Podcasts about Alumni association

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Best podcasts about Alumni association

Latest podcast episodes about Alumni association

Improve Healthcare
Implementing Health Equity with Inovcares CEO - Mohamed Kamara

Improve Healthcare

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 21:33


Mohamed is the founder and CEO of InovCares Connected Comprehensive Healthcare, LLC.He was inspired to develop InovCares following the tragic loss of both his sister and his aunt to pregnancy hemorrhage & preeclampsia. Previously, Mohamed was the Director of Operations for the Russell Innovation Center for Entrepreneurs. During his time at the center, he supported150 minority-led businesses from idea to growth stage and headed the center's nonprofit financial statement preparation, budgeting, billing, and receivables, building operations, and maintenance. Mohamed has served as Entrepreneur-in-Residence for Goodie Nation - a nonprofit supporting 350 impact-driven founders with connections, access to capital, and customers. He also held positions as Chief Financial Officer for Wellness Healthcare Clinic - a comprehensive behavioral health and addiction medicine clinic supporting underserved patients impacted by opioids. Mohamed is also the host and producer for The Empowered Patient Podcast sponsored by InovCares, where he connects with healthcare providers, payor executives, and other healthcare leaders. He has held several roles as Program Leader for Startup Leadership Program, Manager of FP&A for National Fire Sprinkler Association, Senior Financial Analyst for TSYS, Senior Valuation Analyst for Rea & Association, and Senior Financial Analyst for AirNet Systems, Staff for Ernst & Young. Mohamed holds an MBA in Finance from Mount Vernon Nazarene University, where he served on the Alumni Association council board. He received his BSBA in Economics & Accounting with a minor in Political Science. He served as President of the Accounting Association and founded a nonprofit - Voice of Africa, that connects high school students to college campus mentors. He has been featured by Forbes, Google, Google Play, Android, Axios, Washington Post, Politico, Protocol, Medscape Education, Becker's Healthcare, AfroWellness Magazine, and other news outlets for his work with InovCares.Learn More about InovCares

She's WILD
5 Skills Needed To Be A Successful Developer, with Jessica Abramson, Sr. Development Manager, Stiles Corporation

She's WILD

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 40:06


Welcome back to the She's Wild Podcast. Today's guest is Jessica Abramson, Senior Development Manager at Stiles Corporation. Jessica is an owner representative on retail real estate development projects. She focuses on project planning and coordination, due diligence, obtaining government approvals, budgeting, and scheduling. She's worked with numerous clients including Publix, The Fresh Market, Trader Joe's, Ross, Five Below, Planet Fitness, Rooms to Go, Chase Bank, SunTrust Bank, Chipotle, and Starbucks. Jessica is active in the Urban Land Institute's Southeast Florida Region serving on the Florida Retail Project Council, is a graduate of Leadership Broward Class XXXIV, and is active on the Advisory Board for the NSU MSRED program and Alumni Association. In this episode, Jessica and I discuss her career and why she loves working in development. She offers insight on 5 skills she thinks are critical for success as a commercial real estate developer. She also offers a ton of advice if you are new to the business. Memorable Moments: 19:11  Skills to be successful in development include technical skills such as analyzing financials. But it's also negotiating and influencing others. If you're working with a team and you need to influence them to work on your project to get things done. You might work with an architect who has 10 projects, you need to know how to make that person feel like yours is the most important. And then the other skill is to strategically think about problem solving. You're either trying to prevent a problem or you're trying to solve a problem. 19:52. Thinking outside of the box and understanding what to do to make everybody satisfied or to get this done or to get past this hurdle and then getting your team on board to come up with a solution or to agree with what you think the solution might be. Our job is just to, to keep the project moving. And we might have, a large team and that might also include government officials who don't always have the same priorities that you have. 30:56  If you are a young person getting into the business, milk the student card, as much as you can, even if just say, hey, I'm new to the business call people you want to talk to almost anybody will talk to you for a little while, or have a phone conversation or talk to you at a networking event. Because once you get you know, many years into the business, it's a lot harder to to use that card. 31:18  Young professionals should attend every networking event possible. Introduce yourself, make connections. And then as you're doing that, learn about different career paths. Talk to as many people as you can as possible early on in your career.Connect with Nancy:Instagram: https://instagram.com/nancysurakLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/nancysurak/Website: www.nancysurak.comConnect with Jessica:LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jessica-abramson-68003a19/Twitter: @Jejoly619Jessica's Book Recommendation:Risk Game by Francis J. Greenburger via Amazon: https://a.co/d/7zXDxKUThe Liar$ Ball by by Vicky Ward via Amazon: https://a.co/d/dOiCZTpJessica's Podcast Recommendation: The Fort Podcast with Chris Powers http://thefortpod.com/ https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-fort-with-chris-powers/id1410549811Nancy's Twitter Recommendation: StripMallGuy @realEstateTrentShe's Wild Sound Production by:Luke Surak, Surak Productions:  surakproductions@gmail.com

WKOK Sunrise
1/9/23 WKOK Sunrise: Eric Rowe and Dave Hess on the Selinsgrove Alumni Association 'Selinsgrove Sports Hall of Fame Committee' and the upcoming 'Flinging in the Flurries' fundraiser

WKOK Sunrise

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 12:34


Eric Rowe, President, Selinsgrove Area High School Alumni Association, and Dave Hess, coach of the Seals PIAA State Champion football team, taught special education in Selinsgrove for 30 years, member of the alumni association committee and was a driving force behind—and is the committee chair of—the Selinsgrove Sports Hall of Fame Committee, on SAHS Athletic Hall of Fame, the method of nomination, selection and induction, and the upcoming ‘Flinging in the Flurries' Disc Golf Tournament, Saturday, February 25, 7:45am to 4pm.

The Strut with Chilly, TD and Info Joe
The next to the last one of the season

The Strut with Chilly, TD and Info Joe

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 73:07


We welcome Diane Sanders from the Alumni Association, a reflection of ECU and the Birmingham Bowl, and some other stuff to wrap up the show. Did TD get the trivia question right?

Tiger Talk Podcast by Northeast Mississippi Community College

Northeast Mississippi Community College president Dr. Ricky G. Ford sits with Marketing and Public Relations Specialist Liz Roark to discuss different ways and avenues that high school seniors can pay for college. Ford talks about filling out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and additional scholarships during the Christmas/holiday break. Ford discusses the role that the Northeast Development Foundation and Alumni Association plays in providing outside scholarships to those in need and makes a plea to anyone that cannot find money to go to college to seek out Northeast's financial aid department so that they may assist in the process of helping someone obtain their educational dreams. In the second half of the interview, Ford and Roark talk about what sets Northeast apart from not only other community colleges in the state and the nation but apart from four-year colleges and universities and why someone looking to get a start on their college career or returning to college should consider Northeast as a leading contender of where they want to go to school. 

Let's Talk with Sanctuary
Let's Talk Episode 55 | Marriage + Ministry

Let's Talk with Sanctuary

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 50:49


Marriage itself can be beautifully complicated but add in that element that comes with vocational ministry and leadership and things get even more complicated! The truth is: ministry can often become the third spouse in a marriage if we aren't careful. Host Bridgette Tomlin welcomes her husband of 25 years, Chresten, and their pastor friends Greg and Deena Thurstonson to layer the experiences, lessons learned, beautiful bonuses, and wisdom from the multiple decades of marriage and ministry together. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Greg and Deena Thurstonson pioneered Dominion Church in the spring of 1996 with a core group of 30 people. Today the church has over 800 congregants and is continuing to grow. After years of meeting in hotels and shopping centers in and around the Clear Lake area, the church now sits on a beautiful building on 30 acres of property in Dickinson, TX. Pastors Greg & Deena have over 38 years of ministerial experience. Greg now serves as the President of the Alumni Association at his alma mater SAGU, and is committed to seeing the next generation receive a quality Christian higher education. In addition to being a full-time pastor, Greg is a board-certified, faith-based Counselor. He travels as a speaker to various conferences, camps, revivals, and retreats. Closer to home, Pastor Greg loves and serves his community in a variety of ways, including serving on the Diversity Advisory Committee for the League City Chief of Police.His wife Deena is a gifted worship leader and has been sought out to lead worship at camps and conventions, including the South Texas District Council. They have been married over thirty-six years and have two beautiful daughters, Taylor and Morgan, and two grandchildren, Brooklyn and Colt..------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Connect with today's guests:Greg ThurstonsonFacebook: @greg.thurstonsonInstagram:  @gthurst1Web:  www.dominionchurch.orgChresten TomlinFacebook:  @tomlinministriesWeb: www.ctministries.comEpisode Features:Marriage + Ministry (Season 1) episodes with Jim and Pam KingEpisode 7 (Part One)Episode 8 (Part Two)Episode 20 : Leading Your Team with Joy (featuring Greg &  Deena Thurstonson)Learn more about Sanctuary Let's Retreats!Learn more about Sanctuary Let's Connect events!Many thanks to our host, Bridgette Tomlin, and engineer Lindsey Culp of LC Creative. Learn how you can capitalize on all Lindsey can do for your small business, church, or ministry through her creative solutions of media, video, graphics, and more!

Hudson Mohawk Magazine
Talking Haiti, Heritage, and Culture with D. Colin

Hudson Mohawk Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 10:11


D. Colin is a Haitian-American multidisciplinary artist who works in poetry, theater and visual art. She is a Cave Canem, VONA and NYS Writers Institute Fellow as well as the author of Dreaming in Kreyol and Said the Swing to the Hoop. Her work has appeared in Trolley, Ink & Nebula, Jaded Ibis Press, and Porter Gulch Review. She is the 2022 Excellence in Arts & Letters Award recipient for UAlbany's Alumni Association. On April 18, 2018, D. Colin was featured at the Albany Poets Presents reading series and read her poem "Up Ahead We'll See." We talk about that poem, her Haitian heritage, and how she brings her cultural identity into her art.

Racer Alumni
Episode 11: Here Comes Santa Claus...And He's a Racer!

Racer Alumni

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 33:01


Charles Edward Hall, '73, has been delighting people from all over the globe for more than three decades as Santa Claus in New York's famed Radio City Christmas Spectacular.   From the rural landscape of Kentucky's capital city to the lights of Broadway, the Frankfort native has come a long way. Hall graduated with dual degrees in theatre and speech communication from Murray State nearly 50 years ago, and in 1976, he followed his passion for the theatre to the Big Apple.    As a young actor, his theatre career began in plays "off off" Broadway, but it wasn't long until Broadway came calling. His first major role was not that of Santa, but rather as a surprising villain: the Wicked Witch in the Broadway production of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Hall began his run as Santa alongside the famed Rockettes in 1986. Thousands of magic-filled shows later, he announced earlier this year that this 36th season would be his last.    After years as a New Yorker, Hall now resides full-time in Calloway County and commutes to and from New York to work. His 2014 book, Santa Claus is for Real: A True Christmas Fable About the Magic of Believing, is now in development to become a film.  Sponsored by the Murray State University Alumni Association and hosted by Murray State Director of Alumni Relations Carrie McGinnis and 2019 Murray State graduate Jordan Lowe, The Racer Alumni Podcast: Stories from the Finest Place We Know gives you the chance to connect with your alma mater and others within our global alumni family. Racers are 80,000-strong. New episodes drop on the 1st and 15th of each month. Subscribe today and spread the word! Not a member of the Alumni Association? Membership makes this podcast possible. Join today at murraystate.edu/alumni!  This podcast was produced with the help of Jim Ray Consulting Services.  Jim is a 1992 Murray State graduate. He can help you with the concept development, implementation, production and distribution of your own podcast, just as he has done for the MSUAA. The views and opinions expressed during the Racer Alumni Podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Murray State University, its administration or the faculty at large. The episodes are designed to be inspiring and entertaining.  

A Sandwich and Some Lovin’
461: A Sandwich and Some Wreck 'Em, Tech!

A Sandwich and Some Lovin’

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 67:46


Like millions of other Americans who tried to get Taylor Swift tickets during the presale, Kellie failed. Thankfully, one of their very best podcast customers offered to sell Kellie two of her tickets at face value, but Allen might choke when he finds out how much that is. Allen was invited to speak to a PR class at his alma mater, Texas Tech. After his drama-filled motorcycle ride to Lubbock, Allen met the CEO of the Alumni Association and came to the realization that he's the worst Tech alumnus EVER. Then it was off to his class presentation. How did Allen do? Did he have a good opening joke? Did the students engage? What kind of impression did Allen leave on these fresh, young minds? Allen reads some of their feedback. Then Kellie and Allen had the honor of being on the sidelines before the Texas Tech vs. Kansas game, which led to some surprising role reversal. Thank you to our podcast sponsors! Celebrate the season of giving and try Thrive Causemetics today. Right now, you can get 15% off your first order when you visit thrivecausemetics.com/SANDWICH Right now, go to BuyRaycon.com/SANDWICH and use code EARLYBF to get 20% off site wide! That's 20% off any Raycon product, which almost never happens. Or save even bigger and get 30% off Raycon's exclusive holiday bundles! With StoryWorth we're giving those we love most a thoughtful, personal gift from the heart and preserving their memories and stories for years to come. Go to StoryWorth.com/SANDWICH and save $10 on your first purchase! The Upside app offsets inflated prices by giving you cash back on the stuff you're buying anyway. Download the FREE Upside App and use promo code LOVIN to get $5 or more cash back on your first purchase of $10 or more.We would love your feedback... If you enjoyed this episode, tell us why! Leave us a review and make sure you subscribe on your favorite podcast platform.Executive Producer is Riley Peleuses for YEA Networks / YEA Podcasts If you are interested in advertising on this podcast or having Kellie and Allen as guests on your Podcast, Radio Show, or TV Show, reach out to podcast@yeanetworks.com

Racer Alumni
Episode 10: MLB Ump Tripp Gibson -- Baseball's Biggest Stage

Racer Alumni

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 41:34


2005 Murray State alumnus Hal Harrison Gibson III, better known as Tripp, has come a long way since his days growing up and playing baseball in Graves County, Kentucky. He, his wife and their two sons now call the Pacific Northwest home. However, from the first of March through the end of October each year, his stretches there are few and far between. After serving as an umpire in the Major Leagues for nearly 10 years, this year's call of duty was extended even later into the fall when Gibson got the call this October to, for the first time, officiate the World Series.  From umping Murray State Racer baseball games while still a student himself, to working his way up through the minors, and finally launching a storied career in the MLB, Tripp talks to us about what it is like to take his turn on baseball's biggest stage. We'll learn what it takes to get there, the special skills required to make an MLB umpire one of the best, how one handles the pressure of calling balls and strikes during a World Series no-hitter and how he was able to use his national platform to direct the country's attention and resources toward Mayfield, Kentucky, after the deadly tornado destroyed his beloved hometown in December of 2021.  Sponsored by the Murray State University Alumni Association and hosted by Murray State Director of Alumni Relations Carrie McGinnis and 2019 Murray State graduate Jordan Lowe, The Racer Alumni Podcast: Stories from the Finest Place We Know gives you the chance to connect with your alma mater and others within our global alumni family. Racers are 80,000-strong. New episodes drop on the 1st and 15th of each month. Subscribe today and spread the word! Not a member of the Alumni Association? Membership makes this podcast possible. Join today at murraystate.edu/alumni!  This podcast was produced with the help of Jim Ray Consulting Services.  Jim is a 1992 Murray State graduate. He can help you with the concept development, implementation, production and distribution of your own podcast, just as he has done for the MSUAA. The views and opinions expressed during the Racer Alumni Podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Murray State University, its administration or the faculty at large. The episodes are designed to be inspiring and entertaining.  

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 73 – Unstoppable Visionary and Two-Time Cancer Survivor with Howard Brown

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 76:06


Yes, Howard Brown is a two-time cancer survivor. As you will discover in our episode, he grew up with an attitude to thrive and move forward. Throughout his life, he has learned about sales and the concepts of being a successful entrepreneur while twice battling severe cancer.   Howard's life story is one of those events worth telling and I hope you find it worth listening to. He even has written a book about all he has done. The book entitles Shining Brightly has just been released, but you get to hear the story directly from Howards' lips.   About the Guest: Howard Brown is an author, speaker, podcaster, Silicon Valley entrepreneur, interfaith peacemaker, two-time stage IV cancer survivor, and healthcare advocate. For more than three decades, Howard's business innovations, leadership principles, mentoring and his resilience in beating cancer against long odds have made him a sought-after speaker and consultant for businesses, nonprofits, congregations, and community groups. In his business career, Howard was a pioneer in helping to launch a series of technology startups before he co-founded two social networks that were the first to connect religious communities around the world. He served his alma mater—Babson College, ranked by US News as the nation's top college for entrepreneurship—as a trustee and president of Babson's worldwide alumni network. His hard-earned wisdom about resilience after beating cancer twice has led him to become a nationally known patient advocate and “cancer whisperer” to many families. Visit Howard at ShiningBrightly.com to learn more about his ongoing work and contact him. Through that website, you also will find resources to help you shine brightly in your own corner of the world. Howard, his wife Lisa, and his daughter Emily currently reside in Michigan. About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Hi, and welcome to another episode of unstoppable mindset. Today, we get to interview Howard Brown, I'm not going to tell you a lot because I want him to tell his story. He's got a wonderful story to tell an inspiring story. And he's got lots of experiences that I think will be relevant for all of us and that we all get to listen to. So with that, Howard, welcome to unstoppable mindset.   Howard Brown  01:44 Thank you, Michael. I'm really pleased to be here. And thanks for having me on your show. And excited to talk to your audience and and share a little bit.   Michael Hingson  01:54 Well, I will say that Howard and I met through Podapolooza, which I've told you about in the past and event that brings podcasters would be podcasters. And people who want to be interviewed by podcasters together, and Howard will tell us which were several of those he is because he really is involved in a lot of ways. But why don't you start maybe by telling us a little bit about your, your kind of earlier life and introduce people to you and who you are. Sure, sure.   Howard Brown  02:23 So I'm from Boston. I can disguise the accent very well. But when I talked to my mother, we're back in Boston, we're packing a car. We're going for hot dogs and beans over to Fenway Park. So gotta get a soda. We're getting a soda, not a pop. So we add the Rs. They call my wife Lisa, not Lisa. But I grew up I grew up in the suburbs of Boston, a town called Framingham. And I'm a twin. And I'm very unusual. But a girl boy twin, my twin sister Cheryl. She goes by CJ is five minutes older. And I hold that I hold that now against her now that we're older and she didn't want to be older, but now she's my older sister, my big sister by five whole minutes.   Michael Hingson  03:09 Well, she's big sister, so she needs to take care of her baby brother   Howard Brown  03:12 says exactly. And she did. And we're gonna get to that because it's a really important point being a twin, which we'll get to in a second. But so Britta she Where does she live now? So she lives 40 minutes away from me here in Michigan.   Michael Hingson  03:25 Oh my gosh, you both have moved out of the area.   Howard Brown  03:27 So she she moved to Albany, New York. I moved to Southern then California, LA area and the beaches, and then Silicon Valley. And then the last 17 years we've all lived close. And we raised our families together here in the suburbs of Detroit, Michigan.   Michael Hingson  03:40 What got you to all go to Michigan?   Howard Brown  03:43 Well, for me, it was a choice. My wife is from Michigan, and I was in Silicon Valley. And we were Pat had a little girl Emily, who's four. There's a story there too. But we'll we decided we wanted her to grow up with a family and cousins and aunts and uncles and my in laws live here. My wife grew up here. And this made it closer for my parents and Boston suburbs to get here as well. So great place to raise a family very different from Silicon Valley in Palo Alto, California.   Michael Hingson  04:12 Yeah, but don't you miss Steve's ice cream in Boston?   Howard Brown  04:15 I do. I miss the ice cream. I missed the cannolis in the Back Bay. I missed some of the Chinese food. So in the north end, but it just it I do, but I have not lived there. I went to college there at Babson College number one school for entrepreneurship. And then when I got my first job, I moved out to Ohio but then I moved back and well there's a whole story of why I had to move back as well but we'll get   Michael Hingson  04:41 there. So are your parents still living in Boston?   Howard Brown  04:46 They are and so my dad I call myself son of a boot man. My dad for 49 years has sold cowboy boots in New England in the in the in the western you know the states New York Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts. And that's, you know, anyone who stayed somewhere for 49 years got to be applauded. And he's a straight commission boot salesman and he sold women's shoes prior to that. So he he's, he's a renaissance man.   Michael Hingson  05:15 Wow. So does he sell cowboy boots with snow treads as it were for the winter?   Howard Brown  05:21 No snow trends but, you know, like out west when you're working on, you know, on with cattle and working out west and sometimes it's a fashion statement. Not not too many places in New England like that. But he, he made a living, he enjoyed it. And he's, he's just about to retire at the age of 79. This year.   Michael Hingson  05:39 I remember living in Boston and and when I wear shoes with just leather soles, I slid around a lot on the sidewalks and all that so did get rubber rubbers to go over my boots and then later got real boots.   Howard Brown  05:54 Right. So I have the big hiking boots, the Timberlands, but I too have a pair of a you know, in Boston, we call them rabbits, rabbits, robins. And they basically are slip ons that gave you grip. They slipped right over your leather shoes. And you wore them when anyway in the snow and in those sloshing in the mess. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  06:12 And they worked really well. They did. So you went off to college. And I gather kind of almost right from the beginning you got involved in the whole idea of entrepreneurship.   Howard Brown  06:23 Well, I did I transferred to Babson from a liberal arts school called Connecticut College. I just I found out it wasn't for me and Babson College changed the trajectory of my entire life. i i I knew that I wanted to do sales and then later technology. But Babson was the catalyst for that. They just they support entrepreneurship of all kinds, no matter how you define it, and I just drank it in and I loved, I loved my time there. I love my learning there. And I continue to stay involved with Babson very closely as a past president of the Alumni Association, a former trustee, and very actively recruit students to go there and support student businesses. So it was a big impact on me and I continue to give back to it.   Michael Hingson  07:11 That's pretty cool. So how, how did you proceed as far as a career and entrepreneurial involvement as it were in in sales and all that?   Howard Brown  07:22 So I had an internship, I had wanted cellular one when cellular phones came out and I was basically learning the business. This is really early 1984 And five, and then I got another internship at NCR Corporation if you remember national cash register 120 year old company based out of Dayton, Ohio, and now it's in Atlanta, and it's, it's just not the same company. But I took an internship there a lot of Babson folks work there. And I worked as a trainer, sales installation rep. I trained waitresses, waiters, bartenders, hotel clerks, night audits, how to use cash register computer systems. So I was the teacher and a trainer. And I would, you know, talk to waitresses and waiters and bartenders and say you can make more tips by providing better service. But the way that you do that is you type you the order into a computer, it zaps it to the order station or the back to the back of the house to cook to prepare the foods or for the drinks. And you can spend more time servicing your table which should translate into higher tips. Well, about a third of them said nope, not for me, a third of them were need to be convinced and a third of them are like I'm in. I had a lot of fun doing that. And then after the shift, the either the manager or the owner would come over and they'd give you a savior at a Chinese food restaurant. They give you a poopoo platter to go to take home to your dorm room.   Michael Hingson  08:46 So I had a lot of fun, a lot of fun and a lot of good food.   Howard Brown  08:50 Sure sure. So that's what really started me off and hired me   Michael Hingson  08:55 so did that did that concept of tips and all that and advising people ever get you to translate that to Durgin Park?   Howard Brown  09:03 I actually did install the cashiers to computers area ago Daniel hall so the checkerboard you know draped you know cloth on the table and so you know it's there's a lot of good restaurants in Boston, you know the union Oyster House with a toothpick but I did countless restaurants hotels bars, you know it was I was basically at the whim of the Salesforce and there was a couple of us that went to go train and teach people and take the night shift and make sure everything was going smoothly as they installed the new system of course the no name restaurant and other one but well you know for for your listeners that no name was a place to get, you know, really great discounted seafood but you sat on a park bench. Remember that?   Michael Hingson  09:50 Right? Oh yeah, definitely. It wasn't. Well, neither was Durgin park, but I haven't kept up Is it still there?   Howard Brown  10:00 Yes, I believe it's still there.   Michael Hingson  10:01 Oh, good. I heard somewhere that, that it might not be because of COVID. But we enjoy   Howard Brown  10:07 down it shut down for a while during COVID I hope it's back open. I'm gonna have to go now. Yeah, you're gonna make me go check to see if it's open. But you know, many of them are still there. And obviously restaurants turn over. But that's a mainstay that's got a lot of history.   Michael Hingson  10:19 Oh, it does. And we had a lot of fun with the waitresses and so on at their Compac. I know, once we went there, and you know, the whole story, that Durgan is a place where you sit at family tables, unless we actually have four people then they'll let you sit at one of the tables for for around the outside. Well, there were three of us and my guide dog when we went in one time. And the hostess said, we're gonna put you at one of the tables for for just to give more room for the puppy dog. And she sat us down there. Then the waitress came over and as they are supposed to do at Durgan Park, she said, you're not supposed to sit here. There are only three of you. And I said there's a dog under the table. No, there's not. You can't fool me with that. And the waitress isn't supposed to be snotty, right. And she just kept going on and on about it. And I kept saying there is a dog under the table. She went away. And then she came back a little bit later. And she said, You've got to move and I said no. Why don't you just look, there's a dog under the table. You're not gonna make me fall for that. She finally looked. And there are these Golden Retriever puppy eyes staring back at her. She just melted. It was so much fun.   Howard Brown  11:26 Wouldn't be Boston if you didn't get a little attitude. Well, yeah, that's part of what it's all about your right next seating. And they just they sit you in a and they say, meet each other and be married.   Michael Hingson  11:38 Yeah, yeah. And it was a lot of fun. So how long did it take you to get to Silicon Valley?   Howard Brown  11:44 Well, so the story is that I did. I worked for NCR and I got hired by NCR, but I wanted out of the hospitality business. You know, even though he's young work until two, three in the morning, once they shut the restaurant or bar down or the hotel down, and then you do the night audit and you do the records. It was a hard life. So I looked and I did my research. And I said, you know who's who's making all the money here at NCR in the banking division. And it was really the early days of the outsourcing movement, punch cards, and you're outsourcing bank accounts, over 1200 baud modems. And I said, Well, that's interesting. And so I went to NCRs training at Sugar camp to learn how to be a salesperson were they actually in the early days, they filmed you, they taught you negotiation skills, competitive analysis, Industry Skills, it was fantastic. It's like getting an MBA today. But they did it all in six months, with mixing fieldwork in with, you know, training at this education facility in Dayton, Ohio. And I came out as a junior salesperson working for for very expansive experience, guys. And they just, I knew one thing, if I made them more productive, they'd make me money. And I did. And I, they sent me to banks and savings and loans and credit unions all over New England. And I basically learned the business of banking and outsourcing to these banks. And they made a lot of money. So that was how my career started. You can't do better than that. But to answer the question, because it's a little more complex than that. But it took me NCR in 1988. And then I moved out to Los Angeles in 1991, after a big health scare, which we'll talk about, and then I moved up in 2005. So there's the timeline to get me to Silicon Valley.   Michael Hingson  13:29 So you, you definitely moved around. I know that feeling well, having had a number of jobs and been required to live in various parts of the country when going back and forth from one coast to another from time to time. So you know, it's it's there. So you, you did all of that. And you You ended up obviously making some money and continuing to to be in the entrepreneurial world. But how does that translate into kind of more of an entrepreneurial spirit today?   Howard Brown  14:00 So great question, Michael. So what happened was is that I built a foundation. So at that time when you graduated school, and as far as for technology, the big computer shops like IBM Unisys, NCR, Hewlett Packard, what they did is they took you raw out of college, and they put you through their training program. And that training program was their version of the gospel of their of their products and your competitors and all that. And that built a great foundation. Well, I moved to Los Angeles after this big health scare, which I'm sure we're gonna go back and talk about, and I moved into the network products division. So I didn't stay in the banking division. I looked at the future and said voice data and video. I think there's the future there and I was right and AT and T bought NCR and, unfortunately, this is probably 1992. They also bought McCaw cellular they had just bought all of Eddie computer. They were a big company of five 600,000 employees and I have To tell you, the merger wasn't great. You felt like a number. And I knew that was my time. That was my time where I said, I got my foundation built. It's now time to go to a startup. So your time had come. My time had come. So at&t, offered early retirement for anyone 50 and older, and then they didn't get enough takers. So they offered early retirement for anyone that wanted to change. And so the talk around the watercooler was, let's wait they'll make a better offer. And I was like, I'm 26 and a half years old. I what am I waiting for? So they made a tremendously generous offer. I took early retirement, and I moved to my first true startup called avid technology that was in the production space. And we basically were changing film and television production from analog to digital. And I never looked back, I basically have been with startups ever since. And that, but that foundation I felt was really important that I got from NCR, but I prefer smaller companies and build the building them up from scratch and moving them forward.   Michael Hingson  16:07 Yeah, when you can do more to help shape the way they go. Because the the problem with a larger a lot of larger companies is they get very set in their ways. And they tend not to listen as much as maybe they should to people who might come along with ideas that might be beneficial to them, as opposed to startups as you say,   Howard Brown  16:27 Well, it depends. I mean, you know, you want to build a company that is still somewhat innovative. So what these large companies like Google and Facebook do, and Apple is they go acquire, they acquire the startups before they get too big or sometimes like, it's like what Facebook did with Instagram, they acquired six people, Google acquired YouTube, and they acquire the technology of best of breed technology. And then they shape it, and they accelerate it up. So listen, companies like IBM are still innovative, Apple, you know, is so innovative. But you need to maintain that because it can get to be a bureaucracy, and with hundreds of 1000s of employees. And you can't please everybody, but I knew my calling was was technology startups. And I just, I needed to get that, get that foundation built. And then away away I went. And that's what I've done. Since   Michael Hingson  17:16 you're right. It's all about with with companies, if they want to continue to be successful, they have to be innovative, and they have to be able to grow. I remember being in college, when Hewlett Packard came out with the HP 25, which was a very sophisticated calculator. Back in the the late 19th, early 1970s. And then Texas Instruments was working on a calculator, they came out with one that kind of did a lot of the stuff that HP did. But about that same time because HP was doing what they were doing, they came out with the HP 35. And basically it added, among other things, a function key that basically doubled the number of incredible things that you could do on the HP 25.   Howard Brown  17:58 Right, I had a TI calculator and in high school.   Michael Hingson  18:02 Well, and of course yeah, go ahead HPUS pull reverse Polish notation, which was also kind   Howard Brown  18:09 of fun. Right and then with the kids don't understand today is that, you know, we took typing, I get I think we took typing.   Michael Hingson  18:19 Did you type did you learn to type on a typewriter without letters on the keys?   Howard Brown  18:23 No, I think we have letters I think you just couldn't look down or else you get smacked. You know, the big brown fox jumped over the you know, something that's I don't know, but I did learn but I I'm sort of a hybrid. I looked down once in a while when I'd say   Michael Hingson  18:39 I remember taking a typing course in actually it was in summer school. I think it was between seventh and eighth grade. And of course the typewriters were typewriters, typewriters for teaching so they didn't have letters on the keys, which didn't matter to me a whole lot. But by the same token, that's the way they were but I learned to type and yeah, we learned to type and we learned how to be pretty accurate with it's sort of like learning to play the piano and eventually learning to do it without looking at the keys so that you could play and either read music or learn to play by ear.   Howard Brown  19:15 That's true. And And again, in my dorm room, I had Smith Corona, and I ended up having a bottle of or many bottles of white out.   Michael Hingson  19:25 White out and then there was also the what was it the other paper that you could put on the samosa did the same thing but white out really worked?   Howard Brown  19:33 Yeah, you put that little strip of tape and then it would wait it out for you then you can type over it. Right? We've come a long way. It's some of its good and some of its bad.   Michael Hingson  19:43 Yeah, now we have spellchecker Yeah, we do for what it's worth,   Howard Brown  19:49 which we got more and more and more than that on these I mean listen to this has allowed us to, to to do a zoom call here and record and goods and Bad's to all of that.   Michael Hingson  19:58 Yeah, I still I have to tell people learning to edit. Now using a sound editor called Reaper, I can do a lot more clean editing than I was able to do when I worked at a campus radio station, and had to edit by cutting tape and splicing with splicing tape.   Howard Brown  20:14 Exactly. And that's Yeah, yeah, Michael, we change the you know, avid changed the game, because we went from splicing tape or film and Betamax cassettes in the broadcast studios to a hard drive in a mouse, right? changed, we changed the game there because you were now editing on a hard drive. And so I was part of that in 1994. And again, timing has to work out and we had to retrain the unions at the television networks. And it was, for me, it was just timing worked really well. Because my next startup, liquid audio, the timing didn't work out well, because we're, we were going to try to do the same thing in the audio world, which is download music. But when you do that, when you it's a Sony cassette and Sony Walkman days, the world wasn't ready yet. We we still went public, we still did a secondary offering. But we never really brought product to market because it took Steve Jobs 10 years later to actually sell a song for 99 cents and convince the record industry that that was, you know, you could sell slices of pizza instead of the whole pizza, the whole record out   Michael Hingson  21:17 and still make money. I remember avid devices and hearing about them and being in television stations. And of course, for me, none of that was accessible. So it was fun to to be able to pick on the fact that no matter what, as Fred Allen, although he didn't say it quite this way, once said they call television the new medium, because that's as good as it's ever gonna get. But anyway, you know, it has come a long way. But it was so sophisticated to go into some of the studios with some of the even early equipment, like Avid, and see all the things that they were doing with it. It just made life so much better.   Howard Brown  21:52 Yeah, well, I mean, you're not I was selling, you know, $100,000 worth of software on a Macintosh, which first of all the chief engineers didn't even like, but at the post production facilities, they they they drank that stuff up, because you could make a television commercial, you could do retakes, you could add all the special effects, and it could save time. And then you could get more revenue from that. And so it was pretty easy sale, because we tell them how fast they could pay off to the hardware, the software and then train everybody up. And they were making more and more and better commercials for the car dealerships and the local Burger Joint. And they were thrilled that these local television stations, I can tell you that   Michael Hingson  22:29 I sold some of the first PC based CAD systems and the same sort of thing, architects were totally skeptical about it until they actually sat down and we got them in front of a machine and showed them how to use it. Let them design something that they could do with three or four hours, as opposed to spending days with paper and paper and paper and more paper in a drafting table. And they could go on to the next project and still charge as much.   Howard Brown  22:53 It was funny. I take a chief engineer on to lunch, and I tried to gauge their interest and a third, we're just enthusiastic because they wanted to make sure that they were the the way that technology came into the station. They were they were the brainchild they were the they were the domain experts. So a third again, just like training waitresses and waiters and bartenders, a third of them. Oh, they wanted they just wanted to consume it all. A third of them were skeptical and needed convincing. And a third of whom was like, that's never going out on my hair anywhere. Yeah, they were the later and later adopters, of course.   Michael Hingson  23:24 And some of them were successful. And some of them were not.   Howard Brown  23:28 Absolutely. We continue. We no longer. Go ahead. No, no, of course I am the my first sales are the ones that were early adopters. And and then I basically walked over to guys that are later adopters. I said, Well, I said, you know, the ABC, the NBC and the fox station and the PBS station habit, you know, you don't have it, and they're gonna take all your post production business away from you. And that got them highly motivated.   Michael Hingson  23:54 Yeah. And along the way, from a personal standpoint, somebody got really clever. And it started, of course at WGBH in Boston, where they recognize the fact that people who happen to be blind would want to know what's going on on TV when the dialog wasn't saying much to to offer clues. And so they started putting an audio description and editing and all that and somebody created the secondary audio programming in the other things that go into it. And now that's becoming a lot more commonplace, although it's still got a long way to go.   Howard Brown  24:24 Well, I agree. So but you're right. So having that audio or having it for visually impaired or hearing impaired are all that they are now we're making some progress. So it's still a ways to go. I agree with you.   Michael Hingson  24:36 still a ways to go. Well, you along the way in terms of continuing to work with Abbott and other companies in doing the entrepreneurial stuff. You've had a couple of curveballs from life.   Howard Brown  24:47 I have. So going back to my promotion, I was going driving out to Dayton, Ohio, I noticed a little spot on my cheekbone. didn't think anything of it. I was so excited to get promoted and start my new job. up, I just kept powering through. So a few weeks after I'd moved out to Dayton, Ohio, my mom comes out. And she's at the airport and typical Boston and mom, she's like, What's that on your cheek? What's that on your cheek? And I was like, Mom, it's nothing. I kind of started making excuses. I got hit playing basketball, I got it at the gym or something. And she's like, well, we got to get that checked out. I said, No, Mom, it's okay. It's not no big deal. It's a little little market. Maybe it's a cyst or pebble or something I don't know. So she basically said she was worried, but she never told me. So she helped set up my condo, or an apartment. And then she left. And then as long Behold, I actually had to go speak in Boston at the American Bankers Association about disaster recovery, and having a disaster recovery plan. And so this is the maybe August of 1989. And I came back and that spot was still there. And so my mom told my dad, remember, there was payphones? There was no cell phones, no computers, no internet. So she told my dad, she didn't take a picture of it. But now he saw it. And he goes, Let's go play tennis. There's I got there on a Friday. So on a Saturday morning, we'd go do something. And instead of going to play tennis, he took me to a local community hospital. And they took a look at it. And they said off its assist, take some my antibiotic erythromycin or something, you'll be fine. Well, I came back to see them on Monday after my speech. And I said, I'm not feeling that great. Maybe it's the rethrow myosin. And so having to be four o'clock in the afternoon, he took me to the same emergency room. And he's and I haven't had the same doctor on call. He actually said, You know what, let's take a biopsy of it. So he took a biopsy of it. And then he went back to the weight room, he said, I didn't get a big enough slice. Let me take another. So he took another and then my dad drove me to the airport, and I basically left. And my parents called me maybe three weeks later, and they said, You got to come back to Boston. We gotta go see, you know, they got the results. But you know, they didn't tell us they'll only tell you. Because, you know, it's my private data. So I flew back to Boston, with my parents. And this time, I had, like, you know, another doctor there with this emergency room doctor, and he basically checks me out, checks me out, but he doesn't say too much. But he does say that we have an appointment for you at Dana Farber Cancer Institute at 2pm. I think you should go. And I was like, whoa, what are you talking about? Why am I going to Dana Farber Cancer Institute. So it gets, you know, kind of scary there because I show up there. I'm in a suit and tie. My dad's in a suit down. My mom's seems to be dressed up. And we go, and they put me through tests. And I walk in there. And I don't know if you remember this, Michael. But the Boston Red Sox charity is called the Jimmy fund. Right? And the Jimmy fund are for kids with blood cancers, lymphoma leukemias, so I go there. And they checked me in and they told me as a whole host of tests they're going to do, and I'm looking in the waiting room, and I see mostly older people, and I'm 23 years old. So I go down the hallways, and I see little kids. So I go I go hang out with the little kids while I'm waiting. I didn't know what was going on. So they call me and I do my test. And this Dr. George Canalis, who's you know, when I came to learn that the inventor of some chemo therapies for lymphomas very experienced, and this young Harvard fellow named Eric Rubin I get pulled into this office with this big mahogany desk. And they say you have stage four E T cell non Hodgkins lymphoma. It's a very aggressive, aggressive, very aggressive form of cancer. We're going to try to knock this out. I have to tell you, Michael, I don't really remember hardly anything else that was said, I glossed over. I looked up at this young guy, Eric Rubin, and I said, What's he saying? I looked back out of the corner of my eye, my mom's bawling her eyes out. My dad's looks like a statue. And I have to tell you, I was really just a deer in the headlights. I had no idea that how a healthy 23 year old guy gets, you know, stage four T cell lymphoma with a very horrible prognosis. I mean, I mean, they don't they said, We don't know if we can help you at the world, one of the world's foremost cancer research hospitals in the world. So it was that was that was a tough pill to swallow. And I did some more testing. And then they told me to come back in about a week to start chemotherapy. And so, again, I didn't have the internet to search anything. I had encyclopedias. I had some friends, you know, and I was like, I'm a young guy. And, you know, I was talking to older people that potentially, you know, had leukemia or different cancer, but I didn't know much. And so I I basically showed up for chemotherapy, scared out of my mind, in denial, and Dr. RUBIN comes out and he says, we're not doing chemo today. I said, I didn't sleep awake. What are you talking about? He says, we'll try again tomorrow, your liver Our function test is too high. And my liver function test is too high. So I'm starting to learn but I still don't know what's going on. He says I got it was going to field trip. Field Trip. He said, Yeah, you're going down the street to Newton Wellesley hospital, we're going to the cryogenic center, cryo, what? What are you talking about? He goes, it's a sperm bank, and you're gonna go, you know, leave a sample specimen. And it's like, you just told me that, you know, if you can help me out what why I'm not even thinking about kids, right now. He said, Go do it. He says what else you're going to do today, and then you come back tomorrow, and we'll try chemo. So thank God, he said that, because I deposited before I actually started any chemotherapy, which, you know, as basically, you know, rendered me you know, impotent now because of all the chemotherapy and radiation I had. So that was a blessing that I didn't know about until later, which we'll get to. But a roll the story forward a little more quickly as that I was getting all bad news. I was relapsing, I went through about three or four different cycles of different chemotherapy recipes, nothing was working. I was getting sicker, and they tight. My sister, I am the twin CJ, for bone marrow transplant and she was a 25% chance of being a match. She happened to be 100% match. And I had to then gear up for back in 1990 was a bone marrow transplant where they would remove her bone marrow from her hip bones, they would scrub it and cleanse it, and they would put it in me. And they would hope that my body wouldn't immediately rejected and die and shut down or over time, which is called graft versus host these that it wouldn't kill me or potentially that it would work and it would actually reset my immune system. And it would take over the malignant cells and set my set me back straight, which it ended up doing. And so having a twin was another blessing miracle. You know that, you know, that happened to me. And I did some immunotherapy called interleukin two that was like, like the grandfather of immunotherapy that strengthened my system. And then I moved to Florida to get out of the cold weather and then I moved out to California to rebuild my life. I call that Humpty Dumpty building Humpty Dumpty version one. And that's that's how I got to California in Southern California.   Michael Hingson  32:15 So once again, your big sister savedthe day,   Howard Brown  32:19 as usual.   Michael Hingson  32:21 That's a big so we go,   Howard Brown  32:23 as we call ourselves the Wonder Twins. He's more. She's terrific. And thank God she gave part of herself and saved my life. And I am eternally grateful to her for that,   Michael Hingson  32:34 but but she never had any of the same issues or, or diseases. I gather. She's been   Howard Brown  32:41 very healthy, except for like a knee. A partial knee replacement. She's been very healthy her whole life.   Michael Hingson  32:48 Well, did she have to have a knee replacement because she kept kicking you around or what?   Howard Brown  32:52 No, she's little. She's five feet. 510 So she never kicked me. We are best friends. My wife's best friend. I know. She is just just a saint. She's She's such a giving person and you know, we take that from our parents, but she she gave of herself of what she could do. She said she do it again in a heartbeat. I don't think I'm allowed to give anybody my bone marrow but if I could, would give it to her do anything for her. She's She's amazing. So she gave me the gift, the gift of life.   Michael Hingson  33:21 So you went to Florida, then you moved to California and what did you do when you got out here?   Howard Brown  33:24 So I ended up moving up to northern California. So I met this girl from Michigan in Southern California, Lisa, my wife have now 28 years in July. We married Lisa Yeah, we got married under the Jewish wedding company's wedding canopies called the hotpot and we're looking at the Pacific Ocean, we made people come out that we had that Northridge earthquake in 94. But this is in July, so things are more settled. So we had all friends and family come out. And it was beautiful. We got it on a pool deck overlooking the Pacific. It was gorgeous. It was a beautiful Hollywood type wedding. And it was amazing. So we got married in July of 94. And then moved up to Silicon Valley in 97. And then I was working at the startups. My life was really out of balance because I'm working 20 hours, you know, a day and I'm traveling like crazy. And my wife says, You know what, you got to be home for dinner if we're going to think about having a family. And we're a little bit older now. 35 and 40. And so we've got to think about these things. And so I called back to Newton Wellesley hospital, and I got the specimen of sperm shipped out to San Jose, and we went through an in vitro fertilization process. And she grew eight eight eggs and they defrosted the swimmers and they took the best ones and put them back in the four best eggs and our miracle baby our frozen kids sickle. Emily was born in August of 2001. Another blessing another miracle. I was able to have a child and healthy baby girl.   Michael Hingson  34:58 So what's Emily doing today?   Howard Brown  35:00 Well, thank you for asking that. So, she is now in Missoula, Montana at a television station called K Pax eight Mountain News. And she's an intern for the summer. And she's living her great life out there hiking, Glacier National Park. And she ran I think she ran down to the Grand Tetons and, and she's learning about the broadcast business and reporting. She's a writer by trade, by trade and in journalism. And she likes philosophy. So she'll be coming back home to finish her senior year, this at the end of the summer at the University of Michigan. And so she's about to graduate in December. And she's, she's doing just great.   Michael Hingson  35:35 So she writes and doesn't do video editing us yet using Abbott or any of the evolutions from it.   Howard Brown  35:41 No, she does. She actually, when you're in a small market station, that's you. You write the script, she does the recording, she has a tripod, sometimes she's she films with the other reporters, but when she they sent her out as an intern, and she just covered the, this, you know, the pro pro life and pro choice rallies, she she records herself, she edits on Pro Tools, which is super powerful now, and a lot less expensive. And then, when she submits, she submits it refer review to the news director and to her superiors. And she's already got, I think, three video stories and about six different by lines on written stories. So she's learning by doing, it's experiential, it's amazing.   Michael Hingson  36:23 So she must have had some experience in dealing with all the fires and stuff out at Yellowstone and all that.   Howard Brown  36:31 So the flooding at Yellowstone, so I drove her out there in May. And I didn't see any fires. But the flooding we got there before that, she took me on a hike on the North Gate of Yellowstone. And she's she's, you know, environmentally wilderness trained first aid trained. And I'm the dad, and I'm in decent shape. But she took me out an hour out and an hour back in and, you know, saw a moose saw a deer didn't see any mountain lion didn't see any Grizzlies, thank God, but we did see moose carcass where the grizzly had got a hold on one of those and, and everybody else to get it. So I got to go out to nature weather and we took a road trip out there this summer, it was a blast. It's the those are the memories, when you've been through a cancer diagnosis that you just you hold on to very dearly and very tight. It was a blast. So that's what he's doing this summer. She'll be back. She'll be back in August, end of August.   Michael Hingson  37:22 That's really exciting to hear that she's working at it and being successful. And hopefully she'll continue to do that. And do good reporting. And I know that this last week, with all the Supreme Court cases, it's it's, I guess, in one sense, a field day for reporters. But it's also a real challenge, because there's so many polarized views on all of that.   Howard Brown  37:44 Well, everybody's a broadcaster now whether it's Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and all the other ones out there, tick tock. So everybody's sort of a reporter now. And you know, what do you believe, and unfortunately, I just can't believe in something in 140 characters or something in two sentences. Yeah, there's no depth there. So sometimes you miss the point, and all this stuff. And then everything's on 24 hours on CNN, on Fox on MSNBC, so it never stops. So I call that a very noisy world. And it's hard to process. You know, all this. It's coming at you so fast in the blink of an eye. So we're in a different time than when we grew up, Michael, it was a slower pace. Today in this digital world. It's, it's, it's a lot and especially COVID. Now, are we just consuming and consuming and binging and all this stuff, I don't think it's that healthy.   Michael Hingson  38:36 It's not only a noisy world, but it's also a world, it's very disconnected, you can say all you want about how people can send tweets back and forth, text messages back and forth and so on. But you're not connecting, you're not really getting deep into anything, you're not really establishing relationships in the way that as you point out, we used to, and we don't connect anymore, even emails don't give you that much connection, realism, as opposed to having meaningful dialogue and meaningful conversations. So we just don't Converse anymore. And now, with all that's going on, in the very divided opinions, there's there's no room for discussion, because everybody has their own opinion. And that's it, there's no room to dialogue on any of it at all, which is really too bad.   Howard Brown  39:21 Yeah, I agree. It's been divisive. And, you know, it's, it's hard because, you know, an email doesn't have the body language, the intent, the emotion, like we're talking right now. And, you know, we're expressing, you know, you know, I'm telling stories of my story personally, but you can tell when I get excited, I smile, I can get animated. Sometimes with an email, you know, you don't know the intent and it can be misread. And a lot of that communication is that way. So, you know, I totally get where you're coming from.   Michael Hingson  39:55 And that's why I like doing the podcasts that we're doing. We get to really have conversation isn't just asking some questions and getting an answer and then going on to the next thing. That's, frankly, no fun. And I think it's important to be able to have the opportunity to really delve into things and have really good conversations about them. I learned a lot, and I keep seeing as I do these podcasts, and for the past 20 plus years, I've traveled around the world speaking, of course, about September 11, and talking about teamwork, and trust, and so on. And as I always say, if I don't learn more than I'm able to teach or impart, then I'm not doing my job very well.   Howard Brown  40:35 So that's exactly and that's, that's where I'm going after the second health concern. You know, I'm now going to teach, I'm gonna inspire, I'm going to educate. And that's, that's, that's what I do, I want to do with the rest of my time is to be able to, you know, listen, I'm not putting my head in the sand, about school shootings, about an insurrection about floods about all that. You gotta live in the real world. But I choose, as I say, I like to live on positive Street as much as possible, but positive street with action. That's, that's what makes the world a better place at the end of the day. So you sharing that story means that one we'll never forget. And you can educate the generations to come that need to understand, you know, that point in time and how it affected you and how you've dealt with it, and how you've been able to get back out of bed every day. And I want to do the same.   Michael Hingson  41:26 Well, there's nothing wrong with being positive. I think that there is a need to be aware. But we can we can continue to be positive, and try to promote positivity, try to promote connectionism and conversations and so on, and promote the fact that it's okay to have different opinions. But the key is to respect the other opinion, and recognize that it isn't just what you say that's the only thing that ever matters. That's the problem that we face so much today.   Howard Brown  41:58 Right? Respect. I think Aretha Franklin saying that great. She   Michael Hingson  42:01 did. She did. She's from Motown here. There you go. See? When you moved out to California, and you ended up in Silicon Valley, and so on, who are you working for them?   Howard Brown  42:14 So I moved up, and I worked for this company called Liquid audio that doesn't exist anymore. And it was just iTunes 10 years too early on, there was real audio, there was Mark Cuban's company was called Audio net and then broadcast.com used for a lot of money. And so the company went public and made a lot of money. But it didn't work. The world wasn't ready for it yet to be able to live in this cassette world. It was not ready. I Napster hadn't been invented, mp3 and four hadn't been invented. So it just the adoption rate of being too early. But it still went public a lot. The investors made a ton of money, but they call that failing, failing forward. So I stayed there for a year, I made some money. And I went to another startup. And that startup was in the web hosting space, it was called Naevus. site, it's now won by Time Warner. But at that time, building data centers and hosting racks of computers was very good business. And so I got to be, you know, participate in an IPO. You know, I built built up revenue. And you know, the outsourcing craze now called cloud computing, it's dominated by the folks that like Amazon, and the folks at IBM, and a few others, but mostly, you know, dominated there, where you're basically having lots of blinking lights in a data center, and just making sure that those computers stay up to serve up the pages of the web, the videos, even television, programming, and now any form of communication. So I was, I was early on in that and again, got to go through an IPO and get compensated properly unduly, and, but also my life was out of balance. And so before we were called out for the sperm and had a baby, I transitioned out when Silicon Valley just the pendulum swung the other way, I ended up starting to work at my own nonprofit, I founded it with a couple of Silicon Valley guys called Planet Jewish, and it was still very technologically driven. It was the world's first Community Calendar. This is before Google Calendar, this is in 2000. And we built it as a nonprofit to serve the Jewish community to get more people to come to Jewish events. And I architected the code, and we ran that nonprofit for 17 years. And before calendaring really became free, and very proud of that. And after that, I started a very similar startup with different code called circle builder, and it was serving faith and religions. It was more like private facebook or private online communities. And we had the Vatican as a client and about 25,000 Ministries, churches, and nonprofits using the system. And this is all sort of when Facebook was coming out to you know, from being just an edu or just for college students. And so I built that up as a quite a big business. But unfortunately, I was in Michigan when I started circle builder. I ended up having to close both of those businesses down. One that the revenue was telling off of the nonprofit and also circuit builder wasn't monetizing as quickly or as we needed as well. But I ended up going into my 50 year old colonoscopy, Michael. And I woke up thinking everything was going to be fine. My wife Lisa's holding my hand. And the gastroenterologist said, No, I found something. And when I find something, it's bad news. Well, it was bad news. Stage three colon cancer. Within about 10 days or two weeks, I had 13 and a half inches of my colon removed, plus margins plus lymph nodes. One of the lymph nodes was positive, install a chemo port and then I waited because my daughter had soccer tournaments to travel to but on first week of August in 2016, I started 12 rounds of Rockem sockem chemotherapy called folfox and five Fu and it was tough stuff. So I was back on the juice again, doing chemotherapy and but this time, I wasn't a deer in the headlights, I was a dad, I was a husband. I had been through the trenches. So this time, I was much more of a marine on a mission. And I had these digital tools to reach out for research and for advocacy and for support. Very different at that time. And so I unfortunately failed my chemotherapy, I failed my neck surgery, another colon resection, I failed a clinical trial. And things got worse I became metastatic stage four that means that colon cancer had spread to my liver, my stomach linings called the omentum and peritoneum and my bladder. And I had that same conversation with a doctor in downtown Detroit, at a Cancer Institute and he said, We don't know if we can help you. And if you Dr. Google, it said I had 4% of chances of living about 12 to 18 months and things were dark I was I was back at it again looking looking at the Grim Reaper. But what I ended up doing is research and I did respond to the second line chemotherapy with a little regression or shrinkage. And for that you get more chemotherapy. And then I started to dig in deep research on peritoneal carcinoma which is cancer of the of the of the stomach lining, and it's very tricky. And there's a group called colon town.org that I joined and very informative. I there then met at that time was probably over 100 other people that had had the peritoneal carcinoma, toma and are living and they went through a radical surgery called cytoreduction high pack, where they basically debulk you like a de boning a fish, and they take out all this cancer, they can see the dead and live cells, and then they pour hot chemo in you. And then hot chemo is supposed to penetrate the scanning the organs, and it's supposed to, in theory kill micro cell organism and cancer, although it's still not proven just yet. But that surgery was about a 12 and a half hour surgery in March of 2018. And they call that the mother of all surgeries. And I came out looking like a ghost. I had lost about 60 pounds, and I had a long recovery. It's that one would put Humpty Dumpty back together. It's been now six years. But I got a lot of support. And I am now what's called no evidence of disease at this time, I'm still under surveillance. I was quarterly I just in June, I had my scans and my exams. And I'm now going to buy annual surveillance, which means CAT scans and blood tests. That's the step in the right direction. And so again, I mean, if I think about it, my twin sister saved my life, I had a frozen sperm become a daughter. And again, I'm alive from a stage four diagnosis. I am grateful. I am lucky, and I am blessed. So that's that a long story that the book will basically tell you, but that's where I am today.   Michael Hingson  48:50 And we'll definitely get to the book. But another question. So you had two startups that ran collectively for quite a period of time, what got you involved or motivated to do things in the in the faith arena?   Howard Brown  49:06 So I have to give credit to my wife, Lisa. So we met at the Jewish Federation of Los Angeles at this young leadership group. And then they have like a college fair of organizations that are Jewish support organizations. And one of them happened to be Jewish Big Brothers, now Jewish Brothers and Big Sisters of Los Angeles. Suppose you'd be a great big brother. I was like, well, it takes up a lot of time. I don't know. She's like, you should check it out. So I did. And I became I fill out the application. I went through the background checks, and I actually got to be a Jewish big brother to this young man II and at age 10. And so I have to tell you, one of the best experiences in my life was to become a mentor. And I today roll the clock forward. 29 years in is now close to 40 years old or 39 years old. He's married with a son who's one noble and two wife, Sarah, and we are family. We stayed together past age 18 Seen, and we've continued on. And I know not a lot of people do that. But it was probably one of the best experiences I've ever done. I've gotten so much out of it. Everyone's like, Oh, you did so much for in? Well, he did so much for me and my daughter, Emily calls him uncle and my wife and I are we are his family, his dad was in prison and then passed away and his mom passed away where his family now. And so one of the best experiences. So that's how I kind of got into the Jewish community. And also being in sales I was I ended up being a good fundraiser. And so these nonprofits that live their lifeblood is fundraising dollars. I didn't mind calling people asking them for donations or sitting down over coffee, asking them for donations. So I learned how to do that out in Southern California in Northern California. And I've continued to do that. So that gave me a real good taste of faith. I'm not hugely religious, but I do believe in the community values of the Jewish community. And you get to meet people beyond boards and you get to raise money for really good causes. And so that sort of gave me another foundation to build off of and I've enjoyed doing that as a community sermon for a long time.   Michael Hingson  51:10 I'll bite Where does Ian live today?   Howard Brown  51:13 Okay, well, Ian was in LA when we got matched. I had to move to San Francisco, but I I petitioned the board to keep our match alive because it was scholarship dollars in state right. And went to UC Santa Cruz, Florida State for his master's and got his last degree at Hastings and the Jewish community supported him with scholarships. And in was in very recently was in San Francisco, Oakland area, and now he's lives in South Portland, Oregon.   Michael Hingson  51:39 Ah, so you haven't gotten back to Michigan yet? Although he's getting into colder weather. So there's a chance?   Howard Brown  51:45 Well, let me tell you, he did live with us in Michigan. So using my connections through the Jewish community, I asked if he could interview with a judge from the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals a friend of mine, we sat on a on a board of directors for the American Jewish Committee, Detroit. And I said, she's like, well, Howard, I really have to take Michigan kids. I said, You know what? No problem. You decide if he's if he's worthy or not go through your process, but would you take the phone call? So she took the phone call, and I never heard anything. And then Ian called me and he said, I got it. I as a second year loss. Going to be a second year law student. I'm going to be clerking for summer interning and clerking for this judge Leanne white. And again, it just it karma, the payback, it was beautiful. So he lived with us for about four and a half months. And when he came back, and it was beautiful, because Emily was only about four or five years old. And, and he lived with us for that time. And it was beautiful.   Michael Hingson  52:43 But that's really great. That, that you have that relationship that you did the big brother program. And I'm assuming you've been big brother to other people as well.   Howard Brown  52:53 No, no. I have not actually. Because what it did is it trained me to be a dad. So when I had Emily, it was more it was more difficult actually to do that. And so no, Ian has been my one and only match. I mentor a lot of Babson students, and I mentor and get mentored by some cancer patients and, and some big entrepreneurs. Mentorship is a core value of mine. I like to be mentored. And I also like to mentor others. And I think that's, that's what makes the world go round. So when Steve Gates when Bill Gates, his wife, Melinda, just donated 123 million to the overall arching Big Brothers, Big Sisters of America. And that money will filter to all those, I think that that's such a core value. If a young person can have someone that takes interest in them, they can really shape their future and also get a lot out of it. So mentorship is one of my key values. And I hope it's hope it's many of your viewers and yours as well. Michael,   Michael Hingson  53:52 absolutely is I think that we can't do anything if we can't pass on what we've learned and try to help other people grow. I've been a firm believer my entire life of you don't give somebody a fish, you teach them how to fish and however, and wherever that is, it's still the same thing. And we need to teach and impart. And I think that in our own way, every one of us is a teacher and the more we take it seriously, the better it is.   Howard Brown  54:18 Well, I'm now a student not learning podcasting. I learned how to be a book author and I'm learning how to reinvent myself virgin Humpty Dumpty, version two coming out.   Michael Hingson  54:29 So you had been a national cancer survivor advocate and so on. Tell me a little bit about that if you would.   Howard Brown  54:35 So I respect people that want to keep their diagnosis private and their survivorship private. That's not me. I want to be able to help people because if I would have been screened at age 40 or 42, I probably wouldn't have had colon cancer and I was not, but this is a preventable disease and really minorities and indigenous people as they need to get screened more, because that's the highest case of diagnosis for colorectal cancer. But what I think that that's what his needs now it's the second leading killer of cancer right now. And it's an important to get this advocacy out and use your voice. And so I want to use my voice to be able to sound the alarm on getting screening, and also to help people survive. There's I think, 16 million growing to 23 or 4 million by 2030. Cancer survivors out there, cancer diagnosis, it sucks sex all the way around, but it affects more than the patient, it affects your caregiver, it affects your family affects relationships, it affects emotions, physical, and also financial, there is many aspects of survivorship here and more people are learning to live with it and going, but also, quite frankly, I live with in the stage for cancer world, you also live with eminence of death, or desperation to live a little bit longer. You hear people I wish I had one more day. Well, I wish I had time to be able to see my daughter graduate high school, and I did and I cherished it. I'm going to see her graduate college this December and then walk at the Big House here in Michigan, in Ann Arbor in May. And then God willing, I will walk her down the aisle at the appropriate time. And it's good to have those big goals that are important that drive you forward. And so those are the few things that drive me forward.   Michael Hingson  56:28 I know that I can't remember when I had my first colonoscopy. It's been a while. It was just part of what I did. My mother didn't die of colon cancer, but she was diagnosed with colon cancer. She, she went to the doctor's office when she felt something was wrong. And they did diagnose it as colon cancer. She came home my brother was with her. She fell and broke her hip and went into the hospital and passed away a few days later, they did do an operation to deal with repairing her hip. And but I think because of all of that, just the amount that her body went through, she just wasn't able to deal with it. She was 6970. And so it was no I take Yeah, so I was just one of those things that that did happen. She was 71, not 70. But, you know, we've, for a while I got a colonoscopy every five years. And then they say no, you don't need to do it every five years do it every 10 years. The couple of times they found little polyps but they were just little things. There was nothing serious about them. They obviously took them out and autopsy or biopsy them and all that. And no problems. And I don't remember any of it. I slept through it. So it's okay.   Howard Brown  57:46 Great. So the prep is the worst part. Isn't it though? The preps no fun. But the 20 minutes they have you under light anesthesia, they snipped the polyps and away you go and you keep living your life. So that's what I hope for everyone, because I will tell you, Michael, showing through the amount of chemotherapy, the amount of surgeries and the amount of side effects that I have is, is I don't wish that on anyone. I don't wish on anyone. It's not a good existence. It's hard. And quite frankly, it's, I want to prevent about it. And I'm just not talking about colon cancer, get your mammogram for breast cancer, get your check for prostate cancer, you know, self care is vital, because you can't have fun, do your job, work Grow family, if your hell if you're not healthy, and the emotional stuff they call the chemo brain or brain fog and or military personnel refer to it as PTSD. It's real. And you've got to be able to understand that, you know, coming from a cancer diagnosis is a transition. And I'll never forget that my two experiences and I I've got to build and move forward though. Because otherwise it gets dark, it gets lonely, it gets depressing, and then other things start to break down the parts don't work well. So I've chosen to find my happy place on the basketball court be very active in sounding the alarm for as an advocate. And as I never planned on being a book author and now I'm going to be a published author this summer. So there's good things that have come in my life. I've had a very interesting, interesting life. And we're here talking about it now so I appreciate it.   Michael Hingson  59:20 Well tell me about you in basketball seems to be your happy place.   Howard Brown  59:24 So everyone needs to find a happy place. I'll tell you why. The basketball court I've been playing since I was six years old and I was pretty good you know, I'm not gonna go professional. But I happen to like the team sport and I'm a point guard so I'm basically telling people what to do and trash talk and and all that. But I love it a

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All Shows Feed | Horse Radio Network
Athletic Equestrian #86: IHSA Alumni Association - Tammy Cranouski

All Shows Feed | Horse Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 28:18


 Tammy Cranouski is the National Alumni Director for the Intercollegiate Horse Shows Association. IHSAA is committed to connecting IHSA graduates, mentoring undergraduate students, offering competition and providing support and sponsorship for the IHSA. Tammy attended Westfield State University where she rode on the IHSA western team. She took on the role of IHSAA director in 2019. Support the show

Athletic Equestrian Podcast
#86 IHSA Alumni Association - Tammy Cranouski

Athletic Equestrian Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 28:19


Tammy Cranouski is the National Alumni Director for the Intercollegiate Horse Shows Association. IHSAA is committed to connecting IHSA graduates, mentoring undergraduate students, offering competition and providing support and sponsorship for the IHSA. Tammy attended Westfield State University where she rode on the IHSA western team. She took on the role of IHSAA director in 2019.

The Toby Gribben Show
Douglas Simpson

The Toby Gribben Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 15:01


Douglas Simpson is a retired high school English and journalism teacher from the state of Washington. He received degrees from Western Washington University and the University of Washington. He is an avid reader and enjoys theatre, concert music (primarily symphonic) and sports, especially baseball, football and basketball. And, of course, he loves to travel, experiencing the beauty of nature and cultural sites. He has one daughter, a successful gymnastics coach, and two granddaughters. After his first wife passed away, he remarried Marilyn Grindley 2008, a fellow educator and Western grad. He was active in Western's Alumni Association, for one year as president, and was active in the Issaquah Alps Trails Club, for four years as president and over 15 years as newsletter editor. At one time he was also the owner of a used book store. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Racer Alumni
Episode 9: "The Governor" of Murray, Donna Ruth Herndon

Racer Alumni

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 36:40


In episode 9, a special “Centennial Homecoming” episode of the MSUAA Racer Alumni Podcast, we get a history lesson from none other than longtime former Murray State University Alumni Affairs Director Donna Herndon, class of 1964. Donna Ruth Herndon, a Murray native, has been deeply imbedded in the fabric of Murray State University her entire life. Both of her parents graduated from Murray State and her uncle, Marvin O. Wrather, an interim president of Murray State in 1968 and the man for whom historic Wrather Hall was named, was among the University's first graduating class and a founder of the Murray State University Alumni Association in 1926. As a student, she lived in the Sigma Sigma Sigma wing of Woods Hall. She studied art under Clara M. Eagle, for who the art gallery in Doyle Fine Arts is named. And, the aforementioned are not the only people in her life whose names grace historic spaces and places on Murray State's campus. She was a student during the presidency of Ralph Woods, who she calls a consummate educator. She personally knew Forrest Pogue and later worked alongside Harry Lee Waterfield. In this episode, she shares some sage advice she once received from Waterfield, which she still lives by today. In her role as Alumni Director, she served under the direction of four Murray State presidents. Under her leadership from 1981-1992, the Student Ambassador Program and Tent City, longtime traditions which we still enjoy today, both got their start. She'll share with us some of her favorite Homecoming memories, including one particular Homecoming theme that garnered lots of attention for reasons she never intended. It is a walk through nearly 80 of Murray State's 100 years. Sponsored by the Murray State University Alumni Association and hosted by Murray State Director of Alumni Relations Carrie McGinnis and 2019 Murray State graduate Jordan Lowe, The Racer Alumni Podcast: Stories from the Finest Place We Know gives you the chance to connect with your alma mater and others within our global alumni family. Racers are 80,000-strong. New episodes drop on the 1st and 15th of each month. Subscribe today and spread the word! Not a member of the Alumni Association? Membership makes this podcast possible. Join today at murraystate.edu/alumni!  This podcast was produced with the help of Jim Ray Consulting Services.  Jim is a 1992 Murray State graduate. He can help you with the concept development, implementation, production and distribution of your own podcast, just as he has done for the MSUAA. The views and opinions expressed during the Racer Alumni Podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Murray State University, its administration or the faculty at large. The episodes are designed to be inspiring and entertaining.        

TDN Radio On Demand
Untapped Potential Support Dominica Sifocol Alumni Association

TDN Radio On Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 60:31


Untapped Potential Support Dominica Sifocol Alumni Association. Plus, Your identity is your strength

Racer Alumni
Episode 8: Clear the Track! Here Comes Racer One!

Racer Alumni

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 37:55


Clear the Track! With Murray State's Centennial Homecoming just two weeks away, it is only fitting that we talk about one of the most fun, fast and fascinating traditions in all of collegiate athletics – Racer One. Joining us for Episode 8 are 2022-2023 Racer One Jockey Madison Kirby and Racer One Faculty/Staff Advisor Dr. Shea Porr. Dr. Porr is heading into her tenth year on the faculty within Murray State's Hutson School of Agriculture. She began as the Department Head for the Animal and Equine Science program in 2018, taking the “reigns” as Murray State's Racer One Coordinator that same year. Madison, an agriculture education major in her first season jockeying Racer One, is a junior from Fisherville, Kentucky, located in Jefferson County near Louisville. Born to race, Madison has been riding since she was just three years old and spent much of her childhood watching her father race and train horses under the twin spires of Churchill Downs, home of the famed Kentucky Derby.            The current Racer One, whose given name is actually Vegas Impulse, holds a special distinction among his peers. He is the first Racer One since the inception of the tradition in 1976 actually born and raised on Murray State's campus. Learn more about the beginnings of this tradition on Murray State's campus, how jockeys and horses are selected for this prestigious role, what type of training it takes to prepare our most recognizable mascot for his time in the spotlight and why Racer One has become as important to ag education as he is to school and community pride in this episode of the Racer Alumni Podcast. Sponsored by the Murray State University Alumni Association and hosted by Murray State Director of Alumni Relations Carrie McGinnis and 2019 Murray State graduate Jordan Lowe, The Racer Alumni Podcast: Stories from the Finest Place We Know gives you the chance to connect with your alma mater and others within our global alumni family. Racers are 80,000-strong. New episodes drop on the 1st and 15th of each month. Subscribe today and spread the word! Not a member of the Alumni Association? Membership makes this podcast possible. Join today at murraystate.edu/alumni!  This podcast was produced with the help of Jim Ray Consulting Services.  Jim is a 1992 Murray State graduate. He can help you with the concept development, implementation, production and distribution of your own podcast, just as he has done for the MSUAA. The views and opinions expressed during the Racer Alumni Podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Murray State University, its administration or the faculty at large. The episodes are designed to be inspiring and entertaining.

Behind the Blue
October 13, 2022 - Jill Smith & Antoine Huffman (UK Alumni Association)

Behind the Blue

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 42:15


LEXINGTON, Ky. (October 13, 2022) – Homecoming at the University of Kentucky is a week full of opportunities for students and alumni to continue the tradition of what it means to be a Wildcat. This year, UK celebrates its 107th Homecoming week. The UK Alumni Association, Student Organizations and Activities, Black Student Union, National Pan-Hellenic Council, Student Activities Board, the Office for Student Success and many other groups have been working hard to make Homecoming week a special time in the lives of students, alumni and all who participate. The UK Alumni Association will also welcome the Golden Wildcats from the Class of 1972 for a variety of 50th reunion activities. A full list of Golden Wildcat Society reunion activities and registration information can be found on the UK Alumni Association's website. From Oct. 10-14, there are events for all members of the UK community leading up to the Homecoming football game against Mississippi State University on Saturday, Oct. 15. The Lyman T. Johnson Awards Luncheon, DanceBlue Silent Auction, and National Pan-Hellenic Council Step Show are just a few of the annual events that lead into Homecoming weekend, a special tradition on UK's campus since 1915. On this episode of ‘Behind the Blue', UK Alumni Association Executive Director Jill Smith and this year's Alumni Association President Antoine Huffman, highlight some of the events of Homecoming week, the overall mission and worldwide reach of the Alumni Association, how students and alumni can get involved, and more. ‘Behind the Blue' is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK's latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university. For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue. Transcripts for this or other episodes of Behind the Blue can be downloaded from the show's blog page. To discover what's wildly possible at the University of Kentucky, click here.

Racer Alumni
Episode 7: Murray State Board of Regents Chair Dr. Don Tharpe

Racer Alumni

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 28:58


In Episode 7 we get the honor of chatting with the current chair of the Murray State University Board of Regents Dr. Don Tharpe, a 1974 and 1975 graduate of Murray State. A member of the Board of Regents since 2017, Dr. Tharpe most recently served as Board of Regents vice chair and audit and compliance committee chair. He was selected as chairperson unanimously by his colleagues, and officially appointed to the leadership role during the University's quarterly Board of Regents meeting in June. Tharpe is a native of Mayfield, Kentucky. He graduated with both a Bachelor of Science and a Master of Science degree in industrial education from Murray State, prior to earning his doctorate in educational administration from Virginia Polytechnic & State University in Blacksburg, Virginia.  Tharpe's career in higher education and non-profit management has spanned more than 30 years. He served most recently as Chief Operations Officer of the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc., President & CEO of the Pan American Health and Education Foundation and President & CEO of the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation. While he has inked his place in Murray State's centennial history as the first Black chairperson to lead the Murray State Board of Regents, Dr. Tharpe talks in this episode of the Racer Alumni Podcast about his desire to further be remembered beyond that important distinction, by using his leadership position to make a memorable impact on his alma mater and a significant difference in the lives of our students. He has a well-documented passion for academic excellence and asset preservation, often calling on University leadership and his colleagues to make investments in campus improvements and deferred maintenance.   In addition to his oft-heard mantra of “taking care of our stuff,” Dr. Tharpe is also known to crack a joke, tell a story and otherwise provide some much-appreciated levity in the boardroom, where the matters of business at hand often feel weighty. Tharpe currently lives in Nicholasville, Kentucky, with his wife, Linda, who he met as a student at Murray State. Sponsored by the Murray State University Alumni Association and hosted by Murray State Director of Alumni Relations Carrie McGinnis and 2019 Murray State graduate Jordan Lowe, The Racer Alumni Podcast: Stories from the Finest Place We Know gives you the chance to connect with your alma mater and others within our global alumni family. Racers are 80,000-strong. New episodes drop on the 1st and 15th of each month. Subscribe today and spread the word! Not a member of the Alumni Association? Membership makes this podcast possible. Join today at murraystate.edu/alumni!  This podcast was produced with the help of Jim Ray Consulting Services.  Jim is a 1992 Murray State graduate. He can help you with the concept development, implementation, production and distribution of your own podcast, just as he has done for the MSUAA. The views and opinions expressed during the Racer Alumni Podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Murray State University, its administration or the faculty at large. The episodes are designed to be inspiring and entertaining.  

edfranklin.nolimits
Poway High Alumni Association

edfranklin.nolimits

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 31:54


Having been part of the Poway California community for many years and a graduate of Poway High School along with my wife and 6 of my daughters, I have a special place in my heart for this Podcast. Larry Ott is the President of the Poway High School Alumni Association and my guest today. Larry tells us about the organization and what they are doing to promote and manifest a global relationship with Poway High Alumni. https://youtu.be/1nHBbH0TwcI #powayhighschool #golf #association #alumni #poway #positive

Serve to Lead | James Strock
David Pietrusza | Podcast

Serve to Lead | James Strock

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 43:34


In our unsettled moment, there's a burst of interest in one of the United States' most consequential presidents: Franklin Roosevelt. In this episode of the Serve to Lead podcast, acclaimed presidential historian David Pietrusza discusses his highly readable and extensively researched new book, Roosevelt Sweeps Nation: FDR's 1936 Landslide and the Triumph of the Liberal Ideal. The Next Nationalism is a reader-supported publication. To receive new posts and support my work, consider becoming a free or paid subscriber.Critical Acclaim“A robust chronicle of Franklin Roosevelt's quest to stay in the White House. . . a brisk, spirited narrative, abundantly populated and bursting with anecdotes . . . A prodigiously researched and exuberantly told political biography/history.”—Kirkus Reviews (Starred Review )“Pietrusza . . . makes the most of his engrossing tale. . . .  a lively story that is rife with strong personalities and blood stirring incidents. . . . appealing.”– Library Journal“a sweeping yet minutely detailed chronicle of FDR's 1936 reelection campaign . . .an exhaustive and expert chronicle of a critical American election.”—Publishers Weekly“David Pietrusza's Roosevelt Sweeps Nation combines penetrating research with good illustrative anecdotes to bring the 1936 presidential election between FDR and Alf Landon into sharp focus. A marvelous and important history. Highly recommended!”—Douglas Brinkley, professor of history at Rice University, author of Rightful Heritage: Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Land of America.“David Pietrusza has done it again—another fascinating, easy-to-read book on a key moment in history. Franklin Roosevelt won a massive victory in 1936, cementing his New Deal permanently. Pietrusza brings FDR's era to life and shows us how it happened.”—Larry J. Sabato, Director of the University of Virginia Center for Politics“The 1936 election was not just another FDR victory, but an important turning point in the nation's history. The story David Pietrusza tells is riveting and the cast of characters is fascinating. Franklin Roosevelt was the most skillful American politician of the 20th century and this election was a decisive affirmation of his power and appeal.”—Ron Faucheux, political analyst “In the style and with the depth of research of David McCullough, David Pietrusza makes history come alive in his latest book ‘Roosevelt Sweeps Nation.' From religious characters like Father Divine and radio preacher Charles Coughlin, to political ones like Huey Long and Roosevelt himself, the book is a delightful and compelling read.”—Cal Thomas, Syndicated Columnist“Another great election year chronicle from [David Pietrusza] — such a colorful story & writing. Couldn't be juicier.”—Whit Stillman, Director and Academy Award Nominated Screenwriter “David Pietrusza is my favorite historian, and Roosevelt Sweeps Nation is Pietrusza at his best. Nobody can tell a better story than Pietrusza, who always shows you there's more to the story than you thought—that there is juicy stuff hidden in our history that nobody has bothered to suss out or that has long been forgotten. This is another page-turner you won't want to put down. At a time when Americans can use a reprieve from today's news, Roosevelt Sweeps Nation is just what the doctor ordered. And David Pietrusza is a national treasure.”—Matt Lewis, Senior Columnist, The Daily Beast “Roosevelt crafted an election strategy so strong that it has defined national campaigns of both parties ever since. Now historian David Pietrusza brings the stunning 1936 Roosevelt Sweep to life, with timely lessons for our current  challenges.”—Amity Shlaes, Author, Great Society.“all of [Pietrusza's] books are brilliant, but this is just phenomenal.”—John Rothmann, KGO Radio (San Francisco)About the AuthorAward-winning historian David Pietrusza has been called “a national treasure” and “the undisputed champion of chronicling American Presidential campaigns.” His books include studies of the 1920, 1932, 1936, 1948, and 1960 presidential elections and biographies of Theodore Roosevelt (Independent Publisher Book Awards Silver Medal, US History), gambler Arnold Rothstein (Edgar Award finalist) and Baseball Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis (Casey Award winner). Pietrusza has appeared on NPR, C-SPAN, MSNBC, The Voice of America, The History Channel, AMC, and ESPN. He has spoken at the JFK, FDR, Truman, and Coolidge presidential libraries, the National Baseball Hall of Fame, and various universities, museums, libraries, and festivals. A noted expert on baseball history, Pietrusza has served as editor-in-chief of Total Sports Publishing, co-editor of Total Baseball: The Official Encyclopedia of Major League Baseball, national president of the Society for American Baseball Research (SABR), and co-author with Ted Williams of Williams' pictorial autobiography.A former member of the Amsterdam (NY) City Council, he holds bachelor's and master's degrees in history from the University at Albany, is a Recipient of UAlbany's Alumni Association's Excellence in Arts & Letters Award, and a charter member of the Greater Amsterdam School District Hall of Fame.He served as a member of the New York State Commission for the Restoration of the Capitol.The Serve to Lead podcast is now on Substack. It can be accessed in the usual formats, including:Apple Podcasts | Amazon Audible | Amazon Music | Google Podcasts | iHeart | Spotify | Stitcher | Podchaser | TuneIn Image credits | Diversion Books; davidpietrusza.com. Get full access to The Next Nationalism at jamesstrock.substack.com/subscribe

This Week in America with Ric Bratton
Episode 2527: NANA'S SUMMERTIME TREATS by Sharon Rogers

This Week in America with Ric Bratton

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 21:51


Nana's Summertime Treats by Sharon RogersAs far as my family can remember, from back in the early 1960s up to the present, most summers when school is out African American children are sent down South to stay with close family members, such as grandparents, aunts, uncles, to learn how to work the fields or just for free child care. In those days, we truly believed in the scripture that says, "I am my brother's keeper" (Genesis 4:9).This story is about a little girl named Kiari in the twenty-first century, and the routine continues. Kiari is taught that Nana, her grandmother, does her share to keep the family going. What Kiari learns is that being a good cook is hard work. Kiari also learns some reading skills and business techniques at a very young age. She looks forward to sharing this valuable time with her grandparents.Sharon Rogers was born and raise in the small town of Hickman Kentucky population 2,365. She is the daughter of Aubrey and Annie Ruth Brown. Number five out of six children, raised with three brothers and two sisters. She graduated from Fulton County High School. She was a devote member of Lake Chapel Baptist Church where she help taughtSunday School and song in the choir. She would take the Sunday School lesson and put them into today terms so the student could understand it better. She would go over the lesson with her mom to make sure she was on the right track. Sharon holds a Bachelor's Degree in Home Economics, Child Development from Murray State University and a Master's Degree in Education, Instructional Technology from American InterContinental University. She has been writing since high school. She creates stories from her family photo albums. She uses her past and present experiences to uplift young children and motivate them to be all they can be, no matter their age. As a Head Start teacher she would write stories about her students as the star of the story to make them laugh and feel empowered to add to the store. As the Community Resource Manager, when the pandemic hit, she transitioned this service to online so parents could have story time in the homes with their children by creating “Mrs. Sharon Reading Corner. Her ultimate goal is that children actually be excited about learning and seeing themselves in what is read to and with them. She wants them to see the power and potential that reading can have on their lives and the place it can take them.. Sharon is a proud member of Galilee Baptist Church: She served as a Sunday School Teacher, Director of Junior Church, and Black History Month Director. Sharon took pride in building the church Library. Sharon and her husband Alfonso, donated for ten years the Damion Rogers Scholarship to one graduating senior for higher education. Sharon also assist students in preparing for college. Sharon remains connected to her Murray State University community as an active member of the Alumni Association. She was inducted as the Outstanding Children's Services Professional-Child Advocate Award in 2014. Sharon recognizes that ‘you can write the script to your own movie or story. She believes when you bless someone else you are blessed for giving. She is committed to continuing being a servant leader. She spends her free time doing motivational speaking for teenagers, writing children's short stories, poetry, shopping and spending time with her family and Christian friends.” She presently resides in Lansing, Michigan with her wonderful husband Alfonsohttps://www.amazon.com/Nanas-Summertime-Treats-Sharon-Rogers/dp/1662468342/ref=sr_1_1?crid=1M7GBXRH3OIPK&keywords=Sharon+Rogers+Nana%27s+Summertime+Treats&qid=1662697095&sprefix=dr+patrinia+m+bryant+ruby+and+adora+a+bilingual+story+and+activity+book+%2Caps%2C254&sr=8-1https://www.pagepublishing.com/books/?book=nanas-summertime-treatshttp://www.bluefunkbroadcasting.com/root/twia/92222kppa.mp3   

Bleav in Ole Miss
GAMEDAY CENTRAL: Savannah Hulme of the Ole Miss Alumni Association joins the show

Bleav in Ole Miss

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 23:09


GAMEDAY CENTRAL: Savannah Hulme of the Ole Miss Alumni Association joins the show

Racer Alumni
Episode 6: The Communicators - Bob Valentine and Robert Norsworthy

Racer Alumni

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 44:13


In episode six, we welcome Murray State University Journalism and Mass Communication Professor and longtime debate coach Bob Valentine. "Dr. Vee" has been teaching at Murray State since 1974. Outside of Wilson Hall, Valentine has long been known as an emcee extraordinaire, a comedian, coveted public speaker, one half of the duo “The Communicators,” alongside longtime friend and colleague Dr. Bob McGaughey, a Scottish master of ceremonies and even, on occasion, a dupe for Murray State's founder, Rainey T. Wells. Also joining us is Robert Norsworthy, a native western Kentuckian, who spent more than 3 decades as one of the quintessential Mad Men of Madison Avenue. Mr. Norsworthy worked for 30+ years in advertising in New York. From “Have it Your Way” to “Plop Plop Fizz Fizz,” he was at the table when some of America's most memorable catch phrases first came into being. Upon retirement, Norsworthy returned to Calloway County where he has been consulting in the JMC department and matching students with internships in advertising all over the world for more than ten years. Join us as we talk about their Murray State experience, how the local community helped to shape Murray State into an epicenter for culture and higher learning in western Kentucky more than 100 years ago, the life and legend of Bob "Doc" McGaughey and how you can help carry on Doc's legacy of journalistic integrity and good humor into Murray State's next 100 years.  Sponsored by the Murray State University Alumni Association and hosted by Murray State Director of Alumni Relations Carrie McGinnis and 2019 Murray State graduate Jordan Lowe, The Racer Alumni Podcast: Stories from the Finest Place We Know gives you the chance to connect with your alma mater and others within our global alumni family. Racers are 80,000-strong. New episodes drop on the 1st and 15th of each month. Subscribe today and spread the word! Not a member of the Alumni Association? Membership makes this podcast possible. Join today at murraystate.edu/alumni!  This podcast was produced with the help of Jim Ray Consulting Services.  Jim is a 1992 Murray State graduate. He can help you with the concept development, implementation, production and distribution of your own podcast, just as he has done for the MSUAA. The views and opinions expressed during the Racer Alumni Podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Murray State University, its administration or the faculty at large. The episodes are designed to be inspiring and entertaining.

Practice Disrupted with Evelyn Lee and Je'Nen Chastain

Episode 088: Latina Voices in Practice “Why is it that the largest community of color within the US still makes up such a small percentage of the profession?” ~ACSA Hispanic & Latinx in Architecture Four leaders in the profession share their diverse perspectives on race, equity, and architecture. Practice Disrupted is committed to elevating conversations on justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion to teach, empower, and build greater awareness across the industry. Building from prior diversity conversations, this week we learn about Hispanic & Latinx in Architecture. Guest: Venesa Alicea-Chuqui, AIA, NOMA, LEED AP BD+C, WELL AP, an Architect, Educator and Advocate, is Founding Principal of NYVARCH Architecture, a NYC based collaborative Architectural Practice focused on building community and equity through design.  With over 15 years of experience designing multi-family sustainable affordable, and supportive housing developments and civic projects, she is committed to working with local communities to develop good design, both sustainable and socially conscious. She's the Vice Chair of Outreach to the https://network.aia.org/communities/community-home?communitykey=5dccd29e-2089-48ae-8452-471d5068b76d&tab=groupdetails (AIA Small Firm Exchange) and President of the Architecture Alumni Group of the Alumni Association of the https://www.ccny.cuny.edu/ (City College of New York), her alma mater (B.Arch ‘05), where she has also taught the Coop Internship and Professional Practice classes. Committed to design justice in the built environment, she's an active contributor to https://darkmatteruniversity.org/ (Dark Matter University), https://www.dapcollective.com/ (Design as Protest), and a former co-chair to the https://www.aiany.org/committees/diversity-inclusion-committee/ (AIANY Diversity & Inclusion) and https://www.aiany.org/committees/emerging-new-york-architects/ (Emerging New York Architects) committees. She is past chair of the AIANY Puerto Rico Resiliency task force, an active member of the AIANY Planning and Urban Design Committee, and a 2019 Fellow of the https://www.communitydesign.org/ (Association for Community Design). Siboney Diaz-Sánchez is an affordable housing advocate and the community engagement administrator for the City of San Antonio's Neighborhood and Housing Services Department. She serves as a https://www.noma.net/e3/ (NOMA) Empowerment Committee Co-Chair, organizes with https://www.dapcollective.com/ (Design As Protest) Planning and Policy Committee, and is proud to teach Community Practice at The Boston Architectural College. In 2021 she joined the https://www.communitydesign.org/about (Association for Community Design) board of directors.  Prior to returning to San Antonio Siboney was an Enterprise Rose Fellow and project/design manager at https://www.oppcommunities.org/ (Opportunities Communities) in the Boston area working for two non-profit community development corporations, https://theneighborhooddevelopers.org/ (The Neighborhood Developers) and https://nuestracdc.org/ (Nuestra Comunidad).  While in Boston she developed design standards for affordable housing, helped secure funding for a low income housing tax credit housing development, led a community engagement process for a public arts park and served on the https://www.architects.org/ (Boston Society of Architects) board of directors. Siboney insists creative fields are viable vehicles for social change and believes in just redistribution of systemic power through design. She is committed to prioritizing community voices in design processes. She is a licensed architect in the state of Texas and holds her Bachelor of Architecture from https://aap.cornell.edu/academics/architecture (Cornell University).   Vanessa Smith Torres is a Puerto Rican born Architect based in Miami, FL. Vanessa received a Bachelors from https://camd.northeastern.edu/program/architecture-m-arch/ (Northeastern...

Speaking of Simpson
109: Matt DeWolf on the Alumni Association

Speaking of Simpson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 30:38


Graduated from Simpson College? You're automatically a member of the Simpson Alumni Association. President Matt DeWolf is this week's guest to talk about his Simpson story and how he got involved in the alumni association — and how alumni can continue to give to Simpson in many ways.

SBS Sinhala - SBS සිංහල වැඩසටහන
Be kind to your mind: A free mental health workshop for the Sri Lankan community in Melbourne - Be kind to your mind: මෙල්බර්න් ශ්‍රී ලාංකික ප්‍රජාවට නොමිලේ සහභාගී විය

SBS Sinhala - SBS සිංහල වැඩසටහන

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 10:56


Listen to the discussion about a free mental health workshop organized by the Alumni Association of Kelaniya University which will be held this weekend, the 11th of September. - මෙල්බර්න් නුවර කැළණිය විශ්ව විද්‍යාලයේ ආදි විද්‍යාර්ථීන්ගේ සංගමයේ ඕස්ට්‍රේලියානු ශාඛාව විසින් මෙම සැප්තැම්බර් මස 11 දා පැවැත්වීමට සංවිධානය කොට ඇති “Be kind to your mind” නැමති නොමිලේ සහභාගී විය හැකි මානසික සෞඛ්‍ය වැඩමුළුව පිලිබඳව SBS සිංහල සේවය සමඟ සිදුකල සාකච්ඡාවට සවන්දෙන්න....

Racer Alumni
Episode 5: New Athletic Director and Racer Football alumnus Nico Yantko

Racer Alumni

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 31:23


When new Athletic Director Nico Yantko stepped on Murray State's campus in his new role, it wasn't his first Racer rodeo. In fact, it is all too familiar. Yantko, who served as Murray State's starting quarterback from 2007-2009, is a two-time Racer alumnus. Nico, '09, '20, was introduced Aug. 15 as the 10th director of athletics in Murray State history, and although he has been seen around Murray in recent days preparing for his family's move to "the finest place we know," his first official day on the job is today, Sept. 1. He earned a bachelor's degree in integrated studies from Murray State in 2009 and a master's degree in human development and leadership in 2020. He returns home to Murray State as the Racers begin our first year in the Missouri Valley Conference and join the Missouri Valley Football Conference in 2023.   Yantko's career in collegiate athletics began as a graduate assistant in the MSU athletics department and later at North Carolina State, the University of Missouri and the University of Louisiana. Just last month, at the age of 35, The Athletic named Nico to their inaugural list of collegiate athletics rising stars under the age of 40.    On the Racer Alumni Podcast, we talk to him about his experience as a Racer student-athlete, his career leading up to this point, his family, philosophy and what it means to him to guide his alma mater into the next century as we celebrate the centennial of our founding. We'll also discuss his self-proclaimed love for good pizza, his favorite ways to spend his free time and the food culture we know and love in America's friendliest city.    Sponsored by the Murray State University Alumni Association and hosted by Murray State Director of Alumni Relations Carrie McGinnis and 2019 Murray State graduate Jordan Lowe, The Racer Alumni Podcast: Stories from the Finest Place We Know gives you the chance to connect with your alma mater and others within our global alumni family. Racers are 80,000-strong. New episodes drop on the 1st and 15th of each month. Subscribe today and spread the word! Not a member of the Alumni Association? Membership makes this podcast possible. Join today at murraystate.edu/alumni!    This podcast was produced with the help of Jim Ray Consulting Services.  Jim is a 1992 Murray State graduate. He can help you with the concept development, implementation, production and distribution of your own podcast, just as he has done for the MSUAA. The views and opinions expressed during the Racer Alumni Podcast do not necessarily reflect those of Murray State University, its administration or the faculty at large. The episodes are designed to be inspiring and entertaining.

Northwestern Intersections
Welcome (Back) to the Northwestern Alumni Association, Yari Gallegos '19, '20 MS

Northwestern Intersections

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 37:45


In 2018 Yari Gallegos joined the Northwestern Alumni Association (NAA) as a young alumni/Homecoming intern. Now she's returned to the NAA as assistant director of alumni engagement for student to alumni transitions. In her new role she's helping to organize programs like New Chapter. NU Neighbors and staple events for Homecoming. In this episode of Northwestern Intersections, Gallegos shares how her experiences as an undergraduate student inspired her to pursue a career in higher education. As a graduate student Gallegos' research—reflecting on her own college experience—focused on perceived institutional support and ethnic identity salience for Latinx undergraduate students at a predominately white institution. She highlights how through interviews she found that many Latinx undergraduate students discover university resources too late, and that many define their sense of belonging through their community and not with their school. Gallegos shares her thoughts on the importance of connecting with and creating community—especially for first-generation and Latinx students—and how these institutions can support their success. And finally, how through her role new she hopes to contribute to building spaces of belonging for students making the alumni transition. Show Notes: New Chapter. NU Neighbors Homecoming Week Up Next on Northwestern Intersections Northwestern Law Fireside Chat Event Series

Alamodome Audible
Episode 186: #24 Houston Cougars Preview with The Scott & Holman Podcast

Alamodome Audible

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 68:35


Oh baby, we're BACK back. Welcome to game week. Feels good to say. Pass the jello shots and the sausage wraps. We start off the podcast by addressing the (unfortunate) elephant in the room. Ticket sales leading into the home opener are just... good... not great. Is a crowd of 35k really a disappoint? Is there a lack of buzz around the season? We dive into specifics with some takes that might get us flamed on Twitter! At the 15 minute mark we start diving into the surprises and notable additions to the depth chart. The Roadrunners had some young offensive linemen make the jump into the two deep, while the position battle at left tackle rages with a third competitor entering the fray. After a quick cumbia break we're joined by Sam and Dustin from the Scott & Holman Podcast 35 minutes in to the pod. Thanks to Sam and Dustin for sharing their expertise on the Coogs as we prepare for what will assuredly be a highly entertaining content between two strong, veteran-filled teams in the Alamodome this Saturday. Be sure to check out their podcast this week to learn more about Houston's roster, as well as to hear our take on how UTSA matches up against the Cougars. You can follow Sam and Dustin at @SHPawdcast on Twitter. As a reminder, don't forget to catch us LIVE at the Alumni Association tailgate at 12 pm on Saturday as we'll be featured guests for a live pre-game show, College Gameday style. Would love to see you guys out in the crowd with some fun signs. Subscribe to the podcast

AXSChat Podcast
AXSChat Podcast with Denise Reed Lamoreaux, Director of Equity and Belonging at Zillow

AXSChat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 37:17 Transcription Available


Denise Reed Lamoreaux has 30+ years of experience in Learning and Development, Marketing and Communications, Leadership, and Diversity and Inclusion.  SHe has won over 40 international awards for her efforts, and is a sought after speaker across the globe.  One of her career highlights was presenting at Copenhagen 2021, the world's largest human rights conference, on the topic of Transgender rights in the workplace.  Denise is currently the Director of Equity and Belonging at Zillow, and consults regularly with AARP, parity.org, Valuable 500, Inside OUT, Textio, and the Hispanic Promise.  She is the former President of SUNY Geneseo's Alumni Association, and is active in her community, supporting Western NY's Cystic Fibrosis Organization and NY's Warrior Alliance. 

Sing Second Sports
22-23 Season Ep2 [Aug 26, '22]

Sing Second Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 43:08


Welcome to the Sing Second Sports Podcast! A podcast covering the physical mission of the U.S. Naval Academy, and featuring the athletes, coaches and staff at USNA. This week we hear from Coach Niamat as the 'Men of Ken' break camp and begin to prepare for the home opener against Delaware. We also get an update from Alumni Association and Foundation President & CEO Jeff Webb '95. Finally we breakdown Thursday's Navy Men's and Women's Soccer doubleheader. Share feedback on Twitter @wesingsecond...slide into our DMs or tweet at us directly. BEAT ARMY!

News & Views with Joel Heitkamp
Williston State College: Hunter Berg

News & Views with Joel Heitkamp

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 15:05


08/18/22: Joel is joined by Brandon Delvo and Hunter Berg while broadcasting from Williston State College. Brandon is the Director of Marketing at WSC, and Hunter is the Executive Director of the WSC Foundation & Alumni Association.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The HBCU Band Experience with Christy Walker

This week Christy speaks with Kim Evans, who marched for FAMU's "Marching 100" and now serves as the President of the Marching 100 Alumni Association. Kim reps the '100' ALL DAY EVERY DAY and is a true ambassador for the program. Find out about her humble beginnings and how marching for FAMU prepares her for any obstacles that get in her way.  She's also an author in "The HBCU Experience  - HBCU Band Alumni 2nd Edition" which can be found on Amazon.    

Birds Up Podcast
Ep. 24: Season One Recap #1 - "Birds Up" Podcast Team

Birds Up Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 24:31


UTSA Alumni Association"Birds Up" PodcastAlumni Gala and Tickets/TablesUTSA ACOB Alumni Council - "Meet the Dean" Breakfast

He's Holy & I'm Knott
He's Holy I'm Knott Welcomes the great Jim Shaw, a true Maryland Treasure

He's Holy & I'm Knott

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 46:16


Rev Al Hathaway and I are so excited to uncover the life of an incredible man from the town of Federalsburg, Maryland, a town of 1900..the great Jim Shaw.  I have had the pleasure of getting to know Jim well over the past 6 years, his life is facinating and he's a real hero not only to me but many others. A father of two he's a family man recently celebrating his 62nd anniversary. Jim walks us through his journey from the small Eastern Shore town of Federalsburg where he graduated high school with 36 others and went on to ROTC at the University of Maryland.  He joined the Air Force and was trained on the first class of Jet's, the F86 Shooting Star, the first operational jet fighter used by the US Air Force.  He's flown a bunch of jets including a Hurricane Hunter out of Bermuda...flying into the eye of many Hurricane's... Jim walks us through the skills needed to keep your cool when things are getting rough in the air, "Attitude" being number 1... He was asked to start the Alumni Association for the University of Maryland and he did, what a great story that is, always on the cutting edge Jim's next stop after the Air Force was IBM and from there it was off to Memorex, where he started their business on the Eastern part of the country.  He built a Clipper Ship, called Clipper City...186 feet long.. We could go on and on about this incredible journey, touching so many people Jim's life of purpose and driven by a system that he created which he explains in detail... Here the week of the 4th we celebrate this incredible man's journey serving his country and his state.  Thanks Jim for joining us and thanks for all you do for our community.  

From City to the World
Dr. Anthony S. Fauci and Noted Documentarian Stanley Nelson Address 2022 CCNY Graduates

From City to the World

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 73:37


Historic remarks on COVID, health disparities, social mobility, education and present-day politics and culture by CCNY 2022 honorary degree recipients Dr. Anthony S. Fauci and leading documentarian of the African American experience Stanley Nelson are captured in this special Commencement episode. City College President Vincent Boudreau introduces the speeches, recorded live on the occasion of CCNY's 175th anniversary, at the college's first in-person Commencement since 2019. Also hear from the CCNY valedictorian and salutatorian and distinguished guests including Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer.   Host: CCNY President Vincent Boudreau Speakers: Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer; CUNY Trustee Ken Sunshine; honorary degree recipient and documentary filmmaker Stanley Nelson, CCNY '76; Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, director of NIAID and chief medical advisor to Pres. Biden; Valedictorian Rose Mary Biju; Salutatorian Ali Khalil; Chief Marshal Janet Steele; Provost Tony Liss; Gary Calnek, president of the Alumni Association of The City College of New York Recorded: June 3, 2022

We Are For Good Podcast - The Podcast for Nonprofits
289. The Impact Arc Framework: Syndicate + Scale Your Impact - Jonathan McCoy, CFRE and Becky Endicott, CFRE

We Are For Good Podcast - The Podcast for Nonprofits

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 29:52 Transcription Available Very Popular


Jon and Becky are finishing our Friday series, The Impact Arc, which is uncovering their secret formula...to, well, everything. Thanks to all who joined us to explore how we fundraise, build events, campaigns, movements, community, and even our company too. Tune into this 3-part series breaking down the Impact Arc with this week's #3 pillar: Syndication. Spoiler: if you do syndication well, sustainability and scaling will naturally occur too! Episode HighlightsDefinition of syndication (3:45)Key benefits to having a syndication mindset (5:25)Build a 2.0 communications model that prioritizes engagement (8:10)Defining your voice (10:10)The magic of tagging (16:20)Who is in charge of syndication? (18:00)Case study: Wisconsin Foundation & Alumni Association (19:45)Scaling and sustainability (22:55)For more information and episode details visit: www.weareforgood.com/episode/289The We Are For Good Podcast is co-hosted by Jonathan McCoy, CFRE and Becky Endicott, CFRE and welcomes the most dynamic nonprofit leaders, advocates and philanthropists to share innovative ideas and lessons learned 3x a week!Want to hear insider details and to get our best roundup of tips, freebies, resources and show notes from each episode? Join the Good Community - it's free! Visit www.weareforgood.com/helloAbout Our Sponsor PledgePledgeCrypto empowers more than 2 million registered nonprofits to accept cryptocurrency donations without any tech (or crypto) experience required! Simply add a Pledge giving form to your website, and your donors will instantly have the option to gift crypto that gets converted to cash for your organization.Learn more today at pledge.to/crypto Start Learning Today on We Are For Good PRO

The Mark White Show
UA National Alumni Association & Covington County Chapter with Rob Foreman & Dr. Keith Miller

The Mark White Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 33:58


On tonight's show, I'll have Alabama Alumni-Covington County Chapter President Rob Foreman as well as The University of Alabama National Alumni Association President-elect Keith Miller as we discuss their amazing efforts to give college scholarships to young people!

The Mark White Show
Make A Difference Minute: UA National Alumni Association with President-elect Dr. Keith Miller

The Mark White Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 2:25


On this Make A Difference Minute, I have University of Alabama National Alumni Association President-elect Keith Miller to share about the National Alumni Association's impact on his life as a student and his effort to give back through his acceptance of the role of president. I hope you will listen & share. Sponsor: Green's Dependable Hardware Russellville, AL

Steve Smith Podcast
Jenn Opalinski & Eric Perry - SRVRTC Newport - 6-6-22

Steve Smith Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 29:59


Jenn Opalinski (Director: Sugar River Valley Regional Technical Center) & Eric Perry (Interm Director: Sugar River Valley Regional Technical Center) are here talking about what's next for the school after the town vote this past spring, what the timeline will be moving forward, how important the CTE Center is for the students, looking to the future, a new Alumni Association starting up soon, and lots more.

FedUpward Podcast
140. Federal Executive Institute and Alumni Association

FedUpward Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2022 10:57


Heard of the Office of Personnel Management's Federal Executive Institute? In this episode, Steven Frid (FEI Alumni Association Board Member), gives us a quick rundown on what FEI is and the upcoming alumni association event you won't want to miss! Steven Frid currently works as Director of Security at Federal Student Aid, where he manages programs, handles budgets, plans, coordinates personnel information, and oversees physical security efforts. He is also responsible for the emergency and facilities management programs for the agency. Learn more and get registered here: https://www.feiaa.org/ https://leadership.opm.gov/facilities.aspx?f=48

Bruin Success
Matt Wiener '10 of Innovative Partnerships Group

Bruin Success

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 41:33


Mr. Wiener is a Partner, Managing Director and Head of Consulting & Business Development at Innovative Partnerships Group (IPG360), joining the firm less than one year into the company formation. Mr. Wiener oversees growth for the company, serving as a member of the Advisory Board and Executive Team with leadership duties across overall revenue, operations, strategic growth as well as leading property, brand and project-based consulting work including the overall sponsorship and naming rights division across domestic & international clients. Mr. Wiener manages a dynamic, high-performing team across the country and oversees the recruiting and hiring efforts for the firm. Prior to Innovative Partnerships Group, Mr. Wiener was a senior executive at Wasserman, responsible for long-term partnerships for the Fortune 500 and global rights holders. His diverse experience and strategic approach provide a foundation to execute complex, non-traditional partnerships that are mutually beneficial for all parties, building a reputation for his creativity in deal making and delivering win-win-win agreements. Prior to Wasserman, Mr. Wiener worked for the San Diego Padres ownership group as a member of the Front Office holding multiple revenue positions, quickly working his way up through the organization holding the top sales position in the front office every year during his tenure in Major League Baseball. Mr. Wiener is a graduate of the University of California, Los Angeles Mr. Wiener is actively involved with his alma mater's Alumni Association, Sports & Entertainment Network and serves as an executive member of the Milken Institute's global Young Leaders Circle.