Podcasts about Rain Man

1988 American comedy-drama film

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Best podcasts about Rain Man

Latest podcast episodes about Rain Man

A TEAM
4.1 Diagnosis

A TEAM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 106:32


Hey there! Welcome to A Team Podcast. Glad you're here.Since you're here, it's very likely that you, or someone you know, has been searching for information about autism in adults. You've come to the right place. This podcast is all about authentic conversations about being an adult AND being autistic. We're out and proud, and you should be, too. We hope that hearing us talk and laugh (we laugh a lot) and occasionally cry (emotions overwhelm us) will make you feel nothing but positivity about life for autistic people. We call ourselves the A Team for a reason, and we're happy to have you join us. We're re-running our very first recorded conversation because we think it's an important one. Our two founders, Rafael and Robert, explore what it means to them to have learned as adults that they are autistic. We've heard from hundreds of people that this conversation helped them feel, for the first time, that an autism diagnosis was not necessarily a bad thing. In this conversation, we discuss life before and after getting diagnosed, Imposter Syndrome, masking to get along, the history of autism diagnosis, and how having a diagnosis leads to having more understanding and support.If you want more information about the topics we discuss, check out your podcaster's description of this episode for links. And check out the chapter markers to find things that may be important to you. Thanks for listening. Moon LandingRafael MontessoRobert Smythe08:48.68Subreddit: AutismTranslated10:32.52 Why did you seek a diagnosis 13:39.50 Rain Man (1988) - IMDb18:14.80  learning and research after diagnosis 21:08.75 we're very aware of what's going on in our heads 23:53.96 Robert: "I always feel like I'm in a room full of people who are all speaking the same language and I'm speaking the same language but nobody understands me, right? "24:54.24 Outsides don't match insides - further the diagnosis story 28:31.42 Robert's details about getting a diagnosis Robert29:44.37 imposter syndrome32:17.00 Autistic Pride 33:52.46 trying to fit in & I don't find you interesting35:44.17 Am I a willful asshole or just autistic? 37:17.50 Diagnosis gives permission to relax and forgive yourself 38:30.97 Every autistic person is different. "You know the saying is, when you meet 1 autistic person, you've met 1 autistic person."39:52.37 The beginning of the Smythe Love Story and lessons on relationships 46:38.28 Is a diagnosis worth it? 51:45.95 The Florence Syndrome and the importance of a diagnosis53:23.00 David (Michelangelo) - Wikipedia57:36.48 Knowing that you need to prepare to go out59:05.62 Having a diagnosis lends to having more understanding and support 01:07:24.45 Masking to get along 01:13:43.51 The conundrum of diagnosis for young autistics01:16:16.53 Parents trying to fix autistic kids 01:21:03.78 "I don't believe in all this autism,  it wasn't around when I was a kid or it's from the foods we eat…" 01:24:11.25 History of autism diagnosis:&&

Bang Your Bookie's Wife: A Podcast About Sports Betting
College Football National Championship Game Preview: Featuring Congressman/Former UGA QB George Santos

Bang Your Bookie's Wife: A Podcast About Sports Betting

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 43:51


This is the big one everybody, it is not a drill. Rainman is off in the wild, but we march on with our very special guest former Georgia star running back and US Congressman George Santos. Stick around for guest picks, prop bets and all sorts of nonsense. 

Artist Personal Journalist
"RAIN MAN" Movie Review (REVIEW)

Artist Personal Journalist

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 18:42


I discuss how Rain Man is a good film about Family Drama that introduced me to what Autism could be. It aged decently well and has a strong story that's more fast-paced than you'd think for the message and is intense and moving. *Spoilers*. (REVIEW - WEEK 1 YEAR 5) . Social Media: http://linktr.ee/Fk_Arts fk.artists@gmail.com

Homer & Tony
3PM: Guaranteed win

Homer & Tony

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 41:51


In Hour 2, Homer & Tony give their hot stories of the day in the Top 3 at 3, will the Packers beat the Lions on Sunday and make the playoffs, our weekly edition of Rainman and Homer singing a little karaoke.

Bang Your Bookie's Wife: A Podcast About Sports Betting
College Football Playoff Predictions Featuring Joe P's Bubbie

Bang Your Bookie's Wife: A Podcast About Sports Betting

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 4:55


Capper's indisposed. Rainman's on the other side of the world probably on a bender. Consequently, we had to go to the big guns for our playoff preview, Joe public's 88-year-old Bubbie. She doesn't watch college football, but why should that stop anybody?

Homer & Tony
3PM: Final Rainman of the Year

Homer & Tony

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 44:03


In hour 2, Homer and Tony do the final rainman competition of the year. They discuss whether or not Aaron Rodgers would be a good friend.

The Welcome Mat Podcast
Rain Man | The Rent Party Podcast | Ep. 18

The Welcome Mat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 146:00


Zhae is gone, so we're joined by Myles again about 25 minutes in. We talk everything from going home for the holidays, church upbringings the Megan Thee Stallion & Tory Lanes trial, Kanye, Michael Jordan and so much more! Shop Tolsik.com Follow @Tolsik Hosted by comedians Chelse Greaux, Gary King Clark, Corey Young and musician/actor Life of Zhae. Every week they discuss maneuvering through the Hollywood entertainment scene, childhood stories and bias film/TV reviews. Go see Chelse & Corey live! December 30th 9pm West Hollywood, CA More from Chelse Greaux: @comedianchelsayg - Twitter/Instagram More from Zhae: @lifeofzhae - Twitter/Instagram/TikTok More from (Sha)Corey Young: @coreytheevoice -Twitter/Instagram/TikTok/Youtube More from Gary King Clark: @keep_it_g - Instagram Produced by ShaCorey Young. Thanks for listening RATE, REVIEW and share with a friend if you like it! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Israel News Talk Radio
The Hannukah Show: Lighten Up Style!! - Lighten Up!

Israel News Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 48:23


Lenny visits the show again and they discuss Hannukah and Rainman the Anti Semite ! Lighten Up! 19DEC2022 - PODCAST

Vanishing Point
VANISHING POINT #19 - The Hitch-Hiker AVEC MAX (DICHAEL GREY)

Vanishing Point

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 240:30


VANISHING POINT #19 - The Hitch-Hiker (Into the Wild, The Hitcher, The Brown Bunny et... Vanishing point !) Dix-neuvième épisode de Vanishing Point, le podcast itinérant qui vous invite à voyager sur les routes imaginaires du Cinéma, sans gps ni direction assistée, avec comme seule boussole : notre passion, nos échanges et nos envies. Piloté par Mad, Ben et Franck. Accompagné par notre impromptu auto-stoppeur Max Retrouvez Max sur Twitter (@dichael_grey) et sur Youtube : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWNyNDxMFdxk9rlXbMoqa8Q Les films abordés dans cet épisode : 00:01:23 : Skip générique (on juge pas promis) 00:06:40 : Into the Wild, Sean Penn (2007) 01:02:52 : The Hitcher, Robert Harmon (1986) 01:49:48 : BLINDTEST - OST à reconnaitre ! 01:56:50 : The Brown Bunny, Vincent Gallo (2003) 03:01:58 : Vanishing Point, Richard C. Sarafian (1971) Les réponses au blindtest précédent (Episode 18 Viva Las Vegas) : Very Bad Trip, Les diamants sont éternels, Rain Man, Le Parrain, Blade Runner 2049, Lune de miel à Las Vegas, Ocean's Eleven Rejoignez-nous sur les réseaux sociaux : TWITTER : https://twitter.com/vpoint_podcast FACEBOOK : https://www.facebook.com/podcast.vanishingpoint PODCASTICS : https://www.podcastics.com/podcast/vanishing-point/ Et sur votre plateforme de podcasts préférée ! Abonnez-vous

Fantom Facts Society
"Scientific fascism?" With Mike Wallach

Fantom Facts Society

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022 108:47


Mike Wallach joins the show to discuss his latest movie, Theviraldelusion.com and if modern day has medicine gone too far, what his years as a state department analyst taught him during the war and how smallpox, polio, and HIV have been altered throughout history.https://youtu.be/2TUgcP64mWctheviraledelusion.comA Hollywood screenwriter turned medical freedom activist and documentary maker. My new film "The Viral Delusion" just debuted and I would love to speak to audiences about it. It's the extraordinary untold story of the profound fraud at the scientific heart of the pandemic. My background is actually in politics - I have an MA from Columbia University in National Security Studies, and spent two years as an Analyst at the State Department. I left that world to write movies in Hollywood, and among others, wrote the film "The Bay" directed by Oscar winner Barry Levinson (famous for Wag The Dog, The Natural, Rain Man)... When I discovered the litany of extraordinary doctors and scientists who uncovered the fraud at the very scientific heart of the pandemic I had to tell that story on film. The five part film series is now available at www.theviraldelusion.com and has been called "A Masterpiece" by Dr Sam Bailey and "immensely important and beautifully made" by Dr. John Bevan-Smith. Here's what viewers have to say about the film series: "Amazing." Wow" "Incredible." "Must-watch" “Game changing information” “A must see tour de force” "Way Better than I expected." Thank you!" "You Must See This.” "I am sharing this with everyone I know.""Extraordinary." "50 million times better than anything else on the subject." “Please watch.” “Absolutely brilliant.” “I am almost speechless” “Watching now. This is SO GOOD." “Fantastic” “Essential Watching.” “Go Watch It. Thank me later.”As scary as our times are, they are pregnant with possibility: the possibility for a wider understanding of our health and our politics, the possibility of working together to free ourselves from misguided medical authorities, disastrous health protocols and the corruption and injustice that leads to poor access to healthy food, limited access to fresh clean water, dwindling opportunities to breathe fresh clean air, lives filled with extraordinary stress and the un-stopped toxification of our planet - the known causes of disease.

Hochman and Crowder
Betting Dolphins vs. Bills & Rainman

Hochman and Crowder

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 33:13


In hour 2, Lee Sterling gives his pick for Dolphins vs. Bills plus Solana gets a little confused between "Rainman" and "Rambo".

Homer & Tony
3PM: What should Love do?

Homer & Tony

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 39:48


In Hour 2, Homer & Tony give their hot stories of the day in the Top 3 at 3, including Giannis,

Moviebox
Episode #72 - "Fra spillemaskinen til videohylden"

Moviebox

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 39:02


Vi har sagt det før, men Moviebox er jo meget mere end bare VHS-film. Moviebox er en state of mind, people! Eller... Det er i hvert fald alt det, som vi forbinder med lykkelig barndom i 80'erne og 90'erne. En kæmpe stor del af vores lykkelige barndom var computerspil og spillemaskiner. Hvad end det var en omgang Space Invaders hjemme foran fjernsynet, Spy Hunter på Commodore 64 eller en omgang Street Fighter II, mens du ventede på din flækkede ørn med svæller nede på grillen, så er computerspil en fuldstændigt integreret del af Moviebox-oplevelse. Derfor skal vi naturligvis ha' en Moviebox-aften dedikeret til film udelukkende baseret på computerspil. Så ved man nemlig, at kvaliteten er i top!... Aftenens første hyldest til 8-bit-æraen kommer fra Sonny, der lægger ud med "teen-Rain Man på gaming-eventyr" i filmen The Wizard (1989). Herefter dykker Niels ned i filmhistoriens nok mest velkendte spil-til-film-katastrofe i form af Super Mario Bros. (1993), som måske ikke er kendt for at være skide god, men Niels har et mærkbart svagt punkt for den, og hans entusiasme smitter. Og sidste 2-krone i maskinen kommer fra Ask, der giver os kung fu-tøv med Double Dragon (1994). Det er altid en fornøjelse at komme godt rundt i hjørnerne af vores Moviebox-verden og vi tør godt love, at det ikke er sidste gang vi roder med spillemaskiner. Indtil da, rigtig god fornøjelse med episoden og HUSK: Spol altid episoden tilbage, når du har lyttet færdigt! Med venlig hilsen, Ask, Sonny, Niels & Casper

RTFM Podcast
The legend of FOGMAN is born.

RTFM Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 102:05


From Particle Colliders to Labor rights and everything in between. Joe and Jake discuss how the best video game comebacks are made. Is there a thought process to it? Listen to find out. Jake highlights some spooky Eufy security camera issues, and Joe highlights how scary the internet can be. We discuss the oddities of being in the labor force, the looming rail strike, and how that impacts the masses. PS Jake does fall down a rabbit hole regarding a wannabe internet expert attempting to explain Mandela effects and Particle accelerators. Joe discovers FOGMAN...... it's a Wikipedia version Rainman. Follow us on our socials @thertfmpodcast Find Joe On twitch passimeow

Homer & Tony
3PM: Chip on the shoulder

Homer & Tony

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 40:36


In Hour 2, Homer & Tony give their hot stories of the day in the Top 3 at 3 including Pat Hughes being inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, the 49ers blowing it by not trying get Baker Mayfield after Jimmy Garoppolo was lost for the season and a California high school football team winning a state championship without completing a pass all season long. Plus, do the Packers really want Jordan Love to take over after Aaron Rodgers is gone, our weekly edition of Rainman and why has Geno Smith been so good for the Seahawks this season.

Bang Your Bookie's Wife: A Podcast About Sports Betting
College Football Conference Championship Week Preview: Many People Are Asking If Capper Can Read

Bang Your Bookie's Wife: A Podcast About Sports Betting

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 55:06


This week on BYBW: It's conference championship week and the boys have a season long record book to settle. What book will Rainman make Capper read?! Can Capper read??! Drama! Intrigue!     

Homer & Tony
2PM: Barry on borrowed time

Homer & Tony

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 44:33


Homer & Tony discuss if Packers defensive coordinator Joe Barry is embarrassed after his team gave up 363 yards rushing against the Eagles, is this Barry's final season in titletown, will the Packers beat the Bears on Sunday, a special Friday edition of Rainman, the guys make their Pick 5 with Cover 5 selections for the NFL weekend and Are You A Better Guesser "Uruguay Cattle Edition."

Mind Pump: Raw Fitness Truth
1956: What to Do if Cutting Calories Isn't Resulting in Fat Loss, How to Build Muscle After Age 40, Tips for Combining Calisthenics With Heavy Strength Training & More (Listener Live Coaching)

Mind Pump: Raw Fitness Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 88:04 Very Popular


In this episode of Quah (Q & A), Sal, Adam & Justin coach four Pump Heads via Zoom. Mind Pump Fit Tip: Here's the EASIEST, most SIMPLE, and EFFECTIVE diet hack for most people...AVOID heavily processed food. (2:33) Dad's and thermostats. (12:27) The BIGGEST loss of wealth in one day! (13:42) Adam is Rain Man. (18:05) Are the Terminator and Matrix connected? (23:30) Fun Stats with Sal: Why you should laugh often, a horrifying UK study, and testicle size and attractiveness. (29:03) The value of taking multivitamins. (37:50) Shout out to Braydon Barrett (@looklikeyoulift). (41:35) #ListenerLive question #1 - How can I lose body fat after a failed bulk? (44:57) #ListenerLive question #2 - How dialed in does someone have to be to put muscle on at age 50? (57:46) #ListenerLive question #3 - What are your thoughts on combining calisthenics and heavy strength training? (1:10:50) #ListenerLive question #4 - How much should I look to drop weight in the gym when I'm training for a marathon/Ironman triathlon? (1:18:44) Related Links/Products Mentioned Ask a question to Mind Pump, live! Email: live@mindpumpmedia.com Cyber Monday Sale: ALL MAPS Fitness Products & Bundles 60% off!  **Promo code CYBERMONDAY at checkout** (Code expires Friday Dec. 2nd) MIND PUMP LIVE Q&A W/ MAX LUGAVERE Visit Organifi for the exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! **Promo code MINDPUMP at checkout** Huberman Lab Podcast - Dr. Layne Norton: The Science of Eating for Health, Fat Loss & Lean Muscle Premature Deaths Attributable to the Consumption of Ultraprocessed Foods in Brazil Crypto's white knight lost 94% of his wealth in a single day Zuckerberg Took $7 Billion Loss Within Hours Due to Facebook Tom Brady, Larry David and other celebrities named in FTX lawsuit Exit The Matrix: How Sophia Stewart Fooled The Black Internet The Third Eye: Sophia Stewart   You're Not Laughing Enough, and That's No Joke Horrifying study of over 1000 people reveals 1 in 30 poo in the shower Beautiful Males Have Smaller Balls, A Study Suggests Study finds potential link between daily multivitamin and improved cognition in older adults Visit MASSZYMES by biOptimizers for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! **Promo code MINDPUMP10 at checkout** Mind Pump #1565: Why Women Should Bulk Muscle Potential Calculator – Mind Pump Media How To Increase Sensitivity And Density Of The Androgen Receptors? MP Holistic Health MP Hormones MAPS Fitness Prime Pro MAPS Prime Webinar Mind Pump #1927: Performance Training Secrets From A Top NBA Trainer With Cory Schlesinger Mind Pump Podcast – YouTube Mind Pump Free Resources People Mentioned Andrew Huberman, Ph.D. (@hubermanlab) Instagram Layne Norton, Ph.D. (@biolayne) Instagram D R M O L L Y (@drmolly.co) Instagram Braydon Barrett (@looklikeyoulift) TikTok/Instagram Dr. Stephen Cabral (@stephencabral) Instagram Cory Schlesinger (@schlesstrength) Instagram

Homer & Tony
3PM: LaFleur too soft

Homer & Tony

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 38:30


In Hour 2, Homer & Tony give their hot stories of the day in the Top 3 at 3, discuss Marquette's big victory over 6th-ranked Baylor, the guys look at the passing of former Packers quarterback John Hadl, our weekly edition of Rainman and how many of the Packers final five games of the regular season will they win.

Bang Your Bookie's Wife: A Podcast About Sports Betting
College Football Week 12 Preview: The Marvel Cinematic Universe is Rainman's Vietnam

Bang Your Bookie's Wife: A Podcast About Sports Betting

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 55:21


No time for a description this week, title basically explains it all. Let's bet.

Mass-Debaters
One on One: 104 80s Movie Tournament with Harvey Laguerre

Mass-Debaters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 77:21


We are sitting down with Harvey, and he is doing his very own 104 80s Movies tournament. Check out this episode to see what he think is the best movie from the 80s movie. If you want to do your own tournament, please contact us, and we will set it up. Here are all the movies in the tournament: TOP GUN (1986)Harlem Nights (1989)DIRTY DANCING (1987)CADDYSHACK (1980)THE LOST BOYS (1987)BACK TO THE FUTURE (1985)Coming to America (1988)E.T. THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL (1982)Wall Street 1987GHOSTBUSTERS (1984)REVENGE OF THE NERDS (1984)STAR WARS: EPISODE V -- THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK (1980)SPACEBALLS (1987)SIXTEEN CANDLES (1984)THE LAND BEFORE TIME (1988)THE SHINING (1980)ST. ELMO'S FIRE (1985)RAGING BULL (1980)LABYRINTH (1986)RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK (1981)DEAD POETS SOCIETY (1989)DO THE RIGHT THING (1989)COMMANDO (1985)THE PRINCESS BRIDE (1987)FIELD OF DREAMS (1989)THE THING (1982)THE NAKED GUN (1988)DIE HARD (1988)THE KARATE KID (1984)THE TERMINATOR (1984)police academy (1984)BLADE RUNNER (1982)less than zero (1987)RAISING ARIZONA (1987)TOOTSIE (1982)EVIL DEAD 2 (1987)THE RETURN OF THE LIVING DEAD (1985)AIRPLANE! (1980)WHEN HARRY MET SALLY... (1989)PREDATOR (1987)TIME BANDITS (1981)STAND BY ME (1986)LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS (1986)SAY ANYTHING... (1989)THE LITTLE MERMAID (1989)THE GOONIES (1985)PURPLE RAIN (1984)PLANES, TRAINS AND AUTOMOBILES (1987)WARGAMES (1983)SHORT CIRCUIT (1986)DRAGONSLAYER (1981)THE NEVERENDING STORY (1984)STEEL MAGNOLIAS (1989)BEVERLY HILLS COP (1984)FRIDAY THE 13TH (1980)THE BREAKFAST CLUB (1985)A FISH CALLED WANDA (1988)FERRIS BUELLER'S DAY OFF (1986)FOOTLOOSE (1984)HEATHERS (1989)Breakin' (1984)A CHRISTMAS STORY (1983)INDIANA JONES AND THE TEMPLE OF DOOM (1984)RISKY BUSINESS (1983)Rain Man (1988)A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET (1984)REAL GENIUS (1985)ROBOCOP (1987)BIG (1988)BEETLEJUICE (1988)BILL & TED'S EXCELLENT ADVENTURE (1989)THIS IS SPINAL TAP (1984)THE COLOR PURPLE (1985)THE BLUES BROTHERS (1980)WEIRD SCIENCE (1985)GREMLINS (1984)TRON (1982)DESPERATELY SEEKING SUSAN (1985)TO LIVE AND DIE IN L.A. (1985)STAR WARS: EPISODE VI -- RETURN OF THE JEDI (1983)MYSTIC PIZZA (1988)FULL METAL JACKET (1987)PRETTY IN PINK (1986)BATMAN (1989)the last dragon (1985)TRADING PLACES (1983)FAST TIMES AT RIDGEMONT HIGH (1982)NATIONAL LAMPOON'S Christmas VACATION (1989)ESCAPE FROM NEW YORK (1981)PLATOON (1986)THE UNTOUCHABLES (1987)MAD MAX 2 (1981)REPO MAN (1984)AFTER HOURS (1985)BROADCAST NEWS (1987)WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT (1988)THEY LIVE (1988)VALLEY GIRL (1983)SID & NANCY (1986)INDIANA JONES AND THE LAST CRUSADE (1989)LETHAL WEAPON (1987)SCARFACE (1983)POLTERGEIST (1982)BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA (1986) --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mass-debaters/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mass-debaters/support

Homer & Tony
3PM: Is the Pack back?

Homer & Tony

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 43:40


In Hour 2, Homer & Tony give their hot stories of the day in the Top 3 at 3, is Giannis the face of the NBA, the guys discuss the Packers playoff chances and who they need to beat out to make the postseason, our weekly edition of Rainman and is Homer picking the Packers to beat the Titans after Packers reporter Jason Wilde did so?

Pennies and Popcorn
Rain Man – Estate Taxes and Will Challenges | Episode 49

Pennies and Popcorn

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 53:32


In the last episode of our Tom Cruise series, we're tackling Rain Man. This 1988 Oscar winner has its moments, and it's brimming with money lessons. We debate whether the estate tax (the DEATH tax) is a good or bad thing, go over the stats on how many people are actually affected by it, and analyze the argument that the estate tax is awful for small business owners and farmers. We also talk about challenging the validity of a will, and round things off with a rant about how hard it is to win big by counting cards in blackjack. You can find our blog posts and more at: www.penniesandpopcorn.com Follow us on Twitter at: @penniesnpopcorn Follow us on Instagram at: https://www.instagram.com/penniesandpopcorn/

Flavortone
Episode 44: The Roast of Hans Zimmer

Flavortone

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 87:57


Alec and Nick continue their occasional roast series with a roast of German film score composer Hans Zimmer. The conversation surveys and critiques his work across the new wave and new age soundtrack exotica of the 80s and 90s (Rain Man, Gladiator, The Lion King), to the cinematic revelry of his Christopher Nolan-directed epochs (Inception, Dunkirk, Batman) to recent scores such as Boss Baby. The roast also probes his methods of budget-savvy musical fabrication, his management of authenticity and appropriation, and the current ubiquity of his overall sound. The episode then makes broad comparisons between Zimmer, globalist/neoliberal ideology, and the dark humanism of James Ferraro's work—as well as Zimmer's over-moisturized Tommy Bahama-like sensuality and uncanny resemblance to “Beans” from Evans Stevens. 

Bang Your Bookie's Wife: A Podcast About Sports Betting
College Football Week 11 Preview: BYBW After Dark

Bang Your Bookie's Wife: A Podcast About Sports Betting

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 59:50


So this episode is late. Not going to give excuses it just is. Rainman and Capper are hammered. Joe P is indecipherable. But we do have a Cameo—a damn fine one. And the King of the Hill? This kid Matty Nice. He can't miss. It's ridiculous.     

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Episode 717: Actor, Writer, Buddhist Priest, Voice of Artist Beatnik Peter Coyote at Home

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 74:17


Hey Guys!  I am back from my west coast trip and it was AMAZING. I got to meet 4 guys who have been listening to the show for a long time and we all hung out and had a great time and went for a hike that was unforgettable. I LOVE San Francisco. I also went to stay with Peter Coyote for a night and it was simply amazing and wonderful and enlightening. I just love the guy. Here is our latest talk from his him about an hour north of San Francisco Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more PETER COYOTE began his film career at 39, after living nearly a dozen years in the counter-culture during the 1960s and 70s. Since then, he has performed as an actor for some of the world's most distinguished filmmakers, including: Barry Levinson, Roman Polanski, Pedro Almodovar, Steven Spielberg, Walter Hill, Martin Ritt, Steven Soderberg, Diane Kurys, Sidney Pollack and Jean Paul Rappeneau. To date he has made over 150 films. In 2006 he had a major role in three televison series: The Inside on Fox-TV, the 4400 on USA Channel and played the Vice-President to Geena Davis's President on Commander in Chief for ABC-TV until the show's end. In 2011 he starred as the District Attorney in the new version of Law and Order – LA. In 2000 year he was the on-camera announcer of the Academy Awards Ceremony, taking the heavy-lifting off co-host Billy Crystal's shoulders for the detailed announcements and data which played live to an estimated one billion listeners. In 2007 he was prominently featured as an old boxing promoter in Rod Lurie's “Resurrecting the Champ” with Samuel. L. Jackson and Josh Hartnett, and also as Sally Field's disreputable writing teacher on the television series, “Brothers and Sisters.” He recently completed a six hour series called The Disappearance which aired last year. Most recently, he played Robert Mueller to Jeff Daniel's Jim Comey, and Brendan Gleeson's Donald Trump. The series is called The Comey Rule and will be released this year on SHOWTIME.   Mr. Coyote has written a memoir of his counter-culture years called Sleeping Where I Fall which received universally excellent reviews, appeared on three best-seller lists and sold five printings in hardback after being released by Counterpoint Press in 1999, it was re-released in November of 2010 and has been in continuous release ever since. It is currently in use as a source text for Sixties Studies in a number of universities including Harvard where he was invited to teach “The Theater of Protest” last year.   An early chapter from that book, “Carla's Story, won the 1993/94 Pushcart Prize for Excellence in non-fiction. His new book, The Rainman's Third Cure, released in April, 2015 is a study of mentors and the search for wisdom and he is currently readying a new book for publication in 2021-(TITLE) The I Behind the Mask: The Lone Ranger and Tonto meet the Buddha.   Mr. Coyote is well-known for his narration work, and has voiced 150 documentaries and TV specials, including the nine-hour PBS Special, The West. In 1992 he won an EMMY as the “Host” for a nine-hour series, called, The Pacific Century which also won the prestigious duPont-Columbia Award for Excellence in Broadcast Journalism.   In 2010 he recorded the12 hour series on The National Parks for Ken Burns and has recently completed the voice-work on Mr. Burns most recent series—a 16 hour special on The History of Country Music. He won a second Emmy for his narration on The Roosevelts, and has also done Prohibition, The Dust Bowl, and an 18 Hour series on Vietnam with Ken Burns. Mr Coyote and Mr Burns just completed a long series on Ernest Hemingway. In 2011 he was ordained as a Zen Buddhist priest and in 2015 received “transmission” from his teacher, making him an independent Zen teacher. He makes his home on a farm in Northern California, and considers working on his 1952 Dodge Power-Wagon his longest lasting addiction. He has 40 fruit trees and loves to make jam and walk with his two dogs.   Peter Coyote Episode 276 Peter Coyote Wikipedia Peter Coyote Movies IMDB Peter Coyote Books Peter Coyote with me on Episode 14   Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page  

Arroe Collins
Music Update Rain Man On Gaining Success 2016

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 1:19


Homer & Tony
3PM: Toilet paper tradition

Homer & Tony

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 40:16


In Hour 2, Homer & Tony give their hot stories of the day in the Top 3 at 3, should Homer throw toilet paper on the court at the Al McQuire center Thursday night when the Golden Eagles play Central Michigan to honor the Chippewa's tradition from the 1980's, are weekly edition of Rainman, a new Packers signing and how many points would you need to pick the Packers to beat the Cowboys on Sunday.

Arroe Collins
Music Update Rain Man On Gaining Success 2016

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 1:19


Homer & Tony
3PM: Standing pat

Homer & Tony

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 46:22


In Hour 2, Homer plays Are You A Better Guesser "Push-up" Edition, goes over the hot stories of the day in the Top 3 at 3, Fat Jack Sports stops by with his best bets for the football weekend in the pro and college ranks, our weekly edition of Rainman and Homer has figured out how to beat Prize Picks.

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 70 – Unstoppable advocate with Autism with Miyah Sundermeyer

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 65:26


This is one of those episodes I love to experience because I get to discuss a topic about which I know little. Miyah Sundermeyer was diagnosed as a person who happens to be autistic. She received her diagnosis at age 11. As with many of us who happen to be persons with disabilities, the immediate reaction of medical experts and others was that Miyah could not grow up to accomplish anything. Well, she is currently working on her PHD. You will hear about her life as a person on the autistic spectrum among other things about the spectrum.   Miyah works for George State helping to raise awareness concerning autism. By any standards, she is successful, growing and she is making a difference.   About the Guest: Miyah Sundermeyer is a Minnesota native and spent the first 21 years prior to moving to Atlanta in 2003.   In 2010, she earned her associate's degree in psychology from Georgia Perimeter College before transferring her credits top Georgia State University in where she earned  her bachelor's in psychology.   She was hired at Georgia State at the Center for Leadership in Disability where she has helped gather information on autism resources across GA as well as many other roles.  All the while, working to raise Autism Awareness and Acceptance through her podcast “Hello World with Miyah and public speaking.    About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Welcome to another episode of unstoppable mindset. Glad to have you wherever you are. And I want to introduce you to Miyah Sundermeyer , who is our guest this week. Miyah has all sorts of interesting things that we get to discuss. She does a lot addressing the concept of autism. And we're going to find out why as well as other things. And she has asked me some questions about September 11 2001. And I'm curious to learn about her interest in that as well. So we'll get there. Anyway. Miyah, welcome to unstoppable mindset. How are you?   Miyah Sundermeyer  01:55 And the words of my hero and network Dr. Temple Grandin? It's really great to be here.   Michael Hingson  02:02 I have I have heard her and we're glad to have you here. Tell me a little bit about maybe your early life, your childhood and some of that stuff. Let's start. Let's start at the beginning, as Lewis Carroll would say, oh, yeah,   Miyah Sundermeyer  02:14 now you're making me think of the sound of music. Let's go.   Michael Hingson  02:19 There you go. So we'll start with dough.   Miyah Sundermeyer  02:24 And so anyway, I don't want to dry dive off topic too much. But anyway, Mr. Hingson. So my early childhood, I was born, when I was born, as it was my understanding that I was first of all stuck in the womb, and then they got me out. I had swallowed a great deal of placenta. And so there caused some a neck that caused anoxia that caused the brain damage. And so my mom and I looked at each other they when they looked at the doctor, and he spanked the fluid out of me. And so I nearly died at childbirth. But the doctors saved my life. And then what? Well, and then I started to develop according to my late aunt, I mean, she died in 2019. I lived with her for a while and she and I had a mother and daughter relationship. But that was in my 20s. At that was in most of my 20s. But when she would come and meet with my parents, and she'd meet with me, she said that other people in the room would try to talk to me, and they thought that I was deaf. So and then as I began to develop into a toddler, my mom noticed that I was staring into space. I wasn't interested in toys. And she also noticed that I would script waiting, I would copy lines from movies and TV shows and commercials. And she specifically remembers the Burger King commercial, where I said, where the old lady says, Where's the beef?   Michael Hingson  03:53 Where's the beef? Yeah.   Miyah Sundermeyer  03:55 And so my mom caught that caught me, say, where's the beef? And I do recall she said that, I think should they were outside grilling outside of a house that we were renting at the time. And I just ran upstairs and I blurted it out and my mom thought it was funny. I went where's the beef. And so that was the sign right there. And then my mom had started to wonder as to whether or not I was somewhere on the autism spectrum. But keep in mind, this was back in the 80s. And back then autism was looked at very differently. And this was even before that movie Rain Man, which by the way, is not my favorite film.   Michael Hingson  04:36 Understand. So he did a good job of acting, but I understand what you're saying.   Miyah Sundermeyer  04:41 Yeah, well, I just didn't like the idea that they were putting autism into a box. Yeah. And, you know, they just, it was just one person on the spectrum. And I mean, he was, I mean, Raymond wasn't a real character, but it's my understanding that he was based on another individual and spectrum who was known as a savant. And the thing is, the thing is there's studies suggesting that there's only 1% of the autistic population, that even suggests that you would have the Savant type syndrome. So,   Michael Hingson  05:14 anyway, so go ahead and continue. So you, you really weren't like Rain Man, which is understandable.   Miyah Sundermeyer  05:23 No, no, it's my understanding. According to my parents, I was two years old. I just thought it was a normal kid back when I was two. But, you know, I just, I just, I got in trouble a lot with with some of our babysitters, because I was just so hyper. And nobody understood that. At the same time, my mom took me to a series of doctors. And I didn't even think there was anything wrong with me. I thought that it was a normal routine. And I thought that every child went through that. I remember also going to a special preschool, and the special preschool, they had IQ testing. And they had me play with special blocks. But at the same time, when they would observe me one on one, I'd want to play with the blocks, but then the specialists but I was grabbed my fingers and stopped me from putting the blocks together. And I hated that. I just, I didn't know why.   Michael Hingson  06:26 Why, why was that, that they stopped you from putting the blocks together?   Miyah Sundermeyer  06:29 Well, they were using a special, I think they were trying to run tests on me think they were doing IQ type tests and things like that. And so I could, so I didn't understand that what they were doing was they were running some tests on me to test my IQ. And they were also trying to figure out why it was Piper at the same time. They couldn't figure out what was wrong with the autistic traits. Even though back then my mom tried talking to the doctors about actually our family doctors, you know what, I think my daughter might have autism. And they laughed at her because because autism back in the 80s was looked at like Rain Man, and was also looked at, as if everyone on the spectrum was just very, very proud. Even though, even though it was coming out that Dr. Temple Grandin, I mean, she, I mean, by the 80s, she was already beginning to share her story in meetings and conferences across America, and eventually the part of the world. So there's just nobody was making a connection.   Michael Hingson  07:37 So when did they finally decide that that autism was a part of your life?   Miyah Sundermeyer  07:43 That wasn't until I was 11, I was first diagnosed with ADHD, and I was placed on medication before that. And then I was continuing to go to the doctors, but they didn't officially diagnosed me as an autistic, or a person on the spectrum until I was 11 years old. And back then they preferred it to me as PDD NOS or which was pervasive developmental delays, hyphen, none other specified. That helps, yeah, and back then they referred to me as a woman with high functioning autism are a female with high functioning autism, which is rare. So and then I was placed into special education for the rest of my, the rest of my high school from sixth grade all the way up to 12th grade. And, you know, that's just that was a big mess. Let me tell you how so well, first of all, it started with I hated studying, I hated sitting still and doing homework, I wanted to goof off all the time. And I think which is normal for any kid. Every day, every night, my mom would struggle to get me to sit down and do my homework. And I would sit and have a fit because I hated the studying. And then on top of all that I I would fail at my grades. I mean, I would fail at my exams, because I wasn't wasn't studious. But then they put me in a special education. And I had, we had all the IQ tests, and they just basically told my mom don't waste any time with her. She'll never amount to anything. So   Michael Hingson  09:23 I mentioned before we started recording that you could go hear one of my speeches, which talks in great detail about September 11 than the fact is that part of that speech, discusses that went and was discovered that I was blinded about four months, the doctor said that my parents should put me in a home because no blind child could ever grow up and amount to anything. So we're not alone in that, are we?   Miyah Sundermeyer  09:50 No, we're not. And it's just amazing what these teach these doctors and these special education teachers. I don't know where they get these ideas from I don't know where or they get this idea that just because everyone's disabled, it doesn't mean they're going to fit into a box according to the DSM manuals.   Michael Hingson  10:08 Well, the, the fact is that no matter what they choose to believe or not, they are still reflections of society. And unfortunately, people with disabilities are still not really included, understood, or really educated about in a lot of the professions is slowly getting better. But even back in the 80s, much less back in the 1950s, when I was born and grew up, it still was, and to a large degree, today still is a problem. So we we deal with it. So tell me a little bit about the autism spectrum. I don't know a lot about that. And I don't know how many of our listeners do Can you give us a little bit of an insight as to what it is, where you fit on it and how that whole process works.   Miyah Sundermeyer  10:59 So the autism spectrum is very, very broad. If you have people on the spectrum, like myself, who can articulate we can dress ourselves, we can hold down jobs, we can go to college, we can get married. And I mean, me, I'm in a relationship right now. And you know, I have my own place. And I've got a bachelor's degree and getting ready to go back at some point and get my doctorate, I'm planning on developmental psychology. But you also have other people on the spectrum that can talk. But they have other challenges. I mean, I don't like to say, the functioning label, we don't like to say that we don't say, high functioning, low functioning, if people on the Hill, you know, we're a little more moderate, and they can talk. But socially and emotionally, their brain doesn't develop as quickly. I mean, I had some challenges on my own, and that my brain didn't start developing until I was much older. And for them, some of them actually develop the social skills of a child or social skills of a child or up to the level of a teenager. And yes, they can dress themselves, but they have very poor social skills. And then they have other challenges, like some of them have underlying conditions. Some of them have cerebral palsy, but it doesn't mean like, they're not limited from everything, they just have to work around their, their challenges or their disabilities. And some of them have to have coaching and mentoring. And, you know, they can, I mean, they can do it, but some of them need more, more coaching and mentoring. I mean, I still needed coaching and mentoring like everybody else. And then you have other people on the spectrum, the more the severe end, they can't articulate it all. And they refer to them as nonverbal. Or some other self advocates refer to them as people who don't use formal language. I mean, they can talk but they use hollow phrases, meaning that they say one word phrases, like, like, they'll like, they'll say something like, oh, or Oh, are the, they'll just quote a line from a TV show. And then there are other people on the spectrum that just cannot articulate at all, they cannot use the one word phrases, and then some of them, they just, they can't dress themselves, they can't be themselves. Some of those people ended up in group homes and those situations, I mean, it's not that they're fully broken, it's just that they can't take care of themselves. But for them, they would have to use a communicative device or use some sort of a sign language and that they have to have the extra help. But actually, what actually what they have a brain, actually, they're very, very intelligent. But they have you have to unlock that brain. And you have to teach them how to type because they have, they have thoughts like everyone else. And then you have people on the spectrum that have severe sensory input, meaning that they can't sit stay on certain sounds and they can't stand certain colors or they can't stand certain smells. Some of them have the cannot control their bodies, they cannot control their body movements. And then some of them they just, they just they cannot they cannot use the toilet by themselves. So it really ranges and   Michael Hingson  14:34 several years ago, I delivered a speech somewhere and I don't recall exactly was I think it was some sort of association of nurses and there was also someone else who spoke who was on the autism spectrum. And she said at the beginning in describing herself, that she tended to react to loud sounds and about 10 minutes into the speech. For some reason the microphone own started giving feedback. Something was too loud or whatever. And she reacted to that was a pretty for me graphic illustration and helped me understand part of of the whole process. But she she said up front that she tended to react to loud sounds and it was just the way it was.   Miyah Sundermeyer  15:21 Yeah. So by the way was this woman was this woman Dr. Temple Grandin say No, it wasn't   Michael Hingson  15:27 Temple Grandin, I have heard her speak also. But this wasn't Temple Grandin. This was with somebody else, and I can't remember who it was.   Miyah Sundermeyer  15:37 So why No, there was a Donna Williams from Australia, she had severe sensory disorders for temple said she could not stand up, she could not stand looking at fluorescent light bulbs. Actually, there's some people on the spectrum that have was it visual inputs, that I can't remember how it temporally phrased it. But according to one of her book, I think it was the way I see it, I read it in thinking in pictures that you walk under some of the fluorescent bulbs. And according to the way the brain processes information, the lights will flicker like a strobe light. So people on the spectrum that cannot stand that. And there are people on the spectrum that cannot even handle LED lights. And for I'm not one of those people. For me. I don't like micro microphone input either. I just I hate it. And then it's funny, you mentioned temple and we're talking about sensory input, she was doing an interview and she kept imitating the sound of, of a microphone input. And it hurt my ears every time she did it. Like I thought to myself temple stop doing that.   Michael Hingson  16:53 So this person, as I said, reacted when the squealing of the feedback happened. And it took her about a minute or a minute and a half to recover and be able to continue. They dealt with the issue of feedback. And the rest of the speech was fine. But it it makes sense that different people react in different ways. And that's, of course, what the whole idea of innocence, the spectrum is about. It's very difficult to sit there and say, people fit in one box and that you are somewhere on the spectrum. And somebody else might be at the same place on the spectrum as you but it doesn't mean that they necessarily react the same way you do.   Miyah Sundermeyer  17:37 Yeah, there's also speculation out there. That's why it's called. That's why you have neurodivergent because there's a saying that no two snowflakes are alike, right. And there's also another saying out there that goes up. Just because you meet one autistic, that means that you meet one autistic. And I mean, Dr. Temple and I have very, very different types of disabilities. For her, she cannot stand the feeling of stretchy clothes. And I agree with that on her. But you cannot walk in front of her while she is giving a talk. And actually I blogged for future horizons. And I've had a chance to go to some of her talks there put on by future horizons. I kept getting up to use the bathroom. And this was just before the pandemic. And you know, I kept walking and then temple called me out in front of everyone. She goes, you really don't need to be texting. Because I was sitting there tweeting about the event. And I thought I'm talking to you talking to me. And she goes, No, you walked out of here twice. And then she also said don't worry, you'll thank me later. And then she brought up one of her own life memories of a of a POS that slammed down a container of deodorant and I said you always do and she goes, Do you need to sit back? And I'm sorry? She said, Do you need to go sit in the back? And I just kept on talking. I just she just kept on talking and what were you doing anyway? And then I explained to her, Well, why don't you just explain to her what I was doing? Why it was nice. I'm not texting, I'm tweeting. I'm promoting your event and I told her what I do. And she goes, Well, what did you say? So in the first place, and then me I said temple temple I was waiting for you to get done talking. So but yeah, I've had her on my podcast a couple times. And I mean, I've known her since 2014. And I've presented alongside her before so   Michael Hingson  19:36 we were at the same event but we didn't get actually to meet. She spoke over lunch and I was near the back of the room just coincidentally so we never did really get a chance to but I was hoping to have an opportunity to do that. But she had to leave right away so we didn't get to do it, unfortunately.   Miyah Sundermeyer  19:53 Well, she's very, very nice and I think you too would hit it off. I'd love to meet her. I She would be a great guest on your show.   Michael Hingson  20:02 Well, we'd love to explore that. And if you can help us make contact, we'd love to have her on. I mean, she's a person who is extremely well known. Would would love to meet her in person. And I don't even I can probably go back and research. Where was that? I heard her. Very fascinating speaker. Needless to say,   Miyah Sundermeyer  20:23 yeah. She's so funny, too. I mean, she just ranted. It's like she's randomly funny, too.   Michael Hingson  20:30 Yeah. Well, and and that's okay. People are as they are. So you describing the whole idea of autism? And I realize they're not related. But how does autism and the way people function and behave different? Or how does it compare with, say, people with Down syndrome?   Miyah Sundermeyer  20:52 Well, for a person with Down syndrome, I don't really know much about it. I don't know much about what Down Syndrome does. But for Down syndrome, it is genetic, and that I believe that autism is genetic, too. But for Down syndrome, you have the extra chromosome, as far as I know. But I also understand that people who are downs, also have other medical conditions that are underlying, and it's my understanding that people who have Down Syndrome don't live very long as their lifespans are shorter. And I suspect as they get older, they deal with issues such as specific types of Alzheimer's disease. And so I think most of the people who are Down's and then they've died in their 30s.   Michael Hingson  21:48 I wonder about the the the intelligence level or the intelligence differences, because I know that clearly, people with autism, as you pointed out, can be extremely intelligent, it isn't really a lack of intelligence in any way. I don't know enough about Down syndrome either. To understand that,   Miyah Sundermeyer  22:05 well, there are, but there, there are advocacy group movements right now for people who are downs. In fact, there's a whole movement in the college setting called inclusive post secondary education, that allows people with Down's people who are downs that the DSM manual would refer to as an intellectual disability. And you know, for an autistic, I prefer it as I have a developmental disability, yes. But for a person with Down syndrome, they're considered to have intellectual disabilities, but they have specific curriculums now with Inclusive post secondary education. And they, they let the individuals take special class, regular college classes and be with their peers. And right at the moment, they're trying to go from just the individuals audit, auditing classes to taking college courses. But they're also trying to get them out into the world and get them into internships, where they get to do things that their normal peers do. And they're also doing other types of programs for people on the spectrum. In college settings, too. They're trying to come up with a special accommodations, because there's a large number of people on the spectrum right now that have been struggling with college because of accommodation issues, or executive functioning issues. And myself included, because I'm getting ready to I'm getting ready to go back to take some Postback classes this fall, and I'm looking for accommodations because I want I want some internships and I want to get into research and I want to build up some skill sets in that area and learn how to talk with my professors.   Michael Hingson  23:53 Well, Han, you are clearly an intelligent individual who knows what they need to have in the way of accommodations. And clearly, as we understand all being from the community of persons with disabilities, reasonable accommodations are appropriate. So is autism considered an intellectual disability in any way?   Miyah Sundermeyer  24:16 No, not that I know of. I mean, usually, you usually if you had an intellectual disability, there would probably be a dual diagnosis, you probably have someone on the spectrum, but they would also have a diagnosis if they had fetal alcohol syndrome combined with autism. Or they would have Down syndrome, which would be the intellectual disabilities and then autism, which would be the developmental disabilities. So it just really depends on how the child develops in the womb.   Michael Hingson  24:47 So you, I think, have talked a little bit about the concept of raising awareness of autism and being autistic as opposed to acceptance. Tell me about If you would,   Miyah Sundermeyer  25:01 well, actually, I believe in standing right in the middle, I believe in except in raising autism awareness and acceptance, because I think that they're both important. And I do not believe that raising awareness through organizations like Autism Speaks, and OT, and it was at the Autism Society of America, I do not believe that. That's the best way to educate people. I just think that, that way to raise awareness and acceptance are just way too big. I just think that that awareness should be more at the community level. I mean, it starts in our homeowners associations, it starts in our town halls, and it starts in our schools. It starts with our parents. And it can start by having little townhall meetings or little meetings through your homeowners association. And it starts with community building and connecting with each other. That's where the awareness starts. And then you have the acceptance part, again, at the community level, where you have families and you have individuals and you have you have employers that work in the community, that that that could also teach with Teach the individual social skills and soft skills and work skills and get these individuals employed. Because right now, what we have is just way too big. And right now there's a lot of misunderstanding about autism. And because of that we have individuals out there that are 90% either unemployed or underemployed.   Michael Hingson  26:43 That's true across all disabilities to a very large degree. I know for many years, we who happen to be blind have felt that the unemployment rate among unplayable blind people is in the 70% Roughly range. And it isn't because we can't work. It's because people think we can't work. And I suspect that it's the same for you.   Miyah Sundermeyer  27:03 Yeah, because a lot of people think that we don't, because we're autistic, they think that we don't understand something.   Michael Hingson  27:11 Yeah. And that's not necessarily true at all. Well, I'm curious about something if I, if I might, and that is that we have heard over the past several years, parents talk about not vaccinating their children because they might become autistic or that autism is caused by vaccinations and so on. And that there's been a great increase in spike in autism because of vaccinations and so on. Where do you fit into that?   Miyah Sundermeyer  27:41 So, again, I was already I already started to share showing symptoms of autism when I was developing as an infant. Because again, when I was young, my family thought that I was deaf, when it was really part of the autism, because I was probably as a baby, I was hyper, probably very hyper focused on some color, or hyper focused on something in the room as my eyesight was developing. And so I probably wasn't even paying attention to my late aunt Lois. So there's that. But as far as the vaccination goes, I do not think that that's autism at all. I think that that there's some sort of a disorder that mimics autism, but it's not autism, like look at lions disease. And I'm not saying that there's lions disease in the vaccinations, but lions disease mimics autism, I think that they could also be some sort of an allergic reaction that causes damage to the brain and somehow mimics autism, but I don't think that's autism. Or maybe they were already autistic. But perhaps there was a Mercury, there was something in the vaccinations that caused some sort of allergic reaction. And that probably aggravated I mean, I don't know, I haven't done the research. Yeah. Just off the top of my head. So I don't know. Well, the   Michael Hingson  29:06 other thing that comes to mind is that maybe the vaccinations don't have anything to do with it at all. It isn't now we are doing a much better job of diagnosing autism, and that in fact, that is caused a lot of the increase in the number of people who are diagnosed with having autism.   Miyah Sundermeyer  29:27 Yeah, that's another really good speculation. I think that one's pretty good, too. It's just that I know that Dr. Andrew, was it. Andrew Wakefield is the one that claims to have caught the that had discovered that there was mercury in the vaccinations. But his theory since since got ruled out, and I believe he was caught with plagiarism. I'm not sure. It's not good. Yeah. So I mean, his theory was ruled out. The thing is, they're people that are still believing his theories and they're still fighting back. Wow,   Michael Hingson  30:05 it's too bad that, that there tends to be a lot of that. And unfortunately, we also try to find things to blame one thing or another on when we plain just don't know enough to really understand we don't have all the answers yet. That's what science is about. And that's why it's also an evolving process. Yeah.   Miyah Sundermeyer  30:27 And science is a slow process, you know, you know, it's funny, you know, there's, you look at the media, and they're, they put all this information out there, like green tea makes you healthier. And you know, then you look, and then you look at back at those short articles, or green tea makes you sleep better. And then you click on the, on the online articles to your local paper. And then you find out that, that there's that there are other research papers that were much different than what the media have put it out there to be said,   Michael Hingson  31:06 yeah, there are a lot of misconceptions that are put out by people all over the place who don't really understand. And unfortunately, a lot of it comes from the media. But we live in a society today where basically everything gets dumped into the world, for people to see. And there are always people who believe it. And so the result is that a lot of things get spread that maybe it would be better to wait and see. Exactly. We hear about climate change today. And there are a huge number of people who just don't believe it, or it's the natural scheme of things, and there's nothing we can do about it. But a lot of people who just plain don't believe in the idea of climate change. There's way too much evidence that says that it really is something that maybe we do have some control over and that greenhouse gas emissions should be addressed. And we should deal with some of those things.   Miyah Sundermeyer  32:06 Yeah. And then there's situations where you have wildfires. I know that I understand that people can still be conservative and be careful. But I heard that isn't out there in California, there's some areas that get dry. And sometimes you have these brush fires and these forest fires that are caused by heat lightning, because the ground is so dry in California, is that true? Oh, it's   Michael Hingson  32:29 absolutely true. There are there any number of things that cause the wildfires out here, there are also in reality, a number of them that are caused by power lines that touch something and ignite a spark. And we're not doing enough fast enough to upgrade the infrastructure. But yeah, there is what he lightning can do. It is very dry. And so it's not magic to imagine that some of the fires can be created by the some of these things. And that's probably been true all along. But now, we want to find other ways to blame things rather than looking at the issues and how do we address them? Yeah, exact autism and autism is the same thing. Is it caused by something we do? I don't know that I've seen evidence of that. Is blindness caused by something we do? Well, some some people who have become blind, certainly became blind because of medical issues. Premature babies were given oxygen, pure oxygen environments and their retinas tended to malformed. And it took a while for medical science to recognize that too much oxygen might not be a good thing after all. So it's, again an evolutionary process.   Miyah Sundermeyer  33:51 Yeah, well, you know, we were, you know, I'm a big Little House on the Prairie fan. And for years, Laura's sister Laura Ingalls Wilder sister, Mary Ingalls. And I'm not just talking about the TV show, ladies and gentlemen, talking about the real historical figure Mary eagles are so first they thought she had gotten she ended up becoming blind, because she had scarlet fever. But then they discovered later on that there was some other disease in their eyes, and it just caused her eyesight to dim and then she lost it completely. And she was blind the rest of her life. Yeah. So and then there was Helen Keller, I think she saw at one point and then she became what was it blind, deaf and mute?   Michael Hingson  34:36 Correct? Yeah. But clearly had a lot of intelligence and learn to function in the world in which she lived and and hopefully helped a lot of other people grow. How to many people quote Helen Keller, but they don't really go back and intellectually understand that because of of who she was and what she did. Those quotes are meaningful and ought to be taken to heart. And it doesn't mean that we're less capable. It means that we do things in a different way. Have you ever heard? Have you ever heard people use the term differently abled?   Miyah Sundermeyer  35:17 No, I haven't. But that would make sense. But I've used the term human detour system because I was tired of the word disabled. So I decided to call it the human detour system, by learning how to focus on your abilities, and really building on those strengths and working around the things that you can never do, which, which are your disabilities, because that way you don't let the you don't let your disability steal your life and let that ruin your joy. So   Michael Hingson  35:46 well. And the reason I asked the question is, I personally don't value the concept of, quote, differently abled and have quotation because I don't think that we're differently abled, we may do things in a different way. But hey, there are lots of sighted people who do things differently because they're left handed does that make them differently abled, it only means that there may use some alternatives to what most people do. And the same if you're blind or have any other kind of disability. And I agree with you, I don't like the term disability. But I think that the community overall has tried to address that by saying you don't call people disabled people. You call them persons with disabilities. Now, for my part, I believe society in general, every single person on this planet has a disability. And people have heard me say this on the podcast. But I believe that sighted people have the disability that they're like dependent. And Thomas Edison invented the electric light bulb, to allow people to mostly cover up and ignore their disability of being like dependent until the time that there's a power failure. And then they have to run through the flashlights and the candles, but it doesn't change the fact that they have a disability.   Miyah Sundermeyer  36:58 No, it doesn't. I mean, sure, it doesn't change the fact I mean, just because I live on my own, I take the bus everywhere, it doesn't change the fact that I have a disability, you're right, I have my moments where things get too overwhelming. And I just for an autistic, sometimes things get to be too overwhelming. Like there are people there are people on the spectrum today that are scared to disclose the fact that they're autistic, because there are people that are scared to accept us. And there are people on the spectrum that like to do something called masking, which is a form of trying to blend in so people don't bully us. People don't judge us like other people on the spectrum that will love. They won't fit, they won't to stamp meaning they won't rock back and forth. They won't fidget when they're out in society. And so each day, they will go out and try to pretend to be normal, and just basically blend in like a chameleon. And then by the time they get home, they are mentally and physically exhausted. And over time that burnout builds up. Yes. So and   Michael Hingson  38:08 I think there are a lot of people with various disabilities who probably somewhat work the same way. Or they just plain resent the disability. And it oftentimes takes a long time, if at all that people recognize it's nothing wrong with being different. There's nothing wrong with having this so called disability. And I agree with you, I wish there were a better term. But it is the term that we have. And society is great at changing definitions. I mean, look at diversity. We should be included in diversity, but we're not because that is anyone with a disability. The conversation tends not to include us they talk about race and gender and sexual orientation. Disabilities generally aren't included.   Miyah Sundermeyer  38:56 Yeah, yeah. And it's just like, people don't understand that, you know, they, they think that we're whining. And we're not, we're saying, Hey, we're disabilities are part of diversity, too.   Michael Hingson  39:09 Yeah. And so it's important that people start to recognize that it's okay. Now, I and I mentioned speeches that I given that we have on the podcast, if you listen to the second show, on our podcast, you will hear me deliver a speech that I love to call moving from diversity to inclusion, because I won't accept that you can be partially inclusive, either you are inclusive, or you're not. And if you're inclusive, then you need to, and you must include disabilities otherwise you're not inclusive.   Miyah Sundermeyer  39:42 Yeah, exactly. So when did you start your podcast   Michael Hingson  39:46 started at last September, actually. So we've done 38 shows so far, we were given a we actually made Editor's Choice for podcasts magazine in February of 2022 total Surprise, but excited by that. That's awesome. So yes, it's kind of exciting. You mentioned September 11. What is your interest in what did you bring up the concept of September 11?   Miyah Sundermeyer  40:12 Well, I just want to I read that you're a survivor? Oh, yeah, you're the first person I have talked to that has actually been in those buildings. I mean, actually, I take that back. I have friends, I have friends up in the DC area. And they didn't see the Pentagon get blown up. But they said that they were on their way to work. And everything shut down. And because the the Metro in DC was shut down, they spent three hours walking home. Well, I wanted to talk to you about your experiences, because you're the first person I have met, that that was actually in those attacks and 911 what you know, is a part of my life, just like it's a part of everyone's life.   Michael Hingson  40:59 And how did you how did you react to September 11? What What was it like for you?   Miyah Sundermeyer  41:04 So 911 For me, it was very interesting. And I remember I was I was staying at a hospital with a friend and she was a teenager, it was a teenage pregnancy. And she was a girl I grew up with. And so I was in the hospital supporting her and her mom with a new baby. And the baby, the baby's father was there. And I remember getting up the next morning, and I was planning on moving to the same area that my friend and her boyfriend and her mom were and they were going to help they were going to start helping me the next day as well as the kids settled in with that new baby. But anyway, I went downstairs, I had breakfast, and I was waiting for the gift shop to open when a few nurses came in. And they started talking about somebody trying to take over America. And I said what's going on? And one of the nurses kind of brushed me off she went, then she walked away. And I said, Did I just hear you say that someone's trying to take over America. And I heard well, then the Pentagon just got bombs. And at first I blew it off. And I walked out of the cafeteria and I went over to the gift shop which was not open. And I looked and there was a waiting area by the the emergency room. And I walked over, I walked over there and I saw smoke on TV and I said what's going on? And someone said, Bob, and then I heard there was a plane that slammed into the World Trade Centers. And so I sat there trying to take in the same and I was watching as a both of the Twin Towers were on fire. It was just a very unrealistic situation. And, of course, I was so zoned out by it, that I completely. I completely missed the south tower collapse. And I thought I thought what's going on, I just thought there was a lot of smoke. And then someone said that the cell tower has collapsed. That's why you're seeing all the smoke. And then all of a sudden I saw one tower Tandy standing, that was the North Tower. And I first thought, well, at least there's one tower left. And then I was able to go to the gift shop and buy and buy that present for my friend and go back upstairs. But they were just turning on the radio. And I just hopped back in the elevator and I thought, yeah, I think the SEC, yeah, I think the North Tower was going to fall. So I went upstairs, told my friend turn on the TV. And as I was, as I was turning on the TV, there, you know, there was this, there was the North Tower falling. And I remember just I remember being very, I remember feeling very sick after that. I mean, I almost threw up when I saw the second one fall   Michael Hingson  43:56 so much less, much less the Pentagon, but of course I will I don't know actually did they? Did they show much on the news about the Pentagon? Because when I heard about it, I spoke I had been speaking with my wife after both towers fell. So of course the Pentagon was a different thing. But I don't know how much they actually showed us the Pentagon on the news.   Miyah Sundermeyer  44:18 Oh, they went back and forth. But I just remember seeing more of the footage of the World Trade Centers than I remember everybody in the hospital. I mean, they were trying to get my friend out of the hospital that everybody. Everybody was focused on the attacks, even when everybody was at the hospital working.   Michael Hingson  44:39 Yeah, everyone, of course, got focused on this because it's something that we had never experienced before. Yeah. And it became a, needless to say, a very intense thing. And I agree with most people, you'll always remember where you were on September 11. I was in the eighth grade. Read when President Kennedy was shot, it's the same sort of thing, because I remember that I was in my whole class was taking a test in our Constitution and government class in the eighth grade. And Mr. Brown was reading me the questions quietly while everyone else was taking the written tests. And of course, my job was to answer them. And my seventh grade teacher, Mr. Ren Zullo, came in and just quietly spoke to Mr. Brown. And I heard it that President Kennedy was just shot, turn the TV on. And of course, it wasn't long than before he died, the flags went to half staff, and everyone was sent home. So when there are major events like that, yeah, we do remember where we are. And then the issue is, how do we deal with them? And that's what ultimately is, is what we have to discuss regularly and think about is, how do we deal with events like this when they occur?   Miyah Sundermeyer  46:04 Yeah. So me when I saw the World Trade Centers fall, it was very hard for me, you know, when they fell, because it was hard for me to even imagine that there were people in there when they fell. And so I thought, I thought too, that maybe everybody had gotten out, but they did.   Michael Hingson  46:20 Yeah, they didn't. The people. And by the way, mostly that was the people who were above the impact points of the airplanes. I think about 90%, as I heard about it from a police officer, 90% of the people we lost were above where the planes hit. So there were very few people, relatively speaking, who were below who didn't make it out. But it doesn't matter. There were still people who didn't. And we should remember and honor those people always.   Miyah Sundermeyer  46:49 Yeah, I remember seeing video footage on the news, if they were family members that were in denial, this isn't there. They were showing pictures of their loved ones. This is my husband is missing. And you know, just seeing just seeing the reaction of them. You know, you know, that whole grief process? Can you find my loved ones, please? Can you find my loved ones?   Michael Hingson  47:13 So one of my stories of September 11, is that two weeks later? Was it two weeks? I think it was I was in the city meeting with someone. And my wife called and said that she had just gotten a call from someone who was looking for me. And the way the phone call went was that when my wife answered, the guy asked if this was the hingson residence, and of course, she said yes. And he said, Well, I'm I'm trying to find Michael Hinkson. Is this where he lives? And she said, Yes. And he was very uncomfortable. And he said, Well, is Is he okay? And she said, Well, yes. Why are you asking? It turns out that he worked for 9x, which is, of course, now part of Verizon. And he had been on the pile, which it was back then that is the the, the remains of the towers, they were looking for bodies and looking for people and so on. And he found a plaque with my name on it. He took it home, he polished it up. And then he started trying to find me on any of the lists. wasn't on any of the the list of people who'd passed at least as far as they knew, as far as he knew. Anyway, somehow he eventually tracked us down. And so while I was in the city, I did meet him and he gave me the plaque and so on, and we got a chance to meet and visit. But I can almost well I can understand people saying, well, would you help me find my loved one because at the at least at the beginning, and for some time, it wasn't necessarily very clear who totally survived and didn't survive. Really? Did   Miyah Sundermeyer  49:13 they ever find anybody alive under the rubble, not after   Michael Hingson  49:17 the first day or two. But there were a couple of people who were, for example, in the stairwell of one of the towers, who, if you will rode the stairwell down, there was I think, a police officer. And there was a woman that I believe a day or two days later, they were digging through and eventually I think she yelled and they were able to pull her out. So there were a couple. So it's one of those kinds of events where you just never know. And that's why people do a lot of searching after events like this because you don't know who might be surviving and who might not be surviving.   Miyah Sundermeyer  49:59 Yeah, So you were mentioning that 911 wasn't as just walking down the stairs, trying to get out wasn't as scary for you?   Michael Hingson  50:07 Well, for me, and again, this is something we've talked about, but I'll, I'll I'll answer your question. I spent a lot of time, once I was working in the World Trade Center, exploring it, I was the Mid Atlantic region sales manager for a computer company. So it was my job to run an office to run our facility in New York. And my position was to do that I needed to make sure that I knew everything I could about where things were around the World Trade Center, how to get from place to place, what were the emergency evacuation procedures, what were the fire safety procedures, and so on. And I spent a lot of time over weeks learning that which really created a mindset for me, that told me that I knew what to do in an emergency. And so as a result, when it happened, that mindset kicked in. We're actually now working on a book to talk about that. Because what I've realized as a public speaker who's been traveling and speaking about September 11, now for 20 plus years, what I've not done is begun to teach people, how they can learn to not let fear as I call it, blind them, but rather use fear as a powerful tool to help and control their fears. So it's something that we're working toward. And I think that that is that same fear is the same sort of thing that all of us as persons with disabilities face from so many people who are just afraid, or why don't want to end up like them. In one sense, I think at some level, they realize disabilities is an equal opportunity, contributor to people's lives, and they could become a person with a disability in some way. I know. And, and the problem is that, so if you do, do you have the strength? Or will you find that you have the strength to learn to do things in a different way? And that's what people are so uncomfortable about?   Miyah Sundermeyer  52:17 Yeah, now had I had I been in the towers that day, I probably would, if I wasn't, that wasn't super high up, like at the top, like, looking out, I think, if I would have seen the scene, the South Tower on fire, I wouldn't, you know, I would have seen the explosion, I would have been gone, I would have ran down those stairs, and I would have gotten out of there.   Michael Hingson  52:38 Sure. Running wouldn't necessarily have worked because the stairs were pretty crowded. And in fact, when people started to panic on the stairs, we worked to, to try to keep them quiet, or at least to calm them down. To recognize that we all were in this together, we're all going to work to get out together. And a number of us had those kinds of things that we had to work on during the trip down. For me when the plane hit, we were 18 floors below where the plane hit and tower one. So I was on the 78th floor, but no one near me physically in the building at all, no one on our side of the building knew what happened. Because the plane hit on the other side of the building 18 floors above us. So if I had known an aircraft hit the building, I think I can say it wouldn't have made a difference, because I still knew that we had to use the skills and knowledge that we had to get out. But I love information. There were a couple of times that people could have told us. One was when firefighters were coming up. And then when we got down to the bottom, we met someone from the FBI and in both cases, they didn't want to talk about what happened and I can understand that they don't know me they don't know what would throw somebody into panic. But again, my situation would be different than yours. And you you might even just because of autism be more prone to panic or not. I don't know. But you know that's Well that's   Miyah Sundermeyer  54:08 no for me it would have been fight or flight. Yeah, so But So how long did it take you to get down the stairs was I read? How long did it take you to get down the stairs with your coworker?   Michael Hingson  54:20 Well from the time the plane hit until we got outside it was an hour.   Miyah Sundermeyer  54:25 So it took you an hour to get down. Wow. Yep, I know. So read that. The the sprinkler systems were going off down the stairwells as well.   Michael Hingson  54:36 They're probably later on there were the sprinkler systems were on at the bottom when we got got there. But when we were going down the stairs the sprinklers weren't on where we were. And I don't know I assume that there were sprinklers in the stairs. But this I don't know whether there were but the sprinkler systems at the bottom of the stairwell were on there. He formed a barrier between the exit to the stairwell and the lobby of the World Trade Center towers. And you can imagine why that was they wanted to make sure that if fire broke out in the lobby, it wouldn't get into the stairwell. Or if it did get into the stairwell in the air currents took it down, that the fire wouldn't get out into the lobby. So there was a goodly amount of water that was falling from the sprinklers.   Miyah Sundermeyer  55:26 Yeah. And then, you know, sounds like you got out, Nick time to?   Michael Hingson  55:30 Well, I got out from tower one at 945. So we had a little bit of time to get away. But at the same time, we ended up very close to tower to when it collapsed. So we were about 100 yards away. So we ended up having to face it.   Miyah Sundermeyer  55:47 You had to face all that, from what I read you the face all the dust, what do you do to cover your faces?   Michael Hingson  55:52 Nothing for a little while, but then somebody was passing out some masks later on. And we got some.   Miyah Sundermeyer  55:57 Yep. And how long did it take before you got out of that area out of Ground Zero?   Michael Hingson  56:03 Probably by the time we really got up to Canal Street, or in that area, which was a little bit away from ground zero. It was about 1115 or 1130. I think by the time we got there, and then then later we got further up north. Yeah. Well, you know, the thing is that we all react differently to different situations. But we tend to have a lot more power to be able to deal with things, if we truly try to know. And my point is, I wasn't going to rely on people who had signs or red signs. I needed to know what to do. And I will always take input, but I needed to know what to do. And that created a much more firm conviction in my mind that there wasn't a need to be afraid. And I did use a lot of input from both guide dog Roselle at the time, and from the comments of other people that gave me more information going down the stairs. And I think that's something that no matter who we are, those are the kinds of things that we need to do.   Miyah Sundermeyer  57:16 Yeah. Well, I'm glad you got out of there safely. I mean, what, like I said, I'm really glad that you didn't end up caught up in the towers fell.   Michael Hingson  57:25 Yeah, me. Me too. Well, I'm glad that you are, are doing well. And you're going off to get your PhD, huh? Yeah, well,   Miyah Sundermeyer  57:33 right now I'm going I mean, I was planning on going to school back during 911. I just didn't know how I was going to do undergrad back at 19. I had just advocated to get out of special ed. And I was not going to do another transition program. Because I didn't like how the special education teachers were telling me that I needed to do this directions, all because of the DSM and telling me that everything at every dream I wanted was unrealistic. And so they kept shooting it down. And so they tried to put me under a conservatorship or they tried to get my parents to and my parents didn't agree with that. So they told me I could pretty much call the shots. And so at the end of that school year 2001, I just said, Hey, I'm getting out of here, I'm going to find a way to go to college. So but I, I mean, I tend to to go back a few times and take some learning support classes, after doing what they call is the compass exam, which is it's an interest exam for you that you can take a two year school, versus the, the AC T or the SCT, which they steered me away from. And so I went, I went that route instead ay ay, ay, I did the two year education first over a five years, from 23 to 28. And then I transferred my credits over to Georgia State. And I went off and on, off and on. And then I reached I finally got my Bachelor's in 2020. And luckily, I was able to graduate outside on my football field due to COVID, which was a big dream of mine. But   Michael Hingson  59:15 it's good for you.   Miyah Sundermeyer  59:17 But now I'm getting ready to take some Postback classes. And I want to I need to be talking to advisors, anybody I can because I'm fascinated and I have a background that just most of my classes seem to seem to geared towards developmental type psychology and psychology is my baby. So that's what I want to get my doctorate in, is developmental psychology and I want to go into research and I'd also like to teach so   Michael Hingson  59:44 I, and I don't say this lightly, but I'll bet you'll be good at it. You're clearly very articulate, you know what you want to do, and that's as good as it gets.   Miyah Sundermeyer  59:53 Yep, yep. But, but along the way, I mean, because I didn't have along the way at my undergrad. I didn't have mathematical background, I didn't really have much of an academic background because I was in Special Ed and I hated studying. So when I moved to Atlanta from Minnesota at the age of 20, at the age of 21, my aunt told me that, okay, do you want to flip burgers the rest of your life? Or do you want to go back to school? So about so nearly 20 years ago, I moved down here and started learning how to do math. So math is one of my favorite subjects. Nobody understands why. Well, I spent a lot of time getting exposed to it. That's why   Michael Hingson  1:00:34 it doesn't matter. It is. And that's, that's the big issue. But yeah, you do have an explanation for it. So that's pretty cool. Well, Maya, we have been talking for now a little bit over an hour. So I am going to suggest that what we ought to do is to keep in touch. And when you have more adventures about your education talked about, we should get you to come back on the podcast again.   Miyah Sundermeyer  1:00:55 Yep, I will come back and talk about my education, especially as I talked about my progress for that. And then I really need to have temple back on the show. However, I really like to see her in person again, I miss seeing temple. So   Michael Hingson  1:01:11 well, if you talk with her, see if she would love to chat and explore coming on unstoppable mindset. All right, well, thank   Miyah Sundermeyer  1:01:18 you much. Well, I   Michael Hingson  1:01:19 appreciate it. And if people want to reach out to you, is there a way that they can contact you and you have a website or anything or whatever?   Miyah Sundermeyer  1:01:27 Yeah. Well, so I'm a podcast host myself that said that. Yeah. And I'm currently on a podcast tour. And you are number four on the tour. So I've HelloWorld with Miyah, and that's helloworldwithMiyah. podbean.com. That's Hello, world with Miyah dot pod bean.com.   Michael Hingson  1:01:45 Hello, world with miyah dot pod bean.com. Okay,   Miyah Sundermeyer  1:01:50 yeah. And I have two applications. I am calling for proposals. I'm always looking for guests to be on the show. And I am also on a podcast tour right now. So if you know anyone that has any slots that are open, I would love to be on your show. So   Michael Hingson  1:02:07 great. Well, we can introduce you to people and make some of that happen.   Miyah Sundermeyer  1:02:11 All right. Well, thank you so much.   Michael Hingson  1:02:13 Well, thank you. And I appreciate everyone who is listening to this today. Miyah is certainly one of those people that I want to grow up to be like, I can just say that.   Miyah Sundermeyer  1:02:27 But whoever for two years, I have a young face, but I'm about 40 now.   Michael Hingson  1:02:31 There you go. Well, I want to thank you again. And thank you all for listening. If you'd like to reach out to me, we'd love to hear your thoughts about the episode. You can email me at Michaelhi M I C H A E L H I  at accessibe A C C E S S I B E .com. You can also go to our podcast page, which is www dot Michael hingson .com slash podcast Michael Hingson is M I C H A E L H I N G S O N. And if you go to Michael hingson.com/podcast. Or if you're listening to this at some other location, please give us a five star rating. We appreciate the ratings. And I hope that you'll give us a five star one for this episode. So again, thank you all for listening. Wherever you are in Miyah, thank you for listening. Are you all you listen to thank you for being here.   Miyah Sundermeyer  1:03:21 All right, thank you much.   Michael Hingson  1:03:22 Thank you.   Michael Hingson  1:03:28 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

That Would Be Rad
S2 E51: The Stroudsburg Rain Man - The Devil & Don Decker

That Would Be Rad

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 91:58


The mind is a powerful thing. There are certain memories that stick with you forever - sometimes triggered by a smell, or a sound, that will take you immediately back to a moment in time. Whether a fond memory, or a complete nightmare, it seems that we have very little control of when this will happen. For us, the moment we hear the theme song for Unsolved Mysteries, or hear Robert Stack's voice - suddenly we're pre-teen kids again. This week we talk about a case that both of us remember hearing about on our old favorite show Unsolved Mysteries - one that back in 1993 they referred to as the "Rain Boy". This case is a perfectly creepy example of just how powerful the mind potentially is. Don Decker (the Rain Boy, or Rain Man) could seemingly make it start to rain wherever he was, a phenomenon that was witnessed by many including police...one which no one could explain. Was it a case of hydrokenisis, a demonic possession, or simply what would be arguably one of the most elaborate and difficult hoaxes for the time? Find out what we think and decide for yourself this week on THAT WOULD BE RAD... Thank you so much for listening - stay spooky & BE RAD! SHOW INFO

Gold Standard-The Oscars Podcast

Did the Babbitts deserve to be the main men or should one of their fellow nominees have won big at Oscar night? Find out the answer to this question and more as we are joined by special guest Maureen Van Zandt to discuss "Rain Man" !!! Twitter : @oscarsgold @hidarknesspod @beatlesblonde @udanax19 Facebook : facebook.com/goldstandardoscars Patreon : patreon.com/goldstandardoscars

Homer & Tony
3PM: Tony's NFL Power Rankings

Homer & Tony

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 38:14


In Hour 2, Tony gives his first ever Top 7 NFL Power Rankings, the guys try and figure out how to win in Cover 5, our weekly edition of Rainman and would you still want Davante Adams back on the Packers after what he did on Monday Night Football after the game?

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™
291 David Sacks All In Podcast “Rain Man”/Top Tech VC on Armageddon, Ukraine/Russia, Biden, US Mid-terms, Free Speech & more

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 91:18


US President Joe Biden recently warned about the possibility of Armageddon. He said “we have not faced the prospect of Armageddon since Kennedy and the Cuban Missile Crisis.” On this episode of Christopher Lochhead: Follow Your Different, we discuss the current situation in the US and around the world with All In Podcast Rain Man, David Sacks. David Sacks is a legendary entrepreneur, category and company builder, and now venture capitalist. He's the founder of a VC firm called Craft Ventures. He was the founding Chief Operating Officer of PayPal founder and CEO of Yammer, which sold to Microsoft for well over a billion dollars. He has been an early investor in companies like Facebook, Twitter, Uber, SpaceX, Airbnb, Slack, and more. And today, he's also incredibly well known as one of the CO hosts of the All In podcast. So listen in to keep up with current affairs, and you might learn a thing or two on how to prepare for the future. David Sacks on Biden's comment about Armageddon We begin on the recent comments that Biden made about Armageddon. When asked why he thinks Biden's thoughts went that way, David's reply was: “My reaction to this was the man who can't see two steps ahead, suddenly realizes where his policy is leading. We're the ones who have refused to engage in any sort of diplomacy or any sort of negotiated settlement. Our strategy is not to provide them with an off ramp.” – David Sacks But David also thinks that Biden acknowledging this is a step in the right direction. “That being said, I still thought it was incredibly useful for Biden to say what he said, because the first step of getting out of a problem is acknowledging that you're in one.” – David Sacks David Sacks on Tactical Nukes & Risking Nuclear War There has also been talks of using tactical nukes to quickly resolve the situation. David does not agree with this, saying that using nukes at this point just opens up the risk of a nuclear war. “If a tactical nuclear weapon gets used in Ukraine, then the whole world will be different. This thing could escalate very quickly into a larger scale nuclear war. You had Petraeus on the Sunday shows last weekend saying that if Putin uses attack nukes, the US should respond by hitting every Russian military target in Ukraine? Well, again, think two steps ahead. How do you think the Russians would react to that, given that they clearly don't have the military might to stand up to the US in terms of conventional arms?” – David Sacks If countries start using nukes, then it signals that the former agreements against it can be violated with impunity. And that is a dangerous ground to tread. Prediction or Deterrent Returning to Biden's statement about Armageddon, David suggests that, rather than being a prediction, this statement, along with Petreaus', could be interpreted as a warning or deterrent against Russia going nuclear. The problem is that the reasons why the Russians might escalate to the use of nuclear weapons is because they're losing the war by conventional means. Add to the fact that Putin doesn't have an off ramp that lets him keep his reign. Because if he loses this war, or doesn't gain anything significant from it, it is very likely that he will be forced out of office by the public. Putin is pretty much acting like a cornered beast at this point. The scary part is that you don't know what that cornered beast might do as a last-ditch effort to escape. To hear more from David Sacks and the current situation of the world, download and listen to this episode. Bio David Sacks is co-founder and general partner at Craft. He has been a successful founder and investor for over two decades, building and investing in some of the most iconic companies in tech. He has invested in over 20 unicorns, including Affirm, AirBnB, Bird, ClickUp, Eventbrite, Facebook, Houzz, Lyft, OpenDoor, Palantir, Postmates, Reddit, Slack, SpaceX, Twitter, Uber, and Wish. David is also co-host of the popular “All-In Podcast” w...

No BS News Hour with Charlie LeDuff
The Rain Man Cometh – October 3, 2022

No BS News Hour with Charlie LeDuff

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 55:40


Money, Money everywhere, but not a drop was earned. As the federal government cranks up the printing presses, inflation continues to soar, and the Detroit Lions continue to suck. Biden... The post The Rain Man Cometh – October 3, 2022 appeared first on No BS News Hour with Charlie LeDuff.

AOL Underground
AOL History from the people that lived it (part2) - Craig, Jan, Bryan, Erci

AOL Underground

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 68:01


Staff from 1987-2007 (with over 35 years combined experience) talk about their experience while working at AOL. You will hear about the Eworld, Tandylink, Commodore 64, Telnet, RAINMAN, Jay Levitt, Hackers, Q-Guides, scalability issues, and more. Guests: Craig Braquet Jan DeLucien Bryan Teague Erci Stern Host: Steve Stonebraker CoverArt: Created by Broast (https://broast.org), original idea by LampGold. -- Craig Braquet Craig's famous Quora post - https://bit.ly/3OOeijL All of Us: https://bit.ly/3JibxWA https://allofus.nih.gov/about/who-we-are/all-us-participant-partners?page=1 -- Jan DeLucien Surviving a brain injury, my story --Trying to be Virtuous About Brain Injury Services - An Interview Click here to donate your brain (posthumously, or course) -- Bryan Teague https://bryanteague.com https://medium.com/@bryanlteague -- Erci Stern Fancy Cats and Dogs Rescue - I foster for them each year and adopt all my personal pets from them. They are a truly caring and amazing animal rescue organization. www.fancycats.org Doctors without Borders - I give to this organization because there are so many people around the world who don't have access to western style medicine for whom what we consider simple procedures would be life altering benefits. https://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/ -- AOL Underground Podcast Follow us on twitter - @AOLUnderground @brakertech Merch - https://www.redbubble.com/people/AOL-Underground/shop Donate - https://www.buymeacoffee.com/AOLUnderground Contact the Host - https://aolunderground.com/contact-host/ Reconnect with old AOLers - https://discord.gg/reaol https://aolunderground.com/community/

No BS News Hour with Charlie LeDuff
The Rain Man Cometh – October 3, 2022

No BS News Hour with Charlie LeDuff

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 55:40


Money, Money everywhere, but not a drop was earned. As the federal government cranks up the printing presses, inflation continues to soar, and the Detroit Lions continue to suck. Biden calls out a dead woman as Trump beats a dead horse. Why is the state of Michigan doling out hundreds of millions of fake dollars […]

Bang Your Bookie's Wife: A Podcast About Sports Betting
Week 5 College Football Preview: “One Hot Dog, Hold the UCLA Ticket”

Bang Your Bookie's Wife: A Podcast About Sports Betting

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 58:27


We are BACK with another week of locks from our experts Rainman and Capper — who is off to a sizzling 10-5-1 start to the year. Joe P is building on his first successful four-team parlay of the season with another winner sure to hit. We got another slightly less degen King of the Hill pick. And wouldn't you know it, we finally heard back from Jesus!   Email: BYBWpodcast@gmail.com IG: @BangYourBookiesWife Twitter: @BYBWpodcast

Black Lincoln Collective Podcast
Wellfare Queen and the Fatiator| The Black Lincoln Collective Podcast featuring Booze N Chill

Black Lincoln Collective Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 83:18


This week we're joined by our buddy Raymond from Booze N Chill. We lay the Queen to rest, talk about revolution, and how we hate to Queue. Fred's an anglophile, and he's all about the new king. We talk about Tom Hardy with Karate Action, Venom, and all the Marvel movies. Fred loves Morbius, watch for spoilers. We breakdown Thor Love and Thunder, and and have a really long talk about Russell Crowe. Why are the nazis stealing all the good hand gestures? Thankfully, we solve the issue on the show this week. We play Rayman, Raymond, or Rainman.  Parker's Grill breaks, Applebees, and the BBQ Pit Boys crazy food inventions and beards. Who would narrate our lives, Jamie Foxx's Donald Trump Impression is amazing. We tease Allan's next movie review, and Allan's sobriety. RIP Bob Saget,The upbeat Casino music, and we explain the walk of fame and emmy scams we're running. We're joined one of the show's oldest friends, and we play what may be the worst Jeopardy round in history. and we of course talk about rockbox.com and so very much more.

The Bart and Dain Show
Conversation with Patrick Lucas, Candidate for West Virginia House of Delegates

The Bart and Dain Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 66:23


Patrick is running for the House of Delegates in West Virginia. Patrick is a lifetime resident of Cabell County, small business owner, and has been a Realtor for the last 23 years. The focus of his run for the House is to protect the elderly and the most vulnerable and this shows in his commitment to Habitat for Humanity. Bart is now saying he is the Rain Man and we know he can be challenging, and he attempts to show off his linguistic abilities for this episode. Please like, share and follow us to get notifications of new podcasts, we release every Monday, Thanks for listening!

Bang Your Bookie's Wife: A Podcast About Sports Betting
Week 4 College Football Preview: Our Cameo From Jesus Didn't Arrive In Time

Bang Your Bookie's Wife: A Podcast About Sports Betting

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 51:19


The BYBW crew is back and despite the missing cameo we have — in our estimation — the best episode of the season here. I know, what an incredibly low car. Rainman and Capper have been red hot on their Big Rubber locks of the week and Joe Publc is for sure FOR SURE hitting that four-teamer this week. And we caution listeners with a sensitive stomach for repulsive games to please mute our King of the Hill pick, you were warned.   IG: @bangyourbookieswife Email: BYBWpodcast@gmail.com

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Episode 687: Stand Up Special with Actor, Writer, director, author, narrator and Zen Buddhist priest and teacher Peter Coyote

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 50:09


Hi there Kim and apparently Melanie who also reads the show notes. These show notes are for you 2 unless someone else wants to show themselves! I will see you at our next secret meeting and I will invite your favorite guest to join us! How about that for a bonus!  I wanted today's conversation with Peter Coyote to be evergreen or always relevant whenever you decide to listen to it so I eschewed the normal production elements and news and got right to my chat with the legend. Special thanks to Mark Nolte and his ban City Park in Iowa City who wrote this song for Peter. Please go listen or stream it! My previous conversations with Peter are linked below Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more PETER COYOTE began his film career at 39, after living nearly a dozen years in the counter-culture during the 1960s and 70s. Since then, he has performed as an actor for some of the world's most distinguished filmmakers, including: Barry Levinson, Roman Polanski, Pedro Almodovar, Steven Spielberg, Walter Hill, Martin Ritt, Steven Soderberg, Diane Kurys, Sidney Pollack and Jean Paul Rappeneau. To date he has made over 150 films. In 2006 he had a major role in three televison series: The Inside on Fox-TV, the 4400 on USA Channel and played the Vice-President to Geena Davis's President on Commander in Chief for ABC-TV until the show's end. In 2011 he starred as the District Attorney in the new version of Law and Order – LA. In 2000 year he was the on-camera announcer of the Academy Awards Ceremony, taking the heavy-lifting off co-host Billy Crystal's shoulders for the detailed announcements and data which played live to an estimated one billion listeners. In 2007 he was prominently featured as an old boxing promoter in Rod Lurie's “Resurrecting the Champ” with Samuel. L. Jackson and Josh Hartnett, and also as Sally Field's disreputable writing teacher on the television series, “Brothers and Sisters.” He recently completed a six hour series called The Disappearance which aired last year. Most recently, he played Robert Mueller to Jeff Daniel's Jim Comey, and Brendan Gleeson's Donald Trump. The series is called The Comey Rule and will be released this year on SHOWTIME.   Mr. Coyote has written a memoir of his counter-culture years called Sleeping Where I Fall which received universally excellent reviews, appeared on three best-seller lists and sold five printings in hardback after being released by Counterpoint Press in 1999, it was re-released in November of 2010 and has been in continuous release ever since. It is currently in use as a source text for Sixties Studies in a number of universities including Harvard where he was invited to teach “The Theater of Protest” last year.   An early chapter from that book, “Carla's Story, won the 1993/94 Pushcart Prize for Excellence in non-fiction. His new book, The Rainman's Third Cure, released in April, 2015 is a study of mentors and the search for wisdom and he is currently readying a new book for publication in 2021-(TITLE) The I Behind the Mask: The Lone Ranger and Tonto meet the Buddha.   Mr. Coyote is well-known for his narration work, and has voiced 150 documentaries and TV specials, including the nine-hour PBS Special, The West. In 1992 he won an EMMY as the “Host” for a nine-hour series, called, The Pacific Century which also won the prestigious duPont-Columbia Award for Excellence in Broadcast Journalism.   In 2010 he recorded the12 hour series on The National Parks for Ken Burns and has recently completed the voice-work on Mr. Burns most recent series—a 16 hour special on The History of Country Music. He won a second Emmy for his narration on The Roosevelts, and has also done Prohibition, The Dust Bowl, and an 18 Hour series on Vietnam with Ken Burns. Mr Coyote and Mr Burns just completed a long series on Ernest Hemingway. In 2011 he was ordained as a Zen Buddhist priest and in 2015 received “transmission” from his teacher, making him an independent Zen teacher. He makes his home on a farm in Northern California, and considers working on his 1952 Dodge Power-Wagon his longest lasting addiction. He has 40 fruit trees and loves to make jam and walk with his two dogs.   Peter Coyote Episode 276 Peter Coyote Wikipedia Peter Coyote Movies IMDB Peter Coyote Books Peter Coyote with me on Episode 14   SUPPORT THE SHOW BY SUPPORTING  one of the sponsors of the show!   Indeed.com/StandUp   Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Follow and Support Gareth Sever  Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page

Dead Beat Film Society
151 - Rain Man (1988)

Dead Beat Film Society

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 86:36


Course it's definitely time for Dead Beats! Join the Dead Beat Film Society as we discuss 80's Tom Cruise, Dustin Hoffman's difficult reputation, autism awareness, Hans Zimmer's first score, best picture winner, the R word, K-Mart sucks, saccharine 80's movies, onscreen representation, selling lambo's on the black market, Kim Peek and the traveling Oscar, the magical autistic stereotype, counting cards, casting people with disabilities, similarities to Coda, character arcs, Barry Levinson, the jewishness, the solid girlfriend character, Qantas Airlines flight record, Tom Cruise's career, method acting, does anyone learn a lesson?, the money raised by this movie, savant syndrome, the airline edit of the film, our pitch for Rain Man 2 and how it could actually be good! Grab 10 fishsticks and hit play for an in depth Rain Man film analysis! (Special Guest: Jews On Film Podcast) Click here to subscribe to Jews On Film podcast!  

Dads From the Crypt: A Tales From The Crypt Podcast
An Interview with David McGiffert

Dads From the Crypt: A Tales From The Crypt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 78:09


Jason interviews Assistant Director David McGiffert about his new book "The Best Seat in the House" in which David discusses working on movies such as King Kong '76, Tootsie, Rain Man, the Back to The Future Trilogy, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Batman Returns, TFC ep ""And All Through The House"" and more. He also tells storys of working with Sydney pollack, Natalie Wood, Dustin Hoffman, Bill Murray, Paul Newman, Willie Nelson, Rip Torn, Peter Weir, Bob gale, Robert Zemeckis, Tom Cruise, Michael J Fox, Christopher Lloyd, Tom Wilson, Robin Williams, Terry Gilliam, Tim Burton, Christopher Walken, John Travolta, Jim Carrey and Cameron Crowe.

Notes From The Pen
S12 Bonus NFTW (20) - Book Banister And Rain Man

Notes From The Pen

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 40:41


Notes From The Week with Co-host Monkey Wrench: Prison Junk Drawer (or Drunk Drawer as mc incorrectly says), GTL snatching up account money, bloody underwear, book banister, and shout out to Ramen...Rain Man...ahhh...a new pebble. You can read more about Bobby and prison reform on the website: notesfromthepen.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/NotesFromThePen Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/p/CJYuOh4pKxa/?igshid=y8lo9kbdifvq YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHN6enhnEfCr6D45TX9kvVA Intro and Outro music created just for Notes From The Pen by PJ Trofibio and Jeff Quintero and used with permission. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/r-caldwell/message

Famous & Gravy
Rain Man Judge

Famous & Gravy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 57:14


This person died in 2017, age 97. He graduated in 1937 from Hollywood High School, where he briefly dated the future film actress Lana Turner. The full measure of his celebrity was not realized until 1981. He let millions of viewers know that no matter how seemingly insignificant their legal disputes, they, too, were entitled to their day in court. He sat on the bench of the syndicated television show “The People's Court.” Today's dead celebrity is Judge Joseph Wapner.  Famous & Gravy is created and co-hosted by Amit Kapoor and Michael Osborne. This episode was produced by Jacob Weiss. For updates on the show, please sign up for our mailing list at famousandgravy.com. Also play our mobile quiz app at deadoraliveapp.com   Links: Transcript of this episode Famous & Gravy official website Dead or Alive App Follow our show on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn New York Times obituary for Joseph Wapner Carson vs Letterman car case moderated by Wapner Judge Wapner discussing his career as a judge Hollywood High School notable graduates Linden Leaf Spirits USA (promo code FAMOUS20)

We Love the Love
Rain Man

We Love the Love

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 54:02


We're wrapping up our look at the romances of 1988's Best Picture nominees by digging into the winner, Barry Levinson's road trip drama Rain Man. Join in as we discuss our favorite kidnappings, the Crimean War, the action movie version of Rain Man that almost happened, and our own top five movies of 1988. Plus: What was Rain Man's impact on autism awareness? How did it come to be about autism in the first place? Why was it such a box office sensation? And, most importantly, what's Susanna's deal??? Make sure to rate, review, and subscribe! Next week: The Adventurs of Buckaroo Banzai across the Eighth Dimension (1984) --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/we-love-the-love/message

Bang Your Bookie's Wife: A Podcast About Sports Betting
Week 1 College Football Preview: Rubbers, Winners, and Babblers

Bang Your Bookie's Wife: A Podcast About Sports Betting

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 46:26


Everybody's* favorite college football podcast is so back on our bullshit it's agonizing. Rainman and Capper are offering up their four-game slate of winners, and Joe Public makes picks too. Also stick around for the dramatic conclusion of (cue music) The Walkon. *Some people Email: bybwpodcast@gmail.com IG: @bangyourbookieswife

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bonnie Hunt has done it all. And she is extremely good at, well, all of it. She's a comedian, an actor, a TV host, a writer and a director. Her first ever part was in Rain Man, and since then she's starred in films like Jumanji (1995), had parts in three sitcoms in the 90s, and hosted her own talk show in the 2000s. Bonnie has also created several hit TV shows and directed movies. Her latest endeavor is a family TV series called Amber Brown, which is now streaming on Apple TV Plus. It's based on the Paula Danziger book of the same name. Bonnie Hunt joins Bullseye to talk about the new show and why she thought it was important to make an understated kid's series. She also talks about how she discovered improv in Chicago, and how she managed to combine it with her day job as a nurse. Plus, she talks about The Bonnie Hunt Show and what made it so unique.