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Virginia Water Radio
Episode 609 (12-27-21): A Year of Water Sounds and Music – 2021 Edition

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:31).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 12-24-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of December 27, 2021.  SOUND - ~ 5 sec That's the sound of a Belted Kingfisher at Stroubles Creek in Blacksburg, Va., on December 21, 2021.  The year-end chattering of Virginia Water Radio's favorite bird sets the stage for our annual look-back on Water Radio's year.  We start with a medley of mystery sounds and voices from six episodes in 2021.  Have a listen for about 40 seconds, and see how many you recognize. SOUNDS – ~38 sec If you guessed all of most of those, you're a water-sound world champion! You heard Brimley's Chorus Frog;Virginia Tech graduate Maddy Grupper discussing her research on public trust in water systems;Virginia Tech's siren used for tornado warnings;names of some 2021 Atlantic tropical cyclones;Canvasback ducks; andice on Claytor Lake in Pulaski County, Va. Thanks to the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources for permission to use the chorus frog sound; to Lang Elliott for the Canvasback sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs; to Maddy Grupper for the episode on her research; and to Blacksburg friends for the tropical cyclone name call-outs. We close out 2021 with a two-minute sample of music heard in episodes this year.  Here are excerpts of “Wade in the Water,” by Torrin Hallett; “Racing the Sun,” by the Faux Paws; “All Creatures Were Meant to Be Free,” by Bob Gramann; “John Ashe's Spring,” by New Standard; “The Coming Spring,” by Andrew VanNorstand with vocalist Kailyn Wright; and “On a Ship,” by Kat Mills, with violinist Rachel Handman. Thanks to those musicians for permission to use their music. So long, soon, to 2021, and here's hoping for a safe, sound, and sufficiently hydrated 2022. MUSIC – ~105 sec From “Wade in the Water” - ~18 sec – instrumental. From “Racing the Sun” - ~20 sec – instrumental. From “All Creatures Were Meant to be Free” - ~10 sec – instrumental. From “John Ashe's Spring” - ~13 sec – instrumental. From “The Coming Spring” - ~20 sec – Lyrics: “I went outside, the rain fallin' on the branches bare.   And I smiled, ‘cause I could feel a change in the air.” From “On a Ship” - ~25 sec – Lyrics: “We are riding on a ship.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Sounds Used and Their Previous 2021 Virginia Water Radio Episodes (Listed in order heard in this episode's audio) The Belted Kingfisher sound was recorded by Virginia Water Radio at Stroubles Creek in Blacksburg, Va., December 21, 2021. The sound of Brimley's Chorus Frog was from “The Calls of Virginia Frogs and Toads” CD, copyright 2008 by the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (now the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources) and Lang Elliott/NatureSoundStudio, used with permission.   The CD accompanies A Guide to the Frogs and Toads of Virginia, Special Publication Number 3, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries; as of February 5, 2021, that publication is no longer available at Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources online store, https://www.shopdwr.com/.  For more information, contact the Department at P.O. Box 90778, Henrico, VA 23228-0778; phone: (804) 367-1000 (VTDD); main Web page is https://dwr.virginia.gov/; to send e-mail, visit https://dwr.virginia.gov/contact/.  This sound was used in Episode 563, 2-8-21. Virginia Tech 2020 graduate Maddy Grupper discussed her research on public trust in water systems in Episode 564, 2-15-21. The tornado-warning siren was recorded in Blacksburg, Va., in the early morning of April 28, 2011.  This sound was used in Episode 568, 3-15-21. The call-out of Atlantic tropical cyclone names for the 2021 season were recorded by Blacksburg friends of Virginia Water radio in June 2021.  The voices were sued in Episode 580, 6-7-21. The sounds of Canvasback ducks were sound were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, online at https://musicofnature.com/.  These sounds were used in Episode 604, 11-22-21. The Claytor Lake ice sound was recorded at the Sloan Creek inlet of the lake, near Draper in Pulaski County, Va., on January 6, 2018. This sound was used in Episode 606, 12-6-21. Musical Selections Used and Their Previous 2021 Virginia Water Radio Episodes (Listed in order heard in this episode's audio) The arrangement of “Wade in the Water” (a traditional hymn) heard in this episode is copyright 2021 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing this arrangement especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was used in Episode 566, 3-1-21, water in U.S. civil rights history. “Racing the Sun,” from the 2021 album “The Faux Paws,” is copyright by Great Bear Records, used with permission of Andrew VanNorstrand.  More information about The Faux Paws is available online at https://thefauxpawsmusic.com/.  More information about Great Bear Records is available online at https://www.greatbearmusic.com/.  This music was used in Episode 602, 11-8-21, on photosynthesis, including its connection to climate change. “All Creatures Were Meant to Be Free,” from the 1995 album “Mostly True Songs,” is copyright by Bob Gramann, used with permission.  More information about Bob Gramann is available online at https://www.bobgramann.com/.  This music was used in Episode 561, 1-25-21, on the Northern Harrier. “John Ashe's Spring,” from the 2016 album “Bluegrass,” is copyright by New Standard, used with permission.  The title refers to a spring near Ivy, Virginia (Albemarle County).  More information about New Standard is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com.  This music was used in Episode 576, 5-10-21, an introduction to springs. “The Coming Spring,” from the 2019 album “That We Could Find a Way to Be,” is copyright by Andrew VanNorstrand, used with permission.  More information about Andrew VanNorstrand is available online at https://www.andrewvannorstrand.com/.  Information on accompanying artists on “The Coming Spring” is online at https://andrewvannorstrandmusic.bandcamp.com/track/the-coming-spring.  This music was used in Episode 572, 4-12-21, on warblers and spring bird migration. “On a Ship,” from the 2015 album “Silver,” is copyright by Kat Mills, used with permission.  Accompanying artists on the song are Ida Polys, vocals; Rachel Handman, violin; and Nicholas Polys, banjo.   More information about Kat Mills is available online at http://www.katmills.com/.  This music was used in Episode 602, 11-8-21, on photosynthesis, including its connection to climate change. IMAGESAn Image Sampler from Episodes in 2021 From Episode 561, 1-25-21: Northern Harrier, photographed in southeastern Virginia, January 23, 2021.  Photo by iNaturalist user keyojimbo, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/68521040(as of 12-27-21) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.From Episode 563, 2-8-21: Brimley's Chorus Frog, photographed in Chesapeake, Virginia, February 28, 2019.  Photo by iNaturalist user jkleopfer, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/20834796(as of 2-8-21) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.From Episode 580, 6-7-21: Predictions for the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season.  Graphic from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, “NOAA Predicts Another Active Atlantic Hurricane Season,” 5/20/21, online at https://www.noaa.gov/media-release/noaa-predicts-another-active-atlantic-hurricane-season.From Episode 602, 11-8-21: Diagram explaining carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake by trees and other woody plants during photosynthesis, resulting in carbon storage, or “carbon sequestration,” a key concept in the issue of climate change.  Diagram courtesy of John Seiler, Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation.From Episode 606, 12-6-21: Thin ice on a pond in Heritage Park, Blacksburg, Va., December 9, 2021.SOURCES Please see the episodes mentioned and hyperlinked above under “Audio Notes and Acknowledgments” for sources of information about the topics of the individual episodes. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Overall Importance o

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Virginia Water Radio
Episode 604 (11-22-21): Canvasbacks Come Back to the Chesapeake as Winter Approaches

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:33).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 11-19-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 22, 2021.  This revised episode from January 2014 is part of a series this year of winter-related episodes. SOUND – ~5 sec That's the landing sound of a large, distinctive duck that can be found in winter on Virginia's coastal waters.  Have a listen for about 10 seconds to some more of this species' sounds, and see if you know this bird.  And here's a hint: the bird's name, and the male's beautiful color, may remind you of a painting.SOUND – ~12 secIf you guessed a Canvasback, you're right!  Canvasbacks breed on water bodies in the prairies of Canada and the northern United States, but they winter in large sections of the U.S. and Mexico, with one concentration in the Chesapeake Bay area.  According to the Chesapeake Bay Program, at one time almost half of North America's Canvasbacks wintered around the Chesapeake, but that number has decreased to about 20 percent because of reductions in Bay submerged aquatic vegetation, or Bay grasses, a valuable winter food for this species.  Canvasbacks are diving ducks, meaning they typically go completely underwater to obtain food and avoid predators.  In winter, Canvasbacks feed largely on plant roots and buds, while in summer they'll add to their plant diet a variety of aquatic insects and other animals.  Predators on adult and young Canvasbacks include mink, coyotes, foxes, owls and other birds, some reptiles and fish, and human hunters, while Canvasback eggs are eaten by various mammals and birds. The Canvasback is considered one of the most distinctive North American ducks.  The following quote from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's “Birds of the World” Web site describes how the bird stands out.  Quote: “This exclusively North American species is considered the ‘aristocrat of ducks.'  The male's striking appearance—rich chestnut-red head and neck, black chest, white back, and long, sloping, blackish bill—along with its large size distinguish it in the field.”  Unquote. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the Canvasback sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs.  We close with about 50 seconds of music appropriate for the Canvasback's Chesapeake Bay connection.  Here's “Chesapeake Bay Ballad,” by Torrin Hallett, a graduate student at the Yale School of Music. MUSIC - ~51 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 197, 1-20-14, and the sounds segment of Episode 50, 1-24-11. Emily Whitesell helped write this original script for this episode during a Virginia Tech English Department internship in Spring 2011 with the Virginia Water Resources Research Center. The Canvasback sounds were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. “Chesapeake Bay Ballad” is copyright 2020 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 565, 2-22-21. Following are other music pieces composed by Torrin Hallett for Virginia Water Radio, with episodes featuring the music.“A Little Fright Music” – used most recently in Episode 601, 10-31-21, on connections among Halloween, water, and the human body.“Beetle Ballet” – used in Episode 525, 5-18-20, on aquatic beetles.“Corona Cue” – used in Episode 517, 3-23-20, on the coronavirus pandemic. “Flow Stopper” – used in Episode 599, 10-18-21, on “Imagine a Day Without Water.”“Geese Piece” – used most recently in Episode 440, 10-1-18, on E-bird. “Ice Dance” – used in Episode 556, 12-21-20, on how organisms survive freezing temperatures.“Lizard Lied” – used in Episode 514, 3-2-20, on lizards. “New Year's Water” – used in Episode 349, 1-2-17, on the New Year. “Rain Refrain” – used most recently in Episode 559, 1-11-21, on record rainfall in 2020.“Runoff” – used in Episode 585, 7-12-21 – on middle schoolers calling out stormwater-related water words.“Spider Strike” – used in Episode 523, 5-4-20, on fishing spiders.“Tropical Tantrum” – used most recently in Episode 580, 6-7-21, on the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season preview.“Tundra Swan Song – used in Episode 554, 12-7-20, on Tundra Swans.“Turkey Tune” – used in Episode 343, 11-21-16, on the Wild Turkey.  Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGESMale Canvasback (location and date not identified).  Photo by Lee Karney, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; specific URL for this photo was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/1645/rec/2), as of 11/22/21.Female Canvasback in Anchorage Coastal Wildlife Refuge in Alaska in May 2005.  Photo by Donna A. Dewhurst, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; specific URL for this photo was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/14/rec/9), as of 11/22/21.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT CANVASBACK DUCKS The scientific name of the Canvasback is Aythya valisineria. Here are some points about Canvasbacks, excerpted from the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service/Canvasback,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040064&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18949.Physical Description “The adult male has a head that is rusty red, shading to almost black near the bill.  The breast is grayish-black and the sides and back are light gray to white.  The wings and speculum are gray, and the eye is red.  The bill is long and sloping, black, with decidedly long sloping profile that clearly distinguishes it from the redhead. …The adult female head is light brown.  The sides and breast are olive-brown to gray-brown, and the underparts are light gray. The back is gray, finely barred with darker gray, and the wings are grayish brown.  …They have short wings, and a rapid wingbeat.  This species has difficulty leaving the water.  It is one of the fastest flying ducks.  …It is one of the largest ducks.”Breeding “The breeding season is from May to June… This species breeds in Alaska, western Canada, northwest United States, western North America from the prairie provinces of Canada, south into the central and western states and occasionally as far east as Hudson Bay with a few as far north as Alaska.  Spring and early summer they are found in marshes with shallow waters [and in] flooded farmland.  In mid-summer they frequent large marshes and lakes, sloughs, and swampy areas.” Migration and Winter Habitat and Behavior “During migration, they fly in large ‘V' shaped flocks at high altitudes. … They are also associated with larger bodies of water.  …Late migration is in the fall, and early migration in the spring.  This species migrates cross country from the northwestern United States to the Atlantic Coast, principally the Chesapeake Bay.  The migration corridors shift annually, and they have a strong tendency to return to the same breeding ground.  … The heaviest flight is from the Canada pothole country to the Chesapeake Bay. … They arrive at Chesapeake Bay later than most other ducks.  The Chesapeake Bay fall migration is from October 15 to December 15, with a peak from November 15 to December 15.  The spring migration is from February 20 to May 1, with the peak from March 1 to March 30.  They occupy specific and traditional rivers, lakes, and marshes on migratory areas.  … This species winters to Mexico [and to the] Atlantic and Gulf Coast.  ...Virginia is one of best areas for canvasbacks.  …  They are found in lakes, salt bays and estuaries, brackish and alkaline waters near the coast, estuaries and shallow bays, [and] rarely on the open sea. … The optimum in Chesapeake Bay areas is in fresh and brackish estuarine bays with extensive beds of submerged plants or abundant invertebrates, primarily in brackish rather than salt or freshwater areas. … There has been a 53% decline in wintering populations in the United States.  There has also been a decrease in the Atlantic flyway.”  [Population decreases have been caused by several factors, including drainage of breeding marshland, food supplies being depleted by carp and swan, pollution of wintering areas, disappearance of submerged aquatic vegetation in the Chesapeake Bay, droughts on breeding grounds, oil spills, and illegal hunting and trapping.] Diet “This species dives and obtains food from the bottoms of ponds, lakes, large rivers, open marshes, and muddy bottoms.  Plants are uprooted and the roots are eaten.  This species dives to 20-30 feet. … Important foods include…aquatic plants…, molluscs, insects, caddisfly and midge larvae, dragonflies, [and] small fish.  Chesapeake Bay foods include wild celery, widgeon grass, eelgrass, pondweed, clams and mud crabs.  Juvenile foods include caddisfly larvae, midge larvae, and mayfly nymphs.” SOURCES Used for Audio Mike Burke, “The big, beautiful canvasback: What's not to love?”  Bay Journal, November 2021, available online at https://www.bayjournal.com/eedition/page-43/page_136f4325-b978-5e55-bcec-907f0a04b1fc.html. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all; the Canvasback entry is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/entry/canvasback. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/.  The Canvasback entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Canvasback/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home(subscription may be required).  The Canvasback entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/canvas/cur/introduction. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay-3rdEdition, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/; the Canvasback entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040064&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18949. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disas

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Virginia Water Radio
Episode 590 (8-16-21): Osprey Rescue Reinforces Role of Fishing-line Recycling

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021


CLICK HERE to  listen to episode audio (4:30).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 8-16-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of June 28, 2021.  This is a revised version of an episode from August 2013. MUSIC – ~11 sec – instrumental That's part of “Bass Fisherman's Reel,” an adaptation of a traditional tune called “Fisher's Hornpipe,” by Williamsburg musician Timothy Seaman on his 2004 album, “Virginia Wildlife.”  The music sets the stage for a “reel” story about fishing equipment and a summer bird of prey.  We start with a series of mystery sounds.  Have a listen for about 20 seconds, and see if you can guess how the first two sounds add up to the third. And here's a hint: misplaced line makes for a tangled, feathered fisher.SOUNDS - ~19 secIf you guessed, an Osprey running afoul of some fishing line, you're right!  You heard he call of an Osprey, or “Fish Hawk,”; the sound of fishing line, being reeled in; and part of a rescue of an Osprey chick stuck in fishing line.  The latter sound was taken from the “Osprey Cam,” the Chesapeake Conservancy's real-time video transmission from an Osprey nest on Kent Island, Maryland.  On July 29, 2013, the camera showed that one of that year's three chicks had gotten its legs caught in fishing line.  Some viewers of the bird's predicament went to the site, waded out to the nest with a ladder, and climbed up and disentangled the chick. Unwittingly, this lucky Osprey chick had starred in a documentary about the value of fishing-line recycling stations.  Birds, sea turtles, and other animals can get stuck in, or eat, improperly discarded fishing line, nets, or other plastic items.  Such material can also get caught in boat propellers or intakes.  Recycling programs for fishing line are one way to help reduce these threats.  Virginia began a statewide fishing-line recycling program in 2009, run jointly by the Department of Wildlife Resources—formerly the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries—and the Marine Resources Commission.  Recycling is now available at many boat ramps, parks, and marinas, as well as at some outdoor-equipment businesses.  At those locations, anglers can look for the distinctive plastic tubes with a curved top, and help put plastic back to use, instead of on a beak or fin. Thanks to Lang Elliot and the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs, to Timothy Seaman, and to the Chesapeake Conservancy, respectively, for permission to use this week's sounds of an Osprey, fishing line, and the Osprey chick rescue.  Thanks also to Mr. Seaman for this week's music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “Bass Fisherman's Reel.” MUSIC – ~20 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 175, 8-19-13.The Osprey call sounds were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. The fishing line sound and musical excerpt from “Bass Fisherman's Reel,” on the 2004 album “Virginia Wildlife,” is copyright Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at https://timothyseaman.com/en/.The sounds of the rescue of an Osprey chick caught in fishing line were taken from a video recorded by the Chesapeake Conservancy's “Osprey Cam,” available online at http://www.chesapeakeconservancy.org/Osprey-Cam, used with permission.  For more information about the camera or the Conservancy, contact the Conservancy at 716 Giddings Avenue, Suite 42, Annapolis, Maryland 21401; phone (443) 321-3610; e-mail: info@chesapeakeconservancy.org. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Young Osprey in Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia.  Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), made available for public use by the USFWS' National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov.  The specific URL for this image was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/12049/rec/9, as of 8-16-21.Osprey in flight, 2016 (location not identified).  Photo by Alvin Freund, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov.  The specific URL for this image was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/17870/rec/11, as of 8-16-21.Fishing-line recycling container at South Holston Lake, Washington County, Virginia, April 15, 2013. SOURCES Used for Audio Boat US Foundation, online at https://www.boatus.org/clean-boating/recycling/fishing-line-recycling/. Chesapeake Conservancy, “Webcams/Osprey,” online at https://www.chesapeakeconservancy.org/ospreycam. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation, “Commission, “Reel. Remove. Recycle – Don't Leave Your Line Behind,”online at https://mrrp.myfwc.com/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org.  The Osprey entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Osprey/.  Video from an Osprey camera at Savannah, Georgia, is available online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/cams/savannah-ospreys/. Outdoor News, “State Agencies Initiate Fishing Line Recycling Program,” 2/10/09. [Easton, Md.] Star Democrat, Osprey cam chick Ozzie is rescued, 8/7/13. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):“Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/; the Osprey entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040095&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18845; “Recycle Your Fishing Line” is online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/fishing/recycle-your-line/. Virginia Marine Resources Commission, “Introducing the Virginia Fishing Line Recycling Program,” online at https://mrc.virginia.gov/rec_assessment/VFLRP_AD.shtm. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home(subscription required). Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. National Audubon Society, online at https://www.audubon.org/. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds,” ‘Overall Importance of Water,” and “Recreation” subject categories. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes2.5 – Living things are part of a system.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth ResourcesK.11 – Humans use resources.1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly, including that most natural resources are limited; human actions can affect the availability of natural resources; and reducing, reusing, and recycling are ways to conserve natural resources.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life ScienceLS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity. Earth ScienceES.6 – Resource use is complex.ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity. BiologyBIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems, including that natural events and human activities influence local and global ecosystems and may affect the flora and fauna of Virginia. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Civics and Economics CourseCE.3 – Citizenship rights, duties, and responsibilities.CE.7 – Government at the state level.CE.10 – Public policy at local, state, and national levels. Government CourseGOVT.8 – State and local government organization and powers.GOVT.9 – Public policy process at local, state, and national levels.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rdgrade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5thgrade.Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4ththrough 8th grade.Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.

society bay humans university agency music recycling photo natural relationships state video audio living game college world rescue accent cd dark tech water xeno web index rain pond research ocean government education public recreation birds foundation maryland native fish chesapeake snow environment suite organisms images reel msonormal commonwealth stream menu normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens fishing williamsburg arial environmental dynamic times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading remove commission biology civics grade citizenship colorful resource md signature bio ozzie scales washington county govt watershed transcript earth sciences conservancy unwittingly ornithology freshwater hornpipe virginia tech ls annapolis atlantic ocean natural resources wildlife service usfws grades k name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes ar sa seaman zoology national audubon society taxonomy msohyperlink wildlife resources lang elliot audubon society all about birds osprey sections life sciences birdsongs stormwater lang elliott policymakers bmp reinforces new standard acknowledgment virginia department michigan museum cripple creek cumberland gap sols outdoor news florida fish kent island tmdl virginia society wildlife conservation inland fisheries ebird living systems virginia standards water center audio notes
Virginia Water Radio
Episode 572 (4-12-21): Warblers Announce Spring Bird Migration

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2021


Click to listen to episode (4:26) Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.) Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 4-12-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of April 12, 2021.  This revised episode from April 2013 is part of a series this year of spring-related episodes. MUSIC – ~ 18 sec – Lyrics: “I went outside, the rain fallin’ on the branches bare.   And I smiled, ‘cause I could feel a change in the air.” That’s part of “The Coming Spring,” on Andrew VanNorstand’s 2019 album, “That We Could Find a Way to Be,” featuring Kailyn Wright on vocals.  It opens an episode about the feathered “changes in the air” that take place each spring in Virginia.  We start with a series of mystery sounds.  Have a listen for about 15 seconds, and see if you can guess what’s making these three different high-pitched songs, each heard just once.  And here’s a hint: These small creatures make big journeys, twice a year.SOUNDS  - ~12 sec If you guessed warblers, you’re right!  And if you’re an experienced birder, you may have recognized the songs of a Bay-breasted Warbler, Palm Warbler, and Tennessee Warbler.  These three species breed in Canada and the northern United States, but they winter in Central and South America, and they’re among the birds that may pass through Virginia during spring or fall migration.  Virginia’s location along the Atlantic coast and Chesapeake Bay allows Commonwealth birders to have a chance to see songbirds, waterfowl, and birds of prey that migrate along the broad, eastern North American route known as the Atlantic Flyway, one of four main migratory routes on this continent.  For example, while about 100 bird species breed in the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge in southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina, over 200 species have been identified there, particularly during the spring migration from April to June. The Colorado-based organization Environment for the Americas, which has helped coordinate an annual World Migratory Bird Day, has called bird migration, quote, “one of the most important and spectacular events in the Americas.”  Virginia’s part of that spectacle, every spring and fall. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the three warbler species sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs.  Thanks also to Andrew VanNorstrand for permission to use part of “The Coming Spring.”  We close with part of another song, whose title captures how many people may feel about spring’s arrival after a long winter.  Here’s about 20 seconds of “At Long Last,” by the Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels, from their 2011 album, “Live at Goose Creek.” MUSIC – ~ 22 sec – instrumental SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 157, 4-15-13, The sounds of the Bay-breasted Warbler, Palm Warbler, and Tennessee Warbler were taken from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot’s work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. “The Coming Spring,” from the 2019 album “That We Could Find a Way to Be,” is copyright by Andrew VanNorstrand, used with permission.  The music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 509, 1-27-20.  More information about Andrew VanNorstrand is available online at https://www.andrewvannorstrand.com/. “At Long Last,” from the 2011 album “Live at Goose Creek,” is copyright by The Steel Wheels, used with permission.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at https://www.thesteelwheels.com/. Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGESNorth American migratory bird flyways.  Map by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, accessed online at https://www.fws.gov/birds/management/flyways.php, 4/9/21.    Bay-breasted Warbler painting originally published between 1827 and 1838 by John James Audubon in Birds of America (plate 154).  Image made available for public use by the National Audubon Society, online at https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america; specific URL for this image is https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america/bay-breasted-warbler. Palm Warbler painting originally published between 1827 and 1838 by John James Audubon in Birds of America (plate 163).  Image made available for public use by the National Audubon Society, online at https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america; specific URL for this image is https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america/palm-warbler.Tennessee Warbler painting originally published between 1827 and 1838 by John James Audubon in Birds of America (plate 154).  Image made available for public use by the National Audubon Society, online at https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america; specific URL for this image is https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america/tennessee-warbler. SOURCES Used for Audio Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin’s Press, New York, 2001. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org.The Bay-breasted Warbler entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bay-breasted_Warbler.The Palm Warbler entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Palm_Warbler.The Tennessee Warbler entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Tennessee_Warbler. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home(subscription required).The Bay-breasted Warbler entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/babwar/cur/introduction.The Palm Warbler entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/palwar/cur/introduction.The Tennessee Warbler entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/tenwar/cur/introduction. Environment for the Americas, “World Migratory Bird Day,” online at http://www.birdday.org/birdday. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Great Dismal Swamp National Refuge, “Wildlife and Habitat,” online at https://www.fws.gov/refuge/Great_Dismal_Swamp/wildlife_and_habitat/index.html.  The Refuge’s bird brochure, with checklist, is online (as a PDF) at https://www.fws.gov/uploadedFiles/Region_5/NWRS/South_Zone/Great_Dismal_Swamp_Complex/Great_Dismal_Swamp/GDSbirds.pdf. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, “Migratory Bird Program,” online at https://www.fws.gov/birds/index.php.  Information on bird migratory flyways is online at https://www.fws.gov/birds/management/flyways.php. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.  Warblers are online at this link.The Bay-breasted Warbler entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040324&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18726.The Palm Warbler entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040329&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18726.The Tennessee Warbler entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040309&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18726. ___, “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, April 2018,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. National Audubon Society, online at https://www.audubon.org/. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/.Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation Web site, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” subject category. Following are links to other spring-themed episodes.  (Please note: some of these may be redone in spring 2021.  As that occurs, the links below will include directions to the blog post for the updated episodes.) Eastern Phoebe – Episode 416, 4-16-18.Frog and Toad Medley – Episode 408, 2-19-18.Spring arrival episode – Episode 569, 3-22-21.Spring forest wildflowers – Episode 212, 5-5-14.Spring Peepers – Episode 570, 3-29-21.Spring reminder about tornado awareness – Episode 568, 3-15-21.Spring signals for fish – Episode 571, 4-5-21.Spring sounds serenades – Episode 206, 3-14-14 and Episode 516, 3-16-20.FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.”

new york canada society bay university agency america guide music natural colorado state audio game college live north america world change map modern accent south america cd dark north american steel wheels tech water xeno web index rain united states pond press research ocean government education birds plants north carolina chesapeake bay native spring fish chesapeake snow habitat environment organisms images va cambridge adaptations msonormal commonwealth americas atlantic stream menu robbins normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens environmental frogs refuge dynamic times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading wildlife biology colorful signature bio scales warblers watershed transcript ornithology virginia tech ls atlantic ocean natural resources wildlife service grades k name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes harrisonburg zoology minn national audubon society taxonomy spring peepers msohyperlink wildlife resources warbler announce at long last lang elliot audubon society all about birds sections life sciences birdsongs bird migration stormwater john james audubon lang elliott policymakers bmp rockingham county new standard acknowledgment virginia department goose creek michigan museum great dismal swamp cripple creek coming spring cumberland gap sols tmdl virginia society inland fisheries ebird living systems virginia standards water center audio notes
Virginia Water Radio
Episode 561 (1-25-21): The Northern Harrier's a Hawk on the Marsh

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2021


Click to listen to episode (4:04)Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesExtra InformationSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.) Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 1-22-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of January 25, 2021. MUSIC – ~14 sec – instrumental That’s part of “Midwinter Etude,” by Timothy Seaman, of Williamsburg, Va.  It opens an episode about a kind of hawk that’s commonly found around eastern Virginia marshlands in wintertime.  Have a listen for about 10 seconds to the following mystery sound, and see if you know this bird of prey. [Clarification, not in audio: “raptor” is a more precise term for hawks and related birds than is “bird of prey.”]  And here’s a hint: what might you call a cross-country runner located far north of Virginia? SOUNDS  - ~11 sec If you guessed a Northern Harrier, you’re right!  Besides being a name for cross-country runners, harrier refers to a group of birds within the family that includes hawks, eagles, and kites.  The Northern Harrier is the only harrier species found in North America.  Occurring widely across the continent, this species sometimes is a summer breeder in southeastern coastal Virginia, but it’s more typically found in the Commonwealth during winter.It was formerly called the Marsh Hawk because it’s frequently found around marshes, as well as in meadows, grasslands, and other open, vegetated areas.  In these areas, it flies low over the ground in search of its usual prey of small mammals, other birds, reptiles, amphibians, and insects.  Northern Harriers are also capable of taking larger prey like rabbits and ducks, and    they’ve been reported to overcome some of these larger animals by drowning them.  The Northern Harrier’s face looks somewhat like that of an owl, and, according to the National Audubon Society, the bird also resembles owls in using sharp hearing to help locate its prey.  As Alice and Robert Lippson put it in their book, Life in the Chesapeake Bay, quote, “Northern Harriers have an owl-like facial disc that apparently concentrates the sound of its prey; couple this with its keen eyesight, and mice and voles are in constant jeopardy of becoming lunch.” Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the Northern Harrier sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs.  Thanks also to Timothy Seaman for permission to use part of “Midwinter Etude.”  We close with a little more music, in honor of all wild creatures, including harriers and other hawks.  Here’s about 10 seconds of “All Creatures Were Meant to Be Free,” by Bob Gramann of Fredericksburg, Va.  MUSIC – ~12 sec – instrumental SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “Midwinter Etude,” from the 1996 album “Incarnation,” is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Mr. Seaman is available online at http://timothyseaman.com/en/.  The Northern Harrier sounds were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot’s work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. “All Creatures Were Meant to Be Free,” from the 1995 album “Mostly True Songs,” is copyright by Bob Gramann, used with permission.  More information about Bob Gramann is available online at https://www.bobgramann.com/.  This music was previously used by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 524, 5-11-20. Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Painting of Marsh Hawk (former common name for Northern Harrier), originally published between 1827 and 1838 by John James Audubon in Birds of America (plate 356).  Image made available for public use by the National Audubon Society, online at https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america; specific URL for this image was https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america/marsh-hawk, as of 1-22-21.  Northern Harrier in flight at Nantucket National Wildlife Refuge in Massachusetts, July 2011.  Photo by Amanda Boyd, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; specific URL for this image was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/13235/rec/1, as of 1-22-21. Northern Harrier, photographed in southeastern Virginia, January 23, 2021.  Photo by iNaturalist user keyojimbo, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/68521040(as of 1-25-21) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE NORTHERN HARRIER The scientific name of the Northern Harrier is Circus hudsonius. The following information is excerpted from the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service/Tundra Swan,” online at https://vafwis.dgif.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040094&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18649. Physical Description “Adult female [is] brown above and on tail bands; lighter brown below with heavy brown streaking.  [Adult] male [is] ashy gray above and on tail bands; white with cinnamon spots below; wing tips black.  [B]oth sexes have long banded tail with prominent white rump patch.  [F]lies a few feet above ground; tilting from side to side and holding its long narrow wings upwards at slight angle.” Reproduction and Behavior “[R]itualized courtship, calls, skydancing, performed by male to advertise territory; males arrive at breeding grounds ahead of females; male provides food during incubation and early nestling period by passing food items to female in flight; rarely visits nest himself….  [N]ests built on ground often in marshy areas and surrounded by low shrubs or tall grasses rather than open.  [N]est is small structure of reeds and sticks on dry ground….  Forage by slowly flying over marshes and fields, usually below 10 feet (3 meters); they generally take small mammals but also use birds, [reptiles and amphibians], and insects. Status of Population“Harriers occur in relatively low numbers as breeders in Virginia, where they may be found using both open marshes and open upland grassland habitat.  Their numbers swell during the winter with the influx of migrants, and it is this winter population that should be the focus of conservation efforts.  Like other grassland species, Harriers rely on relatively large tracts, such that preserving and restoring blocks of native grasslands is a high priority conservation action for this species.  Wintering harriers will likewise use emergent wetlands; identification, protection, and management (for example, Phragmites control) of suitable marshes will be necessary to ensure continued habitat availability for this species…” SOURCES Used for Audio Alaska Department of Fish and Game, “Sounds Wild/Northern Harrier,” 1 min./31 sec. podcast, online at https://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm?adfg=soundswild.episode&title=Northern%20Harrier. John James Audubon, Birds of America, online by The National Audubon Society at https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america.  The entry for the Marsh Hawk (the former common name for the Northern Harrier) is online at https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america/marsh-hawk. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide/Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all.  The Northern Harrier entry is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/entry/northern_harrier; “Raptors” is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/raptors); and “Marshes and Wetlands” is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/marshes_wetlands/all/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org.  The Northern Harrier entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Harrier. Encyclopedia Britannica, “Bird of prey,” online at https://www.britannica.com/animal/bird-of-prey; and “Harrier,” online at https://www.britannica.com/animal/harrier-bird. Goddess of Never Broken blog site, “The Harrier Incident,” April 9, 2013, online at https://maibey.wordpress.com/tag/northern-harrier-drowning-prey/.  This blot post has a series of photos showing a Northern Harrier drowning an American Coot. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay-3rd Edition, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006, page 234. National Audubon Society, “Guide to North American Birds/Northern Harrier,” online at https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/northern-harrier. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin’s Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Missouri Raptor Rehabilitation Project, “Raptor Facts,” online at http://raptorrehab.cvm.missouri.edu/raptor-facts/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service/Northern Harrier,” online at https://vafwis.dgif.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040094&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18649. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home(subscription required). Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources, “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna of Virginia, April 2018,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf.Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation Web site, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” subject category. The Northern Harrier was one of the birds included in Episode 430, 7-23-18, on birds associated with marshes.  (Other birds featured in that episode are the Great Blue Heron, Wood Duck, Least Bittern, Common Moorhen, and Marsh Wren). Following are links to other episodes on raptors (often also referred to as “birds of prey”). Bald Eagle – Episode 375, 7-3-17.Barred Owl – Episode 382 – 8-21-17.Eastern Screech-Owl – Episode 227, 8-18-14.Osprey – Episode 116, 6-25-12; Episode 175, 8-19-13. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining

new york society bay university agency america guide music photo natural state audio living game college north america circus world painting accent animals cd dark tech water xeno web status index rain pond press research ocean government education birds behavior plants massachusetts chesapeake bay native baltimore fish chesapeake snow environment adult organisms images harrier va cambridge adaptations northern msonormal commonwealth stream menu robbins normal worddocument zoom citizens hawk williamsburg arial environmental dynamic goddess times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading raptors marsh population shenandoah biology colorful md signature bio wetlands incarnation reproduction marshes watershed transcript ornithology virginia tech ls aquatic atlantic ocean natural resources clarification wildlife service grades k populations forage name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes fredericksburg wintering seaman zoology minn national audubon society taxonomy cosgrove barred owl great blue heron msohyperlink wildlife resources lang elliot audubon society bald eagles all about birds osprey sections encyclopedia britannica attribution noncommercial life sciences ben cosgrove birdsongs stormwater john james audubon lang elliott policymakers msobodytext never broken bmp be free acknowledgment virginia department alaska department michigan museum occurring robert l johns hopkins university press cumberland gap wood duck inaturalist sols harriers tmdl virginia society inland fisheries ebird biotic phragmites living systems virginia standards water center audio notes
Virginia Water Radio
Episode 557 (12-28-20): A Year of Water Sounds and Music – 2020 Edition

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2020


Click to listen to episode (5:35) Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.) Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 12-24-20.TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of December 28, 2020. MUSIC – ~13 sec – instrumental That’s part of “Waiting on the Dawn,” by Andrew and Noah VanNorstrand, from their 2007 album, “A Certain Tree.”  This week, as we wait for the dawn of a new year, we look back on Virginia Water Radio’s past year.  We start with a medley of mystery sounds from six episodes in 2020.  Have a listen for about 45 seconds, and see if you can identify what you hear. SOUNDS  - ~46 sec If you guessed all or most of those, you’re a 2020 water-sound wizard!You heard Wood Frogs;a Saltmarsh Sparrow;names of some 2020 Atlantic tropical cyclones;Atlantic White-sided Dolphins;a Black-necked Stilt;and a North Atlantic Right Whale. Thanks to Lang Elliott for the Saltmarsh Sparrow and Black-necked Stilt sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs; to Blacksburg friends for the tropical cyclone names; and to NOAA Fisheries for the dolphin and whale sounds.I hope that, during this difficult pandemic year, you had safe, adequate water and a chance to hear some restorative water sounds.We close out 2020 with 90-second sample of six songs heard on Water Radio this year.  Here are excerpts of “Chesapeake Bay Ballad” by Torrin Hallett; “Turtles Don’t Need No 401-K” by Bob Gramann; “River Runs Dry” by Kat Mills; “Nelson County” by Chamomile and Whiskey; “Love Rain Down” by Carbon Leaf; and “Kartune” by No Strings Attached.  Thanks to those musicians and to Andrew and Noah VanNorstrand for permission to use their music. To 2020: so long, soon; and here’s to a safe and healthy 2021.MUSIC - ~99 sec From “Chesapeake Bay Ballad” – ~15 sec – instrumental From “Turtles Don’t Need No 401-K” – ~12 sec – lyrics: “Turtles don’t need no 401-K; they sit on the rock in the sun all day.  Turtles don’t need no 401-K; it’s stuck in my head and it won’t go away.” From “River Runs Dry” – ~13 sec – lyrics: “What you gonna do when the river runs dry, when there’s no more water in your well?” From “Nelson County” – ~21 sec – lyrics: “Oh Virginia, little darling, I call your mountains home.  Nelson County, where I’ll never be alone, no, no, no, I’ll never be alone.” From “Love Rain Down” – ~24 sec – lyrics: “Well I can’t say that I was every ready, but I can sure say it was time, that I let love rain down, yeah I let love rain down.” From “Kartune” – ~14 sec – instrumental SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Sounds Used The sound of Wood Frogs were recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va., on February 18, 2018.  The sound was used in Episode 509, 1-27-20. The Saltmarsh Sparrow sound and the Black-necked Stilt sound were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot’s work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/.  The sparrow sound was used in Episode 511, 2-10-20; the stilt sound was used in Episode 543, 9-21-20. The call-out of the Atlantic tropical cyclone names for the 2020 season were recorded by 11 Blacksburg friends of Virginia Water radio on May 21-22, 2020.  These voices were used in Episode 526, 5-25-20. The Atlantic White-sided Dolphins sound and the North Atlantic Right Whale sound were from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Fisheries, “Sounds in the Ocean,” online at https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/national/science-data/sounds-ocean.  The dolphin sounds were used in Episode 542, 9-14-20; the whale sound was used in Episode 551, 11-16-20. Music Used “Chesapeake Bay Ballad” is copyright 2020 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio, and a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York.  As of 2020-21, he is a performance certificate candidate at the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was used in Episode 537, 8-10-20.  Turtles Don’t Need No 401-K,” from the 1995 album “Mostly True Songs,” is copyright by Bob Gramann, used with permission.  More information about Bob Gramann is available online at http://www.bobgramann.com/.  This music was used in Episode 513, 2-24-20. “River Runs Dry,” by Kat Mills, is from the 2003 album “Long Time,” from Sweetcut Music; used with permission.  More information about Kat Mills is available online at http://www.sweetcut.com/kat/and at https://www.facebook.com/katmillsmusic.  This music was used in Episode 541, 9-7-20. “Nelson County,” from the 2017 album “Sweet Afton,” is copyright by Chamomile and Whiskey and County Wide Music used with permission.  More information about Chamomile and Whiskey is available online at https://www.chamomileandwhiskey.com/.  More information about County Wide Music is available online at https://countywidemusic.worldsecuresystems.com/.  This music was used in Episode 550, 11-9-20. “Love Rain Down,” from the 2013 album “Constellation Prize,” is copyright by Carbon Leaf, used with permission.  More information about Carbon Leaf is available online at https://www.carbonleaf.com/.  This music was used in Episode 547, 10-19-20. “Kartune,” from the 1992 album “Blue Roses,” is copyright by No Strings Attached and Enessay Music, used with permission.  More information about the now-retired group No Strings Attached is available online at https://www.enessay.com/index.htmland at https://www.facebook.com/No-Strings-Attached-20609132766/.  This music was used in Episode 555, 12-14-20. Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES – A Photo Sampler from Episodes in 2020 From Episode 509, 1-27-20: Wood Frog (date not available).  Photo by Elizabeth Shadle, Virginia Tech Department of Biological Sciences, used with permission.From Episode 513, 2-24-20: Snapping Turtle at Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia, September 2017.  Photo by Chelsi Burns, made available by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov); specific URL for the photo was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/27223/rec/3, as of 12/29/20.From Episode 543, 9-21-20: Black-necked Stilt photographed at Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge in Texas, February 28, 2009.  Photo by Steve Hillebrand, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; specific URL for this image is https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/15361/rec/4, as of 12-29-20.From Episode 550, 11-9-20: A summer float on the Rockfish River in Nelson County, Va. (date not available).  Photo by Michael LaChance, used with permission. From in Episode 542, 9-14-20: Bottlenose Dolphins, photographed near Virginia Beach, Va., August 9, 2020.  Photo by Ty Smith, made available on iNaturalist at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/56137254(as of 12-29-20) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/. SOURCES USED FOR AUDIO AND OFFERING MORE INFORMATION Please see the episodes mentioned and hyperlinked above under “Audio Notes and Acknowledgments” for sources of information about the topics of the episodes. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Overall Importance of Water” subject category. Following are links to previous “year of sounds/music” episodes.2019 – Episode 504, 12-23-192018 – Episode 452, 12-24-18 2017 – Episode 400, 12-25-172016 – Episode 348, 12-26-16 2015 – Episode 295, 12-21-15 2014 – Episode 246, 12-29-142013 – Episode 193, 12-23-13 2012 – Episode 141, 12-17-12 FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION The episodes listed and hyperlinked above under “Audio Notes and Acknowledgments” may help with various Virginia SOLs in English, Music, Science, and Social Studies.  For specific SOLs, please see the online show notes for each episode. Virginia’s SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12thgrade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade.Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8thgrade.Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school.Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rdand 4th grade.Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia’s water resources, for 4th and 6th grade.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 530 (6-22-20): Virginia Rails in Sound and Music

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2020


Click to listen to episode (4:16) Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesExtra InformationSources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.) Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 6-19-20.TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of June 22, 2020. This is a revised version of an episode from June 2013. MUSIC – ~7 sec – instrumental This week, that music opens an episode about wetland-inhabiting birds known for thinness, secrecy, and silent running among marshy vegetation.  Have a listen for about 10 seconds to this week’s mystery sounds, and see if you know this kind of bird.  And here’s a hint: this creature shares its name with a type of fence and with the track of an iron horse.  After the sounds, you’ll hear about 25 seconds more of the music, done by a Virginia composer in honor of the sound-maker. SOUNDS AND MUSIC - ~36 sec - ~10 sec sound, then ~26 sec music (instrumental) If you guessed rails, you’re right!  You heard a Virginia Rail, in a recording by Lang Elliott from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs, and the music was “Virginia Rail Reel,” by Timothy Seaman of Williamsburg, on the 2004 album, “Virginia Wildlife.”  The Virginia Rail is one of nine species in Virginia in the bird family of rails, gallinules, and coots.  From the Clapper Rail to the Purple Gallinule to the Common Moorhen, rails have descriptive names, distinctive calls, and adaptations well-suited to marshy habitats.  It’s questionable whether the expression “thin as a rail” refers to this family of birds, rather than to pieces of a fence.  But there’s no question that rails’ thin bodies allow them to run, swim, feed, and nest within the dense grasses and other plants of saltwater and freshwater marshes. Of the Virginia Rail, here’s some of what 19th-Century naturalist John James Audubon wrote: quote, “Excepting our Little Partridge, I know no small bird so swift of foot as the Virginian Rail. …[A]among the thick herbage to which they usually resort, …they run to a short distance, then tack about, and again scud away in a lateral direction, so as to elude the best dog, or if likely to be overtaken, rise on wing, fly with dangling legs eight or ten yards, drop among the weeds, and run off as swiftly as before.” Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the Virginia Rail sounds.  Thanks also to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this week’s music, and we close with a few more seconds of “Virginia Rail Reel.” MUSIC - ~11 sec – instrumental SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 165, 6-10-13. The Virginia Rail sounds were taken from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot’s work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. “Virginia Rail Reel” (part of the medley “Virginia Rail Reel/Ducks on the Pond/Old Blue”), from the 2004 CD “Virginia Wildlife,” is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  Mr. Seaman’s Web site is http://www.timothyseaman.com/.  The “Virginia Wildlife” CD was a collaboration between Mr. Seaman and the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Virginia Rail in 2010, location not identified. Photo by Dave Menke, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; specific URL for this photo was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/12858/rec/1, as of 6-22-20. Virginian Rail (now Virginia Rail) painting originally published between 1827 and 1838 by John James Audubon in Birds of America (plate CCV [205]), as reprinted in 1985 by Abbeville Press, New York.  Image made available for public use by the Audubon Society, online at https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america; specific URL for this image is https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america/virginia-rail, as of 6-19-20. Map of the occurrence in Virginia of the Virginia Rail. Map accessed at the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries’ “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://vafwis.dgif.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?Menu=_.Occurrence&bova=040107&version=18432. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE VIRGINIA RAIL The Virginia Rail’s scientific name is Rallus limicola. The following information on the Virginia Rail is from the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries’ “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://vafwis.dgif.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040107&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18432. Physical Description“[S]mall; 9-11 inches…; long, reddish bill, rusty underparts, gray cheeks.” Reproduction and Nesting“[B]reeding season in VA [is] May to June; incubation period unknown, but not less than 15 days; eggs 5-12…; breeding behavior secretive and highly territorial, solitary nesters… Nesting is solitary, nests almost always in freshwater marsh or near fresh water though also known to nest in brackish marshes. Nesting materials: coarse grass and cattails; shallow saucer woven into surrounding marsh vegetation….” Behavior“Territoriality and home range very strong. Territoriality peaks in May and decreases to eventual winter core areas…. Forages by probing mud and extracting worms and insects. Feeds on a range of prey items including small fish, worms, larval insects, snails, slugs, caterpillars, beetles, and occasionally seeds of grasses, etc.; plant material is infrequently used; they forage in shallow water or mud by gleaning or probing. Probable predators include gulls, raccoons, fish crows, snakes, owls, and hawks.” Aquatic/Terrestial Associations[F]reshwater and brackish marshes in winter, may visit salt marshes; prefers dense habitats; commonly found in cattails.” SOURCES Used for Audio John James Audubon, “Virginia Rail,” in Birds of America, Plate 207, accessed from the Audubon Society, online at https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america/virginia-rail. The quote in the audio was taken from this source. . Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org.  The Virginia Rail entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Virginia_Rail/.  Information on the family of rails, gallinules, and coots (scientific name Rallidae), is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/browse/taxonomy/Rallidae. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006; see particularly pages 232-233. Patricia T. O’Conner and Stewart Kellerman, “Rail Birds,” published on Grammarphobia, 9/30/07, online at https://www.grammarphobia.com/blog/2007/09/rail-birds.html. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin’s Press, New York, 2001. Bryan Stevens, ‘Thin as a rail’ applies to elusive marsh bird, even if the origins of phrase remain obscure, Bristol Herald-Courier, 9/9/19. Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries’ “Fish and Wildlife Information Service” Web page at http://vafwis.org/fwis/?Title=VaFWIS+Species+Information+By+Name&vUT=Visitor.  The Virginia Rail entry is online at https://vafwis.dgif.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040107&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18432.  Information on all five species in Virginia called “rail” (Clapper Rail, Eastern Black Rail, King Rail, Virginia Rail, and Yellow Rail) is online at this link; information on the Sora, also considered a rail, is online at this link. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all.  The Virginia Rail entry is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/entry/virginia_rail. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and American Ornithologists’ Union, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home (subscription required).  The Virginia Rail entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/virrai/cur/introduction. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation Web site, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” subject category. Following is the link to an episode on the American Coot, another bird in the family that includes rails. Episode 391, 10-23-17. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript or by other information included in this post. 2013 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2010 Science SOLs Grades K-6 Earth Resources Theme 4.9 – Virginia natural resources, including watersheds, water resources, and organisms. Grades K-6 Life Processes Theme K.7 – basic needs and processes of plants and animals. 1.5 – animals’ basic needs and distinguishing characteristics. 3.4 – behavioral and physiological adaptations. Grades K-6 Living Systems Theme 2.5 – living things as part of a system, including habitats. 3.5 – food webs. 3.6 – ecosystems, communities, populations, shared resources. 5.5 – cell structures and functions, organism classification, and organism traits. 6.7 – natural processes and human interactions that affect watershed systems; Virginia watersheds, water bodies, and wetlands; health and safety issues; and water monitoring. Life Science Course LS.4 – organisms’ classification based on features. LS.8 – community and population interactions, including food webs, niches, symbiotic relationships. LS.9 – adaptations for particular ecosystems’ biotic and abiotic factors, including characteristics of land, marine, and freshwater environments. Biology Course BIO.8 – dynamic equilibria and interactions within populations, communities, and ecosystems; including nutrient cycling, succession, effects of natural events and human activities, and analysis of the flora, fauna, and microorganisms of Virginia ecosystems. Virginia’s SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade. Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school. Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school. Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.

Nature Guys
The Sound of Insects on a Late Summer Night

Nature Guys

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2018 28:12


Step outside on a night in late summer and listen to the sounds of the insects. Bill and Bob have some tips on how to listen to these amazing sounds. Our sources for this episode include: Bill suggests the book "The Songs of Insects" by Lang Elliott and Wil Hershberger https://www.amazon.com/Songs-Insects-Wil-Hershberger/dp/0618663975 The Music of Nature by Lang Elliot http://www.musicofnature.com Understanding Insect Sounds: Nature's Orchestra Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FEHbY-ZkzVo What are you hearing http://www.entnemdept.ufl.edu/walker/buzz/i00dis.htm The Singing Insects of Summer https://www.extension.iastate.edu/news/2008/aug/060801.htm

American Birding Podcast
01-04: Natural Soundscapes with Lang Elliot

American Birding Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2017 37:50


Master bird recordist Lang Elliott joins Nate Swick to talk about his new project, a sound-recording expedition to the western US.  Lang hopes to record in a wide variety of locations and habitats, and he's documenting his journey on his website, Music of Nature, and sharing his recordings in a new podcast he has launched. Also, ABA president Jeff Gordon checks in, reporting from eastern Pennsylvania where a Black-backed Oriole has been attracting birders from all over to a nondescript neighborhood outside of Philadelphia full of people who had a front row seat to a real birding phenomenon. Plus, owl baiting and recent Rare Bird news! Thanks to Naturalist Journeys for sponsoring this episode!

Our Blue World (formerly Big Blue Planet)
The Miracle of San Ignacio Lagoon, Episode 11

Our Blue World (formerly Big Blue Planet)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2012 4:58


The late writer C.S. Lewis said in his book, Miracles, there are two kinds of people, those who believe in miracles and those who don't. This is the story of the gray whales and their birthing sanctuary in San Ignacio Lagoon in Baja Mexico. It begins in the early 1800's, when the Grays suffered mass slaugther there at the hands of American whalers, which didn't end until 1946. By that time the whale population was critically endangered. The mother whales fought valiantly during those days to save their lives and the lives of their babies, and were nicknamed "Devilfish" by the whalers, due to their ferocity. Understandably tensions between whales and humans remained long after the whaling stopped, but then, in 1972 something wonderful happened. A miracle. Special thanks to the wonderful musicians who contributed to this episode of Our Blue World: David Arkenstone "Yosemite," Deuter "Heaven and Earth,"Alasdair Frasier "Lament for Hetch Hetchy," Andrea Centazzo "A Nord Dell Egeo," and Avalon Strings for Breakfast." Natural sounds from Lang Elliot and Paul Lloyd Warner. Recommended reading: Doug Thompsons "Whales, Touching the Mystery," and Dick Russell's "Eye of the Whale."

Our Blue World (formerly Big Blue Planet)
Big Blue Planet, The Mysterious Egret. Episode 6

Our Blue World (formerly Big Blue Planet)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2012 2:37


To have the patience of an egret. That would be something. To stand on one spiney leg for hours at a time, waiting for the perfect shrimp or crab to wander by and then to strike with long, pointed beak at incredible speed. Egrets, like ducks and geese, need wetlands to survive. But unlike waterfowl, whose flocks can number into the thousands, Egrets perfer to be alone. To add to the mystery, Egrets spend much of their time in two worlds. They love the delicate balance of a salt marsh with it's fresh and salt water, and dine on the same seafood that we do - shrimp, crab and fish. Egrets were nearly hunted to extinction at the turn of the century for their beautiful plumage. They are now protected and their numbers have recovered. The next time you go to the beach, wander into the tidal flats. If you see a majestic white bird, about three feet tall, standing impossibly still and starring intensely into the water, count yourself as lucky. You've just encountered the magical Egret. Thank you to the wonderful musicians and natural sound artists who contributed to this episode: David Arkenstone's "Yosemite" and "The Spirit of Olympia," Wayne Gratz "Ocala," Peter Buffet "Yonnondio," and "Nota Bene" from Imagine Records. Natural sounds from Lang Elliot and Dan Gibson.

Our Blue World (formerly Big Blue Planet)
Big Blue Planet, Little Hole on the Prairie, Episode 5

Our Blue World (formerly Big Blue Planet)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2012 3:07


In Minnesota, North and South Dakota, and parts of Canada, there are millions of shallow holes and crevices of all shapes and sizes, covering thousands of miles. This vast network of wetlands is known as the "Duck Belt" of North America, because of it's great significance to millions of migrating and nesting waterfowl. Come with me for a visit to the "prairie pothole region," after a spring rain, as we look in on a pair of mallards returning from their winter migration. Thank you to the great musicians and natural sound artists who contributed to this episode: David Arkenstone "Yosemite," Peter Buffet "Northern Morning," Spencer Brewer "Wonderland," Avalon "Strings Before Breakfast," John Jarvis "Lyrica." Waterfowl sounds from Dan Gibson and Lang Elliot.

Our Blue World (formerly Big Blue Planet)
Big Blue Planet, Owls Among Us, Episode 4

Our Blue World (formerly Big Blue Planet)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2012 3:21


It's amazing how many fascinating creatures live all around us, yet we are often times too busy or distracted to notice them. For instance, the Great Horned Owl, North America's greatest predator, lives right in our neighborhood trees. Take an evening walk with me and let's listen for owls, the most mysterious yet human like of birds. A special thank you to the musicians and sound artists who contribute to the sound of Big Blue Planet: David Arkenstone, "Yosemite," Mannheim Steamroller,"Eagles," "Wolves," Himekami, "Maharobi," S. Nardell and G. Bodossian, "Nota Bene." Sounds of Great Horned Owl, Western Screech Owl, Elf Owl, Northern Pygmy Owl and Great Gray Owl courtesy of Lang Elliot.

Groks Science Radio Show and Podcast
Frogs and Toads -- Groks Science Show 2009-07-29

Groks Science Radio Show and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2009 30:27


Some of the most distinctive members in the choral of nature are the frogs and toads. Yet, their unique sounds are often unappreciated. On this program, Lang Elliot discussed the songs of frogs and toads.

Mickelson's Podcast
Wednesday March 18 2009

Mickelson's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2009 88:00


  We talk toad with Lang Elliot..."The Frogs and Toads of North America"...  Tamara Wilder with "Grading Education: Getting Accountability Right"..  Craig Roberts  with the American Legion reacts to an Obama plan to push veteran's health costs onto insurance companies.  BOOM!....then,  the silliness continues.

Groks Science Radio Show and Podcast
Insect Songs -- Groks Science Show 2007-05-30

Groks Science Radio Show and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2007 24:15


Crickets, cicadas, and katydids are the noise makers among the insects. But, how are their sounds distinguished from one another? On this program, Lang Elliot discussed the songs of insects.