Podcasts about airborne divisions

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Best podcasts about airborne divisions

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Latest podcast episodes about airborne divisions

Stand Up For The Truth Podcast
Fernando Arroyo: Suicide Awareness, Warfare & ‘The Shadow of Death'

Stand Up For The Truth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 53:26


Today we talk with author and U.S. Army Veteran, Fernando Arroyo, former Paratrooper in the 82nd Airborne Division, Fernando helped create a Veterans Association at Biola University while earning a Masters degree. We discuss his dramatic testimony and how God saved him from suicide; mental health, combat, serving Veterans, and the importance of community.

The Spear
Company Command in Babil

The Spear

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 33:36


In 2004, Matt Hardman was an infantry company commander in the 82nd Airborne Division. Just returned from Afghanistan, his paratroopers were deployed to Iraq’s Babil province on just a month’s notice. The situation in Babil was uncertain, with limited intelligence on enemy cells, tactics, or objectives. Hardman’s battalion had almost eight hundred square kilometers to patrol and scant resources with which to do it. Within their first week, the company began losing soldiers. He joins this episode to reflect on that challenging deployment, describing the foundations for his paratroopers' success and what he learned about the fundamentals of leadership.

Arroe Collins
Ben Kesling Releases Bravo Company An Afghanstan Deployment And It's Aftermath

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 12:19


In Bravo Company, journalist and combat veteran Ben Kesling tells the story of the war in Afghanistan through the eyes of the men of one unit, part of a combat-hardened parachute infantry regiment in the 82nd Airborne Division. A decade ago, the soldiers of Bravo Company deployed to Afghanistan for a tour in Kandahar's notorious Arghandab Valley. By the time they made it home, three soldiers had been killed in action, a dozen more had lost limbs, and an astonishing half of the company had Purple Hearts.In the decade since, two of the soldiers have died by suicide, more than a dozen have tried, and others admit they've considered it. Declared at "extraordinary risk" by the Department of Veterans Affairs, Bravo Company was chosen as test subjects for a new approach to the veteran crisis, focusing less on isolated individuals and more on the group.Written with an insider's eye and ear, and drawing on extensive interviews and original reporting, Bravo Company follows the men from their initial enlistment and training, through their deployment and a major shift in their mission, and then on to what has happened in the decade since; as they returned to combat in other units or moved on with their lives as civilians, or struggled to. This is a powerful, insightful, and memorable account of a war that didn't end for these soldiers just because Bravo Company came home

Arroe Collins
Ben Kesling Releases Bravo Company An Afghanstan Deployment And It's Aftermath

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 12:19


In Bravo Company, journalist and combat veteran Ben Kesling tells the story of the war in Afghanistan through the eyes of the men of one unit, part of a combat-hardened parachute infantry regiment in the 82nd Airborne Division. A decade ago, the soldiers of Bravo Company deployed to Afghanistan for a tour in Kandahar's notorious Arghandab Valley. By the time they made it home, three soldiers had been killed in action, a dozen more had lost limbs, and an astonishing half of the company had Purple Hearts.In the decade since, two of the soldiers have died by suicide, more than a dozen have tried, and others admit they've considered it. Declared at "extraordinary risk" by the Department of Veterans Affairs, Bravo Company was chosen as test subjects for a new approach to the veteran crisis, focusing less on isolated individuals and more on the group.Written with an insider's eye and ear, and drawing on extensive interviews and original reporting, Bravo Company follows the men from their initial enlistment and training, through their deployment and a major shift in their mission, and then on to what has happened in the decade since; as they returned to combat in other units or moved on with their lives as civilians, or struggled to. This is a powerful, insightful, and memorable account of a war that didn't end for these soldiers just because Bravo Company came home

Sword and Pen
Ben Kesling: Wall Street Journal reporter and author

Sword and Pen

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 31:12


On this episode of Sword and Pen, guest Ben Kesling talks about his quick transition from being a marine corps combat veteran to a reporter at the Wall Street Journal and a published author. Listen in as Ben also reads a passage from his new book, Bravo Company: An Afghanistan Deployment and its Aftermath, a story of the war in Afghanistan through the eyes of the men of one unit, part of a combat-hardened parachute infantry regiment in the 82nd Airborne Division. Ben, an MJV member and one of our Top 10 Military Veterans in Journalism in 2022, talks about how he funded journalism school at Medill at Northwestern; shares his love of his four young children with storytelling that makes a difference; and gives us his backstory to being a two-time winner on Jeopardy. Ben on Twitter | To buy his book, go to Bravo Company | Link to RSVP to Ben and Russell Midori's longform journalism webinar on Jan. 12! This episode is hosted by Lori King Sword and Pen is a Military Veterans in Journalism production, and is brought to you monthly by co-hosts Lori King and Drew Lawrence Twitter | Lori King @intro2pj / Drew Lawrence @df_lawrence Got an idea for a podcast guest? Shoot us an email at lorikingblog@gmail.com and/or drew@mvj.network

Hazard Ground
Ep. 304 - Charlie Faint (U.S. Army / Second Mission Foundation)

Hazard Ground

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 102:26


Charlie Faint served over 27 years in the Army's Infantry and Military Intelligence branches. After graduating from Georgia Military College and commissioning through the ROTC program at Mercer University, he did his Infantry time in the 101st Airborne Division and served two tours with the Second Infantry Division in Korea after his Military Intelligence transition. Charlie also completed seven combat tours and served operational assignments to Hawaii, the Philippines, Egypt, and the Republic of Korea. After his time in Special Operations was over, Charlie attended graduate school at Yale University and taught at West Point for seven years. In retirement, he serves as the Chair for the Study of Special Operations in West Point's Modern War Institute and is the owner of The Havok Journal and the Executive Director of the Second Mission Foundation, and advises for the Peace and Dialogue Leadership Initiative. Support the podcast by supporting our sponsors at www.hazardground.com/sponsors Shop Amazon! As an Amazon Associate We Earn From Qualifying Purchases...You Know The Deal! (Paid Link) Help grow the show! Spread the word, tell a friend!! Subscribe, rate, and review on Apple Podcasts! Episode Intro Music: “Prelude” by “Silence & Light” (www.silenceandlightmusic.com) Photo Credit: Charles Faint

Born to Succeed-E.99-Michael Merritt-“Interview”-Army Vet/Police Officer-Author-Patrick Fitzgibbons

"BORN TO SUCCEED" with Michael & Alyssa Merritt

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 53:54


Check out this awesome and amazing Podcast with Mr Patrick Fitzgibbons. Who is he you ask ?? Listen to this Podcast and read this description below to learn a little more about this Champion !!!! Patrick Fitzgibbons is a retired Police Commander from Colorado with over two decades of experience in many different roles. Patrick currently lives in Scottsdale Arizona. Patrick holds advanced degrees in Business and Organizational Leadership. A former Army Paratrooper with the elite 82nd Airborne Division, Patrick is an avid supporter of active military members & veterans as well as the First Responder Community. Patrick is a personal coach, sought after speaker and is the host and creator of Criminal Justice Evolution. A top ranked criminal justice podcast. After going through severe depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation, Patrick sought treatment. Patrick is now a National Liaison for FHE Health – Shatterproof Program for First Responders. A nationally recognized behavioral health treatment provider which provides quality, innovation, and comprehensive treatment for patients. You can find Patrick and all of his social media below

Get Deep
Ep030 Jack Zimmerman

Get Deep

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 127:41


Jack Zimmerman who was raised in a small town in Minnesota, joined the U.S. Army and became an Airborne Infantryman. He deployed in 2010 with the legendary 101st Airborne Division. After spending nine months in heavy combat, Zimmerman, while on a foot patrol, stepped on an Improvised Explosive Device (IED) and suffered catastrophic injuries. As he lie there, his own life flashed before his eyes, while the platoon medic and teammates worked to save him and the rest of his team engaged the enemy. Zimmerman was not expected to survive that day, but twenty surgeries and two years later, he left the San Antonio Military Medical Center and medically retired from the U.S. Army. Today, Zimmerman is a devoted husband and father and is a strong part of his community working both as a motivational speaker and author.

Outliers with Daniel Scrivner
All-Time Top 10 Guests – #6 Laurence Gonzales (The Chemistry of Fire: Stories from the Top of Mount Washington to 12,000 Feet Beneath the Ocean to Night Assaults with the 82nd Airborne Division)

Outliers with Daniel Scrivner

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 42:56


In Episode #16, we explore The Chemistry of Fire: Essays with the author, Laurence Gonzales. We cover an adventure story of ice climbers on Mount Washington, the importance of rules and systems for decision making, and Laurence's work with the Santa Fe Institute. “There's no way to stop these accidents from happening, but there's a way to stop them from happening to you.” – Laurence Gonzales EPISODE GUIDE (LINKS, QUOTES, NOTES, AND BOOKS MENTIONED) https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/laurence-gonzales2-outliers-show-notes  FULL TEXT TRANSCRIPT https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/laurence-gonzales2-outliers-transcript  CHAPTERS This episode is our definitive guide to The Chemistry of Fire. In it we cover: (00:00:00) – Introduction (00:01:32) – The concept of the chemistry of fire (00:05:06) – An adventure story of ice climbers on Mount Washington (00:06:57) – Why people keep going when they know they should turn back (00:15:54) – The importance of rules and systems for decision making (00:21:32) – The survival of a cross-country skier after a major mishap (00:27:32) – Laurence's work with the Santa Fe Institute (00:34:02) – Words of wisdom for 2021 ABOUT THE CHEMISTRY OF FIRE Laurence Gonzales is the author of The Chemistry of Fire: Essays. In our previous conversation, we discussed Laurence's best selling book, Deep Survival, on who lives, who dies, and why. It's an incredible book, and it's filled with so many parallels to the worlds of business, investing, and peak performance. So when Laurence told me that he had a new book coming, I couldn't resist the urge to pick his brain one more time.

Elevate Your Leadership
Eric Maddox, Author, Speaker, and former US Army Interrogator who used empathy based listening to lead the search for Saddam Hussein

Elevate Your Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 53:43


In this fascinating discussion, Eric Maddox shares why he enlisted in the U.S. Army where he was a paratrooper in the 82nd Airborne Division, a jumpmaster, and graduate of Ranger School. In 2003, he was sent to Tikrit, Iraq where he joined a Delta Force team who was searching for high value targets on the infamous Deck of Cards. After five months and over 300 interrogations, Eric was able to track down and eventually give the team the exact location of the spider hole in which Saddam hid. For this, he was awarded the Legion of Merit, the National Intelligence Medal of Achievement, the Defense Intelligence Agency Director's Award, and the Bronze Star. Eric has successfully transitioned his technique of empathy based listening to teach business leaders across the globe on how to follow the breadcrumbs that lead to the stage of the person you are negotiating with. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Profiles in Havok
Dale Comstock

Profiles in Havok

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 111:56


It is important for veterans' experiential wisdom to, well, not die with them. Passing on the lessons learned - the best practices, the frank admissions, the abject failures - is crucial for both a civilian population that may not otherwise relate AND for the veteran population that does. So it would be a shame not to pick the brain of a man who has operated at the highest levels of the DoD, the most exotic assignments in the USG, and the most adventurous sectors of the private security industry. Dale Comstock is a lot more than the bullet points on his resume. That said, he has a lot of bullet points.Dale served in 1st SFOD-D (Delta Force), 3rd Special Forces Group, and in the 82nd Airborne Division 325th Infantry. He also worked 9.5 years as a paramilitary operative for USG and concurrently worked as a contract security specialist, COO, Vice President, and President for various security companies applying his skills and knowledge on a myriad of security challenges around the world. He has been decorated twice for Valor in combat and is also the famed breacher that explosively breached the Modelo Prison in Panama during the 1989 U.S. invasion and rescue of Kurt Muse. Dale has 6th degree Black Belts in American Open Karate and Extension Fighting, with a 1st degree Black Belt in Ju Jitsu. He is a former professional boxer, kickboxer, and MMA fighter, who authored the 3rd Special Forces Group combatives manual in 1997, instructed the Delta Force combatives program and the 3rd Special Forces Group combatives program. He is a competitive Bodybuilder and actively trains and competes alongside his son. In the world of self-defense Dale has globally managed bodyguard details for high net worth businessman, celebrities, and Politicians. Dale has a Doctorate Natural Health and Alternative Medicine, a Masters Degree in Business and Organizational Security Management, with a Baccalaureates degree in Education. He is fluent in German, with a working knowledge of Spanish and Portuguese. In September 2011 Dale was featured on Discovery Channel's “One Man Army,” and in September 2012 he was featured on NBC's “Stars Earn Stripes” alongside Terry Crews.Dale is very forthright about his own operating system - what has helped propel his career, his health, his accomplishments and, ultimately, his freedom in life. For all of Dale's successes in the military, contracting, business, and coaching, there are the struggles - the marriages, the single parenting, the supervision of civilian contract security employees. From turning down a life of guaranteed comfort to abandoning Hollywood, I think Dale's life is full of lessons that are more than interesting, they are relevant.Follow Dale here.Buy Dale's autobiography, American Badass here.

The FORSCOM Frontline
82nd Airborne Division All American Chorus

The FORSCOM Frontline

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 33:48


Join us for a special episode with the 82nd Airborne Division All American Chorus. A video of them singing 'My Girl' while waiting for an airborne jump went viral earlier this year and has kept them busy. They took some time to sing for us and to share what it is like to be part of the chorus.

War Stories by Preston Stewart
225: Fighting the Global War on Terror with the Bastogne Brigade of the 101st Airborne Division

War Stories by Preston Stewart

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 54:09


Today we are joined with Michael Franks. Michael joined the Army in 2005 on an 18X contract inbound to Special Forces. Injury changed his course where he then found himself with the historic 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry (No Slack) of the 101st Airborne Division. Michael served in both Iraq and Afghanistan with No Slack and served during the events which were filmed for the documentary Hornet's Nest—specifically the Battle of Barawala Kalay Valley. We highly recommend giving Hornet's Nest a watch if you haven't already seen it. We discuss Michael's experience and feelings during the Global War on Terror, and the meaning many of us learned then, and continue to search for. Since leaving active duty, Michael transitioned to the Army Reserves and for his "day-job," serves as a senior wealth advisor in the Cincinnati, OH area.

The Veterans Project Podcast
Episode 45 - Eric Moser (Army Special Operations, OIF Veteran)

The Veterans Project Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 145:37


Host Tim K. sits down in Moab, Utah with Army Special Operations Veteran Eric Moser. Before serving as a Green Beret, Eric spent time with the Army's famed 82nd Airborne Division. On the podcast, Moser opens up about his most difficult day in combat on a rooftop in Samarra, Iraq in 2007. What would become a story of intrepidity and a paratrooper's resolve to never quit fighting was in reality one of the most horrific days of Eric's life as his SKT (Sniper Kill Team), comprised of four paratroopers including himself, encountered a vicious ambush from a well-organized militia. Moser's courage that day led to him being awarded the Army's second-highest honor, the Distinguished Service Cross. After his time in the 82nd, Eric attended and completed SFAS (Special Forces Assessment & Selection) becoming a Green Beret and serving with 10th Special Forces Group. Eric also speaks on the untimely end of his military career and eventual medical retirement. Moser is now living in Colorado Springs and is the Co-Founder (alongside Rob Ziarnick) of Gunfighter Design, a custom cutlery producer. Check out Gunfighter Design online at gunfighterdesign.com and on Instagram: @gunfighterdesign.

S.O.S. (Stories of Service) - Ordinary people who do extraordinary work
Army vet & comedian | Lieutenant Colonel (Ret.) Robin "Phoenix" Johnson - S.O.S. Podcast #63

S.O.S. (Stories of Service) - Ordinary people who do extraordinary work

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 59:49


Robin and I have known each other for years. I met her a few years back as she was initially transitioning out of the Army. At that time, Robin was just starting her comedy career, but it was clear in just those first few times meeting her, she had a gift for making others laugh and was going to go so far. She's now not only showing the world what a successful post-military transition can be, but she is using this skill to demonstrate how laughter can help us in our darkest periods. And she is an Ohio State buckeye like me! In 1994, Robin enlisted in the Ohio National Guard and served as a 92Y Unit Supply Specialist.  She was later commissioned through THE Ohio State University ROTC program as a Quartermaster Officer.  Robin's career highlights include five deployments to Afghanistan and Iraq, Company Commander, A Co, 603rd ASB, 3d Combat Aviation Brigade, 3d Infantry Division;  Support Operations Officer, 3d Cavalry Regiment; Special Assistant to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Battalion Commander, 526th Brigade Support Battalion, 2nd Brigade, 101st Airborne Division; and Employment Director, Soldier For Life.  Her awards and decorations include the Airborne, Air Assault, and Pathfinder badges, three Bronze stars,  and the Defense Meritorious Service medal. Robin's new mission is to heal people, organizations, and communities through humor.  She created Best Medicine Brigade to give veteran and military spouse comedians performance opportunities and heal people with humor.  Robin's passion is the applied and therapeutic use of humor for mental health which is why she also facilitates HEAL*ARIOUS, a humor therapy program for veterans.  She is a Level 2 Certified Humor Professional with the Association For Applied and Therapeutic Humor and a comedy boot camp instructor for Armed Services Arts Partnership. She has been featured on USA Today, ABC, and Fox.  Voted as Charleston's Best Comic of 2022,  Robin is currently on tour and has performed at Carolines on Broadway, Atlanta Comedy Theater, Charlotte Comedy Zone, Bricktown Comedy Club, Louisville Comedy Club, and for corporate audiences all over the country.  Find Robin here https://bestmedicinebrigade.com/Visit my website: https://thehello.llc/THERESACARPENTERRead my writings on my blog: https://www.theresatapestries.com/Listen to other episodes on my podcast: https://storiesofservice.buzzsprout.com

Pratt on Texas
Episode 3090: Army Brigadier Gen. (Retired) John Compere on the Texas Cowboys’ Christmas Ball - Pratt on Texas 11/24&25/2022

Pratt on Texas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 43:27


Retired U.S. Army Brigadier General (Retired) John Compere tells us about the history of the Texas Cowboys' Christmas Ball. Compere is the official historian of the association that maintains this official Texas historical event.John Milsap Compere is a West Texas rancher and retired U.S. Army Brigadier General, Texas lawyer, U.S. judge and Vietnam-era disabled veteran.General Compere is a descendant of the Rev. Lee Compere, who came to America as a missionary to the Native Americans.For half a century, General Compere practiced law as a US Army lawyer and Texas lawyer, mediator and arbitrator in Federal and State Courts. For 4 years, Compere served in Washington D.C. as Chief Judge of the US Army Court of Military Review, a tenured Federal Court position requiring nomination by the President of the United States of America and confirmation by the Senate.Serving for 26 years in the U.S. Army and Army Reserve, General Compere began as an ROTC cadet at Texas Tech University before beginning active duty as a 101st Airborne Division paratrooper, where he served in Thailand, Vietnam, Honduras, Panama and the USA. Compere retired from the Army as a Brigadier General and Vietnam Era Disabled Veteran.You can learn more by reading the histories here: https://texasccb.com/www.PrattonTexas.com

Thecuriousmanspodcast
Stephen G. Rabe Interview Episode 82

Thecuriousmanspodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 65:01


Matt Crawford speaks with author Stephen G. Rabe about his book, The Lost Paratroopers of Normandy. D-Day is a moment in history that has been covered from so many angles and by many authors, for the most part though, the focus of these stories has been focused solely on the soldiers. The Lost Paratroopers of Normandy tells the D-Day story through the eyes of the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions as well as the civilians from the French village of Graignes that helped save them. Predominantly women these villagers welcomed them, fed, gathered intelligence, recovered equipment and risked their lives so the Troopers could carry out the mission. An inspiring story.

Sasquatch Chronicles
SC EP:905 Bigfoot Of The Rockies

Sasquatch Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 62:16 Very Popular


Tonight I will be speaking to Jason Frank. Jason had his world turned upside in 2007 while out turkey hunting. Jason and his wife found tracks they could not place with any animal that is known to science. He later became friends with members of the BFRO. His friends would take him to areas that are known for encounters. Jason writes "I was born and raised in Western Colorado. While Colorado has always been my home, my father's career as a gold miner required that the family follow the work and therefore we lived in North Central California, all over Colorado, and Moab Utah where my father worked at a uranium mine during the Cold War, before Moab was the tourist destination it is now. I was raised hunting, fishing, hiking, and all things outdoors in a family that has generations of outdoorsman and women, cowboys, miners, farmers and explorers. As an adult, I joined the U.S. Army in the early 1990's and served as an Airborne Infantryman in the 82nd Airborne Division based in Ft Bragg North Carolina and a tour in Sinai Egypt. In 1993 while in Sinai Egypt, I was stricken with a serious and mysterious autoimmune disease that severely impacts my life to this day." Jason wrote a book, “Hairys” True ongoing stories of Sasquatch in the Rockies. The book is available at https://bigfootoftherockies.com/ Also check out his YouTube channel "Bigfoot of the Rockies Outdoor Adventures."

Dan Snow's History Hit
Band of Brothers: A New Discovery

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 32:17


In part 2 of this series on Easy Company and the American 101st Airborne Division, we are back in the village of Aldbourne, following in the steps of the infantrymen as they trained, relaxed and got to know Britain in preparation for the liberation of Europe. The team make an exciting discovery that gives them a direct link to soldiers of Easy Company.This episode was produced by Marian Des Forges and James Hickmann and edited by Dougal Patmore.If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe to History Hit today!Download History Hit app from the Google Play store.Download History Hit app from the Apple Store. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Dan Snow's History Hit
Band of Brothers: Yanks in Britain

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 27:00


In the first of this 2-part series dedicated to the legacy of Easy Company and the American 101st Airborne Division, Dan visits the idyllic country village of Aldbourne in Wiltshire, where the 'Band of Brothers' were stationed. Joined by a group of volunteers, including military veterans and archaeologists, Dan and the team dig into the 'friendly invasion' of the Second World War and see what can be learned from the treasures that the Allied troops left behind.This episode was produced by Marian Des Forges and James Hickmann and edited by Dougal Patmore.If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe to History Hit today!Download History Hit app from the Google Play store.Download History Hit app from the Apple Store. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The FORSCOM Frontline
Honoring Veterans

The FORSCOM Frontline

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 29:27


Join us for a conversation with Staff Sgt. Jonathan Young and Spc. Jeremiah Rodriguez, 101st Airborne Division's DIVARTY. We talk to them about the legacy of service in each of their families; what it means to serve; and how those who came before them impacted their decision to serve. These two Soldiers are joining us from Mihail Kogalniceanu Air Base, Romania.

New Books in Military History
Stephen G. Rabe, "The Lost Paratroopers of Normandy: A Story of Resistance, Courage, and Solidarity in a French Village" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in Military History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 43:14


The fateful days and weeks surrounding 6 June 1944 have been extensively documented in histories of the Second World War, but less attention has been paid to the tremendous impact of these events on the populations nearby.  The Lost Paratroopers of Normandy: A Story of Resistance, Courage, and Solidarity in a French Village (Cambridge UP, 2022) tells the inspiring yet heartbreaking story of ordinary people who did extraordinary things in defense of liberty and freedom. On D-Day, when transport planes dropped paratroopers from the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions hopelessly off-target into marshy waters in northwestern France, the 900 villagers of Graignes welcomed them with open arms. These villagers - predominantly women - provided food, gathered intelligence, and navigated the floods to retrieve the paratroopers' equipment at great risk to themselves. When the attack by German forces on 11 June forced the overwhelmed paratroopers to withdraw, many made it to safety thanks to the help and resistance of the villagers. In this moving book, historian Stephen G. Rabe, son of one of the paratroopers, meticulously documents the forgotten lives of those who participated in this integral part of D-Day history. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/military-history

New Books in French Studies
Stephen G. Rabe, "The Lost Paratroopers of Normandy: A Story of Resistance, Courage, and Solidarity in a French Village" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in French Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 43:14


The fateful days and weeks surrounding 6 June 1944 have been extensively documented in histories of the Second World War, but less attention has been paid to the tremendous impact of these events on the populations nearby.  The Lost Paratroopers of Normandy: A Story of Resistance, Courage, and Solidarity in a French Village (Cambridge UP, 2022) tells the inspiring yet heartbreaking story of ordinary people who did extraordinary things in defense of liberty and freedom. On D-Day, when transport planes dropped paratroopers from the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions hopelessly off-target into marshy waters in northwestern France, the 900 villagers of Graignes welcomed them with open arms. These villagers - predominantly women - provided food, gathered intelligence, and navigated the floods to retrieve the paratroopers' equipment at great risk to themselves. When the attack by German forces on 11 June forced the overwhelmed paratroopers to withdraw, many made it to safety thanks to the help and resistance of the villagers. In this moving book, historian Stephen G. Rabe, son of one of the paratroopers, meticulously documents the forgotten lives of those who participated in this integral part of D-Day history. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/french-studies

New Books in European Studies
Stephen G. Rabe, "The Lost Paratroopers of Normandy: A Story of Resistance, Courage, and Solidarity in a French Village" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 43:14


The fateful days and weeks surrounding 6 June 1944 have been extensively documented in histories of the Second World War, but less attention has been paid to the tremendous impact of these events on the populations nearby.  The Lost Paratroopers of Normandy: A Story of Resistance, Courage, and Solidarity in a French Village (Cambridge UP, 2022) tells the inspiring yet heartbreaking story of ordinary people who did extraordinary things in defense of liberty and freedom. On D-Day, when transport planes dropped paratroopers from the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions hopelessly off-target into marshy waters in northwestern France, the 900 villagers of Graignes welcomed them with open arms. These villagers - predominantly women - provided food, gathered intelligence, and navigated the floods to retrieve the paratroopers' equipment at great risk to themselves. When the attack by German forces on 11 June forced the overwhelmed paratroopers to withdraw, many made it to safety thanks to the help and resistance of the villagers. In this moving book, historian Stephen G. Rabe, son of one of the paratroopers, meticulously documents the forgotten lives of those who participated in this integral part of D-Day history. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

New Books in History
Stephen G. Rabe, "The Lost Paratroopers of Normandy: A Story of Resistance, Courage, and Solidarity in a French Village" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 43:14


The fateful days and weeks surrounding 6 June 1944 have been extensively documented in histories of the Second World War, but less attention has been paid to the tremendous impact of these events on the populations nearby.  The Lost Paratroopers of Normandy: A Story of Resistance, Courage, and Solidarity in a French Village (Cambridge UP, 2022) tells the inspiring yet heartbreaking story of ordinary people who did extraordinary things in defense of liberty and freedom. On D-Day, when transport planes dropped paratroopers from the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions hopelessly off-target into marshy waters in northwestern France, the 900 villagers of Graignes welcomed them with open arms. These villagers - predominantly women - provided food, gathered intelligence, and navigated the floods to retrieve the paratroopers' equipment at great risk to themselves. When the attack by German forces on 11 June forced the overwhelmed paratroopers to withdraw, many made it to safety thanks to the help and resistance of the villagers. In this moving book, historian Stephen G. Rabe, son of one of the paratroopers, meticulously documents the forgotten lives of those who participated in this integral part of D-Day history. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in American Studies
Stephen G. Rabe, "The Lost Paratroopers of Normandy: A Story of Resistance, Courage, and Solidarity in a French Village" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 43:14


The fateful days and weeks surrounding 6 June 1944 have been extensively documented in histories of the Second World War, but less attention has been paid to the tremendous impact of these events on the populations nearby.  The Lost Paratroopers of Normandy: A Story of Resistance, Courage, and Solidarity in a French Village (Cambridge UP, 2022) tells the inspiring yet heartbreaking story of ordinary people who did extraordinary things in defense of liberty and freedom. On D-Day, when transport planes dropped paratroopers from the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions hopelessly off-target into marshy waters in northwestern France, the 900 villagers of Graignes welcomed them with open arms. These villagers - predominantly women - provided food, gathered intelligence, and navigated the floods to retrieve the paratroopers' equipment at great risk to themselves. When the attack by German forces on 11 June forced the overwhelmed paratroopers to withdraw, many made it to safety thanks to the help and resistance of the villagers. In this moving book, historian Stephen G. Rabe, son of one of the paratroopers, meticulously documents the forgotten lives of those who participated in this integral part of D-Day history. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books Network
Stephen G. Rabe, "The Lost Paratroopers of Normandy: A Story of Resistance, Courage, and Solidarity in a French Village" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 43:14


The fateful days and weeks surrounding 6 June 1944 have been extensively documented in histories of the Second World War, but less attention has been paid to the tremendous impact of these events on the populations nearby.  The Lost Paratroopers of Normandy: A Story of Resistance, Courage, and Solidarity in a French Village (Cambridge UP, 2022) tells the inspiring yet heartbreaking story of ordinary people who did extraordinary things in defense of liberty and freedom. On D-Day, when transport planes dropped paratroopers from the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions hopelessly off-target into marshy waters in northwestern France, the 900 villagers of Graignes welcomed them with open arms. These villagers - predominantly women - provided food, gathered intelligence, and navigated the floods to retrieve the paratroopers' equipment at great risk to themselves. When the attack by German forces on 11 June forced the overwhelmed paratroopers to withdraw, many made it to safety thanks to the help and resistance of the villagers. In this moving book, historian Stephen G. Rabe, son of one of the paratroopers, meticulously documents the forgotten lives of those who participated in this integral part of D-Day history. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in German Studies
Stephen G. Rabe, "The Lost Paratroopers of Normandy: A Story of Resistance, Courage, and Solidarity in a French Village" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in German Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 43:14


The fateful days and weeks surrounding 6 June 1944 have been extensively documented in histories of the Second World War, but less attention has been paid to the tremendous impact of these events on the populations nearby.  The Lost Paratroopers of Normandy: A Story of Resistance, Courage, and Solidarity in a French Village (Cambridge UP, 2022) tells the inspiring yet heartbreaking story of ordinary people who did extraordinary things in defense of liberty and freedom. On D-Day, when transport planes dropped paratroopers from the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions hopelessly off-target into marshy waters in northwestern France, the 900 villagers of Graignes welcomed them with open arms. These villagers - predominantly women - provided food, gathered intelligence, and navigated the floods to retrieve the paratroopers' equipment at great risk to themselves. When the attack by German forces on 11 June forced the overwhelmed paratroopers to withdraw, many made it to safety thanks to the help and resistance of the villagers. In this moving book, historian Stephen G. Rabe, son of one of the paratroopers, meticulously documents the forgotten lives of those who participated in this integral part of D-Day history. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/german-studies

Mallett and Michelle on Dripping Springs
Ep.45 Bringing Back The Dead (James Fenelon- Author and Historian)

Mallett and Michelle on Dripping Springs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 65:42


Monologue:Wealthiest Individuals in AustinHow to Trap an ArmadilloAngelo Angelou Economic Summit ReportGuest: James Fenelon is the paratrooper-turned-author of Four Hours of Fury, the untold story of Operation Varsity, the American 17th Airborne Division's combat jump over the Rhine River in March 1945. Fenelon's motivation to write about this massive airdrop originated with his love of history and his time in the military. He served for over a decade and is a graduate of the US Army's Airborne, Jumpmaster and Pathfinder schools. Fenelon's avid interest and dedication to the study of WWII combat has taken him to numerous battlefields and historically-related sites, including those in Southern France, Italy, Britain, Holland, Belgium, Egypt, Germany and Crete. Additionally he has made multiple trips to Normandy, including parachuting out of a C-47 near Ranville as part of D- Day's 60th anniversary commemoration ceremony. Fenelon is a regular contributor to World War II magazine and has been previously published in FlyPast, Britain's largest selling aviation magazine. Leveraging his expertise in military history, he has consulted as a technical advisor for video games, screenplays and documentaries. Steve Mallett and Michelle Lewis meet the most interesting people, and discover the places and events that make Dripping Springs, Texas, a Hill Country oasis. Learn why every year, hundreds of people move to this small town just outside of Austin. Every episode features a local resident who's talent and past will make you want to know more about what draws so many unique people to this historical town. From ranchers to engineers, cowboys to entrepreneurs, bankers to bull riders. New episodes weekly. Thanks for listening! Make sure to follow us & leave a review. Apple PodcastsMallett and Michelle on InstagramOur Website - Sign up for latest updates. We love your feedback & comments. Email: mallettandmichelle@gmail.com

The Guys Review
Saving Private Ryan

The Guys Review

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 76:01


Saving Private Ryan Welcome to The Guys Review, where we review media, products and experiences.  **READ APPLE REVIEWS/Fan Mail**Mention Twitter DM group - like pinned tweet @The_GuysReviewRead emails theguysreviewpod@gmail.comTwitter Poll **ASK CHRIS AND TREY ABOUT THEIR RATING FOR GHOSTBUSTERS** Saving Private Ryan Director: Steven Spielberg Starring:  Tom HanksEdward BurnsMatt DamonTom Sizemore Released: July 24, 1998 Budget: $70M ($127.5M in 2022) Gross $485M ($883.1M in 2022) Ratings:   IMDb 8.6/10 Rotten Tomatoes 94% Metacritic 91% Google Users 93%  Here cometh thine shiny awards Sire. My Lord Tucker the Wanker second Earl of Wessex. Lord of the Furries. Heir of Lord baldy the one eyed snake wrestler. Protector of Freedom units. Step Sibling with funny feelings down stairs. Entertainer of uncles. Jailor of innocent. Spanker of innocent milk maids and stable boys. The toxic wanker. Big Chief sitting doughnut. Teepee giver to the great Cornholio. Edgar Allan Poe's shaved muse. The film was nominated for eleven Academy Awards at the 71st annual ceremony, including Best Picture, Best Actor for Tom Hanks, and Best Original Screenplay. The film won five of these, including Best Cinematography, Best Sound, Best Sound Effects Editing, Best Film Editing, and Best Director for Spielberg, his second win in that category. After the film lost the Best Picture award to Shakespeare in Love, many film pundits criticized the Academy's decision not to award the film with the Best Picture Oscar and has continued to be considered as one of the biggest snubs in the ceremony's history. The film also won the Golden Globes for Best Motion Picture – Drama and Director, the BAFTA Award for Special Effects and Sound, the Directors Guild of America Award, a Grammy Award for Best Film Soundtrack, the Producers Guild of America Golden Laurel Award, and the Saturn Award for Best Action, Adventure, or Thriller Film. Saving Piivate Ryan comes in at #71 of AFI's First Time you saw the movie? Plot: An elderly veteran visits the Normandy Cemetery with his family. At a specific grave, he is overcome with emotion and begins to recall his time as a soldier. On the morning of June 6, 1944, the U.S. Army lands at Omaha Beach as part of the Normandy invasion. Captain John H. Miller leads his command, Company C, 2nd Ranger Battalion in a breakout from the beach. The staff at the United States Department of War learns that James Francis Ryan of the 101st Airborne Division is missing and presumed to be the last survivor of four brothers who are all in the military. General George C. Marshall orders Ryan to be found and sent home so that his family will not lose all its sons. Miller is ordered to lead a detachment in finding Ryan. As they arrive in the contested town of Neuville between German defenders and the 101st Airborne, Caparzo is killed by a German sniper. Miller and his men find a paratrooper named Ryan but he is not the one for whom they are searching, and they are directed to a rally point where James Francis Ryan's unit should be. Miller learns that Ryan is defending a key bridge in the town of Ramelle. En route, Miller decides against the judgment of his soldiers to neutralize a German machine gun nest, which results in Wade's death. A surviving German soldier is spared by the intervention of Upham, the detachment's interpreter, who is unused to the horrors of combat. Miller blindfolds the soldier, who has been nicknamed "Steamboat Willie", and orders him to surrender to the next Allied patrol. When Reiben threatens to desert, Miller defuses the situation by calmly telling a story that reveals his civilian background as a teacher and baseball coach, of which he has not previously spoken, and which has been the subject of much speculation among his men and a pool of about $300. Upon arriving in Ramelle, Miller's detachment makes contact with Ryan and informs him of his brothers' deaths. Though deeply upset, Ryan refuses to abandon his post defending the town's bridge, and the town soon comes under siege by attacking Germans. Miller assumes command as the only officer present. He and his unit fight alongside the 101st, but the German armor advantage takes a toll on the Americans. Jackson, Mellish and Horvath are killed along with most of the paratroopers as the Americans retreat across the town's bridge. During the final assault on the bridge, Steamboat Willie reappears and shoots Miller as he attempts to blow the bridge with pre-placed explosives, but before the German force can capture it American P-51 Mustang fighter planes and Sherman tanks arrive and halt their advance. Upham confronts Steamboat Willie, who attempts to talk Upham into letting him go again; Upham instead shoots and kills him. The mortally wounded Miller tells Ryan to "earn this" before dying, referring to the sacrifices others have made so that Ryan can have a postwar life. Returning to the present, Ryan is revealed to be the elderly veteran and the grave to be Miller's. Ryan expresses gratitude for the sacrifices made by Miller and his men, says he hopes he "earned it", and salutes the grave.  TOP 5​1: The plot was loosely inspired by the true story of the Niland brothersScreenwriter Robert Rodat was initially inspired to write Saving Private Ryan when he saw a monument to the four sons of Agnes Allison, who were all killed in the American Civil War. However, when the premise got into the hands of producer Mark Gordon and eventually director Steven Spielberg, inspiration came from the true story of the Niland brothers. They were four brothers fighting in World War II.Two of them died and two survived. However, it was initially thought that only one of them survived, as the other one was missing and presumed dead. He turned out to be a prisoner of war in a Japanese internment camp. 2: Steven Spielberg would've released the movie with an NC-17 ratingWhile he was making Saving Private Ryan, Steven Spielberg feared that the movie's brutal violence would lead the MPAA to assign it an NC-17 rating. Big Hollywood studios usually strive to avoid NC-17 ratings like the Bubonic Plague, and make whatever cuts are necessary to change the rating, because they're box office poison. Some theaters won't show them and the ones that will show them can only admit audience members over a certain age. But Spielberg was so happy with Saving Private Ryan that if it had come back from the MPAA with an NC-17 rating, he still would've released it. 3: The gunfire sound effects are authenticTo acquire the right sound effects for the guns used in the movie, Saving Private Ryan's sound team went to a live machine gun firing range near Atlanta that was owned by a weapons manufacturer. There, they sourced all of the period-specific weaponry that was being used in the movie, that they needed to find the sounds for, and they just started firing them at the shooting range. 4: Saving Private Ryan is the last non-digitally edited Best Film Editing winnerPretty much every movie in the last 20 years has been digitally edited because digital editing – while losing some of the soul of the filmmaking process – is a lot cheaper, easier, and more secure than the old “cutting room” method. Saving Private Ryan was the last movie to be edited using non-digital technology to win the Academy Award for Best Film Editing. Every subsequent winner of the Oscar for editing has been edited digitally. And digital isn't going away any time soon, so Saving Private Ryan will probably hold onto the distinction of last non-digitally edited Best Film Editing winner indefinitely. 5: The D-Day landings sequence cost $11 millionSaving Private Ryan's opening D-Day landings scene took up a hefty chunk of the film's $70 million budget, costing $11 million to pull off. Steven Spielberg decided chose not to storyboard the sequence at all, instead letting the action tell him where to point the camera (he elected to use a handheld camera for the scene) on the days of shooting. The producers recruited 40 barrels of fake blood and more than 1,000 extras for the scene. Between 20 and 30 of these extras were amputees who could be fitted with prosthetic limbs for the sole purpose of being blown off in explosions. **TRIPLE LINDY AWARD** - Dude on top of the tank at the end who didn't move, and got blown up. Obviously it was a mannequin. **REVIEW AND RATING**TreyChrisStephen .5Tucker .5 TOP 5Stephen:1 Breakfast club2 Saving Private Ryan3 Ghostbusters4 Sandlot5 Color out of space Chris:1. sandlots2. T23. trick r treat4. rocky horror picture show5. hubie halloween Trey:1) Boondocks Saints2) Mail Order Brides3) Tombstone4) Very bad things5) She out of my league Tucker:1. T22:Saving Private Ryan3: Tombstone4: My Cousin Vinny5: Ghostbusters WHAT ARE WE DOING NEXT WEEK? Web: https://theguysreview.simplecast.com/EM: theguysreviewpod@gmail.comIG: @TheGuysReviewPodTW: @The_GuysReview - Twitter DM groupFB: https://facebook.com/TheGuysReviewPod/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYKXJhq9LbQ2VfR4K33kT9Q Please, Subscribe, rate and review us wherever you get your podcasts from!! Thank you,-The Guys

Newt's World
Episode 479: Senator Tom Cotton on “Only The Strong”

Newt's World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 33:35


In his new book, “Only the Strong: Reversing the Left's Plot to Sabotage American Power,” Senator Tom Cotton exposes the left's decades-long plot to sabotage American power and provides a behind-the-scenes look at the dangerous failures of Presidents Barack Obama and Joe Biden and explains what we must do to recover America's strength. Newt's guest is Senator Tom Cotton of Arkansas. He served in Iraq with the 101st Airborne Division and in Afghanistan with a Provincial Reconstruction Team. Between combat tours, he served with the 3rd Infantry Regiment (“The Old Guard”) at Arlington National Cemetery. His military decorations include the Bronze Star, the Combat Infantryman Badge, and the Ranger Tab. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 72 – Unstoppable Transformed Tough Guy with Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 71:14


Yes, that is how Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon describes himself. Skip has served as an internal Medicine physician in the Army rising to the rank of colonel.   Throughout much of his life, Skip has also been a wrestler competitor, and he has been good at the sport.   In 2014 Skip discovered that he was suffering from a deep depression. As he worked through his condition and emerged from it he also wrote his Amazon Bestselling book entitled Wrestling Depression Is Not For Wimps.   I very much enjoyed my interview with Skip Mondragon and I sincerely hope that you will as well and that Skip's conversation and stories will inspire you.   About the Guest: Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon, MD is a transformed tough guy. Since recovering from depression in 2014, he's been on a quest to help ten million men struggling with depression, one man at a time. He's practiced Internal Medicine for over thirty years. Colonel Mondragon is a twenty-six-year Army veteran, spent eighteen months in combat zones, and is a national wrestling champion. Skip's book Wrestling Depression Is Not for Wimps! was published in February 2020 and is the author of Inspired Talks Volume 3, an Amazon International Bestseller. He's spoken on different stages, including at TEDXGrandviewHeights in December 2021. Skip's true claim to fame is his five independent and gainfully employed children, his four amazing grandchildren, and especially his wife Sherry. She's a fellow author and a tough Army wife. Sherry has endured raising teenagers on her own, a variety of moves to new duty stations, and far too many of Skip's idiosyncrasies for forty-one years of marriage.   Skip can be reached at: Email: skipmondragon@transformedtoughguys.com Website: www.transformedtoughguys.com Book: www.amazon.com/author/skipmondragon LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/skip-mondragon-66a-2b436 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SkipWNW/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/SkipWnw   About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is an Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes* Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:21 Good morning or afternoon wherever you happen to be and welcome to unstoppable mindset. Today, our guest is Donald  “Skip” Mondragon. I met Donald not too long ago, actually at podapolooza. And we've talked about that before. It's an event where podcasters would be podcasters. And people who want to be interviewed by podcasters all get together. Sometimes one person has all three at once. But I met Skip. And we talked a little bit and I said would you be interested and willing to come on the podcast? And he said yes. So now he's stuck with us? Because here we are. Skip. How are you?   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  01:58 I am doing great. Michael, delighted to be here.   Michael Hingson  02:02 Now where are you located?   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  02:04 I am in the Dallas Fort Worth area.   Michael Hingson  02:06 So there you go two hours ahead of where we are and any fires nearby? Hopefully not. No, sir.   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  02:14 Thank you, Lord,   Michael Hingson  02:15 right now us the same way. And we're, we're blessed by that. But it is getting hot in both places, isn't   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  02:22 it? Oh, yes, indeed.   Michael Hingson  02:25 Well, tell me a little bit about you, maybe your early life and so on. And you know, we'll kind of go from there.   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  02:31 Yes, sir. And the third of eight children born of Hispanic parents, but meager means but born in Denver, Colorado. My father went to the Korean War, and came back a broken man. The man that went to war was not the man that came home. He suffered, I'm convinced with bipolar disorder, PTSD, and he was an alcoholic. And when my dad drank, he was violent. My sister, my eldest sister, Roma tells us that when my dad would come home, we would run and hide, because we didn't know which dad was coming home. The kind, gentle, fun loving dad for the angry mean, violent dad. So this was my early childhood. I actually don't have memories before the age of seven, other than a couple little fleeting memories. So I don't remember a lot of that I get history really from my sister, my older sister,   Michael Hingson  03:33 I help that because he's just blocked it out or something worse.   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  03:37 Yes. It's it's gone. Those I just don't have those memories are not accessible. But that was my early childhood. It was chaotic. It was. It was chaotic. It was traumatic. But I came from very loving family. Eight, you know, seven siblings were all close in age. 10 years separate us. We're still close to this day enjoy being together with one another loud, boisterous. Or they're very affectionate. No. My siblings are in Texas. I have a brother in the Baltimore area, Maryland, one in Raleigh, North Carolina. I'm here in Texas. The others are all in Colorado.   Michael Hingson  04:20 So I guess with a number in Colorado, that's the meeting place.   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  04:25 Yes, sir. Between my wife and I, my mother is the only living parent. And so we go back home as we call it to his in Colorado. Yes.   Michael Hingson  04:36 Well, there's nothing wrong with that. Indeed. So you grew up? Did you go to college?   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  04:45 Yes, sir. tended start my college career at the University of Notre Dame ROTC scholarship, left there, in my fifth semester confused, not quite sure what I was going to do. There's this tug, am I going to go into ministry or says medicine I was pre med at the time I left school I was out of school for three plus three and a half years trying to decide what I was going to do. And then I transferred into all Roberts University where I finished my undergraduate work for Roshan first in Tulsa, Oklahoma. And their I went to medical school and it's there for you that I met my sweetheart sherry. And this year we celebrated our 41st wedding anniversary,   Michael Hingson  05:30 Pierre just ahead of us by a year and a half, I guess because we will, our 40s will be in November. No congratulation, which is great. Now, we knew the marriage was gonna last I'm, I'm gonna get shot for this, I'm sure but we knew our marriage was gonna last because the wedding was supposed to start at four in the afternoon on Saturday, the 27th of November of 90. Yes, and the church was not filled up like it was supposed to be at four o'clock. And it got to be an I remember it well for 12 Suddenly, the doors opened and this whole crowd of people came in. And so we started although it was 14 or 12 minutes late, or 15 by the time they got in chair. And it wasn't until later that we learned that everyone was out in their cars until the end of the USC Notre Dame game. Being here in California, my wife getting her master's from USC, oh my gosh, we knew the marriage was gonna last when we learned that not what USC want the snot out of Notre Dame that   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  06:45 we took some weapons from USC, I'll be it you back. I was at Notre Dame that year that we we beat them and went on to win the national championship and 73. So that that was a turn of events, if you will, after taking some real whippings the years preceding that from USC.   Michael Hingson  07:07 I you know, I gain an appreciation for football and all seriousness. When it was a couple of years later, I was in Los Angeles and I had a meeting. And somebody was listening on the radio and keeping us apprised the fact that at the end of the first half Notre Dame was leading USC 24 to nothing. And then I got in the car and we started going home. And USC started scoring and scoring. It was with Anthony Davis and man who know about that game, and by the time it was over was 55 Switch 24 USC. But it's a great rivalry. And I'm glad it exists.   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  07:50 Right. I think the next year is when they came to South Bend. And they hug hug him in effigy. So I remember they had this thing there. And it's   Michael Hingson  08:00 like the USC, USC, don't let him run against us like that again.   Michael Hingson  08:09 What makes it fun? And as long as it's a game like that, and people view it that way. It's great.   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  08:16 There you go. It's a game. That's all it needs to be. Don't   Michael Hingson  08:19 take it too seriously by any means. No, sir. But it's a lot of fun. So, after Oral Roberts and so on you you went off and had some adventures?   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  08:32 Yes, sir. What kind of happen next? Well, I went to do further training, internship and residency and Canton, Ohio. And there was a turn of events I had expected I was going to do a military internship and go on and complete my residency with the military. But I received this Dear John letter, approximately six weeks before the interview season was going to close the army telling me I did not receive an army internship and I had to pursue a civilian internship, I think and are you kidding me? I was supposed to be in the Army next year, I hadn't even looked at civilian internships. And so I was scrambling. This was a day maybe days before the internet. You had to go to the library, look up programs, phone numbers, call them find out what they needed. So you could apply to that program what documents they needed send to each program individually, the documents the letters, arrange a flight. Now they have a centralized application system. So you complete one application, your letters of reference are all uploaded there. Then you decide which programs you want the sent to wait. So I'm doing this video post taste. Making this application season is ending Christmas is going to be approaching and then there's nothing going to get done. So I gotta get this done. And it was it was hectic ended up in Canton, Ohio. And it was fabulous. I had the best of both worlds great academics, fabulous clinical teaching. And it just so happened. The new program director was retired brigadier general Andre J. Augmentee. And he scared the snot out of us.   Michael Hingson  10:22 What year was this? What year did this take place?   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  10:26 I arrived there in 1985. Got it.   Michael Hingson  10:29 So he scared the snot out of you. Oh   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  10:31 my gosh, we call them Dr. Rowe, the big O or the Oh. And when he was when he was coming, we were like, Oh, no deals coming Fall, we'd be at Morning Report, we'd be talking about new cases that were admitted the night before. And he'd asked me to present the case or ask questions. And I would feel like I I felt like the voices on Charlie Brown. Go home and I tell my wife, oh, I can't seem to answer one interview. Question intelligently. When he is around, he must think I'm the stupidest intern he has ever seen. I I just get so flustered when he was around. I went down in a few months them because I was planning on doing physical medicine rehabilitation. But I had really fallen in love with internal medicine. Because my first few months were on the general internal medicine wards, and then a month in the internal or the intensive care unit. And I really fell in love with internal medicine, went to them and talk and said Dr. Rowe, I I'd like to talk to you. I am interested in drone medicine. But I don't know that I could be a good internist, I remember him looking at me and say, Skip, you could be a good interest. In fact, you could be a very good internist. And we'd love to keep you in the program. I could write letters that are permanent, so you can stay on the program and train here. That was a turning point for me. You away. He actually became very good friends. My last year, he actually asked me to be the chief president. I didn't accept because we were expecting our third child at that time preparing to move to join the army and I just couldn't put that pressure on my wife at that time. But we're still good friends to this day. Yes, wife. So it went from being that Bumbly Ugg boots, intern to a competent senior resident to friendship as the years went on.   Michael Hingson  12:49 So he figured you out and obviously saw something you and you kind of figured him out a little bit it sounds like oh, yes,   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  12:57 sir. Yes, sir.   Michael Hingson  12:59 Where is he today?   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  13:01 He is here in Texas. He is outside of San Antonio. He and his wife Margaret. A little   Michael Hingson  13:06 bit closer than Canton, Ohio.   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  13:09 Oh yes sir.   Michael Hingson  13:11 Well, that's great that you guys are still friends and you can see each other that is that is the way it ought to be. In the end, it's it's always great when you can establish a relationship with the teacher. You know, I wrote thunder dog the story of a blind man his guide dog in the triumph of trust at ground zero when I talked in there about Dick herbal Shimer, my geometry teacher. And to this day, we are still friends and chat on the phone on a regular basis.   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  13:41 That reminds me of my junior high wrestling coach John Gregerson. We were great friends to this day. And we hadn't seen one another for almost 1015 plus years. I'd seen him at the I think it was the 1992 1994 NCAA Wrestling Championships division one in North Carolina, and hadn't seen him to till 2000. Approximately 2015, something like that, when seen one another, but got in touch with him because he had moved back when he retired from teaching there in Colorado. He moved to Wyoming, then moved back to Colorado, gotten in touch with him said to get in touch with you, John, we met when another talks just just like we hadn't been apart. And I remember upon leaving, talking Adam say, John, I love you. And he looked at me and says, I love you too. And a great man, great relationship. And there's so much affection in my heart and appreciation for that man. The things he taught me.   Michael Hingson  14:56 So wrestling is a part of your life, I   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  14:58 guess. Oh my goodness. It's in my blood.   Michael Hingson  15:03 Well tell me about that a little bit.   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  15:05 Please. Oh, yes, I, I was miserable at sports any sport. Growing up, I didn't know how to throw I didn't know how to catch. I don't know how to kick. I didn't know how to run. I failed that tetherball. Okay. So I didn't know the skills, I wasn't taught the skills. So wrestling was the first sport that went out for an eighth grade that I thought after if you practice, I think I can be good at this. And IBM think i think i could be really good at this. That was the first time that I wasn't having to compete against boys that were a lot bigger than I was. Because I was typically the smallest kid in my class. And so I was wrestling in the 85 pound weight class in eighth grade, good lowest weight class. I was having good success. Only eighth grader on the varsity team. I didn't win a match that year. But I learned lots I gained a lot of confidence. The next year come in and the rest of the room. I'm the best wrestler in that wrestling. But I get so worked up before a match. I couldn't sleep a wink all night long. So I'd go into that match utterly exhausted mentally and physically. underperform. However, the summer afterwards, I won my first tournament I entered was a state freestyle wrestling tournament, one of the Olympic styles. When my first match, my second, my third match, win my fourth match. Now I'm wrestling for the championship. And I went after that my coach asked me, you know who this guy was you're wrestling have no idea coach. And he said that guy won this tournament last year. And that further cemented my love for this sport went on. He was a two time district champion in high schools, state runner up and honorable mention All American. So I had a lot of success. Moreso in freestyle wrestling a lot of state tournaments I won many state tournaments placed into Nash national wrestling tournaments as a high schooler and then after. After that, I've wrestled some in college and some in freestyle also. But last time it competed was in 2012 and 2013. In the veterans nationals.   Michael Hingson  17:33 How did that go?   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  17:35 Oh, how did that go? It went great. I had been wanting to compete again. At ba I still had that bug. Oh, I'd like to do this. The dates the training. I couldn't work that in. But I'm sitting up in the stands watching the state finals of the of the Georgia state finals with my youngest son Joey, he had completed his wrestling career had he not been ill and injured. He would have been wrestling on that stage that night. He was one of the best hunter and 12 pounders in the state of Georgia, but being ill and injured, he wasn't there wrestling that night. So we're watching this I had this wrestling magazine. I think it was USA Wrestling and I'm looking at these dates. Veterans national so it's gonna be held in conjunction with the senior nationals and I'm looking at this. Tucson, Arizona, May 5, and sixth I say Joey, she'll train with me. I'd like to compete. Well, my 18 year old son looks and he goes, Okay, Dad, you're gonna have to do everything I tell you. So Joey became my training partner, my trainer and my manager retrained hard, very hard. So this was mid February. And at first week in May, we're going out to Tucson. Those first six weeks and I was in great shape. I mean, I trained worked out like a fanatic, but those first few weeks, you know, oh my gosh, you know, I'd come home from practice. Oh, my wife and go Have you had enough old man. I think I'm gonna go soak in the tub, honey. I'd sit on the couch with ice on a shoulder or knee or elbow or sometimes all of those week. By week, my body toughen and there was the day I got up. Because I added an early morning workout in addition to my afternoon workouts, bring my weight down help a little bit with the conditioning. And my feet hit the floor. I got out to do my workout. I thought Oh, am I feeling good? I thought Joey, you better bring your A game today because your man is feeling good. So we went out to Tucson won a national championship. And we're sitting there taking this picture with the stop sign of a trophy. Now that I got here, it's big that Joey asked me Dad, was it worth it? All those hot baths, all those ice packs? And I look at him and grin. I say, Yes, it was worth. I had a blast. The next year was a national runner up. So those were the last times I competed, but I've coached I've been around the sport. My sons all wrestled my four sons, my brothers. For my four brothers. They're all younger. They all wrestled my brother in law wrestled my father in law was a college wrestler. Wrestling is in my blood. In fact, my kids call me a wrestling groupie. Because I collect wrestling cards. I get wrestling card sign, I get poster side I mug with all these wrestling greats have friends with World Champions and Olympic champions. That's my blood.   Michael Hingson  20:56 What's the difference between the Olympic style wrestling and I guess other forms like freestyle wrestling, and so on?   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  21:02 Okay, so freestyle and Greco Roman are the two Olympic styles. primary difference in those two styles is in Greco Roman, you can't attack the legs. That's the difference in those two. Now, the difference in our style, whether we call school boy or sometimes it's called catches catch can is you also have what we call a a Down and up position that are done differently the way that is in the scoring. To score for instance, a takedown when you take them to the mat, you have to have more control in freestyle is much faster or in in Greco you don't have to show the control, you just have to show the exposure of the back. Plus, you can get a five point move with a high flying exposure, the back or if you take a patient or a an opponent from feet to back in freestyle Aggreko, you can get four points for I said, if it's high flying five points, potentially. Whereas in freestyle, our in our style Americans out, it's two points for a takedown doesn't matter. Take them straight to the back, you could get additional points by exposing the back, if you help hold them there long enough, we'll call a nearfall. And then there's writing time. So if you're on the top position, and you control that man for a minute or longer, you're getting writing time. So there's those factors that that you have. So it's it's and the rules are, are somewhat different. So those are the basic differences in our style and the freedom and the Olympic styles.   Michael Hingson  22:41 But wrestling scoring is pretty much then absolutely objective. It's not subjective. It's not an opinion sort of thing. There are specifics,   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  22:51 there are specifics, but then you get into those subjective things. Yeah, it's a caution. It's a stall. It's it's this and you're saying, Are you kidding me? Or they say that's not a takedown you're going What? What do you mean, that's not a takedown? You gotta be blind not to call that thing. So there's still some subjectivity to it. Sure. There is, you know, are they miss? They miss something, the ref misses something in your thing. And you got to be blind dude, you know, that was   Michael Hingson  23:17 a tape. That's an answer. No, no, no. No, here's, here's my question. Is there ever been a time that both wrestlers go after the riff? You know, just check in?   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  23:29 I have never seen I have seen some, some, some come off there and give up. You know, escaping something. Yeah, you do to me, your GP and we have to say though, never leave it in the hands of the ref. Never leave it in the hands of the ref. And you you don't want to leave a match in the hands of the ref that don't let it come down to that. Wrestle your match. So there's no question.   Michael Hingson  23:55 Well, so you have wrestled a lot. You went from Canton then I guess you joined the army.   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  24:02 Correct? joined the army. Uh huh.   Michael Hingson  24:05 Well, if you would tell me a little bit about about that and what you did and so on.   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  24:10 1989 Our first duty station, Lawton, Oklahoma Fort Sill out there on this dreary day, January 3, I believe is gray, dark, you know, overcast, cold, only new to people. My sponsor and his wife. They were the only people we knew when we arrived. I had gone earlier to rent a home for us. And then we were waiting. We our household goods were arriving. Got there. We had three young children. Adam was for Christmas too. And Anjali was four months old. We get there we're moving in. getting settled. I'm in processing to the arm mean, everything's new to us. And then I start practicing as a doctor had two colleagues and internal medicine, within six months of me joining the army or if you will come in on active duty, I shouldn't say joining I had already been on inactive status in the army, going through school and training, but getting their report sale, they turn around and say, well, you're one colleague, like Keith conkel, was named. He's going to do a fellowship, infectious disease. And then my other colleague, Lee selfmade, or senior colleague in internal medicine was chief of the clinic chief of the ICU, he decided very abruptly to get out and do a nephrology fellowship, civilian fellowship, so he was getting out of the army. Now they say, well, you're now the chief of the internal medicine clinic, you're the medical officer, the chief of the intensive care unit. And guess what? You're the only internal medicine physician we're going to have for the summer. Have a good summer. Well, it was worse summer I've ever had in my life. Miserable Oh, it was horrible.   Michael Hingson  26:20 So I was so   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  26:21 busy there with with patients and care and responsibilities there and having to tell some patients I'm sorry, we don't have capacity for you're going to have to be seen in the civilian sector. Now, mind you, when my two new colleagues came, we had all these patients screaming back saying please, please, please, may I come back, because they knew the care we rendered was superior to what they were getting the care they were receiving in the civilian sector. But it was it was such a demanding physically and emotionally and timewise. spending enormous amounts of time at the clinic and hospital.   Michael Hingson  27:06 So what does Internal Medicine take in   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  27:09 internal medicine, we are specialists for adults, you think of the gamut of non surgical diseases. We take care of adults 18 to end of life. And so our training entails taking care of the common cold, a community acquired pneumonia, that you can treat as an outpatient, to taking care of a patient that's in the ICU, hooked up to life support. That's the scope of what we're trained in. So if you think of the common diseases of adults, high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, lung disease, arthritis, gastrointestinal problems, this is the Bailiwick of an internal medicine physician.   Michael Hingson  27:59 Our biggest exposure to that for Well, first of all, my sister in law was a critical care unit and ICU nurse for a lot of her life. And, and then retired. But anyway, in 2014, my wife contracted double pneumonia, and ARDS, ARDS, oh my gosh. And she ended up in the hospital on a ventilator. And what they were trying to constantly do is to force air into her lungs to try to push out some of the pneumonia. They actually had to use and you'll appreciate this, a peeps level of 39 just to get air into her lungs. They were so stiff. Yeah, they were so stiff. And no one at the hospital had ever seen any situation where they had to use so much air pressure to get air into her lungs to start to move things around and get rid of the pneumonia. Everyone came from around the hospital just to see the gauges.   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  29:02 And your they probably told you this risks injuring her lungs because the pressures are so high. But without the weather, we're not going to be able to oxygenate her.   Michael Hingson  29:15 Right. And what they said basically was that if she didn't have pneumonia, her lungs would have exploded with that kind of pressure. Exactly. Because what the average individual when you're inhaling is a peeps level of like between two and five. So 39 was incredibly high.   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  29:33 Oh, yes, absolutely. But she's glad she recovered.   Michael Hingson  29:37 She did. We're we're glad about that. She was in the hospital for a month and and she was in an induced coma using propofol and when my gosh when she came out of all that I asked her she dreamed about seeing thriller and bad and all that. I was mean. But but no she ordeal, wow. Well, and that's what eventually caused us to move down here to Southern California to be closer to relatives. But I really appreciated what the doctors did for her. And we're, we're very grateful and fully understand a lot of what goes on with internal medicine and she has a good doctor now that we work with, well, who I both work with, and so on. You're very pleased with that. But you say you're in charge of Internal Medicine. And how long did that last at your first station,   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  30:39 first duty station, we arrived in 89. We were there till 92 till summer of 92. So arrived in January 89. I graduated off cycle. And Canton, arrived in, left in summer of 92 went to Walter Reed Army Medical Center. But while I was at Fort Sill was first time I deployed to Operation Desert Shield Desert Storm, my first deployment and it was found out just days, like the week before, that my wife was expecting our fourth child or son Jonathan got home in time, for 11 days before his birth. Thank you, Lord. But that was my first deployment. And that was harrowing in that we were the first major medical group in theater, 47 filled hospital. And we knew that Saddam had chemical weapons, and that is Scud missiles could reach where we were at in Bahrain. So it was it was some harrowing times with that, getting our hospital set up. And knowing that we were well within range of Scud missiles, the alarms that go off and we'd be throwing on our protective gear we call our MOPP gear, our masks and our other other protective gear and these outrageous high temperatures. You know, within a couple of minutes, you were just drenched with sweat pouring off of you. In those those heat in that heat until you'd hear their alarms go off again and all clear. Thankfully, we never were bombed with the Scud. But we were well within the range. And we knew we had used chemical weapons, and we knew they certainly were in this arsenal. So we that was my first deployment. And then Walter Reed where I did a fellowship two years there in Washington, DC, and then we are off to Brooke Army Medical Center. And that was San Antonio, one of my favorite cities, that Fort Sam Houston. And we we were there for four years. And on the heels of that, I was deployed to Haiti for seven months, the last months that we live there, so I've gone I'm just redeploying returning home. And we're in the process of moving. Now we're moving to Fort Hood, Texas. There we spent, actually eight years at Fort Bragg. And there I was, again, chief of the Department of Medicine at Fort Hood, had amazing staff, great people that I worked with wonderful patients everywhere I went this wonderful patients to take care of. And then I was deployed during that time to Operation Iraqi Freedom was, Oh, if one Operation Iraqi Freedom one 2003 2004, stationed up in Missoula, treating caring primarily for the 100 and first Airborne Division aerosols. Major General David Petraeus was a division commander at that time, I got to work closely. My last few months, I was the officer in charge of the hospital, 21st combat support hospital and got to work closely interact with John Petraeus and his staff. Amazing man, amazing staff. incredible experience. Then from there after fort Fort Hood, we went back to Fort Sill, which was an interesting experience because then I was the deputy commander of Clinical Services, the Chief Medical Officer of the hospital. So first time I was there, I was a newly minted captain, new to the army, you know, expect you to know much about the army. Now I go to back to Fort Sill, I'm in the command suite on the Chief Medical Officer of the hospital now as a colonel, they expect you to know air everything. So it was it was interesting. Now, one of the first few days I was there, they give me a tour around to various places and the record group and we're talking and the the records lady, one of the ladies talking to us, telling us about different things and that she She says, You remind me of you remind me of Dr. Longer God, Dr. Monder. God, she had been there the first time I had been there, because we'd have to go down and review our charts and sign our charts on a regular basis. It was, it was amazing. But just some great people that I got to work with over the years, and that our last duty station was in Augusta, Georgia, at the Eisenhower Army Medical Center, where I was again, Chief of Department of Medicine, worked with great people helped train some amazing residents and medical students, PA students.   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  35:39 Just some great experiences. And while I was at Eisenhower Army Medical Center, I deployed for the last time to Iraq for another year 2010 to 2011.   Michael Hingson  35:50 How did all of the deployments and I guess you're 26 years in the military in general, but especially your deployments? How did all of that affect you in your life in your family,   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  36:02 it gives you a much greater appreciation. Well, a few ways. Certainly a much bigger appreciation for your your family and your time with your family, I lost over three and a half years, 37 months out of the life of my family. And you don't get that time back. No, you don't get that back. So all major these major events that go on your life, seeing things with your children happening. There are no do overs with that that's time last. So you get a better appreciation for that, you also get a better appreciation for the freedoms, the opportunities we have in this nation, when you go to some of those countries realize, you see what poverty can be like, you see how certain citizens are treated, you see women who are treated like cattle, in some cases like property, that the lack of rights, you see these people who want to be able to vote, that it's not just a rigged election, but they actually have a say, in their country's democratic process. The appreciation, and one of the things that was so poignant to Michael was the fact that these so many people, every place I've been whether that's on a mission trip to Guatemala, whether that's in Iraq, whether that was in Bahrain and other places that have been there, how many people would come and say My dream is to go to the US and become a US citizen, I heard that over and over and over again. And when I would get back home, I would feel like kissing the ground. Because I realized, by virtue of being born American, the privileges, the opportunities that I have, are so different than so many people around the world. So gave me appreciation for that. But being deployed, you get to see Army Medicine, practiced in the in the field, because Army Medicine is world class medicine, but you get to see it in the field practice again, in a world class way. It's, it's really mind boggling. Some of the things that we do in a field setting in a combat zone, taking care of soldiers, taking care of other service members, the things that we do, literally world class, not just back in brick and mortar facilities. But they're in the field. Unbelievable. And again, working with great colleagues, amazing staff that I had there, the 21st cache and other places that I've worked. So that appreciation and that idea that you're working for a cause so much greater than yourself, that brotherhood that you have. Now, when you've deployed with people and you've been in combat zone with people, let me tell you, you build some strong bonds.   Michael Hingson  39:15 And it's all about really putting into practice what most of us really can only think about is theory because unless we've been subjected to it and need medical help, or have been involved in the situations like you, it's it's not the same. We're not connected to it. And it's so important, it seems to me to help people understand that connection and the values that you're exactly what you're talking about.   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  39:46 Yes, yes. You were asking about the impact on my family. Well think about that. My first time employee My wife has three young children. Adam was six Chris was four. Anjali It was too, and she's expecting our fourth. We're deploying to this war zone that's very uncertain knowing he's got Scud missiles, he's got chemical weapon arsenal, that he's used this. And you're going into this very uncertain war zone. Not knowing when you're coming back home, or even if you're coming back home, all of this uncertainty. The night they announced that, okay, the war had started, that that officially had kicked, kicked off there, that hostilities it started, it was announced on TV. And the kids were at a swimming lesson at the pool, I believe. And somebody came running through some young soldier or something,   Michael Hingson  40:59 the war started, the   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  41:00 war has started. And the children all started bawling. And so Sherry's trying to gather them up and she's thinking, What are you doing, you know, trying to gather up the the kids and get them home. But she didn't allow them to listen to any reports do anything. Thankfully, we didn't have a TV at that time by choice. We didn't have a TV for many years. But she didn't allow him to listen to any reports, because she didn't want them to hear these things. But you can think about the uncertainty, you think about missing the events, you think about a spouse having to manage everything at home, taking care of the family, taking care of all the other things there that are involved in managing a household. That's what's left with that, that spouse and then them carrying on without you. So adjusting without you. And then as those children are a different ages, again, all of that, your spouse taking care of that. And your family, adjusting without you. Now if people don't realize they see these idyllic, idyllic reunions, oh, it's great look at they're coming home, and they're hugging and kissing and crying and looking at how wonderful that is. Well, yes, it is wonderful. It's magnificent. You can't believe the elation and the relief. But there's a short little honeymoon phase, if you will. But then the real work begins reintegrating into your family, finding that new normal, how do I fit back into this, they've done with it. They've been without me for several months, or even up to a year. My kids have changed. I've changed Sherry's changed, our family has changed. So how now do we find that normal? And I think that's what a lot of people don't understand that there is that work that needs to be done. And there's a lot of work that needs to be done after it. service members returned home from a deployment, that it's not easy. And it takes its toll. And I don't think that people realize the sacrifice when service members been gone. for months and months at a time years at a time, the sacrifice of that service member the sacrifice of their fam, with every promotion, every award that I received, I used to tell people, my wife, and my kids deserve this a lot more than I do.   Michael Hingson  43:50 And another thing that comes to mind in thinking about this back in the time of Desert Storm, and so on and maybe up into Iraqi Freedom, I would think actually is how were you able to communicate with home.   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  44:07 Oh, with your family. And in Desert Storm is primarily snail mail. We did have the occasional call that we can make. Now, as the theater matured and they moved us out of living in tents. We got to move into hardened structure in there. I could make a regular phone call when we got to if there we could, I could send e mail and that became snail mail. And e mail were the primary ways that we connected. The last time I was in Iraq 2010 and 2011. Again, it was email but I could also I had a car that I could charge minutes to that I can Make through an international calling system that I can also place telephone calls. But the primary way became again, snail mail and email to communicate with my family. Today, is   Michael Hingson  45:13 there additional kinds of ways of communicating like zoom or Skype? Yeah.   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  45:18 Oh, yes. Oh, yes. Now you're right. They can do face to face zoom. FaceTime there they have, they have their cell phone. So if they're not restricted from using their cell phones, and can even get the international plan and call, we weren't able to do those kinds of things. Yeah. There. Now we did have one thing when I was in Haiti, where it could go into a room. And you could do a as via satellite, it was on a monitor that I could speak to, and they were in this special room there that it was big monitor. But it was a very limited time. And that when that time ended, boom, the screen would just freeze. And the first time it ended like that the kids action starts, started crying because I'm in mid sentence saying something, and I freeze on the screen. And the kids didn't understand what was going on. Yeah. And they was so abrupt that Sherry told me later, can start crying when that happened,   Michael Hingson  46:25 cuz they didn't know they didn't know whether suddenly a bomb dropped or what?   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  46:29 Right, right. Yes. It's shocking to them.   Michael Hingson  46:33 Well, all of this obviously takes a toll on anyone who's subjected to it or who gets to do it. And I guess the other side of it is it's an honorable and a wonderful thing to be able to go off and serve people and, and help make the world a better place. But it eventually led to a depression for you, right?   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  46:55 Yes, yes. I ended up with major depression. And it culminated on April 17 2014, where I was curled up in a fetal position under the desk in my office. They're laying on that musty carpet. I had gone to work as I normally did, like, get to my office that day early, as was my custom. Nobody else on the whole floor. I locked my office turned on the lights, step inside. And everything just came crashing down on me. I was beat up, beaten down and broken. Should behind me lock the door, turned off the lights, close the blinds. And I crawled under that desk. And then for four hours. I'm asking myself skip, what are you doing? Skip? Why are you here? What happened? You're a tough guy. You're a colonel. You've been in combat zones for over 18 months. Your National Wrestling Champion, you're a tough guy. What happened? Then very slowly, looking at that, and scenes and memories colliding, looking at things, promise, difficulties, and I began to put the pieces together. And finally began to understand the symptoms I was having the past nine months, insomnia, impaired cognition is progressively moving these negative thoughts it just pounded the day and night. You're a fake. You don't deserve to be a colonel, you let your family down. You left the army down, who's gonna want a higher loss of confidence in decision, loss of passion and things that I normally have no interest in resting. Joy, no joy in my life. It's like walking through life in black and white. My body old injuries. Overuse injuries, the osteoarthritis body just a make it even worse. My libido my sex drive was in the toilet. Now you talk about kicking the guy when he's down. And I finally began was able to put those pieces together after four hours. Now I was finally able to understand, said scale. You're depressed? Go get help. And I crawled out from under that desk with a flicker of hope. And later that afternoon, I've seen a clinical psychologist to confirm the diagnosis of major depression.   Michael Hingson  49:25 How come it took so long for you to get to that point? Do you think   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  49:30 it was my tough guy mentality? This idea that you just keep pushing through that tough guy identity is like a double edged sword. That tough guys just keep pushing through. There was a lot of things colonel, combat that physician wrestler. So I took on this tough guy persona. And we even have a term for it in wrestling. We call it gutting it out. No matter how hard your lungs and what your lungs burn how much your muscles say, no matter how hard this is, you're just going to keep pushing and pushing. So that was my, that was my modus operandi. That's what I how I operated in my life. You just keep pushing hard and hard and pushing through these difficulties. With it, I couldn't see step back far enough to see what was going on. I knew it felt horrible. I couldn't sleep. I felt badly. I didn't want to be around people. I was withdrawn. But I couldn't step back even as a physician, and put these together to say, Oh, I'm depressed. It's just Oh, keep pushing. And the harder I push, the worse I got. So it was that blindness from that tough guy identity. That there probably some denial going on perhaps. But even as I look back retrospectively, that tough guy mentality just didn't help me. Allow me to see that until it got so crucial where I was just totally depleted. Ended up under that desk.   Michael Hingson  51:11 So how would you define being a tough guy today, as opposed to what you what you thought back then?   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  51:20 Yes, yes. Well, there are two sides to a tough guy, Michael, I see a tough guy. Certainly one aspect of the tough guy as that provider protector, that decisive individual, that decisive man that can do things that need to be done now, and can make those tough decisions, no matter what. That's one aspect of so yeah, but that other aspect to hit balances is. So we think of that one tough guy, you might say that's your impart your rugged, individualistic guy that you see that module, tough guy, that the screen portrays at least aspects of that. But then you see this other aspect of that tough guy, this is the individual that has, can be in touch with his emotions, can understand and able to dig there into that and say, Oh, I'm feeling sad. You know, what, somebody what you just said, really hurt. That's, I'm disappointed with that. I'm able to shed tears open, I'm able to show that tenderness that love very openly, but to balance it between the two sides appropriately. That's what I see as a true tough guy. It's not just the one or the other. It's that blend of both that we need in our lives to make us a tough guy. And if you have only one or the other, you're you're not a tough guy. You only have the tenderness and the warmth, and the gentleness and the ability to share your emotions. Well guess what? You're going to be a tough time you're going to run over people can take advantage of they're not going to be much of a protector for those you need to protect. But if you only have that other side of you. You're very limited. You're not going to be able to function in the full array of what we're meant to function in as men or women. Nor women. Absolutely. It's not just restricted to one sex. Absolutely. You're right, Michael.   Michael Hingson  53:51 So you wrote a book wrestling? Depression is not for tough guys. Right? Not for wimps. Yeah, not for wimps. I'm sorry. Wrestling. Depression is pretty tough guys. Wrestling depression is not for wimps. Tell us about that and how it affected you and your family writing that?   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  54:11 Well, that book, the genesis of that book came about about six weeks into my recovery, but still struggling. And throughout the time that I was sinking down deeper and deeper into the depression and the first several weeks in my recovery. My prayers had been lowered lower, please, please deliver me from this darkness. But six weeks into my recovery. My youngest brother Chris calls me he had been at a Bible study with Franklin Graham, son of Billy Graham. In Franklin talked about the suffering of Christ. And the gist of what was if Christ suffered so brutally upon that cross why as Western Christians do we think we should be immune from suffering. And over the next two days, the birth that kept coming to my mind was from Philippians. To 13 Paul writes, oh, that I know him, and the power of his resurrection and the fellowship of His sufferings. I knew that verse I knew well, I'd prayed that verse hundreds of times in my walk with Christ, but in the midst of my suffering, I wanted deliverance. But over two days, my prayer shifted from Lord, please, please deliver me, the Lord. What would you have me learn? And how might I use it to serve others. And at that point, I knew I was going to have to share my story. I didn't know how, when but I knew I must share my story. So I began to note what lessons I had learned and what lessons I was learning with the intent of sharing those first time I got to do that was at a officer Professional Development Day, there at the hospital at Eisenhower Medical Center, our session, the morning, our session, the afternoon, and the hospital auditorium. And that became the genesis for my book, I want a writing contest in 2015, your have to retire from the army. And with that came a contract to have my book published. And then it was the process of going through the whole process of writing the book, editing the book, selecting the book, cover, all the things go into book, writing, that book was life transformed. It was transformational to me. And so I learned so many things about myself writing this book.   Michael Hingson  56:41 Did you have fun writing it,   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  56:43 I had fun at times. Other times, it was a grind, almost chickened out at the point where we had everything finished. It was ready to go to the publishers and I was I was I was on the cliffs, so to speak. i The book midwife as we called her, the lady is working with Carrie to read love the love with the lady with the company, their Confucian publishing is now called used to be transformational books. I called her and I said, Carrie, I don't know. I think I need to scrap this whole book. I think I need to start over. I can write a much better book. And she goes, No skip. This book is ready. We need to get it birth, we need to extend it to the publisher. And I'm thinking oh, no, no, no, I, I just can in Nice, I need to rewrite this whole thing. I can do a bunch better. This after working. You know, we've been working on this thing for two and a half years getting this thing ready. And I prayed about I'm talking about and then later I called her back in a day and a half and say, okay, Sherry talked me off the cliff. We're gonna send this book forward. But with that, learn things about yourself, going through that access some memories that I hadn't thought about, and some things, some promise that occurred that affected me in profound ways that I didn't realize how much of an impact that had on my life, and for how long that have an impact on my life. Case in point. I lost the state wrestling championship as a senior in high school by two seconds of writing time. Meaning my opponent, Matt Martinez, from greedy West High School knew Matt. There. He beat me by controlling me when he's on the top position for two seconds. He had two seconds more writing time controlling me on that map that I escaped from him three seconds earlier, you wouldn't have any writing time. And we had gotten into overtime. And I believe I would have beat Matt in overtime because nobody, nobody could match my conditioning. But it didn't get to them. So I really that that match. That was probably 10s of 1000s. But what it did is it it really devastated my confidence. And that carried on into my first couple years of college, the College wrestling. Just a lot of things about me. And what I didn't realize it took three and a half years. No, actually five, five years 73 It was 78 and spring of 78 when I was finally healing from that, regaining my mojo. And I didn't realize that until I was writing this book, that profound impact that loss had and the RIP holes, the effects that went on for those successive years there, the profundity of that. And there were other things that I came to light. So there'd be times I'd be laughing. There'd be times I'd be crying. There'd be times I'd be like, Whoa, wow. So it was an amazing experience.   Michael Hingson  1:00:23 So what are some tips that you would give to anyone dealing with depression today?   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  1:00:29 Yep. Thank you for asking that. Michael, first and foremost, men, or anybody if you're struggling, don't struggle. One more day in silence, please, please, please go get help to remember, you're never, never, never alone. Three, keep your head up. And wrestling, we talk about this, keep your head up, instill this in our young wrestlers. Why because if they're on their feet, and they drop their head, and get taken down to the mat, if they're down on the mat, the opponent's on top of them and drop their head, they can turn over and pin. But that's also figurative, and emotional, keep your head up. Keep your head up. And I needed people speaking into my life, like my wife, my family, my friends, my therapist, others speaking into my life, it's a skip, keep your head up. Psalm three, three says the Lord is our glory, and the lifter of our heads. So I tell people, you're never ever, ever alone. third, or fourth, I would say attend to the basics, sleep, healthy nutrition. And some regular activity. Those basics are the basics for good reason. And I call them the big three. And probably the most important of all of those, if you're having dysregulation of your sleep is get your sleep back under control. The last few that I'm sorry, go ahead. And then the last few that I would say is make sure you've got a battle buddy. Make sure you have somebody that you can turn to somebody that you can confide in somebody that, you know, would just listen and walk this journey with you and a prescription. And there's many other things that I talked about in my book, but a prescription that I have left with 1000s and 1000s of patients. I've written this on prescription pads. And I've shared this with patients and I say this medication has no bad side effects. This medication has no drug to drug interactions, and you cannot overdose on this medication. So I want you to take this medication liberally each and every day. Proverbs 1722 says A merry heart doeth good, like a medicine. broken spirit. Drive up the boats. When I was depressed, I had a broken spirit. So lack is good nets. So I say each and every day, laugh and laugh hard to find something that you can laugh about. It's goodness.   Michael Hingson  1:03:40 Oh, whenever I want to laugh, all I have to say is I wanted to be a doctor but I didn't have any patients. See?   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  1:03:55 Oh, that's great.   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  1:03:59 Well, I tell people, in retrospect, I say, gee, if I had only been my own doctor, I would have diagnosed myself sooner. See, well wait, I am a doctor.   Michael Hingson  1:04:15 Or you know what the doctor said Is he sewed himself up Suit yourself. Yeah. I got that from an old inner sanctum radio show. But anyway. Last thing, because we've been going a while and just to at least mention it. You have been a TD X speaker.   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  1:04:33 Yes, sir. I was a TEDx speaker. Indeed.   Michael Hingson  1:04:36 I got it that went well. Oh,   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  1:04:39 it was amazing. Was a TEDx speaker in Vancouver, in December of 2021. My talk is entitled tough guys are an endangered species. And standing up there on the TEDx phase and stage was a common addition of almost nine months of preparation, our mentor, Roger killin tremendous in helping prepare, myself and some colleagues for this, with the help of his sidekick, Dorthea Hendrik, just lovely, lovely people. But to stand on that stage, and deliver my talk, which is about 12 and a half minutes, started off in about six and a half 17 minutes, get cutting down, cutting it down, cutting it down, but stand there and deliver this message directed to tough guys talking about emotions, and the inability that men often have an accessing our emotions because of the way we've been conditioned, the way we've been raised the expectations placed on us. In fact, there's a medical term that was coined, that's masculine, Alexei timea, which means he leaves without words, and how that then sets men up, that I don't, I'm okay, I don't need help. I don't need to share my feelings and we lose contact with our feelings. Men don't seek medical care as often as women in general, much less when they're struggling with mental health issues, that denial, that tough guy, and now they seek it in maladaptive behaviors. I talked about that. But the ultimate behavior becoming suicide,   Michael Hingson  1:06:39 which is why you have given us a new and much better definition of tough guy. Yes, sir. In the end, it is very clear that wrestling depression is not for wimps. So I get it right that time. There you go. Well, I want to thank you for being here with us on unstoppable mindset. Clearly, you have an unstoppable mindset. And I hope people get inspired by it. And inspired by all the things you've had to say if they'd like to reach out to you. How might they do that?   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  1:07:14 The easiest way for them to reach out Michael is go to my website. w w w dot transform, tough guys.com W, W W dot transform Tough guys.com. And there, you could send me a message.   Michael Hingson  1:07:35 Send you a message looking at your book. Are you looking at writing any more books?   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  1:07:39 Yes, sir. I am looking to write another book. And still in the making. But I think the next book, maybe wrestling movies is not for wimps.   Michael Hingson  1:07:53 There you go. Well, we want to hear about that when it comes out. And so you have to come back and we can talk more about it.   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  1:07:59 Yes, sir. Well, thank   Michael Hingson  1:08:01 you again, skip for being with us on unstoppable mindset. I appreciate it. I appreciate you. And it's easy to say you inspire me and and all that. But I seriously mean it. I think you've offered a lot of good knowledge and good sound advice that people should listen to. And I hope that all of you out there, appreciate this as well. And that you will reach out to www dot transform, tough guys.com and reach out to skip. Also, of course, we'd love to hear from you feel free to email me at Michaelhi at accessibe.com or go to www dot Michaelhingson.com/podcast or wherever you're listening to us. Please give us a five star rating. We appreciate it. We want to hear what you think about the podcast. If you've got suggestions of people who should be on and skip Same to you if you know of anyone else that we ought to have on the podcast would appreciate your, your help in finding more people and more insights that we all can appreciate. So again, thank you for you for being on the podcast with us   Donald G. “Skip” Mondragon  1:09:08 there. My pleasure, Mike. Thank you.   Michael Hingson  1:09:10 Pleasure is mine.   Michael Hingson  1:09:16 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

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Warriors In Their Own Words | First Person War Stories
Specialist Nathan Dowds: Paratrooper in Iraq & Afghanistan

Warriors In Their Own Words | First Person War Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 45:20


Specialist Nathan Dowds discusses his training, the moments when his life was on the line, and the hazy morality of the conflict. Dowds served as an Army paratrooper in the 82nd Airborne Division. He deployed to Afghanistan twice, in 2002 and in 2004, and once to Iraq in 2003.  During the episode, he says this about his struggles: “The world is full of pain and suffering, and has been since the beginning of time. And for me to expect my brief moment in this world to be different than every other moment is kind of naive”

The Big Tex Ordnance Podcast
Dirty Converging With Chuck Pressburg and Steve Fisher

The Big Tex Ordnance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 61:25


Chuck Pressburg and Steve Fisher sit down with the BTO crew and discuss lasers, zeros, LPVOs and why it matters where you cross the streams.  This is a great episode filled with knowledge from these two experts.(From Presscheckconsulting.com)ABOUT CHUCK PRESSBURGSGM(R) Pressburg retired from the US Army on January 1, 2017 after 26 years of active service, mostly in Special Operations and Special Missions Units. After Infantry and Airborne Training in 1990, Chuck completed the Ranger Indoctrination Program and was assigned to the 1st Bn, 75th Ranger Regiment. Chuck's experience includes:10 years in the 75th Ranger Regiment including Platoon Sergeant of a 65-man strike force that was deployed to Afghanistan two times in 2001/2002. Chuck's platoon was highly decorated for combat action receiving 10 Silver Stars and 11 Bronze stars with “V” during their first deployment.24 months Rifle and Sniper Squad Leader - 82nd Airborne Division.2 years Asymmetric Warfare Group (AWG) (Founding member, 1st active Army unit member deployed to combat, Selection Class #1, Operational Training Course (OTC) Class #1).20 months in Operation Iraqi Freedom conducting Small Kill Team (SKT) operations and Direct Action raids in support of conventional and Special Operations Forces.12 years, HQ USASOC performing various operational and staff tasks including a two-year assignment to the G8 section where Chuck performed Science and Technology R&D. While assigned to USASOC, Chuck graduated from the Defense Acquisitions University's Combat Developer's Course and The Human Factors Engineering (MANPRINT) Course. Chuck spent several years assisting in material acquisition programs for SOF.(From Sentinelconcepts.com) STEVE ``YETI`` FISHEROWNER & LEAD INSTRUCTORSteve Fisher has been the owner/lead instructor for Sentinel Concepts since 2014. He also is a contract instructor for numerous ranges in Michigan and has been a staff instructor for EAG Tactical.Steve's career as a trainer started in the 90's, first at NTFT and then later as the owner/ lead trainer of MDFI, both Michigan-based companies, and served as one of the primary Instructors for Magpul Dynamics. He was responsible for the development of new programs and tactics for several local police departments and new training curriculum's based on low light, home defense and the use of the carbine, handgun, and shotgun in various roles.Steve has been featured in SWAT Magazine, Recoil Magazine, Breach-Bang-Clear, and has written for both SWAT Magazine and Surefire Combat Tactics. He is a product designer for Tuff Products and provides product development insight for companies like Nighthawk Customs, Midwest Industries, FN, Trijicon, Agency Arms, Surefire and Robar to name a few.Over the years Steve has participated in numerous training programs from notable instructors in the industry as well as many local level schools and stays active on both sides of the training industry. He is also an avid hunter and has a history in the outdoor/hunting television community as both a hunter and cameraman.  Find out more about The Ranch here and Shooter's Symposium here.Want to watch instead of listen? Tune in on Youtube!As always this podcast is produced by Big Tex Ordnance, your source for firearms and firearm accessories!https://www.bigtexordnance.com/  

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 1, 2022 is: sallow • SAL-oh • adjective Sallow means "of a grayish greenish yellow color," and often suggests sickliness. // She returned from her sick leave still looking a bit sallow. See the entry > Examples: "As a member of the 101st Airborne Division, Guy Whidden was among the first American paratroopers to head for Normandy in the early hours of June 6, 1944. The day before, he'd posed for a picture with a few of the other paratroopers. Sixty years later, he flashed the same impish grin, though his hair was white and his skin a little sallow." — Tamela Baker, The Herald-Mail (Hagerstown, Maryland), 25 Sept. 2022 Did you know? In Oscar Wilde's 1891 novel A Picture of Dorian Gray, Dorian's unscrupulous friend Lord Henry Wotton impresses upon the young Dorian what the process of aging will do, saying "Time is jealous of you, and wars against your lilies and your roses. You will become sallow, and hollow-cheeked, and dull-eyed." Literature of the 19th century abounds with sallow people—Charles Dickens applied the word to characters in no fewer than 12 novels—but the word had been in use with the same meaning for centuries before that literary heyday. Its synonymous Old English forbear is salu, which shares an ancestor with an Old High German word meaning "murky" as well as with a Russian word meaning "yellowish gray."

Veterans  Radio
10 Years Later: Airborne Bravo Company 2009 Deployment to Afghanistan

Veterans Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 35:00


Marine and Wall Street Journal reporter Ben Kesling tells the story of the war in Afghanistan through the eyes of the men of Bravo Company of the 82nd Airborne Division. By the time they made it home, three soldiers were KIA, two dozen lost limbs, and half of the company was awarded the Purple Heart. Ten years later, Ben catches up with the men to unravel the impact of the war on their lives. He talks to host Jim Fausone about the purposes and messages packed into this unique look at a warrior company.

The Shadows Podcast
Halloween Special - Episode 98: Michael Bailey Smith

The Shadows Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 87:40


Happy Halloween from the Shadows Podcast! This Halloween, we have the honor of having the man who played Super Freddy in A Nightmare on Elm Street 5, Pluto in the Hills Have Eyes, and Belthazor and Sax in the television series, Charmed, Michael Bailey Smith, join the Shadows! Michael has been in over 100 films and is the Vice President of Global Sales at LEXI. During this episode, Michael discusses his upbringing as an Air Force brat, including graduating high school in Iran. He talks about his time in the 82nd Airborne Division as a paratrooper. He talks about playing football at Eastern Michigan University and eventually landing a free agent with the Dallas Cowboys. Michael talks about the transition from football to the incredible opportunity that landed him an acting role in A Nightmare on Elm Street 5: The Dream Child. Hear Michael cover his astonishing acting career and discuss behind the scenes as he embraced his shadows. Check out this episode in its entirety at linktr.ee/ShadowsPodcast, www.theshadowspodcast.com, and our YouTube Channel! Michael's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelbaileysmith/ We credit the official theme for this Halloween Special to Darren Curtis Music for the Phantom's Castle song located at www.darrencurtismusic.com/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/shadows-podcast/support

Crashing the War Party
Who needs friends when you got quasi-allies? A conversation with Natalie Armbruster

Crashing the War Party

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 40:25


This week, Deputy Secretary of State Wendy Sherman reiterated the U.S. Nuclear Posture Review, which states that "the United States would only consider the employment of nuclear weapons in extreme circumstances to defend the vital interests of the United States, its allies, and partners. Extreme circumstances could include significant non-nuclear strategic attacks." Natalie Armbruster of Defense Priorities joins us this week to talk about who is formally a US ally — and not — and how over the years Washington has built a web of entangling alliances of different formalities and caliber, drawing the US into fights and causing others that have no real basis in the U.S. national interest. In the second segment, Kelley & Dan talk about the U.S. 101st Airborne Division on the border with Ukraine, and the progressives going wobbly on diplomacy.More from Natalie: Who is an ally and why does it matter? — w/ Ben Friedman, Defense Priorities, 10/12/22The 2023 Defense Authorization risks more of the same — Instick Media, 8/4/22Biden shouldn't put American lives on the line to defend the United Arab Emirates — Business Insider, 6/14/22Apply the logic of the Afghanistan withdrawal to Syria — Defense Priorities, 3/7/2022 This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit crashingthewarparty.substack.com

The MisFitNation
Military Author, Harvard Grad, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) Combat Veteran- John Davis

The MisFitNation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 30:57


It is Warrior Wednesday! We have an amazing chat in store for you. The MisFitNation had the honor of having an amazing team come and share their story journey with us.     John grew up in good ol' Iowa and joined the Army after failing out of community college. He served multiple combat tours as an Infantry Squad Leader in the 101st Airborne Division. He earned his bachelor's in history from St. Joseph's College and his master's in education from Harvard. Check him out here: https://www.johnhdaviswriter.com/   This is a chat you will not want to miss. Enjoy episode 208 of The MisFitNation!     All of our latest episodes and videos can be found here:   https://www.themisfitnation.com   This episode   YouTube: https://youtu.be/oYN8xg050ko   #Author #Veteran #SVA #Harvard #101st   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Vince Coakley Podcast
U.S. deploys troops near Ukraine

Vince Coakley Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 57:57


The 101st airborne division has been deployed near Ukraine. CBS News has more:   The U.S. Army's 101st Airborne Division has been deployed to Europe for the first time in almost 80 years amid soaring tension between Russia and the American-led NATO military alliance. The light infantry unit, nicknamed the "Screaming Eagles," is trained to deploy on any battlefield in the world within hours, ready to fight.  CBS News joined the division's Deputy Commander, Brigadier General John Lubas, and Colonel Edwin Matthaidess, Commander of the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, on a Black Hawk helicopter for the hour-long ride to the very edge of NATO territory — only around three miles from Romania's border with Ukraine.  From the moment Russian President Vladimir Putin launched his full-scale invasion of Ukraine on February 24, his forces have advanced northward from the Crimean Peninsula, a Ukrainian region that Moscow illegally seized control of in 2014. For more than seven months, Russian troops have tried to push along the Black Sea coast into the Kherson region, aiming to capture the key Ukrainian port cities of Mykolaiv and Odesa.  Also, Transformation Tuesday.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Hamilton Corner
The U.S. Army's 101st Airborne Division has been deployed to Europe for the first time since WWII.

The Hamilton Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 54:15