. It was a life-changing moment because the beginning in 1999 MP3 files and digital music was starting to be a huge subject of conversation. It was on the front page of USA Today. I was quoted in a bunch of things. It was something that everybody was talking about and knew was coming. But what nobody saw coming was Napster and Napster happened about three months after I got to Universal.Chris Erwin:Oh wow.Adam Rymer:So all of a sudden I was thrown into the fire with, it wasn't just me we had a team of people. But it was the, "Okay. Piracy is real. It's not going anywhere. How do we solve this?" Do we start suing the companies? Do we start suing our customers? Do we create our own technology? Do we create a subscription service, which is no joke, an idea that we presented at the time in 1999. What do we do? How do we solve this problem? Because it's not going anywhere and technology isn't where it is today.Chris Erwin:Follow-up question on that. Adam, did you feel that the leadership, did they understand the weight of the situation? Were they really panicked, very concerned or it's like, "This is an issue we should sort this out over the next five years, but take your time and be thoughtful." What was that sense inside the building?Adam Rymer:I'm going to answer that in a couple ways. I mean, this is a problem that I have seen throughout my entire career, which is that at traditional entertainment companies, the leadership is rarely incentivized to try to really innovate solutions to the biggest challenges that are in front of them. There's a lot of reasons for that. And I don't necessarily blame the leadership that's at these companies. A lot of them are publicly traded. They need to hit their quarterly returns. They're incentivized to hit those quarterly returns. Innovation is very rarely valued at these companies the way that it needs to be. Oftentimes they can buy innovation when they need to. Right? They're big enough. They've got public stock and if there's a startup, they can often buy the company that's going to solve their innovation problem. The difficulty in these cases is when you're dealing with something that's inherently illegal or theoretically illegal, you can't just buy the illegal thing and make that part of your repertoire.Adam Rymer:So the answer that was given was essentially like, "Look, let's let the courts figure this out." It was somewhat of a, "Well, obviously this is illegal. So the government should just stop this and get in front of it and shut it down because we have the right to sell music on discs and all these other things." And I think there was an inherent unwillingness to accept the fact that the consumers get to decide these things. Consumers get to decide how they want to consume content, how they want to live their lives. And ultimately it's the entertainment companies and the media companies who have to answer to the consumers on these things. And that's where I saw the biggest disconnect. And it wasn't just at the music industry. I've seen that through most of my career.Chris Erwin:Yeah. You were at Universal Music for about one to two years. So, and clearly had some early exposure to digital, but we're seeing that this is a theme from very early on in your career and your childhood. But then shortly thereafter you go to Universal Pictures. Why'd you make that transition? Did you feel, "Hey, there's a lot of inertia here, things aren't changing and I want to go to another part of the house," or was it something else? What was that catalyst for change?Adam Rymer:Well, for anybody who remembers the advent of Napster and piracy, also the crash of 2000 from a tech standpoint, just really killed the entire music industry. I mean, the music industry was cratering at that point. People were losing their jobs. Revenue was cut more or less than half very quickly. And I had an opportunity to go to business school. So I jumped and I decided I was going to ride out the storm of 2000 and everything else while I was in business school. And if there was still a music industry to go back to, I loved the music business. I would've gone back to music after business school, but between 2000 and 2002, while I was in school, the music industry kept falling. They couldn't quite figure out the solution. And I spent my summer at Universal Pictures looking at a another side of entertainment.Adam Rymer:So after school that turned into a full-time offer. My thought on it was the biggest challenge the music industry had was technology hit them like a title wave because the technology at the time had already caught up to the feasibility for music, meaning you could download a song in a reasonable amount of time to make it useful for the end-user, right? It only took a couple minutes, 5, 10 minutes at most to download a song, if not an album based on where technology was in 1999. When I graduated from, from school and went off to film the technology, wasn't there to download a movie, right? We were still a long way off from maybe not that long, but technology hadn't quite hit the film business in terms of feasibility for the piracy and the not having enough time to get in front of.Adam Rymer:So the way I saw it was this is an opportunity to get into the film business and try to help them stave off the problems that the music industry faced. How do I take the learnings from music and apply it to the film business and try to do some things differently here that we couldn't do there?Chris Erwin:You go there and you have a seven-year run and you end up rising to become I think the SP of digital for Universal Pictures where you're managing an international staff of, I think over 20 people across the US as well as London and Tokyo, if I'm right. Did you feel that at that point that you were coming into your own as an executive where you have a vision, you know how to solve problems, you know how to build the teams? And did you feel like that was a transformational moment in your career?Adam Rymer:I thought so. I thought so. It was the, "Hey, this is great. My career's really advancing. I'm at the senior levels of a major studio. I'm getting to present to some really cool people." I'm continued to have some really lucky experiences. Got involved in some very cool projects. I was always very much on the business side of it. I was pretty far removed from I'd say the creative side. It wasn't until the very end of my stint at Universal that I got put on the green light committee at Universal, which is where you actually get to have a say over which films get made at the studio, which was a pretty cool experience. Although it didn't last very long.Chris Erwin:How big is that committee and how much weight did your particular vote from the digital strategy side count?Adam Rymer:I'm not sure how much weight anybody's individual vote has, except for a couple of people on those committees. There's about 10 people on that committee across the studio. You've got home entertainment and marketing and production and the head of the studio and those kinds of things. It's fascinating. I mean, it's very kind of closed-door sort of, sort of setting very private, almost Illuminati-ish, but it was pretty cool to be in the room for some of it. But my job was to weigh in on what the digital and alternative revenue streams could be for the titles that we were working on. So things like video games, YouTube content, ancillary products. At the time we were talking about things like ring tones. What's the other stuff that we can do out of these films to generate revenue.Adam Rymer:And then I would be on the hook for delivering those numbers against the P&L for that particular title. It was pretty neat. And I felt like things were going pretty well for my career at that point, for sure. Now the downside was during my time there, we kept getting acquired. And for most people getting acquired sounds like it's a pretty awesome thing. Usually, there's like, "Hey, you got paid out. That's a big success, big exit." Well, in the big giant corporate world, those kinds of acquisitions usually get met with, "Hey, we're just kind of sitting on our hands for a while." So Universal was a big company. And when I started working for them, it was owned by Seagram. Then it was owned by Vivendi. Then it was owned by GE. And when I left, it had been acquired by Comcast.Adam Rymer:And we were always the acquired company, which meant that the acquiring company was taking their people, having them learn about the business that they were buying, meeting with everybody trying to figure out what everybody did, which resulted in a whole lot of work for all of us to educate them. And usually, that met with a whole bunch of reorganization and strategy redesignChris Erwin:Hey listeners, this is Chris Erwin, your host of the Come Up. I have a quick ask for you. If you dig what we're putting down, if you like the show, if you like our guests, it would really mean a lot if you can give us a rating wherever you listen to our show. It helps other people discover our work. And it also really supports what we do here. All right, that's it everybody. Let's get back to the interview.Chris Erwin:So, Adam, I totally feel you on if you're always the target and you're being acquired the reeducation of the new leadership. It's a lot. I mean, I remember when Big Frame was bought by Awesomeness TV and then Verizon, and then Hearst then invested thereafter, and then Comcast NBC U came and bought Dreamworks, which had owned Awesomeness. And there's always the strategic goal shift, the mandate shift there's reorganizations. And there's a point where you're just like, "I just want to get to work." And look, that's the nature of the beast, but was that a reason why after your seven-year run, you then started to explore entrepreneurship? You were the co-founder and COO and CFO of Lava Bear Films. And you did that for a few years. Was that the reason why you made the switch?Adam Rymer:Yeah, look, I mean, there were management changes and to be honest, I had been part of a very big company where I was an employee number. I still remember my employee number to this day, which says a lot, and it was an eight-digit number. So I was just a little tired of being in that kind of structure and part of me who likes solving problems and actually making things happen and not having a whole lot of red tape. There was an opportunity in front of me. The chairman of Universal had left and had an opportunity to start a film production company and asked me to help him put the business plan together for it and raise some capital and go after it. So I thought it would be a great chance for me to not only learn how to start a company from scratch but also learn about the other side of the business, the creative side of the business. How do you actually make content from start to finish?Chris Erwin:Well, you must have been doing something right at universal if the chairman leaves and wants to bring you on board to his next venture, right?Adam Rymer:I would hope so. I would hope so.Chris Erwin:So you're there. You learned the creative side of the business, which I think is, I've talked about this on a few podcasts, right? Usually, in entertainment, you're either on the business side of the house or on the creative side of the house. It's rare for people to speak both those languages. I think of people maybe like Bob Iger or David Zaslav at Discovery in Warner Media. Right. So it's smart to build out that muscle and I think that you are an executive producer on The Rover and you helped finance the movie Arrival?Adam Rymer:That's right.Chris Erwin:Produced by FilmNation and [inaudible 00:28:25] and Glen Basner and they're good friends of ours.Adam Rymer:Great guys.Chris Erwin:Yeah. They're the best. And so you do that for four years and did you see like, "Hey, maybe there's a world where you stay in the creative side of entertainment?" Was that interesting to you?Adam Rymer:Look, it was an amazing experience. I always wanted to see how the whole sausages gets made from start to end and really got to do that. I was going around to film festivals. I was reading scripts. I was handling some of the talent deals. I was negotiating a lot of the financing for the films. We were selling the projects internationally. We were dealing with the studios. We were looking at the marketing for the films when they came out. But for I'm sure you've talked about this on some other podcasts the filmmaking process is very long and very slow. And so for me, it was I like being on the creative side of the business or having involvement on the creative side. But I don't know that filmmaking was the place for me to explore that in the long term, because I'm so used to being in areas where things move very quickly, right?Adam Rymer:Even the music business moves relatively quickly. And on the digital world, I was watching things happen. Snapchat was starting to happen and Twitch wasn't quite there yet, but YouTube was really starting to take off and there were all these other things that were happening in the background. And I just felt like I was missing some really cool, innovative opportunities that were going on. So I had an opportunity to go join Legendary, which was at the time a pretty cool independent studio started by Thomas Tull. They had made Godzilla and Hangover and King Kong and 300. And he asked me if I would help them build their digital businesses over there.Chris Erwin:Was it an immediate yes? Like, "Oh yeah, this makes sense. This is an incredible studio with some incredible IP. There's a lot I can do here. Let's get to work." Or were you evaluating other things too?Adam Rymer:I wasn't evaluating other things. And it was pretty hard decision because you this was a company that I had helped start and I was a pretty big piece of, but the opportunity and it was a blank slate. I was kind of handed a, "We don't know what the right answer is and we need somebody who's got enough experience on both sides of the equation here that understands making some content, understands distribution, understands the business side of it to really help us figure out what we should do with this asset that we have." They had just acquired Nerdist and just didn't have a solid business plan on how to start making real revenues out of it. So for me, it was a puzzle to solve right back to the things that I love, which is trying to put pieces together.Adam Rymer:At a certain level the film business has a very defined path, right? There's not much to solve in that. There's always new innovations that are getting made. There's new ways to finance a film. But for the most part, the business model of making movies is relatively defined. You might say that Netflix has changed that in some way, shape, or form, but there wasn't a whole lot of, "How am I going to do this for the next 20 years and innovate and do some neat things?" And at Legendary, it felt like there was a real chance to try all sorts of new ideas.Chris Erwin:When you enter their first year, they've acquired Nerdist and I think that was... Was that founded by Chris Hardwick?Adam Rymer:Correct? Yep.Chris Erwin:And so what did you think of, okay, these are the wins that I want to get in year one. I think that we are capable of doing this. It also feels innovative. And then I think it's going to set you up to have an exciting career overseeing digital at Legendary going forward. What was that first mandate for you?Adam Rymer:First thing was really figuring out how are we going to generate consistent revenue? Because at the time the video part of Nerdist was founded as one of the funded YouTube channels. Some people might remember that YouTube was putting a lot of money into funding channels for the purpose of creating more premium content on YouTube and right around 2014, they stopped funding those channels. And so a lot of these channels ended up in no man's land of figuring out how they were going to keep their business running. And so for me, the first step was okay, well, now that we don't have this stipend coming from YouTube every year, how are we going to find ways to just generate consistent revenue even if we're still operating at a little bit of loss, something that we can project to keep it all moving. So at the time we had the Nerdist podcast and we had some content that was existing on YouTube, and my first step was, well, how do we start monetizing podcasts in a better way?Adam Rymer:So I was able to take Chris's podcast and structure a deal with Midroll and that helped get us really kicked off with our first seven-figure deal, which let me hire some more staff and start to figure out some new lines of business.Chris Erwin:Did you feel like, "Hey, we figured out a digital revenue model here for media brands and fandoms built around big personalities"? And so did that then inspire you to say, "Well, let's start buying some other companies to add onto this roster"? Because I think you then acquired Geek and Sundry and then Amy Poehler's Smart Girls at the Party.Adam Rymer:That's right. So the idea was, well, if we can create enough of scale around these celebrity-driven community content businesses, then we can justify having an infrastructure that can support all of them the right way. So that allowed us to have a sales team that could support all of them, and start doing branded content deals that could leverage the communities that were built across all of them simultaneously bring some staff efficiencies together, and allow content production to be more efficient. So we had our entire... We had our own content production team. We had our own studio where we produced all of the content that we're making for the YouTube channels ourselves and for our branded content features. And ultimately that led us to start a Twitch channel with Geek and Sundry, which is where I started to learn quite a lot about Livestream.Chris Erwin:So do you feel at this point it's like, "All right." You're attached to a big studio, you have a lot of resources, you have incredible IP to work with, but you also, you're running your own division, which has its own P&L. It seems like you're on both the creative and the business sides of the house, where you have a real strong point of view of what content we're creating. How do we monetize it? What's getting green-lit? What new platforms are we experimenting with? You're building out a team against your vision. Did you feel like, "Hey, I feel like I have it all right now"? This is checking all the boxes for my career.Adam Rymer:In hindsight, I guess so. I mean, at time it felt very stressful. At the time it felt like we were building the plane while we were flying it. And there weren't a whole lot of examples for us to point to say, "Hey, we're doing it like these guys," or we've got somebody else that's done it in front of us. There were the MCNs out there that were aggregating a bunch of channels together. And they had a somewhat different business model, but there was nobody who was really trying to create more premium level content on a regular basis. And I mean, I had to answer to a pretty senior studio executive. So I had a lot of pressure from that side, but I did have the luxury of a good balance sheet. So I wasn't having to deal with trying to raise capital on a regular basis to keep the thing afloat.Adam Rymer:There was a couple years there where it really felt like the coolest, most fun job that I ever could have thought I've had. We were going down to ComicCon. Chris was moderating panels for us in Hall H. Got to go backstage and hang out with the cast of all the Marvel films before they got on Hall H. we had all sorts of fun people coming by the studio to be in the content, got to watch and be part of a lot of the content that was being filmed at our location. I think most of the people that were there at the time will tell you that it was a pretty magical place to be for a couple of years.Chris Erwin:I mean, I remember going to your offices a couple times during that period and just looking around at the different sets and the studios. And I was like, "This sounds like a pretty amazing gig, Adam." I knew that you were working really hard and that it was a lot and you were kind of figuring things out on the fly as you said, but I think everything in retrospect, you get some clarity of like, "Oh, that was a pretty cool moment." You know? And I think that was a very cool moment for you. And clearly, you learned a lot, which has bolstered your career. But I'm curious to hear you so you started experimenting with Twitch. I think that's just an interesting precursor to some of the channels and the partners that you work with today, particularly in gaming, similar to when you saw the power of MP3s when you were up in Cambridge.Chris Erwin:And then you saw how that was going to disrupt the music space. When you were first exposed to Twitch, did a light bulb go off on your head and say, "Hey, there's something incredibly exciting about the power of live?" What was that moment like for you?Adam Rymer:I'll be honest. I wasn't the biggest, "Hey, we're going to figure out how to monetize this immediately live streaming." I was the suit in the room on it. I had some people from Geek and Sundry come to me and they said, "We think that we can create a channel for Geek and Sundry and stream different kinds of content, just do some stuff out of our office. And we will minimize the cost that it takes for us to do it and we'll give it a shot. And they did it and they got it up and running and they spent as little as they could to create a set and livestream and got a bunch of equipment donated. And it was okay. And Felicia came on and streamed with it and that helped build an audience for it. And it was programmed. I mean, the thing that was most interesting about it was it actually had a schedule.Adam Rymer:There were shows that were on certain times of day, certain days of the week, it was a live-streamed TV network. Maybe one of the first of its kind. It started to gain some traction, but it was when Felicia brought in her friends at Critical Role to stream their Dungeons and Dragons game that we really started to see the magic of what live-streaming could be.Chris Erwin:What was unique about bringing Critical Role in live-streaming Dungeons and Dragons? What did you feel was special for the audience or to help amplify marketing? What was that?Adam Rymer:Well, I mean, what was amazing about it was it found a community that never had a place to call home. So most of Twitch was watching people play video games. There was some what you'd call today, just chatting going on, which is mostly what Geek and Sundry was. There was some game playing, but nobody was really streaming D and D at the time or doing things that were a little more creative like that in a meaningful, well-produced way. And all of a sudden this show found a home and started to spread by word of mouth and it had some great talent attached to it, right? Everybody who's on Critical Role is professional voice actors in their own right. And so they brought a level of confidence to it that don't think many people have seen before. And Matt Mercer's just a genius as a DM at the end of the day. So giving this community, which is spread out around the world a home one day a week, where they can all get together and share an experience at the same time, really became a magical place to be.Adam Rymer:So Twitch loved us because we were bringing in a community that wasn't necessarily there naturally again, because most of Twitch was more based around video gaming and the D and D community loved it because it was giving them a place that they had never had before. It was a little bit like lightning in a bottle.Chris Erwin:It just goes back to, I think I was listening to a podcast by Ben Thompson a couple weeks ago. And I think a point that was made is never underestimate the ability of the internet to reach these incredibly niche fandoms all around the world. There is interest in anything at a minimum, at least one person will be into something if you put it out there. But I think Dungeons and Dragons has this massive community and like you said, but they didn't really have a place to call home and you guys created that for them. I think that was just like so beautifully articulated. I love that. So you're doing your thing at Nerdist and Legendary you're there for five years, but then at the end of your five-year run, you go into this exploratory phase where you're advising a few different companies.Chris Erwin:I think you're reimagining cinema with a company called WeVu. And I remember being in your living room, having some brainstorm sessions around that with a few mutual friends, shout out to Adam Sachs. And then you end up as at the CEO, as of Envy Gaming, a big bet on the gaming space. How did that run come to an end? And then it kicked off. I'm going to make a bet on the gaming space. What did that look like for you?Adam Rymer:Sure. So Legendary sold to a big Chinese company called Wanda and I'll make it a short story. It was just the fit for me at the new version of the company wasn't quite the same as it was under the previous leadership. So I left and started advising companies that I just thought were really interesting and cool out there. Did some work with [inaudible 00:40:44]. Did some work with Participant. Did some work with ranker.com, other friends of mine that I had known over the years that I just had a chance to really help out here and there. And then out of the blue, right before COVID hit, I got a call from a recruiter about this position with NB Gaming. And as I've said, I've been a gamer geek nerd most of my life. And I've been paying attention to what's been going on in the gaming and Esports space for a long time.Adam Rymer:At Universal, I was responsible for all the video game work that was done. We had produced a couple games while I was there. We looked at buying a big video game publisher while I was there. So the video game space wasn't totally new to me, but the video game lifestyle space was a little bit new. And I had been following the growth of Twitch, the growth of what you'd call the celebrity influencers and creators that were emerging on the platform. And I had seen some of these Esports organizations. I hadn't necessarily known of Envy at the time, but I did know of a couple of the other ones that were out there. And I saw the potential, right? I saw the early days of a new form of brand and community entertainment, which was emerging on Twitch and other platforms because it was interactive. And when I started meeting the people that were here at Envy, it really felt like the next phase of innovation for me.Adam Rymer:And if you think about the path of my career, which has always been trying to find where's that edge of entertainment and technology and consumer behavior music with Napster and film with digital distribution and Nerdist with community-based content. This really feels like the edge of the universe at the moment, in terms of where the community is starting to emerge, where you've got a new generation of people who are not watching traditional television. It felt to me like this is a place to plant my flag for a while and see how I can help this develop.Chris Erwin:So you end up moving. You were based out of LA. Your family was in LA but the role was in Dallas. Did you just move there full-time in the beginning or were you commuting like four days a week in Dallas? And then back to LA on the weekends?Adam Rymer:I moved here to Dallas in the summer of 2020 having never met anybody at the company in person because we were all working from home. And my family stayed back in LA because of the pandemic. And I would fly back home every two weeks to see them. And we did that for about nine months while my kid was finishing the school year. It was an interesting time to be away from home and in a new city that I knew absolutely nothing about. I had never really been to Dallas before. I knew nothing about the city.Chris Erwin:Did you take on the role without ever meeting anyone from the founding team, the leadership, or the investor group in person? It was all Zoom calls and then you signed on the dotted line?Adam Rymer:Yes.Chris Erwin:Wow. That's a big decision.Adam Rymer:Yes. That's how convinced I was about the future of this space and also the people that were involved with it. So the interesting part about that period of time is I have a son who at the time was eight years old. And the way that he and I would stay in touch and I think this is telling to the future of this space, the way he and I would stay in touch while I was living in Dallas and he was in LA is we would play Fortnite together. Several times during the week I would get home from work, we'd both load up Fortnite and we'd put on the cameras. And while we were playing Fortnite, we'd catch up on how school was going and what his friends were up to and how he's doing. And that to me was the whole reason why I'm in this space.Adam Rymer:Because yes, we were playing a game and we were shooting people and we were like having a good time, but it was really just about us spending time together and talking to each other and interacting with each other. And that's what I think we're going to remember at the end of the day and not what skin we were wearing or any of that kind of thing, which to me shows how gaming is just the natural way of interacting and communicating for people today.Chris Erwin:That is so cool. I mean, I think about from our generations like Gen X and Millennials, oh, early memories of your father, it's like going fishing together, right. Going camping. And I think that your son, right, these like Gen Alpha, their memories will be like, "I remember when we used to play that old game Fortnight and we used to talk and catch up about our what was going on in school." It's just going to be a whole transformation of memories of childhood and with their parents, you know?Adam Rymer:Absolutely.Chris Erwin:I love that. We always say for us, you need to be where your clients are at. Tell our clients to don't resist or to be forceful. And I really like you're meeting your kid where he's at. If you look at the stats, we just did a big research project for a toy retailer of where are parents and kids independently and then also as a co-viewing unit spending their time online. It's on social media and it's in these big gaming environments, like Fortnite, like Roblox, like Minecraft. So I think that's pretty smart parenting, Adam. I am not a parent, but I think that it seems like smart parenting from afar.Adam Rymer:Absolutely. It's a new world. I keep trying to explain to people who are in a, I don't even want to say older generation, right because I don't feel like I'm old these days, but I'll just say anybody who's Gen X and older, we tend to use the word gamer, right? As like, "Oh, there's gamers." People are gamers and it's a misnomer now. It made sense for our generation because gaming was such a new thing for people to do. Not everybody had an Xbox, not everybody had an Atari. Gaming wasn't a natural course of business. But for this new generation, for the younger generations, asking somebody if they're a gamer is like asking people in our generations, if they listen to music or if they go to the movies.Adam Rymer:Well, you might talk to people and say, "Hey, what TV shows are you watching?" And there might be people who say, "I don't watch TV" and you're going to say, "Okay, well, that's strange. I mean, most people watch TV." But in this generation, I think we are increasingly reaching the stage of saying, "What games do you play?" Not, "Are you a gamer?" Because to me that is the given for this generation.Chris Erwin:I love that. Such a poignant point. Couple quick questions before we go onto our closing rapid fire. But when you got in there, I remember I'm like, "Adam, so what's your initial focus there?" And I think that you had a point of view like you've done at your other companies of what is the 360 monetization model? How do you take these teams, these players... How do you build media brands around them? How do you build fandoms? What is the talent-driven model to really take this business to the next level? If you could just tell our listeners what your initial re-imagination and growth vision for the company was in year one.Adam Rymer:A lot of it is applying principles to it at a certain level. What we do, isn't very different from other forms of media and entertainment that I've been involved with. And other people have been involved with in the past, which is we have a brand that has stature and meaning and association. It has a community around it. And through that brand and through the content that we create, we reach our users, we reach their eyeballs. It helps our brands and advertisers reach their eyeballs and it helps us connect with them. And so that's no different from any other form of media, whether that was magazines back in the day or television, or filmed entertainment, it is at a certain level. It is reach and it is scale. And so when I came in here first, it was really just understanding the dynamics of the industry.Adam Rymer:Where does monetization happen? What platforms does it happen on? How do we actually get in touch with these people? What kind of data is available? But then it was what are the assets that we actually have and what levers can we pull and what is our programming? So when you start thinking of the brand and your programming, you start saying to yourself, okay, well, I've got teams and I've got content creators, and I've got original programming that we put out. And you start looking at the pieces of your organization as what reach to each of those pieces have. So I've got this team and they play a certain game. Let's call it rocket league. Well, what audience does that rocket league team bring to me? Where are those people from? What demographic is that group of people? Are they mostly in the US or are they mostly international?Adam Rymer:What age are they? What states do they come from? What do they care about? What brands and industries are they interested in? And then I've got our call of duty team. Same thing. What reach do they have? Switch over to our content creator side. Okay. Well, if I'm going to bring on a new content creator, what's the audience that I'm getting from working with that content creator? It's not overly different. I mean, it is, there are differences in nuances, but if you are Discovery Channel and you're thinking about filling the 8:00 PM slot on Thursday, well, what are you going to put on in that 8:00 PM slot? You don't want to put on something that overlaps with another show that you already get that audience from. This is the whole definition of programming. It's the same reason why Game of Thrones and Westworld aren't on at the same time for HBO. They sequence those things because they want to optimize the programming and make sure that people stay subscribed to HBO for a longer period of time.Adam Rymer:So understanding your audience, understanding who's coming in, understanding the reach that you get with the assets that you have available starts to get the company thinking about us as a media property. And once you shift your mindset to thinking about it as a media property rather than necessarily a sports team, you start to build business processes around that in a different way. And that's what we're focused on at the moment.Chris Erwin:I don't think I've heard a smarter encapsulation of a media strategy than your past couple minutes, Adam. So very well done. So I'm curious in putting that strategy in place, just over the past almost two years, what are some of your favorite moments of some wins with the team? I was reading on LinkedIn. There's the Valorant Championships and the Green Wall, the Fandom really coming alive, having over a million concurrent viewers of the competition. Is that one of them? Are there others? What has that been for you?Adam Rymer:To start with our Call of Duty team won the CDL Championship within a month of me being here at Envy, which was mind-numbing. It's like, imagine joining the Chicago bulls five days before they won the NBA Championship, right? It's that kind of thing. And all of a sudden you've got a ring and you've got a trophy and you've got all this stuff and you barely started to understand what this world is all about. It was a pretty phenomenal moment. It was an amazing way to get indoctrinated into the space and get excited about it all. So now I've got a championship ring that's sitting in my office and that was a pretty fun, pretty fun moment. But yeah, about a year later, we merged with OpTic Gaming, which some of the listeners might know is one of the biggest, most passionate fan bases in the world when it comes to gaming and Esports.Adam Rymer:And that has been like wildfire for us. Hector Hex, just an amazing individual who's knows how to work with his audience and knows how to create content, and knows how to bring the audience into the brand in a really phenomenal way. And he's been educating us on a bunch of things that we didn't quite understand, and we've been working with him on some of the monetization things and just really couldn't have put two better organizations together. So within two months of bringing those organizations together, we won the Valorant Championship in Iceland, which is, as you were mentioning, had over a million people watching it. And just again, just another one of those too picture-perfect of a moment for us. Great memories that we're going to have forever.Chris Erwin:That's awesome. A final question for you is what's next for Envy gaming? What should people be watching for in some of the upcoming announcements, some new business initiatives? I think I was looking at from your team, there's some new virtual character immersion like CodeMiko. I'm pronouncing that right? Maybe some web three activations. What are you working on right now?Adam Rymer:What I think you're going to see out of us over the next year is really continued expansion of optic from a brand perspective, in terms of the areas that we're in. Just really trying to explore new ways to reach our fan base and build communities. I think the whole world of Web3, and I think a lot of people talk about Web3 without necessarily... I'm not saying I'm an expert in it, but I don't think a lot of people quite understand some of the dynamics of what makes Web3 different from Web2. And the biggest thing to me about Web3 that makes it different is community. If you don't have a community tied to some Web3 initiative, then you're missing it. I'll give you an perfect example. Web2 is about user acquisition on a one-to-one basis.Adam Rymer:So you've got a game like Candy Crush and you spend 50 cents to bring somebody in to Candy Crush and they spend a $1.50 on the game. You've made a dollar in profit and you can just keep doing that cycle all day. And you find new ways to bring more people in and you get a huge user base. There's a community that maybe gets formed online on Reddit boards and whatever else talking about Candy Crush, but the community is not an inherent part of what makes Candy Crush successful. In Web3 it's a little bit different. Web3 is if you bring somebody in, if you spend 50 cents to bring somebody to your Web3 platform and they get there and there isn't a whole community for them to connect to, they're going to leave. There's nothing for them to do. The community actually makes your project valuable.Adam Rymer:So in game terms, it's like bringing somebody in to play Fortnite, and they're just sitting in the queue, waiting for the game to start. And because there aren't 90 other people for you to play the game with, you're just sitting there and you're just waiting and waiting and nothing happens. And so it doesn't matter how much you spend on user acquisition, you didn't get your value for it. So we're going to be spending a lot of time on how do we build our community in new ways? How do we get the information about who our community is? Where do they live? What are they looking for us to do? How do we bring value to them? And how do we find partners that want to provide value back to our community? So how do we find those really interesting partnerships where we can take the Green Wall and OpTic and Envy and work together with those platforms to create really interesting dynamic opportunities together and not try to just have everything operate through our own vertical.Chris Erwin:Well said, something that we talk about at RockWater is the sense of valuing your community and communal ownership. I think that there's been a lot of literature over the past, call it year, particularly as you look at the building of different game franchises, where these users, their engagements, all the dollars that they spend on the games, all their engagement that can drive advertising revenues, right? And in-game purchases, the value that they create for a few stakeholders or investors or game owners, and it really gets siphoned to just a few. So the question then becomes, "Well, how do you reward the community for all the value that they're creating?" And I think there's actually a much bigger win there where if there's more of that two-way street, in terms of value sharing, the overall pie gets a lot bigger and everyone can win. And so I think that's a really, really smart mentality.Chris Erwin:Adam, I'll close it out with this before we get the rapid-fire. I just want to give you some kudos here. I think we were first introduced when I was probably at Big Frame and Awesomeness. So this is probably around maybe like 2015 to 2017 timeframe.Adam Rymer:Wow.Chris Erwin:And I know dating us a bit. And I just remember when I met you, you were running Nerdist and Legendary Networks at the time. I was like, "This is a guy who's a super sharp operator." He totally gets it. He's got both sides of his brain activating. I very much thought on the business side, on the creative side, I thought you really understood talent. You knew traditional entertainment, you knew digital. And I thought you were a very, very special mind and operator. And I remember when you were in your, what I call here in my notes, the exploration phase. So like after Nerdist and before you went to Envy Gaming, I think there was a period where you are wondering what really excites you. What's really going to get you going. And I think a lot of things that come across your plate that you weren't too thrilled about. And I just knew, I mean, I don't know if I ever shared this with you the right thing's going to come across Adam's desk and he's going to crush it. And it's going to be a really exciting moment for his career. Now I look back at all the success that you've had with Envy over the past, less than a couple years, and I am not surprised whatsoever. And I can't wait to see what you do there over the next two to three years. So I wanted to just share that with you.Adam Rymer:Thank you, my friend. It was definitely an adventure after leaving Legendary. There were points where I felt like I just needed to take something for the sake of taking something. I will wholeheartedly recommend people holding out for as long as you possibly can to find the right thing that feels right. If you can. Obviously don't sacrifice your family in your future and