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Genus of flowering plants in the family Betulaceae

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InDesign Secrets
InDesignSecrets Podcast 293

InDesign Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 44:48


In this episode… News Adobe InDesign 2022  has an update (v17.01x) CreativePro Magazine issue 1 is out! On-Demand passes now available for the expanded Design + Accessibility Summit Some Totally Obvious InDesign Things We Just Learned This Year Interview with Marcus Radich from PageProof Obscure InDesign Feature: “Roger, hungry, ate 236 peaches and cantaloupes in 1904” Sponsors for this episode: > 3M's VAS: 3M's Visual Attention Software (VAS) is powerful, science-based AI that simulates the human vision system to analyze visual content and predicts with 92% accuracy what is attracting viewer attention. VAS is available as a web app and plugins for Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop and XD. Start your free trial today, and enter promo code CREATIVEPRO5 for 5 additional trial credits! Links mentioned in this podcast: The Design + Accessibility Summit CreativePro Week What's new in InDesign 2022 (17.0) https://helpx.adobe.com/indesign/using/whats-new.html What's new in 17.01: https://helpx.adobe.com/indesign/kb/fixed-issues.html How to make the menus bigger on the Mac (for high-res monitors): https://osxdaily.com/2021/10/12/change-menu-bar-size-mac/ Why versions of Mac OS are all California cities: https://www.linkedin.com/posts/davidblatner_apple-mac-activity-6860597173332135936-PYWB Interview with Marcus Radich at PageProof: What is an Awk: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auk What is an orc: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orc Who is Martinho da Gloria: https://www.automatication.com/about-us/ Obvious Things We Learned (or Re-learned) Move Control Panel to the Bottom of the Screen https://creativepro.com/moving-control-panel-to-bottom-of-screen/ Accessibility tab in hyperlinks… doesn't work the way you might expect: https://indesign.uservoice.com/forums/601180-adobe-indesign-bugs/suggestions/44174832-hyperlink-alt-text-is-ignored-in-the-latest-versio InDesign icon in Publish Online embed: How to do it: https://creativepro.com/publish-online-supports-embedding-indesign-documents/ Problem: https://indesign.uservoice.com/forums/601021-adobe-indesign-feature-requests/suggestions/20459239-allow-removal-of-the-publish-online-button-that Adobe Illustrator: customizing the toolbar: https://creativepro.com/customize-your-illustrator-workspace/ and https://creativepro.com/create-a-custom-toolbar-in-illustrator/   Obscure Feature: Roger, hungry, ate 236 peaches and cantaloupes in 1904 If you make the sample text small, the Birch font will fit the whole line in the column. 

The Mark White Show
Baking Memories 4 Kids with Frank Squeo

The Mark White Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 25:50


Being thankful for what we have and what we can do for others, that is the theme of tonight's show as I highlight Frank Squeo and Baking Memories 4 Kids! With the assistance of WSMV News 4, Nashville and their Surprise Squad, Sawyer Strong: A family's Journey to a 1 in a Million Diagnosis and the Birch family recently received a surprise trip to Orlando, Florida, to visit all the theme parks thanks to Frank's effort! Tonight, I'm talking with Frank about this effort and how you can help.

Charlottesville Community Engagement
November 24, 2021: Unite the Right organizers owe millions in damages; Former City Manager Richardson sues the city over disparagement clause

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 15:27


Is there a name for the day before Thanksgiving? Feast’s Eve? Blackout Wednesday? Drinksgiving? Food Prepageddon? What about "I hope I didn't forget anything at the store because I'm not going back Day?” In any case, even though it is a holiday week, there’s still time for Charlottesville Community Engagement. I’m your host, Sean Tubbs. On today’s program:A jury has found that the organizers of the Unite the Right rally guilty of a civil conspiracy and awarded damages, but did not reach a verdict on other claims Governor Northam and the Virginia Service Commission honor two area churches for their COVID testing work since the pandemic began Former City Manager Tarron Richardson is suing the city Albemarle County will revisit its 21 year old policy on cell tower placementAlbemarle says goodbye to long-time budget chief, and a Dean at the UVA School of Architecture takes a new jobSines v. Kessler verdict After a month-long trial, a jury has awarded more than $25 million in damages to the plaintiffs of a civil lawsuit against organizers and participants of the Unite the Right Rally in August 2017. The jury in Sines v. Kessler held that plaintiffs proved their civil conspiracy case under Virginia law as well as their claim that the defendants engaged in racial, religious, or ethnic harassment. Under the conspiracy count, twelve defendants must pay $500,000 each in damages and five organizations must pay a million each. On the harassment count, five individuals must $250,000 each to two plaintiffs $250,000 in compensatory damages. However, the jury did not reach a verdict on a count claiming the defendants “engaged in a conspiracy to commit racially motivated violence in violation” of federal code. (42 U.S. Code § 1985 - Conspiracy to interfere with civil rights) They also deadlocked on a second count on the defendants failure to prevent the conspiracy. The jury also found that James F. Fields owes damages for an assault and battery claim to specific victims of his deliberate decision to drive into a crowd of people on 4th Street SE on August 12, 2017, as well as another count for intentional infliction of emotional distress. Fields is currently serving time for a criminal conviction on those charges. Read the full verdict on Court Listener. Former City Manager sues CharlottesvilleAnother former Charlottesville official is seeking legal action against the City of Charlottesville. The Daily Progress reports that Dr. Tarron Richardson has filed a federal lawsuit against City Council and four individuals for entering into an agreement that prevented his ability to publicly critique the city after he left his position as City Manager in September 2020. “The First Amendment expressly forbids government bodies — including city councils — from engaging in viewpoint discrimination and retaliating against people based on the content of their speech,” reads the Nature of the Case section of the suit. Richardson wants a jury trial. The civil rights suit seeks damages as well as a declaration that a non-disparagement clause in his severance agreement is not enforceable. The suit also individually names City Councilors Heather Hill and Nikuyah Walker as well as City Attorney Lisa Robertson and former interim City Manager John Blair. The suit revisits Richardson’s tenure as city manager including his enactment of a policy to regulate use of city-issued credit cards and claims some Councilors sought to usurp his authority. “Because of ridiculous demands and the ongoing chicanery and obstructionism from Walker and Hill that would eventually prevent him from adequately performing his job, Dr. Richardson was constructively terminated,” the suit continues. The narrative claims that Councilors did not hold up their end of the severance agreement and disparaged him in social media posts and one interview that was later removed from a local media outlet. This past January, Dr. Richardson asked to publish an op-ed in the Daily Progress on race-relations in Charlottesville, but Robertson said the city would keep open the option of suing to compel Richardson to return the severance payment of $205,000. In all, the suit has four counts including violation of the First Amendment and breach of contract. He’s represented by the Haley Law Firm of Greenville, South Carolina, Keith B. French Law of Pearland, Texas, and Brand Law of Dallas. Earlier this month, former Police Chief RaShall Brackney announced she was filing a wrongful termination claim with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. That’s the first step toward a potential lawsuit. After Richardson left, Council appointed John Blair to serve as interim city manager before naming Chip Boyles this past January. Boyles resigned in October, six weeks after firing Brackney. Marc E. Woolley will become the next interim city manager on December 1. (view the suit on Court Listener)Richmond HUD awardThe agency that owns and operates public housing in Richmond has been awarded a planning grant for the revitalization of a property in Historic Jackson Word. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development awarded $450,000 to the Richmond Redevelopment and Housing Authority for revitalization of Gilpin Court as part of HUD’s Choice Neighborhoods Initiative. “Known as “the Harlem of the South," the neighborhood’s once vibrant main street was filled with thriving theaters, stores, and medical practices,” reads a description in a HUD press release. “The historical heart of the neighborhood was all but destroyed by its bifurcation for the construction of Interstate 95/64.” The intent is for the process to be led by residents, a process already underway at the Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority. The CRHA had applied for a planning grant in 2010 but was not selected. The agency has not applied since. (list of 2010 applicants)Outgoing budget chief The government of Albemarle County is in transition with many long-time staffers having already retired or about to do so. One of them is Lori Allshouse, who served for many years leading up the county’s budget preparation each year. Nelsie Birch joined Albemarle’s executive leadership in the summer of 2020 as Chief Financial Officer and had this to say about Allshouse at the Board of Supervisors meeting on November 17, 2020.“She’s been the face of all things budget, all things capital projects, capital planning, five-year financial planning, financial policies,” Birch said.  Birch thanked Allshouse for preparing her and the rest of the staff for all of the various budget challenges that have come during the past two years. Allshouse has worked for the county since 2000. Her last job title was Assistant Chief Financial Officer for Policy and Partnerships in the finance and budget department. Her last presentation dealt with cost allocations for partner organizations in next fiscal year. You’re reading Charlottesville Community Engagement and it’s time now for another subscriber-supported Public Service Announcement. Since the pandemic began, the Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society has been offering virtual presentations on all manner of topics. This Sunday at 4 p.m. they’ll present an important topic to the Association for the Study of African American Life and History and the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society. The ACHS is working on a Race and Sports initiative to tell the story of the “Desegregation of Central Virginia Public High School Athletics.” Dr. Shelly Murphy and other participants will update the Richmond groups on local efforts to collect stories from those who lived through the transition away from segregated schools, when institutions such as Jackson Burley High School vanished. This is part of the Sunday Sit-In series put on by the Richmond groups. Register online for the event, which begins at 4 p.m. this Sunday. (register)A-School moveAn associate dean at the University of Virginia’s School of Architecture is moving on to take a position at Georgia Tech. Ellen Bassett will become the Chair of the College of Design at the Atlanta-based university. Bassett is currently the associate dean for research at the School of Architecture. She’s also served as the chair of the Department of Urban and Environmental Planning and the director of the School of Architecture’s Real Estate Design and Development.*Service awardsTwo Charlottesville-area churches are among the recipients of Governor Ralph Northam’s Volunteerism and Community Service Awards for 2021. Mt. Zion First African Baptist Church and Church of the Incarnation have been honored as Outstanding Faith-Based Organizations for their offering of free COVID-19 testing in their respective neighborhoods.“Located within highly populated neighborhoods, the majority of those tested have been members of the community’s most vulnerable populations who would otherwise be unable to receive free, consistent, and timely testing,” reads the press release for the awards. Mt. Zion First African Baptist Church is located in the city’s Ridge Street neighborhood and the Church of Incarnation is located off of Hillsdale Drive in Albemarle County. Albemarle wirelessAlbemarle County will review the rules by which cell towers are regulated. A previous Board of Supervisors adopted a policy in December 2000 which among other things requires tall towers to be as invisible to the eye as possible. Several supervisors since then have asked for the policy to be revisited to increase the availability of voice and data service throughout the county. The Board has authorized $100,000 for a study, and Development Process Manager Bill Fritz checked in elected officials on November 17. (2000 Wireless Policy)“Staff wants to ensure that we put out a [request for proposals] that meets the Board’s expectations for the scope of work in the review of these regulations,” Fritz said. “The policy has never been revisited and changes in the regulations have been largely limited to keep up with changing federal regulations, court decisions, and changes in technology.” Fritz said the consultant would be charged with taking potential changes through a community engagement process eventually resulting in a public hearing before the Board of Supervisors. Changes might include elimination of some permits having to go to the Board for approval.“It could include revisions to the ordinance to eliminate the need for special exceptions that have been routinely approved,” Fritz said. “It could include allowance of facilities at greater height or lesser design standard in areas of poor coverage. These are just some ideas.”Supervisor Diantha McKeel has been asking for the policy to be revisited for many years. She suggested going right to making changes in the county code. “The policy is so old that to be honest with you I would just start over with an ordinance,” McKeel said. “And let’s get to the meat of it and let’s not worry about this old outdated policy.” McKeel said the new policy needed to put more emphasis on what she said were the positive benefits of more cell towers, including public safety. Supervisor Ann Mallek said there are other ways to provide more voice and data service that would not require a wholesale change to the policy. “This is taking the mantra of the sales people that this is the way to achieve broadband,” Mallek said. “The county has made a dedicated investment and will continue to make a dedicated investment that broadband is delivered through fiber.” Supervisor Donna Price said the county should explore any methods to expand data service. “We need to update our policy and acknowledge the changes in technology as well as the needs, not the desires, but the needs for connectivity through all of the mechanisms that are available,” Price said. The request for proposals has not yet been issued. END NOTES:Thanks to Becky Calvert and Jennie More for their assistance in coming up with names for the day. Special announcement of a continuing promo with Ting! Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

I Survived Theatre School
Carole Schweid

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 98:48


Intro: buzzsaws and clean slates, rage, Where the Wild Things AreLet Me Run This By You: MoneyInterview: We talk to Carole Schweid about Juilliard, Phoebe Brand, John Lehne, Michael Brand, Midnight Cowboy, musical comedy performance, open dance calls, starring in the original cast of A Chorus Line, Bob Fosse, Pat Birch, Martha Graham, Minnie's Boys, Mervyn Nelson, playing Fastrada in the first national tour of Pippin, being a lone wolf in theatre, Lewis J. Stadlen, doing West Side Story at Bucks County Playhouse, Shelly Winters, Mary Hinkson, Nellie Forbush in South Pacific, playing Tzeitel in Fiddler on the Roof, Peppermint Lounge, Nick Dante, Michael Bennett, Marvin Hamlisch, Public Theater, Gerry Schoenfeld, The Shubert, the wish for a job vs. the real experience of working, Theda Bara & The Frontier Rabbi, Agnes de Mille, Play With Your Food, Staged Reading Magic, Albert Hague.FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited):2 (10s):And I'm Gina Pulice.1 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it. 20 years later,2 (16s):We're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense1 (20s):If at all we survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet? As more space is actually a huge thing.2 (36s):Yeah. I have to apologize for the sound of buzz saws. What is going to be going the whole time I'm talking, doing well, you1 (50s):Took some trees down, right.2 (53s):You know, that's how it started. Yeah. It started with actually, you know, it all was a surprise to me, basically one we've been talking about taking down all the trees in the front of our house. And one day Aaron said, they're coming tomorrow to take down the trees. And I'm like, how much did that cost? Because you know, taking down trees is usually really expensive. And so he says, well, he's going to do everything in the front for whatever. It was $5,000.1 (1m 22s):Yeah. She was pretty good for more than one tree. Cause one tree we had removed was $5,000 at my mom's.2 (1m 28s):Well, and it's not like they have to extract the whole tree. It's just, you know, just chopping it down. Like it's not, I don't know if it's different when they have to take out the, yeah,1 (1m 38s):I think it is when they have to take the stump out the roots and all that.2 (1m 43s):So that was fine. Although I did think to myself, Hmm. We have $5,000 to spend and this is what we're spending it on.1 (1m 54s):I've been there. Oh, I've been there2 (1m 56s):So the morning, but I'm letting it go. And so the morning comes and he tells me to go outside so we can talk about the trees and, and, and I, anyway, we, we designate some trees and they're all in the lower part of the front of our house.1 (2m 10s):Yes. You, and by the way, for people that don't know, like you have a lot of land for, for, for, for not being in the super super country, you have a lot of courage. I mean, you got a lot of trees.2 (2m 21s):Well, yeah, we have an acre and it's a lot of trees and it's a lot of junk trees. What they call junk trees. Because the idea here is once upon a time, when everybody got their heat from wood, you had to have fast growing trees. So it's these skinny trees. Yeah. Anyway, so I thought we were sort of on the same page about what we were going down. This is where I'm getting with this. And I had a couple of meetings yesterday and I was hearing the sound pretty close, but it wasn't until I looked outside that I saw, they took everything out.2 (3m 1s):The, every living thing out in the, in the front, in front of our house, including the only tree I was really attached to was I have a beautiful lilac tree.1 (3m 14s):Okay. Oh shit. And everything out.2 (3m 21s):What's that? Why they1 (3m 22s):Take everything out? Is that the plant? I think,2 (3m 25s):I think what happened was for the first couple of days, the boss was here. And then I think yesterday, the boss was like, you guys just go and finish up. And I don't know that anyway, you know what, I'm just choosing it to be, I'm choosing to look at it like, okay, well we're getting to start over and it can be exactly how we want it to be. So yeah,1 (3m 45s):That is a great attitude because there's nothing you can do you really do about it? Absolutely. Zero. You can do about threes coming out.2 (3m 53s):The only bummer is that it sounds like buzz saws all day at my house and at my neighbor's house, I'm sure they're annoyed with us too. Well,1 (4m 2s):What are you going to put? It is. Okay. So, so, okay. The good, that's the sort of wonky news, but what the good news is, what are you going to put in? Like, is there going to be a whole new,2 (4m 12s):I think it's just going to GRA, I mean, I think it's just going to be grass, which is fine. I mean, my thing was actually, it does a little bit of a metaphor because when we first moved here, we loved how quiet and private and everything is. And part of why everything feels very private at our house is there's trees and bushes blocking our view of anything. I mean, all we can see is trees and bushes when we're laying on the front, which for a while seemed cozy. And then it started to seem like annoying that we could never see. And actually there's kind of a really beautiful view of the mountains behind us. So our mountains Hills.1 (4m 51s):Yeah. But I mean, small mountains, like small2 (4m 53s):Mountains. Yeah. So I realized that it does coincide with our psychological spelunking and trying to just be like more open about everything. Like totally. You know what I mean? Like this is just be open to people seeing our house. This is open to seeing out and let's have, and actually my kids were kind of like, oh, but it's just also open and we don't have any privacy. And I'm like, yeah, well you have your room and bathroom. I mean, there's, there's places to go if you don't want people to, to see you, but let's just be open.1 (5m 31s):There's like a whole, yeah. It's a great metaphor for being visible. Like I am all about lately. I have found a lot of comfort and refuge in the truth of the matter, even if it's not pretty, even if I don't actually like it. So like getting the facts of the matter and also sharing the, of the matter without a judgment. So I appreciate this, like wanting to be seen and then letting go of what people make of that, whether your house is this way or that way, or the neighbors think this or that, I'm also the, I I'm all about it.1 (6m 15s):I'm like, you know, this is, there's something about transparency. That's very comforting for me. It's also scary because people don't like it when they can see, or they can say whatever they want, but the hiding, I think I'm pretty convinced hiding from myself and from others leads to trouble.2 (6m 37s):It leads to trouble. And any time you're having to kind of keep track of what you're, you know, being open about and what you're not, and what you've said, you know, it just it's like it's T it's listen. If I only have a certain amount of real estate in my mind, I really don't want to allocate any of it too. Right. Hiding something and trying to remember. Right.1 (7m 1s):And it's interesting, the more that we do this podcast, the more I see that, like, you know what I thought gene, I thought when we're dead, this podcast is going to remain. And then our children's children's children. I mean, I don't have kids, but my nieces and nephew and your children's children's children will have a record of this. And, and I'd rather it be a record of the truth, the truth and transparency, then some show about pretending. So I think it's going to be good for them to be able to look back and be like, for me, it's like the, my crazy aunt, like, what was she doing? And what did she think? And, and, oh my God, it's a record of the times too.1 (7m 43s):Yeah.2 (7m 43s):I think about that kind of a lot. And I think about, of course I say all this and my kids are probably like going to be, have no interests unless the, until they get to a certain age, I mean, I'll put it to you this way. If I could listen to a podcast of my mother in her, you know, in the time that I don't really the time of life, certainly before I was born, but in my life where I still didn't see her as a person until, you know, I'd love to just things like what her voice sounded like then, and that kind of thing. I mean, it's interesting.1 (8m 16s):I have nothing of my mom, like we have a very few, it was interesting because we didn't, you know, we, there was not a lot of video of my mother and today's actually the 10th anniversary of her passing.2 (8m 28s):Oh, wow. Wow. That's hard.1 (8m 31s):It is hard. You know, it is hard. And I'm working through, I started therapy with a new therapist, like a regular LCSW lady. Who's not because my last guy was an Orthodox Jewish man who wanted me to have children. Like it was a whole new, I just got involved in all the Shannon Diego's of like weirdness. I attracted that weirdest and whatever. So this lady is like a legit, you know, therapist. And they only bummer is, and I totally understand she's on zoom, but like, I I'm so sick of like, I would love to be in a room with a therapist, but I get it. She's in, she's an older lady, which is also great. I was so sick of having like 28 year old therapists.1 (9m 13s):Yeah,2 (9m 13s):Yeah, yeah. For sure.1 (9m 16s):I don't even seem right. Unless clients are like, you know, fit seven to 17. So anyway, so, but all this to say about my mom, I was thinking about it and I think what's harder than right. My mom's death right now is that there's I just, you know, and this is something I wanted to bring up with you is just like, I have a lot of rage that's coming up lately about my childhood and we weren't allowed to feel rage. And my mom was the only one allowed to feel rage. And so this rage mixed with perimenopause slash menopause. I mean, like I still get a period, but like, it's, it's a matter of time before that's over.1 (9m 58s):So, but the rage, so I guess, right. I get, you know, people like to talk about rage as some or anger as something we need to process and we need to do this and that, but the truth of the matter is since we're being transparent, like rage can be really scary. Like sometimes the rage, I feel, it's not like I'm going to do anything. Why wonky? I hope, but it's more like a, I don't know what to do with it. That is my, and I was talking in therapy about that. Like, I'm not actually sure. Practically when the feelings come up, what to do with rage. And I feel like it speaks to in our culture of like, we're all about now, this sort of like, we talk about this fake positivity and shit like that.1 (10m 41s):And also like embracing all your feelings, but there's not really practical things that we learn what to do when you feel like you're going to take your laptop and literally take it and throw it across the room and then go to jail. Like you, you. So I have to like look up things on the internet with literally like what to do with my rage.2 (11m 1s):I think that's why that's part of my attraction to reality. Television shows is a, is a performance of rage. That's that I wouldn't do just because I don't think I could tolerate the consequences. I mean, an upwards interpretation is, oh, it's not my value, but it's really just like, I don't think I can manage the content of the consequences. I'm totally at having all these blown up1 (11m 30s):And people mad at me and legal consequences. I can't,2 (11m 35s):It's something very gratifying about watching people just give in to all of their rage impulses and it's yeah. I, it it's, it may be particularly true for women, but I think it's really just true for everybody that there's very few rage outlets, although I guess actually maybe sports. Well, when it turns, when it turns sideways, then that's also not acceptable.1 (12m 3s):Yeah. I mean, and maybe that's why I love all this true crime is like, these people act out their rage, but like lately to be honest, the true crime hasn't been doing it for me. It's interesting. That is interesting. Yeah. It's sort of like, well, I've watched so much of it that like now I'm watching stuff in different languages, true crime. And I'll start again. No, no, just stories. I haven't all been the only stories that I haven't heard really, really are the ones from other countries now. So I'm watching like, like true crime in new, in Delhi.2 (12m 42s):Do you need your fix? I actually was listening to some podcasts that I listened to. There's always an ad and it's exactly about this. It's like, we love true crime, but we've heard every story we know about every grisly murder, you know, detail. And it was touting itself as a podcast of, for next time I listened to it. I'll note the name of it so I can share it with you. You know, about this crimes. You haven't heard about1 (13m 9s):T the thing is a lot of them now, because I'm becoming more of a kind of sewer. Like a lot of it is just shittily made. So like the, the they're subtitled and dubbed in India, like India. So you've got like the, the they're speaking another language and then they're and if they don't match, so then I'm like, well, who's right. Like, is it the dubbing that's right. Or the subtitles that are right. And, and actually the words matter because I'm a writer. So it was like one anyway, it's poorly done is what I'm saying in my mind. And so it sort of scraped scraping the bottom of the barrel. It's like deli 9 1 1. I swear to God. That's what it, and, and it's, and also it's, it's horrifying because the, you know, the legal systems everywhere fucked, but India has quite a system.2 (13m 57s):I think that to the rage, like, tell me more about what comes up for you with rage and where you,1 (14m 6s):Yeah. Okay. So some of it is physiological, like where I feel literally like, and I think this is what my doctor's talking about. The menopause symptoms. I literally feel like a gnashing, my teeth. Like, I feel a tenseness in my jaw. Like, that's literally that. And she's like, that could also be your heart medication. So talk to your heart doctor. I mean, we're checking out all the things, but like, but it's tension. That's what it really feels like in my body is like tight tension where I feel earth like that. If I had to put a sound effect to it, it's like, ah, so I, I feel that is the first symptom of my rage. And then I feel like, and, and I say out loud, sometimes I hate my life.1 (14m 54s):That's what I say. And that is something I have never allowed myself to say before. Like I, I think unconsciously, I always told myself, like, you just, you have to be grateful and you know, those are the messages we receive, but sometimes life just fucking sucks. And sometimes my life, I just, I just can't stand. And, and in moments, you know, I never loved myself. So it's mostly a physical symptom followed by this is intolerable, what someone is doing. Sometimes my dog or my husband, but even, even if the coworking space, you know, like the lady was talking too loud and I was like, oh my God, this is intolerable.1 (15m 34s):She has to shut up. So agitation, that's what it is. And, and then it passes when I, if I, if I can say, oh my gosh, I am so fricking in Rouge right now. Then it passes.2 (15m 52s):Yeah. Well, it, it kind of sounds like from, from you and probably for most people, the only real option is to turn it in on yourself, you know, like you're not going to put it elsewhere. So you've, you know, you have, which is, so I guess maybe it's okay if you turn it on yourself, if you're doing, if you're working, if you're doing it with acceptance, which is the thing I'm gathering from you, as opposed to stewing and festering. And1 (16m 21s):I mean, it becomes, it's interesting. Yes, it is. So it's like, so red, hot, and so sudden, almost that the only thing I can do is say, okay, this is actually happening. Like, I can't pretend this isn't happening. I, it I'm like physically clenching my fists. And then I, yeah, there is a level of acceptance. I don't get panicked anymore. Now that I, that something is wrong. I just say, oh, this is rage. I name it. I'm like, I feel enraged and white, hot rage, and then it, and then it, and then I say, that's what this is.1 (17m 3s):I don't know why. I don't know where it's coming from. Right. In this moment. It's not proportionate to the lady, like literally talking on the phone at my coworking space that she's not shouting. So it's not that. And I don't want to miss that. I'm not like I can't fool myself to think that it's really, that lady's problem. That I feel like throwing my laptop at her head. And then, and then it passes. But, but, but it is, it is more and more. And, and I think a lot of it, not a lot of it, but you know, my doctor really does think that it's, it's hormonal. A lot of it just doesn't help the matter. I mean, it's not like, oh, great. It's hormonal. Everything's fine. But it, it does help to make me feel a little less bonkers.2 (17m 45s):Maybe you should have like a, a whole rage. Like what, like a rate. Well, first I was thinking you should have a range outfit. Like, oh, for me, if I, I noticed I pee in the winter anyway, I pick like my meanest boots and my leather jacket. When I'm feeling, you know, maybe say maybe kind of a rage outfit, when did Pierce?1 (18m 9s):No, I, I scratched myself in my sleep. Oh no, it's okay. It happens all the time. I do it in my sleep. It's a thing that it's like a little skin tag that I need to get removed. It's2 (18m 23s):So you could have a rage outfit and then you could have a rage playlist, And then you might even have like rage props. I'm just trying to think about a way that your ma you, you could write because if, if how you process something is artistically creatively, then maybe you needed a creative outlet that's specifically for, for race.1 (18m 48s):Yeah. And you know, the, I, I love that. And now I'm thinking about like, as a kid, we, because we, anger was so off limits to us. I used to violently chew gum. Like I would chew on the gum. That was a way, and my mom did the same thing, even though she also got her rage out, but it was like, you know, when people violently chew on their gum, like that was a way I could get my aggression out. That's so sad that that's like the only way.2 (19m 16s):Well, I mean, you find it wherever you can find me. It's like water looking for whatever that expression is, right? Yeah. Huh. Well, I have to get more in touch with my rage because I I'm told that I seem angry a lot.1 (19m 33s):You do.2 (19m 35s):I, I do get told that, but, but that sucks for me because I feel like I'm not expressing my anger and I'm, but I'm not. So I'm not, and I'm being seen as angry at certain times. So that means I didn't even get the benefit of like letting out the anger that somebody is.1 (19m 56s):Right. You didn't even get to act out the anger. It's like, yeah. So for me, miles tells me that all the time, like, he's like, you seem really in couples therapy. Also, I have to admit yesterday was a big day. We had couples therapy on zoom. Then I had individual therapy. And in between I had all kinds of like, just stuff happening. So, but yeah, I'm told I a miles is like, you seem so angry and he's not wrong. And, and we take it out on the people that we live in a two by four apartment with. So I also feel like this office space is helping with that, but yeah, I dunno, I'm going to have to keep exploring my, my rage and that's what it is.1 (20m 37s):And also it is like, I am the character in where the wild things are that kid, that is what I feel like. And it feels it's like the perfect cause he wants to gnash his teeth and, and he does, and a thrash, thrash, thrashing mash, or the words 2 (21m 6s):Let me run this by you that I wanted to do when we're going to talk to Molly that we didn't get to do. And it was based on made, you know, and just about money and, and wondering like what your relationship is right now with money. And also, but when were you at your lowest with money? What do you remember as being your lowest moment? Sure, sure. With money with money.1 (21m 40s):Okay. I have moments of what first comes to mind was when right. I was at DePaul. So it's an apropos in college and there was obviously a sense. I had a sense of lack, always, even though based on whatever, but it was phone. Somehow my accounts were always negative, right? Like, and I would call the number, the banking number, incessantly to check, and it would always be negative. So I have this panic thoughts about that. Like being a time of like, and that's not the only time that happened like that.1 (22m 23s):Where, what is the feeling? The feeling was that, and this was in college where it started to happen, where I felt like there's never enough. No, one's going to help me. I'm irresponsible with money. Was the message I told myself and I probably was, I was in college, but I can't handle money. And literally that, that panic was also, I mean, it was true. I had no money, but my parents would have backed me, probably helped me out, but I was too scared to ask for help. So that's like, that's when, when you asked that question, that's where I go.1 (23m 4s):But, but that's also a college kind of me. So like in terms of an adult, me, that's a really great, great question. My lowest, I don't know. What about you?2 (23m 22s):Well, I've got a lot of Loma Loehmann's moments with money when I was in high school. The thing was, I lost my wallet all the time.1 (23m 35s):Oh, I remember this. I remember you talking about,2 (23m 38s):Yeah, that'd be still lose stuff all the time. That actually started at a young age with, you know, my mom would, she, my mom was really into jewelry and she would buy me destroyed. And there's nothing wrong with the fact that she brought me jewelry, but I lost it. You know, she buy me nice gold jewelry1 (23m 59s):Because she likes nice things. That's right. Yeah.2 (24m 4s):In college it was pretty bad. And the first time it was pretty bad. I had to move back in with my mom because I couldn't afford rent. And then the second time I just, I re I really, if I had more bravery, I probably would have signed up to be one of those girls in the back of the Chicago reader. Like, I, I, I just figured what ha how literally, how else? Because I had a job, but I only worked however much I could work given the fact that we were in rehearsals and like busy all day, so I never could make enough money. And then I just, I think I always have had a dysfunctional relationship with money.1 (24m 51s):Wait a minute, but I have to interrupt. Why, why didn't our parents fucking help us? Okay. Look, I know I sound like a spoiled asshole brat, but like, when I think of the anxiety that we were going through and I know your mom did, so I'm not going to talk shit about your mom or anything, but I'm just saying like, why did we feel so alone in this when we were so young, this is not right.2 (25m 11s):Yeah. Well, my mom did help me out as much as she possibly could, but I think part of it too, my dad certainly didn't think it was that. I mean, when my mom was 18 and my dad was 19, they bought a house and had a baby. So I think part of it is, has been like, what's the matter with you? Cause I didn't go to college, you know, that's the other thing. So, so then when I, then I had a period for like 10 years where I always had three jobs, me two, what1 (25m 46s):Did you have enough then? I mean like, could you make rapid enough?2 (25m 49s):I had enough then yeah, I had enough then. But then when Aaron decided he wants to go to medical school, it was really on me to, to bring in the income. I mean, his parents always gave him money. They helped, it was a lot more. I mean, and actually it's why he became a therapist because I thought, well, we're going to be living with no income because he's going to be a student. Right. So I better giddy up and get a job. So the whole time I was in social work school, I was bartending. I remember that. And then I went quickly into private practice so that I could make money.2 (26m 29s):And it turned out to be, it turned out to backfire on me. Tell1 (26m 35s):Me, tell me, tell me more.2 (26m 37s):It backfired in two ways. Number one, I was, I shouldn't have been operating a private practice without my LCSW. I had my MSW and I was working at the time in a psych hospital. And all of the psychiatrist said, you should start your private practice. You should start your private practice. And I remember saying at the beginning, I don't know if I'm allowed to oh yes, yes. You definitely can. I know tons of MSWs into plenty of people and it's true. I don't know if it's still true now in New York, but at that time you could walk around and see plenty of nameplates for offices where somebody in private practice and that just have an MSW.2 (27m 18s):They just had to have a supervisor1 (27m 19s):Or something.2 (27m 22s):I don't know. Okay. I dunno. Right. So that ended up coming to haunt me when a disgruntled patient. And they're all disgruntled in some way, a family who actually had been swindled by a con artist, like they, they were a blue blood, rich ass family and they got swindled by a con artist. And so they were talking about rage. They had a lot of rage about that. When this guy who was paying for his daughter's treatment, didn't think it was going where, you know, he wanted it to right.2 (28m 4s):He started pushing back about the fee and then he was submitting to his insurance company and they were not reimbursing because I didn't have the LCSW. So then he reported me to the New York state office of professional discipline or1 (28m 21s):Whatever yeah.2 (28m 21s):Regulation or whatever. Yeah. And I ha I had to go through a whole thing. I had to have a lawyer and I had to go, yeah, yeah. It was a nightmare. It was a complete and total nightmare. And I, and I said nothing, but like, yeah, I did that. I did do that. And I did it because I needed to make the money. I mean, in some ways I don't regret it because I did it worked for the time that it worked. And then by the time it stopped working, I was ready to leave private practice anyway. Oh my God. Yeah. But then it also backfired because we were taking in this money, which we desperately needed living in New York city with two kids.2 (29m 3s):And, and we were, we were spending it all and not hold withholding any for taxes. So then that started, that started, that started almost 10 year saga of just, I mean, I, it's embarrassing to even say how much money we've paid in just in fees, compounded fees. Nope. I'm sure. In the last 10 years we've given the government a million dollars.1 (29m 29s):That sounds, that sounds about right. And you know, I think the thing with money too, is the amount of forgiveness I've need to muster up for the financial decisions that I have made. So one of them that I'm super embarrassed about is that, and I, and I hear you when it's like, yeah, I, it, it's embarrassing. I, I, when I did my solo show, I inherited the year that my mom died. My great aunt also died, who I very barely knew. And I inherited like, like a lot of money. Well, to me, a lot, like 50 grand from her, and I spent 15,000 on a publicist for my solo show that did nothing.1 (30m 14s):So I was swindled. Oh,2 (30m 17s):I'm so sorry to hear that. That really did nothing.1 (30m 22s):I could have done it all on my own. I could have done it all on my own, on drugs, in a coma. Do you know what I'm saying? Like, like, come on. So I have done made some questionable decisions. I did the best we did the best we could with, with the information that we all had at the time. I would never make that decision. I wouldn't, I will never make that mistake again. So yeah. Money is very, very, obviously this is so like kind of obvious to say, but it is, it is. So it is a way in which we really, really use it to either prize or shame ourselves. Right. And, and, and w I do it either way, like I do it.1 (31m 2s):Oh, I'm so fancy. I inherited this dough. And then I also do it. It's that thing that they talk about in program, which is like, you're the worm, but you're the best worm for the festival, special worms. And like, you're not a worker among workers. I'm just like the best idiot out there. It's like,2 (31m 18s):Dude. Yeah. And you're making me realize that money might be the only very quantifiable way of understanding your psychology list. The money is like, understanding your psychology through math. It's going okay. If you're a person like me who gets offered a credit card at age 20 totally signs up and, and immediately maxes it out at whatever, to get 27% interest rate. So whatever little thousand dollars of clothes I got, I probably paid $10 for it. And for the longest time. So, so that's me being afraid of the truth of my financial situation, being unwilling to sacrifice, having, you know, whatever, cute clothes being about the immediate gratification of it all and not thinking longterm.2 (32m 15s):Yeah.1 (32m 16s):Okay. Well, not asking for help either. Like, like, I don't know who I'd asked, but someone had to know more than me. I didn't ask my parents. They didn't really know what was happening at, or that just was their generation of like, not teaching us about money. It was sort of like, good luck. Get it together. We got it together. You get it together. Okay. Fine. But like unwillingness and fear to ask, to be taught something about money. Like, I didn't know, Jack shit about credit or interest Jack shit.2 (32m 46s):Yeah. And I recently realized that I'm basically redoing that with my kids, because we supposedly have this allowance. Only one of my kids ever remembers to ask for it because you know, only one of my kids is very, you know, very interested in money, but like, in a way I can understand why the others don't because it's like, well, anytime they want something, I pay for it. I never say sometimes I'll say recently, I've gotten better about saying, if we're going to go back to school shopping I'll especially if the oldest one, I'll say, this is your budget. If you, if you spend it all on one pair of sneakers, then I hope you're okay with your sweat pants that don't fit and wear them everyday for the rest of the school year.2 (33m 31s):Right. But it's, we've, we've just been extremely inconsistent in tying, like, for example, chores to your allowance,1 (33m 42s):It's fucking miserable and hard. And I have trouble doing that for myself. I wouldn't be able to do that for my children. If I had children, I can't not give the dog people food. What are you talking about? How am I going to bring it? Doesn't shock me. We didn't learn the skills and I'm not blaming. I mean, I'm blaming, of course my parents, but I'm also just saying, it's just the facts. If we're going to be that in the truth, like, I didn't learn, I didn't educate myself and nobody educated me. So I'm really learning through trial and error. Mostly error, how to be okay with money. And it is you're right. Like finances, romance, and finance teach us the most about our psychology.2 (34m 24s):Yeah. Yeah. Romance finance. I love that. 1 (34m 28s):I think that my boss at Lutheran social services to say all the time, finance and romance, romance, and finance, that's what all these addictions are about is that's how you see them. I'm like, she's right. I mean, she was, I liked her. She was bonkers, but I liked her. She said some good. She, she also is famous for saying, and she didn't say it, but she would always quote, the, no one gets out of here alive. You know, none of us getting out of here life, we might as well start2 (34m 54s):. Well, today on the podcast, we were talking to Carol Schweid and original cast member of the original production of a chorus line on Broadway. She's got great stories to tell she's a fascinating person. And I think you're going to really enjoy this conversation with Carol Schweid. Exactly. Carol shrine. Congratulations. You survived theater school. I did. You did.2 (35m 34s):And where did you go to theater school. Okay. First of all,3 (35m 38s):Let me just take my coffee, my extra coffee off of the stove and put it on my table. Cause it's gonna burn because we don't want that.4 (35m 51s):Okay. You're I am looking for a cop. If you have one, you know, this is ridiculous.3 (36m 2s):Hi there. Hi. This is a riot that you talk about surviving theater school. I think it's great. Okay. So this is working, right? You can hear me. Yeah, no, totally. A hundred percent. So this is my, I started college at Boston university. I was an acting major, which I loved. I really did, but I, what I loved more than anything was I loved the history of the theater. We had a great professor who told the tales of the gladiators and the, you know, the gladiators on the island and the fighting, and then the island, the survivors, and then the island would slowly sink into the water.3 (36m 45s):What is this? What did I miss? It was the early history of the theater. It was starting on the church steps. It was, you know, the second, whatever all of that history was, I found it really interesting. I also loved the station shop crew stuff. I liked learning about lighting. I was terrible at it. I, you know, I would fall off ladder, but I, I, I enjoyed the backstage stuff as much as I enjoy. I just, I liked it. I, we did the rose tattoo and my, and my first job was to take care of the goat. I was on the prop crew.3 (37m 28s):I took care of the goat. Was it a stuffed goat? No, it was a real goat. Wow. What can I tell you? The rose tattoo. There's a goat in the play. I didn't realize you could have livestock and colleges, college, whatever it was. I look like I have jaundice with is that something's wrong with the light jump I sent you stop your, where is the microphone part of your, do you want me to hold it up better? Because when you move, it hits your shirt and it makes like a scratching, right? That's right. I'll do it this way. I won't move around. When you look tan, you look, you don't like jaundice at all. Okay. Well then that's all right. Good. Thanks. Were the goat handlers.3 (38m 8s):Good to talk to you. I mean, that was, and I didn't mind, I didn't mind being an usher. All of those things, you know, I remember somebody sitting us down and saying, you're you are the first person. The audience we'll meet tonight as an usher. I took all of the stuff I did, but the acting business was very confusing to me. I didn't quite know. I had done a lot of theater and dancing and been in the shows and stuff, but I really, I was a little more of a dancer than an actor. I'd taken class in the city. I'd followed some cute guy from summer camp to his acting class. But half the time, I honestly didn't understand a word.3 (38m 48s):Anybody said, I just, nobody does. I really didn't get it so much at the time I loved it, but I didn't always get it. And for some reason, and I have no idea where this, why this happened. I had a boyfriend in summer stock whose mother worked at Barnard and her best friend was a woman named Martha Hill. Martha Hill ran the dance department at a school called Julliard. Nope. I had no idea. Cool. Just a little, nothing school. This is back in the day. It's a long time ago. It was just a plain old school. It wasn't like a school, you know, where you bow down. And I really was a very good dancer and always loved dancing.3 (39m 33s):You know, I've been dancing since I'm like a kid, a little five or six or whatever. So I was a little disenchanted with my successes at Boston U even though I had friends, I was having a great time. I mean, Boston in the late sixties was amazingly fun, but I felt like I wasn't getting it. I mean, it wasn't a school that was cutting people. Thank God, because that would have been torture. I don't know how anybody survives that, but I audition for this dance department in this school called Juilliard and got in and then told my parents that I was going to change colleges. I remember making up a dance in the basement of my dorm in Boston.3 (40m 17s):Cause you had a sort of take class and then you had to show something that you should have made up. And somebody else from college was leaving school to come to New York to be a singer. So we decided we were going to be roommates. And then we had a summer stock. Somebody at BU started some summer theaters. So I had a job or two, I think I had some friends from there. So I ended up moving, changing colleges and going to Juilliard. And I spent three years there. I was a modern dancer major. So we had the Limone company, including Jose Lamone wow teachers and the Graham company.3 (40m 59s):I mean, Martha, Martha Graham did not teach, but her company did as a winter and Helen, I was Helen McGee. One of the, they were maniacs. I mean, they're, they're like gods and goddesses and their whole life is about dance. And I was one of those demonstrators for her eight o'clock beginning class, my third year of school. I mean, I, it was all about technique. We had amazing ballet teachers. We had Fiorella Keane who, I mean, Anthony tutor taught class there and he was Anthony. I mean, so I got a out of being at that school that I have never lost. I mean, I can, I'm making up the answers for high school kids now really.3 (41m 42s):I'm just finishing up a production of grease, which is really kind of boring, but whatever I liked Greece, tell me more. Yeah. It's okay. If you hear it enough, you really get sick of it. Well, that's true. Yeah. I mean high school kids doing high school kids is like, Jesus, God, you just want to slit your throat. The moodiness when it comes to the girls. I mean, I love them. I really love them. I love the guys because puppies, they fall all over each other and they're fabulous, but that's a lie anyway. So I did something that I don't know why I did it and how it worked out. That way I left. I had a very best friend in college that was, you know, and I came to New York and made, made and shared an apartment with this slightly crazy woman.3 (42m 32s):And a year later I got myself a studio apartment on west end avenue and 71st street. And my mom co-signed the lease. And I spent three years dancing, honestly dancing almost every day. I wanted to take sights singing, but they wouldn't let me because I was in the dance department. And I didn't know, you could advocate for that. Sure. I didn't know. You could take classes at Columbia. I mean, who had time anyway, but was it a three-year program? It was a four year program, but I had taken a music class at BU that was like music appreciation one. Yeah. And for whatever reason, they gave me credit for that.3 (43m 14s):So I had a full year credit. Yep. Three years of Juilliard where I really worked my tail off. What's weird about it is that I am, you know, just a plain old Jewish girl from New Jersey, you know, a middle-class Jewish girlfriend. And to, to think that I could have a profession where people don't talk and don't eat, which is what the answers do is a riot to me. Yeah. Yeah. It's an absolute riot because you know, I mean, that should be basically the manual for dancers. Don't talk, don't eat, but I always knew that I was heading to Broadway. I really have always wanted to do that.3 (43m 55s):And I, and, and w was not really ever in question that I would, I somehow assumed if I worked hard and figured it out enough, I would find my way to working on Broadway. And I, and I made the right choice in the sense of switching colleges. Because in the seventies, if you look at your list of Broadway shows, all the directors were choreographers. They were all dancers, all of them Fauci, Michael Bennett champion, all of them. So I started working when I got out of school, you know, it was, and I had already done a couple of summers of summer stock and I did a summer Bushkill pencil, you know, these ridiculous, stupid theaters all over, but it was a blast.3 (44m 36s):It was fun. Where, what was your first job out of school? I was still, I was in school and it was the Mount Suttington Playhouse, which was like a tin shell in Connecticut. And I think it was still in college. Cause two guys from school had opened this theater at the skiing place, but it wasn't skiing. Then it was a sh it was like a tin shell. So couldn't really do a show when it was raining very well. And I believe it was stopped the world. I want to get off and I can still remember the Alto harmony to some of the songs. So you okay. Wait, so you don't consider, you didn't consider yourself a, an actor or did you?3 (45m 20s):Well, I did, but I think what happened was I had to audition for something. It'd be you like, they had grad programs and it wasn't that I was unsuccessful there, but somebody came and I didn't get cast. I didn't get hired. And I didn't understand, you know, like they give you all these acting exercises. We do sense memory. Well, I didn't know they were exercises. I didn't, they were they're like plea aids. Right. They're like learning things. I took this all very seriously. I would stand in a room and try to feel it was like that song from chorus line, you know, try to feel the emotion, feel the, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.3 (46m 5s):I did all of that. I didn't really understand the simple, what am I want here? And what's in my way of trying to get it. Yeah. It took me so long to find teachers that I really could understand and make me a better actor. So when did you find them? When did you start to find them? Oh, that's interesting. Well, I found a couple of good teachers in New York. I mean, honestly there was a woman named Mary Tarsa who had been in the group theater and an older lady. I mean, it's a long time ago anyway, you know, but I remember sitting in her class and she would talk about using imagery and th and I started to sort of understand a little bit, which is amazing to me because after I moved to Westport and I met, do you know the name Phoebe brand?3 (46m 58s):Yeah. Phoebe brand was in our theater workshop. Oh, taught a class. She was already up in her eighties and she taught a class, a Shakespeare class on Sunday mornings. And all of a sudden these things that I didn't understand from decades before. Hmm. It sort of pulled it all together. But for me, I went, I was in California after I got married and moved to LA for a couple of years, found a teacher named John LAN and Lee H N E and two years in his class. I started to really understand how to do it. And then when I came back to New York, he sent me to Michael Howard and Michael Howard, Michael Howard was a great teacher for me.3 (47m 44s):He's still a great, I don't know if he's still around if he's teaching or not, but he was a wonderful teacher. And I started to understand how to do it. Was Len the, did he teach the method or what was yes, he was, he was an actor studio teacher. And I started to understand about being present on the stage and being able to deal with people. All of it, it just changed dramatically. I mean, I started to understand what this was about and seeing other good actors and chipping away at it and finding people to rehearse with. And1 (48m 22s):You, you, from what I know, and what I'm gathering is that once you graduated Juilliard, you were cast in New York.3 (48m 30s):Well, you know, I did get my very, my V I I've. I mean, I, I remember going to see midnight cowboy, which was about the same time as I got out of college. And I remember going into a terrible panic of, oh my God. I mean, really scared about all of it. And I, I went, I joined a class that a friend of mine, somebody told me about this class, you know, I always follow somebody to a class. I'm always, I have good friends. And I, somebody says, oh, I love this guy come to class and I'd show up.3 (49m 12s):And this was a musical comedy singing class, kind of where there were writers in the class and actors in the class. And the writers in the class would work on a musical that they didn't have permission for. It wasn't like they were, we were doing this for money or for, for future. So my friend who I became friends with wrote her musical version of barefoot in the park and which has never been done, but I remember I was in it and this guy was in it. And we, it was the kind of a class where it was a very warm, funny group, funny group of wacko theater people. And I would go to open calls and I'd usually go to open dance calls because that was a door for me.3 (49m 59s):And also I used to have to sneak out of Jew, not sneak necessarily, but essentially sneak out to take my singing lessons. And I took singing lessons every, you know, every week for years, for three years, I would, you know, and I, and I was not really, I don't think a very good singer, but I became a good singer. I would sneak out of school and go to an acting class. I don't even know when I started that, but I know that I would find the time to do it and then talk about acting and find a teacher so that when I would audition for a musical and I would get through the dancing. Usually if I got through the first cut, I would make it to the end. I wouldn't always get the job, but if I made it through that first horrible, random cut, you know, where there's 200 people in your dancing across the stage and it's yes, no, yes, no.3 (50m 47s):Is it really?1 (50m 48s):Because I'm not a dancer. So I never had this. I, when my agents are like, oh, there's an open dance call. I'm like, ah, that's you sent the wrong person, the email. So it's really like that, like in, in chorus line where they say, you know,3 (51m 1s):Oh yeah. It's like all that jazz. It's really like that.2 (51m 6s):Wait, I have a question. I want to hear the re the rest of that. But I, I just, I've never asked anybody. What's the biggest difference between the people who got cut immediately. I mean, was it training or were there people that, in other words, were there people who were just walking in off the street with no training trying to audition? Yeah,1 (51m 29s):No, truly an open call.3 (51m 31s):No. And sometimes these were equity calls. Cause I, I, I did get my equity card on a summer. That one summer I worked for a non-union, you know, we were in either Bushkill Pennsylvania or Southern Eaton Connecticut, or I did a couple of those summers. And then the next summer, the choreographer from that show had an equity job. And he hired like three of us from our non-unions summer stock, because we were good enough. And1 (52m 4s):So when you went to these open calls, everyone, there was a bad-ass dancer. No one, there was like,3 (52m 10s):That's not true. That's not true. There were all different levels of dancers, but it was also a look await, you know, it was always, I was always like seven pounds overweight. It was like, the torture is thing of weight does enough to put anybody over the edge1 (52m 26s):That they literally3 (52m 27s):Weigh you, Carol. Oh God. No. Oh, but it's so look, and I will tell you there's one. There was one time when I remember auditioning for above Fossey show and there were a lot of people on the stage and we were whatever we were doing. And then at 1.3 Fossey dancers, it was their turn. And these three gals, okay. Their hair was perfect. Their makeup was fabulous. They had a little necklace, they had a black leotards, you know, cut up high, but not out of control. Good tights, no, no runs, nice shoes, nails done.3 (53m 7s):And they were fantastic. They were clean. They were technically, and we all sort of went, oh fuck.1 (53m 16s):Right.3 (53m 18s):Right. And I have friends who became Fossey dancers. I mean, I worked for Bob, but I have friends who did a lot of shows him. And they had that same experience where they saw other people, the way it should be. And then they would go back a month later and get the job because they knew what it took. It was all about knowing what it takes. But the thing about having studied acting and having slowly studied singing is that in the world of musical theater, I was ahead of the game because there's not that much time. So you have to be willing to spend all of your time.3 (54m 0s):Right.1 (54m 1s):There are some people I'm assuming Carol, that could dance wonderfully, but couldn't do the singing and the acting part. And that's where you were like, that's the triple threat newness of it all is like, you could do3 (54m 12s):Well, I could do them better than a lot of people. And I certainly could sing well, and I had, I could sing a short song and I knew that you sing a short song. I knew that you'd probably do an uptempo, you know? And also I tend to be a little angry when I go into an audition. It's like, why do I fuck? Do I have to audition? I better, duh. So I needed to find things that allowed me to be a little angry so I could be myself. And I could also be a little funny if I could figure out how to do that. So all of these things worked in my favor. And then of course, like everybody else in her, a lot of people, pat Birch, who was a choreographer, she had like a gazillion shows running, including Greece on Broadway. And now over here, I don't know if she did grease, but she did over here.3 (54m 55s):She did. She was very prolific choreographer. She had been a Martha Graham dancer and she had taught a couple of classes at Julliard. And when it came to my auditioning for her, she needed girls who could dance like boys. She didn't need tall leggy, chorus girls. We were doing the show she was working on, was a show called Minnie's boys. And it was a show about the Marx brothers and the last number of the show. We were all the whole chorus was dressed up like different Marx brothers. And she needed girls who could be low to the ground, who can, you could turn who and I was the right person.3 (55m 36s):And I remember being in that class, that wonderful musical theater class with a teacher named Mervin Nelson, who was just a great older guy who kind of worked in the business. I remember I had to go to my callback. I went to my class and the callback was at night. And I remember him walking me to the door, putting his arm around me and saying, go get the job. And if you don't get this one, we'll get you. The next one1 (56m 4s):That makes me want to3 (56m 4s):Cry. Well, it made me feel like part of the family, cause we all want to be part of that theater family. And so I tend to do that when I'm with an actor, who's going to go get a job or go get, you know, you want to feel like it's possible. Yeah. You feel like you can, you deserve it.1 (56m 29s):You said, you mentioned briefly that you worked for Bob3 (56m 32s):Fossey. I did.1 (56m 35s):Oh my gosh. Did you turn into one of those ladies that looked like a bossy dancer too? Like, did you then show up to those auditions? Like, oh3 (56m 43s):No, I don't think I, I couldn't, I didn't, I could not get into a chorus of Bob Fossey, but I did get to play for strata in Pippin in the, in the, in the first national tour. And he, Bob was the, he was the director and I, I knew I was the right person for that job. It was also a funny, kind of lovely circumstances that I was in some off-Broadway an off-Broadway show that had started as an awful off, off of a, that, that Bubba, that moved to an off-Broadway theater. I got some excellent reviews. And I think the day the review came out was the day I had my audition for Bob Fossey.3 (57m 24s):So I, and I played it. I had talked to people who knew him. I talked to, you know, I, I knew that I, I don't know, I just, I, I had done some work and I just, I don't know the right person at the right time, somebody, he needed it. That part required a good dancer. Who could, I don't know how I got the part. I just,1 (57m 57s):I'm kind of getting the impression that we're talking about being a strong dancer.3 (58m 0s):Well, let's strong dancer. And also being able to, being able to talk and sing was really the key. I'm not sure that I certainly, as a young person, I, I didn't do nearly as much comedy as I did when I got a little older, but, and also there were a lot of divisions. You sort of either did musicals or you did straight plays and it was hard to get into an audition even for a straight play. And the truth is I think that a lot of us who thought we were better than we were as you get better, you see when you really, wasn't a very strong actor.1 (58m 43s):Right. But there's something about that. What I'm noticing and what you're talking about is like, there's something about the confidence that you had by maybe thinking that you might've been a little better than you were that actually behooves young actors and performers that, you know, cause when Gina and I talked to these people were like, oh my God, they have a healthy ego, which actually helps them to not give up as where I was like, I'm terrible. I'm giving up at the first hour.3 (59m 9s):Exactly. Right. Right. And, and it, and it goes back and forth. It's like a CSO one day, you feel like, oh yeah, I'm good at this. I can walk it. I get, I'm like, I'm okay with this. And the next day you just to hide under the bed, I think that's sort of the way it goes. I didn't know that people who worked on Broadway even then all had coaches and teachers and support systems and you know, being kind of a little more of a lone Wolf, which I was, and still fight against in a way I come against that a lot, for whatever reasons, you know, whatever it doesn't work, what to be a lone Wolf.3 (59m 54s):Yeah. Yeah. You can't do this alone. You can't do it without a support system. It's just too hard because when I actually had the best opportunity I had, which was being part of a chorus line, it was harder than I thought to just be normal, come up with a good performance every night, you know, it was up and down and loaded and that you lost your voice and had nobody to talk to because you couldn't talk anyway. And we didn't have the internet yet. You know, there was so many, it was so much pressure and so much, and I hadn't really figured out how to create that support system up for myself.3 (1h 0m 42s):And it was harder, harder than it needed to be. Did you ultimately find it with the cast? No. Oh, not really where they mean, oh, none of the cast was fine. It wasn't that anybody was mean it's that I didn't take care of myself and I didn't know how I was supposed to take care of my shirt. How old were you when you were cast in a chorus line? 27? Maybe I was, I was young and, but I wasn't that young. I just, but it wasn't that C w it was a strange situation to, I was, I had already had one Broadway show, so I had done, and then I had gone out of town to bucks county Playhouse.3 (1h 1m 25s):And did west side story Romeo was your first Broadway show. I'm sorry. It was called Minnie's boys. Oh, that was it. That was my, I did. And it was a show about the Marx brothers. Right. And I don't know if you know who Louis. We would probably do Louis Stadol and Louis J Staglin who works with, he works with Nathan Lane a lot. Oh yeah. Yeah. He's like second bun and he's incredibly talented. He played Groucho. Okay. We were all 25 years old. We were kids. We were right out of college. And the weirdest part of all was that the mother was played by Shelley winters. And this was a musical. What a weird you've really. Okay. So then you went onto chorus line.3 (1h 2m 6s):Well then, well then in between that, this is like, you know, then, then I went out of town to bucks county. I love being in bucks county for a year. We did west side story. We did Romeo and Juliet during the week. We do them together, one in the morning, one in the afternoon for high school kids. And then on the weekends, we do one of the, and I was the only person in the cast who liked dancing at 10 o'clock in the morning. You know, I didn't mind doing west side at 10 in the morning. I'd been up at eight, being a demonstrator for Mary Hinkson, teaching people how to do a contraction. So I didn't care. I love working in the daytime. That's what I play with your food is such a nice success. My lunchtime theaters here, I get tired at night.3 (1h 2m 47s):I don't know.2 (1h 2m 49s):Most people do wait. So was the, was the audition process for chorus line?3 (1h 2m 56s):I have a great story. I can tell you what my story is. Okay. So I, I was in, I don't know what I was doing. I had done a lot of off-Broadway work. I had been doing, I had been working a lot. And then of course there were the year where I didn't work. And then I went off to south North Carolina and played Nellie Forbush in south Pacific, in the dinner theater for three months. And I loved that. Actually, I think it was one of those times I had a job and a boyfriend and it was like a relief. It was wonderful to have like a life and then do the show at night. You know, I, I enjoyed that a lot and I didn't, you know, it was a big part and I didn't panic about seeing it.3 (1h 3m 37s):And it was just, I learned a lot from doing a part like that. I was doing Fiddler on the roof at a dinner theater in New Jersey, down the street from where my folks lived. And occasionally my mom would stop by her rehearsal and watch the wedding scene. Honest to God. I'm not kidding. She's like, Carol, you ever gonna get married? Are you ever gonna? Okay. So I'm doing Fiddler on the roof, in New Jersey. And there's a guy in the cast, one of the bottle dancers who were dropping off at night on 55th street, because he's working on this little musical about dancers and he would bring in monologues and he'd asked me to read them at rehearsal because he wanted to hear them out loud.3 (1h 4m 25s):And there was some stuff about this place to ever hear the peppermint lounge back in the studio. Right. It was a disco thing, but it was also a place where there was something. I remember one the couch girls, girls who would just lie on the couches and the guys, I mean really crazy stuff that did not make it into the show, but some interesting stuff. And I was playing the eldest daughter sidle, and it's a terrific part for me. So I was good. Yeah. And Nick knew I was a dancer. Anyway, this little show called the chorus line was in its workshop. Second workshop. They had already done the I, cause I was not a Michael Bennett dancer. I didn't, you know, I, I, I had auditioned for my goal once for the tour of two for the Seesaw.3 (1h 5m 10s):And it was the leading part and I didn't get it. I auditioned, I sang and I read and I read and I sang and I didn't get the part. And I came home and I was like in hysterics for like five days. I just, you know, I, I didn't get the part year and a half later, I'm doing Fiddler on the roof with Nick, Dante in New Jersey. And somebody leaves the second workshop and Nick brings up my name because there's a job all of a sudden to cover, to be in the opening and to cover a couple of parts next, bring up my name. And Michael Bennett says, wait a minute. I know her. I know she's an actress and she's a singer. Can she dance?3 (1h 5m 52s):So I showed up the next morning and I danced for 10 minutes and I got the job. I mean, I think, wow. Yeah. That's a great story.2 (1h 6m 1s):No. So that means you didn't have to participate in3 (1h 6m 4s):Callbacks or nothing. Oh, I started that day. I mean, honestly, it was Fiddler on the roof, you know what, I don't remember whether, how it went. Cause we were already in performance tour or something, you know, I, I it's a long time ago, so I don't really remember, but I know that this particular story is the absolute truth. That's fantastic. That2 (1h 6m 27s):Was it a hit right away3 (1h 6m 29s):Chorus line. Well, it wasn't, we were in previews. I'm no, we weren't even previous the second workshop, which means it was still being figured out. And when I came to the first rehearsal and sat and watched what was going on, I could not believe what I was seeing because the truth of what was happening on stage and the way it was being built was astounding. It was absolutely astounding because something about it was so bizarre. Oh. And also, also Marvin Hamlisch was the rehearsal pianist on Minnie's boys.3 (1h 7m 10s):Wow. So I knew him a little bit, not well, you know, but he was the rehearsal pianist that nobody would listen to a show about the Marx brothers, Marvin would say, wait, this is the Marx brothers. You got to have a naked girl running out of the orchestra pit. You gotta, you gotta, and of course, nobody would listen to him. Wait a minute, just turn this off, stop, stop, turn off. Sorry. So I couldn't get over what I was seeing. And I, I knew from the beginning, of course, I think most of us did that. Something very, very unique was going on and it was always changing. Like Donna McKechnie came in late at the audition, all dressed up in like a fur thing.3 (1h 7m 56s):And it was like, I'm sorry, I'm late. I'm sorry. I'm late. And then Zach says, would you put on dance clothes? And she said, no, no, wait a minute. Anyway, you couldn't help. But know sort of, you just kind of put,2 (1h 8m 8s):I mean, I remember seeing it when I was a kid and not, not being able to relate as an actor, but now that I think back, it just must've felt so gratifying to be seen for all of the, you know, because like we w the Joe Montana episode, we3 (1h 8m 28s):Haven't listened to yet, but I'm looking forward to2 (1h 8m 30s):It here today. But he was saying, I love3 (1h 8m 33s):Him2 (1h 8m 34s):For you. You were saying that when he won the Tony and everybody would say, well, it's like to win the Tony, what's it? Like he said, it's like, you won the lottery, but you been buying tickets for 15 years. You know, that's the part of acting that people now, I think it's a pretty common knowledge that it's really difficult to be an actor, but I don't know how Hmm, how known that was then. And it just, must've been so gratifying for all of those people. I mean, who are living in their real life? The story of that musical. Yeah.3 (1h 9m 9s):I think that that's true. And also, I mean, it really did come out of people's experiences. Those stories are so, so to be part of something like that, and down at the public theater, which of course it was a vol place to be, you know, you, you knew that Meryl Streep was walking down the hallway and you knew that. I mean, talk about confidence. I mean, I don't know if you've read her new book, no book about her. No, it's worth the time I listened to it. Actually, I didn't read it. I listened to, it's quite wonderful because you see a very confident person who's working on creating who she is.1 (1h 9m 47s):Do you feel, I feel like you have a really strong sense of confidence about yourself too. Where did that come from? Would you agree? First of all, that you have, it sounds like you had some comps, some real chutzpah as a youngster and maybe now as well. Where'd that come from3 (1h 10m 5s):Beats me. I have it now because I, I, I, I've had a lot of, a lot of experience. And I, I think that, that, I, I think I know a lot about this, but I don't know that I had it. The trick was to have this kind of confidence when it really matters. Yes. And I think I had it, like if I was in an off-Broadway show, I could say, I don't think that's good enough. Could you restage this blah, blah, blah. Or if I'm in North Carolina, I'm not, I think we need to dah, dah, dah, dah, dah. But when it comes down to the real nitty gritty of standing up for yourself, when it really, really matters, boy, that's harder than it looks.3 (1h 10m 51s):You know, even things like, I mean, my character, when I eventually took over the role of Miralis, which I under, you know, I was we've covered all these parts. There were nine of us. We sang in the little booth in the wings. We had microphones and little headsets. And the coolest part of all was Jerry Schoenfeld, who was the chairman of the Schubert organization would bring any visiting dignitary who was visiting the city that he was showing around his theaters. He would bring them into our little booth. And then we would watch the show from stage left in our little booth while we're singing, give me the ball, give him the ball. Cause half the dancers on the stage, cause stop singing because they had a solo coming up.3 (1h 11m 31s):So, you know, singing in a musical is not easy. You know, there's a lot of pressure and you got to hit high notes and you, you know, you just wake up in the middle of the night going torture, torture, and you have to work through that and finally go, fuck it. You know, fuck it. I don't care what I weigh. Fuck it. I don't care if I, if I can't hit the high note, but it, it takes a long time to get there. You know, I see people who do this all the time. I don't know how they live. I don't know how they sleep at night. There's no wonder people like to hire singers who have graduated from programs where they really understand their voice, know how to protect that, which you don't, you know, you have to learn, you have to learn how to really take.3 (1h 12m 24s):That's why, you know, it's wondering about ballet companies now have misuses and we didn't have any of that. You were hanging out there alone. I felt maybe I'm wrong, but that's how I felt. And if I was vulnerable or if I didn't feel well, and I was like, oh, what am I going to do? I can't tell anybo

Guild of Dads: Vision+Action=Meaning
HELEN BIRCH - Finding My Way Back From My Partners Suicide.

Guild of Dads: Vision+Action=Meaning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 72:46


Today I speak to a mum who was bereaved by their partners suicide and now campaigns for those suffering trauma following birth, is a specialist suicide intervention and prevention trainer along with being Co-Founder of The Paternal Mental Health Alliance – Helen Birch. With Suicide being the biggest killer of men under the age of 45 and men being three times more likely than women to take their own lives it's a big deal for all men. The highest risk age groups in the 45-49 year old age group usually consists of dads and the impact on those left behind to pick up the pieces is immense. In my conversation with Helen we discuss: The circumstances that let to her partner completing suicide. How she wasn't aware of the warning signs when she looks back The coping mechanisms that men rely upon in times of crisis that can worsen their mental health rather than improve it How we can prepare boys and young men to develop better more healthy coping mechanisms from an early age. The changes that need to happen on a societal and governmental level to effect real and lasting change for men going through mental health problems

The Skinny Confidential Him & Her Podcast
Amanda Goetz CEO of House Of Wise On How To Start Your Own Business, Raise Money, & Build A Lasting Brand While Staying True To Yourself

The Skinny Confidential Him & Her Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 81:34


#410: On today's episode we are joined by Amanda Goetz. Amanda is the founder and CEO of House Of Wise and a single mother of 3. Amanda joins the show today to discuss how you can start your own business, raise capital, and build a lasting brand all while staying true to yourself and your family.  To check out House Of Wise visit www.houseofwise.co and use promo code SKINNY to get 20% off your first SLEEP, SEX, or STRENGTH product.  To connect with Lauryn Evarts click HERE To connect with Michael Bosstick click HERE Read More on The Skinny Confidential HERE For Detailed Show Notes visit TSCPODCAST.COM To Call the Him & Her Hotline call: 1-833-SKINNYS (754-6697) This episode is brought to you by The Skinny Confidential  The Hot Mess Ice Roller is here to help you contour, tighten, and de-puff your facial skin and It's paired alongside the Ice Queen Facial Oil which is packed with anti-oxidants that penetrates quickly to help hydrate, firm, and reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, leaving skin soft and supple. To check them out visit www.shopskinnyconfidential.com now.  This episode is brought to you by Birch Living Birch makes organic, non-toxic mattresses made right here in America and shipped straight to your door with no-contact delivery, free shipping, free returns, and a 100-night sleep trial. Birch mattresses are made here in America with just four materials sourced straight from nature: organic latex, organic cotton, New Zealand wool, and American steel springs. Birch is giving $400 off ALL mattresses and 2 free eco-rest pillows at www.birchliving.com/skinny This episode is brought to you by Bite Toothpaste Bite is reinventing personal care by making products that are good for you and the planet. Bite's hero product is their dry tooth paste tablets that come in a reusable glass jar and the refills come in home compostable pouches. You just pop one in your mouth, bite down and brush, it will foam up just like regular toothpaste but with no plastic tube or messy paste. Bite is offering 20% off your first subscription order. Go to www.trybite.com/skinny or use code SKINNY at checkout to claim this deal.  This episode is brought to you by Coinbase Crypto currency might feel like a secret or exclusive club, but Coinbase believes that everyone, everywhere should be able to get in the door. Whether you've been trading for years or just getting started, Coinbase can help. For a limited time new users can get $10 in free Bitcoin when you sign up today at www.coinbase.com/skinny  Produced by Dear Media 

Killer Instinct
A Father Forgives His Son For a Family Murder: The Bart Whitaker Story

Killer Instinct

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 36:19


Thomas Bartlett "Bart" Whitaker had a loving family that he threw away the night he plotted to have them murdered. While out having a celebratory dinner, no one in his family could've imagined the horror that waited for them when they got back home. This week, Savannah details how Bart hired a hitman to kill his family as soon as they set foot inside, how he was found out, and the miraculous survival of his father, Kent Whitaker. Incredibly, Kent has since forgiven his son for orchestrating the killing of his son Kevin Whitaker and wife Patricia Whitaker, and has even visited him regularly while he was on death row. And in another twist, mere minutes before Bart was set to executed, he got a call from the governor commuting his sentence instead to life in prison. So why did Bart kill the people he supposedly loved? All to cover up another web of lies. Love Killer Instincts but hate the ads? Subscribe to the ad-free version here!: https://killerinstinct.supercast.tech/ Get 10% Off by visiting BetterHelp.com/instinct! Go stamps.com, click the microphone at the top of the page, and enter code KILLER for a special offer that includes a 4-week trial, free postage, and a digital scale. No long-term commitments or contracts! Birch is giving $200 off ALL mattresses and 2 free eco-rest pillows at BirchLiving.com/killer Right now, Dad Grass is offering our listeners 20% off your first order when you go to DADGRASS.COM/KILLER Start streaming your next obsession. Try Sundance Now free for 30 days by going to SundanceNow.com and use promo code killer Listen to The Generation Why Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, or you can listen ad-free by joining Wondery Plus in the Wondery app! If you have any thoughts on this case or any other case, or just want to get in touch with Savannah about the show, email her at killerinstinctpodcast@gmail.com.  Watch the podcast on YouTube: https://bit.ly/KillerInstinctYT Don't forget to subscribe to the podcast for free wherever you're listening or by using this link: http://bit.ly/KillerInstinctPodcast If you like the show, telling a friend about it would be helpful! You can text, email, Tweet, or send this link to a friend: http://bit.ly/KillerInstinctPodcast Follow Savannah on IG: @savannahbrymer  Follow Savannah on Twitter: @savannahbrymer   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Absolutely Not
Google It Bitch

Absolutely Not

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 51:08


Heather is fresh off of having her labia, ahem, I mean larynx investigated and things are rough. She is joined today by good friend and road dog Christina Tompkins to chat all things tour, positive heckling, farty cowboys, and the power of Google. After all the computer knows more than you ever will.      Match with a licensed therapist when you go to talkspace.com and get $100 off your first month with the promo code ABSOLUTELY.   Take your FREE in-depth hair consultation and get 15% off your first order today! Go to Prose.com/absolutely.     Birch is giving 400 dollars off ALL mattresses and 2 free eco-rest pillows at BirchLiving.com/absolutely   That's thepillclub.com/absolutely, to get your first birth control care package and donate to help more women in need of affordable birth control.   Produced by Dear Media.   

Emergence Magazine Podcast
They Carry Us With Them – Pt. 2: Sugar Maple, Paper Birch, and Red Spruce

Emergence Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 19:50


This month we released a special multimedia feature exploring the migration of trees and what is at stake for both ecological and human communities as forests move. Following up from last week's story on black ash, staff writer Chelsea Steinauer-Scudder shares three tree migration vignettes: sugar maple, paper birch, and red spruce. Each offers a glimpse of just one aspect of tree migration: nourishment, forest succession, and industry. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Dental Marketer
367: Dr. Sanket Upadhyay | Birch Point Dental Clinic

The Dental Marketer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


Join this podcast's Facebook Group: The Dental Marketer SocietyGuest: Dr. Sanket UpadhyayBusiness Name: Birch Point Dental Clinic‍Check out Sanket's Media:‍Email: info@birchpointdental.ca Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/birchpointdental/ ‍‍‍‍Host: Michael Arias‍Website: The Dental Marketer‍‍Join the podcast's Facebook Group: The Dental Marketer Society JOIN MY EMAIL LIST HERE FOR GROUND MARKETING STRATEGIES AND TACTICS.‍‍‍My Key Takeaways:What impresses Sanket about his front office?What's the culture he is creating in his practice?How he dealt with the negative toxic employee?Why were the contractors still in his face, in his practice, even after opening?‍‍Please don't forget to share with us on Instagram when you are listening to the podcast AND if you are really wanting to show us love, then please leave a 5 star review on iTunes!‍‍DON'T FORGET TO:Join The Newsletter here and be a part of The Dental Marketer FamilyClick here to see how you can attract new patients immediately and consistently!Click Here to join the Ground Marketing Facebook Group

Country Focus
Choose Wild!

Country Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 27:56


There's a growing number of woodlands in Wales being owned and run by communities. Llais y Goedwig - the community woodland network for Wales say they're all managed differently and for different purposes. For some communities they offer important respite and recreation, which helps improve their local environment. For many of them though, they're managed for nature, biodiversity and the climate. Beyond the social and environmental benefits they can also have an economic benefit. This week, Pauline Smith hears how the Dewis Gwyllt - or Choose Wild - project is finding new ways for community woodlands to develop an income. Following the rhythm of the seasons we begin with Birch sap trials in March, Wild Garlic in the spring, followed by Elderflower and on to tree seeds in the autumn.

Leicester City Football Forum
The Boot Room - 11-11-21

Leicester City Football Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 55:51


Owynn Palmer-Atkin and the Birch assess Leicester City's season so far.

The Australian Herpetoculture Podcast
Running a large reptile collection w/ Peter Birch.

The Australian Herpetoculture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 136:14


In this episode, we are joined by Peter Birch to talk about running a large collection.Follow Peter Birch on IG:CrittaCamFollow Jason Rodgers here:The Gecko Effect Follow Luke here:Beaches Scaly Beasts FacebookBeaches Scaly Beasts YoutubeMPR Network:Website: https://www.moreliapythonradio.netYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtrEaKcyN8KvC3pqaiYc0RQ@MPR Network on FB and IG.Email: Info@moreliapythonradio.comTee-spring store: https://teespring.com/stores/mprnetworkPatreon: https://www.patreon.com/moreliapythonradio★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Beats, Beards & Brews
Jerry Cantrell, Honorable Mack Beard Oil, Hopititis & Boozy Pumpkin Beer

Beats, Beards & Brews

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 62:04


For the music review portion of the podcast, Dan and Eric dive into Jerry Cantrell's third solo album Brighten. It seems like the Alice in Chains' guitarist was in a happier place as he recorded this one and we're here for it. We're also here for Jerry's fancy hat collection. Jerry Cantrell songs previewed on this episode include: "Brighten" "Prism of Doubt" "Had to Know" Evan joins the recording just in time to drop a quick review of Cantrell's latest. Then Eric shares his thoughts on the Honorable Mack Beard Oil from The Bearded Mack Grooming Co. Is broccoli seed oil the missing link to a better beard? Tune in to find out! For the scent curious: The Honorable Mack has notes of Oud, Birch, Black Oud, Leather, Saffron, Jasmine, Tobacco, and Vanilla. You can view the full list of carrier oils on the website, as well. Finally, Eric and Evan catch Hopititis ... ah, no wait, they drink Hopititis and catch a buzz from this 9.2% abv Imperial IPA from 515 Brewing Co. in Des Moines, Iowa. Dan also makes a hard return to drinking beer by breaking out his 11.1% abv cellared 2019 Jamaican Rum Barrel-Aged Imperial Pumpkin Ale from Dangerous Man Brewing Co. As always, thanks for listening! And stay tuned for more new episodes of Beats, Beards & Brews.

Witchy Wellness Radio
#138 Amazing Little Sleepers with Valerie Birch

Witchy Wellness Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 34:56


Valerie Birch is a pediatric sleep coach, a mindful mother to three children, a lover of the outdoors, sleep, all emotions and anything sweet! Since 2013, Valerie has been working one to one with families, coaching and helping them restore the sleep and tranquility into their homes. She works with families who children, ages birth - 6 years of age, are not sleeping well at night and/or during the day, coaching and teaching them about the science of sleep and improving sleep for the child -and ultimately the entire family.  Along with sleep, Valerie focuses on mindfulness and emotional acceptance with her families as they have a huge part in the family dynamics and improving sleep.  Sleep is the foundation of everything wonderful!  Googling, researching and relentlessly asking your friends and family for sleep advice can leave you feeling more confused, exhausted and hopeless.  Having the proven knowledge and support to make those changes confidently can happen with a single phone call with Valerie.  Her years of knowledge and experience will help you find the exact next step to take to improve sleep in your home.  You'll leave the coaching session feeling confident, clear and ready to take action!    Book a 1-1 Let's Chat Session with Valerie to learn how to improve sleep in your home for your exact situation.  Use the code WITCHY for 15% off.  https://www.valeriebirch.com/sleep-coaching-for-children SHOW LINKS: Use the code WITCHY for 15% off Valerie's services:  https://www.valeriebirch.com/sleep-coaching-for-children Sign up for FREE Essential Oils Webinar Class: https://www.hol-fit.com/oilsclass Buy Magnesium: https://lddy.no/r61x use code WITCHY to get 10% off

nowyouknow's podcast
Tesla Time News 269!

nowyouknow's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 64:43


Thank you Birch for sponsoring! Visit https://birchliving.com/nowyouknow to get $400 off your Birch mattress, plus two free pillows. To get the 100 pk of blades for free, make sure to add it to your shopping cart, and use the code 'nowyouknow'.  Thanks again to Henson Shaving for sponsoring this episode of Tesla Time News! https://bit.ly/3CMf5Mq Get your tickets today for Holley's High Voltage Experience at Sonoma Raceway in California, November 13-14th, by going to https://www.HolleyHighVoltage.com To send us your contributor stories/community mail, email us at: hello@nowyouknowchannel.com My Tesla Adventure YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9vPzqzYmMfdQ0hTb5CTZtQ The Starman Report YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFrtmcBbVEelN7Aw-Nkq5QA/videos https://starmangifts.com/product/nowyouknow/ The Adventure of Starman Begins: http://StarmanBegins.com Send us your Supercharger reviews here! https://www.nowyouknowchannel.com/supercharger-reviews To subscribe to Disruptive Investing use the link below! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTuFDdZdVXgfeZAxTubID0g Use the code NOWYOUKNOW to get 5% your purchase today at https://www.BigBattery.com Use promo code “NowYouKnow” to get your free trial of A Better Route Planner Premium. https://abetterrouteplanner.com/ref/NOWYOUKNOW Cybertruck Owners Club: https://www.cybertruckownersclub.com/?utm_source=Now%20You%20Know&utm_medium=Link&utm_campaign=NYK Cybertruck Owners Club Reservations Spreadsheet: https://www.cybertruckownersclub.com/forum/threads/how-to-tell-your-place-in-line-based-on-cybertruck-preorder-reservation-number.251/ Use promo code “NowYouKnow” to get your free trial of A Better Route Planner Premium: https://abetterrouteplanner.com/premium/ Want to buy Zac and Jesse's shirts and help support the show? Visit https://nowyouknow.ecowear.us/  to get your merch! Our Amazon Associate Link:- https://amzn.to/2JFZjaE International Amazon Associate Link: http://geni.us/NowYouKnowAMZN` Check out Evannex and all their awesome Tesla gear and use the code “nowyouknow” to get $10 off any purchases over $100: https://evannex.com/ http://www.patreon.com/nowyouknow Check out our Now You Know Clips channel here! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCacwzDEdpVEO2UjIO00CpqQ Check out Energy Pal here: https://energypal.com/nowyouknow/ The Wolfpack Berlin YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/the_wolfpack_berlin Jeff Roberts YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/peterdog15

Locked On Raptors - Daily Podcast On The Toronto Raptors
OG Anunoby drops career-high 36, short-handed Raptors down Knicks at MSG 113-104

Locked On Raptors - Daily Podcast On The Toronto Raptors

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 37:28


In Episode 1048, Sean Woodley goes solo to react to the Toronto Raptors' 113-104 win over the New York Knicks at Madison Square Garden on Monday night, as Scottie Barnes was sidelined with a thumb injury. Off the top, Sean digs into OG Anunoby's career-high 36 points on 13-of-27 shooting, and the star-level diversity to hit shot profile that really made it special. Next, Sean talks about the many rotation-related development on the night, as Khem Birch's rock solid play coupled with another rough outing for Precious Achiuwa probably should have sealed Birch's move back into the starting five, while Malachi Flynn showed a flash or two in 11 minutes of action. Lastly, Sean debuts a new segment geared toward the guy who helped the Raptors win who didn't figure into the opening couple segments: The Dude of the Game. Gary Trent Jr. is that dude. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Shopify Go to Shopify.com/lockedonnba for a FREE fourteen-day trial and get full access to Shopify's entire suite of features. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

How's your ePresence? with Mark Galvin
How to Optimize an eCommerce Shop with Kathryn Smith of Walton Birch

How's your ePresence? with Mark Galvin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 32:34


Kathryn Smith is an eCommerce professional who aids small businesses and solopreneurs in their next steps. Here, she shares a few key things to consider when starting or scaling your eCommerce brand. Kathryn Smith: https://waltonbirch.com https://www.linkedin.com/in/kathrynrsmith/ https://www.instagram.com/krs_consulting/ ePresence: http://www.epresence.me   http://www.twitter.com/epresenceme   http://www.linkedin.com/company/epresenceme   http://www.fb.me/epresenceme   http://www.instagram.com/epresenceme  Mark Galvin: http://www.twitter.com/epresencemg   http://www.linkedin.com/in/epresencemg   http://www.fb.me/epresencemg  

Leicester City Football Forum
The Boot Room - 28-10-21

Leicester City Football Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 55:39


Owynn Palmer-Atkin and the Birch on the League Cup win and look ahead to Arsenal at home.

Unpleasant Dreams
The Strange Death of Edgar Allan Poe - Unpleasant Dreams 9

Unpleasant Dreams

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 16:13


For our Halloween episode, we explore the strange death of the master of the macabre himself, Edgar Allan Poe. --- Cassandra Harold is your host. EM Hilker is our principal writer and researcher with additional writing by Cassandra Harold. Jim Harold is our Executive Producer. Unpleasant Dreams is a production of Jim Harold Media. You can find EM Hilker's original article HERE PODCAST TRANSCRIPT There is much that can be said about Edgar Allan Poe, but in terms of his literary habits, little that needs to be. Much more famous in death than he was in life, he was nevertheless a literary critic of some renown in his own time. His true love, however, was lurid, ghastly fiction. Poe unknowingly fathered the genre of detective fiction, through his tales of C. Auguste Dupin. The most well-known Dupin story was The Murders in the Rue Morgue, which served to set the stage for Sherlock Holmes and his ilk. He is best known now for his gothic fiction, morbid tales filled with crumbling stone castles and candle-lit catacombs, of demonic foes and bitter sweet revenge. He brought us The Raven, Hop-Frog, The Fall of the House of Usher. The creative mind of Poe was deep and dark and mysterious as a night ocean.  … but little is so mysterious as Poe's own death.... FIND THE REMAINDER OF THE TRANSCRIPT HERE SOURCES – FURTHER READING Anon. “Poe's Death Theories.” Poe's Death | Edgar Allan Poe Museum | Richmond, VA, www.poemuseum.org/poes-death. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021 Birch, Doug. “The Passing of Poe: What Really Happened to the Master of the Macabre in the Days Leading up to His Death Here 145 Years Ago?” Baltimoresun.com, 24 Oct. 2018, www.baltimoresun.com/news/bs-xpm-1994-10-02-1994275208-story.html. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021 Edgar Allan Poe: A Life from Beginning to End. Hourly History, 2018. Kindle ed. Eschner, Kat. “Who Was the Poe Toaster? We Still Have No Idea.” Smithsonian.com, Smithsonian Institution, 19 Jan. 2017, www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/who-was-poe-toaster-we-still-have-no-idea-180961820/. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021  Geiling, Natasha. “The (Still) Mysterious Death of Edgar Allan Poe.” Smithsonian.com, Smithsonian Institution, 7 Oct. 2014, www.smithsonianmag.com/history/still-mysterious-death-edgar-allan-poe-180952936. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021 Kay, Liz F. “Poe Toaster Tribute Is ‘Nevermore'.” Baltimoresun.com, 9 Dec. 2018, www.baltimoresun.com/entertainment/bs-xpm-2010-01-19-bal-poe0119-story.html. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021. Lovejoy, Bess. Rest in Pieces. Simon and Schuster, 2013. Miller, John C. ‘The Exhumations and Reburials of Edgar and Virginia Poe and Mrs. Clemm,” Poe Studies, Dec. 1974, Vol. Vii, No. 27: 46-4, www.eapoe.org/pstudies/ps1970/p1974204.htm. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021 Meyers, Jeffrey. Edgar Allen Poe: His Life and Legacy. Cooper Square Press, 2000. Pruitt, Sarah. “The Riddle of Edgar Allan Poe's Death.” History.com, A&E Television Networks, 26 Oct. 2015, www.history.com/news/how-did-edgar-allan-poe-die. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021. Semtner, Christopher P. “13 Haunting Facts About Edgar Allan Poe's Death.” Biography.com, A&E Networks Television, 13 Jan. 2021, www.biography.com/news/edgar-allan-poe-death-facts. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021. Walsh, John Evangelist. Midnight Dreary: The Mysterious Death of Edgar Allan Poe. St. Martin's Griffin, 2000. 

Heal Thy Self
Knowledge Bomb: Breast Cancer Show, Guest: Dr. Staci Whitman, Is Fluoride Safe?

Heal Thy Self

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 88:50


Knowledge Bomb: The 2021 breast cancer show is here! Dr. G reviews all of the science behind what we know about breast cancer as well as the evidence based interventions that may help prevent it. He talks about the root causes that we need to look at holistically in order to be our healthiest selves. This show is for everyone, whether you had breast cancer to no history. It is to optimize your breast health overall.  Special Guest: Dr. Staci Whitman joins the show to give us the low down on oral health. What is behind optimal oral health? What foods should we be eating? Can cavities be reversed? Is fluoride necessary? Are metal fillings toxic? Are root canals safe? As a functional dentist Dr. Staci is trained to look at all the factors to optimize oral health and thus our overall body health.  Guest Bio: Doctor Staci Whitman is on a mission to create a cavity-free world. She is the founder of NoPo Kids Dentistry where she takes a whole-body, holistic, and functional approach with her patients. Her dentistry and practice philosophy is grounded by science and powered by love. Doctor Staci attended Tufts University School of Dental Medicine and initially worked as a general dentist, eventually going back to school, earning a certificate in pediatric dentistry from Oregon Health and Sciences University (OHSU). She has always been passionate about children's sleep and airway health, focusing her research in residency on how to improve airway assessments and diagnostic tools in the pediatric population.  In 2019 she founded NoPo Kids Dentistry with a mission to take a whole-body approach to dentistry. She became a Diplomate of the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry in 2012 and is a Board-Certified Pediatric Dentist and a Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. She is also involved in many organized dentistry groups including the Holistic Dental Association, the International Academy of Oral Medicine and Toxicology, the International Academy of Biological Dentistry and Medicine, the American Association of Ozonotherapy, and has her Certification in Laser Proficiency. She has taken numerous courses and trainings in children's sleep and airway medicine, studying oromyofunctional therapy, craniosacral therapy, and is a Breathe Institute Ambassador.  Doctor Staci is an Internationally Certified Health and Wellness Coach from the Institute of Integrative Nutrition and is currently attending the Institute of Functional Medicine and the American College of Integrative Dentistry and Medicine with expected certification dates in 2022 and 2023 respectively. She dreams of a world without cavities and believes in motivating families to join her as a team, keeping their children healthy and thriving with small, manageable daily changes. Connect with her on her website at caninestateofmind.com and on instagram @CANINESTATEOFMIND BiOptimizers Massenzymes: For an exclusive offer for my listeners just go to www.masszymes.com/drg and use the code drg10 for a 10% discount. Birch: birchliving.com/healthyself and get $400.00 off of your mattress plus your two free pillows. Willa's: willaskitchen.com, amazon and select specialty retailers. NED: As a giveback to being a Heal Thy Self listener you'll receive 15% off your first purchase or 20% off your first membership purchase. Memberships offer many great perks, including 15% off every purchase. So go to helloned.com/drg or enter the code drg at checkout to get 15% off your first one-time order or 20% off your first subscription order plus free shipping. Be sure to like and subscribe to #HealThySelf Hosted by Doctor Christian Gonzalez N.D. Follow Doctor G on Instagram @doctor.gonzalez https://www.instagram.com/doctor.gonzalez/

The Grave Talks | Haunted, Paranormal & Supernatural
232 Birch | The Grave Talks Revisited

The Grave Talks | Haunted, Paranormal & Supernatural

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 34:59


Well before Steve Blackwell moved into 232 Birch, Steve had a childhood dotted with paranormal run-ins. Encounters that proved the existence of ghosts and sprits in our world to him, as facts of life. Well before Steve Blackwell moved into 232 Birch, Steve had a childhood dotted with paranormal run-ins. Encounters that proved the existence of ghosts and sprits in our world to him, as facts of life. As an adult, Steve and his future wife would begin their lives together at the address of 232 Birch. An address that would leave them wanting to better understand the spirits that cohabitate the world we share. Visits from a little ghost boy, strange noises and unexpanded happenings would lead Steve and his wife to a journey of paranormal discovery. This is the story of Steve Blackwell and 232 Birch. In part 2 of our interview at http://www.patreon.com/thegravetalks we discuss: What was Steve's wife opinion about the ghost boy wandering around their home? After they saw a little boy at 232 Birch, how did things take a turn for the dark? What did Steve's daughter see when in her bed as a small child? How did this entity affect Steve's daughter while sleeping? Did Steve and his wife miss the Ghosts after they moved out of their haunted house?

Leicester City Football Forum
The Boot Room - 21/10/21

Leicester City Football Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 49:29


Owynn Palmer-Atkin and the Birch on two wins, and a night to remember for Patson Daka.

Deep in the Weeds - A Food Podcast with Anthony Huckstep
Quick Bite: Zoe Birch (Greasy Zoe's) - Yearning to cook again

Deep in the Weeds - A Food Podcast with Anthony Huckstep

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 13:03


Last time we caught up with Zoe Birch (Greasy Zoe's) she'd reduced her restaurant to a 6-seat experience and made real connections with local producers. The very next day Victoria went into another lockdown, and its been back and forth ever since. As she prepares to open a lot has changed, she has a new family member, a clearer vision on her cooking and a yearning to connect and cook for people again.https://www.instagram.com/greasyzoes/?hl=enFollow Deep In The Weeds on Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/deepintheweedspodcast/?hl=enFollow Huckhttps://www.instagram.com/huckstergram/Follow Rob Locke (Executive Producer)https://www.instagram.com/foodwinedine/LISTEN TO OUR OTHER FOOD PODCASTShttps://linktr.ee/DeepintheWeedsNetwork

Widdershins
Hoodoo Sen Moise joins us tonight

Widdershins

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 159:26


Our local expert on Vodou, Hoodoo, Conjure and Palo joins us so we can pick his brain about some of those things

Killer Instinct
Alex Murdaugh Arrested & More Secrets Revealed: The Murdaugh Family Case Update

Killer Instinct

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 58:30


In August of this year, Savannah showcased the Murdaugh family, a wealthy family in South Carolina that has been linked to multiple murders, including the mother and youngest son, This week, Savannah brings you new developments on the cases since the last episode aired, including the arrest of the patriarch of the family, Alex Murdaugh. Before Alex was arrested, Alex was shot at by a seemingly random passerby, leaving only a superficial wound and arousing a lot more suspicion around him. Alex was arrested on October 14th, 2021 for a variety of charges after conspiring to steal $3 million in fraudulent insurance money from the family of the Murdaugh's former housekeeper, a woman who died in the Murdaugh home under mysterious circumstances. The Murdaughs have affected many lives, but are they merely victims in a string of unfortunate occurrences, or is the family hiding dark secrets? Listen to the first episode on the Murdaugh case here: https://bit.ly/KIMurdaughFamily1 Love Killer Instincts but hate the ads? Subscribe to the ad-free version here!: https://killerinstinct.supercast.tech/ Get 10% Off by visiting BetterHelp.com/instinct! Birch is giving 200 dollars off ALL mattresses and 2 free eco-rest pillows at BirchLiving.com/killer Get 20% off your first order of legal, organic smokable hemp when you go to DADGRASS.COM/KILLER Follow Over My Dead Body / Season 3: Fox Lake on Apple Podcasts or wherever you're listening right now. Or you can listen early and ad-free by subscribing to Wondery Plus in the Wondery App.  If you have any thoughts on this case or any other case, or just want to get in touch with Savannah about the show, email her at killerinstinctpodcast@gmail.com.  Follow Savannah on IG: @savannahbrymer  Follow Savannah on Twitter: @savannahbrymer   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Good Will Hunters
Spring Series 6 – Resilience, with Cissy Gore-Birch, Sheridan Waitai and Sangeeta Mangubhai

Good Will Hunters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 57:13


Welcome to the sixth episode in the Spring Series of Good Will Hunters, which asks, Can Australia be a Sustainability Superpower? WWF is proud to be collaborating with Good Will Hunters on this series, in the lead up to COP26, the UN Climate Change Conference in Glasgow from 31 October to 12 November. You can join the conversation via @goodwillpod or #RegenerateAustralia. In this episode, Dermot speaks to three formidable female leaders. Our guests are Cissy Gore-Birch, Sheridan Waitai and Sangeeta Mangubhai. Cissy is a Jaru/Kiji woman and the Executive Manager Aboriginal Engagement at Bush Heritage Australia. Sheridan is the Executive Director Strategic Relationships and Innovation at Ngāti Kuri Trust Board. Her tribal affiliations are Ngāti Kuri, Te Rarawa, and Tainui. Sangeeta is Director of the Wildlife Conservation Society's Fiji Country Program. She holds a Doctor of Philosophy in coral reef ecology. This episode is a conversation between three passionate leaders on importance of indigenous ecological knowledge, building resilience to climate change, the importance of gender in conservation, and why traditional ecological knowledge must be at the heart of managing country – whether it is in Australia, NZ, or the Pacific. Enjoy the episode, The GWH Team

Leicester City Football Forum
The Boot Room - 14/10/21

Leicester City Football Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 56:21


The Birch joins Owynn Palmer-Atkin to talks City's defence and the visit of Man Utd.

Trail of the Week
North Fork Birch Creek

Trail of the Week

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 0:58


Tucked away between Choteau and Browning, the North Fork of Birch Creek showcases the incredible geology of the Rocky Mountain Front. As you walk alongside the cascading creek, you'll pass through a recently burned area rich with wildflowers and lush new vegetation. You'll also be treated to spectacular sights of uplifted and folded layers of bedrock that have been sculpted and exposed by water, fire, and wind. For the full Rocky Mountain Front experience, climb to the top of the unnamed pass at the head of the creek for broad views over the Bob Marshall Wilderness Complex and Badger-Two Medicine.

Deep in the Weeds - A Food Podcast with Anthony Huckstep
Renée Wallace (Birch Restaurant, Moss Vale) - Regional re-birth

Deep in the Weeds - A Food Podcast with Anthony Huckstep

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 36:33


With a finer dining restaurant in regional NSW Renee Wallace (Birch Restaurant, Moss Vale) took the bull by the horns when lockdown landed and diversified the offering to open a retail store, bespoke food in a box and started planning collaborative events around the regions. The move proved incredibly successful and now on the precipice of reopening they're looking forward with this new model, rather than trying to go back to the way it was, and it's delivered a sense of freedom, without limitation and a chance to do things they may not have ever considered in pre-covid times.https://birchrestaurant.com.auFollow Deep In The Weeds on Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/deepintheweedspodcast/?hl=enFollow Huckhttps://www.instagram.com/huckstergram/Follow Rob Locke (Executive Producer)https://www.instagram.com/foodwinedine/LISTEN TO OUR OTHER FOOD PODCASTShttps://linktr.ee/DeepintheWeedsNetwork

The Skinny Confidential Him & Her Podcast
Kaitlynn Carter On The Hills BTS, Dating In The Public Eye, Pregnancy, & Pre/Postpartum

The Skinny Confidential Him & Her Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 65:27


#399: On today's episode we are joined by Kaitlynn Carter. Kaitlyn joins the show today to discuss what really goes on behind the scenes on reality TV. We also discuss what it's like dating in the public eye, pregnancy, depression, and more. To connect with Lauryn Evarts click HERE To connect with Michael Bosstick click HERE Read More on The Skinny Confidential HERE For Detailed Show Notes visit TSCPODCAST.COM To Call the Him & Her Hotline call: 1-833-SKINNYS (754-6697) This episode is brought to you by The Skinny Confidential  The Hot Mess Ice Roller is here to help you contour, tighten, and de-puff your facial skin and It's paired alongside the Ice Queen Facial Oil which is packed with anti-oxidants that penetrates quickly to help hydrate, firm, and reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, leaving skin soft and supple. To check them out visit www.shopskinnyconfidential.com now.  This episode is brought to you by Pill Club Life is stressful enough, access to healthcare shouldn't be! Luckily, getting birth control is one less thing you have to worry about. With The Pill Club, you'll never have to make a trip to the doctor or wait in line at the pharmacy ever again. Right now when you go the www.thepillclub.com/skinny The Pill Club is offering a $10 donation to Bedsider.org for every listener who becomes a patient. Your donation will help low-income individuals get access to birth control through bedsider.org This episode is brought to you by RITUAL Forget everything you thought you knew about vitamins. Ritual is the brand that's reinventing the experience with 9 essential nutrients women lack the most. If you're ready to invest in your health, do what I did and go to www.ritual.com/skinny  Your future self will thank you for taking Ritual: Consider it your ‘Lifelong-Health-401k'. Why put anything but clean ingredients (backed by real science) in your body? This episode is brought to you by Skillshare. Skillshare is an online learning space offering more than 25,000 courses. Join the millions of students already learning on Skillshare today with a special offer just for our listeners: Get two months of Skillshare for free. That's right, Skillshare is offering The Skinny Confidential listeners two months of unlimited access to over 25,000 classes for free. To sign up, go to www.skillshare.com/skinny This episode is brought to you by Birch Living Birch makes organic, non-toxic mattresses made right here in America and shipped straight to your door with no-contact delivery, free shipping, free returns, and a 100-night sleep trial. Birch mattresses are made here in America with just four materials sourced straight from nature: organic latex, organic cotton, New Zealand wool, and American steel springs. Birch is giving $400 off ALL mattresses and 2 free eco-rest pillows at www.birchliving.com/skinny Produced by Dear Media 

Heal Thy Self
Knowledge Bomb: Money Relationships, Guest: Diane Fong: Optimize Your Ability to Detox

Heal Thy Self

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 68:27


Knowledge Bomb: Dr. G talks about relationship to money. Is your relationship with money holding you back from financial abundance? He also goes into the steps to take to open up space for success. Lastly, he gives you his personal daily mantra to out into practice. Special Guest: Dr. Diane Fong joins the show to talk about detox. She specializes in chemical and heavy metal detox. Dr. Fong talks about the detox funnel and how to optimize our pathways of elimination. She also mentions how disease manifests due to improper elimination and how to remove them.  Guest Bio: Diane Angela Fong, ND is the medical director of Cleanbody (previously NaturalStart Medicine). She focuses on chronic disease and preventive medicine, with an emphasis in naturopathic dermatology, gastroenterology, endocrinology, and environmental toxicology. She developed the Cleanbody Program, a health transformation program in which she supports patients in identifying their toxic exposures, and then customizes a protocol to cleanse these toxins and support the body's healing response. For more information, or to take the Cleanbody funnel assessment, visit www.cleanbody.health. Website: www.cleanbody.health Instagram: @drfong.nd, @cleanbody.health Ned: helloned.com/drg code - drg BiOptimizers Massenzymes: For an exclusive offer for my listeners just go to www.masszymes.com/drg and use the code drg10 for a 10% discount. Birch: birchliving.com/healthyself and get $200.00 off of your mattress plus two free pillows. Be sure to like and subscribe to #HealThySelf Hosted by Doctor Christian Gonzalez N.D. Follow Doctor G on Instagram @doctor.gonzalez https://www.instagram.com/doctor.gonzalez/

Fringe Radio Network
Where Did the Road Go? Superstars: Adam Gorightly and Greg Bishop Discuss Robert Anton Wilson

Fringe Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 92:20


Greg Bishop and Adam Gorightly. The discussion begins with iconic writer/philosopher Robert Anton Wilson and Discordianism- and quickly goes... a lot of places! Topics include: 1960's and 70's counter-cuture, RAW's "Winners Scripts" and changing suicidal negativity, "The Illuminatus! Trilogy", Kerry Thornley, Greg Hill, Dr. Robert Newport, Lee Harvey Oswald, Jim Garrison, JFK assassination investigations and conspiracies, the summer of love, psychedelics, libertarianism, Playboy magazine, Discordian names, pranking important people and organizations, the Illuminati, the John Birch Society, paranoia, Live Action Role Playing, Timothy Leery, Disinfo.Con, RAW's unique funeral, zines and the early internet, model agnosticism, Information Awareness Office, John Poindexter, Operation Mindf****, fake Illuminati chart, Robert Shay, "Principia Discordia", Loompanics Publishing, Discordian Popes, Church of the SubGenius, slack, true skepticism vs. anti-belief, CSICOP, James Randi, dogmatism, reality tunnels, ritual magick, RAW's encounter with possible non-human entities, experience of a number of unconnected people with beings from the Sirius star system, Philip K. Dick, Dorris Lessing, Jim Moseley's "Saucer Smear", artist David Huggins, Susan Demeter-St. Clair, temporarily adopting belief systems, the Virgin of Guadalupe, Aleister Crowley, "Mirage Men", strange phone calls and opened mail, magick and co-creation of reality, Dr. Karla Turner, surveilance and mail manipulation of activists, liminal experiences, Dean Radin, laboratory testing of ESP, Lou Elizondo, remote viewing, ego/greed limiting results, drug testing in today's world, people's unease with uncertainty and ambiguity, David Weatherly, Bigfoot, Lyle Blackburn, the paranormal conference circuit and groupthink, UFOs, and more.

Raptors Over Everything
Raptors Player Previews: Anunoby, Siakam, Birch, Boucher, Achiuwa & Watanabe

Raptors Over Everything

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 47:50


Yahoo Sports Canada's Amit Mann and Yasmin Duale of the Dishes & Dimes podcast try to project what's to come for these players this season. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Apple Seed
A Taste of The Apple (Seed)

The Apple Seed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 113:40


Welcome to The Apple Seed! Some time just about every day filled with stories for you and your family. We always hope the stories we feature on the show spark memories for you that you can share with the people you love. That's been our mission since the show began in 2013, and we hope to spark many more memories for you for years to come. If you're new to the show then you should know that when you tune in to The Apple Seed you're going to hear tall tales, personal tales, fairy tales, historical tales and more. All kinds of tales, from all kinds of tellers, including Stephanie Beneteau, Antonio Sacre, Odds Bodkin, Dan Keding, Bobby Norfolk, Dolores Hydock, Donald Davis, Diane Edgecomb, Diane Ferlatte, and Bill Harley. On today's episode, enjoy the following: “Maternal Instinct” by Allison Downey from Allison Downey a selection of stories and songs (1:58) Radio Family Journal: "The Doldrums" by Sam Payne (15:16) “The King's Ring” by Stephanie Beneteau from Dreaming Tall: Stories for Growing Girls (21:30) “Nina's First Rainbow” by Antonio Sacre from The Apple Seed: Live (World's Second-Best Dad) (33:52) “The Three Spinning Fairies” by Odds Bodkin from The Wise Little Girl (39:25) “The Hero” by Dan Keding from Rudy and the Roller Skate (50:09) “Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People's Ears” by Bobby Norfolk from Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People's Ears (58:58) The Daily Mix: “Little Women” with Dolores Hydock (1:10:49) “Aunt Esther Saves a Little Boy's Life” by Donald Davis from Mama Learns to Drive (1:19:33) “Dancing Spirit of The Birch” by Diane Edgecomb from In the Groves (1:27:04) “Penny For Your Thoughts” by Diane Ferlatte from Penny For Your Thoughts (1:39:06) “Little Things Make Big Things” by Bill Harley from The Apple Seed: Live (1:47:02)

Art and Cocktails
Finding Joy and Connection Through Daily Painting with Kate Jarvik Birch

Art and Cocktails

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 18:12


Kate Jarvik Birch is a full-time visual artist, author, playwright, and daydreamer. Her art has been featured worldwide in stores like Target, Pier One, and World Market, as well as in television series and major motion pictures such as Transparent, Medium, Glee, Twenty-One Jump Street, and Looper. She graduated with a degree in Painting and Drawing from the University of Utah in 2005 and lives and works in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Bill Meyer Show Podcast
Dr Robin Podcast for 09-29-21 Guest Kelly Birch

Bill Meyer Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 40:46


Dr Robin Podcast for 09-29-21 Guest Kelly Birch

The Price of Football
EFL chief executive Trevor Birch interview

The Price of Football

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 61:28


Kevin and Kieran talk to EFL chief executive Trevor Birch, and find out why UEFA have dropped the charges against the remaining three clubs in the European Super League.Follow Kevin on Twitter - @kevinhunterdayFollow Kieran on Twitter, - @KieranMaguireFollow The Price of Football on Twitter - @pof_podSupport The Price of Football on Patreon:https://www.patreon.com/priceoffootballCheck out the Price of Football merchandise store:https://the-price-of-football.backstreetmerch.com/Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/priceoffootball. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Stone Mountain Media
Aaron Birch, Gypsy EDC Cut Man

Stone Mountain Media

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 133:14


All things knives. Blood, guts, glory…Gypsy EDC.

Leicester City Football Forum
The Boot Room - 23/09/21

Leicester City Football Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 50:55


The Birch joins Owynn Palmer Atkin to look ahead to this weekend's game at Burnley.

Absolutely Not
Must Be Nice!

Absolutely Not

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 52:35


On this episode of Absolutely Not Podcast, Heather has come unhinged with the bullshit. Between Jeff's sweaty ass and everyone giving their opinion on everything, MUST BE REAL NICE SHERYL, to blow up your own facebook with insanity.  She's hitting the Absolutely Not line and its very clear y'all are rolling into fall on the hot mess express.   Get more time back to *do you* and take care of yourself this summer! Go to DAILYHARVEST.com and enter code absolutely to get up to forty dollars off your first box!   Prose is the healthy hair regimen with your name all over it. Take your FREE in-depth hair consultation and get 15% off your first order today! Go to Prose.com/absolutely.   Birch is giving 200 dollars off ALL mattresses and 2 free eco-rest pillows at BirchLiving.com/absolutely   Right now Ritual is offering my listeners 10% off your first three months. Visit ritual.com/ABSOLUTELY and turn healthy habits into a Ritual.   See Oldnavy.com/bodequality for additional details.   Produced by Dear Media. 

The Rich Roll Podcast
Paul Hawken: Ending The Climate Crisis In One Generation

The Rich Roll Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 148:56


In the words of today's guest, global warming is not a science problem. It's a human problem.When it comes to taking meaningful steps to redress the climate crisis, so many of us are left crippled. It's a problem so huge, so existential, most people feel powerless to make a difference. But in truth, there are many substantive onramps to participate in the solution, and today's guest is a wonderfully gracious, charitable, experienced, and optimistic cipher to explore these various paths.Meet Paul Hawken, one of the environmental movement's leading voices returning for his second drop on the podcast, the first being at our big live event with IN-Q.In addition to his profound work as a planetary change agent, Paul is an entrepreneur who founded both Erewhon Markets and Smith & Hawken. He's also the author of eight books including the groundbreaking New York Times bestseller Drawdown, and his astonishing, beautiful new work entitled Regeneration: Ending The Climate Crisis in One Generation,which aims to guide, inspire and galvanize the burgeoning climate movement.This is an optimistic conversation about our greatest existential threat. A conversation that extends beyond statistics, blame, and fear to illuminate what each and every one of us can all do now to support what Paul calls regeneration: a call to action that weaves justice, climate, biodiversity, equity, and human dignity into a seamless tapestry of action, policy, and transformation to live more symbiotically with the planet that supports us usWe cover everything from the current state of affairs of the climate crisis, to the actionable steps we can all take to foster regeneration and most importantly, the state of mind we all need to maintain to heal our earth and secure the future of humankind.Paul is a friend, a mentor, and lighthouse. He's a man who has indelibly shaped my perspective and actions when it comes to ecological responsibility, and it's an honor to host him today.To read more click here. You can also watch listen to our exchange on YouTube. And as always, the podcast streams wild and free on Apple Podcasts and Spotify.My hope is that Paul's message will do for you what it has for me—inspire and empower you to take action in your own way.Peace + Plants,Listen, Watch & SubscribeApple Podcasts | YouTube | Spotify | Stitcher | Google PodcastsThanks to this week's sponsors:Audible: Audible has everything you love to listen to—all in one place. With an Audible membership, you can download titles and listen offline, anytime, anywhere. The app is free, and you can listen across devices without losing your spot. Audible is your playlist for life. New members can try it out for free for 30 days at audible.com/richroll or text RICHROLL to 500-500.Navitas Organics: Fine purveyors of delicious organic superfoods on a mission to forge a better world by supporting organic farmers & enhancing plant-focused lifestyles. For a limited time you can get 30% off your entire order by using the code RICHROLL at navitasorganics.com/richroll.Birch Living: The best, most affordable, organic, and sustainable mattresses on the market with a 100-night risk-free trial. 1% of each purchase is donated to the National Forest Foundation and Birch purchases carbon offsets for each mattress sold. For $200 off ALL mattress orders, visit BirchLiving.com/RichRollWhoop: The world's most powerful fitness tracker. Get smarter about how you sleep, recover, and train, so you can unlock your best self. Go to WHOOP.com and use the promo code Richroll at checkout to save 15% off WHOOP.For a complete list of all RRP sponsors, vanity URLs & discount codes, visit Our Sponsors.Show Notes:Connect with Paul: Website | Instagram | Twitter | FacebookBook: Regeneration: Ending the Climate Crisis in One GenerationProject Regeneration: About | InstagramBioneers: The Environment As A Human RightForbes: 3 Things To Learn About The Process Of Systems ChangeThe Tyee: The Most Important Climate Action You Can Take? We Asked Paul HawkenThe New York Times: A Smorgasbord of Solutions for Global WarmingThe New York Times: Read These Three Books About Global WarmingThe New York Times: How Much Do You Know About Solving Global Warming?Forbes: This List Of Climate Change Solutions May Be Key To Reversing ItHBO: Paul Hawken: Project Drawdown | Real Time with Bill MaherHOW CAN I SUPPORT THE PODCAST?Tell Your Friends & Share Online!Subscribe & Review: iTunes | Spotify | Stitcher | Soundcloud | Google PodcastsDonate: Check out our Patreon accountSupport The Sponsors: One of the best ways to support the podcast is to support our sponsors. For a complete list of all RRP sponsors and their respective vanity url's and discount codes, visit my Resources page and click "Sponsors".Thank The Team: I do not do this alone. Send your love to Jason Camiolo for audio engineering, production, show notes and interstitial music; Blake Curtis & Dan Drake for video, & editing; graphics by Jessica Miranda & Daniel Solis; portraits by Davy Greenberg & Grayson Wilder; copywriting by Georgia Whaley; and theme music by Tyler Piatt, Trapper Piatt & Hari Mathis. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Rapcast by Raptors Republic
#1391 - The Interview: Dave Rice, Khem Birch's College Coach

The Rapcast by Raptors Republic

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 20:48


To former UNLV Head Coach Dave Rice, Khem Birch is All-Defence, All-Motor and All-Loyalty. Coach Rice outlines why he was confident taking Birch into the fold after an ugly exit with his first college team. Despite Birch admittedly being a shy person, Coach Rice beams about Birch's explosion in his leadership between his sophomore and junior seasons, not to mention his explosion in the stat sheet. Plus we go into the locker-room after UNLV was upset in Birch's lone NCAA tournament appearance. Despite going undrafted in 2014, Rice details why he knew then that Birch was going to have a "long and illustrious" career. Part of that is Khem's perseverant, team-first attitude. Another is his burning motivation to prove his ever-growing list of doubters wrong. Coach Rice is proud of every player he's helped make the NBA, but find out why, to him, no one is any more special than Khem Birch. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Rapcast by Raptors Republic
#1390 - The Interview: Dave Rice, Khem Birch's college coach

The Rapcast by Raptors Republic

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 20:48


To former UNLV Head Coach Dave Rice, Khem Birch is All-Defence, All-Motor and All-Loyalty. Coach Rice outlines why he was confident taking Birch into the fold after an ugly exit with his first college team. Despite Birch admittedly being a shy person, Coach Rice beams about Birch's explosion in his leadership between his sophomore and junior seasons, not to mention his explosion in the stat sheet. Plus we go into the lockerroom after UNLV was upset in Birch's lone NCAA tournament appearance. Despite going undrafted in 2014, Rice details why he knew then that Birch was going to have a "long and illustrious" career. Part of that is Khem's perseverant, team-first attitude. Another is his burning motivation to prove his ever-growing list of doubters wrong. Coach Rice is proud of every player he's helped make the NBA, but find out why, to him, no one is any more special than Khem Birch. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Killer Instinct
Father and Son Suspects in a Murder, But Both Blame Each Other

Killer Instinct

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 45:55


Diane Kyne was murdered in her own home while her husband and son were there, those details are not disputed. What's not clear is which of the 2 men is the witness and which is the murderer? This week, Savannah breaks down the baffling case of a father and son blaming each other for a murder. 2 separate 911 calls, 2 separate stories, but only one true murderer. Love Killer Instincts but hate the ads? Subscribe to the ad-free version here!: https://killerinstinct.supercast.tech/ Get to know your fertility status and be able to plan ahead with Modern Fertility. Visit ModernFertility.com/KILLER for $20 off! Follow Suspect on Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, or you can binge all nine episodes ad-free by subscribing to Wondery Plus in Apple Podcasts or the Wondery app! Get 10% Off by visiting BetterHelp.com/instinct! Birch is giving $200 off ALL mattresses and 2 free eco-rest pillows at BirchLiving.com/killer Download the 5 star-rated puzzle game, Best Fiends FREE today on the App Store or Google Play! If you have any thoughts on this case or any other case, or just want to get in touch with Savannah about the show, email her at killerinstinctpodcast@gmail.com.  Follow Savannah on IG: @savannahbrymer  Follow Savannah on Twitter: @savannahbrymer   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit
Boost Your Brain Health with These Key Nutrients (Minisode #45)

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 45:18


Boost Your Brain Health with These Key Nutrients | This episode is brought to you by Birch Living and BiOptimizers.Food isn't like medicine, it is medicine. What we eat is literally transformed into tissue throughout our bodies, creating this vessel that lets us live our lives. When it comes to nutrition and health, people often only think about improving their weight or heart health. But the brain should be one of our top focuses for a long happy life, and there are so many foods we can eat every day with nutrients that specifically support it. In today's mini-episode, Dhru speaks with Shawn Stevenson and Dr. Drew Ramsey about the top foods for brain health, and some of the most informative studies on using food as medicine, especially for the brain.Shawn Stevenson is the author of the international bestselling book Sleep Smarter and creator of The Model Health Show, one of the top health podcasts in the world. Shawn has been featured in Forbes, Fast Company, The New York Times, Muscle & Fitness, ESPN, and many other major media outlets. He is also an in-demand keynote speaker for numerous organizations, universities, and conferences. Dr. Drew Ramsey is a psychiatrist, author, farmer, and founder of the Brain Food Clinic in New York City. He is the author of four books, most recently Eat to Beat Depression and Anxiety. He lives with his wife and two children in New York City and on their 127-acre organic farm in rural Indiana. Find Dhru's full-length conversation with Shawn Stevenson here: https://lnk.to/dhru-230/ Find Dhru's full-length conversation with Dr. Drew Ramsey here: https://lnk.to/DrDrewRamsey2/ For more on Dhru Purohit, be sure to follow him on Instagram @dhrupurohit, on Facebook @dhruxpurohit, on Twitter @dhrupurohit, and on YouTube @dhrupurohit. You can also text Dhru at (302) 200-5643 or click here https://my.community.com/dhrupurohit. Interested in joining The Dhru Purohit Podcast Facebook Community? Submit your request to join here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2819627591487473/.This episode is brought to you by Birch Living and BiOptimizers.I recently upgraded to a Birch mattress by Helix. The Birch is made right here in the US, out of 4 non-toxic, natural materials: organic latex, organic cotton, New Zealand wool, and American steel springs. If you're looking for a new mattress, I highly recommend checking out the Birch. Right now they are giving my community $200 off all mattresses, plus 2 free eco-rest pillows. Just head over to https://birchliving.com/dhru. If I had to pick one supplement that has made the biggest difference in my overall health, it would be magnesium. I personally started taking magnesium to help with my sleep, especially when I travel, and it's been super helpful. But I don't take just any old magnesium, I take BiOptimizers Magnesium Breakthrough. It contains 7 different forms of magnesium, which all have different functions in the body. I haven't found anything else like it on the market. Right now, BiOptimizers is offering my community a few special bundles and for a limited time BiOptimizers is also giving away free bottles of their bestselling products P3OM and Masszymes with select purchases, just head over to magbreakthrough.com/dhru with code DHRU10. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

nowyouknow's podcast
Walt Disney World's Biggest Mistake | In Depth

nowyouknow's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 31:13


Visit https://birchliving.com/nowyouknow to get $400 off your Birch mattress plus two free pillows! Sign the Petition to convert Disney to Electric: https://chng.it/pL5n2TJn Bobby's Social Media https://linktr.ee/bobbybriggs15 Don't forget to tweet #evdisney to @waltdisneyworld and @disney to help push to make this change! DISCLAIMER: We hold stock in PTRA and DIS. Our Suggestions are our own opinions alone and are only done for entertainment purposes. Please Don't take any of this content as guidance for buying or selling any type of investment or security. Please do your own research before making any investment decisions. #disney #waltdisneyworld #evdisney Use the code NOWYOUKNOW to get 5% your purchase today at https://www.BigBattery.com Want to buy Zac and Jesse's shirts and help support the show? Visit https://nowyouknow.ecowear.us/ to get your merch! Use promo code “NowYouKnow” to get your free trial of A Better Route Planner Premium: https://abetterrouteplanner.com/premium/ https://apps.apple.com/us/app/a-better-routeplanner-abrp/id1490860521 https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.iternio.abrpapp Check out our Now You Know Clips channel here! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCacwzDEdpVEO2UjIO00CpqQ Check out Energy Pals here: https://energypal.com/nowyouknow/ Patreon:https://www.patreon.com/nowyouknow Our Amazon Associate Link: https://amzn.to/2JFZjaE International Amazon Associate Link: http://geni.us/NowYouKnowAMZN Sources: https://www.busboss.com/blog/school-bus-maintenance-an-analysis-of-costs#:~:text=According%20to%20these%20results%2C%20the,at%20%2443%20less%20per%20year. https://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy03osti/33797.pdf [2] Ali NA, et al. (2019). Growing evidence for the impact of air pollution on depression. Ochsner Journal. DOI: 10.31486/toj.19.0011 https://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy03osti/33797.pdf https://www.laughingplace.com/w/news/2015/04/22/walt-disney-world-bus-fleet-to-run-on-renewable-diesel/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QcS3ovdsgNI https://www.forbes.com/sites/sebastianblanco/2019/04/18/proterra-ready-for-electric-bus-battery-leasing-with-200-million-credit-facility/?sh=2572eeeb2314

Another Mother Runner
#482: Two Coaches Talk Post-Run Recovery

Another Mother Runner

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 58:27


Sarah has an in-depth conversation with her favorite coaching duo, Liz Waterstraat and Jen Harrison, focusing on perhaps the most oft-overlooked element of running: recovery. The coaches cover: -the three main components of recovery (including that it even starts pre-run!); -what qualifies as a rest day; -pointers for foam rolling; -sleep hygiene and its roll in successful workouts; plus, -the mental side of recovery. In the intro, Liz details her recent, forged-from-adversity sprint triathlon race; Coach Jen jumps on at 15:39. When you shop our sponsors, you help AMR. We appreciate your—and their—support! Stress less: Enjoy 40% off a Calm Premium subscription at Calm.com/amr Good night! Birch is giving $200 off all mattresses + 2 free eco-rest pillows at BirchLiving.com/amr Feel empowered with Birdie: Get 15% off your first purchase at ShesBirdie.com/AMR Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Unexpectables
Episode 161 - Son of a Birch

The Unexpectables

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 121:04


The Unexpectables split the party! To... VERY different results!

The Rich Roll Podcast
Sergey Young on The Science of Growing Young

The Rich Roll Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 119:23


What if I told you that there was a Russian millionaire who wants to help you live to be 150-years-old?This isn't science fiction—it's ‘immortality science'. It's the science of lifespan extension. The science of what today's guest calls growing young.Meet Sergey Young, the exceedingly bright and optimistic chemical engineer turned investment banker turned venture capitalist committed to not only funding cutting-edge lifespan extension breakthroughs but also ensuring that such advancements are affordable and accessible to all.Named one of the Top 100 Longevity Leaders in the world, Sergey is an XPRIZE Foundation Board Member, the founder of the $100M Longevity Vision Fund, and a development sponsor of the Age Reversal XPRIZE, which is a global competition designed to find a cure for aging. Yes, you read that right—a cure.He's also the author of the new book hitting shelves everywhere August 24, 2021 (and now available for pre-order) entitled, The Science And Technology Of Growing Young, which is a fascinating demystification of the longevity landscape, a primer on the science and technology developments aimed at healthspan enhancement, and a practical guidebook outlining the many things we all can and should be doing now to live vibrantly to 100 and beyond.Today we run the gamut on longevity, including near and long-term science & technological advancements like the advent of bio-tracking wearables, body digitization, and the role of artificial intelligence in revolutionizing medical diagnostics and early disease detection.We also cast a future gaze into the insanely wild far horizon of age-reversal science, digital avatars, telexistence, 3-D organ printing, and AI-brain integration.Pivoting to the immediately practical, we also converse about the many things we can and should all be doing now to extend not just our lifespan, but our healthspan—things like eating a plant-based diet, prioritizing exercise, sleep, relationships, and spending time in nature.But the most interesting aspects of this exchange are the moral and philosophical dilemmas that surface in the conversation around human lifespan extension—and the urgency with which we need to be thinking very deeply about the many profound implications of these advancements.Brilliant, charming, and quite funny, it's an honor to share Sergey's wisdom with you today.Break out the pen and notepad. You're going to want to take notes on this one.To read more click here. You can also watch listen to our exchange on YouTube. And as always, the podcast streams wild and free on Apple Podcasts and Spotify.Enjoy!Peace + Plants,Listen, Watch & SubscribeApple Podcasts | YouTube | Spotify | Stitcher | Google PodcastsThanks to this week's sponsors:Athletic Greens: 75 whole food sourced ingredients designed to optimize 5 key areas of health, Athletic Greens is the delicious daily habit that sets you up for a healthy future. I take the packets everywhere I go. Invest in your health without compromise! Go to: athleticgreens.com/richroll to get a FREE year supply of Vitamin D ​AND​ 5 free travel packs​ with your first purchase.Blinkist: Unlimited access to read or listen to a massive library of condensed non-fiction books from self-help, to business, health, and history—all for one low price. Join me and 12 million others gleaning from the best and brightest. Try Blinkist FREE for 7 days AND get 25% off a Blinkist Premium membership at blinkist.com/richrollCalm: The app designed to help you ease stress and get the best sleep of your life with guided meditations, sleep stories, and more. Right now, my listeners can get a special limited-time promotion of 40% off a Calm Premium subscription at calm.com/richroll. It includes unlimited access to ALL of Calm's amazing content. Get started today!Birch Living: The best, most affordable, organic, and sustainable mattresses on the market with a 100-night risk-free trial. 1% of each purchase is donated to the National Forest Foundation and Birch purchases carbon offsets for each mattress sold. For $200 off ALL mattress orders, visit BirchLiving.com/RichRollFor a complete list of all RRP sponsors, vanity URLs & discount codes, visit Our Sponsors.Show Notes:Connect with Sergey: Instagram | Twitter | FacebookBook: The Science and Technology of Growing YoungSergey Young: AboutLongevity Vision Fund: MissionLongevity Vision Fund: PortfolioXPrize: Impact RoadmapForbes: Will You Live To 200? Five Levels Of Breakthroughs In Longevity Research You Must Know AboutForbes: The Science And Technology Of Growing YoungCrunchbase News: When 90 Is Young: What A Moonshot VC Thinks About Radical LongevityEndpoints News: Peter Diamandis' right hand man Sergey Young wants to reverse aging via his $100M Longevity Vision FundThrive Global: Sergey YoungLongevity Technology: Forever Young – our exclusive with Sergey YoungHOW CAN I SUPPORT THE PODCAST?Tell Your Friends & Share Online!Subscribe & Review: iTunes | Spotify | Stitcher | Soundcloud | Google PodcastsDonate: Check out our Patreon accountSupport The Sponsors: One of the best ways to support the podcast is to support our sponsors. For a complete list of all RRP sponsors and their respective vanity url's and discount codes, visit my Resources page and click "Sponsors".Thank The Team: I do not do this alone. Send your love to Jason Camiolo for audio engineering, production, show notes and interstitial music; Margo Lubin and Blake Curtis for video, & editing; graphics by Jessica Miranda & Daniel Solis; portraits by Ali Rogers, Davy Greenberg & Grayson Wilder; copywriting by Georgia Whaley; and theme music by Tyler Piatt, Trapper Piatt & Hari Mathis. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.