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Best podcasts about Dexcom

Latest podcast episodes about Dexcom

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
In the News.. New G7 data, Lingo sensors, COVID & Diabetes studies and more!

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 5:51


Every week "In the News..." brings you the top stories and headlines around the diabetes community. Top stories this week include: a Dexcom G7 data update, Abbott announces new Lingo sensors to measure ketones and more, it's 100 years since the first insulin shot, Lilly Diabetes discontinues T1D Everyday Magic and an ultra releases diabetes data to a medical journal -- Join us LIVE every Wednesday at 4:30pm EST Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Episode Transcription Below  Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I'm Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days. All sources linked up where you're watching and at Diabetes-Connections dot com when this airs as a podcast. XX Looking to get organized? Check out my new guide with top tips to clear your diabetes clutter. Everything from how to start to where to donate and how to keep it from taking over your house. Head over to diabetes-connections dot com to organize your diabetes supplies! XX Some new information about Dexcom's upcoming G7, which has been submitted to the US FDA and in Europe. Latest clinical study show the MARD of the G7 is 8.2 for adults, compared to 9 for the G6. MARD is the Mean absolute relative difference and the lower the better here. G7 was even lower, 8.1 for kids. This is close to the same results they talked about last summer, but the group in the trial was bigger. G7 is expected to get approval in Europe this quarter and likely in the US much later this year. Our last longer format interview episode is with Dexcom's CEO and we go in depth on this. https://www.drugdeliverybusiness.com/dexcom-ceo-touts-unprecedented-performance-of-g7-in-clinical-trial-awaits-fda-decision/?fbclid=IwAR3G5_Fu9fhPfR0M3FzgCNCsFYmo4gDRDy5nJySgxt56mMVJgrpUsVQedis https://investors.dexcom.com/static-files/0c3012e2-40f4-4046-a962-85e6b421d490 XX Two COVID and diabetes studies I want to talk about.. the first showing that more children are being diagnosed with type 1 and type 2 diabetes after getting COVID. This study looked at databases of people under 18 starting in March 2020 and going for 18 months. There are a LOT of questions here.. including whether post-COVID type 2 diabetes will actual be a temporary or chronic condition. Which leads us to the other study.. this one of adults, in almost 4-thousand covid patients, just under half developed high blood sugar levels, including many who were not previously diabetic. These researchers say a lot of the patients here were in their 30s and 40s, no sign of diabetes before COVID.. and the levels of glucose in their blood were incredibly high, sometimes more than twice the level that indicates diabetes. These patients still had high levels of C-peptide, which shows that they were still producing insulin. The theory here is that something is disrupting the fat cells. But the researchers admit they are just at the beginning of figuring this out. It's this latter study and others like it that seem to be showing that there really is something different about COVID and blood glucose. I saw a lot of people dismissing the children's study with, well, any virus can cause T1D.  I'm glad these researchers are digging into what's going on. https://www.sciencenews.org/article/coronavirus-covid-diabetes-fat-cells-blood-sugar https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/07/health/kids-covid-diabetes-cdc.html XX Abbott unveils plans for a new line of consumer bio-wearable sensors that will collect a broader range of biological readings to help users optimize their exercise and nutrition regimens and overall health. Called “Lingo”- which are still under development and aren't intended for medical use— they are based on the existing Freestyle Libre diabetes monitoring technology. We're talking about glucose, ketones, lactate and alcohol. Interesting to me that these were shown at the Consumer Electronics Show and not a medical conference, but Abbott is up front that these are basically for athletes and not for people with diabetes or those who need to make medical decisions based on the sensors. We'll see which of these makes it off the drawing board. https://www.fiercebiotech.com/medtech/abbott-ceo-ford-unveils-lingo-line-sports-biosensors-based-diabetes-monitoring-tech XX Another divestment for Lilly Diabetes – last week we told you they were doing away with their Journey Medals for diaversaries.. they have since announced that T1D everyday magic is no more. This was a partnership between Lilly and Disney that was a blog and a place for recipes and the home of those Coco books, the cute monkey with diabetes who hangs out with Mickey & Minnie Mouse. As of today you can still get digital versions of the books via the website but we'll see how long that lasts. Full disclosure: I wrote for them a couple of times – and was paid by them – glad I saved those columns. https://www.t1everydaymagic.com/thank-you-for-sharing-the-magic/ XX Interesting news from an amazing athlete with type 1. We told you that Sebastien Sasseville biked across Canada this summer. He previously went up Mt Everest and did a brutal race across the Sahara. Now, all the data on his blood sugar during that recent ride has been published. It's in the Journal of Diabetes, Obesity & Metabolism. Sasseville wore the Tandem and Dexcom Control IQ system during the ride.. the article is about how using that kind of automated insulin delivery system can help ultra athletes with diabetes.   https://dom-pubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/dom.14629?fbclid=IwAR2JLTn9dGJu43have5EMqXkWlENuDgPFDQq6RrsbY7TJyRJV0aERsDxYbo XX This week marks 100 years since the first person received a shot of insulin. Canadian teenager Leonard Thompson got that life saving injection on January 11, 1922. Of course, this was via Dr. Frederick Banting and his team.. Thompson was drifting in and out of a diabetic coma and weighed only 65 pounds. He was 14 years old. The first shot was found to be impure and didn't work. But they were able to fix the problem and administer a second purer shot. Thompson only lived to age 27 but his actions helped save so many lives. https://www.healthline.com/diabetesmine/diabetes-care-joslin-100-years-first-human-insulin-shot#A-century-of-Joslin XX Before I let you go, as I mentioned earlier, the podcast this week is an update from Dexcom. CEO Kevin Sayer answers your questions about the G7 and lots more. Listen wherever you get your podcasts or if you're listening to this as on a podcast app, just go back an episode. That's In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
"Different every step of the way" - A Dexcom G7 Update (and more) with CEO Kevin Sayer

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 32:24


This week, Dexcom CEO Kevin Sayer spoke to the JP Morgan Healthcare Conference about the G7 and beyond. We talk about information from that presentation and get to as many of your questions as time allows. This interview took place on Tuesday Jan 11 and much of what we discussed isn't FDA approved. Dexcom presentation info here Club1921 info here  Our usual disclaimer: Dexcom is a sponsor of this podcast, but they don't dictate content and they don't tell me what to ask their executives. Recent Dexcom episodes: CTO Jake Leach talks about Garmin, Dexcom One & more CEO Kevin Sayer talks about G7, Direct to Watch, Adhesive and more CEO Kevin Sayer talks about Dexcom in Hospital, G7, VA program and more Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Episode Transcription Below  Stacey Simms 0:00 Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dexcom. Take control of your diabetes and live life to the fullest with Dexcom and by Club 1921. Where Diabetes Connections are made This is Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. Welcome to another week of the show. You know I'm always so glad to have you here. We aim to educate and inspire about diabetes with a focus on people who use insulin. And I'm talking with Dexcom CEO this week, it's Kevin Sayer, he is back to check in with us again. And in the interest of getting this episode out to you as soon as I could. It might sound a little different right here at the beginning. But Dexcom episodes are always so high interest that it really merits a quick turnaround. I didn't want to sit on this interview for a week. So here's the setup. Dexcom CEO Kevin Sayer gave a presentation to the JP Morgan healthcare conference, if you're listening as this episode goes live, that was just Monday of this week, January 10, the interview you're about to hear took place on Tuesday, January 11. My usual disclaimer Dexcom is a sponsor of this podcast, but they don't dictate content and they don't tell me what to ask their executives. I asked the Diabetes Connections podcast Facebook group for questions. And Whoa, boy, did you have a lot as always not a surprise. And I really appreciate you sending those in, I got to as many as I could, while also trying to include what the folks at Dexcom had really asked me to bring up there are some topics that they wanted Kevin to make sure to address. And I think we do a pretty good job of trying to reach a balance here. Kevin, welcome and Happy New Year, Kevin Sayer 1:46 and Happy New Year to you. Stacey Simms 1:48 Thank you. Well, this seems to have started out in pretty happy way on the headline, just from this week. Dexcom CEO touts unprecedented performance of G7 in clinical trial. This is after your talk at the annual JP Morgan healthcare conference. Tell me a little bit about that unprecedented performance data. Kevin Sayer 2:08 I'm happy to. And I just have to qualify it by saying no, I can't send it to all your listeners at the end of the call yet. We're still waiting for approval in Europe. And we have filed this with the FDA, I'm going to take you back a little bit, we made a decision when we were going through the G7 development process that we wanted to answer that performed better than G6. And all of our scientists looked at us and they go oh, really, you're sure because this is really good. And so we spent a lot of time new algorithms and new manufacturing techniques, there's a lot of things in G7 that make it different. We also wanted to validate that performance with a study that was so large, nobody could refute it. So as you look at the data that I presented at the conference yesterday, over 300 patients 39,000 Match pairs all across since one ranges and on the I CGM standard side, but with the 5% 95% lower bound, and even the absolute points, you can see we are well within all of the iCGM standards, which are very technical and actually are a very good measure of how a sensor actually performs in reality. And they were very thoughtful in developing these standards to try and pick the centers that don't work to put you statistically in a bind to whereby if you really aren't performing in the low range or wherever, you're not going to get that iCGM designation. We're very comfortably there. And the overall MARD in the study, Stacey is eight point, you know I it's in the low eight for adults and pediatrics. And if you start looking at the data, we gather the data sets in three periods, you know, days one and two, the middle days, four, or five and six, and the last days nine and 10. It's pretty low, I think it's below 10. In the first group a day, the first days, which are always a little bit higher, traditionally in our centers than the other days. But in those middle and end days, it's it's near seven, and strips for six. I mean, we have done something that I've been in this business for since 1994. I didn't think we'd ever do this when I started. As far as being this good. This is really, really good data. And we're going to continue to deliver the experience to our customers that they demand from us. So as you can as you think about an iCGM that's driving an automated insulin delivery system. And not only is the performance great, the user where it's 60% smaller, it's a 30 minute warm up. It's a new app. From our perspective, we've got a lot of the clarity data, your listeners will know about clarity. We've got a lot of your clarity data right on the app. There's new alarm configurations. Stacey Simms 4:48 I'm gonna just jump in with a couple of quick clarifications before we go on. You mentioned a number of there that went by quickly I apologize when you talked about the 300 people in this trial 39,000 match what I missed that one Kevin Sayer 5:00 matched pairs. That's where you compare the CGM value to the blood glucose value from the laboratory instrument. So the way our studies work is literally we draw blood samples from the individuals in the study at intervals, and then we actually match the CGM data to that laboratory blood instrument. So 39,000 points from these 300 people in this study were matched. Got it? Stacey Simms 5:27 And you mentioned the MARD mean absolute relative difference. Most of you, as you listen are very familiar with this, the lower the better for CGM G6, I, my understanding was G6 was in the low nines. This is 8.1 for peds. 8.2 for adults, as I'm reading it, that's right. I know you can't tell me I'll ask you anyway, why? What made the difference here? Is it sighs is it algorithm? Do you have anything you can point to? Or is that a trade secret Kevin Sayer 5:49 it's combination, I think the algorithm has been the most, the algorithm changes were really extensive here. And, you know, we always have manufacturing processes to get better, the way we build the G7 centers different in every step of the way. Literally, our G6 manufacturing processes go away and the G7 ones take over the summer, we're a little similar on the actual sensor wire itself, and that manufacturing, but everything else is different. We just think it it's smaller, it's a lot shorter than G6 was. And so it is it's going to be a completely different experience for everybody. Stacey Simms 6:28 So to go back to what you were talking about, before I jumped in there, you were starting to talk about alarms, is there something different for the alarm, Kevin Sayer 6:35 the app is different. And so access to them, and, and just how you use them, if we try to get to be more consumer, thoughtful, as we configured the alarms, we'll see how everybody loves him. It'll be interesting. The alarms are one of the things we get the most comments on when we launch a product initially, we try and please everyone, but we never please everyone. And then you get you know, the agency at one time. I don't know if your call. I think one of our other discussions, we had to make the mute override not work on the low end. Boy, we got a lot of people mad at us about that one. So we've tried to comply with what our users want, and also comply with what the FDA has asked us to do. But I think users will find the alarm experience. Good as well. I like I think it's just gonna be a home run. Yeah, well, I Stacey Simms 7:24 mean, my son would be happy if an alarm never made a noise again. And I know other people who put like it to alarm every time there's any movement. So I hear where you're coming from, can you give any insight into the G7 app in terms of what the differences that we may see as users? And I guess especially one of the questions I always get is about follow any changes of significance coming that you can share follows Kevin Sayer 7:47 on a separate software track. And so the G7 system, the app is just we tried to get more data in the app itself, versus what we have with G6. So a lot of the clarity data, or at least summary query data is sitting there right in your app. And that will be i we think people will like that just to see how they're doing over time you got your time in range data for, you know, three 714, you know, a month, 90 days, see how you're doing time in range wise and the app is other than that it's relatively similar. The startup is different and you know, in the interface is going to be different. I think over time, what you'll see with us is that app is now going to get more sophisticated, we changed the entire software platform for G7 and started over again, and we developed a software platform, we can now really change and add on to a lot easier than we could in the past. And so we're hoping to have more frequent software releases. But we've also learned that CGM is not like Battlestar Galactica game, a game where you want to get a new release every two weeks to fire everybody up. We can't do a release every two weeks, because people depend on this for their, you know, for their lives. And if you do too frequent releases, and you botch a release, you do some wrong, you remember what happened, if we ever make a mistake on the software, the data side, we can't do that. But we do want to add more features more quickly in this platform will enable us to do that. I think one of the things you'll see going forward on the software side, we really want to automate a lot of the tech support features. We've added some, you know, you can get FAQs right from the app now with respect to your sensor, but there are other things we think we can do tech support wise in the app that will you know, reduce everybody's burden. Nobody likes making a phone call and nobody likes picking up the phone. And when we have a sensor fail, and we do have sensors fail, it just doesn't make any sense that you have to call us if we've got data on a phone, it'd be much easier. For example, if we could diagnose that failure right on the app and go through a very quick process to why but where you could get one. I can't give a timeframe when all those things are going to come but the platform is robust enough that over time, we can add features like that. One of the other nice things about G7, since it's fully disposable, you know, every sensor has its own unique serial number. Whereas with G6, that same transmitters used with three months' worth of sensors. So it will be, it will be fun to be able to follow things like that and see how the sensors go through the channel where everybody gets attract things of that nature. So what we're really looking forward to the change in our business that G7 affords us. Stacey Simms 10:28 As usual, I have listener questions, I'm going to try to not repeat because you've been really accessible in the last year, we've talked to a couple of folks from Dexcom, besides yourself. So as you listen, if I didn't get to your question, or if you have a question, good chance, we actually answered it in the last year, year and a half. But given let me ask you about compression lows, because that's one of the things we had talked about, about testing the G7. Any update on that in these trials, if you lay on it, you know, circulation slows, and you can get a false reading any better with the G7 Kevin Sayer 10:54 part of the clinical study is in the compression, because you're pretty much sitting in a chair with a needle in your arm drawing blood. So I'm sorry, we can't really test that we'll learn more about compression when it gets in the field. My hope is that it isn't as much but I can't promise that because I don't know, we're not enough people. I think there are ways over time where we can manage compression better, I'm not going to get into all the science on the phone, believe it or not, I do spend a lot of time with the engineers on this specific issue. Because I have it happened to me from time to time too. So I will call them up say Hey, can we do X, Y or Z? And I think there are some some answers, but I can't give them away because I don't want to give away the playbook. So let's let's just see what we can do overtime on that one. Stacey Simms 11:42 Okay. All right. But you know, the next clinical trial just have them lean against the side of their bed. Kevin Sayer 11:46 We will we'll have to do well. Diffic very scientific. Stacey Simms 11:50 Another question came up, and I think I'm gonna knock wood. I think we've been very lucky on this. It's about new iOS launches from Apple. And I'll read the question and it'll tell you, briefly our experience. This person said Dexcom is part of the Apple Developer Network developers have access to new release such as iOS months before launch, why does Dexcom lag behind Apple iOS launches by months in terms of quote, approved use. And our experience, frankly, is that we have not had any issues Benny and I both have, we just got but as a 13. Plus, we both had very old phones. And we have a latest software and no glitches for us. But that's not everyone's experience, can you talk a little bit about that, Kevin Sayer 12:30 we do get the iOS versions in advance, and we do our best to comply with them, I would I would tell you that it isn't as simple as it's made out to be. And the iOS version that's launched isn't always exactly what we've worked on as they as they make tweaks, not big ones. But you also test for everything that you know about the new iOS versions, and sometimes are things that you don't know, that are in there that come back and may affect the app later on, which is why we delay a little bit, we try and go through every bit of testing that you can imagine. And I'll be honest with your users, Apple's made iOS changes, because of us, we have called up and said, Look, you got to do XY and Z here we have a problem. And they're very good to work with, they've not been difficult at all, you know, when you think about iOS and Android operating system and all the things that they impact. And it's very hard not to impact somebody adversely when you do a new iOS launch. And you know, the perfect example with us is the home you'd override journey that I brought up earlier. In the beginning, I believe the only app that can overcome the mute override within iOS is authorized manna in the beginning was Apple's alarm clock, but other people would go around it with their apps was a medical device, we can't do a go around, we have to make sure what we do is in compliance and known so they work with us very well to make sure we could do what the FDA wanted with respect to the mute button. And the same thing with Android on that, and that was a very difficult exercise. So if there's a delay, it's because we're taking time to see what might have been put into iOS that would change our app. And it just one more thing that will stop. new operating systems are often designed to minimize power usage to extend battery life. Oftentimes, minimizing power usage affects an app that has to be running continuously. And those are the types of battles that we fight are things that we have to make sure we test as a new iOS minimizes power usage. Just does that turn us off? Does it does that stop Dexcom? And we've had, we've discovered things of that nature where it could affect our app. So there you go. Long answers. All right. Stacey Simms 14:44 No, no, that's great. And you mentioned you've asked iOS you've asked Apple to make changes. I assume the alarm was one any others that you can share. Kevin Sayer 14:52 I know that nothing I could share. Nothing major that I like you said they're very cognizant of the Dexcom community there we are. You know, we're we're a very large part of the iOS, you know, we're pretty, it's pretty vocal group when it comes to iOS, Stacey Simms 15:06 pretty vocal group period, the whole community. Alright, we say that with love. So another question came from my group, which was about Sugarmate. This is a, I would describe it as a third party app that uses the Dexcom information. And now the real time API to display and and act on data in its own way, my understanding is that Tandem owns Sugarmate, just from way of background here. And you know, Dexcom owns a little bit of Tandem. So there's a relationship there. Can you speak a little bit about data sources, but the bottom line question here was using Sugarmate and the situation to ask you, does Dexcom feel like they own the patient data? Or do the patients still own their data, even when going through the Dexcom web API's, we believe Kevin Sayer 15:49 the patient's own their data, not us, let me rephrase that we believe the patient's control the use of their data, we are the stewards of that data sitting on our servers. And so we have a responsibility to maintain it and to keep it but where that data goes and where that data is used. We do believe, particularly if it's identified data, that the patient absolutely has complete control over that there's vector sugar made, it's interesting, it was not using API's before it was a like many and non authorized use of the data to display it in a different format that people quite candidly, mess, like better than looking at the Dexcom app. And that's fine. That's why we built the live API's, we made a server change to upgrade our server platform, again, more capacity, more safety, more redundancy. It's a project that's been going on for years. And we've come to the end of that project this year. And when doing so there were some technical issues with Sugarmate, they very quickly switched over to the live API's. And now this is an authorized use of the data based on platform and data pipes that we built. So we're willing to share the data with people when they want it. I think that's an attitude of Dexcom. That changed very much over the years, when we first started, we had a hard time with that concept. Because we worked so hard to invent this technology and gather this data, why would we share it with anybody and say, See, you remember the early days and Nightscout, they were mad at us, we were mad at that. Now, we're not mad at anybody anymore. I think it's important that the data sharing be structured and be used for good purposes. But you know, all in all, it's a, it's a good use of the data that we have, because these are still Dexcom customers. If you want to, you're still buying sensors and using them. It's not a bad thing. Stacey Simms 17:35 Let me ask you a question about the sensors. And this came up in the fall. I've seen it less since but it's still out there. And I don't know if this is something you can answer. But it seems that we have not received this. But it seems that some customers are getting the G6 sensors, the inserters brand new in the original packaging, but a new label on it that says this product meets shelf-life extension requirements. I'm your people I reached out to them in the fall, they told me the stickers, oh, you know, it's all legit. There are updated expiration dates. But I'm curious why this is happening. And you know, what is the shelf life of the G6, Kevin Sayer 18:10 I can tell you exactly what's going on, you do shelf-life testing for product as selling your product will last. And over the course of our product lifecycle, you trying to extend that shelf life through more testing to make sure the product still works for the same amount of time period, if you manufactured product with 12 months shelf life, and then extend that shelf life to 18 months. And it's still the same product and still same manufacturing process rather than unbox it, put it in a new box or throw it away, we put a sticker on the outside because it's same products been tested, it's been proven that it works for 18 months, that's not a problem. That doesn't mean that it's 18 months old, we never have inventory that sits around that long to my knowledge, but we do extend shelf lives, it's important for us to do that, with respect to the distribution channel, particularly as we go to the pharmacy, you know, in the drugstore and and our distributors, the longer they have, you know that they can keep product, the better. We don't want people throwing product away if they don't have to. So all that means is we've extended our testing and shown that the product still works for a longer period of time and wanted to to label the product accordingly. That's all Stacey Simms 19:17 Yeah, I think because it came at a time when there is nervousness just in general not just in diabetes about supply chain and, you know, scarcity concerns. It just seemed unexpected, if that makes sense. Kevin Sayer 19:30 Well I one of the reasons to extend life is in fact supply chain we don't have inventory issues with G6 you know G6 is a very very well running process right now and still, you know, the premier sensor on the market. In fact, we launched a G6 derivation product in Europe, these past three months called Dexcom. One a it's a cash pay product sold on the E commerce platform in four European countries say See now and it's a lower price and geographies. But we did a feature that we took away, share and follow. We're not connecting any devices. It's it's a simpler technology. And again, we have d six supply to be able to go and do things like that. And we are planning to have G7 capacity to do similar things. We are not shooting small on either front will have capacity on both sides. And, you know, listeners on a supply chain perspective, we have been extremely diligent with respect to components for our products. And right now we see things very good today. We my operations team has just been outstanding on this front. So knock on wood, no, no Dexcom problems today. Stacey Simms 20:40 All right, two more questions for you. As always, we're going to run out of time. And as you're listening, I would refer you again, we did have a conversation about Dexcom. One in a previous show. So I will link that up. This one is more of I've asked this, you answered it, but I still continue to get questions to please ask you please make sure when GS seven comes out that Medicare is taken care of? Kevin Sayer 21:00 Well, that is a great question. And I think we've learned from our mistakes in the past. So we will when we get G7 done, what we will do is we will file with CMS to get G7 reimbursement. That's a process that I've heard anecdotally takes three to six months. So if we can get it done in three months, we can't file with CMS until it's approved. But we'll file after approval, and then we'll go and it is our plans to have capacity for all of our US users. When we go it is not that Medicare delay for G6 was one of the most emotionally gut-wrenching things I've dealt with here, because you can't imagine how many emails I got. But we didn't have capacity, and we didn't have everything ready. We've learned from our mistakes. And we'll hopefully be ready to go to everybody. That's our plan right now. Stacey Simms 21:49 That's great. Okay, and my last question is, and I hate doing this to you, but I'm doing it anyways, look into the chapter, we're gonna look, we're gonna come at it sideways, because I did have one listeners and ask him what's planned for the g8? And I said, Come on, let's let him get the G7. Oh, you know what? I'm happy? You can answer that. Let's go for it? Kevin Sayer 22:07 Well, well, I'll give you two because we did lose some time in the beginning because my computer wasn't functioning properly. As we look to the future, we want performance to continue to be better. And then we ask ourselves, but we're getting to the point where as you get to an eight, Mar D, we're getting close to finger six, I don't know how much more of a gap there's going to be, as we look to the future, and even G7 derivatives, we want to go to a longer life, we want to go to 15 days rather than 10. We'll be running studies doing that over the next couple of years. We've got a couple of plans there. We're always looking to upgrade the electronics, and how much better electronics, you know, I know one of your bigger user complaints is connectivity and loss of data, how do we improve that experience for our customers to make that better over time? Because we can always be better. And phones change faster than medical devices? So what why do we put there, we're looking at ways how we can help the environment for future product launches again, and changes in the next platforms, G6 has a lot more materials than G7 does as far as just raw plastic. So how do we make an impact there? On the cost side, there's some form factor things that are pretty far out there that we look at that I won't go into that are really, really fun. We'll see if we had done that. And if they're feasible from a cost of manufacturing perspective, but again, we're now very much focused on customer preference, rather than can't we make this work well enough, you know, in my early days here, it's Can we can we just get this thing working well enough to whereby people can rely on it. Whereas now it's one of those features that are going to make it a more engaging experience. And the last one will be software and analytics and things like that, as I look out over time, do we end up with analytics to whereby we can offer our users a menu of choices on the software side to whereby they can get more if you want Dexcom when don't want to connect or talk to anybody? You can have that if you want something that literally literally analyzes every glucose measurement that you take and does something scientifically. How do you get there, I think there's a number of experiences we can develop over time for future product generations without changing the form factor. So I don't see any slowdown in investment on the r&d side. And on the product side, G6 is the best product out there now and G7 will just be better in every way. And then we just keep going from there. Stacey Simms 24:27 And I appreciate you answering that. Thank you. So if you keep going from there, this is the sideways kind of question I wanted to ask. Okay, go ahead. Okay. A couple of days ago, Abbott announced the idea of what they're calling Lingo, which is bio wearables that will track not only glucose, but ketones and lactate and alcohol. And they say these are not medical devices. You know, this is for people who want to be you know, ultra-marathoners and things like that. We're already seeing sensors used in that way right now. Any plans to do something like this? Kevin Sayer 24:56 You know what our electronics platform for G7 We could put any, if we could develop a sensor wire with membranes and analytes and such for to measure something else, it would fit right into G7. And we design G7. With that in mind, we have advanced technology work going on with the other analytes. But it's still an advanced technology phase, we have to answer a couple of questions. First, have we done all we're supposed to do on the glucose side? Before we run there, and we got a lot to do right now, Stacy, you've heard me talk on this call. And so we need to get done what we started, we need to get G7 launched, we need to scale it up and manufacture it in the 10s. And ultimately, hundreds of millions of products as we stand up a factory in Malaysia and get our Arizona facility built out even more. So we've got to get that work done. The second piece, I'm going to answer this in three pieces. The second piece is what is the commercial opportunity for each of those things. They did announce this line of sensors, but they're all individual sensors. So I've worn a lactate sensor, I'll be completely honest with you from the lab and seeing what it does to my workouts and it's very cool, I can see which workout is better than another one. But I'm not ultra-marathoner, I probably wouldn't change my life. But it was very interesting to look at. There are other scientific uses of black data, particularly in a hospital setting. But what is the market for those, and so we're gonna kind of take an approach, we'll continue to develop the science and if Abbott wants to go develop a market, I am happy to follow this time rather than create it, like we've done with glucose. The third piece of this is there are a lot of biosensors out there. Now, you have your Apple Watch, and Apple is continuing to gather more and more data or ranks, whoop bands, Fitbits, they're advertised on television all the time, I would love to incorporate data from these other sensing technologies into into Dexcom. And vice versa, share our data with those people, particularly as you head down the health and wellness path. And let's get some other people's sensors into our platform. In all honesty, if Abbott's really good at sensing these other things, we'll take that data on our platform and analyze it to if they want to, I guarantee you, that probably isn't gonna, gonna happen. But we would, you know, let's be open about this. We're going to get our glucose work done to because we've not seen an opportunity that exceeds this. Stacey Simms 27:13 Got it? Excellent. Well, thank you so much for answering that it really is so interesting to watch and to see if, as you say, if any of this really, really makes a difference commercially, if people do want to adopt it widely. You know, I think the jury's still out, so we shall follow. Kevin Sayer 27:26 Hey, thanks for having me again. Stacey Simms 27:27 Thank you so much. Have a great day. You're listening to Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. More information at the episode homepage, diabetes, Dash connections.com. I'll have the transcription up as soon as I can. But again, quick turnaround on this episode. Thank you so much, again, for sending in the questions. Obviously, I didn't get to all of them. And if you're not in the Facebook group, that's generally where I asked for questions for this kind of thing. It's Diabetes Connections of the group. I'll link it up in the show notes. As always, I know not everybody's on Facebook, please feel free to always email me if you email me now about Dexcom. I'll save those questions until the next time we talk to them. It's Stacey at diabetes connections.com. Again, it's in the show notes and it's on the website. But I get it not everybody is on Facebook these days. To that point, at the very beginning of the show, in that little sponsor tease before things even begin, I mentioned club 1921. So let me tell you a little bit more might be an update for some of you. Maybe some of you are hearing about this for the very first time. Briefly, club 1921 is a website. It's a project I've been working on for a long time. And it is a place where anyone with any type of diabetes can find events anywhere in the United States. We are in beta right now. I invite you to go to the website club 1920 one.com. Until around, check it out. Let me know what you think we've immediately identified we went into beta, late last fall several things mostly about the signup that need to be fixed, those could be fixed by the time you log in, my guess is closer to the end of January. There's a little bit of confusion there. I'll explain in a moment. But other than that, it's pretty well set. The idea here is that instead of a Google Calendar or something like that, this would be a website where you go, you sign up, you tell us what kind of events you're looking for, and then you never have to come back, we'll email you automatically. When events that meet your criteria are edit, very easy. So you pick your type of diabetes, you pick your location, you pick which type of events you want, you pick your age, I mean, you can just say I want everything in every category you can kind of go through, but whatever you pick, and you can change those if you want to come back and change your filters, but whatever you pick, we will email you when those events are added. If you want to add events. There are two types of events you can add one we're very creatively calling events. This is your JDRF walk. This is your friends for life conference. This is your hospital education for people with type two. It's an event by an organization a was a staff an event where they expect lots of people or it's regularly scheduled, or there's a fee, that kind of thing. The other kind of events we're calling Hangouts. These are my favorite types of events. I love what we're calling Hangouts. This is your mom, coffee, your kid play date at a playground, you know, you're going out to a bar, post COVID, with your adult friends with type one, hang outs are not put on by an established organization. They're put on by people like you and me, we don't have a staff, we just want to meet people in our area. When you're adding those. That's where a lot of the confusion came up in the registration process. Because if you want to add events or Hangouts, you actually have to sign up in a different way. So I'm going to talk more about that as the weeks go on. We're fixing that part of the website. But if you try to sign up and you see some confusion, it may be because you are trying to add an event or a Hangout. If you want to just sign up to learn about the events and Hangouts, it should be pretty simple. But if it's not, if you have any questions, any suggestions, please let me know. Email me Stacey at diabetes connections.com. Pretty soon you'll email me Stacey at Club 1920 one.com You're going to be hearing a lot more about this because I'm so excited about it. Yes, I know, we might not have a lot of events this year, that's fine. We're going to have events, eventually, in the diabetes space. Again, we're gonna have lots of events, and social media, Facebook, even things like Eventbrite are a terrible way to get the word out about them. And it shouldn't be work to find them, you should be able to just raise your hand and say, I want to know about this stuff. And it should automatically come to you. And that's what I'm hoping to do here. Okay, back to our regular schedule with the podcast. We will have our Wednesday in the news that's live at 430. Eastern on Wednesday on YouTube and Facebook, and then 445 on Instagram. And then that turns into an audio podcast episode for Fridays. And hopefully next week, we're back to Tuesday and Friday. And we won't do any of this nonsense of pushing episodes around. But I do appreciate your patience. Again, I didn't want you to wait a week for this interview. All right, thank you as always to my editor, the very flexible and understanding John Bukenas from audio editing solutions. And thank you so much for listening. I'm Stacey Simms. I'll see you back here in just a couple of days until then, be kind to yourself. Diabetes Connections is a production of Stacey Simms media. All rights reserved. All wrongs avenged

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
In the News.. new glucose-regulating molecule discovered, eary CGM use helps kids, Lilly ends Journey Awards and more!

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 6:42


In the News... top stories this week: A second glucose-regulating molecule discovered, CGM use closer to diagnosis helps T1D kids, Lilly discontinues "Journey Awards," study on Dexcom use in hospitals, and why does this concept car share a diabetes tech name? -- Join us LIVE every Wednesday at 4:30pm EST Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Episode Transcription:  Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I'm Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days. All sources linked up on our Facebook Page and at Diabetes-Connections dot com when this airs as a podcast. XX In the News is brought to you by The World's Worst Diabetes Mom, Real life stories of raising a child with diabetes. Winner of the American Book Fest Prize for best new non-fiction. Available in paperback, on Kindle or as an audio book – all at Amazon.com. XX Our top story.. You know insulin helps regulate blood glucose. Now scientists have discovered a second molecule in the body that seems to do the same thing. It's produced by fat tissue but uses a different molecular pathway.. so it's hopeful this could get around insulin resistance. These scientists say the hormone, called F-G-F-1 suppresses breakdown of fat cells into free fatty acids and regulates the production of glucose in the liver. Because it does this in a different way from insulin, they're calling it a second loop. Very early here but very intriguing.   XX New study out of Stanford says setting children and teens up with a CGM shortly after a T1D diagnosis.. results in a lower A1C a year later. They looked at kids diagnosed in 2018 to 2020… and compared that group to other children diagnosed four years earlier. In that first group, about 90-percent started CGM in the first month.. in second group it was under 2-percent that started that early.  At diagnosis, the children in the newer cohort had higher A1c s. At 6 months and 12 months after diagnosis, the patients in the new cohort had significantly lower A1Cs than the other kids. These researchers say the news is more evidence to get insurers to cover the devices. https://healthier.stanfordchildrens.org/en/kids-early-use-of-diabetes-technology/ XX A new risk factor for type 2 mostly affects women, and it's in about 10-percent of the population. A new study says about one in 10 adults has a lump in their adrenal glands that, though otherwise harmless, increases production of certain hormones that increase the risk for Type 2 and high blood pressure. About 70% of those with them were women, most of whom were 50 years old or older. It's called mild autonomous cortisol secretion and these researchers say we should start screening for it. https://www.upi.com/Health_News/2022/01/03/adrenal-tumor-diabetes-blood-pressure-study/2471641237308/XX XX After almost 50 years of honoring people with diabetes with anniversary medals, Lilly Diabetes is phasing out the Journey Awards. Awards were given to patients for 10, 25, 50 and 75 years. A Lilly spokesperson confirmed the news to me today.. saying “We periodically need to re-assess and prioritize programs as the environment and our business shifts. We believe our decision will allow us to focus on programs that we hope bring the most value to people living with diabetes.” They encourage people to check out the Joslin Medalist program and I'll link that up. Joslin.org/research/our-research/medalist-program-study XX Movement on a couple of court cases involving insulin makers. Sanofi lost its appeals court bid to revive patents on Lantus. You'll recall that last year, Viatris got approval for Semglee, it's long-acting insulin, which is basically the same thing and is approved for the same indications as Lantus. Sanofi is facing an antitrust lawsuit accusing it of obtaining some 20 patents in an effort to delay competition. Viatris has been knocking out the patents in court. https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-12-29/sanofi-loses-bid-to-revive-lantus-solostar-insulin-pen-patents XX A federal judge has pared down a class action lawsuit accusing the biggest insulin makers of racketeering. Novo Nordisk, Sanofi and Eli Lilly  are accused of scheming together to inflate prices. However, the US District Judge ruled that claims under the racketeering laws of several states (except for Arizona's) must be dismissed… because the laws do not allow claims by plaintiffs who bought the drugs through intermediaries, such as insurance companies, rather than from the drugmakers directly. The same judge did allow these RICO claims to proceed earlier this year in a separate class action against the companies brought by direct purchasers. https://www.reuters.com/legal/litigation/sanofi-lilly-escape-state-racketeering-charges-insulin-price-battle-2021-12-17/ XX New look at CGM accuracy in hospitals, mostly for people with type 2. This study looked at the Dexcom G6 and didn't measure how it influenced care, just whether the readings were accurate compared to finger sticks.  As you'd imagine, the readings were less accurate at the extreme highs and lows, but the researchers concluded CGM technology is a reliable tool for hospital use. The FDA allowed expanded Dexcom use in hospitals less than two years ago, so this is still very new. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34099515/   XX Dexcom partners with another new company.. this one is called SNAQ.  Snaq is a diabetes app that is designed to track both your diet and your blood glucose… and can give you nutritional info of your food just by taking a photo with your smart phone. Good write up & review on that  from Diabetes Daily which I'll link up. Apparently, it works pretty well! The partnership means all US based SNAQ users can automatically view Dexcom CGM Data together with their meals inside the Snaq App https://www.diabetesdaily.com/blog/we-tried-the-snaq-diabetes-app-695058/   XX Hat tip to our friend Nerdabetic who spotted this ridiculous story. LG Electronics introduced a new in-vehicle infotainment concept tailored to autonomous vehicles. It's designed to blur the distinction between home and car .. This is a car cabin that can turn into a space where passengers work, watch TV, exercise or experience camping virtually. The name? LG Omnipod It was presented at the Consumer Electronics Show this week. No comment yet from Insulet, the makers of the Omnipod with which most of us are already familiar. http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20220103000636 XX   Before I let you go, a reminder that the podcast this week is all about diabetes in media, a really deep dive into how representation on screen influences those watching. Listen wherever you get your podcasts or if you're listening to this as on a podcast app, just go back an episode. Next week's episode will be a little bit delayed.. released either very late Tuesday evening or early Wednesday morning. I'm set to talk to the CEO of Dexcom on Tuesday and I want to get that to you as soon as I can.. rather than hold it. So thanks for your patience on that. That's In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

Pardon My Pancreas
I Got Covid As A Diabetic (And Experimented With My Blood Sugars)

Pardon My Pancreas

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 23:53


Matt got COVID and has had some messy blood sugars as a result... but he's here to share details behind the experience, including EXACT insulin strategies used.Grab your ticket to the T1D Webclass here:https://t1duniversity.com---------Welcome to the Pardon My Pancreas podcast!! This show is all about REAL life with type 1 diabetes, understanding fluctuations, and how to stabilize your blood sugar for good. Your host is Matt Vande Vegte is a certified personal trainer, nutritionist, and type 1 diabetic whose biggest goal in life is to help people with diabetes around the world live their lives fearlessly. Looking for an online health coaching program to help you live your best life? Go to https://www.ftfwarrior.com to learn more about his program for diabetics only that is focused on helping you reach your goals while living a happier and healthier life. Join the Tribe today!This podcast is sponsored by FTF Warrior - An online health and fitness coaching company for type 1 diabetics dedicated to helping them master their blood sugars through any activity, exercise, or meal!https://www.ftfwarrior.comFollow Matt here:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ftfwarrior/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ftfwarrior/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/ftfwarrior------------------------------------------------------Disclaimer: While we share our experiences with diabetes, nothing we discuss should be taken as medical advice. Please consult your doctor or medical professional for your health and diabetes management.

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
(Un)Doing Diabetes Representation: What the media gets wrong (and what we can do about it)

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 45:24


Diabetes on TV and in movies is rarely anything close to accurate. Turns out, those media misconceptions can be real-life harmful. This week, Stacey is joined by Dr. Heather Walker, the co-author of (Un)Doing Diabetes: Representation, Disability, Culture and Dr. Phyllisa Deroze, who contributed a chapter called “Laughing to Keep From Dying: Black Americans with Diabetes in Sitcoms and Comedies. Dr. Deroze & Dr. Walker both live with type 1 and both have difficult diagnosis stories that influenced their experiences with diabetes going forward. This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. More about Dr. Phyllisa Deroze More about Dr. Heather Walker ---- Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Episode Transcription: Stacey Simms  0:00 Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dexcom. Take control of your diabetes and live life to the fullest with Dexcom. This is Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. This week, diabetes on TV and in the movies is rarely anything close to accurate. And those media misconceptions can be real life harmful. Here's one from the sitcom 30 Rock.   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  0:30 Tracy has diabetes there. And he does this skit where he replaces his foot with a skate. And he's like I'm practicing for when I lose my foot to diabetes. And that is the thing. There was a diabetes diagnosis and the next scene, he's already imagining himself with an amputation.   Stacey Simms  0:49 That's Dr. Phyllisa Deroze, who wrote a chapter in a new book we're talking about this week. The book is called (Un)Doing Diabetes Representation, Disability Culture. And it's authored by Dr. Heather Walker, Dr. Deroze and Dr. Walker both live with type one, and they join me for a great conversation. This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. Welcome to another week of the show, I am always so glad to have you here. You know, we aim to educate and inspire about diabetes with a focus on people who use insulin. This is our first show of 2022. So Happy New Year, everybody. I hope you're doing okay. Still stressful days for everybody. But hopefully you can kind of come along with me every week, as we talk about what we're finding interesting in the diabetes community. And I say that because 2021, I decided I was going to focus on technology for the year, I was going to try to do as many episodes as I could, talking about new technology talking to these companies. And I did that although I gotta say the log jam at the FDA made that a little difficult, right? I mean, we thought we'd have a lot more new technology. And a lot of companies will not talk about stuff until it is FDA approved. So this year, I'm going to stay with that because the technology episodes are what you have told me you are the most interested in, in fingers crossed are going to have some approvals pretty soon. But I gotta tell you, I've also decided that I'm going to do shows on just whatever the heck I find interesting. I started this show seven years ago, this coming summer, and honestly, this might be the last year of it in this form. I mean, I love it. I love doing this but seven years is a long time for any project. I have some new things that I'm working on. I'm not sure how much time all of it is going to take. I'm not abandoning the podcast by any means. I want to hear from you too. As we go forward. You know, as the year goes by, I will keep the lines of communication open. We will figure it out together. This episode does fall into the category of something I am fascinated by and I love to talk about and that is diabetes in media. And by the way separately. Both of my guests this week have bananas misdiagnosis stories, we get to that right out of the gate. Wait till you hear what one of their doctors ended up doing. I have never heard this happening before. It was pretty wild. And we will talk about the book I mentioned that it is (Un)Doing Diabetes Representation, Disability Culture. It is authored by Dr. Heather Walker and Dr. Dr. Bianca C. Frazer. It contains essays by other authors including Dr. Phyllisa Deroze a little bit more about the book in its public description. It says undoing diabetes is the first collection of essays to use disability studies to explore representations of diabetes across a wide range of mediums from Twitter to TV and film to theater fiction, fan fiction, fashion and more. In undoing diabetes Authors deconstruct assumptions the public commonly holds while writers doing diabetes present counter narratives community members create to represent themselves. And just a little bit more about my guests. Dr. Heather Walker is Associate Director of qualitative research at the University of Utah health. She was diagnosed with type one at age 11 in 2001, and Dr. Phyllisa Deroze began blogging at diagnosed not defeated almost immediately after being misdiagnosed. She found out later with type two diabetes in 2011. And now she has been correctly diagnosed with LADA. Dr. Phyllisa Deroze is also the founder of Black diabetic info after the interview, and it's a pretty long interview. And that's okay. They have a lot of great stuff to say, I'm going to come back I want to tell you about something that happened to me. It's not quite diabetes in media, but it is diabetes jokes. So I want to tell you how I handled something in a Facebook group. But I'll come back and do that after the interview.   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze, Dr. Heather Walker, welcome. I'm so happy to talk to you both. Thanks for coming on.   Unknown Speaker  4:50 Thank you.   Stacey Simms  4:51 So let's start if we could, I mean there's so much to get to and I was so excited to see you both at friends for life and see the presentations that you were doing but which You mind kind of backing up a little bit and kind of letting people get to know you? We could start just tell me a little bit about your diabetes diagnosis story. And Phyllisa, let me let me ask you to start with that if I could.   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  5:12 Um, yes, I was diagnosed shortly after getting my PhD in English literature. I had moved to North Carolina, I experienced the classic symptoms of hyperglycemia. I had seen a physician who didn't check my blood sugar told me that I just needed to drink Gatorade because my electrolytes were off. A little later I was in the hospital. Blood sugar didn't register. Finally, I think first reading was like 597, or something like that. So I was told I had diabetes, and what type didn't get clarified until I was discharged. When I was discharged. I was told that I had type two diabetes, and I lived with that diagnosis for eight long years, it was inaccurate, I was misdiagnosed. I live with latent autoimmune diabetes in adults. And I was correctly diagnosed and joined the T1D group in 2019. I get this   Stacey Simms  6:06 question. Every time I speak to somebody like yourself who was misdiagnosed like that it happens so often. How do you live with what is really type one for all that time? I mean, I can't imagine you felt very well.   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  6:20 I did. Okay, after diagnosis, I had a pretty long honeymoon phase, I actually lived about three years with just diet and exercise. I think one thing in the T1D community is that we don't talk enough about honeymoon phases and people who have latent autoimmune diabetes and adults, because so much of the common knowledge about type 1 diabetes is that everyone is insulin dependent. And that's not necessarily true, everyone will become insulin dependent. And that's an important message, because I never thought to have test done until I went into DKA. Again, so I myself didn't know that it was possible to have type 1 diabetes have a long honeymoon period and be misdiagnosed.   Stacey Simms  7:09 Yeah. The more I learned about Lada, it is so similar, but it's so different. There's a lot more to it, I guess, is what I would say, than I had realized for sure. Heather, what is your diagnosis story? When were you diagnosed with diabetes?   Dr. Heather Walker  7:21 So I was diagnosed at 11. And I also sort of have a misdiagnosis story. So I had diabetes, and I was in what I assumed to be a honeymoon phase for three months before my diagnosis actually came around. Because I was seeing a physician at the time who looked at me, skinny white girl, whose parents were really afraid because she kept losing weight, who was just about to hit puberty, and he thought eating disorder. No matter how many times I told him, I was eating everything in sight and drinking everything in sight. That's still what he firmly believed. Luckily, at about three months after I started coming in to see him for this and for the symptoms, he went on vacation, and I got to see his pa instead. And his pa John, you know, it's so funny. I don't even remember his last name. But just he's just warmly John to me, right? He just looked at my chart, and he knew right away, it's like, oh, you have diabetes, you know, so calmly, and I remember that freaking me and my mom out. We were in the appointment. It actually was my dad. But still, the first thing that we did was went and got me a doughnut because I think my dad was like, alright, well, maybe this is it. You know, he'll never eat another doughnut. Yeah, like, we really don't know about this, we don't know what's gonna happen. And so they didn't do a glucose tests on me. They just drew blood. So we didn't know right away anyway. And then it was like, you know, the next day, they called and said, You need to come to the hospital and for US history.   Stacey Simms  8:45 I'm guess I'm gonna get ahead of myself a little bit here. I don't want to start drawing conclusions too early in this interview. But it is interesting how both of you were misdiagnosed. Somebody else made an assumption, because of how you present it to them. I've got to imagine. So Heather, let me ask you. And then Phyllisa, I want to ask you the same question. But other how has that stuck with you? I mean, you you kind of set it so matter of factly they're like, Hey, he assumed I had an eating disorder. Did you kind of carry that with you?   Dr. Heather Walker  9:11 Oh, yeah, absolutely. I think I got a huge chip on my shoulder. From that. I mean, there's something about you know, being 11. And being in a world that already doesn't take you seriously, and then have a life threatening disease thrown at you. And your doctor doesn't believe what you say, even before diabetes. And Stacy, I've heard on episodes of your podcast you talking with with teens about or people who were teens with diabetes, about how fast it speeds your life up, right? Like you don't really get to have a childhood you don't really get to be a teenager and like, you know, carry on with reckless abandon because you just can't because there's all these safety things that you need to take into account. And so, but even before diabetes, I was kind of like that, like I was, you know, a 30 year old and a 10 year old body. I've been the same Age since then until now, but that, for sure gave me a big chip on my shoulder. It made me want to like, look into everything and see as it's happening to other people is like what's going on with this diabetes stuff.   Stacey Simms  10:13 Phyllisa, I'm curious for your experience too, because as you you kind of already said something interesting, which was like, Well, I didn't know how were you supposed to know? Right? The doctor supposed to know.   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  10:23 Right. What's interesting is that when I was told that I needed to look into LADA because I had given a speech in Dubai to a roomful of doctors from the MENA region, Middle East and North Africa. And I was simply telling them my diagnosis story, very similar to what I share with you is a little more in depth, but pretty much that was the basics. And you know, I'm 31 years old at the time. And so during the q&a, some of the physicians from Tunisia, they raised their hand, and I was like, yes, they were like, well, your story kind of sounds more like LADA than type two. Are you familiar with it? And I said, not really. I mean, I know Cherise Shockley has it, but I don't know any more details than that. And it was at the lunch afterwards, one of the physicians came up to me and she said, you really ought to look into seeing if you have a ladder, and don't stop until you get the answer. And that kind of haunted me like, don't stop until you get the answer. But I just thought it was a simple request. So I asked my Endo, I got told no, I asked three months later, if I had ever been tested, the answer was no. Well, can I get tested? No. I saw a second opinion. No, you have type two. So I definitely think their view of me being an African American woman living with obesity played a lot into the constant denials. It took me over a year, another decay episode, and begging my gynecologist to run type one antibody testing for me in order to get it. So it wasn't easy. I literally had to not stop until I get the answer.   Dr. Heather Walker  12:11 For Phyllisa, it was your OB they finally gave you the testing you wanted?   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  12:15 Yes. Because I told her, I can't get an endocrinologist to run this test. I know I'm in decay, a I'm losing weight rapidly. And she listened to me and she said, Okay, she said, I don't do endocrine, I do you know, OB GYN. So we were literally on her computer on Google trying to find the codes to request the testing. And so she was calling around, what do I put in to order this? And I remember when she called and she said, Listen, you know, this is out of my field. But come get these results, because your endo was going to need to see them. That was all on me. I got the results. I just remember seeing the get 65 should be below five. And mine was greater than 7500.   Stacey Simms  13:05 Oh, I'm almost speechless. I mean, I'm not I'm never actually speechless. I came in less than that happened. But the idea that you have to work so hard to get those answers, I've got to assume just like with Heather, that had to inform not only your experiences going forward, but the way you help other people because you both are extremely active in the community. You You're both very prolific writers, you both have, you know, studies and presentations that we're going to talk to, but Felicity, that whole experience with somebody else saying, Well, I think you have lotta to I got to get answers for myself to finally getting them. When you look back on that, how does it inform how you talk to other people about   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  13:43 diabetes? I tell people definitely to be way more assertive than then imagined. Like, I honestly did not think it would take me constantly asking for the results. I thought it was like a simple test. I mean, you're testing my cholesterol, you're testing my a one C, like you're already getting a vial of blood, like just check off one antibody. So I thought it was something simple. And it turned out it was not, which was very frustrating for me. Because like in that I realized my education level didn't matter to them. I was literally like you are African American living with obesity. And that was what I believed to be their motivating factor to deny me testing. And what's so problematic about that, in addition to everything else you can imagine is as my physician Wouldn't they want to know that they're treating the right condition. Yeah, I'm asking so my records actually have a note from my endo saying, Melissa asked multiple times for type one antibody testing, and I denied it   Stacey Simms  14:55 literally says I denied it in your file.   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  14:57 Yes. Wow.   Stacey Simms  14:59 I'm just sorry. I got to ask, did he show that to you as an apology? Or did you sit there in the room while you made him write it?   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  15:05 What I did was I refused to leave the appointment. I love it until there was this moment of record, like, I need you to recognize that I have been asking you for over a year for this test. We just need to come to that because it was like, Oh, you need insulin, let's go. And, you know, I was kind of being escorted out of the room. And I said, No, I'm literally not going to leave this chair until we have this conversation. And so I didn't know that my endo would put it on my records. But I definitely refused to leave until that conversation was had, they did apologize. And there was a note and my files.   Stacey Simms  15:47 It just didn't have to be that hard. This could have been an episode in and of itself. Want to make sure to get to that the research or the publications that sparked my interest here.   Right back to our conversation and right was like kidding about the diagnosis stories, and then her doctor putting in her chart that he was wrong. Oh my god. Alright, Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dexcom. I want to talk for a minute about control IQ, the Dexcom G6 Tandem pump software program. When it comes to Benny's numbers, you know, I hardly expect perfection, I really just want him happy and healthy. And I have to say control IQ, the software from Dexcom. And Tandem has completely exceeded my expectations, Benny is able to do less checking and bolusing. And he is spending more time in range. This is in a teenager, a time when I was really prepared for him to be struggling, his sleep is better to this is great for all of us basal adjustments possible every five minutes, the system is working hard to keep him in range. And that means we hear far fewer Dexcom alerts, which means everybody is sleeping better. I am so grateful for this, of course Individual results may vary. To learn more, go to diabetes connections.com and click on the Dexcom logo. Now back to the interview. And we are moving on to Dr. Walker's book. Heather, tell me about the book that's coming out.   Dr. Heather Walker  17:14 Okay, I'm so excited to be talking about this. So you might hear that excitement in my voice. So it's awesome. The title of the book is called undoing diabetes representation, disability culture, that's a full title. And it's going to be released very soon, by the end of the year, we hope it's a collection of essays that looks at diabetes in a new way, the volume or the volume as a whole. You know, it points out that all the stereotypes of diabetes that the public really buys into are like maintained through a lens of individualism, our society looks at diabetes as a problem of the individual person right of their choices. And so to respond to that public tendency, right to like focus on the individual, all of our authors in the book do the opposite. So in the collection, they ask questions like, What do individualistic stereotypes reveal about the social conditions for the diabetic person? So it like flips it on its head? And also what do they conceal, right? What is stereotypes hide? What do they prevent us from seeing? And how do these like harmful narratives, these harmful assumptions, these stereotypes that just break down our community? How do they reinforce ideas that the public already has, for what constitutes like a normal or a good body, which is just like, as a person who's living with diabetes, this makes me so excited. And then I'll just add one final thing about the book, which is our collection is really unique in that we use disability studies frameworks to unpack all of these questions. What are disability studies? So this ability studies is a field of study that looks at the social conditions of disability. So how is disability perceived in society? How is it represented on the screen, and all of those types of things. And so we have frameworks in the field that we use, it's kind of imagined, like a camera lens, right? That's kind of like a framework and the camera lens has a filter on it. And so when we look at this movie, or this film, we're looking at it through a specific lens with a specific filter. In our book, all of our authors are looking at different types of media, through these disability studies, frames or lenses, and sort of seeing how they operate in society and what they do, and then poking holes at what it does. And every chapter is brilliant, and Phyllisa is going to talk about hers, but as a volume, like I could not be more proud of this collection and all the work that it does. And all of like the change and the shifts it's going to make for readers.   Stacey Simms  19:43 It's so interesting to me because of the mediums that you use so let's let's ask Felicity if you want to if you could talk about what you presented friends for life, what you talked about you were looking at TV shows, right and not unfortunately not more current ones which sometimes get it right.   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  19:59 Um, yeah, I was the title of my chapter is laughing to keep from dying black Americans with diabetes in sitcoms and comedies. So I was looking at television shows as well as movies, and focusing on how those representations make meaning of diabetes within African American communities. Part of this started, when I thought about the first time I heard you have diabetes, and I was in the emergency room, my first thought was, I'm going to die. Like that. Was it? Like, I just thought like diabetes meant death? And when I started unpacking that, to find out where did I get that messaging from? Because no one in my family has diabetes. I didn't personally know anybody with diabetes. It really came from television and film, and of course, our media. And I thought it would be really nice to look at some of these classic movies and TV shows that are very popular in African American communities to see what story is told when you focus on the diabetes characters. Can you talk about some examples? Yeah. So for example, like Soul Food is one of those classic staple in African American film, a memory just like the color purple is something that people cite quotes from all the time. But when you look at Soul Food, it really stems from Big Mama who has diabetes. We understand this because she burns her arm on a stove. And a couple of things later, she passes away, she has an amputation and then a stroke. And she's no longer with us. The Big Mama character also comes up in Tyler Perry's plays and his films in his television shows. And again, these are staple matriarch characters who have diabetes. Now Madea lives on because that's a part of, you know, Tyler Perry series, but she has diabetes Boondocks I look at and of course Blackish. So blackish, I would say is probably where we first see the the image turn, where we first see a character with diabetes, checking their blood sugar, and all the other stuff we don't. And so what that tells us is that diabetes is going to cause either a slow death or quick death, perhaps an amputation, if you're familiar with 30, Rock. Tracy has diabetes there. And he does this skit where he replaces his foot with a skate. And he's like I'm practicing for when I lose my foot to diabetes. And that is the thing, there was a diabetes diagnosis, and the next thing, he's already imagining himself with an amputation. So when we look   Stacey Simms  22:59 at something like this, what do we take from it now? I mean, we you can't go back and change those representations. What do you want us to kind of learn from them.   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  23:08 But I would ideally like for the film industry, to change their portrayal of characters with diabetes, I mean, all characters, not just African American ones. But last year, there was the release of the Clark Sisters first ladies of gospel biopic on lifetime. The Clark Sisters are like a staple in African American culture. They were these gospel singers that were absolutely phenomenal. The Lifetime movie of them ended up being the highest rated Lifetime movie and four years. This comes out last year, the mother has diabetes. She is seen not taking her medication, not caring about her diabetes. And of course, there's all these tragedies that happen. And the thing is, when we don't see African Americans using CGM technology, insulin pump technology, we don't see checking blood sugar. What happens with those messages is that it becomes the common assumption. So when someone goes to the doctor, the doctor may think, Oh, well, black people don't check their blood sugar. And so then that begins to impact the individual prime example. I was in a setting once. And a woman said, Oh, I didn't think black people ate vegetables. What? Yes, yes, literally said this. And I was just so floored, but I thought, okay, she didn't think black people ate vegetables. And so I'm wondering like, what images you know, is she being fed? Right? Yeah. came from so the thing is, is we have to look at our television and our film, not just as sources of enjoyment for some people, but also as information that provides an understanding about certain people. So literally in all of the films and television shows that I look that there were probably two that showed the African American character with diabetes, actually living a rather fruitful life. Outside of that it was amputation and death. And so when someone is diagnosed with diabetes, like I was, and I didn't know anyone with diabetes, instantly, the first thing I thought about was death and dying. And that association that comes with it, when I hadn't seen people living well, with diabetes, I just want to say this. When I was first diagnosed, I went to Barnes and Nobles sat down in a bookstore with one of Patti LaBelle cookbooks, and I flipped to a page and she said, in this book, I had diabetes, but I wasn't going to let diabetes have in me, and I cried, right there in the Barnes and Noble, because that was the first time that I had ever seen or read or heard someone who looks like me diagnosed with diabetes, and they were determined to continue living their life. Like if you want to see that image, where do you go? Because our television and our films are not that place. And that's also the fertile ground for which black diabetic info on my website started and my blog, because I didn't know where to go for that. Like, I got it in Patti LaBelle cookbook, and I cry. But then where can I go to see it again? Yeah, didn't have an answer. Heather, I   Stacey Simms  26:53 want to come back to you and ask you something I saw you posted about on on Twitter. A couple of months ago, Pixar posted a teaser for their new movie turning red, which I think comes out in the spring. And there's like a split second shot of a kid wearing some kind of what looks like diabetes device. It's, you know, an insulin pump or a CGM. And they confirmed it. I actually talked to somebody behind the scenes at Pixar and fingers crossed, we'll have them on the show in a couple of weeks. But it is a diabetes. I'm so excited. But it is a diabetes device. But you were pretty adamant about one point, would you mind sharing that? And why? Sure.   Dr. Heather Walker  27:30 So when I saw that, you know, I came late to the show. Let me preface with that, right. Like, by the time I saw that trailer, the community was abuzz. Like they everyone was so excited. And what I saw was, Oh, my goodness, we see a character with type 1 diabetes. And as someone who is completing a chapter for a book of essays on representations of diabetes, you know, my antenna went up when I saw how the community was claiming that. And I just thought to myself, This is not a representation of type 1 diabetes, this is a representation of diabetes, because people with type two can and should have access to those devices as well. And so for the type one community to be exclusive, in this moment, in this grand opportunity for all of us to celebrate together, really sort of broke me down in a way, you know, I was like, Why? Why can't we just keep this open? Why can't we make this a win for everyone? Instead of saying, quote, unquote, type two people don't use these devices? And I think that the reason why it was like it was like a jab in my heart is I think that that claiming does something in society, right? It, it functions to show us that large groups of the diabetes are the type one community feel like, maybe type two diabetics aren't using that technology, because they're the ones who don't care. And they're the ones that the stereotype is about. And so that shows me that we have pockets in our type one community that buy into the stereotype just like the public does.   Stacey Simms  29:06 I'm looking at the description of the book in terms of the different mediums you use Twitter, to TV to film to theater to fiction, fan fiction.   Dr. Heather Walker  29:13 Yeah, we have a chapter, whatever author of your chapter covering a segment of fan fiction, and it's wonderful and actually, that author and she discloses in her chapter as well, so I'm not outing her. She also lives with diabetes herself. And I'm pretty sure she has a physical science PhD. So this genre and this discipline is new for her and she just like, Oh, she did such a great job having us understand how diabetes is being pulled into fanfiction. Alright, we   Stacey Simms  29:46 now should have set this up better if you're not familiar, and I'm going to do probably a terrible job of describing this. If you're not familiar. Fanfiction is stories, poems, pictures, it's fiction, written by people who are Fans have a genre or fans of a certain bunch of characters, and then they kind of make up their own stories using the established characters most of the time. So in other words, you love Harry Potter, you write yourself into Harry Potter or you write a different adventures that the characters might have had. And it's accessible to pretty much everybody. Is that how I feel about fanfiction? Yeah, I   Dr. Heather Walker  30:18 think it's kind of a, you know, once you get into it, you know where to look. You can probably Google it. And you know, I'm not even really in the world of fanfic, full disclosure and transparency. But I feel like I want to beat now that I've read, I've read that chapter. So   Stacey Simms  30:34 these are characters people are writing about that loop with diabetes, or they are the just bringing diabetes into exactly as it sounds. It sounds silly, as I'm saying it out loud. Like I'm explaining it. I'm trying to, you know, hit it over the head to the to find a point. But just to be clear,   Dr. Heather Walker  30:48 yes. So I think in the pieces that this author talks about in their chapter, it's situations where the characters themselves do not have diabetes, and the fanfic authors write them having diabetes. Oh, so they add that to their character.   Stacey Simms  31:04 You know what we were doing that a long time ago? Because I don't know if you know, Heather, and Phyllisa, but Bob, the builder definitely has diabetes, because why else? Would he have that big belt around his equipment? Because that's where his insulin. So anytime we saw somebody on screen with that, he was like, Oh, he's got diabetes. I didn't mean to interrupt Heather. But that clarifies it for me.   Dr. Heather Walker  31:23 Oh, yeah. That's a perfect example. Right is imagine that we had a fanfic author who loves Bob the Builder when they were a kid. And now they're writing the whole story about Bob, the builder and his diabetic life. It's wonderful. The book itself,   Stacey Simms  31:37 is this something that's accessible to people? And I asked that I mean, is it more of an academic book, tell me a little bit more about that.   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  31:43 So one of the things that I like about the book is that it's assessable. For a large reading audience, if you are a casual reader, you can get through it, if you are an academic, you can get through it. So it's not laced with academic jargon. But again, we are using theoretical frameworks, but in a language that is accessible to everybody. So that's one I definitely enjoy about the collection, is there something in there forever?   Stacey Simms  32:13 And that's a great point, because I think we do get a little nervous about academic type books, Heather, right. I mean, it's, it can be a little scary and off putting it away.   Dr. Heather Walker  32:21 Yeah. And I'll just add, you know, we have, so we have several authors who are like myself, and Phyllisa, who are scholars and community members, which is very nice, and just like really brings it home. And so, you know, you kind of know, as a community member, that you're going to get authentic pieces by people who are living with this, in addition to having a couple of us who are scholars and committee members, we do have chapters from community members, from activists who don't have their hand in academia at all, and they're writing about their personal experiences. And, you know, they're still talking about representation in different media, but they're doing so from their lens existing in the community existing in the world with diabetes. And if nothing else, although I, I would also say what, you know, Melissa said was true, all of them are accessible, but especially those that are coming, you know, from the mouths of babes that are coming from our community members, who, who many people who do pick up the book already know,   Stacey Simms  33:20 before I let you go, let me let me pose this question to each of you in kind of a different way. And that would be you know, full. So you mentioned blackish, being a bit of a turning point, the show where people are shown, you know, a character shown checking blood sugar. I'm looking back over the last year and thinking of a more accurate depiction of diabetes, or at least type one with the Babysitter's Club on Netflix with we'll see with Pixar is turning red, but with Greenland, you know, written by someone who's married to Greenland, the movie Written by someone who is married to a person with type one, do you think things are getting better? And and I would ask you, as well to include the black community, because we don't talk about that enough. You know, I mean, I'm trying to think if all of those I mentioned they did not feature people of color. Do you think it's getting better? I mean, what would you like to   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  34:06 see, I would like to see more diversity as we get better in the American film industry. When I look at all the films that I studied, type 1 diabetes is grossly under represented like none of these characters have type 1 diabetes, which again, if you think about myself, 31 years old, being diagnosed, I never knew type 1 diabetes could be an option. I'm still not seeing African American characters using technology wearing CGM. Often when I'm out in public. People are asking me about my devices. It's the first time you're seeing them. I'm explaining insulin pumps. And so while things are getting better, I would say within shows, television shows and films that are popular within African American characters. Progress is about Very slow on that. And   Stacey Simms  35:01 Heather, from where you stand. Could you share a little bit about what you think is going on in media? Are we getting better?   Dr. Heather Walker  35:07 Yeah, I think Phyllisa what you're speaking to right is incremental ism. It's like we are getting better slowly, like painfully, slowly, bit by bit. I mean, I'm inclined to say yes, only because the number of representations that we're seeing are increasing. But, you know, I'm hesitant at the same time to say yes, because we still have to ask, okay, if we even if we have more representation, are they representations that are doing good for diabetic people in society? Right, like, not necessarily, Are they accurate? Or are they you know, a direct portrayal of what people experience? But what is the public taking away from that representation? Like, what are they leaving that with? And if we have a lot more characters all of a sudden who have diabetes, but the audience still thinks, Okay, well, diabetes is still what I thought it was, right? It's like overweight people over eating, making bad choices not exercising? If that's what they're leaving with, then the answer, of course, is no, we're not making progress, even if we're having more characters. And what I find is, what I think we would need to make really big change would be to centralize a character with diabetes instead of making them a sub character, right? Yeah, like for the baby sitters club. And Stacey is not a new character with diabetes is has old, right, like we've known that Stacey has had diabetes for a long time, it just wasn't being produced at the quality it's being produced at. So that's not really even a new one. But we do have new ones, like there's a just a year and a half ago, or so there was a new series called Sweet magnolias. And one of the characters there has, or is about to be diagnosed with diabetes, and it's the same, it's the same story. It's like, you know, if you don't fix your habits, you're gonna get diabetes, and you're gonna die like your mom and all these fear tactics. And so and I really want to be hopeful, Stacy, I really want to be hopeful and say, Yes, we're headed in the right direction. But I just don't know i We need people in the writers room with diabetes, and other health conditions and disabilities, to have a direct voice and call things out before they're produced.   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  37:19 I agree 100%, we have to be in the room. Because some things they don't make sense. For example, blackish, you do see him check his blood sugar. However, once he puts the strip in the meter, he starts talking to his wife, and anyone who knows how to use a meter knows that you have about 30 seconds before you have to put a drop of blood on that thing, or else you've lost it. So even little things like that.   Stacey Simms  37:46 I had indicated that was the last question, but I got one more. And that would be and II feel free. Either one of you jump in? Or both? What can the community do? You know, sometimes I feel like, you know, I stopped correcting people online a lot of the time unless it's really egregious, you know, but if they make a joke, or there's a hashtag diabetes with dessert, or things like that, like I'm tired, you know, and then you have no sense of humor, you know, gosh, what can we do to try to fix this? Or what can we do to to improve the situation?   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  38:15 I think, this research, this book, this podcast, these conversations are so important. So for example, prior to writing my book chapter, I didn't see anything talking about the representation of African American characters in television and film. Whenever I talked about diabetes characters, there was maybe the one mention of soul food, but like, there was a dearth there. So this book chapter hopefully helped spark the conversation in wider circles. And so by talking about it more, and rallying around these things, hopefully, the attention like first recognizing that there is a problem, and then getting think tanks together to talk about them is probably the best plan of action.   Dr. Heather Walker  39:06 I love that. And I would just add, you know, I think what the community needs to prioritize is inclusion, right? Like, we need to give up on being exclusive, especially in the type one community, and we need to open our doors to people with type two people with Ladda. People with all like, there are so many different types of diabetes, that even saying type one and two is, is exclusive. I really believe that if we can do that, and if we can elevate the voices of people with diabetes of all types, who are also people of color, then we'll make a lot of progress in our community because we'll start seeing those perspectives that we've been missing that make us as a community really limited to our own perspective. To me, that's the only way to do it. I love the idea of a think tank Phyllisa I think that's brilliant, and just absolutely, and I'm sure you would agree needs to be diverse, right? Like it can't Be a bunch of like, white people. I don't know. There's a lot we can do. There's a lot.   Stacey Simms  40:08 Thank you both so much for joining me. This is amazing. I'm so thrilled to have you both on the show, you've got to come back on there. We just kind of scratched the surface here. So thank you for spending so much time with me.   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  40:18 It's a pleasure. Thank you for having me.   Dr. Heather Walker  40:21 Yeah, this has been so fun. You're listening to Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms.   Stacey Simms  40:34 More information about my guests and about the book on diabetes all at diabetes connections.com. As you know, every episode has its own homepage with transcriptions and show notes and all that good stuff. The transcription started in January of 2020. And we're working our way back here in there, hopefully filling in all the blanks. But right now, not every episode before 2020 has a transcription. And I should tell you just I don't want to get ahead of myself here. That Pixar movie that we talked about turning red. Since our conversation, they put out another trailer and it showed more diabetes gear, another child in the movie is wearing a Dexcom. So it looks to me I mean, really can't tell yet. But it looks to me like one kiddo has some kind of pump. And another kiddo has a Dexcom. So as I said, I had a contact at Pixar. And I've got another one now. And it looks like there might be an actor, a voice actor in the movie who has diabetes. So we're to sort this all out. And I should be able to have somebody on about this. I don't want to over promise. But the folks at Pixar have been really receptive. So that looks like they won't do it too far in advance because the movie comes out in March. So as we get closer, I'll keep you posted for it. And I had mentioned a story before the interview about not necessarily diabetes in media, but about jokes. And I don't know about you, but years ago, I was on high alert for diabetes jokes, you know, I can't eat that, or the the hashtag of my dessert is diabetes. And I don't know, I got burned out. And I don't talk about it as much. I don't police it as much, certainly, but I couldn't help myself last week, at Christmas, I'm in a group. It's a very clever group. It's called fatten the curve. If you want to join it. It's a public group, a friend of mine in the Charlotte area started at the very beginning of COVID. Obviously, it's a play on flatten the curve. And as you would expect fatten the curve is all about food. And it's just become a place where people who cook and eat like to share their photos. And somebody posted around Christmas time, you know, it's my diabetic coma, and then all of this food. So I kind of did the do I want to go to I want to do this, or I want to get this person's face. So I just very nicely said, Hey, diabetes jokes are never cool. Not sure if you thought about that. But hey, the food looks absolutely delicious. You know, hope it was as good as it looked or something nice like that very casual and breezy. Just like Hey, dude, not cool. But moving on. And there's a couple of other people in the diabetes community who have joined that group, but it's not diabetes, it's just food. But you know how it is when when Facebook shows you something people, you know, jump in. So other people commented like, yeah, Stacey's right? Please think twice. And this guy apparently lives with type two posted like a non sequitur about his scientific studies and stem cells and all this stuff about diabetes. He did, obviously, not really sunk in I don't think, but he didn't respond negatively. And I just said, You know what, fine, I'm moving on, right? But then a couple of days later, somebody else popped in, it was like, nobody can make a joke anymore. You're too sensitive, and why we're just too easily offended. And that's when I was like, Alright, now I need to respond. So I very nicely, I think it was nice. You know, I wrote a response. And I said, Hey, you know, once the guy said he had diabetes, you'll notice I didn't clap back, I didn't get nasty. We are all entitled to say whatever we want. But it's important to understand that what we say does have meaning and impact. And as you listen, I know, you know, all this, I did the standard. When we joke about diabetes, we don't do this with other conditions. We don't talk about a cholesterol coma, or a high blood pressure problem when we're eating big meals like this. Why is it only diabetes? And did you realize that actually, you know, the blame and shame that can be encountered here prevents people from seeking treatment or makes them feel like it's all their fault, and nothing they do will matter. I posted all that waiting for the response. There was none, which I'm really glad about. Because I don't want to argue I just it's exhausting. But everyone's not something like that pushes my buttons and I have to save something. Hopefully that group will just go back to posting yummy pictures of food because it's been two years and we haven't had any issues like that. I mostly post pictures of what my husband cooks. Because I don't like to cook and what I do cook isn't really Facebook, really. So I guess we're often running for 2022. We are back to the Wednesday in the news episodes. I hope you'll join me for that either live on Facebook, YouTube or Instagram, or as an audio podcast which comes out on Fridays. Thanks as always to my editor John Bukenas from audio editing solutions. Thank you so much for listening. I'm Stacey Simms. I'll see you back here soon, in a Couple of days until then, be kind to yourself   Benny  45:07 Diabetes Connections is a production of Stacey Simms media. All rights reserved. All wrongs avenged

Pardon My Pancreas
T1D Sickness And A New Perspective On Life?

Pardon My Pancreas

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 15:17


Matt got SUPER sick and has had some messy blood sugars as a result... but also learned an important lesson about type 1 diabetes. Listen in to find out what it is. Grab Matt's free T1D Webclass here:https://diabetesinaction.com---------Welcome to the Pardon My Pancreas podcast!! This show is all about REAL life with type 1 diabetes, understanding fluctuations, and how to stabilize your blood sugar for good. Your host is Matt Vande Vegte is a certified personal trainer, nutritionist, and type 1 diabetic whose biggest goal in life is to help people with diabetes around the world live their lives fearlessly. Looking for an online health coaching program to help you live your best life? Go to https://www.ftfwarrior.com to learn more about his program for diabetics only that is focused on helping you reach your goals while living a happier and healthier life. Join the Tribe today!This podcast is sponsored by FTF Warrior - An online health and fitness coaching company for type 1 diabetics dedicated to helping them master their blood sugars through any activity, exercise, or meal!https://www.ftfwarrior.comFollow Matt here:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ftfwarrior/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ftfwarrior/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/ftfwarrior------------------------------------------------------Disclaimer: While we share our experiences with diabetes, nothing we discuss should be taken as medical advice. Please consult your doctor or medical professional for your health and diabetes management.

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
"Forward is a Pace" - T1D Peloton Instructor Robin Arzon

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 21:45


Peloton instructor Robin Arzon was diagnosed with type 1 as an adult, when she was already an endurance athlete and marathon runner. After her diagnosis, she was determined to keep those incredible fitness feats coming. Arzon is now Peloton's VP of fitness programming, an ultramarathoner, a best-selling author, a new mom, and more. If you're looking for some new year fitness inspiration, she's got you covered. This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. More about Robin Arzon More about Gvoke HypoPen Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Episode Transcription Below: Stacey Simms 0:05 This is Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. This week, peloton, instructor Robin Arzon was diagnosed with type one as an adult when she was already an endurance athlete and marathon runner. after her diagnosis, she was determined to keep those incredible fitness feats coming. Robin Arzon 0:24 I really have had to treat myself kind of like an experiment like get curious and just see and trust that even on the days that aren't my best, I'm trying my best and my best is good enough Stacey Simms 0:35 Arzon is peloton's vice president of fitness programming an ultra marathoner, a best selling author, a mom, and more. If you're looking for some new year's fitness inspiration, she's got you covered. This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. Welcome to another week of the show. I'm always so glad to have you here, you know, we aim to educate and inspire about diabetes with a focus on people who use insulin. this time of year I always seem to have a fitness interview, right? That makes sense. It's the new year we're making resolutions. We're getting motivated. So you know, take a look back in years past I talked to Chris Rudan from the Titan games. I talked to Eric Tozer, who did seven marathons on seven continents in seven days, you know, stuff like that. But you don't have to have these incredible achievements, these these incredible goals. You know, this to be fit to stay healthy. I mean, I'm certainly never doing an ultra marathon. It's not one of my goals, especially as I get older, I want to stay moving. That's really important to me. So well, somebody like this week's guest Robin Arzon isn't I'm sorry, Robin isn't going to motivate me to ever run a marathon. She is going to inspire me to try a little more to do some different things. And I hope she inspires you in the same way as well. Whatever your fitness goals are for 2022 I have a story that I want to share about something that happened recently with me and Benny, it isn't really about new year's resolution. So I'm going to keep it till the end of the interview. I'll come back and tell you he challenged me to do some things kind of an empathy exercise about type one, I failed miserably. That's the spoiler. So we'll get to that in a little bit. This week's interview is one of my shortest ever I had very limited time with Robin. So I decided to not ask her about her diagnosis story. I skipped a couple of questions that I would usually ask, but in case you're not familiar with her, I wanted you to learn more. So here is a quick explainer that she gave beyond type one a few years ago, and we're playing this with their permission. Robin Arzon 2:32 I am a reformed lawyer turned ultra-marathoner. I'm head instructor at peloton cycle as well as vice president of fitness programming. I'm on the Leadership Council beyond type one. I was an endurance athlete Well, before I was diagnosed with type one diabetes, I was diagnosed in February of 2014. So only a few years ago, as an adult, I was in my 30s when I was diagnosed. And it's been an interesting little dance I'm doing with my pancreas these days. I had just returned from a trip to India. I was in India for about three to four weeks with my mom and my sister. And when I came home back to New York City, I thought I had jetlag or something like my body just felt really sluggish. And I had extreme thirst. That was the number of extreme thirst and frequent urination. And that was the number one thing that really was strange, because I know it wasn't dehydrated. And as an athlete, I kind of could tell immediately that something was off with my body. I had an awareness of type 1 diabetes, but certainly not on any kind of medical or even practical level. And I definitely didn't know how to how to live with it. That was actually my very first question after I was diagnosed was how am I gonna run 100 mile races? And that was a question pretty unfamiliar for my endocrinologist and so then I want an immediate search for all the technology that would allow me to train uninterrupted. I actually had a half marathon two weeks after my diagnosis and I and I ran it. And I think I was on a pump within a week that I had a Dexcom within 14 days. Stacey Simms 4:27 Robin was diagnosed in 2012. She's now peloton vice president of fitness programming. She and her husband had a baby in 2021 and January just a couple of days from this episode going live. She is publishing a children's book and you will hear her talk about that. There is a video of this interview over on the Diabetes Connections YouTube channel if you want to watch I will link that up in the shownotes. Full disclosure. The reason I had limited time for this interview is because Robin is on a media tour courtesy of Gvoke Hypopen so you will hear a lot about that in this interview ended agreed To do this, I also agreed to post information about Gvoke in the show notes which I have done. If you've listened for a long time, you're probably tired of hearing these disclosures. But if you're new, it's very important to me that I'm open and honest about what you hear on the show. And I really thought the tradeoff of hearing about Robin's experiences and advice was worth it. Robin, thank you so much for joining me and spending some time with me and my listener. So how are you doing today? Robin Arzon 5:29 I'm great. So nice to speak with you. Stacey. Stacey Simms 5:31 I know that you have a little bit that you want to talk about with Gvoke. They are a sponsor of my podcast as well. Let's just dive in and talk about that because being prepared is just part of the reality when you live with diabetes, right Robin Arzon 5:42 100% I mean, in the landscape of things that are uncontrollable of living with diabetes and diabetes management, we have to control what we can control and Gvoke Hypopen is the first auto injector of medicine if we have a severe low blood sugar event, and the looming prospect of that can be scary. And as an ultra marathoner as someone who lives as an athlete lives with movement, you know, and I know your listeners are very, very well versed in the diabetes landscape, and probably can relate to that to a certain extent. I needed to take agency back, which is why I partnered with Gvoke Hypopen because recently, for example, when I ran the New York City Marathon, I had the Gvoke Hypopen in my race kit. Thankfully, I didn't need to use it. But it does give me peace of mind out there on the racecourse, you know, knowing that I have this medicine accessible to me, if I have a severe low, Stacey Simms 6:31 I'm going to knock wood everywhere I can find some because yeah, I've had to use Gvoke or any kind of emergency glucagon in the 15 years since my son was diagnosed, have you ever had to use anything? Robin Arzon 6:41 Thankfully, no, thankfully, I have not had to use it. And I'm very grateful for that. And I'm also grateful that I sought out the right care for myself. And I advocated for myself with my doctor. And I recommend folks do the same and of course, do their own, you know, investigation of safety and risks and allergies and all the things associated with with any medical prescription. But we have to advocate for ourselves and figure out what works for our lifestyles. Stacey Simms 7:04 Alright, so you were diagnosed with type one as an adult, you were already an incredible athlete. And I think I heard you say somewhere that you ran a half marathon a week or two after your diagnosis. Robin Arzon 7:14 Yes. So I had a half marathon, I think a week later. And then I had a 50 mile ultra marathon few weeks after that. So it was a blurry and really daunting time. And I had to figure out quickly, this new life, this new thing, I believe superheroes are real. And I know that folks living with diabetes, diabetes warriors are superheroes. And in my superhero toolkit, It now includes insulin, it includes glucose taps. It includes the you know, the Gvoke Hypopen and it's I developed a mantra actually, during that time that forward is a pace. There are some days when the next step is the only step that you can focus on and that's okay. But I figured it out because it was meaningful to me the first question I asked, when my endocrinologist said, you're going to be living with insulin, your pancreas doesn't produce enough or any, I thought, Oh, okay. And I said out loud, how am I going to cross the ultra marathon finish line I have in a few weeks. And we figured it out. And I made mistakes, and I figured it out. And I educated myself. And I want folks to feel that same empowerment of like, gosh, we're gonna figure it out. We're going to be ready. We're going to be warriors, and we're going to continue to be epic. Stacey Simms 8:24 One of the biggest questions I got when I told my Facebook group for the podcast that we were talking was, again, knowing everybody is different. But you know, just what do you do to avoid lows? Because exercise? I mean, let's face it, some people with diabetes do not exercise because they are afraid of low blood sugar. How did you get past that? How do you avoid crazy highs, crazy lows, when Robin Arzon 8:44 you're exercising, it is a lot of trial and error. And just like anything else, it's observing, just like observing how your body reacts to a certain food, you have to observe how your body reacts to a certain type of movement. For example, lifting weights, for me might make my blood sugar go up. Whereas of course, cardiovascular or aerobic things like the bike with running will make it go down. So I really encourage folks to get curious, start small, right? Well, you don't have to go out and run an ultra marathon. But maybe you know, you start with the 10 minute walk around the block and see what happens. And then you bring you know the glucose tabs or the apple juice with you, I always have some type of rescue carbs, right. And this is really where the Gvoke Hypopen can come in as well. Because you know, you've got that in a severe and you know, in the situation where we're really putting ourselves in a low blood sugar, severe low blood sugar circumstance, we have medicine that is on the spot that is going to react on the spot that gives me a lot of peace of mind. So it's that two pronged approach of daily diabetes management. And then you know, having this in a circumstance where things get a little bit more severe, or a lot more severe. Stacey Simms 9:48 Yeah, we have quite a few people who said I take her class I see her all the time. Have you ever had a low blood sugar during instruction like when you're doing a class? Robin Arzon 9:57 Thankfully, yes, I've gone low but It's all been manageable, drink some juice, keep it moving. I've never had to stop a workout, thank goodness. And that's literally 1000s of hours of practice of knowing my body and knowing the exact timing of like, okay, I'm going to drink a quarter of my smoothie. Eight minutes before this class, I really have had to treat myself kind of like an experiment, like, get curious and just see and trust that even on the days that aren't my best, I'm trying my best and my best is good enough. That is also encouraging. So So I encourage folks to give themselves that same grace, but also that same dose of bravery. You mentioned that there are folks of your listeners who are so scared that they're not moving, but they're not working out. And that really saddens me, because they're limiting their own potential. And why you're letting diabetes when when you do that. Stacey Simms 10:46 I don't know if you're familiar with Don Muchow, who ran or walked from Disney Land to Disney World that she I did I Robin Arzon 10:53 read about this. He was told Stacey Simms 10:55 when he was diagnosed a long time ago, right. I think it was the late 70s. He was told do not exercise because it was too dangerous. That was a real thing that people were told not all that long ago. And he had to wake up one day and say no, no, you know, so I give you so I mean, sounds silly to say, but I give you so much credit for getting your diagnosis and saying no, no, I'm, I'm getting right back into it. And I've had the privilege of talking to a lot of people in the public eye like yourself who have treated lows while they're on camera. musicians who sneak a sip of orange juice or racecar drivers to kind of have it in their car. Can I ask you do you keep something sneaky? Is your water bottle is the other two maybe that people should look for? Robin Arzon 11:32 One is water and one is juice. I always have some form of juice on me onset always, always, always. And yeah, no shame in that. If I need it. Take a sip, keep it and keep it moving. Thankfully, you know, Stacey Simms 11:44 yeah, I think it's lovely to find out those little things because it makes our kids and a lot of adults feel better to know they're not alone. I mean, that's half of this. Did you find a community when you were diagnosed with type one because it can be very isolating? Robin Arzon 11:57 You know, I was, as I mentioned, I was running ultra marathons at the time and there is an amazing ultra marathoner, Steven Anglin, very accomplished he does hundreds and hundreds of miles at a time really epic guy. He was the first person I went to outside of my medical team. And I was like, What the heck, what do I do and you know, he kind of talked me down. And you know, I hope to be able to pay that forward, especially as being part of this be ready campaign, I want to be a visible example of the fact that we can continue moving, we can continue being heroic in big and small ways in our very own lives. Um, you know, as a new mom, I read fairy tales to my baby girl every night and I want to live a fairy tale that is is is even stronger than things that she's going to read in books, and then pass the baton to hertz to one day live just as gravely, but it does require us to be prepared. And that is literally why I wanted to partner with the Gvoke Hypopen team. Because the reality is, the more prepared we are, the more peace of mind we're going to have. You can't control everything. And with any prescription medication, you have to speak to your medical provider to make sure that this is the appropriate avenue for you. But it does provide me peace of mind in the event that a severe blood sugar is looming. Stacey Simms 13:05 You're coming to 8 years with type one, have you experienced burnout at all yet? You know, it's I think, Robin Arzon 13:12 yes, I mean, there are certainly days where just like really more of this tightrope walk. So it's definitely exhausting. And we make to think like a pancreas requires a lot of mental energy. But I'll tell you something, I've discovered more than burnout, that every single day we have the choice to turn why me and to try me. And the self pity is poison. I think that self pity is poisonous and much more harmful than burnout. For me, I choose to constantly flip the script, constantly turn pain into power, I have no other way. And it's both being someone that lives with type diabetes, and also being an athlete, and also being a mom, and also being an executive and also being an author and also being an entrepreneur. And it's like, let's go. Stacey Simms 13:56 I know we're gonna run a time. Two more questions, if I could, you mentioned your daughter things beep with diabetes. How was she doing with that? I mean, she's so tiny. But does she know what? Robin Arzon 14:05 Oh, my goodness, you know, I mean, we're just learning and she's very curious about the gadgets and the beach and the stuff and I will explain to her, you know, in age appropriate ways of like, this is mommy's medicine, and this is what Bobby needs to do. And now I explained to her what a pancreas is, and you know, things that I definitely didn't learn at her age. But you know, I want her to know, I want her to be informed too. And I want her in order for her to be proud of me. She needs to be informed as to what I go through. And I want her to see me dealing with challenges and rising above it. The Diabetes community is incredibly supportive, and whether you know, the Gvoke Hypopen can be used for folks, age 2 and up. So that's a wide swath of our community and Gvoke.com is a great place for more information. That's where the total story is, including any side effects information and safety language. Stacey Simms 14:51 And then the last question is just what are you looking forward to in 2022? You've already accomplished so much you listed all those things that keep you so busy. Robin Arzon 14:58 I'm very excited. about the launch of my children's book, it's my first children's book strong mama. It is a love letter to my baby girl. And it really puts the focus on a caregivers self care. So let's remember that we have to prioritize our self care. It's not selfish, whether your parents or not take the time for yourself. Because yes, that burnout is real. And we have to go inward sometimes in order to give Stacey Simms 15:21 outwardly but like hope when it comes out, you'll come back on and share. Robin Arzon 15:24 Oh, that would be great. That would be great. Nice. Nice to see you today, Stacy. Stacey Simms 15:28 Oh, my gosh, thank you so much, Robin, I appreciate your time. Have a great one. You're listening to Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. More information about Robin a full transcript and the links to Gvoke and to the video are all at the homepage at diabetes connections.com. I am going to follow up with her hopefully, she'll come back on in a couple of weeks to talk about her children's book and answer more of your questions. I mentioned at the beginning of the show that Benny asked me to try something new. So let me just set kind of set the table about what's been going on here, especially if you're new to the show. So Benny was diagnosed in 2006. Right before he turned two, he is 17. Now, and so he's had diabetes for really just over 15 years. For the last two years, I've really tried to slide into doing less and less and less to the point where in October of 2020, I turned off all of my Dexcom alarms except for urgent, low. And after a big trip he took the summer he went to Israel for a month with a non diabetes camp after he did well with that. I said to him, Well, what do I do now? Right? What do you want from me? How can I help you? Am I here just for customer service? Right? When you want me you contact me, not the other way around? And he said that that's what he really wanted to do. Have I been 100% successful at that, of course not doing nag him here and there to bolus or if I see something wonky? Of course, is he doing? Well? Yeah, he's doing really well, except I'll be honest with you. He's not as diligent. He's not as on top of it. And he wouldn't mind me saying this, as he was when I was diligent and on top of you know, and as you're listening, if you're laughing, if you're an adult with type one, or if you're a parent of an older child, or young adult with type one, you have gone through this, I've gotten a lot of reassurances from my friends, the diabetes community that as long as he's not doing anything dangerous, and he certainly is far from that he's doing great that the way I would do it is not gonna happen anymore. It's up to him now, which is really, really, really hard. So here's what the challenge came in. About a month ago, I pointed out to him that, you know, he was missing some boluses. And he wasn't paying attention to things as well, you know, we had like a, it was a moment where I said, can I talk to you about this? And he agreed, and we had a really good conversation like we do every once in a while. And he said, You know what, Mom, I'd like you to try to remember every time you eat to do something, and I said, Yeah, but after 15 years, like how can you not know how can you not do this? Right? I mean, every parent has said that or thought that right? So he said to me, okay, every time you eat anything, I want you to text me. I said, Sure. No problem. I always have my phone with me. That's gonna be easy. And you know, he rolled his eyes. And he said, we'll say, so the first day, I text him every time I eat three meals, you know, a billion snacks, whatever I'm eating, I text him every time. The next day. I text him. I'm not even really thinking. I text him at dinner. He was at work. He texts back “Is this the first time you've eaten today?” with assorted emojis. And I went, Oh, my God. I did not text him for breakfast. I did not text him for lunch. I hadn't even thought about it. I completely forgot about our bet. And I said, Okay, not fair. That was just day two. It wasn't that I forgot to quote bolus while I was eating. I just forgot that we had agreed to do that. He said, Okay, I'll give you another couple of days. Well, the next day, I remembered breakfast, I forgot lunch. So he wanted me to keep it up for two weeks, which was our original agreement, I felt that he had proved his point after a day and a half, really. But I kept it going. And I did better. But I really failed at it. Was that a lesson with universal implications? Probably not. I bet you'd be a lot better at it than I was. I don't know why I couldn't remember. I don't know what I was thinking. But between the two of us, it was a fantastic lesson. And it was such a great way for me to see how even after all this time, you know how difficult this is how tough it is to be perfect. And you know, as you listen, maybe your lesson is, well, that means that you need to set more reminders. And be on him more. I mean, everybody, I guess would take this a different way. The lesson to me was: have a little bit more empathy, and have a lot more respect for the way he is doing it. Well, I mean, we're not talking about a kid who's ignoring his diabetes, and you don't like I don't talk about numbers, but we're talking about an A1C that's, you know, maybe a couple of tenths, maybe a half a point higher than it was last time. And we're already seeing numbers that I never thought we'd see when he was in the teenage years. If you'd asked me, you know, years ago, thank you control IQ. Thank you for a kid who is responsible. So that's a long way of telling this story that I really got a lot out of so as you listen, if you're a parent, talk to your kid, maybe this is something you can do if you're an adult nodding your head saying yes, Stacy, we could have told you that's what would happen. You know, thank you for your patience. But I got a year and a half before Benny goes off to college. That's it. He is beginning his second semester of junior year. And I think most of these lessons, frankly, are for me. So boy, I hope I'm learning. All right, we do you have a newscast this week, that is Wednesday, live at 430, on Facebook, and YouTube, and then live on Instagram at 4:45 different times, until these services decide to play nicely together. And I can do them all at once. But right now, Instagram will not let you that's why there are different times for that, but we turn it into an audio podcast that you can listen to on Fridays. And then going forward, we're back to our regular schedule with the long format interview shows every Tuesday. I am hoping that we're gonna have a lot of technology to talk about this year. We do have some great episodes coming up with the folks at Tandem. We've got an update from Dexcom, as well as some interviews with newly approved products and products overseas that are going to be submitted for approval in the US this year. So a lot to work on a lot to come. I'm really excited about 2022 Not just for the show, but for what I really hope the community starts seeing when this logjam of COVID approvals or COVID, delays at the FDA starts loosening up and walking through so fingers crossed for that. Thank you as always to my editor John Bukenas at audio editing solutions. Thanks so much for listening. I'm Stacey Simms. I'll see you back here in a couple of days until then be kind to yourself. Benny 21:29 Diabetes Connections is a production of Stacey Simms media. All rights reserved. All wrongs avenged

Pardon My Pancreas
My T1D Christmas List To Santa

Pardon My Pancreas

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 8:45


What if you could actually ask Santa for type 1 diabetes "gifts", what would you ask for? Matt dives into what you should be asking for, and how to use this to actually benefit your blood sugars...Grab Matt's free T1D Webclass here:https://diabetesinaction.com---------Welcome to the Pardon My Pancreas podcast!! This show is all about REAL life with type 1 diabetes, understanding fluctuations, and how to stabilize your blood sugar for good. Your host is Matt Vande Vegte is a certified personal trainer, nutritionist, and type 1 diabetic whose biggest goal in life is to help people with diabetes around the world live their lives fearlessly. Looking for an online health coaching program to help you live your best life? Go to https://www.ftfwarrior.com to learn more about his program for diabetics only that is focused on helping you reach your goals while living a happier and healthier life. Join the Tribe today!This podcast is sponsored by FTF Warrior - An online health and fitness coaching company for type 1 diabetics dedicated to helping them master their blood sugars through any activity, exercise, or meal!https://www.ftfwarrior.comFollow Matt here:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ftfwarrior/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ftfwarrior/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/ftfwarrior------------------------------------------------------Disclaimer: While we share our experiences with diabetes, nothing we discuss should be taken as medical advice. Please consult your doctor or medical professional for your health and diabetes management.

DeviceTalks by MassDevice
Exploring HeartMate, CardioMEMS and the rest of Abbott's toolbox to help heart failure patients

DeviceTalks by MassDevice

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 76:27


In this episode, we'll dive deep into the Heart Failure business at Abbott. First we'll connect with Philip Adamson, MD, chief medical officer of the group. Dr. Adamson uses an explanation of CardioMEMS to give a vivid portrait of how patients live with heart failure. Technology, he says, makes turns those patients into their own health care workers. This podcast is sponsored by KNF. Then, we'll talk with Kevin Bourque, vice president of research and development, and Robert Kormos, division VP, global affairs of heart failure, about the advances of Heartmate 3. Both also detail how Abbott is working to help children suffering from the condition. Dr. Kormos also shares the most gratifying part of his job. The entire editorial staff joins the podcast to share their personal top stories of 2021. News includes mentions from Vicarious Surgical, ResMed, Philips, Pfizer, BioNTech, Abbott, Dexcom and Insulet. Happy New Year!!! We'll see you in 2022. LIKE! FOLLOW! SUBSCRIBE!

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
In the News... Insulin-producing cells discovery, Miss America T1D history & more!

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 5:57


Our top stories in the news this week: Congressional report on insulin pricing, SGLT2 pulled from EU market, Insulin-producing cells found outside the pancreas, Sugarmate returns & Miss America with #T1D joins Smithsonian display. -- Join us LIVE every Wednesday at 4:30pm EST Full episode transcription below: Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I'm Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days. As always, I'm going to link up my sources in the Facebook comments – where we are live – we are also Live on YouTube and in the show notes at d-c dot com when this airs as a podcast.. XX In the News is brought to you by The World's Worst Diabetes Mom, Real life stories of raising a child with diabetes. Winner of the American Book Fest Prize for best new non-fiction. Available in paperback, on Kindle or as an audio book – all at Amazon.com. XX New Congressional report from Democrats on the House Committee on Oversight & Reform keeping the focus on insulin pricing. It says Medicare could have saved more than $16.7 billion on insulin if it were allowed to negotiate like other health programs. This final report is the culmination of an almost 3-year investigation. Documents from Eli Lilly, Novo Nordisk, and Sanofi indicate these firms "raised their prices in lockstep in order to maintain 'pricing parity'. One particularly damning quote – a Novo Nordisk pricing analyst remarked, '[M]aybe Sanofi will wait until tomorrow morning to announce their price increase...that's all I want for Christmas'," https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/964799 XX Surprising move in Europe – they've pulled the SGLT-2 inhibitor Forxiga from the market for people with type 1. AstraZeneca said the decision isn't about safety but didn't explain further. There are already concerns about an increased risk of DKA from SGLT-2 inhibitors in people with type 1.. that's why they aren't approved in the US.. but many advocates say the benefits outweigh the risks. The UK Chief Executive of JDRF, said it is "appalling" that the drug has been withdrawn, as quote "many people with type 1 are finding it an effective and useful tool to help manage their glucose levels." https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/964844 XX The FDA issues a warning to Medtronic over it's diabetes headquarters. This is related to a July inspection that led to recalls of the MiniMed™ 600 series pump, and a remote controller device for MiniMed™ 508 and Paradigm™ pumps. Medtronic says they are implementing a range of corrective actions and process improvements related to the observations, and will continue reviewing these actions with the FDA. https://www.kpvi.com/news/national_news/medtronic-diabetes-receives-fda-warning-letter/article_bf45a3c3-1759-5fff-b234-6a71cd874a98.html XX Here's a new one. Israeli scientists have discovered that the human fetus makes insulin in its intestines before birth and say this means that adults may have a “backup” system that could be reactivated to treat diabetes. This is peer-reviewed research published in the journal Nature Medicine. These scientists say there's a lot here they don't understand and practical applications are a long way off but.. the hope is that some kind of medication could one day reactivate these cells in adults. https://www.timesofisrael.com/israeli-scientists-say-humans-may-have-backup-insulin-system-diabetics-could-use/ XX Good news Sugarmate fans! Late last week the app makers announced it would once again connect with Dexcom for US customers. They issued an apology and thanked users for their patience. Still working on re-connecting for those outside the US. This is all about changes to the Dexcom API, the way apps talk to each other. https://help.sugarmate.io/en/articles/5790778-reconnecting-your-dexcom-data-source?fbclid=IwAR3FC616f4mGt4yAGUcEvLDaTVpDhC7aqQIxQPN7lk5ZBNJVxASIDzK57k8 XX Dexcom expands it's physical presence, opening a second large facility in Arizona. Big celebration this week with a ribbon cutting ceremony at the 500-thousand square foot facility and a job fair. In looking into this story, I found that earlier this year the other Dexcom center was used as an indoor drive-thru Covid vaccination site.. a partnership between Dexcom, the Arizona Health Department and Walgreens. https://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/news/2021/12/14/diabetes-device-maker-opens-another-mesa-facility.html XX Time Magazine's Heroes of the Year are the scientists behind the COVID vaccines. While there are of course many people at work here, they highlighted four – including Dr. Drew Weissman who has lived with type 1 for more than 50 years. He and partners began working on mRNA science for vaccines in 1997, publishing a landmark paper in 2005. There's a lot more to this story of course.. DiabetesMine ran a photo of Weissman almost a year ago, getting the vaccine and you can see his insulin pump on his belt. https://time.com/heroes-of-the-year-2021-vaccine-scientists/?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=person-of-the-year&utm_term=_&linkId=144413683 XX Miss America memorabilia moves to the Smithsonian, including items from Nicole Johnson, the first Miss America with type 1 diabetes. Johnson posted about this on social media saying she was donating her insulin pump, swimsuit and letters from children with diabetes that she received during her reign in 1999. The exhibit will mark 100 years of the competition. Other items include a hearing-aid-compatible microphone used by Heather Whitestone, the first deaf Miss America of 1995 and the first swimsuit worn in the pageant. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smithsonian-institution/miss-america-contest-is-forever-shaped-by-its-swimsuit-competition-180979125/?fbclid=IwAR0YAQt1Lo1X5hB1yce2Ixftk5Y3I6_ncLLCbNBy9H-nKttLtBaYgSXx_Is XX New York Times article today about model Lila Moss wearing her omnipod during a fashion show a few months ago. They included a few other runway models with type 1 and got some quotes from JDRF.. nothing too new here but worth mentioning. One tidbit.. it's not uncommon, these models say, for pumps and CGMs to be airbrushed out if the client or they wish it to be – they're keeping their tech on for the shoots. https://www.nytimes.com/2021/12/15/style/lila-moss-hack-diabetes-runway.html XX Before I let you go, a reminder that the podcast this week is my favorite things! I had a great time with this episode.. it's short and fun I think – and I talk about accessories, storage, toys and more. Listen wherever you get your podcasts or if you're listening to this as on a podcast app, just go back an episode. Next week our predictions episode – DiabetesMine Managing Editor Mike Hoskins joins me as we talk about tech in the new year. That's In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.  

Pardon My Pancreas
DON'T Copy My Diabetes Decisions

Pardon My Pancreas

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 12:42


There's a reason that there's no "perfect" diabetes management strategy. Matt dives into WHY and what you can do about it.Grab Matt's free T1D Webclass here:https://diabetesinaction.com---------Welcome to the Pardon My Pancreas podcast!! This show is all about REAL life with type 1 diabetes, understanding fluctuations, and how to stabilize your blood sugar for good. Your host is Matt Vande Vegte is a certified personal trainer, nutritionist, and type 1 diabetic whose biggest goal in life is to help people with diabetes around the world live their lives fearlessly. Looking for an online health coaching program to help you live your best life? Go to https://www.ftfwarrior.com to learn more about his program for diabetics only that is focused on helping you reach your goals while living a happier and healthier life. Join the Tribe today!This podcast is sponsored by FTF Warrior - An online health and fitness coaching company for type 1 diabetics dedicated to helping them master their blood sugars through any activity, exercise, or meal!https://www.ftfwarrior.comFollow Matt here:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ftfwarrior/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ftfwarrior/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/ftfwarrior------------------------------------------------------Disclaimer: While we share our experiences with diabetes, nothing we discuss should be taken as medical advice. Please consult your doctor or medical professional for your health and diabetes management.

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

This week… something completely different! It's an episode all about my favorite things. With apologies to Oprah, this isn't about the holidays – it's a little late for that! And while some of this might make good gifts, this more of a season-less list. Just good stuff I like. Couple of rules I set for myself: Nothing that needs a prescription. Nothing that I'm getting paid for. No one on this list will even know they've been mentioned until the episode goes live! Hope you enjoy! -Stacey Here are the links to everything I mention: Keep it cool: Frio wallets Tempramed VivCap Sticky stuff/application: Skin Tac wipes Stay Put medical patches Benadryl spray and Flonase spray Nexcare waterproof bandages Cases/accessories T1D3DGear (warning, profanity) Casualty Girl pouches  Disney-themed pouches  Dia-Be-Tees shirts and stickers Books: Think Like a Pancreas Raising Teens with Diabetes Sugar Surfing When I Go Low Just for fun: Heroic Kid (play d-tech for toys)  I Heart Guts New Rufus the Bear! Misc. The Useless Pancreas (marketplace) Highs and Lows Ring Guitar Pick Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Episode transcription below:   Stacey Simms  0:00 Diabetes Connections is brought to you by... Dario Health – Manage your blood glucose levels. Increase your possibilities.By Gvoke HypoPen, the first pre-mixed autoinjector for very low blood sugar. And By Dexcom. Take control of your diabetes and live life to the fullest with Dexcom This is Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. This week, something completely different. It's an episode all about my favorite things. With apologies to Oprah, this isn't about the holidays, it's a little late for that. And you know, some of this might make good gifts. This is more of just something I've been thinking about doing for a long time. So I would consider this a bit of a seasonless list, just good stuff that I like. And unfortunately, unlike Oprah, I haven't hidden everything I'm talking about here under your seat as a gift. So I can't do that. But I did set a couple of rules for myself, you're not going to hear me talk about anything today for which you need a prescription. Right, I'm not gonna talk about medical stuff, and nothing that I'm getting paid for. I will put the links for all this stuff in the show notes, but they're not affiliate links. So that means they go right to the product where I think it's most easily available. They don't go to a special link, you know, which tallies you up and then pays me. I mean, there's nothing wrong with that as long as everybody knows what's going on. And a couple of these folks may sound familiar, I've worked with them before, we have had partnerships and sponsorships with the mostly the booked clinic program. But I really just wanted this to be a fun way to share my thoughts. If you have a product that I mentioned. And the link is wrong or doesn't go exactly where you want it, please reach out. I want to make this great for you and easy for my listeners. So drop me a line Stacey at diabetes connections.com. And maybe we'll get a thread going in the Facebook group to find out some of your favorite things. Because you know, Benny is older now and the products that we really needed, you know, like the super cute insulin pump pouches that he used when he was three years old, he does not use anymore. So I don't have recommendations for stuff like that. Maybe we can kind of get a list going and I can do a follow up in a couple of weeks or months for listeners but you really should be in the Facebook group. Anyway, if you're on Facebook, I know not everybody is so if you're there, come on over. Alright, so here are a few of my favorite things   let's talk about keeping insulin at room temperature. A couple of products I really like for that we don't have a ton of issue with this day in and day out. I do live in North Carolina and Benny of course is  outside quite a bit in the summer, he does go to summer camp. When we've needed to keep something at room temperature. We use a Frio generally these Frio wallets pretty standard in the diabetes community you probably know about them. What's nice is you can get them at CBS. Now, I think Walgreens carries them used to be online only. They're really easy to use. Please follow the directions. Don't be like me and oversaturate and then you can't get anything in the wallet. You have to just read the directions. You'll figure it out better than we did. But Frio doesn't keep it cold. It just keeps it cool. But we love Frio. Close to edging it out. And the only reason it doesn't here is because of the price. And because it doesn't yet cover vials. But that's coming is the VIVI Cap. These folks reached out to me middle of last year, probably spring of last year and sent us a sample we decided to try it on Benny's trip to Israel. If you'll recall, my son went to Israel with his non diabetes camp last summer for a month. This included tons and tons of outdoor activity in temperatures that were in excess of 100 degrees. Quite often, he packed two bags, one was like the go bag, three days worth of supplies. And then the other bigger bag that stayed inside or in a refrigerated area, at least the insulin part of it did on the bus or you know, wherever they went, I have my suspicions as to whether it's stayed perfectly refrigerated the whole time, but only a little bit of insulin went into the desert with. But the idea was he would take a pen, we would use the VIVI Cap, and then he would just change the pen out continuing to use the VIVI Cap in his backpack. Whenever he needed more insulin. He had vials he had pens we use both in his pump. And it's always nice to have a pen in case you need to give yourself a shot something like that. So when he came home and this is so typical of my son went through his bag, for he did a great job with diabetes, but there must have been like a communications problem because he never changed out that insulin pen. He never needed to give himself a shot, which is probably why but he just always used the vials that I'd sent him with. I sent him with way too much insulin for a month but you know, you know mom's What am I gonna do? So upshot of this long story is that the one insulin pen that we sent to Israel with stayed in hot temperatures definitely in excess of probably 75 degrees around the clock, and certainly in excess of 100 degrees for several days at a time during the daytime. And what happened to it right it was with the VIVI Cap the whole time so we decided to test it out. You know how he supervised setting right? I wasn't going to let him use this pen and then jaunt off do overnights or whatever he was with us. And look, we would know right away if that insulin was no good. And guess what? It worked perfectly. It was fantastic. He was in range. I mean, he was really we were really watching obviously, right. But he was in range pretty much the whole three days. So it was fantastic. And I was definitely converted to VIVI Cap. That should be their tagline guys call me if you can stand the Israeli desert heat, right, you can certainly hang out a day camp in North Carolina this summer. They often have promo codes, discounts. It's more expensive than the Frio wallet. But it's also really durable and lasts for a whole year. And it has different sizes. So it will fit whatever insulin you're using. My understanding is that they are working on a similar bit of technology for insulin vials, and that would be great.   Let's talk a little bit about getting stuff to stick. I have a whole document about this. If you haven't seen it, it's been a pop up for a couple of months. It's been incredibly popular. So I haven't taken it down yet. But I'm probably going to move it over to the bookstore section. Do you don't have a bookstore section on the website, we're kind of creating a place to put documents a lot of stuff is free. There are PDFs, so we're gonna move that over there. But of course there there's my book to buy and there will be more later this year. But the getting stuff to stick is so personal. I think it's really hard right? Everybody's skin is so different. So here's what we have liked over the years could not keep anything on Benny skin with a Skin Tac that is the brand that we like we get Skin Tac from Amazon. Over the years we've gone from just using the little Skin Tac wipes to using the liquid bottle we used to liquid for many years. I think gosh, Benny was like 13 or 14 and he was like no more. I don't want that it's not portable enough. He's never home. So he uses the wipes. Now. He uses nothing to dissolve it. So I have no favorite product for that. He literally just rips things off his skin. I cringe every time but hey, it's not my body. We like Stay Put Medical patches. That's the brand, Stay Put Medical just foyer for years and years. We had trouble in the water. I tried vet wrap I tried all the stuff that all the moms tell you to try. The Dexcom overlays that come free from the company are great, but it didn't work as well in the ocean, or with sweat, that kind of thing. So Stay Put patches really were fantastic for us. The story I always tell is Benny with a diabetes camp for a full week, right Saturday to Saturday. And then we went to the beach and we restarted the ducks calm. This was a couple of years ago. And it survived to Stay Put and the Dexcom survived a week of diabetes camp where they swim and sweat and you know, they're pretty gross for a whole week. It's hot. Again, as I said we live in North Carolina, and then three days at the ocean, sand and ocean. All that stuff that you get and it really did stay put. So I really love that they're big. He got an incredible tan line. That's one of the only downsides of it. We used Benadryl spray, Benny had a brief time of having a mild allergic reaction. I think this was to the Dexcom G5 years ago and my husband came back from the store with over the counter Benadryl spray not Flonase requested, and it worked fine. So it's kind of a weird, favorite thing, but I haven't heard a lot about Benadryl spray, but I'll mention it here. I also really really like next care waterproof Band-Aids, the brand doesn't really matter. I mean, it's just a Tegaderm bandage, but I'd like to mention it because you can get it at the drugstore or the grocery store. It's over the counter. Unlike a lot of the stuff that has to be ordered from your medical company or from Amazon, you can take a waterproof bandage and in a pinch, slap it over your Dexcom or slap it over an infusion set. I mean, you have to cut a hole into for the infusion set. But sometimes you can just slap it on top. We've done that and then gently pulled it off later to reconnect to the tube to pump. And it works great. I've heard a lot of people say they're afraid of doing that because they don't want to block the signal from the Dexcom people. We have done this many, many, many times I can show you photos. When we went to the Dead Sea in Israel, I did not want to take a chance of the salt. Right. It's so salty, corroding the transmitter. So we put a waterproof bandage over the Dexcom. And he left it on for a couple of days. I don't know the probably wasn't very comfortable, but he didn't seem to care. And it worked fine. So that's my in a pinch favorite thing at the beach   let's talk about cases and organization something that my son doesn't care about at all. And if I if this were me, I'm the kind of person that I love pouches and organization and cool stuff like that and he really doesn't care. But I will go through and tell you what I like. I am a huge fan of T1D3DGear. This is just a fantastic family in the diabetes community to begin with, and their stuff is awesome. So as you can imagine T1D3DGear, they're making stuff right they're printing it out on their 3d printer and it's everything from trays, which we do use, I love those makes your supplies really easy to find. And they've got different sizes for different brands to insulin protection vials, which I like a lot, and they will do custom colors as well, we've been so lucky, where's the wood that I can knock that we've never actually like dropped a vial, but I always put the vial we're using in the case. And that makes me feel so much better. It's just a really easy, it kind of looks like R2D2 in a way. I don't think that's by design, but it's really helpful and really handy and they're making super useful products. They also make the cutest ones like if your kid wants a unicorn or different options. I'll link up their website, as I mentioned, Benny doesn't really like pouches, but I make him use them anyway because otherwise his diabetes bag is just a complete mess. So we like the ones from casualty girl, some of these have a bit of profanity, you know, all my diabetes stuff. You can fill in the blank there, but they have a bunch of really clean ones, obviously, you know, for younger children, even for my kid I don't like him carrying stuff in public that that has profanity on it, but they have some really cute stuff specific to diabetes, also personalized. They put names on it, and they were so nice. A couple of years ago we gave away a bunch of their stuff at friends for life, so I always like to recommend them. I also will recommend and link up Disney themed pouches that don't look super Disney. I know a lot of you especially friends for life people you're big Disney fans. I am too but I don't like to have like Mickey Mouse on my purse. I like it to be a little bit more subtle. And at red bubble. There's a bunch of people who will put together pouches you can see the samples. They just kind of hint at Disney so I have the small world pouch but it's just like a pattern that is featured in small world. It's not actually it doesn't say small world. I got Lea my daughter for Hanukkah. This year. I got her one that has the Haunted Mansion wallpaper on it. You'd never know unless you knew. So very cool stuff. It doesn't have anything to do with diabetes. But I love red bubble. They also have a fun bunch of diabetes stickers there. Oh, speaking of stickers. The best is Dia-Be-Tees This is my friend Rachel. And she has amazing T shirts. She is so creative. She's got great stickers, she made an ugly Hanukkah sweater for diabetes, because a couple of years ago, she makes these great, ugly Christmas sweaters for their diabetes steam. They say funny stuff on them. But I pointed out to her like, hey, everybody celebrates Christmas and she was immediately on it. My favorite stickers are the Tyrannosaurus Dex, get it and the Banting fan club that she made this year for Dr. Banting. Very, very cool stuff. And I'll link up to her Etsy shop.   Let's talk about books. I promise I won't talk about my book here. I talk about it enough. But I really would like to recommend some books that have helped us a lot over the years. My favorite, the one that I always recommend is Think like a pancreas A Practical Guide to managing diabetes with insulin. And that is by the amazing diabetes educator Gary Scheiner. He is out with an updated edition. So he did this book, it's got to be I don't know, Gary, I'm guessing 10 years old, but he does update it frequently. I think it's the third edition now. It's really a great source and resource to understand your diabetes and your child's diabetes better and more thoroughly, let's say then perhaps you might get these quick endocrinology visits, definitely better than the information you're getting on Facebook. I of course love raising teens with diabetes, a survival guide for parents by Moira McCarthy that has not been updated for the technology that has come out since its publication. However, I don't think that matters. I think that there are so many wonderful ideas, thoughts and ways to recognize how tough a time it is for teenagers and come through that time with your relationship with your child intact. So I really recommend that I know Maura is working on updating it. But even still, it's so good because I think so many people with teenagers, even as we say all the time Oh, it's such a tough time. It's they feel so alone. I still I mean gosh, you guys I always wonder and I call Moira. She would vouch for me. And I'm like I'm not doing this right. It's hard. It's really hard. I also love Sugar Surfing how to manage type 1 diabetes in a modern world by the amazing Dr. Steven ponder, I would be lying if I said we are perfect sugar surfers. But we have used a lot of the principles that are in this book. And it does help you understand so much about how everything works and the dynamic way of managing. You know before CGM. It's incredible to think how much Dr. Ponder was able to do. And now with the monitoring, it's really, really helpful. But I will say you can get this for free. If you're newly diagnosed, I believe it's the first three months it might be six months, I will link it up. But I'm telling you right now, if you get this for free when you're newly diagnosed, put it away for a couple of weeks at least maybe put it away for six months, because it's it's pretty advanced in my opinion, and you got to learn diabetes, you got to learn a little bit more about it before you start worrying about the Delta and other stuff that's in here. But I love Dr. Ponder and highly recommend that one. I get asked a lot about children's books. And you know Benny and I read so many diabetes children's books, so many I mean how many are there in the market but we read them so often when he was little And my favorites probably aren't even available anymore. You know, Jackie's got game was about this kid who was trying it for the basketball team. And then he goes low. We loved Rufus comes home, which is about the JDRF. Bear, there were a couple of that diabetes kind of popped up into lots of picture books that we read if the person in them didn't have diabetes, or the animals in them. But I gotta be honest with you, I struggle to recommend children's books, because I'm not reading them with little kids anymore. And I think they're a really good judge, right? I do. Like when I go low, a diabetes picture Guide, which is a terrific book by ginger Viera. And Mike Lawson. And this is a terrific book, because both of those people live with type one, we had them on the show, you know, I've known them for years I full disclosure, but I think it's so valuable because as a parent of a child with diabetes, who doesn't live with diabetes herself, I don't have that kind of insight. And I really trust those authors to share that information and help a child kind of give voice to how they're feeling when they go low, that sort of thing. It's a fun, cute book, it's, you know, it's not serious. It's not scary. It's really great. And I'm just gonna say, and don't be mad parents, if you're thinking of writing a children's book, just carefully consider it. Look at what was already out on the market. I talked to a lot of people who spent a lot of money to put these books out, you know, most of them are not published by a traditional publishing house. Some are but most are self-published. And that's great. But you know, gosh, there are so many out there right now that are very similar. So you know, we don't need a general explainer, please think about what the need in the community is, what's the unique need, you can fill? And I would say, you know, that's why I like when I go low, because it's written by people with type one, we do need them. I mean, the children's books are great. And there's some wonderful ones out there, but I'll tell you, what I'd like to see is some elementary school and tween level books. That's what we really need around here. We don't need another picture book, we need something that an 11 year old or an eight year old could read and see themselves in, you know, baby sitters club is the only thing I can think of where diabetes is there, but it isn't always the focus, it would be really nice to have something else like that. Frankly, I'd like to see that adult level book as well. There's a couple of authors that have written books were diabetes featured but isn't like the main point. But boy, it would be really fun to see that in like a blockbuster bestseller kind of book if they got it right of course.   Alright, let's talk about some just for fun stuff. years ago, Benny got his years ago on his 10 year diaversary. So five years ago, we gave Benny the I heart guts, stuffed pancreas. I heart guts is a company that makes they're so funny. They make stuffed animal type body parts, I'm sorry, they call them plush organs. And since we purchased a few years ago, they have a few more options on their website. They have socks, they have pouches, I was talking about pouches earlier, there's one that says party in my pancreas. But what I really like about this is you can get something for your kiddo with type one. But you can also find something for a sibling who doesn't have diabetes, right? If you're if you're just looking for something silly, I gave my daughter the heart, right? I mean, knock on wood, thank God, there's nothing wrong with her heart. But it was a symbol of my love for her. And while she thought it was kind of silly, you know, it's a way to include her. So diabetes isn't always you know, the middle of everything. And they I mean, this place absolutely cracks me up. There is so much here. They've got puns as far as the eye can see. So if your kid needs their tonsils out, if your wife is having a knee replacement, these are just really fun. And I may have to go and order a huge amount of the stickers. One of the things I absolutely love is that a lot of businesses have popped up to make toy accessories for kids with diabetes. So you know, you've probably heard like Build A Bear has a diabetes kit, you can get that online. years ago, the American Girl doll kit kind of kicked this off. But there's a bunch of people in the community making this stuff. So I recommend heroic kid, and they make tiny little CGMs for your Elf on the Shelf. If you're into that, or you can put it on an American Girl doll. You can have a libre, they now make a bunch of insulin pumps. It's awesome. I love this stuff. I mean, I can't even imagine if we'd had a real real looking insulin pump for Benny when he was two years old that he could have stuck on his Elmo. Holy cow. So heroic kid is fantastic. And the other thing for kids I wanted to share. And I I tell if you saw my newscast last week, we talked about this I broke this story in 2019. Jerry the bear, and Rufus the bear are now one, there can only be one, there was only one bear. And we talked about this when beyond type one and JDRF announced their alliance in 2019. I kind of jokingly asked like what happens to the bears? And they answered it with a straight face and said only one. We're gonna figure this out because it doesn't make any sense to have to, you know, we don't want to be spending money on this kind of stuff. So what happened is Rufus is now $22 which is a lot less than the starting price of Jerry. And if you're not familiar, I probably should explain. So Jerry, the bear is an interactive toy made by the folks at Sproutel, they have gone on to make things like my special AFLAC duck. They have, I think it's called a purrburl. It's like a little stuffed animal that kind of helps kids kind of calm themselves. It's interactive that way. And but they started with Jerry, the bear was their first product developed when these guys were in college. It's a really smart team. But Jerry is a teaching toy. And there's an app on he's evolved over the years and really looks great. And of course, now he looks like Rufus. So this is Rufus on the outside Jerry on the inside, and it's available for $22. I'm gonna call this next category, miscellaneous, because these were just a couple of things that I wanted to make sure to tell you about. But they don't fit into many of these categories. And the first one popped up into my Facebook feed. But it looks beautiful. It's a ring. It's kinda like a zigzaggy ring. But it's called to my daughter highs and lows ring, it is only $36. It is cubic zirconia. It is sterling silver plated with 18 karat gold. So this is not a you know, super expensive super valuable ring. And that's fine. I think it's great for what it is, makes it a terrific little gift. And it comes with a card that says the ring stands for the highs and lows in life, wear it as a reminder that I will be there for you through all of them. That's pretty cool. And hey, moms, I mean, you can buy it for yourself. Even though we go through some highs and lows, they don't all have to be diabetes related. I want to mention, this is very silly. But this is our miscellaneous category. And these are my favorite things. I think everybody who uses a Dexcom should have a guitar pick lying around. Because you've probably seen the trick to use a test strip to to pry the Dexcom transmitter out of the sensor for a couple of reasons doesn't work for us. I don't know if our test strips are weak or our transmitters are strong. But we have found that a guitar pick does the trick very easily. And I'll tell you the number one reason why we have to remove Dexcom transmitters, it's because then he will start a dead transmitter, or I'll start a dying transmitter. And he'll ignore all the notifications, we'll put the sensor on and clip the transmitter and then the transmitter is dead. So yeah, the guitar pick comes in handy to pry that out and then put the new transmitter in. I also want to recommend a website not a product here but Useless Pancreas.com is a clearinghouse for so many products. They've done an amazing job. We had them on the podcast earlier this year. But since I talked to them, they've added so much. So if you're tooling around and you're not sure even what you're looking for, like I need to get something that'll make stuff stick or I need something that'll they have these two categories, like what will make my kid happy. It's just a neat place to go and find a diabetes marketplace. So I'd like to recommend that because, you know, you go on Amazon, there's so many choices. But they've done a nice job of really trying to narrow it down and give us one place to go. Alright, before I wrap it up here, I did ask Benny if he had any favorite diabetes, things to recommend. And he looked at me like I hit three heads. After thinking about it for a minute or two. He said, The silent button on my pump and Dexcom. So I can't say I blame him for that. I am happy that he has the vibrate only we wish every alarm could be silenced. We understand why they cannot be. So there you have it. That's my very first favorite things episode, I will put a link in the show notes. For every item that I talked about here, I want to make it easy for you to find. Again, if you are haven't mentioned and you have a product and you're not crazy about the link I use, feel free to email me Stacey at diabetes connections.com or ping me on social media and we will figure it out. I want to make sure that people can find your stuff. And if you have your own favorite things that you'd like to list, I think I will put something in the Facebook group and maybe we'll share that in the weeks to come. Thank you as always to my editor John Buchanan from audio editing solutions. Thank you so much for listening. A couple of weeks left in December, we are going to have these Tuesday episodes, as I mentioned, including kind of a look ahead to next year some predictions possibly. And I'm really hoping to get one more technology update for you in before the end of the year trying to get someone from Tandem to come on and talk about that R&D update that I spoke about in the news episode. Last week. They laid out their five year plan for new products and software. But I will see you back here on Wednesday for in the news or if you listen on podcast. That'll be Friday. All right. I'm Stacey Simms. I'll see you back here soon Until then be kind to yourself.   Benny  24:43 Diabetes Connections is a production of Stacey Simms media. All rights reserved. All wrongs avenged

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
In the News... Tandem's tiny pump, more stem cell progress, a new Rufus the Bear & more!

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 8:03


Our top stories In the News this week... Tandem Diabetes shares a big R&D update, laying out their product pipeline for the next 5 years. More stem cell progress, this time from Viactye, a look at another non-invasive CGM claim, big news for Rufus the Bear from JDRF and Stacey spends some time remembering Beyond Type 1 CEO Thom Scher. -- Join us LIVE every Wednesday at 4:30pm EST Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Episode transcription below: Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I'm Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days. As always, I'm going to link up my sources in the Facebook comments – where we are live – we are also Live on YouTube and in the show notes at d-c dot com when this airs as a podcast.. XX In the News is brought to you by The World's Worst Diabetes Mom, Real life stories of raising a child with diabetes. Winner of the American Book Fest Prize for best new non-fiction. Available in paperback, on Kindle or as an audio book – all at Amazon.com. You can also get a big discount right now at diabetes-connections.com – use promo code celebrate to save $4 XX Our top story, big news from Tandem as they lay out their product line for the next 5 years. Still waiting for FDA approval for bolus by phone.. once that comes through next up is Mobi, that's brand name for what we've all been calling T-Sport until now. Then there will be an X3 pump, then Mobi goes tubeless, then a true disposable patch pump. They also mentioned some software upgrades. A lot can happen in 5 years but exciting to see it laid out. A lot more to come here, we're working on having Tandem on the show soon. https://investor.tandemdiabetes.com/events-and-presentations XX Over at Insulet, CEO Shacey Petrovic says they no longer expect FDA approval for Omnipod 5 in 2021. After all, that's in just a couple of weeks. She spoke at a NASDAQ investor conference and said it's not any kind of problem, just the COVID backlog at the FDA. Petrovic says she is – quote – “eminently confident in our submission.” https://www.medtechdive.com/news/insulet-omnipod-5-delay-fda/610981/   XX More stem cell research news, this time from Viactye. University of British Columbia and Vancouver Coastal Health.  showing that a tiny implant infused with stem cells can help the body produce insulin on its own. Fifteen patients living with Type 1 diabetes participated in the study, which included the insertion of a device the size of a quarter in their abdomen. Each device contained millions of lab-grown cells that were “coached” into becoming insulin producing beta cells. Six months later, the cells had started producing tiny bits of insulin. Next year the team plans to do the procedure without immunosuppression drugs. The ultimate goal to have somebody who stops taking insulin and not have to take any anti-rejection drugs. We first talked to Viactye about this in 2016 – I'll link up that episode. https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/stem-cell-based-treatment-may-help-type-1-diabetes-patients-produce-insulin-canadian-study-1.5694725 XX The White House continues it's push to pass Build Back Better.. focusing a lot this week on the insulin co-pay cap. It's passed the House and if the Senate approves..  government and private insurers have to cap the cost to the patient at $35 for a 30-day supply of insulin. Nothing in the bill for those without insurance. Btw 20 states and DC have passed similar copay limits. I did see late this afternoon on Twitter a few reps who want to change the language to include the uninsured. We shall see.. XX The Free Style Libre 2 App is now available for Android. Approved earlier this year, it's now actually available for download. The Libre 2 version features optional real-time alerts for both low and high glucose levels, without the need to manually scan the sensor to trigger those alarms. You do still need to scan to see the actual number.   https://www.abbott.com/corpnewsroom/diabetes-care/freestyle-libre-2-now-connected-to-your-iphone.html XX Dueling lawsuits from Abbot and Dexcom. Abbot filed suit last week – it's sealed but has to do with a 2014 settlement agreement. That agreement gave the companies cross-licenses to patents related to glucose monitoring. It also included agreements lasting through March 2021 not to sue each other for patent infringement or challenge the patents' validity. We told you back in June of this year that Dexcom filed the first suit, Abbott countered the next day. This seems like an additional legal maneuver in the same case. https://www.reuters.com/legal/transactional/abbott-sues-dexcom-over-glucose-monitoring-patent-settlement-license-2021-12-02/ XX Another entry for the non-invasive blood sugar monitor rumor mill.. K-Watch Glucose smartwatch has a disposable part underneath that features something called “micro-points” that will measure blood glucose. The company says, “Although the wearer might feel some slight pressure, there is no breaking of the skin and therefore no pain.” Not sure those two thoughts really go together – enough pressure can be uncomfortable enough.. but we shall see. The coverage here talks about clinical trials and getting this on the market late next year. I went to the actual clinical trial recruitment site – and I'll link that – it says the trial started in November but it also says it hasn't started recruiting. I know I'm the dream killer with the non invasive monitoring stuff. I do believe it'll get here I promise! But I think the coverage of most of these items Is irresponsibly based on rumors. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT05093569 https://www.notebookcheck.net/Painless-continuous-blood-sugar-monitoring-on-the-horizon-for-US-199-thanks-to-the-K-Watch-Glucose-from-PKVitality.582622.0.html XX there's a follow up to a fun story I broke back in 2019 – the merger of Jerry the Bear and Rufus the Bear with Diabetes. Rufus is getting a big  it looks like the Rufus outside with the Jerry the Bear educational interactive stuff and the app. The price is 22-dollars! A far cry from the first version of Jerry which we gave away a few years ago and cost hundreds of dollars. This is really great and I would have absolutely bought it for Benny if it was out when he was little. How'd I break the story? I interviewed the heads of JDRF and Beyond Type 1 when they announced their alliance– and I asked what was going to happen to the bears almost as a joke. They said, nope – they told me then.. only one bear would make it. https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/jdrf-announces-the-relaunch-of-rufus-the-bear-with-diabetes-301437309.html XX I want to take a moment and remember Thom Scher – the CEO of Beyond Type 1 who died earlier this week. I went back and listened to that interview we did back in 2019 – the one where he and JDRF told us about Jerry and Rufus… and a lot more. It was one of many times we talked on and off the podcast. I didn't know Thom as well as many others in the diabetes community. We only met in person a few times – first in 2018 at the Diabetes Mine conference and again in 2019 at FFL – where we talked about working together more.. sort of noodling out the possibility of bringing the podcast into the Beyond Type 1 content. Thom was a terrific interview – not afraid to go on the record and very accessible. I remember once I warned him that I had some tough questions from the community about get-insulin dot org because beyond type 1 takes money from the insulin makers. He welcomed it and answered the questions other people would have avoided.  I just read that Thom was 33 when he died. So incredibly young.  He believed in what he did.. he wanted to make life better for people with diabetes. And the world is little emptier without him today. XX Before I let you go, a reminder that the podcast this week is with the executive team at ConvaTec – the people who make infusion sets for tubed pumps, including the new 7-day set for Medtronic. you can listen to wherever you get your podcasts or if you're listening to this as on a podcast app, just go back an episode. Next week it's a first for me, I'm going to do a “favorite things” episode. That's In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.  

Pardon My Pancreas
What My Newborn Taught Me About T1D

Pardon My Pancreas

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 10:05


Matt shares a recent "ah-ha" moment about his type 1 diabetes and how his newborn daughter helped him learn this lesson.Grab Matt's free T1D Webclass here:https://diabetesinaction.com---------Welcome to the Pardon My Pancreas podcast!! This show is all about REAL life with type 1 diabetes, understanding fluctuations, and how to stabilize your blood sugar for good. Your host is Matt Vande Vegte is a certified personal trainer, nutritionist, and type 1 diabetic whose biggest goal in life is to help people with diabetes around the world live their lives fearlessly. Looking for an online health coaching program to help you live your best life? Go to https://www.ftfwarrior.com to learn more about his program for diabetics only that is focused on helping you reach your goals while living a happier and healthier life. Join the Tribe today!This podcast is sponsored by FTF Warrior - An online health and fitness coaching company for type 1 diabetics dedicated to helping them master their blood sugars through any activity, exercise, or meal!https://www.ftfwarrior.comFollow Matt here:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ftfwarrior/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ftfwarrior/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/ftfwarrior------------------------------------------------------Disclaimer: While we share our experiences with diabetes, nothing we discuss should be taken as medical advice. Please consult your doctor or medical professional for your health and diabetes management.

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
The seven-day infusion set is here. What's next from ConvaTec Infusion Care?

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 43:38


When we heard about a new seven day infusion set approved this past summer, we had a lot of questions! We've been told since the very first day of pumping to only use the inset for 3 days tops and to always rotate the site. How did they get seven days out of one of these without skin irritation and with good absorption? We asked the folks who make the inset to come on the show and explain. Turns out, ConvaTec Infusion Care makes the insets for Medtronic, Tandem, Ypsomed, Dana RS and Roche pumps. So while I started off talking about the longer-wear version, the conversation you'll hear includes everything from proper insertion technique, their challenges teaching users best practices, improvements they're making to the cannula and more. In this interview you will hear: John M Lindskog, President & COO, Matthias Heschel, Vice President, Research & Development and Intellectual Property Rights and Dr. Kerem Ozer, Director Infusion Care Clinical Development Good article about using insets correctly and understanding the different types. Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Episode Transcription Below:  Stacey Simms  0:00 Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dario Health manage your blood glucose levels, increase your possibilities by Gvoke Hypopen, the first premixed auto injector for very low blood sugar, and by Dexcom take control of your diabetes and live life to the fullest with Dexcom. This is Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. This week, how much have you thought about the way your insulin pump connects to your body? Honestly, it's where a lot can go wrong. The people who make the insets know that they have come a long way. And they're trying to make it better.   Matthias Heschel  0:40 It's what some people call their Achilles heel in the arm therapy were very much aware of it. And our approach simply is instead of doing product design at the drawing board, to the product design in the field, really taking the patient at the core of our design process, really understanding behaviors, understanding what could go wrong, and then design the product accordingly.   Stacey Simms  1:05 That's Dr. Matthias Heschel, head of R&D for ConvaTec infusion care. He, the CEO and the Medical Director sat down with me to talk about longer were tips for users and what's next for this really important part of pumping. This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. Welcome to another week of the show, you're always so glad to have you here. We aim to educate and inspire about diabetes with a focus on those who use insulin. I am really excited and happy to talk to the guys from ConvaTec. This week, you know, they were frank, they were really up for anything. And I have said for years that insets are the weak link in pumping. And they really opened my eyes to some of the issues and what we can do as users or you know, as parents of users to make things a little bit better. And of course, they're working on improvements as well. But before we jump in a little bit of housekeeping, I want to talk about the rest of the year schedule for the podcast, I can't believe we're in well into December at this point. Right now the plan is to keep going with these longer format. The interview shows that air on Tuesdays, and we'll have that there shouldn't really be any interruption or any week skipped through the rest of the year and into January. I'll let you know if that changes. But that is the plan right now. As for the newscast, I will probably not have a newscast on the 22nd of December. Again, I reserve the right to jump in and make a liar out of myself. There is breaking news sometimes late December is when the FDA makes a lot of decisions. So we could have some breaking news. But I would say right now, it looks like at least that one date will not have the live newscast on Wednesday on Facebook, Instagram and YouTube. And so then I will not be turning it into one because that would be a podcast on Christmas Eve and I don't think there's a lot of demand for you to listen on Christmas Eve but you tell me if there is I'm happy to serve and try to put all that together. Another quick announcement and I'm actually going to talk more about this after the interview is that book number two is in the works. The second World's Worst diabetes mom, I signed on the dotted line to deliver that next year. So we have a timetable. We have a theme. I have lots of stuff. I'll tell you about that again after the interview, but man, I'm really excited about it. Alright, a little bit more about our guests. ConvaTec infusion care makes insets for both of the tubed pumps available in the US they make for Tandem they make for Medtronic, they don't make Omni pods. They also make insets for Ypsomed and other tubed pumps abroad. But if you use a tubed pump in the US you use their products. In this interview you will hear John Lindskog The President and CEO, Dr. Matthias Heschel, the head of R&D, research and development and Dr. Kerem Ozer, the Medical Director, I worry a bit about three voices. I mean, really, it's for with mine, but we do I think we do make it clear. And there is always a transcript over at diabetes connections.com at the episode homepage, if you find it easier to you know some people follow along, reading as they listen. Some people prefer to read my transcription software. Let me tell you got a workout on this one. It doesn't speak diabetes very well to begin with. And as you can imagine, there was a lot of technical stuff but we did it we got it and it's there for you. But I think that these three were very frank and gave us a lot of information a national here. They have a question for us. That's coming right up but first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dario health. Bottom line you need a plan of action with diabetes. And we've been lucky that Benny's endo has helped us with that and that he understands the plan has to change. As Benny gets older you want that kind of support. So take your diabetes management to the next level with Dario health. Their published studies demonstrate high impact results for active users like improved in range percentage within three months reduction of a one C within three months and a 58% decrease in occurrences of severe hypoglycemic events. Try Dario's diabetes success plan and make a difference in your Diabetes management, go to my dario.com forward slash diabetes dash connections for more proven results and for information about the plan. John, Matthias and Kerem, thank you so much for joining me. We have a lot to talk about. And I feel like I've ever been to the company at my disposal. Thank you so much for taking the time to do this.   John Lindskog  5:20 Thank you, Stacey. This is John and thanks for having this opportunity to talk with you. Maybe just a couple of words of ConvaTec infusion care. I'm the president and CEO of that part of ConvaTec. We are based out of Denmark and out of Mexico, we have one plant making a few sets in Denmark, and we have two plants almost side to side in Mexico, and also is fully dedicated to making few sets for subcutaneous infusion. Today with me, I have the Matthias and I Kerem and if you could just kind of introduce yourself briefly.   Matthias Heschel  5:58 Yeah, this is Matthias. I'm heading research and development at ConvaTec Infusion Care. I've been with the company for 10 years. Just happy to be here.   Dr. Kerem Ozer  6:07 Hi, everyone. I'm Kerem Moser and I'm the medical director for ConvaTec infusion care. I'm an endocrinologist by background. I've been with ConvaTec for about four months now. And prior to that I was in practice seeing endocrinology and diabetes patients for about 15 years, and very excited to be here.   Stacey Simms  6:28 Wonderful. Well, thank you all so much for joining me. We have a lot of questions, questions for my listeners questions that I have as a mom of a kid who has used insets since he was two years old. So let me jump in and ask about the newest infusion set as I see it, which is with Medtronic and Matthias. Let me ask you about this if I could. we're hearing really interesting things seven day up to seven day wear, which I believe rolled out in Europe first is now approved in the United States. How I don't want to ask you to give any trade secrets away. But how do you get it to last so long when we've been told for years that two to three days is the maximum for an infusion set?   Matthias Heschel  7:03 Yeah, actually, the answer is very simple. Stacey. Medtronic, they provided quite some details about the year back at the virtual conference. So Medtronic, they added a proprietary connector, which connects the tubing to the pump reservoir. And this connector stabilizes the instrument. On top of the canula, a new tubing, which contains the preservatives, contains the antimicrobial effect of the preservatives. And the last thing is that we added a new adhesive to keep the infusion set on the body for up to seven days. So basically three things. New connector, new tubing, containing preservatives and a new adhesive.   Stacey Simms  7:48 So it was kind of a partnership with Medtronic. It's not all on the inset itself.   Matthias Heschel  7:52 It's a partnership with Medtronic, and they in general, talking about new product development, future products. It's all at system level. So we cannot just develop a new infusion set. We need to take the reservoir into account we need to take algorithms into account so it's it's always a close partnership with pump manufacturers.   Stacey Simms  8:15 how have people received it? Or is it working well, is the adhesive doing okay, on people's skin?   Matthias Heschel  8:20 It seems so we have received some first indication Medtronic percent that results at the diabetes technology meeting here this week, actually. And that has shown that there are lower occurrence of hyperglycemic events. There are fewer occlusions. And I think the average wear time was seven days. So it seems that the patients that have come on to an extended wear infusion set are really happy and the infusion sets perform as designed.   Stacey Simms  8:57 Before I move on from this one more question for you Mateus if I could. I'm curious, are you working with other pump companies on longer where infusion sets? Or is this going to be a Medtronic exclusive for the foreseeable future?   Matthias Heschel  9:10 Well, extending the wear time of infusion sets, that's the unmet need, number one among all patients, so and that's in general interest from all pump manufacturers to have extended wear products in the portfolio. So yes, we're working on the portfolio of infusion sets.   Stacey Simms  9:30 Kerem, let me move over to you if I could for this question. As a parent of a child with type one. We were schooled early on the importance of rotating sites, right? You can't let an infusion set go in the same part of the body over and over again. But most kids and frankly most adults I've talked to who use these products do kind of have a favorite spot. The body. Can you talk a little bit about Yes, I guess there the importance of rotating, but something like a seven day wear or what's coming in the future. Is there a possibility that it could be a little less important? to move that around, or am I dreaming?   Dr. Kerem Ozer  10:02 That's a really good question, Stacey sort of looking forward, just taking a quick step back, just like you said, the importance of sort of proper rotation is something we always talk about in clinic yet in real life, we know that people have their favorite sites. And part of the idea of the rotation, of course, is to reduce scarring and is to reduce lipohypertrophy. I know your listeners will be very familiar with this. But of course, when we say lipohypertrophy, we're talking about sort of the hardening that bumpiness of the layer right under the skin, that subcutaneous area. And when I think about lipohypertrophy, there are several factors that increase that risk, you know, multiple daily injections, pumps, continuous glucose monitors, sometimes the type of insulin being used, and that really changes from person to person reusing pen, needles, all those factors, even higher insulin doses tend to cause more of a higher risk, higher diabetes, duration is a higher risk. Now, when I think about those factors, some of them are you can't change those like diabetes, duration. Some of those factors, you can change by rotating things, when you look at something like extended wear, I think one advantage is you are going to need to change it out less often. So you're technically changing it, you know, less often, it's probably best practice to still change the site and rotate the site. But one thing I think that's going to be even clearer, and I see this all the time, you know, when I talk with my patients, is, I think it's going to be important to realize subtle changes in the characteristics of that site, even before you start feeling hardening of the skin, even before one starts feeling that bumpiness if you notice that a site is starting to not respond as well, you know, you're feeling that you're needing more insulin, you're feeling that the dynamics are changing. That's I think, when it's going to be really key to make that site change.   Stacey Simms  12:21 Interesting. I have kind of said, it's a little bit flippant, but I've said since we started pumping, 14 and a half years ago that gosh, these insets are the weak link in pumping. And what I mean by that is they can fall off easier, they can get occluded, they only last a couple of days. John, maybe let me ask you, can you talk us through a little bit about how you're really trying to make these better? Because I feel like I can have the greatest algorithm in the world on my pump and if the darn thing is flapping on my kids off my kids stomach it's not gonna work   right back to our conversation. Yeah, he does answer that question. But first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Gvoke Hypopen. You know low blood sugar feels horrible. You can get shaky and sweaty or even feel like you are going to pass out – there are lots of symptoms and they can be different for everyone. I'm so glad we have a different option to treat very low blood sugar: Gvoke HypoPen. It's the first autoinjector to treat very low blood sugar. Gvoke HypoPen is premixed and ready to go, with no visible needle. Before Gvoke, people needed to go through a lot of steps to get glucagon treatments ready to be used. This made emergency situations even more challenging and stressful. This is so much better and I'm grateful we have it on hand! Find out more – go to diabetes dash connections dot com and click on the Gvoke logo. Gvoke shouldn't be used in patients with pheochromocytoma or insulinoma – visit gvoke glucagon dot com slash risk. Now back to John Lindskog answering my question about making the insets more foolproof.   John Lindskog  14:00 No, no, no, I totally understand what you're saying I will say and then maybe Matthias can chime in after this that, you know the products like insets, they go through a quite extensive and long development program before they actually come to the market and the products also available on basis on customer feedback. And since this is a medical device, it's very highly regulated in the US through the FDA requirements and Europe through CE and in many, many other countries through local legislation. So the level of rigor and preciseness that you have to do in this work is quite extensive for us to develop a product and mass make it into volumes, which we're talking about millions of units per year does require quite a bit of development work to go there. And there is a little bit of you know there's a lot of factors that play into to the to the development, particularly manufacturing of the infuser set, the quality has, of course, to be the highest possible within the requirements. And there's also, of course, a economical part of it, where you need the competitive cost in order to have these products on the market. So I mean, the process that you see today is actually a combination of all the the user input, and of course, also about, you know, the requirements from regulatory authorities. And, and you know, what can be made in very high scale, we, you know, and strive to improve the products along the way, however, even what may seem as being very small, and my new changes, does actually require a complete change process, which is very well documented, and in that sense, also kind of lengthy process. And I don't know Matthias. If you have any anything to add to that, yeah, quick   Matthias Heschel  15:56 Yeah, but I would like to add is that we have, we have about 1 million pump users worldwide. And as a create variability, it's both the interpatient variability and intra patient variability. So huge differences between patients and also huge differences between the use conditions during a day for the same patient. So what we are going after in our product design is really making as robust designs as as reasonably possible. And best example is, is the newest infusion set on the market, which is the base of the extended wear we talked about earlier, an infusion set we call Mio advance which virtually only has one user step. So you hit the bottom activation button and it produces the soft cannula, retracts the needle and detaches the serter all instantly. I mean, all the steps happening in a fraction of a second. And that means you're basically take the patient out of the equation, the patient cannot do any mistakes during the insertion process. And there we see a huge reduction in in failures on the market. So to your question, Stacey, I mean, we understand that the infusion set is the weakest link, it's what some people call the Achilles heel. In pump therapy, we are very much aware of it. And our approach simply is, instead of doing product design at the drawing board, to the product design, in the field, really taking the patient in the core of our design process, really understanding behaviors, understanding what could go wrong, and then design the product accordingly. And we have seen the first successes and they hope to see further successes.   Stacey Simms  17:40 You know, that's a great point about the very simple insertion of the Medtronic inset. Are there any plans to simplify more brands, because I'm thinking of the one we use for Tandem? And you know, by the time you open it, you peel off the sticky stuff, you, you cock it, you get it ready? You know, sometimes you're already set for error, because if the paper writes up the needle, you know, there's all sorts of different things that can happen if people either press too hard or do it at a weird angle. I know you know this, I don't have to spell it out for you. But are there plans to simplify other insets in the way that you just described? Since you've seen how successful it is?   Matthias Heschel  18:16 yeah, plans to incremental improvements on existing infusion sets, based on the learnings we have from the field, among others, what we touched upon removing the paper liner from the adhesive, we can certainly redesign this to make it easier for the patient. And that's, that's definitely on our agenda.   Stacey Simms  18:37 I have a bunch of questions that I got from my listeners, they were really interested that we were talking so let me go ahead and grab those. The first one here was really interesting to me. This listener wants to know about the faster acting Fiasp insulin, which seems to have a little bit of difficulty in some pumps, I was wondering if you were looking into that for different faster acting insulins that the manufacturers are coming out with and if you're testing those and working on ways to improve that in the insets   Matthias Heschel  19:06 Yeah, maybe keep a close eye on the market. And every time a new insulin is approved for pumps, therapy, we add this onto our list and do all the necessary trucks stability testing, device stability testing, so you can put this onto our indication for the infusion sets and then it's up to the to the pump manufacturer to also indicate the pump for the new insulin and then the patient can use it. So and that also applies to Fiasp. So we have done all the necessary homework and we know that at least a couple of the pump manufacturers are considering to broaden their pump indication to also include the Fiasp   Dr. Kerem Ozer  19:47 And to that I may also add that we're also going to be looking at Lyumjev ultra rapid lispro insulin from Lilly, which as you know is also approved just recently for pump use. So That will also go through the same processes that Matthias mentioned, whether it's working on biocompatibility, looking at what the system does to the insulin, and its excipients and what the insulin is excipients do to the pump. And so that's in the works as well.   Stacey Simms  20:15 I meant to ask earlier, I had heard about something I don't know if this is the in-house name or something that you're using and research called Lantern technology. Could you explain what that is what you all are working on?   Matthias Heschel  20:27 I was hoping you would ask this question. Lantern is a pretty simple feature tries to mitigate the occlusions we sometimes see for soft cannula infusion sets, when the soft cannula is bent or kinked. And the Lantern features are actually pretty simple. So we provide the soft cannula with additional slits close to the tip of the cannula, and in case the soft cannula experiences any physical impact is spent or even kinked then those slits would open up and would allow to the inset to continue to flow. So it's basically a measure to mitigate the risk that a cannula on the infusion set can get occluded in the cannula.   Stacey Simms  21:15 That sounds really interesting. It sounds like didn't BD medical a few years ago have something that sounded it sounded at least to my ear similar that it had the different slits in the cannula? And it never came out? Is this similar technology.   Matthias Heschel  21:29 It's you could see it as it's different as a similar technology. It's though, quite quite different. I mean, they provided an additional exit hole, just one hole close to the tip of the cannula. And that actually weakened the cannula significantly, and the product was out on the market. They call it a smart flow technology. And the product was marketed by Medtronic as a process that was withdrawn from the market right after. And with our long term technology, putting a number of slits, we have really avoiding this issue that the cannula really occludes. Imagine if you just have one side hole and the cannula kinks or bends, and you would close up this hole. And in our case, having four or six slits, that would be always a couple of slits open and allow the Insulet to flow. So it's a different technology.   Stacey Simms  22:25 Yeah sure. And I don't know how much you can share which brands might get that? In other words, are you working with Medtronic on this? Or you're working with Tandem on this as somebody else? You know, in the should we be watching for this in a more proprietary form? Or will it just going to go in all of your insets?   Matthias Heschel  22:40 Right now we're in the process of implementing technology in our mainstream products, which are the inset two products, which are available to all pump manufacturers, and then we need to see pump manufacturers will pick up on this.   Stacey Simms  22:56 Got it. Kerem, let me ask you if I could, do you have any best practices for your patients when it comes to using the insets and infusion sets? Are there mistakes that are very common that people make, I'd love to kind of hear, you know, what you what you tell your own or in the past what you've told your own patients?   Dr. Kerem Ozer  23:13 Absolutely. The key things, especially if someone is very new to living with diabetes, as you know, there's there's a lot of anxiety there. Everything is new, a lot of new information is coming in, you know, at our clinic, what I always tried to do, what we always tried to do was sort of taking a deep breath, letting people know that there's a lot of resources, there's a lot of support, you know, at the risk of sort of repeating the cliche, it's not a sprint, it's a marathon, and really providing the resources, sort of focusing that more on to the infusion set side, I think one key thing is starting, especially if someone's new to pump therapy, sitting down with them going over the whole process, we had demo kits, sometimes I would demonstrate sets on myself even just to make sure that everyone's feeling comfortable, especially for our younger patients, having the parents there and really taking the time to walk them through the process of what an ideal insertion looks like. And I think doing it in real life really helps in person in real time. As opposed to watching a video which where everything looks so perfect, right? So we definitely emphasize that prioritize that. And then when we start thinking about using the sets, a lot of those things using the alcohol pad and cleaning the area, a lot of things that are repeated, easy to say hard to do every single time. But I think emphasizing the fact that the closer and closer we get to that ideal that the longer we can keep the site's healthy, the longer we can keep the process healthy is important. And as more technology comes in as continuous glucose monitoring gets integrated. As the pumps get smarter, I think there's always the importance of that of that person factor. And making sure that we're really addressing everyone as an individual and sort of seeing where they are and going and holding their hand and walking with them to where they need to be or where they want to be, is key. And then there is as you know, a lot of variation from person to person. And there's a lot of variation from day to day. And being aware of that repeating that message. And sometimes you wake up and you have a perfect day. And sometimes you wake up and there's a lot of obstacles and changes and bringing that message that, yes, diabetes is there. Yes, it brings challenges. But if we see it as part of a larger system, and if we address it as well as we can, as if we can stick with those guidelines, and recommendations. And if we keep open lines of communication between the patient and the family and the clinic, things tend to fall into place. And I'm very proud to say your many, many patients, of course, live decades and decades of healthy lives with diabetes. And I think that the key component there is keeping those lines of communication open and keeping that sort of positive attitude going.   Stacey Simms  26:38 Alright, let's get back to some of the questions that my listeners had. And I thought this was a really interesting one, she asked me when insets are designed is any consideration given to those of us who deal with limited hand strength, or older adults with smaller hands, or even using color tubing to increase the visibility of air bubbles or maybe using color in the cannula. So it'd be easier to see if it was correctly inserted. I've got to believe that you look at this and you do research it but Matthias, can I ask you to just hop in an answer that one?   Matthias Heschel  27:07 Sure. Well, every time when we design a new product, we put a lot of effort into the initial conceptual work. And that means that you propose certain designs, which we then show to the target population. And if the target indication of the product is smaller children or elderly people, those will be included in the assessment of the concept. So we really trying to already in the concept phase to design the product in the way that we can make sure that it can be used by the by the target population. And at the same time, we are compliant with standards. For example, when we have a product that requires activation to push a button, what's the strength of a point of finger for a for a small girl? so we were really trying to incorporate this in our product design.   Stacey Simms  28:05 Another question came in there used to be an infusion set by a different company called an Orbit. I don't recall this, but this sounds great. It rotated so the tubing was less likely to get caught. Any plans to bring that back or something similar.   Matthias Heschel  28:18 Well Orbit is owned by another company Ypsomed in Switzerland, and to our knowledge, the product is still on the market. So we don't have any insights in the in the details. But it's not it's not one of our products.   Stacey Simms  28:35 Got it? It's probably something that's not available in the US yet because we don't have Ypsomed here yet. But it's it's supposed to be coming. Okay, I have a very might be a silly question, but I will ask it anyway, this is a silly question. I get it from listeners all the time. One of the first times I remember getting our box of inserters we had the old one I always describe it looks like a little spaceship. I mean, I know you know exactly what I'm talking about for it was the Animas way back when and now we use Tandem, it came with these little plastic pieces, and no one ever told me what they were for. And as it turns out, then we realize this after my son's inset got filled with sand at the beach, and we could not reconnect. It turns out these little pieces are supposed to go in and protect the site and keep sand out. But I've heard a lot of different versions of what they are really supposed to do and when you are supposed to wear them. So my question is, when you put an inset on the body, it was explained to me like it's almost as though you've got like a vial of insulin with a little rubber on top. You can pierce it, but you can't get into it. In other words, you don't have to cover it every single time you take a shower or go in a pool because nothing is seeping through until you reconnect the needle. Is that the proper use of those inserters   John Lindskog  29:50 Yeah, this is uh, John maybe just a quick comment. So that that is that is true that at the at the time development there were some spare caps. And the idea here was that when you disconnect the tubing from the side, it's true that you know it sealed, the side doesn't seal because there are septums that closes the fluid pathway. However, the idea about providing these small inserts was that you could protect kind of the surface of the septum. With that kind of cover so that you wouldn't have any kind of larger particles being able to, to come in the way like the listener just described getting sand in it. So it was actually, you know, kind of a protection. However, it was not something which was necessary, it was kind of, you know, choice you could make to add that in, though. So that the reason behind that   Stacey Simms  30:48 perfect, there just seems to be a little bit of a misunderstanding in some parts of the community, what people think it keeps bacteria from getting, in other words, if you swim in a lake or something like that, you should pop it in. But it really is just to keep out particles like sand.   John Lindskog  31:01 Yeah, it's only for larger particles. And, you know, the site is perfectly sealed as it is. So it's it's more to kind of say, Okay, I want to make sure that that, you know, I don't have to clean it up afterwards, and so on. So that was the rationale behind that.   Stacey Simms  31:18 I have one or two more questions, kind of to wrap it up. Have I missed anything in particular that you guys wanted to make sure to bring up before I start wrapping up?   John Lindskog  31:26 Actually, there was just one question that I think that at least I had, I would be curious to know about, you know, in each box of the insets, there is an instructions for use, how you deploy, the infusion set.  What's out and, you know, that is in some countries made in a number of different languages and so on. And I guess I'm just curious about is that being read all the time, or is that you know, being kept in the place or simply just, you know, put it into the trash can. But what's kind of, because I have a I have an assumption. We have an assumption, what happens to these but but I was just curious to know, if you could share that with us.   Stacey Simms  32:07 I'm so excited that you asked that question, John, I think you know the answer, I can't imagine anyone is really reading the instructions, we all should. In fact, I'm going to take those instructions out and look through them. But it's one of those situations where my book that comes with each box is so thick and intimidating. As I'm telling you this, I'm thinking this is why I don't do it, maybe it's just I'll have to take a look at how long the actual instructions are. Maybe it's in several languages. And that's why it's so thick, but we're so used to and maybe we can blame the iPhone for this. We're so used to opening something up and being able to use it immediately and hoping right that it's very intuitive, that maybe that's why we don't read the instructions. So there's a lot of user error. And frankly, I know there's a lot of user error within sets. I've seen it in my house, I've been the user making the error. So I'll ask my listeners, I mean, I'd be happy to take a quick poll in the Diabetes Connections Facebook group, but I do recall taking a pump class, and we were there for two hours, I came home a couple of days later, I had to change the inset on my two year old I had forgotten everything I had learned. And at the time, this was 2007. I found one video, I mean, think about the days of YouTube back in 2007. And it was in French to show me how to change the inset. But I did that rather than look for the instructions. So John, what a great question. And I will get you more feedback from the community on that.   John Lindskog  33:29 Okay, thanks. Thanks a lot. Thanks. I will say though, that, you know, it is a regulatory requirement that we put those in a box. And we would, you know, like to move it into some kind of, you know, YouTube media or something like that. However, the regulatory requirements are that they should always be there. So we want to see if we can move that in the regulatory requirements. So we can, you know, save some printed matter, and, you know, reduce the waste and make it easier to access.   Stacey Simms  34:02 It's a great point. That is a great point. Before I let you go, here in the United States and I assume in many parts of the world, there's a lot of concerns about supply right now. Any issues, any concerns anything people should be thinking about for the next couple of months?   John Lindskog  34:16 No, I you know, and we have had some issues on supplies in the beginning of the when COVID-19 was at the highest and we have been putting in extra capacity for making progress and investing large sums of money into getting you know, capacity brought up and we should be out of those weeds by the end of this year. And we don't really see any, any issues going forward. But you know, it may take some time to get that all through the supply chain, but I can assure you that we're doing everything which is now a power to always have the capacity to supply the what the demand is.   Stacey Simms  34:57 Let me as we wrap this up, Kerem, let me ask you this. You are new to the company, or you are the newest person here, so the company, what excites you and you know, you've worked with patients for a long time, you've seen how important this part of the device and system is, what excites you about this technology going forward?   Dr. Kerem Ozer  35:15 This is a great question. And this is the reason I'm, I'm here, I'm in the company, I think it really goes back to that point about realizing how important looking at patients insights, their experiences, where they are, what they need, and bring that feedback into the company to help develop new technologies. And I would say, a direct corollary to why I'm so excited about my role here is this is really sort of being a medical person, a physician, and endocrinologist and industry, you really play a bridge role. You're constantly talking with the engineers with the business side, and you're keeping your ear open to your patients, your community and your colleagues. And sort of you're part of that feedback loop, bringing back ideas, presenting your products and saying this will work. This is a great idea, and sort of keeping that momentum going. And I'm very excited about that.   Stacey Simms  36:20 Excellent Matthias you are in r&d, you are the head of r&d, you're in the I wouldn't say the trenches so much. But you're really seeing realistically what's happening on the company every day. Anything you want to add to that. I mean, is there anything that you're really excited about that you'd like to listeners to leave listeners with? Yeah,   Matthias Heschel  36:37 I mean, what, what I always tell the engineers is, you guys, you are directly responsible for how patients or people in the state beat is, how they feel how they are able to manage their daily life. If we do a great job, those people can lean back once in a while and perhaps even forget about the disease, if it will not do a perfect job. They have a terrible day. So that's, that's really what people understand. And that's why at least how I see it. I mean, those people in the medical device industry typically work longer work harder, because they understand they understand the responsibility they have.   Stacey Simms  37:17 Well, thank you so much all of you for spending so much time with me for answering our questions for posing your own questions, which doesn't happen that often. And I'm really glad that you did that. We will get you some answers. Thanks so much, gentlemen.   You're listening to Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. Lots more information at diabetes connections.com at the episode homepage, and I'll link to some of the studies they talked about that longer were the stuff that's in the works. And let me tell you, I went and got the book. I have it right here. Can you hear that? I'm wiggling it, I went and got the book that comes with the insets. And it's right there. Of course, at the top with the little horseshoe thingies that they explained. I hope they cleared up some stuff for you. The book is long, because as I said, it's in many other languages other than English, the directions are maybe two or three pages long. I think it's really just two pages. There's some pictures here. But the English instructions are one to three pages long. And then that's it. So Benny and I actually sat down and read them. And he does it slightly differently. But what he does works, I mean, we are 15 years into diabetes. So that means we were 14 and a half years into pumping. So he's got it down. But if you're having trouble, I may start a thread in the Facebook group. Because there's some really easy tips and techniques to make sure that you you put these insets on correctly in follow the directions. That's your best bet. But as you know, the community can help too. So we'll we'll put that in there. And of course, I'm going to put a poll up about the and we put I may have already done that by the time the episode airs, because a pull up about have you ever read the directions? I was a little embarrassed. You heard me laughing when he asked, but I'm glad he did. Alright, I've got some news coming up about next year. Oh my gosh. But first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dexcom. And when we first started with Dexcom, it was back in 2013. It was about this time here, the share and follow apps were not an option. They just hadn't come out with the technology yet. So trust me when I say using share and follow make a big difference. I think it's important though to talk to the person you're following or sharing with and get comfortable with how you want everyone to use the system. Even if you're following your young child. These are great conversations to have, you know what numbers will make you text, write how long you're going to wait to call that sort of thing. That way the whole system gives everyone real peace of mind. I'll tell you what I absolutely love about Dexcom share and that is helping Benny with any issues using the data from the whole day night. And not just one moment. Internet connectivity is required to access separate Dexcom follow up to learn more, go to diabetes connections.com and click on the Dexcom logo. A couple of weeks ago I told you I would have some book news and I do I am so excited to announce that the world's worst diabetes mom, part two is going to be out next year, I just signed on with my publisher. We talked this week, actually this morning, as I'm taping this episode, and we laid it all out, because my goodness, with some of the publishing issues, probably hopefully not the shipping issues by next year. But a lot of what's going out of the publishing industry, I have to have everything done earlier than I did last time to have the book Ready by a certain time of year I wanted out for as you can imagine, I wanted for November of next year, because Diabetes Awareness Month is my best bet to get any kind of, I guess, mainstream media attention on diabetes, media attention. And that worked really well. In 2019. When I put out the first book, the name of the book is not part two. I'm not sure what we're going to call it yet. But I will be sharing that with you all, I'm going to be sharing more of the process this time around, just as I think it'll be fun. And I'm going to be sharing things like cover options and title options in the Facebook group Diabetes Connections, the group. So if you'd like to help me the community was a huge help last time around in terms of how to word things. Because you know, when you're a parent of a child with type one, there are some differences that you want to be respectful about. There's some differences and ways of wording things that that just for clarity, right? A good example is are you a T one D parent, to me, that means a parent who lives with type one, right? So you have to It's little things like that you just have to be careful about and you will help me so much with that the first time around. So I will be asking the second time around, I have an idea for a title, I kind of know what the direction is going to be. I know what the title is going to be. I know what the focus is going to be on. We're going to be addressing a lot of the things that I have been asked about since the first one came out. So really excited, a little bit nervous. But man, I loved writing the first one. So I hope this will be as much fun to put together. All right, thank you so much to my editor John Buchenas from Audio Editing Solutions. We will be back on Wednesday. We are now live on Facebook and YouTube at 430. Eastern time. And then around 445 I'm live on Instagram. A little bit different for those of you who live on Instagram a lot like evolve. I mean, what a pain. Right? But it's fun. I like doing it. It's only a pain because I share photos. And I'm not that adept. Really. I mean, Instagram is not a friendly platform for sharing photos live and reading a script. Let me just tell you say if you've got advice on that, and you know how to do it, well, let me know. Or you could just listen to the audio podcast that comes out every Friday for in the news. Thank you so much for listening. I'm Stacey Simms. I'll see you back here soon Until then be kind to yourself.   Benny  42:35 Diabetes Connections is a production of Stacey Simms media. All rights reserved. All wrongs avenged

Pardon My Pancreas
Newborn Parenting And Type 1 Diabetes (Full Story)

Pardon My Pancreas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 34:36


I became a father last week, my blood sugars have been... interesting so far. Here's the full story.Grab Matt's free T1D Webclass here:https://diabetesinaction.com---------Welcome to the Pardon My Pancreas podcast!! This show is all about REAL life with type 1 diabetes, understanding fluctuations, and how to stabilize your blood sugar for good. Your host is Matt Vande Vegte is a certified personal trainer, nutritionist, and type 1 diabetic whose biggest goal in life is to help people with diabetes around the world live their lives fearlessly. Looking for an online health coaching program to help you live your best life? Go to https://www.ftfwarrior.com to learn more about his program for diabetics only that is focused on helping you reach your goals while living a happier and healthier life. Join the Tribe today!This podcast is sponsored by FTF Warrior - An online health and fitness coaching company for type 1 diabetics dedicated to helping them master their blood sugars through any activity, exercise, or meal!https://www.ftfwarrior.comFollow Matt here:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ftfwarrior/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ftfwarrior/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/ftfwarrior------------------------------------------------------Disclaimer: While we share our experiences with diabetes, nothing we discuss should be taken as medical advice. Please consult your doctor or medical professional for your health and diabetes management.

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
Think big (and don't be an idiot) - Dr. Partha Kar on the future of diabetes care

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 32:53


When you have a national lead on diabetes who really seems to listen to patients and delivers on some big ideas, you get our attention. Dr. Partha Kar is the diabetes co-lead of NHS England. We talk about access, getting more out of your doctor's visits and what he sees in the future of diabetes tech. Dr. Kar's announcement (after our interview was taped) that CGM or Flash Glucose Monitoring will be available to all people in England with type 1 diabetes  This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Episode Transcription Below:   Stacey Simms  0:00 Diabetes Connections is brought to you by. Dario Health – Manage your blood glucose levels. Increase your possibilities. By Gvoke HypoPen, the first pre-mixed autoinjector for very low blood sugar. And By Dexcom. Take control of your diabetes and live life to the fullest with Dexcom This is Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. This week when you're a national leader on diabetes, and you really seem to listen to patients and you deliver on some big ideas, you get our attention. Dr. Partha Kar says it shouldn't be that unusual.   Partha Kar  0:39 And I also feel that clinicians sometimes believe that people living with type 1 diabetes won't be able to handle the truth, so to speak, oh, you can't tell them when you can. They're all adults are surrounded by adults, and they deal with tough calls in their lives all the time. You know,   Stacey Simms  0:57 Dr. Kar is the diabetes co-lead of NHS England. Yes, this is a US centric show. But I've followed him on social media for a long time. And I've loved what he has to say. We'll talk about access, getting more out of your doctor's visits, and what he sees in the future of diabetes tech. This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. Welcome to another week of the show, I am your host, Stacey Sims, and we aim to educate and inspire about diabetes with a focus on people who use insulin. If you're part of our mostly American audience, I hope you had a really good Thanksgiving, I hope the travel was safe. If you had to go anywhere, I hope the food was great. And I hope the family was okay to really hope you had a great holiday. If you're part of our international audience, which is still pretty big, I would expect it to be bigger this week, just because of who we're talking to. And that is Dr. Partha Kar, national specialty advisor for diabetes with NHS England. And this is one of those times where I just was interested to see what somebody had to say, as I mentioned in that the opening teaser, I followed him online for quite a while. And I thought you might be interested as well. And boy, when I put it in the Facebook group, you all were thrilled. So I hope you enjoy the interview. He didn't have a ton of time to talk to me. But that is to be expected. But I'm really happy with the questions I was able to ask. And you know, just the fact that he was able to share some information with us, even though his his health system is is markedly different than ours here in the States. Before we jump in, I do want to take a moment this is a little self promoting. But gosh, guys, I got such exciting news recently. And that is that I won this huge book price. Yes, I know the book came out a while ago, but I won best new non fiction in the American Book fest. This was of course for the world's worst diabetes mom real life stories of raising a child with type 1 diabetes. And it kind of took me didn't kind of it really took me by surprise. I had entered it earlier this year, I had forgotten about it. When we got the email, my publisher kind of emailed me quickly and said, you know, being a finalist is really nice. And then she said no, no, wait a minute, you. That was kind of my reaction to it was laughing. But I won. So I know you're asking, Okay, the world's worst diabetes mom came out in 2019. How did we win an award in 2021. The book fest the American Book, festival boards are kind of rolling. So you're eligible for almost three years. So this year's books were from certain dates in 2120 20 in 2019. This was our first time entering the book, and it was actually our last chance to enter. So boy, I'm so excited. I'm really proud of the book. And I have some news coming in December. I have some more book news that was already planned before this award. But thank you for letting me indulgent, do a little patting myself on the back. It was not easy to write and get it out and do everything we needed to do for it. And boy, you all have been so supportive, considering I haven't been able to do any kind of book tour at all right? I mean, it came out at the end of 2019. I think I went to two or three places. And that was it. And just like everybody else in 2020. It hasn't been the same since I'm hardly alone in that. So more book news coming up, and Dr. Partha Kar in just a moment I should probably tell you just a little bit more about him if you're not familiar. He has been a consultant in Diabetes and Endocrinology on the national level there in the UK since 2008, clinical director of diabetes from 2009 to 2015. And here's the full title national specialty advisor diabetes with NHS England. And there are so many things that he's been involved with, most recently, very prominently getting the FreeStyle Libre being available across the country over there and I will talk about that specifically. Being very involved in language matters. Getting CGM available to all t one D pregnant patients. And he hinted this week that a big announcement was coming. So I will link that up in the show notes so you can find out we talked The week before Thanksgiving here in the States, so timing wise full bit tricky, but he was announcing something big and I will include that to the best of my ability. Okay, Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Gvoke Hypopen. Almost everyone who takes insulin has experienced a low blood sugar – and that can be scary.  A very low blood sugar is really scary. And that's where Gvoke HypoPen comes in. Gvoke is the first autoinjector to treat very low blood sugar.  Gvoke HypoPen is premixed and ready to go, with no visible needle. That means it's easy to use. How easy is it? You pull off the red cap and push the yellow end onto bare skin – and hold it for 5 seconds. That's it. Find out more – go to diabetes dash connections dot com and click on the Gvoke logo. Gvoke shouldn't be used in patients with pheochromocytoma or insulinoma – visit gvoke glucagon dot com slash risk. Partha Kar Welcome to Diabetes Connections. Thanks so much for making some time for me and my listeners. Absolute pleasure. Thank   Partha Kar  5:55 you for asking.   Stacey Simms  5:56 I gotta tell you, I'm a little nervous. I'm a huge fan. I'm just following you on social media. And then I put into my Facebook group like I always do. You know, do you have any questions for this guest? We've got a part of the car coming up. I have very few questions from the group. But I have lots of oh my gosh, I love him. Tell him we love him. Tell him. Thank you. Thank you. And I'll tell you specifically why they're thanking you in a moment. But you do have a quite a big fan club over here. So going in, I guess I'm trying to butter you up. But going in, you should know that.   Partha Kar  6:24 No, it's very quiet, very kind. I always see this, you know, at the end of the day, it's my job to do as well. But you know, the love and blessings you get is just makes it stronger. So yeah, no, absolutely. Thank you.   Stacey Simms  6:35 You're welcome. Let me just start off by asking you, you do not live with diabetes? How did you get into the position that you were in today? Why this field for you. So I think   Partha Kar  6:43 a lot of it was, you know, when we are when we are training, you pick your subjects as you go along. And then I sort of gravitated towards Diabetes and Endocrinology because I thought there was an opportunity here to talk to a lot of people, you know, be a part of their journey throughout life. So it was quite good. And I like talking, and then sort of more towards type one, because I think I get got to realize the more senior I got a lot of attention, quite understandably, was into type two diabetes. And that's, you know, the bigger volume number, etc. But I think what I found that there's not a lot of things being done for type one as a trade back of that. So it's been more of a, let's see what we can do in the space. Let's try and help people. And I think just being an advocate, so to speak. So yeah, that's probably how it's graduated over the course of time. One of   Stacey Simms  7:31 the things that we've observed, just following your social media here in the US, is the adoption and use of libre for many more people, can you talk a little bit about how that came about?   Partha Kar  7:41 So I think Libre, I'm in freestyle Libre first came into the market on 2014 2015. And I think it started to sort of gradually make its way into the UK setting and the sort of people would buy it funded. And I think it sort of started taking off in 2016 2017. And that's when I sort of got into the job. And for me, people are always asking why this particular device, I think it's not the device, I think it's more of a mass device. And I think there'll be more competition coming along. But to me, it's be a very good example of what self management can do. I mean, simply put, if you see more of your numbers and more of your trends, you tend to intervene more and do better. So that's been the device and it's been a battle to try and get it into people's lives as you go along. As you're the system here is slightly different. You have to justify every single thing you do, because you're saying, Well, this is why we're trying to do it. And it's a funny place to be in because you know, you're you're sort of fighting, so to speak against other conditions, that doesn't feel right, either trying to justify why you needed more compared to X or Y. And I think that's the challenge. And then people start looking at well, actually, there isn't a randomized control trial, which showed y or Zed and I can't fund it. And I try and explain to people it's not just about the RCTs, or the randomized control trials all the time. It's not just about doing one see, it's about the quality of life and what it does do so yeah, I think I think that's how it came about. And then driving it through, pick up or take up around the country sort of battling with regions. So yeah, it's it's been a journey in the half, so to speak. Can you   Stacey Simms  9:14 get a little bit more specific in terms of how many people now in your system do have access and do use the freestyle?   Partha Kar  9:20 Yeah, I mean, I think we got I mean, given round, figure wise, we've got about 200, we got a quarter of a million people with type 1 diabetes, and I think about 53% of them are on it right now across the country, and of all our cards land. Well, I think it should be available, either, you know, Libre or its equivalent should be available to everybody, everybody, very soon.   Stacey Simms  9:42 So yeah, I mean, the reason I wanted to ask that is because first of all, it's already such a big number comparatively speaking too much for the rest of the world. Certainly, I've got to imagine you're starting to see better outcomes too. Yeah,   Partha Kar  9:53 absolutely. I mean, it's coming through your h1 HB ones is a better I mean, I can tell you from my own clinical practice, people are huge changes. We're seeing it across the country and the data we're collecting and guess what admission levels are down. People feel happier your HP once he's down, it's doing what it says on the tin.   Stacey Simms  10:08 What would be the ultimate goal? Is it with that device? Is it then moving on to other CGM? Or do you want to kind of get as many people as possible in this one?   Partha Kar  10:15 Oh, no, absolutely. I've always maintained I'm a Libre or freestyle Libre is has been the tip of the spear. I think there was a lot of things there, which was about showing people the what is possible, because before that, in the world of the NHS technology has always been seen as a Okay, well, let's see what we can do. I mean, for example, insulin pumps have been around for so long. We even had nice guidance on it available since 2008. But the pickup rate really low 15% 16%. Really many reasons behind it. And CGM for isn't traditional CGM like Dexcom. Really low again, 4% 5%, or there abouts. But I think this was about showing what could be done if you really pushed on it hard. And I think it's opened up many, many doors. You know, subsequently, because of that, we're looking at competition coming along, we're looking at every single pregnancy with type 1 diabetes not having access to a Dexcom, or Medtronic device, we're doing trials and closed loop, suddenly, it has become a flagship, and due to luck, serendipity or default, it's worked out as one of the projects, which has really, really played out well in the NHS. And so a lot of people are looking at it. And for me, that was always the purpose. It's the tip of the spear. If you can show you could do it with one, there's no reason you can't. And it's definitely not the end goal never has been. I think the end goal would be that every every person with type 1 diabetes, irrespective of the age has the ability to choose whatever technology they so can, whether it's flash, whether it's traditional CGM, whether it's a pump, or whether it's a closed loop, partnership salutely.   Stacey Simms  11:44 And I'm just a little bit more about the Libre, I'm curious to obviously the biggest objection many people would have had would have been cost. But inside your organization or external critics, what were their objections thinking going into something like this,   Partha Kar  11:57 I think the NHS always is a very traditional setup. And I think they're very good when it comes to drugs to pharmaceutical products. For example, pharmaceutical companies will do massive randomized control trials to show Okay, here is the drop in HBO and see, and thereby you can calculate it. The problem is with technology company, they necessarily haven't done that. If you look at Frisco Librem, the initial studies that came out, they never showed any change in HB one C, primarily because they chose a lot of people's age 20 with the excellent to begin with. And you're sitting there going, Well, that was a mistake, I think, for companies not to take up the trials, because straightaway to a lot of policymakers, you don't have any room to maneuver, because you're banking yourself completely on the ability that will show improvement of hypos and quality of life. Now, the other problem, I suspect has been there nice, which is our governing body, so to speak, who you know, looks at evidence, they're quite slow at coming off the blocks. Sometimes it can be too late in the technology world by the time you assess, you know, right now they're assessing Libre one you are Libre 123 out. So what are you assessing? There's got to be nimble and quick. That's been that was the obstacle people saying that. So I think there were that level of obstacle Well, nice having said so so why should be, there's also a lot of people who fundamentally believed that this was just a gizmo and this was just shiny toy, and we shouldn't give it to people with diabetes, they should or for example, they had to earn it, you know, they have to either have complications to have it, or they should be testing 10 times a day to get it, which I think is pretty silly. Because you know, the whole point of doing this exercise is to target people are finding it difficult to test and find giving it to people to stop them from having complications. But there you go, it's a very traditional set of thinking, which is what has been the challenge trying to break through?   Stacey Simms  13:39 Yeah, do we have similar issues in the states where they're doing trials? And you always see like, well, they're a one see went from 7.3 to 6.9. And that's wonderful. But you know, we need to reach the people who's a one sees our 10.5 100%, right, because of either education or access, or whatever it is. I know, I know, you're struggling with that as well. Yeah,   Partha Kar  13:58 So, for example, you know, we have learned from that, you know, we, when we collected the real world data with Libre, we showed exactly what he said, the higher the higher your starting age, we want to see the better your outcomes. And you're like, Well, that's obvious. So what we're doing with those with Kevin, so what you're doing with closed loops right now, so we're running a real world trial evaluation throughout the country, it's about 34, five centers around the country, adults and pediatrics doing it. And guess what we see, again, the higher your agency, the better you're a flattening of your agency. So it's not rocket science. And I always am flabbergasted when people doing trials go like, no, let's just pick the people's controller really good. And as you said, but that goes against the whole deprivation thing that we discuss about because we know people who come from very deprived backgrounds will have worse control. So if you really want to tackle deprivation, you need to control that and you need to tackle that. So the thinking needs to be far more refined than what it is at the present moment. And hopefully we're trying to show some ways of doing so.   Stacey Simms  14:54 So one of my listeners said, I want you to please let parked the car know how much I appreciate In his posts, she goes on to say, there's not much I appreciate more than medical professionals who treat us like real people and don't talk down to us. Where did you learn your bedside manner your style or what you know what we as as not your patients see on social media because that's one of the things I think that very much resonates with people is that you're you're very plain spoken and you don't talk down to people with diabetes   right back to our conversation, but first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dario health. And you know, over the years, I find we manage diabetes better when we're thinking less about all the stuff of diabetes tasks. That's why I love partnering with people who take the load off things like ordering supplies, so I can really focus on Benny, the Dario diabetes success plan is all about you, all the strips and lancets you need delivered to your door, one on one coaching. So you can meet your milestones, weekly insights into your trends with suggestions for how to succeed, get the diabetes management plan that works with you. And for you. Dario is published studies demonstrate high impact clinical results, find out more go to my dario.com forward slash diabetes dash connections. Now back to Dr. Kar, talking about how he has developed a good bedside manner and respect for his patients.   Partha Kar  16:20 I think it's come with time, if I'm very honest, and most likely, it's not like a suddenly over a bed. And one day I decided to become like this. And I think what I've realized over the course of time is their Medical School doesn't teach us consultations, kills diseases, a lot of stuff, right? It's just teaches us what the book said, which is my Insulet physiology, how it works, doesn't really teach us a lot about interaction with human beings, which is what we did with some things like the language matters and stuff and people found language matters. Interesting. I found that just human sense, you know, common sense, human, it's not that difficult to be nice to people. And we somehow are not we somehow, and I think social media teaches me a lot of stuff. I think my patients teach me a lot. And I don't say that in a glib way, because things like, you know, I will do transitional or young adults clinic. And I remember these words from this young girl who sat there looked at me and said, If he took an exam sometimes, you know, and I want to watch that. And she said that, I don't know. It just feels like I'm going to be asked what I'm doing with judgment, what I'm doing, you know, when I sat down, but like, that's not right, that's wrong. Why are we making people feel like that way? And then we are wondering why they're not coming back to our clinics. So a lot of my consultations were very honest, not about diabetes, with my patients they're very much about could be a football or movies. I mean, yesterday, when just watch the internals and today in clinic, we were talking about one of my patients, and that was the conversation, what did you think about that paid the post credits, what was it, and I think you build a rapport with people, they trust you more, you get along more. So I like to keep it very plain. And I also feel that clinicians sometimes believe that people living with type 1 diabetes won't be able to handle the truth, so to speak. Oh, you can't tell them when you can. They're all adults and or, or in or surrounded by adults, and they deal with tough calls in their lives all the time, you know, how to get a mortgage, you know, how to get your car or dealing with ups and downs, or the Why wouldn't they be able to they live with it. So I've always benefited that by turning around and saying I can't do this for you. It's outside my expertise. And I think finally, I'm also trying with my other role trying to deconstruct the myth, and the and the whole thing that doctors are built around them so that there's some sort of, you know, material human beings here for to burn themselves to the altar, normally not, you know, we trained professionals, like a fireman or a policeman and trying to do my best. And sometimes I'll get it wrong, sometimes I'll get it right. But at least I want to portray across that I'm trying and trying my best. And we'll see where we go from there.   Stacey Simms  18:50 You know, it brings up an interesting point, because I consider myself a very strong advocate with my doctors, for myself and for my children. But I still hear you get intimidated, you do very much respect my doctors, any advice for patients who who want to have a difficult conversation with their physician who want to start broaching that, hey, treat me like a partner and may not know how to start?   Partha Kar  19:12 Yeah, I mean, I think it's really difficult. It's really difficult to do that. Because I think this is why it's a bit like I always give the example of let's say, sexism. Now. It's not the it's not just the job of women to go and solve sexism, is it. I mean, it's men have got an equal part, you will not understand nuance as a man or a woman goes through, but you know, when it's wrong, and you can turn around and say, Nah, guys don't do that. Right. So I think what I would encourage rather my clinical colleagues to say that, look, it's not tricky to sort of have that feedback and saying your approach may not be the right thing. And I think this younger generation coming through which does that. So my advice to patients who would like to do that would be to, I think doctors feel very challenged as soon as you challenge them. It's an ego thing. Don't forget that we have been taught in medical school that we are the top of the top there is no Nobody better than us, right? When you're told that for five years, seven years, eight years, 10 years of your life that there was nobody better than you, it's very difficult to then sit in a space. And if somebody challenges you to actually take that on board, so there is a bit of that complex that has happened over the course of time. So the way to approach that would be to probably do it from a slightly different angle. And rather than pointing out the mistake and say, What would you say? What do you think if we did this? Do you feel like so I think you try and do that there'll be some people who are open to the idea of saying, I don't agree with that, and you go with it. But I think the biggest advice I can give is find an ally, was also a clinician who will do that for you. So in meetings, when I go to, I always see myself as that sort of advocacy role return rentable. And now I don't agree with that. Because I know I've spoken to a lot of people who want to agree with that. So that is the sort of fine balance to strike, it will change, doctors are changing. And you know, if you've been long enough in the system, the 90s, were different to 1000s were different, and now is different, but doctors are evolving slowly takes a long time to get you got good get rid of you got complex.   Stacey Simms  21:02 Another question from one of my listeners who wanted to know, Brexit to will, or already has had an impact on diabetes care or supplies,   Partha Kar  21:11 hasn't affected supplies, because we actually knew there was going to be a problem. So we planned and we worked with the industry to make sure we had good suppliers. And there will always be teething trouble as we go along with this. But no, we don't expect, he says Fingers crossed. We have some plans in place in case of anything, but Brexit is one of those political things in life, isn't it? So we just have to ride the storm with it as we go along. So   Stacey Simms  21:34 this is an American based podcast, mostly because I'm American, we do have listeners all over the world, which I'm very, very grateful for. But our healthcare systems are so different. I'm curious if you have any advice, or any lessons that you think we could learn from how how you all do it?   Partha Kar  21:53 Yeah, I mean, so I think the debate about healthcare becomes incredibly emotive on both sides of the Atlantic. I think that's the problem. So when you turn around, people start saying, so for example, if you challenge the NHS, people go like, well, you don't like the NHS, because you want to make it privatized to you. And you will? Um, no, not really, I'm just saying that there are gaps in the prison system as we fund it, for example, we say it's equal to all well, not really, if you come from a deprived community. Right, now we've got issues with race. So as I've said, if you're a black child, your chance of getting a continuous glucose monitor is half of that of a wide shot. This isn't the NHS which professes to be equal to everybody. It's not right. So the challenge is there, even however, the funding is, I think my advice to in the US setting would be it's so vast and so big. Taking aside the politics, which is so difficult to do, obviously, I think too much attention is focused when it comes to chronic disease on the to the three parts, which I think of type 1 diabetes, I think I see it as self management, peer support, and access to train professionals. That's the three things on which good type 1 diabetes care sets. And the US system is incredibly good about doing number three, too, it makes it more and more expensive, because we don't have any trained professionals. And so you end up having to really top load that bit. If you switched a lot of the attention to one and two, self management with technology of peer support, you probably will have better outcomes, I don't think it's about the make of the system. And it's insurance based or public funded. And that's where the politics comes in. It's about the switching of that mentality where you get peer support and self management as being a main key focus and investment into but the US system, partly the UK as well. But the US system hinges heavily on number three. And that's why you the costs are so out of control. That's my view, at least   Stacey Simms  23:38 we've seen it in our own experiences. And people who listen to this podcast know that that peer community matters immensely with camps and communities and meetups. And it's incredible. It makes such a difference. Absolutely. You mentioned language matters. Can you speak a little bit about that for people who aren't familiar? Yeah, I   Partha Kar  23:55 mean, I think there's a fair few versions of that. I'm the principal of that was built in Australia in 2012. And again, it's nothing dramatic. It's not I mean, became it basically saying just be nice to people. You know, I think you've got embroiled in this whole debate for a bit of time. Because it was done in the States. There was papers out of him that we picked up in the UK, different countries have done it and people get stuck up in the Oh, is it is it about calling somebody a diabetic or a person with diabetes, it's not lots of people don't mind being called diabetic, some people do mind being called diabetic, that's not about that what the document is about. The document is very, very simply about trying to be less judgmental about people whose lives you don't leave. Right? If you're saying to somebody, or you know, I'm not sure you're you should be doing that in the morning, when you don't know what like the lead. You don't know that they're having to, you know, rush to drop off their kid to school and do this and do that. It's not easy to then go you should have a very structured breakfast and take your insulin on time. Well, that's fine for you to say, but that for that individual. They might have two kids to drop off and then go to work while trying to make sure you know their husbands had their work. It's It's not easy. So I think that's what it's about don't don't try and judge others whose lives you don't leave lid. So that that was pretty much it.   Stacey Simms  25:08 I think that the libre goal that you have I know you're not done with and you wouldn't call it a an ultimate success yet has been tremendous. What is next? Is it trying to get more pumps covered? Is it trying to get more equality as you've already mentioned, racial and economic lines,   Partha Kar  25:23 closed loops, I think I think is, is the is the next target, I think more more access to closed loops, more access to all the types of different loops that are available, and you touched upon it, irrespective of your deprivation, ethnicity, that's going to be huge for because going ahead, I want more people to have access to technology, because I think technology is an enabler sort of ticks, that box of self management, it also encourages more peer support. So if we did that, together well, and did more standardized training for healthcare professionals that I think that's the sort of ultimate goal. But I think closed loops are going to be the thing I suspect the focus and target on as we go ahead.   Stacey Simms  26:01 Fabulous. And I'll let you go. I know you got to run. But we are speaking during Diabetes Awareness Month, and you put out a video very plain spoken as you do, saying, basically, be nice. Don't judge, don't be an idiot. And you have a two minute long video explaining this. What was the reaction? I mean, it's a very plain statement, but at the same time, it's quite blunt. Yeah, I   Partha Kar  26:21 mean, I think I see the debates between and it's so silly, some of the stuff that goes on, on social media and wider and I can understand people do it because they have a book to sell, or a podcast or blog or whatever they want to do, or Twitter likes, but the simplistic narratives and never helped people, you know, we could we could turn around and say, Well, if you eat too many cakes, you will have type two diabetes, there is not a single evidence base that will support that statement. Yes, people say that right? You know, and I think that's the problem. And then that rolls into how did your child have diabetes? You give them too many cakes, and you sitting there going like what how uneducated Are you didn't come up with a statement like that. And it's so frustrating to see that. So I think the reaction has been good. I mean, I've always been known for my and I genuinely think when people don't know something, I'm very happy to explain it to them in today's day and age. If people say that, Oh, I didn't know that type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder has got nothing to do with your diet or your lifestyle, then I'm sorry, you were just uneducated. And that's my bottom line to that. So you haven't even made the simple effort to open Google. So things like that. And I think that was the that was the idea of that is Diabetes Awareness Month. Just be aware of different types. Be nice to people don't judge others and you know, at least at least do some research and you've got Google on your smartphone. So simple.   Stacey Simms  27:41 Okay, last question. You mentioned the eternal is no spoilers. I haven't seen it. But I know you're a big Marvel fan. How was the movie?   Partha Kar  27:47 Oh, it's good. I really enjoyed it. It's as a standalone, it works really well. And my only big tip also is mistake for the after credits. Very good, especially the last one. Very, very good. All right.   Stacey Simms  27:58 Well, thank you so much for spending so much time with me. I really appreciate you being here. Thanks very much. Partha Kar Pleasure.   You're listening to Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. More information at diabetes connections.com. Of course, there's always a transcript as well. I will link up how to follow Dr. Kar on social media, I highly recommend his Twitter feeds. And he is just very informative, very straightforward. And he's always willing to admit when he makes a mistake or something funny happens. I mean, he's just let's face it. He's just a human being online, which is why I think so many of us respond to him so well, that I liked a lot of the advice he gave there for us to take to our doctors, we really have to be straightforward with them. So many times they don't even realize what they're doing or how they're talking to us. Sometimes they do and they're they're just jerks. But most of the time, I think they want to have a good relationship with us. At least that has been my experience. There's only been one doctor, in my my experience. I'm not talking about Benny, because we've been very lucky with him. There's only been one doctor that I have fired. And I fired him from my hospital room because oh my gosh, was he talking down to me? So don't be afraid to do it. Alright, Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dexcom. And we were watching TV the other night. My husband and I are really into the expanse now, which is a sci fi show that's been out for a while. We are totally binging it, we're going through every season. So we're watching that. And the Dexcom went off the alert on my phone and Benny was upstairs in his room. And you know, for some reason, it took me back to the days when we basically had blood sugar checks on a timer. If you're of a certain age you remember this we would check doing a finger stick the same time every day at home and at school and whenever extra we needed to. It's really amazing to think about how much our diabetes management has changed with share and follow. I didn't stop the movie to check on him. I knew what was going on. I mean, I could decide whether to text him or go up and help out for this instance. I did absolutely nothing because I didn't need to using the share and follow apps have really helped us talk less about diabetes. which I never thought would happen with a teenager. Trust me Benny loves that part too. That's what's so great about the Dexcom system. I think for the caregiver or the spouse or the friend, you can help the person with diabetes manage in the way that works for your individual situation. Internet connectivity is required to access Dexcom follow separate follow app is required. learn more, go to diabetes connections.com, click on the Dexcom logo. If you're listening as this episode goes live, Happy Hanukkah, we will be marking night three as you're listening again, if you're listening when the episode first airs, and Paul hits early this year, that my daughter's already packing school, but that's how it goes. I hope your life because they're yummy and your Hanukkah guilt is delicious. And you're not stressing out too much about diabetes, and you're able to enjoy what the holiday has to offer. Looking ahead. I mean, what am I going to say? Here? We are December. Oh my goodness. So we've got some great shows coming up. We've got a conversation next week with the folks at convatec. They make all of the insets except for Omni pod. But if you use a Tandem Medtronic, yep, so mid, those pumps, they make your insets. So we had a really good conversation about how to make those better, some good information for the community from them. And I'm hoping that'll be an ongoing conversation. And we have a lot of good stuff in the works for the rest of this year. Going into January, does he I would ask is if you have listened to this far and you are not signed up for our newsletter, please make sure to do that I send out an email every week along with the show. And quite often there is more information in there than just a week's episode. We do surveys, we do research opportunities that I get from companies. There's a lot of info in that. And as we move forward next year, and I'm branching off into other projects, I'm gonna be using that newsletter to communicate more and more about things, not just the podcasts that I think are of your interest, but I don't spam you or anything dumb like that. So go ahead, you go to diabetes connections.com a little pop up will come up. If you don't see it, just scroll down. There's a little newsletter thingy that'll help you sign up there. Thank you to my editor John Bukenas from audio editing solutions. Thank you so much for listening. We are back on track for our newscast this week. So I will see you back here Wednesday on Facebook or YouTube Live for in the news. And then on Friday, we turn that into an audio, podcast whatever works better for you. Feel free to join me in whatever way is the best. I'm Stacey Simms Until then be kind to yourself.   Benny  32:24 Diabetes Connections is a production of Stacey Simms media. All rights reserved. All wrongs avenged

Pardon My Pancreas
I Threw The "Diabetes Rulebook" Out The Window... Here's Why You Should Too

Pardon My Pancreas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 15:23


3 "rules" that your doctor taught you wrong on diagnosis day... Here's why and what you can do about it. Grab Matt's free T1D Webclass here:https://diabetesinaction.com---------Welcome to the Pardon My Pancreas podcast!! This show is all about REAL life with type 1 diabetes, understanding fluctuations, and how to stabilize your blood sugar for good. Your host is Matt Vande Vegte is a certified personal trainer, nutritionist, and type 1 diabetic whose biggest goal in life is to help people with diabetes around the world live their lives fearlessly. Looking for an online health coaching program to help you live your best life? Go to https://www.ftfwarrior.com to learn more about his program for diabetics only that is focused on helping you reach your goals while living a happier and healthier life. Join the Tribe today!This podcast is sponsored by FTF Warrior - An online health and fitness coaching company for type 1 diabetics dedicated to helping them master their blood sugars through any activity, exercise, or meal!https://www.ftfwarrior.comFollow Matt here:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ftfwarrior/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ftfwarrior/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/ftfwarrior------------------------------------------------------Disclaimer: While we share our experiences with diabetes, nothing we discuss should be taken as medical advice. Please consult your doctor or medical professional for your health and diabetes management.

Startup Knox Podcast
Mason Testerman and Jeff Knox

Startup Knox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 23:25


Today we continue our series of interviews in partnership with Webb School of Knoxville. Each student in the Introduction to Entrepreneurship & Design Thinking course will interview a local entrepreneur. In this episode, Mason Testerman ‘24 interviews Jeff Knox, Territory Business Manager at Dexcom.

Light Reading Podcasts
KORE Wireless CEO: Looking beyond the IoT hype

Light Reading Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 9:03


ICYMI: From our coverage of Mobile World Congress Los Angeles in October, here's a short interview with KORE Wireless President and CEO Romil Bahl. Bahl talks to Light Reading's Kelsey Ziser about the challenge of managing IoT devices, and he shares a use case where KORE is working with Dexcom to improve health monitoring systems for diabetes patients.  Bahl also discusses KORE's approach to IoT security in both the device and the network, and he reveals how the company is using eSIM technology to connect IoT devices globally. Making IoT management simpler, he said, is what will help the industry move beyond IoT hype to real use cases.

Pardon My Pancreas
How To Personalize Your Diabetes Management

Pardon My Pancreas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 19:12


Diabetes isn't a cookie-cutter plan, and it's time our medical team learned that. It's about so much more than your A1C.Grab Matt's free T1D Webclass here:https://diabetesinaction.com---------Welcome to the Pardon My Pancreas podcast!! This show is all about REAL life with type 1 diabetes, understanding fluctuations, and how to stabilize your blood sugar for good. Your host is Matt Vande Vegte is a certified personal trainer, nutritionist, and type 1 diabetic whose biggest goal in life is to help people with diabetes around the world live their lives fearlessly. Looking for an online health coaching program to help you live your best life? Go to https://www.ftfwarrior.com to learn more about his program for diabetics only that is focused on helping you reach your goals while living a happier and healthier life. Join the Tribe today!This podcast is sponsored by FTF Warrior - An online health and fitness coaching company for type 1 diabetics dedicated to helping them master their blood sugars through any activity, exercise, or meal!https://www.ftfwarrior.comFollow Matt here:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ftfwarrior/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ftfwarrior/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/ftfwarrior------------------------------------------------------Disclaimer: While we share our experiences with diabetes, nothing we discuss should be taken as medical advice. Please consult your doctor or medical professional for your health and diabetes management.

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
Ask the D-Moms Holiday Edition - More Fun, Less Stress (we promise!)

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 40:15


With Thanksgiving almost here and the winter holidays around the corner, we know that diabetes stress is about to ratchet way up. The D-Moms are here to help! Moira McCarthy joins Stacey to talk about everything from holiday travel, long car rides, well meaning relatives and holiday gifts centered on T1D. And of course, FOOD! Get advice to keep your children with T1D safe and happy so you can make terrific memories without freaking out about "perfect" blood sugars. Previous D-Mom Holiday advice here Adults with T1D give their take on the holidays:  This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Episode Transcription below:  Stacey Simms  0:00 Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dario health. Manage your blood glucose levels increase your possibilities by Gvoke Hypopen the first pre mixed auto injector for very low blood sugar, and by Dexcom, take control of your diabetes and live life to the fullest with Dexcom.   Announcer  0:20 This is Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms.   Stacey Simms  0:26 This week, Thanksgiving is almost here and many holidays just around the corner. Ask the D moms is here to help more McCarthy and I answer your questions and share our own stories to help you make more wonderful memories with less stress, even if that means doing things differently for a special occasion.   Moira McCarthy  0:44 And the reality is in this long, long, long, long, long lifetime marathon diabetes, you need to just chill a mile here and there. And by doing this and saying to your children, we're going to turn this off. This is okay. Don't worry about it. You're fine. You're modeling that for them and you're giving them the confidence and the courage to know that they can be okay. Yeah,   Stacey Simms  1:06 she said turn this off. She's talking about something I dare to say and do about Benny's CGM. We also talk about long car rides well-meaning relatives and holiday gifts centered on diabetes. This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. Welcome to another week of the show. I'm your host Stacey Simms always so glad to have you here. You know, we aim to educate and inspire about diabetes with a focus on people who use insulin. And yes, this time of year. I mean, it's the holidays are stressful without diabetes, right. But I'm already seeing in my local group, the stress ratcheting up, somebody said to me the other day that they feel like even though they're not necessarily doing more than they did before the pandemic as more people are venturing out and traveling. They feel like they're really busy. And I think a lot of it has to do with the fact that we haven't been very busy for the last year and a half, really. So there's gonna be more pressure on this holiday season. There's going to be more travel, there's going to be I don't know, it'll feel like higher stakes and especially if you are new to type one, that first year those first holidays, those first milestones are incredibly stressful. So Moira and I are here to help you out you probably already know. But just in case Moira McCarthy is a dear friend of mine. She is the author of many books about raising kids with diabetes, including the amazing raising teens with diabetes, which has that fabulous photo of a teen rolling her eyes right on the cover. I love that cover. You'll hear how long her daughter Lauren has lived with type one. She's a very successful adult now living on her own. And if you are brand new, my son Ben, he was diagnosed almost 15 years ago. He is almost 17, which is really hard to believe so most of my stories have to do with the early years. We're not out of the teens yet, and Moira will help kind of pick it up from there. And I always look to her for guidance as well. One funny thing about Thanksgiving this year, we have a set menu, right? We have our traditions. My husband is the cook in the family and we've always hosted Thanksgiving. He does something a little different every year, but it's really up to him. But Benny has been working in a grocery store for the past six or seven months now. And he is really jonesing for a sweet potato casserole with marshmallows, which we don't usually do nothing do with diabetes. It's just not our style. We generally save the marshmallows for dessert. But my mom who makes our sweet potato casserole every year has valiantly stepped up and says she will make one for him. Because at the grocery store. He has been seeing the display and he's like Mom, it's just sweet potatoes, brown sugar, sweet potatoes, marshmallows, sweet potatoes, brown sugar, like they have this. And he took a picture that I saw the last time I was there. I mean, it's one whole side of a produce display. So this poor kid, he is really dying for that that marketing worked on him. He wants those marshmallows. My daughter is the canned cranberry sauce person, right. You know you make that beautiful, homemade cranberry sauce with the whole cranberries. Are you you boil it down? No, we have to have it in the can with the jelly lines on it. I prefer that as well. I have to admit. Alright, Moira and I talking about real stuff just a moment. But first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Gvoke Hypopen. Our endo always told us that if you use insulin, you need to have emergency glucagon on hand as well. Low blood sugars are one thing – we're usually able to treat those with fact acting glucose tabs or juice. But a very low blood sugar can be very frightening – which is why I'm so glad there's a different option for emergency glucagon. It's Gvoke Hypopen. Gvoke HypoPen is premixed and ready to go, with no visible needle. You pull off the red cap and push the yellow end onto bare skin – and hold it for 5 seconds. That's it. Find out more – go to diabetes dash connections dot com and click on the Gvoke logo. Gvoke shouldn't be used in patients with pheochromocytoma or insulinoma – visit gvoke glucagon dot com slash risk.   Moira, welcome back. I am so excited to talk to you What a week. I didn't even think about this when we planned. This is a big week for you and Lauren,   Moira McCarthy  5:04 it is yesterday, October 28. At 2:35pm was exactly her 24th diaversary. My daughter has had type 1 diabetes for 24 years. I can't even believe it. It's crazy.   Stacey Simms  5:22 But I have to ask you the time had you know the time.   Moira McCarthy  5:25 So I don't know why I know the time. We were at a doctor's appointment, and I know what time the appointment was. And I know what happened when I got there. So I don't know. It's just drilled into my head. And then there's people I meet that are like, I can't even tell you what day my kid was diagnosed. But for some reason, it just stuck with me. And as a little kid Lauren, like celebrating every year, so I sent her flowers yesterday. No, I don't care. 24 hours or so give us Do you   Stacey Simms  5:51 mind, maybe just a little bit of how she's doing maybe a little update. If this is someone's first time joining us for Deimos.   Moira McCarthy  5:57 I'd be happy to so my daughter Lauren was diagnosed. Well, I just said the date. So basically the beginning of kindergarten when she was six years old, right after her sixth birthday. I can remember feeling like the world was gonna end. But we had a really great medical team from the beginning who were saying to us, you are going to live the life you lived before. We're just going to add steps to it. And Lauren at six years old was saying I'm gonna lead you're not gonna, you know, let this hold me down. Now has it been all rainbows and butterflies? Absolutely not. We have had challenging days. We've had challenging weeks, we've had challenging years in her teen years. But right now, I think, well, first of all, what everybody cares about most is her physical health. She is 100% healthy. She has the labs that a person without diabetes would have if you checked, you know, her kidney and her eyes and everything else. Emotionally, she's really doing great. She has a long struggle with burnout. But I think she really has figured out a way to deal with that when she recognizes it coming up. And the most important lab of all I always say is she's incredibly happy. She has an amazing career and lives in the middle of Washington, DC all by herself, and I don't follow her on share. And I never worry about her. She has 8 million friends and I couldn't be prouder of her and the life that she is building as a young adult. So that's where she's at pretty good. Right? Despite diabetes, that's fine.   Stacey Simms  7:28 I love hearing that, as you know. And as you listen, you may know, I have followed Moira and Lauren story for many, many, many years since before more and I knew each other. So I always kind of look ahead. It's like my time machine of what could happen with us. Where could he go? And of course, he's never leaving our hometown, going to a scary place far away like DC he's gonna He's going to live here. And   Moira McCarthy  7:51 Sunday dinner every week   Stacey Simms  7:53 is nice. That's so nice. So I'm glad she's doing so well. Like you're doing so well. And you know, gosh, I heard something recently about diversity that made me smile. Instead of the diversity you're you're on the new level. So Lauren has reached level 24.   Moira McCarthy  8:08 I like that. That's really funny. And her boyfriend is a big video gamer so he'll like that.   Stacey Simms  8:13 Oh, that's good. Yeah, Benny's approaching level 15. And I am one of those people who I always have to look up the date. I just know it's the first weekend of December, but I never. Yeah. Alright, so we are in that time of year where it's not just our kids diver series. It is holiday time. And after I rewound the Halloween episode that we did a couple of years ago and I got a lot of questions and people asked us to do a follow up for Thanksgiving and looking ahead to the winter holidays. And I got some great questions. So I was wondering more if you wouldn't mind sharing though, you know, the first holiday season that you and Laura and your whole family had to address this you guys want a very different routine? Yeah, we can be a little more difficult but would you mind sharing what that was like that first year?   Moira McCarthy  8:59 I will and and I think it's good to hear because it can help people see how far we have come daily care for this disease. We may not have a cure yet, but what it looks like on a day to day basis is completely different. So Lauren was diagnosed in October so Thanksgiving was our first big holiday and I remember we were going to my in laws and back then you took a moderate acting or we called it long acting, but it was really middle acting insulin called NPH that peaked a bunch of times during the day and then you took regular which you had to take it wait 30 minutes and then eat exactly what you had dose for it exactly 30 minutes which was super fun with a six year old child I will tell you and no waiting in between. So I had reached out to my in laws ahead of time and asked them if they could work the meal around the time that it would work best for her to eat and they said yes and I I move some things around with A doctor to kind of compromise with them, you know, so we changed what time we gave everything starting, like two days before to be ready for Thanksgiving. And then we showed up and they were like, oh, yeah, we decided on a different time. Oh my gosh, the world is ending. But the world didn't end. You know, we figured it out. We got through it. What I will say for these holidays, for people who are new to it, it's not always going to feel this scary and confusing and daunting. I think the first 12 months, you go through every holiday, every special event, every family tradition for first time. And then the second year, you're like, Oh, I remember this from last year, and it gets a little better. And then the third year, you're, you're sailing. That's my theory, and I'm sticking to it.   Stacey Simms  10:43 I would absolutely agree with that. I also kind of suffered and I'll say suffered from this feeling out of the box, that it had to be perfect. Because I remember one just show everybody that we were okay. Especially my mom, I wanted her to not worry. And know that we were we were just fine. And for some reason that got tangled up in my brain by thinking this has to go perfectly and I can't make a mistake. And of course that lasted about three   Moira McCarthy  11:06 seconds. Yeah, we're really with a toddler with type one, and you want to put together a perfect Thanksgiving. Why don't we do that to ourselves, though, you know, but feelings of control at a time when you feel like you've lost control?   Stacey Simms  11:21 Night? Exactly. Alright, so let's get to some of the questions that came in. I got one in my local group. And this was about travel. And the question was, we're driving along distance. And I guess we could talk a little bit about flying or other modes of transportation. But this particular case, we're driving along distance, you know, six or seven hours to a relative's house. Any ideas or tips for helping me and the question here was about stable blood sugars. But I'm also going to kind of throw in there. How do I make this trip? easier on the whole family? Yeah, I'm I have a lot of ideas that maybe you do too.   Moira McCarthy  11:56 Well. So I guess my first idea would be for special occasions and events, stable blood sugars aren't the most important thing ever. I don't think there's anything wrong with trying, of course, we want to try but the first thing I'd say is if it doesn't go perfectly, that's perfectly fine. I am quite sure if you ask your medical team to help you with the plan. That is one of the things they will say to you. That's the first thing. So I mean, what did you do on long car rides? For us it I don't remember it impacting her blood sugar that much, you definitely have to have snacks in the car and like more than you ever think you're going to need in your life, because you never know when you're going to get stuck in a traffic jam from a car accident or something like that. You know what it is be prepared, and then you don't need it. We tend as a family, not just for the person with diabetes, but for everyone to try to stop every 60 minutes and get out of the car and stretch and move around and breathe fresh air and then get back in. I think that helps   Stacey Simms  12:56 us How about depressive we don't my husband would have fit? No. So in my   Moira McCarthy  13:01 father, he would never do that. That's probably why I do it. I grew up driving from Minnesota to Massachusetts and like never being allowed to get out of the car. So   Stacey Simms  13:10 I would say for us we actually did struggle a lot with long car rides, because we did a lot of trips, especially to my parents in Florida, which is like a nine or 10 hour road trip. And we found that Benny's blood sugar would go very high. Just you know, an hour or two in the car and looking back, it's probably because toddlers never stopped moving. So his insulin dosage was all based on constant activity. So when he was sitting still, just looking back that's my assumption. Also, as you mentioned, you know everybody's eating in the car   Right back to our conversation, but first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dario health. And, you know, we first noticed Dario, a couple of years ago, we were at a diabetes conference, and many thought being able to turn your smartphone into a meter. It's pretty amazing. I'm excited to tell you that Dario offers even more now, the Dario diabetes success plan gets you all the supplies and support you need to succeed, you'll get a glucometer that fits in your pocket unlimited test strips and lancets delivered to your door and a mobile app with a complete view of your data. The plan is tailored for you with coaching when and how you need it. And personalized reports based on your activity. Find out more go to my dario.com forward slash diabetes dash connections. Now back to the D mom's and I'm talking about what we did when we realized Benny's blood sugar would always go pretty high in the car. What we did was talk to our endocrinologist about adjusting doses giving more insulin when he was in the car, giving more insulin for food when he was in the car. And that was a real trial and error for us because, you know we have to be really conservative about that you're not going to be changing basal rates by enormous amounts and so it may not quote unquote work the first time you do it, but I think you know we're doing Talking about stable blood sugars, I hope that this person means is like maybe kind of sort of in range. You know, when I see somebody talking about stable blood sugars, I usually think like, it's not going to be a steady line at 95, right? We're just trying to keep them from skyrocketing and staying there. And even if that happens, which happened to us a ton, it's fine, and you fix it. When the baby was younger, and the kids were younger, I was much more mindful about healthy eating. You know, they're 19 and 16. And it's like, they buy half their own food. Now anyway, I don't know what they're eating. But we used to get coolers the big cooler, and fill it with, you know, healthy fruits and veggies and hard boiled eggs and carrot sticks. And you know, and then of course, everybody would want to stop for fast food and ruin everything. Right?   Moira McCarthy  15:39 So I made the assumption, and perhaps I shouldn't have that by stable, she meant within that range. If this mom is suggesting that her child should have a straight line across my answers quite different. I have no idea going on the assumption that what she means is within their range. And my answer was based on that what I meant was, if you go above your range, or below your range, I think it's okay. I don't think that if you're going to celebrate with a family, the most important thing is, is staying in your blood sugar range, I think the most important thing is enjoying the time and loving your cousin's and running around and having fun and staying within a an area that is safe. And by safe. I mean, you're not you don't need to get in an ambulance, I guess. And maybe my advice would be talk to your medical team, take some ideas that we have on your idea, I think that's a great idea. My only caveat would be the doctors probably going to want you to err on the side of your child being hired. The first time you do this, as you mentioned, you did it after some trial and error, I'm not sure a new parent to diabetes should just, you know dial way up on their kids insulin because they're going to be in the car for nine hours, I think you should take it slowly and go a time or two or three and see what happens. And then make decisions like that after that. But for now talk to your team. They're they're going to say what I said, and they're going to support you and say, Don't worry about going out of range. You know how to do corrections, here's when and here's why to do a correction and then take it from there.   Stacey Simms  17:12 And like you said, some kids sit in the car and nothing happens. Right? They don't go super high. That's why can't do   Moira McCarthy  17:17 assumption, right. That's why you have to wait and see what happens. One quick   Stacey Simms  17:22 thing about the car that I learned the hard way you mentioned about you know, be prepared for traffic be prepared for you know, delays, if you have and we all do I think have a you know a diabetes kit. Make sure it's where you can reach it, especially if your child is very young, right? I mean, there's a lot of kids, they're older, they can have it the backseat with them. I'll never forget packing everything we needed and leaving it in the trunk or like the way back of the minivan. And then we were delayed. And I'm like I need a new inset like says it was leaking, or we'd like crawl through the car.   Moira McCarthy  17:54 That's a really good tip. So put it   Stacey Simms  17:57 up to the front seat with your pack, even if you just pack a couple of things. And we had so many car adventures. Okay, the next question, I loved this one, because this just I could picture this one I know you can do more. So Deborah said we are in the first year of diagnosis, I just realized I don't know what to do about our Christmas cookie tradition. We make a bunch and give them to relatives we usually eat as we go. Can we still do this with diabetes child is eight and is on multiple daily injections, so no insulin pump yet.   Moira McCarthy  18:26 So my answer is eat all the cookies, bake all the cookies, visit all the friends have all the fun, click your fingers if you want to. But then wash your hands, have all the fun and check in with your child's doctor. And what they're going to say is go do all that check at the end of all the fun. If you need a correction, here's what we'd like you to correct. And here's what we'd like you not to correct for they may not want you to correct because sometimes these things involve a little adrenaline high. And again, first times you have to see what's going on. But just have all the fun. Fix it later. If your child gets high during it, it's no big deal. If they get low, you've got cookies. There's an old saying it started with Kelly crewneck, who's a very well known person on the diabetes world on the internet. And she said people with diabetes can't have cookies, dot dot dot with poison in them. Right? The only cookies you can't have.   Stacey Simms  19:26 I think that's fantastic. And it took me back listening to that about we know we don't have a Christmas cookie tradition. But we certainly you know, I think most people with little kids love to bake. And it's just such a fun activity to do with them. And in the first couple of weeks with shots, it was so difficult. You know, Binney ran away from us. He didn't want anything to do with it. But after a little while, he didn't really care as long as we didn't make a big deal and make him stop what he was doing. So and we bought after, which I know is like bananas that people admit to bolusing after these days, but I think it's so much less   Moira McCarthy  20:00 Streisand gets really super smart, particularly with a small child.   Stacey Simms  20:04 And so for something like this, like we would bake, and then I would kind of try to estimate like, what did he licked the spoon? Did he eat the crumbs? You know, when you do a guess? And in my case, I would always get a little less because he was teeny tiny. And then we would eat the cookie, and a couple hours later, we would correct and move on. Now. I don't know, I feel like the fun as you said, the memories of that time, you know, outweighed the quote, unquote, out of range blood sugar, I'm sure his blood sugar went out of range. And he might have been low, because they sometimes they just get really excited. And you know, he might have been high, but he's, they're healthy.   Moira McCarthy  20:39 You know what, I think this, this mom, and anyone who's considering these kind of questions over the holidays should think about too, when I look back on Lauren's life, these 24 years with type one included, I don't remember that her blood sugar went higher low. I don't remember what her diabetes did one day, I remember that the cookie swap was fun. And so that's why I think it's important to focus on the fun, within reason with a kid with diabetes, you know,   Stacey Simms  21:12 oh, yeah, that's a great way to put it. And I'm realizing as he gets older, I have a lot of those same feelings. I'm so glad it didn't stop us. I'm sure at the time. My heart was pounding, right, especially at first, I'm sure I was worried. I'm sure I was thinking, Am I doing this the right way. But look, you know, you have those fabulous pictures and those great memories. So that's a great way to put it. Alright, so let's talk about well meaning relatives. More Hi, Moira. And Stacy. My aunt thinks she knows everything about diabetes. She has type two and is always lecturing me about not letting my second grader eat, quote, bad foods. Holidays are the worst. I'm sorry to laugh, because she wants us to have sugar free desserts. There's so much going on. In that question.   Moira McCarthy  21:59 Bless her heart, right. You know, I mean, what do you do? It would depend on what kind of person she is. And if they have, if they have a relationship that she could, I would call her ahead of time and say, Look, we're working on adjusting Stevie's life, whatever the child is, and, and there's a lot of things he's dealing with right now. So I'm just asking you, if you have anything you want to say about it? Could you say it to me now over the phone before we go, and let's just avoid talking about diabetes other than Hey, how you feeling? I'm really glad you're doing well at the holiday because I don't want him to feel sad when he has all this on his mind. That's a great way to put it. Who knows what she'll do. Right, right.   Stacey Simms  22:45 I mean, you have you have well meaning relatives who want to help you have nosy relatives who think they're helping, it all depends on my mother for the first year or two she wants to make she makes one of those sweet potato casseroles, not always with marshmallows, but it's got a ton of sugar in it. And so she made it sugar free. And I didn't really notice but it's not something Vinnie was going to eat much of anyway. Yeah, when he was he was three at his first Thanksgiving with diabetes. But she meant well, but what I found worked over the years, and I still use this, even though he's his own advocate. Now, I really found that saying, Our doctor says, which I made up, but our doctor says helped everything. So I would say to somebody like this. Oh, you know, thank you so much for thinking about my son. I really appreciate it. I gotta tell you things with diabetes have changed so much now. And our doctor says that he can eat these foods and as long as we can dose with insulin, you know, we know what we're doing. He's helping us or our doctor says that Thanksgiving should be a date, like every other day or whatever it is. But people would never listen to me. Listen to what my doctor   Moira McCarthy  23:46 says my my words for that was always her medical team. Yeah. sound very official, our medical team is me. But they don't need to know that. The one thing I'll say, though, is it's also okay, if it's not super aggressive, and really out of line. I think it's also okay to teach our children to show some people a little grace. And sometimes and all this even when people are wrong, maybe at the family thanksgiving, or Hanukkah, or whatever party isn't the time to say, Do you know what I mean? Great. And so if someone makes a sugar free thing, and your kid hates sugar free, you say to your kid, please just put a tiny slice of that on your plate and then push a couple pieces around under something. And it'll be fine. They met Well, yeah, you know, yeah, say and then afterwards, you can say hey, he really liked that. But FYI, next time, you don't even need to do that make the same delicious pie, but you don't need to make it sugar free. Right   Stacey Simms  24:41 on everything. And that's a good point. Because we're so in our society today, we're so ready to fight. We're so ready to be on the defensive. And so I think that that's a great point just to be able to say we really appreciate it. We know how you meant it, you know, just thanks and then have the discussion later on. Yeah,   Moira McCarthy  24:57 but if they're over the top aggressive about about telling your child what they do wrong with their diabetes, then you need to have a conversation ahead of time. That's right.   Stacey Simms  25:04 Or you know, even in the moment if this sometimes you see, you know, I made this for these kids who don't have diabetes and look at this wonderful vegetable plate I made for your child like they're having cupcakes, but you could have the carrot that it's okay.   Moira McCarthy  25:17 It just jello Jaguars. My daughter was locked up. I always have to bring a tray of jello jugglers This is before acting. And   Stacey Simms  25:25 that is so funny. I'm so sorry for sugary jello. jigglers Woohoo. Oh, my gosh. Okay, another question. How do I dose for all of the grazing that goes on during Thanksgiving and holiday gatherings? This is kind of similar to the Christmas cookies, or I would think our answer is going to be but in some homes, right? It's not just one set meal. It's we showed up and we're starting to eat and we don't stop for seven hours. Oh, yeah.   Moira McCarthy  25:51 My house isn't that yours?   Stacey Simms  25:53 Isn't? No, no, no.   Moira McCarthy  25:57 Not every house was like that on a holiday. Seriously, this is interesting. All right, well, I guess I'll answer this first, then talk to your medical team. Ask them about planning different times during the day for check ins. And then just let your child have what they're going to have. And at the check in times that you agree with your doctor, it may be every two hours, it may be every three hours, it may be twice I don't know. They'll they'll help you decide. You see where they're at. You look at what's going on what they're going to be doing next. And then you do a correction of corrections needed. That's it.   Stacey Simms  26:31 Go, I'm going to add a layer to that. Yes, please do. For those who are addicted. I don't know anyone like this. I certainly have never been like this anyone who's addicted to their Dexcom. So if you're listening to more thinking, how am I supposed to check every two hours when the Dexcom or wherever three hours, whatever the most no more thinking how am I gonna check at those intervals, when my Dexcom is blaring every five minutes, okay, stay with me, people consider turning your Dexcom high alarm off, and then look at your child's Dexcom High Alert off, and then only looking at it as recommended by your care team. It will take away an enormous amount of stress. Even if your child goes high. And you bolus it's not going to happen right away. You know this, it takes a long time for insulin to work, right. So you're not really doing yourself any favors by checking it every five minutes. I know it's hard. Ask your doctor. But that has helped me more than the years when I was glued to it listening for this a lot.   Moira McCarthy  27:34 And you know, I think that's really wonderful advice. Because there's nothing wrong with freeing up the family to enjoy a good time. If it's so important to you that you keep them in a certain range and you want to watch it all day, then go ahead. But I think what you suggested and what you just said you do is such a good model for your child, because as you care for your child, you're modeling how they should care for themselves later. And the reality is in this long, long, long, long, long lifetime marathon diabetes, you need to just chill a mile here and there. And by doing this and saying to your children, we're going to turn this off, this is okay. Don't worry about it, you're fine. You're modeling that for them. And you're giving them the confidence and the courage to know that they can be okay. If they're not doing, you know, 150%. So I love that answer. Stacy, you get a gold star. Yeah,   Stacey Simms  28:34 it's funny to think about, but that's actually how we use Dexcom. And how everyone use Dexcom intil. Gosh, I'll probably get the year wrong. But until, let's say 2015 Because Dexcom share did not exist, right? So at school, our child would like many others basically used his Dexcom receiver as a no finger stick monitor. Right. So at the time of day were Benny would normally have done a finger stick, he just looked at the receiver showed it to his teacher. And that was it. We started using it like that. So I think it makes it a little easier if you come home from the hospital, like a lot of families do attuned to every alarm. These things may seem like an astronomical ask, but you really can do it. And I would also add with the grazing, we you know, we were grazing experts, because I had a two year old with type one who was diagnosed. I mean, a few years after Lauren, so you know, was not on that very regimented timing. So Benny could pretty much eat all day, like a normal two year old. I mean, obviously not all day, but you know what I mean? Several times a day, and we just had to give them fast acting. So it makes it it does make it a little more difficult, right? It's not but it's not something you do every single day, either. So I think that you know, you've got to kind of let go a little bit, but it's not harmful and it can make these ladies have these wonderful memories. Alright, and finally, this question, I'm a little stymied by this one. What's the Christmas present for a child with die? beedis   Moira McCarthy  30:01 Okay, a good Christmas present for a child with diabetes is what they put on their Christmas list. If you want to give diabetes related gifts for Christmas, that's all good and fine. I knew someone who gave their child quote unquote, their insulin pump for Christmas and like, their heart was in the right place, and the child felt great, but it just made me a little sad. I guess if your child puts insulin pump on their Christmas list, though, that's different. But even then I think I'd say no, Santa doesn't need to bring you medical stuff, we can just get that went whenever you need it. There are toys and animals and things like that. If someone's interested in actually, diabetesMine is having me do a list of them that's going to run in late November, early December. We can link that on this after Oh, that would be great. Like   Stacey Simms  30:54 the American Girl doll stuff and road kid kits. Fabulous.   Moira McCarthy  30:59 And then I don't mean that there's anything wrong with that stuff. I just think that you should give your child gifts that they want as a child, not as a child with diabetes. Yeah,   Stacey Simms  31:09 I think a lot of that depends on how your family celebrates and what gifts you're giving. We are We joked in our family for Hanukkah, when I was growing up, you would get everything from the toy that you really, really wanted to the dictionary that you did not ask for to the socks that you need it right so if your gift giving is like that mixed up, and it's you know, if your family expectation is that kids will get super useful stuff in all the kids not just the kid with diabetes, then I guess I could see it. But I'm with you, I think unless it's something really fun like one of those add on what your list is going to be made up but like, what are those stuffed pancreas like? silly things like that. And yeah, accessories for dolls and fun stuff. It's just like a useful medical thing. I think you've got to be very careful and know, the child like especially a parent to a kid is one thing but if you're like the fun and or you're the family friend thinking this will be a big hit. I just be a little careful. One of the things I saw in another group was you know, there's a newly diagnosed child which they get the family and the most popular response was don't get them anything quote diabetes related, get them fuzzy slippers, and a gift certificate for babysitting or you know a trip to the movies and get them something fun and engaging.   Moira McCarthy  32:22 Get them something normal and and pushing back on what you said I still even if my family did that stuff, I still wouldn't give my child like a box of syringes. So core. I like if you're giving your kids toothpaste for Christmas, because that's what you do, then give your kid with diabetes toothpaste for Christmas treats the same way you treat your other kids when it comes to gifts.   Stacey Simms  32:42 That's a good point. I think if anybody ever gave Benny any diabetes related gifts, and no one would ever mind my family would have ever done that. But   Moira McCarthy  32:49 one time in our family Yankee swap, I used a syringe box, like for the gift and whoever opened it thought it was syringes and we're like, I don't get it. And I'm like, Oh, for goodness sake. It's just a box.   Stacey Simms  33:03 Open it up. Is a Yankee swap like a Secret Santa.   Moira McCarthy  33:07 Yeah, kind of but you you could take gifts away from like a one white elephant. I don't know. I'm sorry. That's a white Jewish lady. It's like we're from different worlds, Stacy.   Stacey Simms  33:21 Oh, you New Englanders.   Moira McCarthy  33:24 Bless my heart.   Stacey Simms  33:26 We do have one funny story. So on Christmas day in Gosh, I'm looking back already. This was this is eight years ago. So on Christmas Day, we started the Dexcom. The very first time we ever used the G four platinum. Vinnie was nine. Oh no, the g4 Platinum pediatric. So Vinnie was nine years old. And we were sitting around a Christmas day at my mom's house like you do. And we said, let's start the Dexcom. Why don't we will put it on we had been instructed on how to do it. Of course, again, I don't know if I can emphasize this enough. We do not celebrate Christmas. I don't think I would do this. Christmas. So but we put it on and I will never forget because that was you know, Christmas Day. Gosh, so yeah. Merry Christmas kid. That was the big horrible insert or two.   Moira McCarthy  34:14 But then it could have Chinese food before the movie, right?   Stacey Simms  34:18 Really my house.   Moira McCarthy  34:21 I know you.   Stacey Simms  34:23 That's great. So normally at the end here, we talk about where we're going in the diabetes community. Of course, you know, there's no diabetes events going on now. And I'm really, really hoping they come back next year. But I mean, I'm doing some virtual events. I'm reaching out, but I cannot wait to be in person again more.   Moira McCarthy  34:39 I feel you. I can't believe I was just thinking about this the other day because my Facebook memory was, I guess right before the pandemic I was in Buffalo, New York speaking at a big diabetes event at this time and they were all these pictures and people posting about interesting things they learned and how happy they were going to be and I was like, oh, I want to go back somewhere. I think we're We're gonna see things start bubbling up I do believe friends for life is going on this summer I'm hoping I'll be there I haven't heard yet but um I know that's probably happening and I think JDRF is going to start doing some smaller half day programs in the near future knock on wood so I hope we're in the same place to Stacey that's what I hope not only we get out and speak but you and I are in the same place.   Stacey Simms  35:22 Yeah. Oh my god,   Moira McCarthy  35:23 it's all about us.   Stacey Simms  35:26 Why not? I was kind of pausing because I don't remember when we saw each other live to look that up. At the end of the show.   Moira McCarthy  35:33 I think it's been at least two years Stacy that's really weird.   Stacey Simms  35:37 It has to be it has to ah, I miss you.   Moira McCarthy  35:40 Me too. We talk every day practically. I miss you as a as a human life form.   Stacey Simms  35:50 Well, the next time we get together we can we can do a Yankee swap.   Moira McCarthy  35:52 Yeah. And and a white elephant, white elephant.   Stacey Simms  35:57 Well, if I don't speak to you have a wonderful Thanksgiving, enjoy your family and your adorable grandchildren. And give Lauren my best and tell everybody we said hi. Same here   Moira McCarthy  36:07 and make sure those kids yours know that I still think they're awesome.   Announcer  36:16 You're listening to Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms.   Stacey Simms  36:21 I will link up some information, including to an episode we did with adults with type one and their take on Thanksgiving. I'll put that in the show notes along with the transcription for this episode, you can always go to diabetes connections.com. Every episode starting in January of 2020 has a transcription. And there's lots more information there. I got to tell you more. And I make it sound pretty easy now, right? But those first couple of years, it's so stressful because you're trying to have a nice holiday. You're trying to project confidence, you know, we're doing great. Diabetes won't stop us. And then you're freaking out, you know, what did you eat? Should we pre bolus what's gonna happen now? Am I gonna be up all night? You know, it's, well, you know, who's got the carb count? Is it accurate? Spoiler, the carb count is never accurate. It's never accurate. I hope you know that. We're estimating everything, even packaged foods. Even somebody who weighs in measures, everything is a total guess, on carbohydrates. So just do the best you can. And it's you got to get through that I think you've just got to get through that experience. There is no other teacher like experience and diabetes, you've got to make mistakes, you've got to kind of be upset, you gotta be worried you got to get through it. But if you let yourself I think as a parent, you really can get to a place where you're like sure marshmallows on sweet potatoes, we can figure that out and go from there. And if you hated my advice to turn the Dexcom off, let me know I would love to hear from you. You can yell at me all you want. Let me know if you try it though. And if it works for you, I don't want to cause more stress. I promise. Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dexcom. And hey, listen, I'm all about using the technology in a way that helps you thrive with diabetes. So when I say turn it off, it's not a knock on Dexcom. It's sharing how we use it to help us make great choices. Live well and be happy. I stand by that you know we have been using the Dexcom system since he was nine years old. We started back in December of 2013. And the system just keeps getting better. The Dexcom G six is FDA permitted for no finger sticks for calibration and diabetes treatment decisions, you can share with up to 10 people from your smart device. The G six has 10 Day sensor where the applicator is so easy. I have not done one insertion since we got it but he does them all himself, which is a huge change from the previous iteration. He's a busy kid, knowing that he can just take a quick glance at his blood glucose to make better treatment decisions is reassuring. Of course we still love the alerts and alarms and that we can set them and turn them off how we want. If your glucose alerts and readings for the G six do not match symptoms or expectations use a blood glucose meter to make diabetes treatment decisions. To learn more, go to diabetes connections.com and click on the Dexcom logo. A couple of quick housekeeping notes we will have a regular episode next week. Our regular episodes are on Tuesdays. So we will have one for you next week. We will not have an in the news edition of Diabetes Connections. Thanksgiving week though. I will not be doing that live on Wednesday and there will not be an episode Friday the 26th I will say if anything really big happens if we get an FDA approval, you know something like that. I'll probably pop on and give you an update. I you know, I know we're all waiting for something so I can't promise I won't do it. It's not it's like the news person in me I was in you know, I've been doing this since I was 19. So if something breaks, I'm gonna have to jump on. Even if Slade is like, you know, making turkey behind me. We'll figure it out. But right now again this week, the week of the 16th. We will have the regular in the news on Wednesday, which will become an audio only podcast on Friday. The following week. We will have a regular episode, but there will be no in the News episode Thanksgiving week. All right. With that thank you to my editor John Bukenas from audio editing solutions. Thank you so much for listening I'm Stacey Simms I will see you back here for in the news this week until then be kind to yourself Diabetes. Benny  40:10 Connections is a production of Stacey Simms media All rights reserved. All wrongs avenged

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
In the News.. Tandem & Omnipod updates, T1D kids & COVID and more!

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 6:06


It's "In the News..." the only diabetes newscast. This week we find out about: SGLT2 inhibitors, more evidence this T2D med works for T1D, Tandem & Insulet earning calls: what you need to know, Which kids with T1D did even better during COVID? How you sleep could increase risk of gestational diabetes, what's going on for Diabetes Awareness Month and lots more! Have 5 minutes? Give it a listen! -- Join us LIVE every Wednesday at 4:30pm EDT Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Episode transcription below:   Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I'm Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days. As always, I'm going to link up my sources in the Facebook comments – where we are live – we are also Live on YouTube and in the show notes at d-c dot com when this airs as a podcast.. XX In the News is brought to you by The World's Worst Diabetes Mom, Real life stories of raising a child with diabetes. Available in paperback, on Kindle or as an audio book – all at Amazon.com -- XX Our top story, evidence that SGLT-2 inhibitors can help kidney and heart health in people with type 1. These are diabetes drugs that are already shown to lower blood sugar levels – they have brand names like Invokana and Jardiance – but they are not approved for T1D in the United States. The problem is that they can lead to DKA even with normal glucose levels. However, they are approved in Europe and many advocates say they can be used safely if people no to monitor closely. https://www.news-medical.net/news/20211107/Study-examines-benefits-of-SGLT2-inhibitors-in-individuals-with-type-1-diabetes.aspx XX Some tidbits in Tandem's third quarter investment call last week. CEO John Sheridan says they plan to ask the US FDA this year to approve Control IQ down to age 2 – right now it's only approved to age six. Also asking for expanded labeling for people with type 2. Mobile bolus or bolus by phone still out there waiting for approval – Sheridan says the FDA last asked them any questions in August. He says they have three initiatives for 2022: filing for the Tsport pump, integrating the upcoming Dexcom G7 and moving ahead with their partnership with Abbott's Libre. Sheridan thinks it'll be a matter of a few months before Tandem pumps integrate the G7 saying, “When it comes to Dexcom, we've integrated three generations of their sensors already. We're on the fourth. We know how to do this” I hadn't heard this, but Sheridan says the Libre had a bit of a hiccup with the FDA approving it as an iCGM, that's a newer designation… because taking vitamin C can throw the readings off.. but he believes they've addressed that. We'll follow up. https://www.fool.com/earnings/call-transcripts/2021/11/03/tandem-diabetes-care-inc-tndm-q3-2021-earnings-cal/ XX Insulet also had their quarterly call – CEO Shacey Petrovic says she's still optimistic about Omnipod 5 being approved this year.. she says they've had a lot of back and forth with the FDA in the last few months and that's what makes her more confident. Other tidbits.. Omnipod reports that 80% of their customers were previously on multiple daily injections only .. no prior pump experience. They think when Omnipod 5 comes out there will be more competitive switchers from other pumps. They reiterated that it will be a limited release when approval comes with a gradual rollout in the US. https://www.fool.com/earnings/call-transcripts/2021/11/04/insulet-corporation-podd-q3-2021-earnings-call-tra/ XX Really interesting news about some children in the US with type 1 during the pandemic – they had more time in range and lower A1Cs during the first year of the pandemic compared to the year before.  They also saw their doctors more, even though 90-percents of the visits were virtual. This was a group of kids ages 1-17 all of whom use a CGM. The researchers say they want to take a closer look to try to figure out why this was the case: speculation ranges from more oversight from parents to flexibility in schedules. I can say this definitely happened in my house.. however I'll also throw in that my son started on his first hybrid closed loop system in Jan 2020 just before the pandemic– Tandem's CIQ - and that made a huge difference, especially when we were stuck at home and he was eating at 2am. They don't mention the insulin delivery system here.. just that every kid had a CGM. https://www.healio.com/news/endocrinology/20211108/metrics-improve-for-us-children-with-type-1-diabetes-using-cgm-in-first-year-of-covid19 XX Something called sleep-disordered breathing may play a role in gestational diabetes and insulin resistance. There isn't a lot of research here.. This study looked at women who had risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea, a form of sleep disordered breathing that has been linked with high blood pressure, heart disease, and Alzheimers. The data suggests those with it may enter pregnancy at higher risk for gestational diabetes and recommend more screening. They added further investigation is needed to see if treating the breathing issue in early pregnancy could improve glucose levels. https://www.contemporaryobgyn.net/view/women-with-sleep-disordered-breathing-linked-to-insulin-resistance-and-gestational-diabetes-risk XX Fun story in football this week: Mark Andrews and Blake Ferguson will face each other in the big Thursday night NFL game. Andrews is with the Baltimore Ravens, Ferguson plays for the Miami Dolphins. They both live with type 1.  It's thought this is the first time two NFL players with T1D have faced each other. They each use Tandem pumps, btw, so expect to see some posts from that company promoting the game. XX Big grant for Beyond Type 1's DKA Awareness Campaign. The Helmsley Charitable Trust is giving them more than $300-thousand dollars for their grassroots messaging movement. This provides posters to schools and communities and sends literature to pediatricians. Almost 50%  patients under the age of 18 in the U.S. are in DKA when diagnosed with Type 1. https://beyondtype1.org/beyond-type-1-receives-300985-helmsley-charitable-trust-grant-for-dka-awareness-campaign/ XX Lots of good stuff happening for Diabetes Awareness Month.. Dexcom is partnering with Nick Jonas and Patti LaBelle… they say to help the diabetes community feel seen and heard, while  advocating for improved access to diabetes care. Nick Jonas has been sharing people living with diabetes on Instagram and that's been really fun to see. Patti LaBelle lives with type 2.  She spoke to Congress earlier this month to talk about better access for people with Type 2 diabetes, especially in communities of color. XX Great round up of this kind of stuff – what the big organizations are doing for Diabetes Awareness Month over at Diabetes Mine.. I'll link that up in the show notes; https://www.healthline.com/diabetesmine/diabetes-awareness-month-2021#dexcom XX quick reminder that the podcast this week is our first ever tech roundtable. Really great discussion with two guys who follow this stuff very closely – Kamil Armacki better known as Nerdabetic and Chris Wilson. We go through everything in front of the USA FDA, some stuff that's approved in Europe and talk about what's coming next. you can listen to wherever you get your podcasts or if you're listening to this as on a podcast app, just go back an episode. Next week: holiday help – ask the Dmoms is back to help you through what can be a stressful time of year. That's In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.  

Hill-Man Morning Show Audio
GHS- Brian Burns says an apology would be nice, but Mac Jones declines to apologize

Hill-Man Morning Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 35:31


Hour 3 - Brian Burns says an apology would be nice, but Mac Jones declines to apologize, NHL Analyst Mike Milbury joins The Greg Hill Show, Roy Thomas from Dexcom joins the show, Christian Fauria's 25 for 25k to benefit American Diabetes Association NHL Analyst Mike Milbury joins The Greg Hill Show: Thoughts on Bruce Cassidy sitting Taylor Hall "if you start publicly scolding people...it will turn people off"  Christian asks what was the biggest party night you (Mike) had? Comments on Carey Price, thoughts on the goalie situation - having Tuukka around is not good for the goalies but it's good for the Bruins See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pardon My Pancreas
When Diabetes Gets Tough, We Get Tougher (#NDAM Special)

Pardon My Pancreas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 27:46


If you're having a rough diabetes day, week, or year, you need to hear this message. Be sure to complete the action items from the video over on YouTube (https://youtu.be/JIb0OJxUk6U)Grab Matt's free T1D Webclass here:https://diabetesinaction.com---------Welcome to the Pardon My Pancreas podcast!! This show is all about REAL life with type 1 diabetes, understanding fluctuations, and how to stabilize your blood sugar for good. Your host is Matt Vande Vegte is a certified personal trainer, nutritionist, and type 1 diabetic whose biggest goal in life is to help people with diabetes around the world live their lives fearlessly. Looking for an online health coaching program to help you live your best life? Go to https://www.ftfwarrior.com to learn more about his program for diabetics only that is focused on helping you reach your goals while living a happier and healthier life. Join the Tribe today!This podcast is sponsored by FTF Warrior - An online health and fitness coaching company for type 1 diabetics dedicated to helping them master their blood sugars through any activity, exercise, or meal!https://www.ftfwarrior.comFollow Matt here:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ftfwarrior/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ftfwarrior/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/ftfwarrior------------------------------------------------------Disclaimer: While we share our experiences with diabetes, nothing we discuss should be taken as medical advice. Please consult your doctor or medical professional for your health and diabetes management.

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
Diabetes Tech Round Table: What are we waiting for?

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 53:32


At this point in 2021, we thought there would be several new pieces of diabetes technology on the market. COVID delayed several FDA submissions and approvals so where do we stand? Stacey sits down with Kamil Armacki, AKA Nerdabetic, and Chris Wilson to talk tech. Both Kamil and Chris keep a close eye on everything from filings to clinical trials to investor calls and neither is affiliated with any diabetes company. There is also video of this if you prefer to watch over on the YouTube channel. Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Episode transcription below Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Stacey Simms  0:00 Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dario Health. Manage your blood glucose levels increase your possibilities by Gvoke Hypopen the first premixed auto injector for very low blood sugar, and by Dexcom, take control of your diabetes and live life to the fullest with Dexcom. This is Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. This week, I wanted to try something a little different as we enter the end of 2021. And look ahead to next year, I thought it would be a good time to sort of take stock of diabetes Technology. Welcome to another week of Diabetes Connections. I'm your host, Stacey Simms. And we aim to educate and inspire about diabetes with a focus on people who use insulin. And while this community likes to say we are not waiting, frankly, there was a lot of stuff that we are waiting for right now, I asked a couple of friends who really have their finger on the pulse of this stuff to come on and share their thoughts. The only problem we really like to talk. So this is a longer episode than I expected. And frankly, it's not just that we'd like to talk there's just a lot of technology that we are waiting for. So to that end, I'm just going to jump right in, we'll do the quick add that we always do at the top and then we'll get to the panel. There is also video if you prefer to watch our conversation that's over on the YouTube channel. I'll link it up in the show notes but we are not showing any product. So it's really just about whether you prefer audio or video. Alright, Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dario health. And the bottom line is you need a plan of action with diabetes. We've been lucky that Benny's endocrinologist has helped us with that and that he understands the plan has to change as Benny my son gets older, he wants that kind of support. So take your diabetes management to the next level with Dario health. Their published studies demonstrate high impact results for active users like improved in range percentage within three hypoglycemic events. Try Dario's diabetes success plan and make a difference in your diabetes management. Go to my dario.com forward slash diabetes dash connections for more proven results and for information about the plan. And as always, this podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. All right, welcome. We're trying something new on Diabetes Connections. And that is the first of its kind kind of tech panel. And I am joined in this conversation by Chris Wilson and Kamil Armacki . And these are two guys that I'm gonna let them introduce themselves a little bit, but that I follow for technology news, as well as for some analysis. So thank you both for jumping on with me. You're not industry people. But let me ask you to kind of describe yourselves first, Chris, you are somebody that I always turn to for the insight and information about technology. But this is not what you do for a living?   Chris Wilson  3:00 No, not really. I sort of jumped into the online diabetes online community when I reached a point where I had access to insurance and could actually look at diabetes technology because it became affordable. And at that point sort of started jumping into a lot of the groups and online discussions tried to figure out what I was interested in for myself at the time. And then over time, I wound up being asked to join the admin team of a couple of the bigger Facebook groups getting involved on Twitter and other platforms. And so now i is part of that role. I sort of find and analyze listen to the investor calls that the companies do, you know, sort of keep an ear to the ground here what people's sales reps and endos are whispering about to to their patient populations and glean some information from that. I've also been a frequent participant in research, especially in clinical trials. I was in the clinical trial for the G6 that prove that acetaminophen didn't interfere with it. I was in the clinical trial for the Xeris Gvoke. I was in the clinical trial for the Ilet, which is still apparently ongoing. I've got a fair amount of experience for playing with stuff that isn't necessarily out yet. And sort of seeing things from a different perspective than just the end product that people see when they finally get a prescribe from their doctors.   Stacey Simms  4:23 That's great and comedic view or better known as Nerdabetic. On social media, many people probably recognize your Omnipod. Those are Omnipod pods lit up right behind you.   Kamil Armacki  4:34 That is absolutely right. That is 550 inch LED Omnipods. Most of them this is very DIY. Most of them actually placed with LED lights and painted and we saved them on a temporary wall kind of thing and we glued them off. So we had this is one of the proudest things I've ever done as Nerdabetic I also can't really take credit my dad that 95% I only paid a couple of walls, and I feel like I'm taking all the credit. So massive shout out to him.   Stacey Simms  5:07 I love it. I love it. And as Nerdabetic, you are known for interviewing CEOs getting all sorts of tech information out there. And we'll probably mentioned this at least once later on, you do a lot of both, you do some 3D printing, right to see what the items might look like. Yeah, so   Kamil Armacki 5:23 I've been running my YouTube channel for I think four years at this point, just when I started university, and I just graduated this summer. So it kind of it was over four years ago. So you just been trying out different things within within that channel. One of them was 3D printing. I'm absolutely fascinated by that technology. I don't own a 3D printer. But I think it is a very interesting way of giving an idea, a bit of a tangible feel to it. So for doing that, and all of those things they mentioned. And most recently, I had the honor of speaking to some pretty pretty important people in the industry to see what's been happening over there as well.   Stacey Simms  6:01 Cool. All right. And Kamil is in the UK, obviously, you sound like you're based in the UK, but you are there now, which means some of this discussion will include information from the US FDA, or at least we're gonna speculate about that same thing, European CE mark, but some differentiation of products there. But I just thought it'd be fun to talk to you guys. So all right, we've got it out there. And I'm a diabetes mom, I read stuff, I listen to stuff, I don't think quite as much as Chris, or Kamil, but that's my knowledge base. So just to be clear, nobody who works for the FDA, nobody who works for diabetes company, we are just observing and birth speculating, which I think would be some pretty fun and interesting conversation we'll see. So let's start by talking about what is in front of the FDA right now, because this year, and last year had seen some big delays due to COVID. So we're waiting. I mean, it's been a long time. Let's start with Omnipod 5. And that is, of course, still as we are speaking, I mean, who knows what will happen today or tomorrow, but it is still in front of the FDA. But what's interesting is when they submitted and Phil, I know you talked to their CEO recently I talked to her I believe right before they submitted, it was going to be very different from the other commercial hybrid close loops in that the range was going to be lower. In other words, your blood sugar range, initially, I believe, was supposed to be able to get below 100 As a set point, but now it's 110. And they do have all sorts of really interesting other features. What did Shacey Petrovic, the CEO of Omnipod share with you recently, when you talk to her anything changed, or anything that stood out to you?   Kamil Armacki 7:36 Yeah, so I've spoken to her a couple of weeks ago at this point. And the product that they've submitted to the FDA, for my understanding, has a target glucose, which goes as low as 110, and can be customized up to 150 milligrams per deciliter. In terms of the actual product, I think I'm very excited about Omnipod 5, because it will be the first product, the first pump, which actually talks directly to the Dexcom G6 continuous glucose monitor. So there'll be no need to carry a physical controller, which obviously, I think makes sense for a product like Omnipod because you know, you wear it on your body. And so it will connect directly in terms of actual updates to submission as of a couple of weeks ago, she said they still expect an A by the end of the year, with a limited release in the US. And during that interview, which was slightly kind of European focused. We talked about many things including Omnipod on the runway during Italy's Fashion Week in Milan. But she also mentioned that they are hoping to bring that technology to their to Europe to the UK, once they get their FDA approval.   Stacey Simms  8:48 When you said the first one or the only one do you mean in the UK? Because we've got Dexcom talking to Tandem, at least here in the States.   Kamil Armacki 8:55 First one where you don't need so where the pod talks wearable talks throughout behind okay. Yeah, I thought directly to the G 610.   Stacey Simms  9:05 Is control IQ approved in the   Kamil Armacki 9:06 UK stupid question. Yes, we have. So at the moment, we have control IQ and seven ATG which we will I'm sure mentioned Oh, yeah. Okay. I didn't come EPS actually. So we have three other countries across Europe. They have other systems like dialup as well, France, Germany, but we don't have that one here. Yeah. Hashtag Brexit.   Stacey Simms  9:28 I was gonna say show off, but then right. It's not in the UK. Lots of and there's other systems coming to that we may get to, Chris, anything that you have heard over the last year in terms of Omnipod? Five. I mean, I just feel like we're kind of waiting.   Chris Wilson  9:40 I mean, just from my view on the outside. I think that insolence estimates of hopefully getting it before the end of the year, probably right. I know that it did qualify as a breakthrough device. So it's supposed to have a faster review at the FDA, but we're still dealing with the COVID backlog with all kinds of stuff. For me, there's things that we probably expected six months ago, there's still pending. And I know there's always rumors circulating that this got approved, but it hasn't been released yet. And so half the time I'm going and checking the FDA database for what approvals were announced in the last week.   Kamil Armacki 10:16 Only Chris does this kind of stuff.   Stacey Simms  10:20 I did have an interesting question from a listener who was talking about Okay, so as we're taping, Dexcom g7 has not yet been submitted to the US FDA, it has been submitted in Europe. And her her thought was like, Oh, my gosh, if Omnipod has been sitting there all this time, and Dexcom hasn't even submitted, how much longer is it going to take? And my point to her was, it's not as though Omnipod and these other submissions are just sitting in a file cabinet. Right? I mean, they are actively being looked at. You're both nodding. Can you tell me a little bit about what we know I mean, these submissions again, they don't just land on a desk and then one day someone opens them and rubber stamps them. Back to our conversation in just a moment, but first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Gvoke Hypopen and you know, low blood sugar feels horrible. You can get shaky and sweaty or even feel like you're going to pass out there are a lot of symptoms and they can be different for everyone. I am so glad we have a different option to treat very low blood sugar. Gvoke Hypopen is the first auto injector to treat very low blood sugar. Gvoke Hypopen is pre mixed and ready to go with no visible needle before Gvoke people needed to go through a lot of steps to get glucagon treatments ready to be used. And this made emergency situations even more challenging and stressful. This is so much better. And I'm grateful we have it on hand, find out more go to diabetes connections.com and click on the Gvoke logo. Gvoke shouldn't be used in patients with pheochromocytoma or insulinoma visit Gvoke glucagon.com/risk. Now back to Chris answering my question about FDA submissions.   Kamil Armacki 12:00 Yeah, so for the pandemic, the main reason as to as to why we have a backlog is that regulators that used to regulate that were in charge of regulating medical devices like continuous glucose monitors, hybrid closed loop systems. And this is across actually Europe and US it's very similar, simply because of the pandemic, they were actually responsible for overseeing all of the medical queries related to the pandemic from, you know, vaccines emergency authorizations. So that's what we call when a product is used in a slightly different way to kind of simplify it. And so using a CGM and hospital was a good example of that we seen an emergency authorization of that, so they've kind of, you know, dos thinks took priority. So too, you know, that's where we have a backlog, but now they from my understanding, kind of back on on track, and, you know, four hands on that backlog, working their way through it.   Chris Wilson  12:57 There's just only so many people to do the work. And I mean, even when stuffs in development, there's always a lot of back and forth between the company that's developing it and the FDA, what are you going to require us to do, and so then they alter the product design sometimes to make it fit what the FDA wants, and that can even go into is as deep as the training modules. And the other information that gets given to patients when the product is prescribed, they're looking at all of that they're looking at human factors testing are people you know, able to follow the directions and use it the way that it's intended to be used, are they going to do something stupid and mess it up? They're looking at all of that. And then they're going through all of that data on all the different aspects of the devices and needing to decide, okay, is this safe enough to actually be effective? And there are different standards in Europe versus in the US? The FDA has much higher safety thresholds, whereas the European standard is basically does it do what it says it's going to do?   Kamil Armacki 13:58 And just to close up Omnipod 5, I think FDA has added it Chrissie would agree this is just my personal opinion. I think FDA has been pretty scared of going to full control. And the biggest today there isn't an insulin pump, which offers, you know, remote bolus capabilities. And that's part of Omnipod 5, you know, that's what they've submitted to them. So, you know, my speculation would be that if actually they didn't submit full control within that first submission, maybe we already you know, maybe it would be here already. You know, it is an area that FDA has been very cautious about. So I guess that's a significant factor contributing to to the to the backlog as well to the delight.   Stacey Simms  14:40 Well, and that brings us to our next item that's in front of the FDA. Thank you for setting that up. So Tandem has also submitted in the last year and is waiting for bolus by phone. You know, that's not the official name of it. But I agree with you. I think the FDA is really taking a very, very careful look at that bit of technology. And Tandem, you know, I believe, to your point, Chris, there has been some back and forth. You know, they don't issue press releases. Every time they asked for that, but it is happening, I think, to me, you know, as a mom of a kid who takes his phone everywhere, you know, this is something that I cannot wait for. I mean, bullets by phone just seems like such a basic capability in 2021. But of course, it's a medical device, and it's your phone. Chris, are you hearing anything? Or do you have any opinion on that?   Chris Wilson  15:29 I mean, at least as far as Tandem goes, I think there's less of a risk because you still actually have the physical pump that can be used to do something if for some reason, there's a problem with the phone. If you're relying exclusively on the phone, you've got to worry about what happens if it gets lost. What happens if they're dead batteries? What happens if you unlock it and hand it to your kid to play a game and the kid goes into your bolus app and accidentally gives you 15 or 20 units of bolus while they're chatting around? I mean, all of those things need to need to be taken into consideration and mitigated as much as possible.   Stacey Simms  16:01 I wonder Kamil, it's interesting to think about Omnipod because they've when I've talked to them, I've always asked like, why can't you put some buttons on the pod. And their point was, and I think this leads to Chris's point from the phone, their point has always been well, it's for safety with the pediatric patients, they don't want the kids touching the pod pressing buttons, this makes perfect sense. I was a parent of two small children, they're gonna touch everything. But it's kind of the flip side now on the phone, right. So it's an interesting look to see what you trade off in a way.   Kamil Armacki 16:31 So actually, to that point, in the UK, we do have an insulin pump from rush called accucheck. Solo. And on the high level, it's kind of like a nominal pot, where the pot like device that you put on your body and actually has two buttons on it. So you can actually bolus from the patch itself. And the way they've actually engineered it is that you need to press both buttons at the same time, ensure that you don't kind of you know, lean on the you know, you could very easily lean on a button and just press it, you know, other companies have gone down that route as an Omnipod. To use that I do use a monopod. So I use Dexcom and Omnipod in a DIY setting. And yeah, I love the simplicity of it. So yeah, massive, massive fan.   Stacey Simms  17:14 I think it's just all trade offs. Right. I mean, there's no perfect system, I don't think but people want to perfect. Exactly. Right. Exactly. Chris, what do you use? If you don't mind me asking?   Chris Wilson  17:25 I am on a Tandem with control IQ, although I don't use it exactly as designed. I've been working with better bullet strategies and playing with the modes that have put that it gets put in be an exercise or sleep that change some of the the targets that it's trying to hit to get it to behave a little bit more like I think it should.   Stacey Simms  17:47 So you're using Ctrl Q and Kamil, you're using   Kamil Armacki 17:50 loop? Yeah, that's right. Yeah. on any iPhone. Yeah.   Stacey Simms  17:53 All right. I don't want to move on from Tandem quite yet. But I want to talk about loop in a moment. So we've got bolus by phone in front of the FDA, which we also think could come approval could come by the end of the year, but Tandem moved their submission for TSport. Right. They were going to submit that in 2021. Chris, they are moving that to 2022. Right.   Chris Wilson  18:12 That was the last that I heard. Yes. To me.   Stacey Simms  18:16 I see you nodding.   Kamil Armacki 18:17 Yeah, I agree that that's what my understanding of the T sport is, I think they had some communication with FDA with the phone control, which obviously plays into T sports as well. Like the point Chris was making, you know, there's no display I don't think on the although, you know, it's a patch, you know, it's kind of moving into that kind of tubeless to pipe bridge mode kind of pump. So yeah, I'm pretty sure they've decided it's pushed back further.   Stacey Simms  18:48 And I should have set that up better if you're not familiar with a tee sport is a very tiny version of the T slim it is been to me it looks kind of like a beefed up cartridge and it sticks somehow to your body. There is still a tube and there is still an inset, but it kind of I don't know if it dangles off, or it sticks some I don't know. So they haven't they haven't released that I've asked a bunch of people when Lily a while ago was coming up with its own pump and it was supposed to be inset and sticky. I'm still trying to figure out how it supposed to stick to your body with an inset and they haven't really explained that. So maybe at some point, but clearly you made a 3D version of this yourself right? Didn't you like mock up a Teesport at one point and freak everybody out? Because we thought you had one?   Kamil Armacki 19:27 I did. So just on that entire idea in general, there's actually a pump in it's been kind of out here in Europe and has been taken off the market and I think it's coming back at some point called collider which uses a similar idea of where three colors bright colors. Yeah, so So that's kind of it's an interesting concept because you have an infusion set and like a sticky dye upon your body. And I think it that's what Tandem has gone off as well. But yeah, I did. It's very interesting how people often will look at especially on YouTube because it's a very visual form, they will look at a picture without watching the video. And yeah, a lot of people thought I had some insider info on the T spot, which was a very interesting experiment and a lot of comments about that go like, where did you get this? And I'm like, I didn't Freeview print hello, it's 2020.   Kamil Armacki 20:19 Be careful, be careful, hey,   Chris Wilson  20:21 I need to take some of the blame, actually, I think for potential delays on the other Teesport, I was involved in some of the Human Factors testing. And based on some of the questions that I got asked afterwards, I think I may have done some things that they weren't expecting it some stupid things or something that was not dissipated. So that may actually be the source of some of the   Stacey Simms  20:45 Alright, well, if you can't answer I understand what the heck could you have done? What   Chris Wilson  20:52 I think it was, it was just in case of directions weren't necessarily clear. Or I was expecting, you know, think about this, rather than actually do it. I obviously can't go into specifics. But needless to say, I clearly wasn't doing everything that they expected as part of the tasks in the testing. So who knows that may be part of the the reason that things got delayed, but hey, if it prevents somebody else from doing the stupid things that I did, and having a problem later on, then that's actually a good thing. And actually,   Kamil Armacki 21:24 I'm so glad that you did, Chris, because so many companies have tried this idea of you know, having a patch and in a short tube. So novo, they went out of business Kaleido also really struggling, we don't really know if they're gonna come back. And Tandem is now trying, they're kind of stab at it. No one has really made this idea work. So   Stacey Simms  21:43 yeah, it's a good point. But one thing I do like, again, I don't have diabetes, I don't wear the devices. But the idea I like is that with an inset, you do have a choice of how it connects angled or what the cannula length is, or steel, you know, with Omnipod, or you don't have as many options in terms of how it connects. Now, many people will say to counter that, well, you have many more options of where you can put it, you know, so it really just depends on how you wear it where you're comfortable with. But I think that's why they keep trying cumulus because there's that different kind of inset that people can use. So who knows? But I think that's a really good point.   Chris Wilson  22:18 Well, it's a great example of how your diabetes may vary. Yeah, no one solution is going to work for everyone. So that's why it's important that we have these options.   Stacey Simms  22:27 Alright, so let's talk about loop. One of the other submissions. This is such a laundry list in front of the FDA is tide pool loop. And that was submitted earlier in 2021. It's been very quiet, but it is it's hanging out there. Anybody here anything? Anybody know anything? Any comments?   Chris Wilson  22:45 I really haven't heard anything. I mean, it's so pure speculation. Obviously, this coming from the open source community is going to be subject to a lot probably more scrutiny than if it's coming from an established player. And I was not entirely clear on exactly what the trials for approval looked like. It sounded like some of the DIY data from DIY loot may have actually been used as part of the submission. So I would imagine that that's probably at least one of the things that may be taking a little bit extra time because I'm feeling the FDA is probably going to look a little bit more closely at that than they would if it was coming directly from Insulet. Or someone else.   Stacey Simms  23:28 That's a good point and was used I believe, that's what they told me earlier this year was a lot of that open source a lot of that DIY community data was put in so you wonder what then the FDA came back and asked for no, no, what we really need is or no, that is enough. I mean, we'll find out later, but it's very interesting stuff.   Kamil Armacki 23:46 And in some ways, it is a perfect storm, because it is using, you know, using that DIY technology, which is just absolutely amazing. I mean, the whole title team has been so tremendous in this project. So it's you know, taking that DIY, but then also the phone control point that we mentioned earlier, where it's an Omnipod. So actually, you know if your battery dies, I'm sure everybody's asking those questions. You know, if your iPhone dies, how is the child going to bolus? I'm sure that those are the questions that you know regulated system has to they need to have that usually answers for that. So I'm sure they face in similar scrutiny on the phone point just like Omnipod 5 does with eventually   Stacey Simms  24:26 this just occurred to me and again, I don't use the system so that's probably way to think about it, but these DIY systems that already use the phone can you use your watch to control them to Kamil, I wonder if that's something that's done? Yes.   Kamil Armacki 24:39 It's it's just like with Dexcom you still need your phone. So phones like the the house the home of the of the whole system, you can remotely you know, bolus and enter carbohydrates and Al's meals etc. Using your Apple Watch. Bought a phone is still required to actually do all of the calculations the brain behind all of it on Omnipod, five doc, this all happened on the pod both title loop that's all happening on the phone just like with a DIY system. Oh, yeah, that's a really good point. So you really need that to to make this system work. And there are all of those you know, your phone die in, you know, someone's stealing your phone cases that you know, I'm sure FDA is wants answers for   Stacey Simms  25:22 it to be clear, because a lot a lot of information there. I think this is a good point Omnipod 5, as you said, controlled by the pod. So you lose your phone, it keeps on trucking, it's going to deliver basil, the loop will continue a tide pool loop and loop DIY, whatever it's called right now is all controlled by the phone. So if your phone dies, the system won't continue.   Kamil Armacki 25:40 Well, so by design, it will always deliver background insulin in the way that it's intended. I mean, my phone dies, sometimes you know, it's live, right? I'm a 23 year old. Me because it is difficult to keep it charged in the pub. So you know it does happen. So and those are kind of a real world cases that you know, I'm sure FDA is also asking about. So with the DIY system, and I would assume with Title loop as well. But that is just my speculation. When your phone dies with the DIY system, it automatically goes to the default background rates for you kind of bolus because you need your phone to do that. And I would assume it would be relatively similar of tide pool loop, because I don't think there would be making a separate backup device like Omnipod just doing with Omnipod 5. Okay,   Stacey Simms  26:31 thanks. Alright, last item that is in front of the FDA, I think is the Medtronic 780, which is already available in Europe.   Right back to our conversation, but first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dexcom. And if you're a veteran, the Dexcom G6 continuous glucose monitoring system is now available at Veterans Affairs pharmacies in the United States. qualified veterans with type one and type two diabetes may be covered and pick it up your Dexcom supplies at the VA pharmacy may save you a lot of time to connect with your doctor for more information. Dexcom even has a discussion guide you can bring with you I know it can be hard to know what questions to ask, get that guide, find out more about eligibility at dexcom.com/veterans. Now back to Kamil answering my question about whether the Medtronic 780 is available in Europe?   Kamil Armacki 27:34 That's right. Okay. So 780 G has been here for it's been approved last summer. So kind of just as COVID was kind of a couple of months in, and it's been rolled out across various countries in Europe. I think we got it in the UK earlier this year. Well, I think the 770 G's, the newest version that you guys have in the US. So the 700 pumps, they all have Bluetooth built in. So you can have your pump alarms, all of that on your phone, no control. But you can view everything by the 780s, kind of the newest pump in that line, which has a new brain new algorithm. In my view, it is completely different. Because actually, it's not really made by Medtronic. It's made by an Israeli company called Dream met.   Stacey Simms  28:23 So that's free. That's right. The algorithm is from Dream Med, I've interviewed them, I forgot to actually   Kamil Armacki 28:28 said that in one of my videos, and Medtronic wasn't really happy with me. So   Stacey Simms  28:32 I feel like we have it's ours. Now. It's been,   Kamil Armacki 28:35 they officially said something like it's built by a dream met with Medtronic engineers. So you know, it is a partnership. And that's apparently true. You know, I have no reason to deny that. So I'm sure they work together on it. But you know, the the foundation of seven ATG is actually completely different. It's not like they took 670 and added a couple of capabilities. You know, it's a great we design I mean, on the outside, it looks the same, but actually the the actual brain inside is completely different. And I guess one of the one of the key things that we mentioned is actually the ability to have your glucose set as low as 100. You know, people have diabetes across Europe, they've they've been really kind of enjoying that. And it has automatic corrections as well. So a lot of people listening to this might not be as techie as we are. So just in simple terms, it kind of matches control IQ, I would kind of say in terms of the feature set, maybe slightly better, because you can reduce your target to 100, which I know a lot of people have been asking about. I don't know if you agree, Chris, without saying it's kind of at the same level as control like you   Chris Wilson  29:37 from a tech perspective. Yeah, they both the the key difference or the key feature there is the automated correction boluses, which is what differentiates what they call an advanced hybrid closed loop from just a standard hybrid closed loop, which is what the 670 and 770 were, it's nice to see more high tech options coming to the market from more players. says it gives people more options.   Stacey Simms  30:01 That's interesting, though about any kind of criticism for mentioning dream, Ed, because I mean, control IQ was developed by type zero technology, right? Wasn't it like a University of Virginia thing that then Tandem bought? Yeah, well,   Chris Wilson  30:14 it got bought by Dexcom Dexcom, bought type zero and then license the tech to Tandem. So   Stacey Simms  30:22 interesting times. And we should also mention that all the Medtronic systems use their sensors. This is not yet a mix and match world, I believe the Medtronic sensors, and I keep hearing that they're much better, but still need to be calibrated. So even the latest version No, your shake your head, Kamil tell Oh, that's right. We're waiting for that approval in the US.   Kamil Armacki 30:42 Well, so. So guardian for has been approved in three guardians. And so that's the no calibration version. And it's I know, like one person who's using it. So it's not I think they slowly roll in and out. They haven't really started shipping it yet. But it's basically what we all know, as guardian free just with with no calibrations. As far as I'm understanding the accuracy is not improved. It's kind of the same, if not slightly worse, from a margin perspective with Guardian four, compared to Guardian three. And yeah, I think it's in the FDA backlog as well. I'm gonna go ahead and   Stacey Simms  31:21 just double check that on my end only because it'll be good to know the actual mark from their studies and things like that. So we'll pop that into the show notes. But I think you're exactly right, because I was just doing the time. It'll be interesting to see what the time shift is, in terms of episodes being released, because we were just doing our game show. Wait, wait, don't poke me for friends for life. And I actually I can't believe I forgot I asked this question about Guardian four. Because the codename for it or at least the in house name for it was Zeus. So we had been talking about Zeus for Medtronic for a long time, no calibrations I know this is the I get in the weeds of the trivia and then I forget what I know. So thanks for correcting me. Alright, and then Alright, let's talk about Dexcom. Because Dexcom g7, as we're taping g7 has not been submitted to the US FDA, but it has been submitted for European approval. Kamil, you had Dexcom CEO on your show, wearing and showing off the device. I was so jealous when I saw that I'm gonna yell at Kevin Sayer. Next time I talked to him. But yeah, tell us what that was like and what you thought of it when you saw it.   Kamil Armacki 32:27 You know, I've been the massive Dexcom advocate, I pay for my own decks because I'm not an ambassador, I just genuinely it's been a life changing product for me. And yeah, it's been it's been an honor speaking to him. So you've spoken to him a couple of weeks after they announced that they submitted for the for the European European approval. I mean, it looks tiny, as I'm sure you've seen, if you've seen the video, I'm incredibly excited to see kind of how that one develops, and from literally a couple of days. So they kind of in the investors call, like Chris was saying, I also sometimes tune into those, and they confirmed that the expecting to get that approved in Europe by the end of the year.   Stacey Simms  33:07 It's interesting. And Chris, maybe you could speak to this, for people who might not be that familiar, the Dexcom technology, while it is very different from the G6, the speed at which it might get approval, Europe is one thing, right us is another this is not like an insulin pump, we don't expect it at least to take quite as long as insulin pumps are different systems because it's not putting insulin into your body, right? It's just measuring,   Chris Wilson  33:28 but it is being used to calculate doses of a high risk medication, which is insulin, there's definitely still some concern as far as how accurate it is. And if it's off it, how off? Is it? Is it going to cause a problem? But I'm really excited with the clinical data that they presented. I think it was at EASD Earlier this year, showing that the g7 the marred the that measure of accuracy that they use is actually now under 8%. With the g7 which I mean we're getting into how much more accurate can we reasonably get just because there's so much variation in human body that I mean, you can take six fingerprints from six different fingers and get six different answers from his standard meter. The fact that we're really dialing in the accuracy is as tight as we can and actually ever since is almost in the same boat with their new Wow, what any product they had. I think two versions I recall, but that's coming as well. And the the 180 day version as long as we're talking CGM. Yeah, there is no absolute answer for anything. This is actually I was in a study last Thursday, where they were seeing how long I could go without insulin. But as part of it, they're they're monitoring it with a y si, which is this reference grade laboratory meter that they actually do a blood draw and they centrifuge it down. And then they measured the glucose level in the plasma without any of the blood cells in it. And that device in the lab was actually not putting out the correct numbers, there was some sort of hiccup, they had to restart it to get it to come up. But my Dexcom was matching, and then they compared it to multiple Ultra accurate fingerstick meters and set to figure out what was going on. But, you know, nothing's perfect. This was, you know, elaborate reference glucometer. That's the most accurate one that you can get. And they don't even make them anymore.   Stacey Simms  35:23 I will never forget, when Betty was little like poking the same finger, you said six different fingers, who put the same finger three times in a row because it was confusing or something. And it was always three different numbers. It's crazy.   Chris Wilson  35:33 I just think it's important that people keep in mind that you know, nothing is ever going to be perfect. whatever device you're wearing, however, you're measuring your stuff, there's always going to be variation, it's never going to be exactly the same number every time on every device   Stacey Simms  35:46 you mentioned ever since that's the CGM that goes under your skin. And then the transmitter goes on top. And Kamil, you are you've got a little bit are you using the libre as well like to test it out? Or did you? What did you show us earlier,   Kamil Armacki 36:00 I am trying the free celebrate free, which is like the newest version. It's not available in the UK, I should make it very clear. But someone bought it for me in Germany. And they imported it over to the UK is actually it's actually been a very interesting over here. Because obviously it's it's not available in the UK. So I had to enter freestyling briefly, there was no physical receipt, but you need to get an app. So only use your phone, you can only use your phone, there's no physical reader, there's no physical device, which I don't know how that's going to work with, you know, children going to school and you know, having to carry phones, but anyway, but it's not available in the British App Store. So I had to create a German Apple ID. And everything on my phone is German. So I gem Apple Music, German podcasts, everything is in German, it's still English. But other than that I have been enjoying my German lifestyle over the last I've had it for four days now. So it's been it's been fun.   Stacey Simms  37:03 What are the different features like what's I'm not as familiar with the Libre system. So what is new with the three,   Kamil Armacki 37:08 it's much smaller, it's much smaller compared to the first two. And on a high level, it works exactly like you would expect a CGM to work like Dexcom web, no scan and it just always shows the value and the glucose your trends alarms ever found on your phone. So they kind of made it work in exactly the same way as at the center of Dexcom. But most importantly for me, they keep them the same price. And I think that's very important for a lot of people have diabetes here in Europe because I mean, Libra has been a giant success in the UK for example, just because actually, because of its price point it is accessible to the National Health Service. So it is you know reimbursed to you know, vast majority pretty much every single person of type one who wants it to get can get it. And libre two is the same price point is libre one and now libre free. In Germany, when they did launch, it's also the same price. So they keeping it the same, which is which is very reassuring   Stacey Simms  38:08 process, we'll see what happens in the US. But that is very reassuring for our friends in Europe. I went device I meant to ask about and didn't but I don't think it's been submitted. And that is beta bionics and the iLet. And Chris, you kind of alluded to this much earlier in our talk, because you were I believe in one of those trials,   Chris Wilson  38:25 I was at least told that I was patient number one at the trial site that I was at.   Stacey Simms  38:33 But we don't think we don't know for sure they have not submitted down or have they?   Chris Wilson  38:38 Well, I keep hearing parents and other patients still people diabetes, still saying, you know, I just finished my time in the primary phase of the trial for the eyelids, or now my kid is going into the extension phase, things like that. So if the trial is ongoing, clearly, I don't think they've they've submitted yet. It's definitely more hands off. I won't lie my time and range did go down a little bit when I was on it.   Stacey Simms  39:03 But your your time and range we should specify is extremely high.   Chris Wilson  39:06 Right? My 90 day average right now is 94% a week going into the current trial, the arm of the trial that I just finished was actually 97.   Stacey Simms  39:20 So it's all relative, but otherwise. Yeah. But it's a good point in that, you know, the eyelid is much more hands off, as you mentioned,   Chris Wilson  39:32 right? It's you know, no correction boluses there's not even mechanism to do it. All you can really do is tell it when you're eating and give it a rough guesstimate as to the meal size. So I would imagine especially for people who want to be more hands off with their diabetes and have good control because of the control wasn't bad by any stretch of the imagination, that it'll be a very good option for a lot of people once it does get approved. And this is the Insulet only version. We've still got The version with insulin and glucagon having both a gas and a brake will definitely make it easier to drive the car going forward in the next version. So we're looking forward to, to them starting the trials on that as well.   Stacey Simms  40:13 Yeah, it is all relative. I mean, I just think about my son, you know, he misses a couple of meal boluses a week for sure. And I think he would happily trade off control, you know, to just have that kind of stuff be taken care of. It's so interesting to see how I mean, I'm, I'm, I know, we're gonna get somebody questions as Chris gets so much time and range, what is he doing with control IQ? So that'll be another episode tips and tricks from Chris to or maybe the maybe the tips and tricks, Kamil is just spent a lot of your time in diabetes trials? Yeah. I mean, I kidding. I know. That's not it. But   Kamil Armacki 40:48 well, you're my time and ranges, but it's knowing me about? Very, very happy with it. I like to say that my time and happiness, though is 98. If not 100%?   Kamil Armacki 41:00 Go? And that's what matters. Yeah, right.   Stacey Simms  41:04 Absolutely.   Chris Wilson  41:05 I mean, that we joke about doable, do a lot of trials. And it helps. But there is definitely some truth to that. I mean, I get to talk to and interact with some of the top endocrinologist in the world, right? Sometimes, you know, on a weekly basis. So I'm going into the clinic to have an injection of something that they're testing out or to check in and let them download the data from the device that I'm testing in half the time we're chatting while they're doing other stuff. And you know, discussing the theories that underlie a lot of this stuff. And it definitely deepens your understanding, if you want to really understand diabetes, more and more like an endocrinologist does that say, it's a great way to gain some experience?   Stacey Simms  41:49 Let's talk a little bit. We've talked about what's happening and what we're waiting for. So let's talk a little bit about what we're excited for. And not just the products that we mentioned. But if there's anything else that's on your mind, I'm curious what you guys who live with diabetes, you use these devices, you follow this tech? Chris, what are you looking forward to? And I mean, it could be something that we talked about, or something that's like maybe 10 years from now,   Chris Wilson  42:10 I think probably the thing that that's most interesting, I mean, to a certain extent, the tech we even if it's not there yet, we know where it's going. Yeah, where it's sort of the end point is the point is you were a sensor, you were a pump, and it does everything for you, and you don't need to worry about it. But beyond that, I think one of the things that I'm most excited about is seeing the medications that were originally designed for type twos being used in more type ones. Yeah, since most type ones do have some insulin resistance, it's actually you know, a known thing that happens, it's partly just due to the fact that normally, insulin gets made on in the middle and spreads out to the edges, and we're infusing it from the edges and having it go into the middle of the circulation. But things like I know, Stacy, you've mentioned in the past the SDLT, two drugs that help us her pee out the excess sugar from your blood, those have shown really great improvements in kidney health, cardiovascular outcomes, and making those safer for type ones, since it can cause an issue with going into DKA even though your blood sugar's stay relatively normal. That was actually the the test that I was last Thursday was checking a new drug that as an add on to help reduce the chance of that happening if you're a type one on one of these medications, but there's lots of different classes of medications that are coming out things that not only enhance the function of insulin, but potentially block some of the functions of glucagon to help improve things since they've documented that. A lot of type ones the the sort of regulation and counter regulation in insulin, the insulin glucagon axis, I guess, it does happen with a fair amount of frequency in people with type one. So that may be something moving forward. And actually, it's not even necessarily just diabetes. They're testing this medication that they were trying to lay on me as an enhancement for cancer immunotherapy. Wow. In North Carolina, I somebody was asking me about something. And so I went on the clinical trials website, it was digging into what said he's looking at this drug and found a study that they were looking at it to see if it'll enhance the ability of some immunotherapies for breast cancer. So I mean, a lot of this stuff may even have ripple effects outside of diabetes.   Stacey Simms  44:33 That's really amazing. All right. That's a great point. I love that. All right. You know, you don't have to go outside of technology. I mean, that is still technology gets medication, but can we what are you looking forward to? Are you looking at down the line? I'm   Kamil Armacki 44:46 going to keep this one very, very simple. I'm just looking forward to seeing more access to all of this. I feel like in terms of getting incredible technology. I feel like we could summarize all of this all of today's talking Massive tech, right? We have incredible continuous glucose monitors even better on the market. And even better versions of them are common over the next year or so with g7, libre free etc. Same with pumps, that technology so sadly, isn't really accessible to so many people. And this applies to so many regions, so many countries in the UK, we now have an a trial of 1000 people with diabetes trial in closed loop technology to hopefully have our national proof that it does work is self restraint and actually seeing all of this because, you know, it's like every single country wants their own proof even though you know, there are so many trials from all over the world proven that yes, actually, it does help people. But you know, it is a very bureaucratic process. So I'm just looking forward to actually see in 1000s, if not millions of people have access to CGM. And then if they choose to hypertrophic therapy.   Stacey Simms  45:55 That's wonderful. All right. Before I let you go, this last question, it's not really a great follow up to our discussion about access. But this is one that it just honestly, it drives me bananas, and I want to get your opinion on and that is this every other day, I feel like someone is asking me when the Apple Watch is going to monitor blood glucose with non invasively. Right, that I know, right? You're gonna get the watch, it's gonna read your blood glucose and then move on. And I get these questions all the time by people outside the diabetes community, frankly, who read about it or hear about it. What's your take? I mean, I know what's coming. I hope it's coming. I don't want to I feel like I'm the hope killer. I go on these threads. And I'm like, unless you see a clinical trial, right. It's not going to happen. But I feel like it is coming it will be useful to some people sometime, right?   Chris Wilson  46:44 I think, absolutely. I think there's a couple of companies that are pretty far along. In the process of actually doing non invasive glucose monitoring. I think you had an episode recently, where you mentioned one where they look at the eye, yeah, within the eye, which is cool. I've heard of a couple of different texts that are technologies that are being introduced, using either heat at low levels infrared, to potentially sense it, or radio signals, believe there's a company in Israel that's working on that as well. Yeah, they're probably not good enough to necessarily dose insulin from yet, but they're getting there and the tech keeps getting smaller and more portable and stuff, I think there's a company in Germany that's got the tabletop scale right now, where you can just basically put a finger into on the sensor and it will give you an estimate of your blood sugar in there hoping to scale that down to being a portable device that will be non invasive, and then eventually a wearable device that will be non invasive. So it's, it's definitely coming, but the stuff takes time, there's so figuring out serve a lot of the ways that the various sensing technologies interact with the body and figuring out exactly how best to estimate your blood sugar from the readings that they get back. So it's coming. I've seen presentations with actually impressive accuracy, especially considering that it's non invasive, but I don't see it any time at least probably not in the next couple of years, but especially integrated into a consumer device like an Apple Watch.   Kamil Armacki 48:13 I completely agree with Chris I think especially as someone living with diabetes we tend to look at this from a you know, kind of a medical point of view but if this ever were to happen, it's really a health companion and I think that entire trend have actually seen a lot of what I would consider mainstream technology companies you know, Apple Samsung, you know, those kinds of players becoming more involved in health is a good thing because I think you know, we've heard of so many stories of you know, people using you know, Apple watches and you know being alerted that actually your heart rate is too low or too high and actually you know, if you deploy that kind of capability on you know, a population scale you know, with with millions of people using Apple Watches, it really drives you know, big changes and cold drives colossal impact on you know, general population you know, how we live our lives for if ever does happen I mean, we hear about this all the time and literally this year I think it was six or seven days after Apple Watch Series seven came out there was already a rumor saying the Apple Watch Series eight Yes. Well habit and I saw on Twitter and I just went I just did this emoji six days, six days the longest amount of time we can have without any rumors about Apple Watch.   Stacey Simms  49:39 It just shows you how much money is in it   Kamil Armacki 49:43 It's click bait, interesting topic because you know it is the next frontier that you know everyone is trying to tackle. Yeah, so I understand the excitement bore and sometimes I'm probably causing it because I have talked about as well. In my in my printer diabetic days, I I was excited about it. I've been excited about as Nerdabetic, and we can't not be excited.   Stacey Simms  50:05 Well, even this episode, someone could clip out what Chris said it's coming.   Kamil Armacki 50:09 Yeah. But we do need to be realistic about it that even when it comes in, you know, 1015 years, it probably won't really have any tangible impact on any buyer lives.   Chris Wilson  50:21 Maintaining being realistic, that's a very good point. Because it reminds me of the vertex announcement a couple of weeks ago, with the the first patient of their trial, got infusion of stem cell derived Ilet cells, and is, you know, 90% reduction in insulin use. And everybody went nuts over that. And I wound up posting a big, long thread on Twitter explaining that really like this isn't the hard part yet. It's great that they're this far, it's awesome that people are pursuing different avenues, I hope they succeed. But this isn't going to be something that people are going to have in the next couple of years to just go in and get your eyelid infusion. And then you don't need to worry about measuring your blood glucose or worrying your pump or taking injections anymore.   Stacey Simms  51:10 I heard a great point on that, which was if they've sent a press release, it's quite different than if they've submitted a for publication in a clinical journal. It was a little bit, I'll say a little meaner than that. I think the quote was something like, you know, if it's a press release, they're looking for money, if it's a journal they're looking for, you know, approval. There's some truth to that, though. And I think that that's a good thing for us to keep in mind as we stay very hopeful is a very hopeful crowd. And as we stay realistic, as well, I think we've run the gamut. There's always so much more to talk about. So I hope you'll come back on when these things maybe we hear more, they start to get approved, or we just talk about different things. But this was great. Thank you both so much for jumping on.   Chris Wilson  51:50 It's always fun to talk to you, Stacey.   Stacey Simms  51:51 Oh, thank you, thank you. It's always great to get caught up on this stuff and kind of speculate and talk about it. So thanks so much. I appreciate you guys both being here. And we will put lots of links in the show notes and everywhere else we can find them so that people can find you on social and follow your musings and your thoughts, but I really appreciate it. We'll talk to you soon.   You're listening to Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. Lots of information there. I'm going to link up a couple of articles some things we referenced at diabetes connections.com. At the homepage for this episode, there is a transcription as well as always, what do you think? I mean, I know it was long, and there were a lot of things to get through. But I'd like to do that on a more regular basis, maybe with some different people in the community. Love to hear feedback from you what questions you have, what topics you'd like us to tackle. But man, those guys, really they know the ins and outs of all of this, they really keep their finger on the pulse. So we'll follow up. We'll do more on that. This was taped, as I said the very first week of November 2021. So in a couple of days between now and when the episode comes out, maybe something else was approved. If it happened, we will follow up on it here. All right, thank you, as always to my editor John Bukenas from audio editing solutions. We've got in the News Live every Wednesday now 4:30pm Eastern Time, on YouTube and on Facebook Live on both channels, and then we turn it around into an audio podcast episode that airs Fridays. So I hope to see you back here for that until then be kind to yourself. Diabetes Connections is a production of Stacey Simms media. All rights reserved. All wrongs avenged

We Should Talk About That
We Should Talk About Type 1 Diabetes and Our Kids with Nurse Practitioner and Diabetes Care and Education Specialist, Ellie Kagan

We Should Talk About That

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 57:41


November is National Diabetes Awareness Month and in order to raise more awareness around the rising diagnosis of type I diabetes in children. The Two Jess(es) sit down with Nurse Practioner and certified diabetes care and education specialist, Ellie Kagan, for an incredibly informative conversation on type 1 diabetes and how it affects children with a diagnosis. Ellie breaks down the road to diagnosis, what families will face, and how they should expect to navigate such a life altering situation, for the entire family. Ellie outlines the symptoms you might encounter, what to look for, and when to seek professional help. This episode is incredibly eye opening and a must for every parent. Meet Ellie:As a Nurse Practitioner and certified diabetes care and education specialist, Ellie Kagan has been helping children with type 1 and their families manage their diabetes for the past 13 years. She worked as part of the outpatient clinical practice at Mt. Washington Pediatric Hospital, an affiliate of Johns Hopkins Hospital and University of Maryland Hospital from 2008-2021. Ellie is a certified insulin pump trainer for Tandem, Insulet and Medtonic as well as a certified continuous glucose monitor trainer for Dexcom. Ellie saw the need for more personalized diabetes education and recently opened Diabetes Education Solutions, a private diabetes coaching and consulting business.  She provides families with the tools they need to help their child succeed and thrive with diabetes. She currently serves as an advisor and research moderator for Seagrove Partners, LLC, an independent consulting firm concentrating on diabetes research and technology. Ellie is a frequent guest speaker and educator for school nurses at public and private schools and is called on to speak about diabetes management at school conferences. To find out more about Ellie and her work go to: http://diabetesesolutions.comSupport the show (http://www.paypal.com)

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
In The News.. Sugarmate update, new BG meter approved, T1D scholarships and more!

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 6:17


This week, the top diabetes stories and headlines in the news include: the popular Sugarmate app loses Dexcom connection, interesting study about internal clocks and type 2 diabetes, the FDA approves new "POGO" BG meter, T2D remission might be more common than thought, Type 1 college scholarships and lots more. -- Join us LIVE on Facebook and YouTube every Wednesday at 4:30pm EDT Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Episode transcription below: Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I'm Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days. As always, I'm going to link up my sources in the Facebook comments – where we are live – we are also Live on YouTube and in the show notes at d-c dot com when this airs as a podcast.. XX In the News is brought to you by The World's Worst Diabetes Mom, Real life stories of raising a child with diabetes. Available in paperback, on Kindle or as an audio book – all at Amazon.com -- Top story this week.. Big issue for a popular app – users of Sugarmate have been told as of this week – November 4th to be precise – customers in the US will lose connection. Those outside the US have seen issues since October. This is because of a change Dexcom made to its servers. Sugarmate says Dexcom is working with them to fix the issue – basically they're going to join the Dexcom Partner API – we've told you about that, it's how third party apps can talk with Dexcom.. In the meantime, Nightscout is probably the best alternative if you use Sugarmate. Quick note: Tandem acquired Sugarmate last year. And you'll recall that Dexcom does own a small piece of Tandem. So it looks like this will all probably work out.. but exactly how in the long run will be interesting to watch. -- https://help.sugarmate.io/en/articles/5678010-faqs-sugarmate-and-dexcom-connection?mkt_tok=MzQ4LVJYVi03MDUAAAGAgZ5w-m8YKeY90ybxznIKZ4b4XWStjdvSjf7vH3dNx8PMDzDa9sJP0En6odZtM-Z4UthLL9z7MNV86wnQ4R9o61-islyzvtyvg13By4FB5A&fbclid=IwAR39j2vxjr3JuUbcQdruIAttCSuRl5dD1jVbdNKrm1b5JQpuyYlQiwH1xXs XX A study of “dented” internal clocks seems to build evidence for a theory that people who work late or irregular hours are more at risk for diabetes. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania created a timing mismatch by altering the function of a molecule within the brains of mice.. shortened their circadian rhythms from 24 to 21 hours. These mice gained more weight, had higher blood sugar, and fattier livers. This all corrected when the researchers changed their environment – sleep and meals – to match that shorter, 21 hour day. They say it might be a good idea for shift workers to try to do the same – eating meals and going to bed in a cycle that works better for them. https://www.pennmedicine.org/news/news-releases/2021/october/a-dented-internal-clock-provides-insight-into-shift-workers-weight-gain-and-diabetes XX New Blood glucose meter gets FDA approval. This is the POGO … with 10-test cartridge technology. The strips and lancers are loaded inside already, so you don't carry anything separate. You just put your finger down and press the button. They're calling this automatic blood glucose monitoring or ABGM. On the inside it's still a basic finger stick and blood collection. But you don't see any of that on the outside. Of course, there's a Bluetooth connected app for you and your healthcare team to use. The product is called POGO. the app is Patterns. https://finance.yahoo.com/news/pogo-automatic-one-step-blood-113000135.html XX New numbers out for diabetes around the world and the International Diabetes Federation says it's a pandemic of unprecedented magnitude. The IDF says more than 10-percent of adults worldwide live with diabetes.. by 2045 that number will be one in eight. The report also says that one in two people with diabetes across the world who need insulin cannot access or afford it. The theme of World Diabetes Day this November 14th is Access to Diabetes Care. https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/diabetes-is-a-pandemic-of-unprecedented-magnitude-now-affecting-one-in-10-adults-worldwide-reveals-the-international-diabetes-federation-301413238.html XX Good news for people with type 1.. when more intensive glucose management starts early, it greatly reduces the future risk of heart and kidney issues. This info comes from a look back at the DCCT and EDIC trials – which are 100% worth looking into if you aren't familiar with them. By the way, in these trials “intensive” glucose control was pegged at an A1C of 7 and the riskier group had an A1C of 9 or above. The earlier the A1C was brought down to 7, the less risk of complications. https://www.endocrinologyadvisor.com/home/topics/diabetes/type-1-diabetes/earlier-intensive-type-1-diabetes-treatment-reduces-long-term-cardiovascular-and-kidney-complications/ XX How common is type 2 remission? It's hard to say but a new study from Scotland suggests it's more common than we might think. These University of Edinburgh scientists say in Scotland, it's one in 20. They looked at everyone in the country over the age of 30 with type 2, based on A1C levels -that's about 160-thousand people. Then they said during the study year, 77-hundred people went into remission, which means their A1Cs dropped to 6.5 without medication. Those people were older, had lost weight since their diagnosis, had no history of glucose lowering therapy or bariatric surgery, and generally had healthier blood readings at the time of their diagnosis. https://www.sciencealert.com/reversing-type-2-diabetes-seems-to-be-more-common-than-scientists-realized XX College scholarship contest to tell you about. Senita (sen-EE-tuh) Athletics is partnering with Insulet to award four $5,000 scholarships to people with type 1 diabetes. In honor of National Diabetes Awareness Month, the athletic fashion wear maker is looking for 'Senita Scholars.” The co-founders have a younger brother with type 1 and their fitness gear is known for really good pockets. To be eligible, students across the U.S. must be either a graduating senior in high school or a current undergraduate and have type 1 diabetes. Applications close on Nov. 30. https://finance.yahoo.com/news/senita-athletics-partners-insulet-corporation-150000801.html XX Lots of events happening around the diabetes community for this awareness month. Friends for Life virtual starts next week as does Together T1D. I mention this because it's got a powerful lineup, with Olympian Charlotte Drury, Pietro Marsala, the first person with T1D to get a commercial pilot's license in the US and more… XX And finally, a big happy diaversary to a previous guest of the podcast – Yerachmiel Altman is marking 60 years with type 1 on November 8th. I'll link up my episode with him.. he worked on early insulin pumps and has worn every bit of tech you can think of.. Wishing you continued good health and thank you for sharing your experience and wisdom with us. -- quick reminder that the podcast this week is with Ken Rodenheiser – a diabetes educator who now works with Dexcom. He explains how he went from angry and lonely as a teen, to helping others start off on the right foot at diagnosis. It's a great story you can listen to wherever you get your podcasts or if you're listening to this as on a podcast app, just go back an episode. That's In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.  

Pardon My Pancreas
I Ran Out Of Insulin, But Stayed In Range? Here's My Analysis...

Pardon My Pancreas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 14:20


DISCLAIMER: If you listen closely, I DID eventually change my pump site and get the insulin flowing again. Matt ran out of insulin in the middle of running errands. Here's his analysis of how he stayed in range without letting this unplanned mishap derail his entire day. Grab Matt's free T1D Webclass here:https://diabetesinaction.com---------Welcome to the Pardon My Pancreas podcast!! This show is all about REAL life with type 1 diabetes, understanding fluctuations, and how to stabilize your blood sugar for good. Your host is Matt Vande Vegte is a certified personal trainer, nutritionist, and type 1 diabetic whose biggest goal in life is to help people with diabetes around the world live their lives fearlessly. Looking for an online health coaching program to help you live your best life? Go to https://www.ftfwarrior.com to learn more about his program for diabetics only that is focused on helping you reach your goals while living a happier and healthier life. Join the Tribe today!This podcast is sponsored by FTF Warrior - An online health and fitness coaching company for type 1 diabetics dedicated to helping them master their blood sugars through any activity, exercise, or meal!https://www.ftfwarrior.comFollow Matt here:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ftfwarrior/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ftfwarrior/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/ftfwarrior------------------------------------------------------Disclaimer: While we share our experiences with diabetes, nothing we discuss should be taken as medical advice. Please consult your doctor or medical professional for your health and diabetes management.

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
From Angry T1D Teen to Diabetes Educator: Meet Kenny Rodenheiser

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 44:41


Kenny Rodenheiser is a diabetes educator, and a big part of the Children with Diabetes community. But when he was diagnosed as a young teenager, he felt angry and isolated and wanted nothing to do with anything like a diabetes conference. Kenny talks about what changed his mind, his road to becoming an educator and his current role at Dexcom. This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Episode transcription coming soon Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
In the News.. Israel implant for type 2, sports study for T1D kids, Tidepool period project and more!

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 5:44


This week, In the News our top stories include: Israeli researchers test an implant for type 2 remission, a new sports study looks at kids with type 1 on multiple daily injections, a new camera app to turn your old meter into high-tech info, the Tidepool period project, type 1 in the World Series and more! Join us LIVE every Wednesday at 4:30pm EDT Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Episode transcription below: Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I'm Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days. As always, I'm going to link up my sources in the Facebook comments – where we are live – we are also Live on YouTube and in the show notes at d-c dot com when this airs as a podcast.. XX In the News is brought to you by Real Good Foods! Find their breakfast line and all of their great products in your local grocery store, Target or Costco. XX Our top story: Lucky mice but will it work in people? Israeli scientists say they have a one-time implant that brings blood glucose into non-diabetic range. The implant is healthy tissue grown in a lab – the glucose dropped by an average of 26-percent and stayed there the four months of the study. The engineered cells absorbed sugar, improved glucose levels and also improved absorption in other muscle cells. Long way to go before this is tried in people. https://www.timesofisrael.com/diabetes-reversed-in-mice-for-4-months-after-one-time-implant-from-israeli-lab/ XX Sports and kids with type 1 can be a tough balance, especially on multiple daily injections. A new study called the Car-2-Diab trial looked at what changes work well for teens during exercise. There's a lot here, so I'd urge you to follow the link I'll provide, but basically everyone in this small study experienced overnight hypos and some high BG just after exercise. The most common fix was a drop in total basal insulin. These researchers say sports and type 1 have a – quote - “irreducible level of confounding factors.” Which.. from personal experience, I can say.. I agree. https://www.endocrinologyadvisor.com/home/topics/diabetes/type-1-diabetes/execise-impacts-insulin-doses-in-children-with-type-1-diabetes/ XX Big new study about Medtronic's 780G pump, available in Europe and in front of the US FDA right now. This looked at 3200 kids age 15 and younger. Time in range was 74% overall and overnight 82%. The 780G uses the Guardian Sensor 3 as a hybrid closed loop where you still bolus for meals. Overall these kids saw a 12-percent bump up in time in range.. which is a better boost than Medtronic's first hybrid closed loop system, the 670G. https://www.fiercebiotech.com/medtech/medtronic-s-newest-minimed-insulin-pump-improves-glycemic-control-children-study XX Good write up about adults with type 1 which make up more than half of all new cases of type 1. This summary in the ADA publication Diabetes Care shows that there are big differences between adult and childhood onset, many of which aren't understood. This also points out that misdiagnosis occurs in nearly 40% of adults with new type 1 diabetes, with the risk of error increasing with age. https://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/44/11/2449 XX New app to retrofit a regular old blood glucose meter and make it a bit more high tech. Computer vision technology developed by University of Cambridge engineers can read and record the glucose levels, time and date displayed on a typical glucose test.. it does this with just the camera on a mobile phone. The technology, which doesn't require an internet or Bluetooth connection, works for any type of glucose meter, in any orientation and in a variety of light levels. The app is called Gluco-Rx Vision. You think about a lot of the services and programs that have popped up that require Bluetooth and remote monitoring – this helps people take advantage without having to buy a new meter. https://www.myvetcandy.com/newsblog/2020/11/14/computer-vision-app-allows-easier-monitoring-of-diabetes XX Tidepool gets a boost for it's Period Project… from Amazon. The Tidepool Period Project is trying to address the unmet needs of people with diabetes who menstruate. This funding from Amazon Web Services will go to supporting prototype concepts and user interface designs at Tidepool. There's not a lot of data on diabetes and periods despite the fact that we all pretty much know anecdotally that there's a lot going on in terms of glucose levels and hormones. Kudos to Tidepool for gathering this info for future research. https://www.thedailytimes.com/business/diabetes-and-femtech-intersection---tidepool-receives-aws-financial-support-for-tidepool-period-project/article_7b5c40fb-3020-5428-aa0b-69ea242675ec.html XX More to come, including diabetes in the world series.. But first, I want to tell you about one of our great sponsors who helps make Diabetes Connections possible. Real Good Foods. Where the mission is Be Real Good They make nutritious foods— grain free, high in protein, never added sugar and from real ingredients—we really like their breakfast line.. although Benny rarely eats the waffles or breakfast sandwiches for breakfast.. it's usually after school or late night. Or sometimes it's dinner. You can buy Real Good Foods online or find a store near you with their locator right on the website. I'll put a link in the FB comments and as always at d-c dot com. Back to the news… And it's sports news! As of this taping the Atlanta Braves have won Game 1 of the World Series.. with Adam Duvall getting a 2-run home run. We've high-lighted Duvall here before.. he was diagnosed with type 1 at age 23. We've seen a lot of posts on social media of him taking the time to meet with families during the season, signing autographs and taking photos with his pump. Good stuff. -- And finally.. Just as the newest Apple watch was released - without blood glucose monitoring.. rumors are already swirling about the next version of the watch. As we've said.. you'll know it's real when they start clinical trials.. but Dexcom's Chief Technology officer talked to me this week about their new agreement with Garmin and looked ahead to the G7 and possible non invasive blood glucose monitoring. Interesting stuff you can listen to wherever you get your podcasts or if you're listening to this as a podcast, just go back an episode. That's In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

Earnings Season
DexCom, Inc., Q3 2021 Earnings Call, Oct 28, 2021

Earnings Season

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 58:51


DexCom, Inc., Q3 2021 Earnings Call, Oct 28, 2021

Pardon My Pancreas
2 (And A Half) Ways Your T1D Doctor Is Failing You

Pardon My Pancreas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 18:47


Your doctor doesn't know everything, we know that. Let's dive into how YOU can know why they might be failing you, and what you can do about it. Grab Matt's free T1D Webclass here:https://diabetesinaction.com---------Welcome to the Pardon My Pancreas podcast!! This show is all about REAL life with type 1 diabetes, understanding fluctuations, and how to stabilize your blood sugar for good. Your host is Matt Vande Vegte is a certified personal trainer, nutritionist, and type 1 diabetic whose biggest goal in life is to help people with diabetes around the world live their lives fearlessly. Looking for an online health coaching program to help you live your best life? Go to https://www.ftfwarrior.com to learn more about his program for diabetics only that is focused on helping you reach your goals while living a happier and healthier life. Join the Tribe today!This podcast is sponsored by FTF Warrior - An online health and fitness coaching company for type 1 diabetics dedicated to helping them master their blood sugars through any activity, exercise, or meal!https://www.ftfwarrior.comFollow Matt here:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ftfwarrior/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ftfwarrior/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/ftfwarrior------------------------------------------------------Disclaimer: While we share our experiences with diabetes, nothing we discuss should be taken as medical advice. Please consult your doctor or medical professional for your health and diabetes management.

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
"Amplify the Value of CGM" - Dexcom's Jake Leach talks about Garmin, the G7 and Dexcom One

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 36:38


With Dexcom announcing a big new agreement with Garmin this month, it seemed like a good time to check in on a few issues. Stacey talks with Dexcom's Chief Technology Officer Jake Leach about Garmin, the upcoming Dexcom G7 and Dexcom One. She asks your questions on everything from G7 features to watch compatibility to the future and possible non invasive monitoring. Just a reminder - the Dexcom G7 has not yet been submitted to the US FDA and is not available for use as of this episode's release. This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. Previous episodes with Jake Leach: https://diabetes-connections.com/?s=leach Previous episodes with CEO Kevin Sayer: https://diabetes-connections.com/?s=sayer Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Episode transcription below:   Stacey Simms  0:00 Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dario Health. Manage your blood glucose levels increase your possibilities by Gvoke Hypopen the first premixed auto injector for very low blood sugar, and by Dexcom take control of your diabetes and live life to the fullest with Dexcom.   Announcer  0:20 This is Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms.   Stacey Simms  0:26 This week Dexcom announced a big new agreement with Garmin this month seemed like a good time to check in on a few issues, including what happens to the watches and insulin pump systems that work with G6, when Dexcom G7 it's the market.   Jake Leach  0:41 We're already working with Tandem and Insulet. On integrating G7 with their products have already seen prototypes up and running, they're moving as quickly as possible.   Stacey Simms  0:49 That's Chief Technology Officer Jake leach who reminds us that the G7 has not yet been submitted to the US FDA. He answers lots of questions on everything from G7 features to watch compatibility to the future and possible non invasive monitoring. This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. Welcome to another week of the show are we so glad to have you here I am the host Stacey Simms, and we aim to educate and inspire about diabetes with a focus on people who use insulin. You know, my son Benny was diagnosed with type one right before he turned to my husband lives with type two diabetes. I don't have diabetes, I have a background in broadcasting. And that is how you get the podcast. And when I saw the news about Garmin, and Dexcom. I knew you'd have some questions. And I thought this would be a good chance to talk about some of the more technical issues that we're all thinking about around Dexcom. These days. I should note that since I did this interview with CTO Jake Leach on October 19. And that's exactly one week before this episode is being released that Dexcom released some new features for its follow app. I did cover that in my in the news segment. That was this past week, you'd find the link in the show notes. And as I see it for that news that release in the update, the big news there is that now there is a widget or quick glance on the followers home screen, it depends on your device, you know, Apple or Android, there's no tech support, right from the follow up, and a way to check the status of the servers as well. And I think that last one should really be an opt in push notification. If the servers are down, you should tell me right, I shouldn't have to wonder are the servers down and then go look, but that is the update for now. And again that came out after this interview. So I will have to ask those questions next time. And the usual disclaimer Dexcom, as you've already heard, is a sponsor of the show, but they only pay for the commercial you will hear later on not for any of the content you hear outside of the ad. I love having them as a sponsor, because I love that Vinnie uses the product. I mean, we've used Dexcom since he was nine years old. But that doesn't mean I don't have questions for them. And I do give them credit for coming on and answering them. Not everybody does that. I should also add that this interview is a video interview, we recorded the zoom on screen stuff. You can see that at our YouTube channel. I'll link that up in the show notes if you would rather watch and there always will be a transcript these days in the show notes so lots of options for however it suits you best. I'm here to serve let me know if there's a better way for me to get this show to you. But right now we've got video audio and transcript. Alright Jake leach in just a moment. But first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dario health and you know one of the things that makes diabetes management difficult for us that really annoys me and Benny, it's not really the big picture stuff. It's all the little tasks that add up. Are you sick of running out of strips do you need some direction or encouragement going forward with your diabetes management? Would visibility into your trends help you on your wellness journey? The Dario diabetes success plan offers all of that in more you don't the wavelength the pharmacy you're not searching online for answers. You don't have to wonder about how you're doing with your blood sugar levels, find out more, go to my dario.com forward slash diabetes dash connections. Jake leach Chief Technology Officer for Dexcom thanks so much for joining me. How are you doing?   Jake Leach  4:22 I'm doing great, Stacey. It's a pleasure to be here.   Stacey Simms  4:24 We really appreciate it. And we are doing this on video as well as audio recording as well. So if we refer to seeing things, I don't think we're sharing screens or showing product. But of course we'll let everybody know if there's anything that you need to watch or share photos of. But let me just jump in and start with the latest news which was all about Garmin. Can you share a little bit about the partnership with Garmin? What this means what people can see what's different?   Jake Leach  4:49 Yeah, certainly so I'm really excited to launch the partnership with Garmin. So last week we released functionality on the Dexcom side and Garmin released their products, the ability to have real time CGM readings displayed on a whole multitude of Garmin devices by computers, and a whole host of their watches. So they've got a lot of different types of watches for, you know, athletics and different things. And so you can now get real time CGM displayed on that on that watch. So they're the first partner to take advantage of some new technology that we got FDA approved earlier in the year, which is our real time cloud API. So that's a a way for companies like Garmin to develop a product that can connect up to users data through the Dexcom, secure cloud and have real time data, we've had the capability to do that with retrospective data that three hour delayed, many partners are taking advantage of that. But we just got the real time system approved. And so Garmins, the first launch with it.   Stacey Simms  5:50 Let me back up for just a second for those who may use these devices, but aren't as technologically focused. What is an API? When you got approval for that earlier in the summer for real time API? What does that what does that mean? Yeah, so   Jake Leach  6:03 it's a API is an application programming interface. And so what it really means is, it's a way for software applications, like a mobile app on your phone, to connect via the Internet to our cloud with very secure authentication, and pull your CGM data in real time from from our cloud. And so it's basically a toolkit that we provide to developers of software to be able to link their application to the Dexcom application, and really on the user side, to take advantage of that feature, you basically enter in your Dexcom credentials, your Dexcom username and password. And that is how we securely authenticate. And that's how you're basically giving access to say, for example, Garmin, to pull the data and put it down onto your devices. What other   Stacey Simms  6:51 apps or companies are in the pipeline for this. Can you share in addition to Garmin? I think I had seen Livongo Are there others?   Jake Leach  6:58 Yeah, so Livongo so Tela doc would purchase the Lubanga technology, they've got a system. They're also in the pipeline for pulling in real time CGM data into their application. And so they're all about remote care. And so trying to connect people with physicians through, you know, technology, and so having real time CGM readings in that type of environment is a really nice use case for them. And so and for the for the customers. And so that's, that's where they're headed with it. And we've got kind of a bunch more partners that are in discussions in development that we haven't announced yet. But we're really see this, the cloud API's are interfaces as a way to expand the ecosystem around a Dexcom CGM. So we really like to provide our users with choice. So how do you want your data displayed? Where do you want it? And so if you want to right place, right time for myself, have a Garmin bike computer so I can see CGM readings right on my handlebars, I don't have to, you know, look down on a watch or even thought phones, it's really convenient. That's what we're about is providing an opportunity for others to amplify the value of CGM.   Stacey Simms  8:06 This was a question that I got from the listener. What happens to the data? Is that a decision up to a company like Garmin, or is that part of your agreement, you know, where everybody's always worried about data privacy? And with good reason?   Jake Leach  8:19 Yeah, data privacy is super important area when when you're handling customer information. And so the way that it works is, when you're using our applications at the beginning, when you sign up, there's some consents, you're basically saying this is what can be done with my data. And the way we design our systems is, for example, with the connection to the Garmin devices, the only way they can access your data is if you type in your credentials into there, it's like it's almost like typing your username and password into the web to be able to access your bank account. It's the same thing, you're granting access to your data. And each company has their own consents around data. And so we all are required by regulatory agencies to stay compliant with all the different rules to Dexcom. We take it very seriously, and are very transparent about what happens with the data that's in we keep it in all of our consent forms that you click into as you as you work through the app.   Stacey Simms  9:13 But to be clear to use the API or to get the Dexcom numbers on your garmin, you said earlier, you have to enter your credentials,   Jake Leach  9:19 you have to you have to enter your Dexcom username and password. And that's how we know that it's okay for us to share that information with Garmins system because you are the one who authorized it.   Stacey Simms  9:30 Right. But that's also how you were going to use it. You just said you have to enter your name and password for them to use the information. So they just have to read individually like okay, Garmin or Livongo or whomever. Yes. Your individual terms of services.   Jake Leach  9:42 Yeah, for each each application that that you want to use you it's important to read the what they do with the data and how to use it.   Stacey Simms  9:49 That's really interesting. And Has anything changed with Dexcom? It's been a long time since we've talked about how you all use the data. My understanding is that it was blinded, you know, you're not turning around over to health insurers and saying yeah, done on this day this or are you?   Jake Leach  10:03 No, no, not at all, we basically use the information to track our product performance. So we look at products there. So it's de identified, we don't know whose product it was, we just can tell how products are performing in the field. That's a really important aspect. But we also use it to improve our products. So we when we see the issues that are occurring with the use of the product, we use it to improve it. So that's, that's our main focus. And the most important thing we do with it is provided to users where, where and when they need it. So you know, follow remote monitoring that the reason we built our data infrastructure was to provide users with features like follow and the clarity app and so forth.   Stacey Simms  10:36 Do those features work on other systems? Can I use Garmin to share or follow?   Jake Leach  10:41 Not today? So right now, it's, it's basically intended for the the person who's wearing the CGM. It's your personal CGM credentials that you type in to link the Carmen account. And so for today, it's specific around the user.   Stacey Simms  10:57 I assume that means you're working on for tomorrow.   Jake Leach  10:59 There's lots of Yeah, lots.   Stacey Simms  11:02 Which leads us of course to Well, I don't have to worry about that right now. Because you can't use any of this without the phone and the Phone is how we could share it follow. So it's not really an issue yet. Jake, talk to me about direct to watch to any of these watches. Yeah, where do we stand? I know G6. It's not going to happen. Where are we with G7? Right back to Jake answering my question, you knew I was gonna bring that up. But first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Gvoke Hypopen. And when you have diabetes and use insulin, low blood sugar can happen when you don't expect it. That's why most of us carry fast acting sugar and in the case of very low blood sugar, why we carry emergency glucagon, there's a new option called Gvoke Hypopen the first auto injector to treat very low blood sugar Gvoke Hypopen is pre mixed and ready to go with no visible needle. In usability studies. 99% of people were able to give Gvoke correctly find out more go to diabetes connections.com and click on the Gvoke logo. Gvoke shouldn't be used in patients with pheochromocytoma or insulinoma. Visit Gvoke glucagon.com/risk now back to Dexcom's jake leach answering my question about direct to watch   Jake Leach  12:19 That's a great question and a really exciting technology. So direct to watch is where through Bluetooth, the CGM wearable communicates directly to a display device like a watch. So today, G6 communicates to the phone and to insulin pumps in our receiver are the displays. With G7, what we've done is we've re architected the Bluetooth interface to be able to also in addition to communicating with an insulin pump or a receiver and your mobile phone, it can also communicate with a wearable device like a Apple Watch, in particular, but other watches have those capabilities, with G7, reducing the capability within the hardware to have the direct communication director watch. And then in a subsequent release, soon after the launch to commercial launches of G7, we'll have a release where we bring the director watch functionality to the customers, there's the Bluetooth aspect, which is really important, you got to make sure it doesn't impact battery life and other things. But there's also the aspect of when it is direct to watch, it becomes your primary display. And so being able to reliably receive alerts on the watch was something that initially in the architecture wasn't possible. But as Apple's come out with multiple versions of the OS for the watch, they've introduced capability for us, so that we can ensure you get your alerts when you're wearing the watch. And so that was a really important aspect for us. And it's also for the FDA to ensure that if that's your main display, you've walked away from your phone, you have no other device to alert you that it's going to be reliable. And so that's exciting progress of last couple years with Apple making sure that can happen. You know,   Stacey Simms  13:56 we're all excited for Direct to watch. Obviously, it's a feature that many people are really clamoring for. But you guys promised it first with the G five in 2017. Do you all kind of regret putting the cart before the horse that way? Because my next follow up question is why should we believe you now?   Jake Leach  14:15 Yeah, you know, it Stacy's a good question. So we are hand was kind of forced because Apple actually announced it before we did. So they basically said we're opening up this capability on the watch to have the direct Bluetooth connectivity. And of course, we were excited to have someone like Apple talking about CGM on that kind of a stage. But then as we got into the details of actually making it work, we, you know, continually ran into another technical challenge after another technical challenge, and I totally agree. I wish it would have been two years later that they talked about at the keynote, but I'm comfortable that we've gotten past those types of issues. And so and it is built into G7. So we've got working systems and so it will introduce it rather quickly with G7   Stacey Simms  14:56 and to confirm G7 has been submitted for the CE mark Because the approval in Europe, but has not yet, as you and I are speaking today has not yet been submitted for FDA approval in the US.   Jake Leach  15:06 Yeah, we're just we're just finishing up our submission, we get some validations that we're running on some of the new manufacturing lines to make sure we can build enough of these for all the customers, we want to focus to move over to G7 as quick as possible. And so we'll we'll submit you seven to the FDA before the end of this year,   Stacey Simms  15:22 just kind of building off what you mentioned about Apple and making these announcements or, you know, sometimes Apple lets news get out there. Because they I don't know if they seem to enjoy it. I'm speculating. I don't have any insight track at Apple. But I wanted to ask you, I don't know if you can say anything about this. For the last year, every time I talk to somebody who's not getting the diabetes community, but they're on a technology podcast, or they're, they're hearing things about non invasive blood glucose monitoring, right, the Apple, Apple series seven or some watch this year, we're supposed to have this incredible, non invasive glucose monitoring was gonna put Dexcom and libre out of business, it was gonna be amazing. Of course, it didn't happen. But a bunch of companies are working on this. And Apple seems to be really happy to say maybe, or we're working on it, too, is Dexcom listening to these things. I mean, obviously, they're not here yet. They they are going to come. I'm curious if this is all you kind of happy to let that lay out their speculation. Or if you guys are thinking about anything like this in the future,   Jake Leach  16:17 we pay a lot of attention to non invasive technologies. We have a an investment component of our company that looks at you know, early stage startups. We also have many partnership discussions around CGM technologies. And so when it comes to non invasive, I think we'd all love to have non invasive sensors that are accurate and reliable. You know, for many, many years since I've been working on CGM, and many years before that, there has been attempts to make a non invasive technologies work. The challenge, though, is it's just sensing glucose in the human body with a non invasive technology is not been proven feasible. It's just there's a lot of different attempts and technologies have tried, and we pay close attention. Because if if something started to show promise, we become very interested in it. And basically making a Dexcom product that uses it, we just haven't seen anything that is accurate and reliable enough for what our customers need. That's to say, there could be a use case where a non invasive sensor doesn't have to be as accurate and reliable as what what Dexcom does. And so maybe there's a product there. But we're very focused on ensuring that the accurate, the numbers that we show, the glucose readings that we present to users are highly accurate, highly reliable, that you can trust them. And so when it comes to non invasive, we just haven't seen a technology that can do that. But I know that there's lots of folks out there working on it. And we're, we stay very close to the community.   Stacey Simms  17:40 Yeah, one of the examples I gave a guy who doesn't he does an Apple technology podcast, and he was like, you know, what, what do you think? And I said, Well, here's an example. He would a scale, and you have no idea if it's accurate. But you know, that once you step on it that that number probably is is stable, then you know, okay, I gained 10 pounds, I lost 10 pounds. But I have no idea if that beginning number makes any sense at all, you might be able to use that if you are a pre diabetic, or if you're worried about blood glucose, but you could never dose insulin using it because you have no idea where you're starting. So I think that's I mean, my lay person speculation. I think that's where that technology is now and to that point, but other people outside the diabetes community are looking to one of the more interesting stories, I think, in the last year or two has been use of CGM and flash glucose monitoring for people without diabetes at all, for athletes, for people who are super excited and interested in seeing what their body's doing. So we have companies like levels and super sapient. And you know, that kind of thing using the Liebreich. I'm curious of a couple of parts of this question. If you think you want to answer it is Dexcom. Considering any of those partnerships with the G7, which is much more simple, right? fewer parts and that kind of thing.   Jake Leach  18:46 Yeah, that's a great point, Stacey. So yes, G7 is a lot simpler. It was designed to be to take the CGM experience to the next level. And part of that is just the ease of use the product deployment the simplicity, someone who's never seen a CGM before, we want to be able to walk up approach G7 And just use it. There's a lot of opportunity we feel for glucose sensing outside of diabetes. Today CGM are indicated for use in diabetes, but in the future, with 30% of the adult population in the US having pre diabetes, meaning the glucose levels are elevated, but not to the point where they've been diagnosed with diabetes. There's just so much opportunity to help people understand their blood sugar and how it impacts lifestyle choices impact their blood sugar. In the immediate feedback you get from a CGM is just a there's nothing else like it. And so I think, you know, pre diabetes and even as you mentioned, kind of in athletics. There's a lot of research going on right now in endurance athletes, and in weight loss around using CGM readings for those different aspects. So I think there's a lot opportunity we're today we're focused on diabetes, both type one and type two and really getting technology to people around the globe. That can benefit from it. That's where our focus is. But we very much have programs where we look at, okay, where else could we use CGM? It's such a powerful tool, you could think in the hospital, there's so much opportunity around around glucose. Alright, so I'm   Stacey Simms  20:13 gonna give you my idea that I've given to the levels people, and they liked it, but then they dropped off the face of the earth. So I'll be contacting them again. Here's my idea. If somebody wants to pay for a CGM, and they don't have diabetes, but they're like paying out of pocket because they like their sleep tracker, and they like this and they like that, or some big companies gonna buy it and give it away for weight loss or whatever. You know, the the shoe company toms, where you buy a pair of shoes and they give one away. People are in the diabetes community are scrimping and saving and doing everything they can to get a CGM. Maybe we could do a program like that. Where if you don't quote unquote medically need a CGM. Your purchase could also help purchase one for an underserved clinic that serves people with diabetes.   Jake Leach  20:54 Getting CGM to those folks that didn't need them, particularly underserved areas, clinics. It's so important. I like the idea. It's a that's if there was a cache component that then provided the CGM to those that are less fortunate. I think that's, I like the idea. Next month is National Diabetes Awareness Month. And one of the things we're focused on for the month of November is how can we bring broader access to CGM? It's something we've been working on, you know, since we had our first commercial product, and there's still, you know, many people in the United States benefit, you know, 99% of in private insurance covers the product. You know, a lot of our customers don't pay anything, they have no copay. But you know, that's not the case for everybody. And so there's, there's definitely areas that we need to we are focusing on some of our non profit partners on bringing that type of greater access to CGM, because it's such a powerful tool and helping you live a more normal life.   Stacey Simms  21:50 In the couple of minutes that we have left. I had a couple more questions, mostly about G7. But you mentioned your hospital use. And last year, I remember talking to CEO Kevin Sayer about Dex comes new hospital program, which I believe launched during COVID. Do you have any kind of update on that or how it's been going?   Jake Leach  22:06 Yeah, so it was a authorization that we got from the FDA to raise special case during COVID, to be able to use G6 in the hospital. And so we had quite a few hospitals contact us early on in COVID, saying, Hey, we've got these patients, many of them have diabetes, they're on steroids. They're in the hospital, and we're trying to manage their glucose. And we're having a hard time because their standard of care in hospitals is either labs or finger sticks. And so we got this authorization with the FDA, we ship the product, many hospitals acquired it, and they were using it pretty successfully. What we'd say about G6 is really designed for personal use your mobile phone or a little receiver device, designed integrated with a hospital patient monitoring system or anything like that. You could imagine in the future that that could be a real strong benefit for CGM, the hospital, you can imagine you put it on, you know, anybody who has glucose control issues comes in the door. And then you basically can help ensure where resources need to be directed based on you know, glucose risk. I've always been passionate about CGM at a hospital. It's one of the early projects I worked on here. Dexcom. And I think it there's a lot of promise, particularly as we've improved the technology. So there's still hospitals today using G 600 of the authorization. And we're interested in designing a product for that market specifically, instead of right now. It's kind of under emergency years. But we think there's there's a great need there. That CGM could could help in basically glucose control in the hospital.   Stacey Simms  23:28 That's interesting, too. Of course, my mind being a mom went to camp as well. Right? If you could have a bunch of people I envision like a screen or you know, hospital monitoring that kind of thing. You wonder if you could do something at camp where there's 100 kids, you know, instead of having their individual phones or receivers at camp, it would be somewhere Central?   Jake Leach  23:46 Well, you know, what, between with the with the real time API, there are folks that are thinking about a camp monitoring system that can basically be deployed on campuses right now with follow. It's great for a family, but it's not really designed to, to follow a whole camp full of campers. But with the real time API, there's opportunities for others to develop an application that could be used like that. So yeah, there you go.   Stacey Simms  24:08 All right, a couple of G7 questions. The one I got mostly from listeners was how soon and I know, timelines can be tricky. But how soon will devices that use the G6? Will they be able to integrate the G7 Insulin pumps, that sort of thing? Sure. It's only Tandem right now. But you know, Omnipod, soon that that kind of thing?   Jake Leach  24:26 Yeah, I mean, that's coming. So I'll start with the digital partners like Garmin and others, that is going to be seamless, because the infrastructure that G6 utilizes to move data to through the API's is the same with G7. So that'll be seamless. When you talk about insulin pumps, so those are the ones that are directly connected to our transmitters that are taking the glucose readings for automated insulin delivery. So those systems were already working with Tandem and Insulet. On integrating G7 with their products have already seen prototypes up and running so they're moving as quickly as possible. So once We have G7 approved, then they can go in and go through their regulatory cycle to get G7 approved for us with their AI D algorithms. Really the timing is dictated mainly by those partners and the FDA, but we're doing everything we can to support them to ensure this as quick as possible.   Stacey Simms  25:17 Take I should have asked at the beginning, I'm so sorry, do you live with type one I've completely forgotten.   Jake Leach  25:21 I don't I made a reference to where I wear them all the time. Because, as you know, kind of leading the r&d team here, I love to experience the products and understand what our users what their experience is. And I just love learning about my glucose readings in the different activities I do. So I don't have type one. But I just I use the products all the time.   Stacey Simms  25:42 So to that end, have you worn the G7? And I guess I'd love to know a little bit more about ease of use. It looks like it's, it just looks like it's so simple.   Jake Leach  25:51 It is. Yeah. So I've participated in a couple of clinical trials where we use G7, it is really simple. One of the most exciting things though, I have to say is that when you put it on, it has this 30 minute warmup. So the two hours that we've all been used to for so many years, by the time you put the device on and you have it paired your phone, it's there's like 24 minutes left before you're getting CGM. So it's like it's it. That part is just one of the things that you it sounds awesome. But then when you actually experience it, it's pretty amazing. But yeah, the ease of use is great, because it's the applicator is simple. It's a push button like G sex where you just press the button and it deploys. But there's other steps where you're not having to remove adhesive liners, the packaging is very, very small. So we really focused on low environmental footprint. And so it's really straightforward. But probably the most the really significant simplification the application process is because the transmitter and the sensor all one component and sterilized and saying altogether, there's no pieces, there's no assembly required, you basically take the device and apply it and then it's up and running. There's no transmitted a snap in or two pieces to assemble before you you do the insertion.   Stacey Simms  26:59 I think I know the answer to this. But I wanted to ask anyway, was it when you applied for the CE mark? And I assume this would be the same for the FDA? Are there alternate locations? In other words, can we use it on our arms?   Jake Leach  27:11 And yeah, that is that is a great question. Yeah, our focus with one of our phones with G7 and the revised form factor, the new new smaller form factor and sensor probe was arm were so yeah, arm wears is really important part of the G7 product.   Stacey Simms  27:26 I got a question about Dexcom. One, which seems to be a less expensive product with fewer features that's available in Europe. Is that what Dexcom? One is?   Jake Leach  27:34 Yeah, so there's a product that we recently launched in Europe in European countries. That is it's called Dexcom. One. And what it is, is it's it's a product that's designed for a broad segment of diabetes, type one, type two, it's a lower price point. It has a reduced feature set from G6. But what it's really about is simplicity. And so in you know it's a available through E commerce solutions. So it's really easy to acquire the product and start using it. It's really to get into certain markets where we either weren't didn't have access to certain customers. And so it's really designed for get generating access for large groups of people that didn't have access to CGM before.   Stacey Simms  28:20 What does e commerce solution mean? No doctor   Jake Leach  28:23 there. So outside the United States CGM isn't no prescription required for many, many countries. So the US is one of the countries that does require prescriptions, other some other countries do too. But there's a large group outside the US that don't, but it's really around, you can basically go to the website, and you can purchase it over a website. So really kind of nice solution around think Amazon, right. You're going you're clicking on add the sensors and you're purchasing it. It's a exciting new product for us that we are happy to continue developing.   Stacey Simms  28:53 I think it might come to the US don't know. Yeah, that's   Jake Leach  28:56 good. Good question. Don't don't know. I mean, I think right now we see CGM coverage is so great access is great for CGM in the US it can always be better and extend your focus on that. But it's really for countries where there wasn't access,   Stacey Simms  29:08 I would think tough to since we do need a prescription differently. Yeah, Jake, you have been with Dexcom, almost 20 years, 18 years now. And a lot has changed. When you're looking back. And looking forward here at Dexcom. I don't really expect you to come up with some words of wisdom off the top of your head. But it's got to be pretty interesting to see the changes that the technology has brought to the diabetes community and how I don't know it just seems from where I sit and you're probably a couple of years ahead. It seems that the last five years have just been lightspeed. It has   Jake Leach  29:39 been things are speeding up in terms of our ability to bring products to market and there's a lot of things one is the development of technology. The other component is working with your groups like the FDA on you know, how do we get products to the customers as fast as possible and that that's been a big part of it right moving cheese six to class to becoming an IC GM that That was a huge part of our ability to get the technology out quickly and also scale it. I think there's a lot of aspects that has been faster. And you know, when I started Dexcom, we had this goal of designing a CGM that was reliable didn't require finger sticks that could make treatment decisions. All that and we were 100% focused on that. And as we got closer and closer, and now we have that which you six and also what you seven, then the opportunity that that product can provide, you start to really understand how impactful CGM can be around the world. And that's what I'm excited about now is I'm still excited about the technology always will be and we still have lots to do on making it better, more reliable and more integrated. But just how much CGM can do around around the globe. There's just so many things. It's beyond diabetes to so very excited about the future.   Stacey Simms  30:47 Many thanks, as always, and we'll talk soon, I am sure but I mean, I could never get to say it enough. I can't imagine doing the teenage years with my son without Dexcom. You guys, I know you did it just for me. You did it just in time. Appreciate it very much. He is doing amazing. And I can't he would not be sticking his fingers 10 times a day. So thank you.   Jake Leach  31:05 That's great to hear. Thanks, Stacy.   Announcer  31:12 You're listening to Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms.   Stacey Simms  31:18 As always more information at diabetes connections.com. And yeah, but that last bit there, I can say nice things. I mean, I really do feel that way. And I can still ask not so nice questions. Like if you're new, quite often, I will open up a thread in our Facebook group. It's Diabetes Connections of the group to gather questions for our guests. And I did that here with Dexcom, there's usually quite a lot of questions, I do have to apologize, I missed a big one. Because of the timing of the interview, I promise I will circle back around next time I talk to Dexcom. And that is all about the updates for iOS and for new phones, and how you know, sometimes Dexcom is behind the updates. What I mean by that is that they lag behind the updates. So you can go to the Dexcom website, I'll put a link up for this for Dexcom products that are compatible in terms of which iOS and that kind of thing. And they are behind. And Dexcom will always say they've said very publicly that they are working hard to catch up. But I guess the question that a few people really wanted to know was why, you know, why do they lag behind? What can be done about that? So they know, but I think it would be a good question to ask. So Sarah and others. I appreciate you sending that question. And I apologize that I didn't get to it this time around. And I'll tell you, you know, it's not something we've experienced, but I think it has to do and I'm speculating here more with the phone with the the newness and the the model of the phone sometimes then for the updates, especially if you don't have your updates on automatic. So I guess I'm kind of saying the same thing. But what I mean by that is Vinny, and I have very old phones. I have an eight. I'm not even sure he has the eight. We are terrible parents and I don't care about my phone, I would still have a Blackberry if that were possible. So I can't commiserate. I'm so embarrassed to even tell you that I can commiserate with the updates, because it's just not something that we have done. Benny, definitely if he were here, trust me. It's like his number. I would say it's his number one complaint that it's really high up on the list of complaints to the parenting department in our house. And yes, Hanukkah is coming. His birthday is coming. There will be some new phones around here. I'm doing an upgrade. I'm sure both of us have cracked phones. Were the worst. Oh, my goodness. All right. Well, more to come in just a moment. But first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dexcom. And this is the ad I was talking about earlier in the interest of full disclosure. But you know, one of the most common questions I get is about helping kids become more independent. I get asked this all the time at conferences for virtual chats in my local group. These transitional times are tricky. And we've gone through this preschool to elementary elementary to middle middle to high school. I can't speak high school to college yet, but you using the Dexcom really makes a big difference. For us. It's not all about sharing follow, although that's very, very helpful. Just think about how much easier it is for a middle schooler to look at their Dexcom rather than do four to five finger sticks at school, or for a second grader to just show their care teams a number. Here's where I am right before Jim. At one point, Ben, he was up to 10 finger sticks a day, he didn't have Dexcom until the end of fourth grade not having to do that made his management a lot easier for him. It's also a lot easier to spot the trends and use the technology to give your kids more independence. Find out more at diabetes connections.com and click on the Dexcom logo. I don't know about you, but I am getting a ton of email already about Diabetes Awareness Month and that is November this time of year I usually get I'd say 120 emails that are not snake oil, right one in 20 emails that maybe make sense for something we want to talk about on the show here that I would share on social media and I'm just inundated with nonsense. So I hope you are not as well. But I gotta say Diabetes Awareness Month this year. I've been pulling in My local group and talking about what to do because usually I highlight a lot of people and stories and I'll I'll still do that, I think, but I got to tell you people are, um, you know, this, we're all stressed out. And while it's a wonderful thing to educate, I always think Diabetes Awareness Month is not for the diabetes community, right? We are plenty aware of diabetes, this is a chance to educate other people. And that's why I like sharing those pictures and stories on my page, because the families then can share that with their people. And it's about educating people who don't have diabetes. But gosh, I don't know this year, I'm going to be just concentrating on putting out the best shows that I can I do you have a new project I mentioned last week that we're going to be talking about in the Facebook group. By the time this airs, I will have the webinars scheduled in the Facebook group. So very excited about that. Please check it out. But what are you doing for Diabetes Awareness Month? If you've got something you'd like me to amplify, please let me know. You can email me Stacey at diabetes connections.com. Or you can direct message me on the social media outlet of your choice. We are at YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. That's where Diabetes Connections lives. I'm on Tik Tok, or Snapchat or Pinterest. Oh my gosh. All right. Well, that will do it for this week. Thanks as always to my editor John Bukenas from audio editing solutions. Thank you so much for listening. I will be back on Wednesday. live within the news. Live on Facebook and now on YouTube as well. Until then, be kind to yourself. Benny: Diabetes Connections is a production of Stacey Simms media. All rights reserved. All wrongs avenged

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
In the News.. Dexcom Follow update, glucose eye scanner, stem cell research and more!

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 7:05


This week "In the News.." our top stories include: New features for Dexcom Follow, Vertex makes stem cell progress on a functional cure for type 1, funding comes through for a eye scan for glucose levels, a new aggregate diet/nutrition study measures T1D risk in babies, Medtronic snaps up a patch pump company and a lot more.. Join us LIVE every Wednesday at 4:30pm ET for the top diabetes headlines of the week. Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Episode Transcription below:   Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I'm Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days. As always, I'm going to link up my sources in the Facebook comments – where we are live – and new this week – Live on YouTube..  and in the show notes at d-c dot com when this airs as a podcast.. so you can read more if you want, on your own schedule. XX In the News is brought to you by Real Good Foods! Find their breakfast line and all of their great products in your local grocery store, Target or Costco. XX Earlier today, Dexcom released some new features for its Follow app. It now includes a Homescreen Widget to an Apple device, a Quick Glance for Android users. You can submit a Technical Support Request or Request a Callback via Follow's Contact Menu. I assume that means you can request replacement sensors from within the app? And you can Access the Status page via Follow's Help Menu to check the status of any of the Dexcom systems. This is version 4.4 of Dexcom Follow and only applies to US users. XX Some news in the stem cell race – a few companies now looking at this as a practical cure for type 1. Vertex announced that the first patient in its islet cell replacement therapy is doing well – with a lower A1C and less insulin needs. The person is on immunosuppressive therapy and does still need to use insulin – although 90-percent less. This caught my eye - this person was diagnosed 40 years ago – this isn't a recent diagnosis. They also had incredible hypoglycemia, up to 5 episodes a day and pretty much have their life back now. One person does not make a cure but it's good to see these therapies moving forward. You may recall Vertex acquired Semma and joins ViaCyte which has an encapsulated stem cells – the hope for all long-term is that no immune suppressants would be needed. https://www.biospace.com/article/vertex-s-type-1-diabetes-therapy-shows-promise-in-early-stage-trial/ XX A new eye scan that could help diagnose diabetes is moving ahead. British-based startup Occuity has received investment funding for the Occuity Indigo, a non-contact, optical glucose meter.. The company says it's different from the failed Google contact lens… the Google version measured fluid.. but the Occuity looks within the eyeball. The company says quote - it is a transparent, stable environment whose glucose levels correlate with those of the blood. The Occuity Indigo sends a faint beam of light into the eyeball and measures the light that bounces back into the device. It can infer glucose levels in the eye based on the refraction of the returning light. https://www.uktech.news/featured/eye-scan-for-diabetes-berkshire-startup-is-developing-revolutionary-medical-technology-with-285m-funding-20211019 XX Medtronic's in talks to snap up what sounds like a pretty advanced patch pump from an Israeli company called Triple Jump. The Triple Jump system has a compact, fully portable, battery-operated miniature insulin pump and hand-held controller and includes all supporting accessories and sterile single-use disposables. The release here says it will be included in a future artificial pancreas system and that Medtronic plans to integrate Triple Jump's device to improve its pumping capabilities.   https://en.globes.co.il/en/article-medtronic-in-talks-to-buy-israeli-co-triple-jump-for-300m-1001387534 XX No surprise but important info – using a flash glucose moniotor can improve A1Cs and reduce DKA cases. Big study in Scotland using the Libre – called a flash monitor because this version isn't continuous – you have to swipe to see your glucose. The technology has been free in Scotland since 2018 – so use in people with type 1 went from about 3 percent in 2017 to 46 percent in 2020. Improvement was seen across all ages, genders and socio-economic lines. Also.,regardless of prior or current pump use, completion of a diabetes education program, or early flash monitoring adoption. https://www.endocrinologynetwork.com/view/flash-glucose-monitoring-lowers-hba1c-rates-of-dka-in-patients-with-type-1-diabetes XX Controversial but more research into preventing type 1.. new studies showing that longer breastfeeding and later introduction to gluten may reduce the risk. This was a look at aggregate studies in Sweden.. which has the second highest incidence of type 1 in the world. (number one is Finland – I knew you were going to ask) For babies nursed for at least six to 12 months, the risk of developing type 1 went down 61 percent. Gluten at three to six months of age lowered the risk 64 percent. The studies also pointed to a protective effect of vitamin D supplementation during infancy. These researchers are careful to say that this isn't definitive but instead points to the need for more studies of babies' diet and vitamin intake and the risk of type 1. https://www.news-medical.net/news/20211018/Breastfeeding-and-later-introduction-to-gluten-may-have-a-protective-effect-against-type-1-diabetes.aspx XX Some early news about type 1 diabetes, pregnancy and the gut microbiome. This study shows pregnant women with type 1 had a decrease in "good" gut bacteria and an increase in 'bad' gut bacteria that promote intestinal inflammation and damage to the intestinal lining. These changes could contribute to the increased risk of pregnancy complications seen in women with type 1 This is very early on.. the next stage of the project was to identify markers that would determine which women with type 1 diabetes might benefit from safe interventions during pregnancy, including dietary changes. https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-10-dietary-pregnancy-complications-women-diabetes.html   XX More to come, including mental health help and a bit of a correction on my part. But first, I want to tell you about one of our great sponsors who helps make Diabetes Connections possible. Real Good Foods. Where the mission is Be Real Good They make nutritious foods— grain free, high in protein, never added sugar and from real ingredients—we really like their breakfast line.. although Benny rarely eats the waffles or breakfast sandwiches for breakfast.. it's usually after school or late night. He ate like four waffles at ten o clock at night the other day. You can buy Real Good Foods online or find a store near you with their locator right on the website. I'll put a link in the FB comments and as always at d-c dot com. Back to the news… -- We talk a lot about mental health and diabetes and how there just aren't enough resources to help. I want to call your attention to a free virtual workshop by the Center for Diabetes and Mental Health. This is tomorrow as you watch me live – and if you're listening or watching after I'd still urge you to check out the resources. This is from Dr. Mark Heyman who I've had on the show and who has his own podcast. Dr. Heyman is a diabetes psychologist and Certified Diabetes Care and Education Specialist and he lives with type 1. https://cdmh.org/ https://www.reimaginet1d.com/c/reimagine-t1d?fbclid=IwAR1dsPn5wefVM3vnypUgRuBf8OA9qL-suMKlbdPZeASRXDyFuneTAYQ3igw XX Bit of a correction to last week's news.. I had speculated whether the Dexcom/Garmin partnership which uses the name Connect IQ had anything to do with Tandem's Control IQ. I heard from a lot of you – apparently Garmin's whole app system is just called Connect IQ.. and has been for years. But I did get that interview with Dexcom I mentioned.. so that will be our long-format interview episode coming up on Tuesday. That's a chat with the chief technology officer of dexcom The episode out right now is all about Halloween – it's an ask the d mom conversation with my wonderful friend moira mccarthy. We talk about everything from candy to getting your kids insulin pump under the costume to sugar free candy from well meaning neighbors That's In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

Pardon My Pancreas
3 Key Factors For Stable Blood Sugars After ANY Meal

Pardon My Pancreas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 17:37


Matt (Nutritionist living with T1D) shares his secrets after trying out many of the popular T1D diets.Grab Matt's free T1D Webclass here:https://diabetesinaction.com---------Welcome to the Pardon My Pancreas podcast!! This show is all about REAL life with type 1 diabetes, understanding fluctuations, and how to stabilize your blood sugar for good. Your host is Matt Vande Vegte is a certified personal trainer, nutritionist, and type 1 diabetic whose biggest goal in life is to help people with diabetes around the world live their lives fearlessly. Looking for an online health coaching program to help you live your best life? Go to https://www.ftfwarrior.com to learn more about his program for diabetics only that is focused on helping you reach your goals while living a happier and healthier life. Join the Tribe today!This podcast is sponsored by FTF Warrior - An online health and fitness coaching company for type 1 diabetics dedicated to helping them master their blood sugars through any activity, exercise, or meal!https://www.ftfwarrior.comFollow Matt here:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ftfwarrior/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ftfwarrior/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/ftfwarrior------------------------------------------------------Disclaimer: While we share our experiences with diabetes, nothing we discuss should be taken as medical advice. Please consult your doctor or medical professional for your health and diabetes management.

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
In the News.. Dexcom and Garmin partner, faster insulin tested, once a week basal and more...

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 6:59


Top stories this week include: a new adjunct therapy is being tested for type 1, Dexcom and Garmin will officially work together (no more DIY needed), once weekly basal insulin study, can psychedelic drugs prevent type 2?! and Australia bets on Rugby for diabetes education Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Episode transcription below:  Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I'm Stacey Simms and I am on location this week. I'm at the She Podcasts LIVE conference.. but the news doesn't wait. So.. these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days. As always, I'm going to link up my sources in the Facebook comments – where we are live – and in the show notes at d-c dot com when this airs as a podcast.. so you can read more if you want, on your own schedule. XX In the News is brought to you by Real Good Foods! Find their breakfast line and all of their great products in your local grocery store, Target or Costco. XX Our top story.. There's a lot of buzz these days around adjunct therapy for diabetes.. basically another treatment along with insulin. Earlier this year, a drug so far just named TTP-399 got FDA breakthrough therapy approval. A new study shows it works well to keep people with type 1 out of DKA. This was small study, 23 people. They found that TTP-399 can help lower blood glucose without increasing the risk of DKA. It's important because other adjunct therapy.. such as S-G-L-T-2 inhibitors do help lower blood glucose, but the FDA has said they cause too much of a risk of DKA in people with type 1. Those are brand names like Invokana and Jardiance. Pivotal trials of TTP-399 begin later this year. https://www.biospace.com/article/vtv-therapeutics-type-1-diabetes-drug-shows-promise/ XX New partnership announced today - Dexcom and Garmin. You will still need your phone.. I knew you were going to ask.. but with the new Dexcom Connect IQ apps you can now see your Dexcom G6 info on your compatible Garmin smartwatch or cycling computer. Jake Leach, chief technology officer at Dexcom says.. Garmin is the first partner to connect through the real-time API, which we told you about a few months back. Basically, you'll be seeing more connectivity without having to use a third party, community sourced work around which a lot of people do now. The name here is interesting, right? Connect IQ, very similar to Tandem's Control IQ. But since Dexcom owns a bit of Tandem, maybe that's no coincidence. I've requested an interview with Dexcom so maybe we'll find out. garmin.com/newsroom, email media.relations@garmin.com, or follow us at facebook.com/garmin, twitter.com/garminnews, instagram.com/garmin, youtube.com/garmin or linkedin.com/company/garmin. XX New study about time in range, hybrid closed loop systems and faster insulins. The headline here is that using Fiasp with the Medtronic 670g system resulted in greater time in range. How much? The Fiasp group spend 82 point 3 percent time in range.. the Novolog group spent 79.6 percent time in range. This was over 17 weeks and the participants mostly bolused AT meal times, not before, no prebolusing. The researchers echo what I was going to say here, quote – “While the primary outcome demonstrated statistical significance, the clinical impact may be small, given an overall difference in time in range of 1.9%.” So just a heads up if you see headlines screaming about how much faster Fiasp is because of this study. https://www.endocrinologyadvisor.com/home/topics/diabetes/type-1-diabetes/fast-acting-insulin-aspart-versus-insulin-aspart-closed-loop-type-1-diabetes/ XX People who have tried a psychedelic drug at least once in their lifetime have lower odds of heart disease and diabetes. This is a University of Oxford study published in Scientific Reports. These researchers examined data from more than 375-thousand Americans who had taken part in an annual survey sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Participants reported whether they had ever used the classic psychedelic substances including LSD, mescaline, peyote or psilocybin. They also reported whether they had been diagnosed with heart disease or diabetes in the past year. The researchers found that the prevalence of both conditions was lower among psychedelic users. While no one is recommending you start taking mushrooms to avoid diabetes.. there's a growing push to start serious research to investigate the link between psychedelics and cardio-metabolic health. https://www.psypost.org/2021/10/psychedelic-use-associated-with-lower-odds-of-heart-disease-and-diabetes-study-finds-61958 XX Update on the once a week basal insulin I've been reporting on for a while.. both Lilly and Novo Nordisk are testing their own version of this.. this most recent study looks at the Lilly version called Tirzepatide. These researchers found it to be safe and effective with lower rates of hypoglycemia and slightly lower A1Cs than daily basals like Lantus or Tresiba. Lots of studies ongoing here, for both brands of potential once a week dosing, including a large phase 2 program that includes people with type 1. https://www.healio.com/news/endocrinology/20211012/novel-onceweekly-basal-insulin-safe-effective-in-type-2-diabetes XX More to come, including how rugby and diabetes education may go together.. But first, I want to tell you about one of our great sponsors who helps make Diabetes Connections possible. Real Good Foods. Where the mission is Be Real Good They make nutritious foods— grain free, high in protein, never added sugar and from real ingredients—we really like their breakfast line.. although Benny rarely eats the waffles or breakfast sandwiches for breakfast.. it's usually after school or late night. Ugh.. do your teens eat breakfast? You can buy Real Good Foods online or find a store near you with their locator right on the website. I'll put a link in the FB comments and as always at d-c dot com. Back to the news… -- Getting out of the doctor's office and into something that people can actually relate to.. Diabetes Australia is using rugby to teach men about the risks of type 2 diabetes. League Fans in Training (League-FIT) is based on a Scottish initiative that used football teams to deliver exercise and nutritional advice to overweight and obese men. The program includes education and goal setting and a rugby league-based exercise session, delivered by coaches and some of the club's players. What I really like about this is that -from what I can tell - they're focusing on small changes and not telling these guys to give up everything they like to eat and drink or that they have to become professional players to get a little bit more fit. Imagine if NFL players had a clinic for fans to come and learn a little bit about fitness and nutrition? Again, not to be pros.. just to live a little better and lower risks of type 2. https://www.diabetesaustralia.com.au/news -- On Diabetes Connections this week, we're talking to a mom with type 1 who has had two children during the pandemic. One last summer and the other just a few days before our interview! That's In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

Pardon My Pancreas
Should Type 1 Diabetics Go STRICT Vegan? (High Carb Adventures)

Pardon My Pancreas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 17:57


Matt (Nutritionist living with T1D) shares his brutally honest thoughts (pros and cons) on the "Vegan" LFWFPB diet for Type 1 Diabetes.Grab Matt's free T1D Webclass here:https://diabetesinaction.com---------Welcome to the Pardon My Pancreas podcast!! This show is all about REAL life with type 1 diabetes, understanding fluctuations, and how to stabilize your blood sugar for good. Your host is Matt Vande Vegte is a certified personal trainer, nutritionist, and type 1 diabetic whose biggest goal in life is to help people with diabetes around the world live their lives fearlessly. Looking for an online health coaching program to help you live your best life? Go to https://www.ftfwarrior.com to learn more about his program for diabetics only that is focused on helping you reach your goals while living a happier and healthier life. Join the Tribe today!This podcast is sponsored by FTF Warrior - An online health and fitness coaching company for type 1 diabetics dedicated to helping them master their blood sugars through any activity, exercise, or meal!https://www.ftfwarrior.comFollow Matt here:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ftfwarrior/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ftfwarrior/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/ftfwarrior------------------------------------------------------Disclaimer: While we share our experiences with diabetes, nothing we discuss should be taken as medical advice. Please consult your doctor or medical professional for your health and diabetes management.

Pardon My Pancreas
Is The Keto Diet Right For A Type 1 Diabetic?

Pardon My Pancreas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 23:24


Matt (Nutritionist living with T1D) shares his brutally honest thoughts (pros and cons) on the "Keto" diet for Type 1 Diabetes.Grab Matt's free T1D Webclass here:https://diabetesinaction.com---------Welcome to the Pardon My Pancreas podcast!! This show is all about REAL life with type 1 diabetes, understanding fluctuations, and how to stabilize your blood sugar for good. Your host is Matt Vande Vegte is a certified personal trainer, nutritionist, and type 1 diabetic whose biggest goal in life is to help people with diabetes around the world live their lives fearlessly. Looking for an online health coaching program to help you live your best life? Go to https://www.ftfwarrior.com to learn more about his program for diabetics only that is focused on helping you reach your goals while living a happier and healthier life. Join the Tribe today!This podcast is sponsored by FTF Warrior - An online health and fitness coaching company for type 1 diabetics dedicated to helping them master their blood sugars through any activity, exercise, or meal!https://www.ftfwarrior.comFollow Matt here:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ftfwarrior/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ftfwarrior/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/ftfwarrior------------------------------------------------------Disclaimer: While we share our experiences with diabetes, nothing we discuss should be taken as medical advice. Please consult your doctor or medical professional for your health and diabetes management.

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
Pay or Die: A new documentary about the price of insulin

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 33:30


There's a new documentary in the works, all about the struggle of insulin access and affordability. Rachel Dyer and Scott Ruderman, who lives with type 1, join Stacey to talk about their experience making this film and why they think it could make a difference. Pay or Die Film provides an inside look at how the soaring price of insulin in America is threatening—and even taking—the lives of people with type 1 diabetes. This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Episode Transcription coming soon! Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Stacey Simms  0:00 Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dario Health manage your blood glucose levels increase your possibilities by Gvoke Hypopen the first premixed auto injector for very low blood sugar and by Dexcom take control of your diabetes and live life to the fullest with Dexcom.   Announcer  0:22 This is Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms.   Stacey Simms  0:27 This week, a new documentary in the works to show people outside the diabetes community the struggle of insulin access and affordability. Rachel Dyer and Scott Ruderman had an experience in Canada that made them say, we got to do this,   Rachael Dyer  0:42 where he was paying at home in America up to $450 a vial out of pocket then to have the same vial same manufacturer same everything brought to him for $21 in Canada and to watch Scott just break down and start crying there in the pharmacy and for myself as well. I was left in shock and disbelief, and we just looked at each other as we walked out and said it's time now to make this documentary.   Stacey Simms  1:11 We'll talk to Rachel and Scott who lives with type one about their experience making this film and why they think it could make a difference. This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. Welcome to another week of the show always so glad to have you here. You know we aim to educate and inspire about diabetes with a focus on people who use insulin and insulin access and affordability as you heard is what this week's episode is all about. I'm your host Stacey Simms. My son Benny was diagnosed with type one right before he turned to almost 15 years ago. My husband lives with type two diabetes. I don't have diabetes. I have a background in broadcasting. And that is how you get the podcast In our most recent in the news episode. And that's the previous podcast episode two this one, I explained Lily's new move to drop the price of insulin lispro. Between that and Walmart's deal with Novo Nordisk, which lets Walmart price Novolog, same exact Insulet Novolog. a lot lower. We're seeing some interesting action on the cash price of insulin at the pharmacy. As I've said for years, though, I think it's going to take state and federal legislation to see real systemic change, you still need to jump through a lot of hoops, you still need to know that this is out there, you still need to find coupons in many cases, or you need to, you know, have really good insurance. There's a lot going on, and my guests this week are hoping that their documentary film will help educate people and make a difference. That film is currently in production. It is called Pay or Die. Here's a clip from the teaser, Trailer here: https://payordiefilm.com/film-teaser   Stacey Simms  3:17 If that last bit sounds familiar, that's Nicole Holt Smith, who I've had on the show her son Alec died after rationing insulin, and that audio is from her arrest at a protest at Eli Lilly headquarters in 2019. Today, you're going to hear from the filmmaker Scott Ruderman and Rachel Dyer. Scott was diagnosed with type one in 2009. He is an award-winning filmmaker. He's worked on documentaries for Netflix and Hulu in the BBC and HBO, his documentary short piano craftman won Best Director at the Madrid art film festival. He has a long list of credits, as does my other guest Rachel Dyer. She is an award winning journalist and producer who won a Southern California journalist Award for Best International feature, as well as a Clio entertainment grand winning entry for her work on the greatest showmen live the world's first live commercial for theatrical release the story behind Pay or Die in just a moment but first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dario Health bottom line you need a plan of action with diabetes. We've been really lucky that Benny's endo has helped us with that and that he understands the plan has to change as Benny gets older you want that kind of support. So take your diabetes management to the next level with Dario health. They're published Studies demonstrate high impact results for active users like improved in range percentage within three months reduction of a one c within three months and a 58% decrease in occurrences of severe hypoglycemic events. Try Dario's diabetes success plan and make a difference in your diabetes management. Go to my dario.com forward slash diabetes dash connections for more proven results and free information about the plan. Scott and Rachel, thank you so much for joining me. I appreciate you spending some time with me and my listeners today.   Rachael Dyer  5:14 Thank you so much for having us. Stacey. We're really great, great time and looking forward to being here.   Stacey Simms  5:19 Let me start if I could with you, Scott, could you live with type one? Just briefly, could you tell us your diagnosis story, you were diagnosed as and as an adult? That's correct.   Scott Ruderman  5:29 I was in college, and it was around 2009. And it was my first semester in college I was I was going to Suffolk University in Boston, Massachusetts. And for about two weeks, I really wasn't feeling good. had all the symptoms, I say got very blurry, drinking a lot of fluids. I woke up one morning, and I just couldn't feel my legs from my waist down. It felt like they were being bags, I went to the school infirmary. And they they told me it sounds like type 1 diabetes are just diabetes. But they weren't. You know, they said it's probably not. But when they actually took a glucose reading, they left the room, the nurse came back in and she said, Look, I thought the meter was broken. But I checked my blood sugar and it's fine. Your blood sugar is not, it's not reading on the meter. So it's definitely going to be high, we want to send you an emergency room. So I went to Mass General, and I checked in and I was there for about a week. And then I resumed classes the week after it was it was a really hard week. But it was just one of those things. And I think a lot of type ones could relate that you just have to accept it. And the learning curve is it took a few years to really get on top of it. And then as the newer technology came in, it just got easier to manage.   Stacey Simms  6:42 So what led you all to this documentary? I assume it didn't happen as soon as you were diagnosed, Scott, but can you tell us a little bit about kind of what led you down this path, of course.   Rachael Dyer  6:53 So this has been a passion project for Scott for some time. And Scott and I actually met working together in the field. So obviously, we're both in the documentary business. And we just finished up working on a documentary together. And then I have a journalistic background. And I had done quite a few stories where I was looking at a lot of Americans traveling to Canada to get alternative medicine up there and their prescription medicine out there because it was a lot cheaper. I hadn't ever focused on insulin, but I had done other stories. So when Scott and I had met in the field and started speaking, Scott had told me that he was a type one diabetic, which I knew nothing about at the time, I knew very, very little about diabetes in general, let alone type one. And I was traveling to Canada because I'm Australian and half Canadian, and I was visiting my family. And I asked God to come with me. And I told him that I done some of these stories about, you know, Americans traveling up there. And Scott didn't believe me at first. And I thought that it was crazy what I was talking about. But we went, we went to Vancouver and we said, Look, I said why don't we just try. Let's see how we go. So he went to a few pharmacies and there and then the pharmacists were great. And we explained our situation, you know, Scott had shown brought in the insulin that he was on. And they, you know, were so generous and welcoming and kind and said to him, Look, what insulin Do you need right now for this trip? What can I help you with? And as Scott likes to explain it, he says it was like he was a kid in a candy shop, just to have that overwhelming experience with insulin that was so inaccessible, and so expensive in America to come forward and have it brought to him where he was paying at home in America up to $450 a vial out of pocket than to have the same same vial, same manufacturer, same everything brought to him for $21 in Canada, and to watch scotches break down and start crying there in the pharmacy. And for myself as well was I was left in shock and disbelief. And we just looked at each other as we walked out and said, It's time now to make this documentary. We have to do something about it. So that led us on our journey.   Scott Ruderman  9:19 I have to stay Stacy, to Rachel's point, it was a very emotional experience. It was one of those experiences where you feel joy but kind of frustration and at the same time I think I say this all the time. I really looked at my hands and for the first time I said Well, I'm feeling a little bit more accepted and cared for and thought out for then my experiences going to a pharmacy in the United States where I need more insulin and my prescription. You know, it's not it's not fully made out for the month yet and they're kind of like no, you have to come back next Tuesday and I can walk out of there and they know I could potentially die without my Insulet So it was just quite an experience. And to Rachel's point again, yes, we both said we're making a film about this.   Stacey Simms  10:07 So it seems to me that just from what you've said, it looks like it changed a bit though from Why can't we get more affordable insulin in the US? Why can't you like you can in so many other countries walk in and buy what you need to people are dying? And I'm curious, did you realize that as you started this project, or was that always part of the story all along?   Scott Ruderman  10:27 For me, when I was doing the initial research, you know, when I realized, the first thing I said, in my head, I wonder what people are doing that can't afford it, and where they're going, and upon my initial research, you know, obviously, people that can't afford to go on Facebook, you know, the clinical black market and media. But then I started reading all these stories about people rationing their insulin, and going into decay and dying just to make ends meet. And that's where things got a little bit more serious. And like, Whoa, this is not just being able to afford it, people are actually losing their life because they can't afford it. And that's kind of where the film kind of took it. It's kind of approach was that this is an issue and people are dying.   Stacey Simms  11:09 Rachel, what do you think the film is for? You know, it's very difficult, as you probably know, and as you live with type one, Scott, it's difficult to explain any of this to people who don't live with it day in and day out. I'm curious who you're producing this for, of course, and   Rachael Dyer  11:26 I think, you know, with anything, that is a huge challenge with trying to firstly explain an illness, which a lot of people do not live with. And also to, to differentiate between type one and type two, that is obviously a challenge in the beginning. But you know, there are huge differences. And there are huge differences, which we do point out in the film. Obviously, as you know, with your son living with type one as well, it is a life threatening illness, and you are insulin dependent. So you know, we explore that, but also to exploring the medical system in America, which, as anyone who lives here can understand that it is very complicated, which they love for it to be to make everyone think that this is something that we just have to live with. But for me, being an Australian and Canadian, I think, the shock factor from an international audience and not having to not only live with a debilitating illness, but also to then navigate this healthcare system is what we're trying to present throughout the film as well and show the microcosm of this healthcare system in the United States. So I would say that this film is being produced not only for the type one community or the diabetes community, but for not only also to a domestic and international audience to show what is going on in the states and how unjust it is, and how unfair it is for people just to not be able to access life saving medication and medication that in a lot of other countries around the world is affordable and accessible, and you shouldn't be dying because of it. So it's for everyone.   Stacey Simms  13:11 I'm curious, too. It's so hard to get this message to be clear, because our healthcare system is so complicated to the point where you can go on social media any day and see people within the diabetes community arguing about whether or not people can afford insulin. In other words, you know, if you start any kind of Twitter chain or Facebook conversation, you'll have everything from you know, mine's covered. 100%. I don't understand what your problem is to why don't we just get a coupon to the president lowered the price of insulin? No, the president raised the price of insulin. It's so confusing at Scott, did you focus on any of that conversation? Or is this more focusing on individual stories? Right back to Scott answering that question, but first, Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Gvoke Hypopen and you know, low blood sugar feels horrible. You can get shaky and sweaty or even feel like you're going to pass out. There are a lot of symptoms that can be different for everybody. I am so glad we have a different option to treat very low blood sugar Gvoke Hypopen is the first auto injector to treat very low blood sugar Gvoke Hypopen is pre mixed and ready to go with no visible needle before gvoke. People needed to go through a lot of steps to get glucagon treatments ready to be used. This made emergency situations even more challenging and stressful. This is so much better. I'm grateful we have it on hand to find out more go to Diabetes connections.com and click on the Gvoke logo. Gvoke shouldn't be used in patients with pheochromocytoma or insulinoma visit g vo glucagon.com slash risk. Now back to Scott answering my question about whether the film looks at the bigger system or focuses on individual stories.   Scott Ruderman  14:56 That's a great question. This is a question that's brought up a lot as well. Let's just within our team, you know, this film is really, through, you know, the stories of people that are struggling. And we're capturing those human stories and seeing kind of the lengths, they are going to try to get access to the medication they need financially. And through their stories, we will kind of go into a little bit about the complex system, as well as politically what's happening. But the idea of the film is, this is a very character driven film. And we want people to be able to familiarize themselves with these characters and be able to, you know, say, well, that could be me, or that could be my friend's daughter who has type one or, you know, not even just type 1 diabetes. I mean, there's other medications that are so expensive, that anyone can kind of put themselves in those shoes and be like, what do I do if I can't afford medication. And that's really the shock factor we want to bring through in the film and urgency, because we can go on and on and on and talking about the complexities. But the problem is, it's never going to be solved, unless you're faced with the realities of it yourself. So bringing that to the viewer of making them feel like they are in the position of what our characters are going through is the goal to show the reality of the struggle   Rachael Dyer  16:16 to Scott's point that is very much the focus of the film, but we do have experts that we are speaking with that, breaking down the complexities behind it and showing how the system works. And with the experts that we have, they do actually show that the complicated system is being put there for a reason to make people feel like it is more complicated than what it actually is to make it so confusing that people just throw up their hands and say, I can't be bothered, this is just the way it is, which is certainly not the case. And it doesn't need to be the case. So you know, we do have the experts that have come in to break down that process and make it as simple as possible so people can understand this is not the way that it needs to be. Yeah,   Stacey Simms  17:03 that's great. Scott, what conclusion do you come from after this? I mean, I agree with Rachel, it's complicated, because it's designed that way. I do think the government will eventually get involved. We're seeing states now start making some changes. I'm not sure the federal government will ever take action. But you know, is it going to be a change in list price? Are we going to need to get rid of pbms? You know, did you draw any conclusions from this?   Scott Ruderman  17:28 You know, I think one of the the challenging things is the barriers of entry for just anyone trying to make a change with what's happening. And part of making this film is to kind of shine light on how complicated this system is. And no, this is this film gonna be the ultimate change? No, but it's trying to make the world a better place and down the road, do I think Insulet will be free? No. But I think just recently in the media over the last few years, this issue has been hot. And I think people are catching on and people are realizing that there needs to be more, you know, regulation on this. And prices need to be more affordable. I mean, think about when insulin, the discovery of insulin and Frederick Banting. I mean, the whole reason he sold it for $1 was so no one can make a profit of this. And I think looking at where we are today, I mean, discovery, insulin was a breakthrough discovery for the United States of America. And it's been celebrated. But if people can't afford it, and they're dying, because of it, that's going against the whole idea of making it affordable with bandings purpose to selling it. Hopefully, this is just a wake up call to say, hey, insulin was to to help people not to make profit off.   Stacey Simms  18:46 And I before Rachel jumps in, because I know she's half Canadian. Dr. Banting was Canadian, so we have to give the props. I know, I know, you meant you know, the manufacturer in the United States, and really purchasing getting all of that. But tell us a little bit if you could Scott about maybe some of the you said characters tell us a little bit about the people in this piece,   Scott Ruderman  19:05 of course. So you know, we have some principal characters, we've been following Nicole Holt Smith, who lost her son Alec, he was rushing his insulin, he couldn't afford, you know, the monthly cost. And he, he went into decay and died. And she's been fighting on the Minnesota State level to try to get access to emergency insulin in Minnesota. And we've been following her kind of battle on the state level. So that's one of our main stories. Another story. We've been following a mother and daughter who've been living out of their car because they need to make ends meet and you know, they're both type one, and they couldn't afford their insulin. So unfortunately, they were living in their car trying to survive, and they're the ones that crossed the border to find cheaper insulin in Canada. So we followed that story. And then we also have another story of a newly died This is during COVID. And the reason we brought that story in is we needed to, we want to cover all angles, we don't want all our characters to be this repetition of, I can't afford insulin, it's they're all struggling in different ways. And our COVID story of being diagnosed on COVID is, is to show the reality of what it's like and how your life just flips with type 1 diabetes, the management side, the physical side, and then again, the financial side. So it's all those aspects are in that story.   Rachael Dyer  20:29 Yeah. So just to Scott's point, I think that what we're trying to capture with all of our contributors and following their stories is it is just that it is a financial, emotional and physical burdens that, you know, everyone who is diagnosed with Type One Diabetes goes through on a daily basis. And I think that is the main emphasis that we really focus on throughout the film. And you see it through the stories, you see it through the emotional, physical and financial burden that they go through. And I think where Scott and I work well at both together, but our style as documentary filmmakers, is we are a very small footprint on the ground, a lot of the time, it is just Scott Nye traveling together. So we have a very personal relationship with the people that we film with, and they open up their world and they let us in and we become very familiar with who they are. And you see the heartbreak, you see the tears, you see the joy, and hopefully that is what is going to come across on film and and in the stories and if anyone has a daughter has a mother has a son has a child that is struggling in any capacity, whether it's with type one or something else, I feel as though that they're going to be able to relate. And that's the purpose behind these special stories that we're bringing to the screen.   Stacey Simms  21:58 Scott did anything surprise you, as you talk to these folks, when you live with type one yourself, I'm curious if anything that they said or anything they shared, took you by surprise,   Scott Ruderman  22:07 not only surprised, but as we kept going back into the fields, and filming, I think, you know, realizing that I am a type one and that this could happen to any day just kind of drop the reality perspective back to me. And I'm feeling what they're saying. Because, again, this I could be in this position. as a freelancer alone, covering my own health insurance, a bad month puts me in a bind. I'm actually the subject of my film in a way. So it's a very interesting connection. And it takes a toll on me. Every time I go and film, I need space after to just process what I'm hearing and what I'm going through, I think filming with Nicole Smith hope of being a mother of, you know, losing her son, I think my mom like what my mom would go through. If I were to pass away because of this and following Nicole. And you know, that's where you kind of see a real mother's purpose of just she's not going to stop being Alex's mother. By doing that she's going to continue to try to make an example that this is not okay, and be a voice for all the mothers out there that do have children diagnosed with type one and could be struggling because when you turn 26 years old, and you're off your parents health insurance as a type one, it's a new learning curve. It's a financial learning curve. And it could be very difficult. It could mean the job you get where you apply. It's not what you want to do in life. It's what can I do, that's going to keep me alive so I can afford, you know, for my insulin to keep me alive. It's a very scary and Nicole always says it's that number 26. And I'm only 31 years old, and I was 26. I remember that moment. It's really hard.   Stacey Simms  23:58 Before I let you go, unless each of you this question, why do you work in documentary? This is a it's such a different type of filmmaking. It's so personal. As you said, Scott, you kind of have to recover if every time you talk to somebody, why do you do it?   Rachael Dyer  24:12 I'll jump in. I think for me, as I mentioned earlier, my experience and background was as a journalist for over 10 years and you know, I dealt with some really challenging and and hard hitting stories. For the my first four years in America, I was traveling the country and working in breaking news. And for me, with the 24 hour news cycle that has just become so relentless, my personality is one of which I just had to stop being on the ground for less than 24 hours and seeing these people let's hop right and wanting to share their story more and so naturally, I just transitioned over to wanting to be in the documentary space to spend money. more time with individuals learn about who they are and share these really important stories on the world stage. Rather than just jumping in and out for a one and a half minute nice cars. Yeah, for me, it was just important to be there with the people, and spend the time sharing these really relevant stories.   Scott Ruderman  25:19 For me. I love storytelling, I think one of the greatest things about documentary is to every project, you're in a different world, you are discovering the lives of people and what they're going through, and to be able to film that and see transformation and see someone change along the way along the process is extraordinary. For me, it's also extremely challenging. And being in a room with a camera and filming people at on the moment. It's in this sense, you know, I like to say in fiction film, you know, the director is God. But when it comes to documentary and nonfiction, God is the director, and you don't know what's going to happen in front of your lens, and to be there and capture a moment that could only happen once and walk away with that and be part of that is what keeps me coming back to make more documentaries.   Stacey Simms  26:11 And in general, and maybe just for this one, too. I'm always curious, how much more do you film than you use? Right? I mean, it's got to be hours and hours and hours that you're filming that you're not going to use?   Rachael Dyer  26:24 Yeah, I think that's always the fun part. The fun part for us, but definitely not the fun part for the editor when they have hours, and hours and hours of footage to go through. But yeah, like Scott said, I think that the difference between documentary and true documentary is that you do not know a lot of the time what is going to happen, you can only prepare so much. But there is a lot that is unpredictable and doesn't happen and you you know, you want to film that you want to see the change and evolutions in these people. So again, I think it depends on the documentary, the subject matter, but and also to where you initially thought the film might go might not be how it ends up in the Edit. So we're not at that stage yet. So I think we will see but you know, there is a lot that we have filmed but a lot of special moments to within that.   Scott Ruderman  27:22 Yeah, another challenging thing about making a documentary. And you know, I just also want to point out there this documentary, until we started actually securing funds was funded out of pocket by me. And one of the hardest things is, you know, we have characters across the nation, West Coast, mid coast, and one of the hardest things is always being there at the right moment. And you know, being able to jump on a plane with all the gear get there and be there in time to capture it. That's a huge cost factor. And you know, that's a decision you have to make. That's one of the challenges about document and you're not with people, you know, we've been filming this for a few years now we're not with our characters fully on for years. It's it's coming back and going. And there are moments where it's exhausting for subjects because we're there and we have to take a break. And then we come back and you know, new development occurs. And that's the beauty of it is following and following and following it seeing that transformation.   Stacey Simms  28:17 Well, Scott and Rachel, we really look forward to the completion of this and seeing it and spreading the word. Thank you so much for joining me and sharing your story and we look forward to the release of the movie. Thanks. Thank you watch. You're listening to Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. More information at Diabetes connections.com. I will link up the website to Pay or Die and any other information about the timing production, that sort of thing. Of course, there's a transcription along with this episode as there is with every episode since the beginning of 2020. Just a real quick note about our experience with insulin and coupons. And I've shared this story before and it's been about a year now I realize that we decided we had changed insurance right around this time last year, and they wanted to change us from human log to novolog. But he's been doing great. I did not want to make any changes. I mean, you know how it is when things are going well. So we decided we had a little bit of a stockpile, Lino, let's fight it. And it took me a full two weeks of spending a lot of time calling the pharmacy calling my doctor we got some coupons I went to get insulin.org and went through that process and you know, immediately printed out a coupon for human log and said this will be $35 a month. It was not that easy. I took it to the pharmacy and they said nope, it doesn't scan so we had to jump through a lot of hoops. What happened for us was we got a new prior authorization from Benny's endocrinologist and the pharmacy ranted as a new prescription. So that helped us and you know what, I'm afraid knock on wood is word As I'm looking around here, we have not had to do anything else it renewed automatically for 2021. And so far so good. I'll keep you posted. if anything changes, it was a lot of hoops to jump through. I'm grateful I had the time and the knowledge to do so I know not everybody can spend that much time and has that good of a relationship with both their pharmacist and their endo. What a mess. Alright, more to come. But first I want to tell you about another one of our sponsors Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dexcom. You I want to talk about control IQ. This is the Dexcom G6 Tandem pump software program. And when it comes to Benny, even though I hardly expect perfection, I really do I just want him happy and healthy. I have to say control IQ the software from Dexcom. And Tandem has exceeded my expectations, Benny is able to do less checking and bolusing. And spending more time in range is a once these are the lowest they have ever been. This isn't a teenager at the time when I was really prepared for him to be struggling. And everybody's sleep is better to with basal adjustments possible every five minutes, the system is working hard to keep him in range. And that means we hear far fewer Dexcom alerts, rural sleeping better. I'm so grateful for this, of course individual results may vary. To learn more, just go to Diabetes connections.com and click on the Dexcom logo. If you're listening to this episode as a first airs, it's the first episode of October of 2021. It's also the beginning of a stretch of really, really busy weeks for me, I am hoping to have an episode every week this month. But please follow me on social it is possible, especially two weeks from now, that's kind of iffy, but I'll see what I can do. I am traveling to New York this coming weekend, I was supposed to go to friends for life White Plains, that is now a virtual event that's going to happen in November. But I'm still going because I have family up there. And I have some plans. So I'm really excited. And then the phone week I'm going to shoot podcasts live, which is a female podcasting event that I've been working on. I'm working with them to help with that event. So I'm really excited about that. And then later in the month, my husband and I are going to go away to celebrate a big birthday of mine. And in between I'm trying to make room for lots of just fun local stuff where I am because yeah, I mean, I don't usually celebrate my birthday all month long. But hey, I'm turning 50 I gotta tell you, I mean, are you Is anybody excited about turning 50? I'm not thrilled right about getting older. But man, I'm thrilled about getting older. I really have mixed feelings about this, because it is a milestone. So I'll be sharing more maybe on social media, we'll see. But I do have a couple of fun announcements coming up. They will be mostly in the Facebook group, or at least they'll be first in the Facebook group. So if you're not in Diabetes Connections, the group please make sure to jump in there. end of October, maybe mid to late October. I've got a couple of announcements. I need your help with some upcoming projects. It's going to be a lot of fun. All right, thank you as always to my editor John Bukenas from audio editing solutions. Thank you so much for listening. I will be back with in the news that's gonna happen every Wednesday at 430. Even as I'm on the road, I've done it before. I don't mind doing it again, from my friend's homes, my sister's house or from hotel rooms. I like doing those in the news episodes live. So those will continue. I'll see you back here in just a couple of days. Until then, be kind to yourself. Benny  33:12 Diabetes Connections is a production of Stacey Simms Media. All rights reserved. All wrongs avenged

Late Night Health
Diabetes & The Pandemic

Late Night Health

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 7:35


Many people with diabetes have faced serious challenges during the pandemic. In fact, a recent survey found that three out of four Americans put off going to the doctor or delayed medical services due to the pandemic. This can be deadly for people with diabetes, and it comes at a time when the American Diabetes Association reports that more than 25% of Americans age 65 and older have diabetes, making the disease the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. Thomas Grace, MD., shares his personal story about living with Type 1 diabetes and new life-saving technology that is available for help patients properly monitoring glucose levels. You'll learn why Dr. Grace, the Director of the Blanchard Valley Diabetes Center, is teaming up with Dexcom to raise awareness of the benefits of a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system that is proven to have significant benefits on a user's health. The sad fact is that many of your listeners are not aware of these monitoring devices, which use a small, wearable sensor and transmitter to measure and send real-time glucose values wirelessly to a smart device or receiver, that can now be paid for through Medicare. Dr. Grace talks with Mark Alyn.

Pardon My Pancreas
My Thoughts on "Low Carb" for T1D (Pros vs Cons)

Pardon My Pancreas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 20:28


Matt (Nutritionist living with T1D) shares his brutally honest thoughts (pros and cons) on the "low carb" diet for Type 1 Diabetes. Grab Matt's free T1D Webclass here:https://diabetesinaction.com---------Welcome to the Pardon My Pancreas podcast!! This show is all about REAL life with type 1 diabetes, understanding fluctuations, and how to stabilize your blood sugar for good. Your host is Matt Vande Vegte is a certified personal trainer, nutritionist, and type 1 diabetic whose biggest goal in life is to help people with diabetes around the world live their lives fearlessly. Looking for an online health coaching program to help you live your best life? Go to https://www.ftfwarrior.com to learn more about his program for diabetics only that is focused on helping you reach your goals while living a happier and healthier life. Join the Tribe today!This podcast is sponsored by FTF Warrior - An online health and fitness coaching company for type 1 diabetics dedicated to helping them master their blood sugars through any activity, exercise, or meal!https://www.ftfwarrior.comFollow Matt here:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ftfwarrior/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ftfwarrior/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/ftfwarrior------------------------------------------------------Disclaimer: While we share our experiences with diabetes, nothing we discuss should be taken as medical advice. Please consult your doctor or medical professional for your health and diabetes management.

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
In the News... Implantable insulin pump, Doctors (not parents) miss T1D symptoms, Dexcom shelf-life extension and more!

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 6:41


It's "In the News..." the only diabetes newscast! Top stories this week: Medtronic moves on implantable insulin pump, study: doctors - but not parents - are missing symptoms of T1D in kids, Dexcom "shelf-life extension" explained, news about whether COVID is causing a surge of diabetes in children and what happened with the Apple watch BG monitoring news? -- Join us each Wednesday at 4:30pm EDT! Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Transcription Below:    Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I'm Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days. As always, I'm going to link up my sources in the Facebook comments – where we are live – and in the show notes at d-c dot com when this airs as a podcast.. so you can read more if you want, on your own schedule. XX In the News is brought to you by Real Good Foods! Find their Entrée Bowls and all of their great products in your local grocery store, Target or Costco. XX Our top story.. What helps people with diabetes gain better glucose control? Expansion of Medicaid. As part of the 2010 Affordable Care Act or Obamacare, U.S. states were given the option of expanding Medicaid coverage to more people as a means of reducing the number of people without health insurance. As of today, only 12 states have not taken advantage. A new study finds that blood pressure and glucose control measures have improved in states that have. The researchers behind the study say it may take a while to show up but that, over the longer run, expanding Medicaid eligibility may improve key chronic disease health outcomes for low-income, marginalized populations. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/medicaid-expansion-improves-hypertension-and-diabetes-control XX Medtronic takes over the intellectual property rights to an implanted infusion pump. This is technology developed by the Alfred E Mann foundation. 25 years ago, there was a lot of buzz about implantable insulin pumps, but it hasn't panned out. The tech is just what it sounds like – a small insulin pump that goes under the skin and holds enough insulin for a few months. Medtronic had one on the market but pulled it almost 15 years ago. One of the drawbacks is that you have to go to the doctor every time you need to fil the pump and there's other upkeep – but the upside is said to be better control and a lot less thinking about diabetes. Interesting to follow this one. https://www.fiercebiotech.com/medtech/medtronic-buys-implanted-infusion-pump-tech-to-develop-new-type-1-diabetes-treatment XX A story familiar to way too many parents.. symptoms of type 1 diabetes are not always immediately recognized by primary care providers. This was a study of about 240 kids under 18.. published in Pediatric Diabetes These researchers found that 39% of parents had suspicions of new-onset diabetes before they brought their child in for care. Of those, the majority of parents first brought their child to the doctor with symptoms.. and then ended up bringing the same child to the emergency room within the next four weeks. This was a Swedish study, but research shows especially during COVID, diagnosis during DKA is increasing in children in many countries, showing the greater need for better education all around. https://www.usnews.com/news/health-news/articles/2021-09-21/doctors-often-miss-signs-of-type-1-diabetes-in-kids XX We've heard a lot during this pandemic about an increase in new diabetes diagnoses. A new report from Mississippi, where providers are reporting a -quote – massive increase. One pediatric endocrinologist is says they've seen up to a 40% increase this year, compared to 2019. That's both type 1 and type 2. So what's going on? Lots of theories including indirect effects of quarantines, closures, and unemployment. It might sound odd to some, but severe emotional stress is thought to be a trigger for diabetes, especially in type 1. Additional studies show that COVID targets the insulin making pancreatic beta cells. A full understanding may be some time away, but these endos say the surge is real. XX Interesting listener question about Dexom sensors.. thanks for sending in this photo – seems that some customers are getting these G6 inserters – brand new in the original packaging – with a label that says “this product meets shelf life extension requirements.” I reached out to Dexcom and they told me: the stickers are legit and there are updated expirations dates. I've asked for a bit more information as to why they'd do something like this and if it means that all G6 sensors could have extended shelf life. They responded that they aren't going through all the sensors, so only the ones labeled can be considered extended.. no answer as to why now or to which part of the sensor or inserter actually expires. I'll follow up next time we talk for the podcast, but if you get one of these labeled sensors – the company says it's legit and safe. XX More to come, But first, I want to tell you about one of our great sponsors who helps make Diabetes Connections possible. Real Good Foods. Where the mission is Be Real Good They make nutritious foods— grain free, high in protein, never added sugar and from real ingredients—the new Entrée bowls are great. They have a chicken burrito, a cauliflower mash and braised beef bowl.. the lemon chicken I've told you about and more! They keep adding to the menu line! You can buy online or find a store near you with their locator right on the website. I'll put a link in the FB comments and as always at d-c dot com. Back to the news… Big news for a great children's book. JDRF has put Shia Learns About Insulin into the Bag of Hope. We had the author on the show last year... I'll link that episode up so you can hear the whole story. Shaina (SHAY-ahn-uh) Hatchell is a Registered Nurse, Certified Diabetes Care and Education Specialist, and Nurse Manager at the Howard University Diabetes Treatment Center. The story was inspired by her brother, who lives with T1D. The JDRF Bag of Hope is given to newly diagnosed children age 11 and under. Frankly, it's pretty hard to get new products in there – it's nice to see some more diverse representation. https://www.jdrf.org/press-releases/jdrf-announces-the-addition-of-shia-learns-about-insulin-book-into-the-bag-of-hope/ -- Last bit of news is note worthy for what didn't happen. Big apple news conference this month with absolutely no mention of blood glucose monitoring. You'll recall there was a ton of speculation about this all year long.. with many tech websites breathlessly reporting this was going to be happen. Look – I do think it will.. but there is really no hard evidence that anyone has come close to cracking this. Non invasive remotely accurate glucose monitoring is really hard. And, as I've said all along, we'll know it's for real when we see some clinical trials. -- Please join me wherever you get podcasts for our next episode - The episode out right now is with American Idol contestant turned actor Kevin Covais – he's in a new Netflix show out this month and he spent some time this summer mentoring teens. Fun guy with great behind the scenes Idol stories, too. That's In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
From American Idol to Actor and Advocate: Meet Kevin Covais

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 41:50


Kevin Covais was one of the youngest contestants on American Idol; he was just 16 when he made his debut during season 5. He'll share some behind the scenes stories including managing low blood sugar during a live performance. Diagnosed with T1D at age 11, Kevin has been working steadily as an actor. We'll talk about working in Hollywood with diabetes – and what that's been like during COVID, more about American Idol, and how Kevin found himself mentoring other kids with type 1. This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Episode Transcription below Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android   Stacey Simms 0:00 Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dario Health. Manage your blood glucose levels increase your possibilities by Gvoke Hypopen the first premixed auto injector for very low blood sugar, and by Dexcom take control of your diabetes and live life to the fullest with Dexcom. Announcer 0:20 This is Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. Stacey Simms 0:26 This week, actor Kevin Covais was one of the youngest contestants on American Idol back in season five, he'll share some behind the scenes stories, including managing low blood sugar during a live performance. Kevin Covais 0:38 And I'm singing and I just like, I can't wait for this thing to be over. I can't wait to stop singing and get the critiques from the judges that I'm not even gonna really listen to you because I got to get off the stage and I got to get some juice or I gotta get some tablets. I gotta take care of this. Stacey Simms 0:49 He was fine. And since Idol , Kevin has been working steadily as an actor. We'll talk about working in Hollywood with diabetes and during COVID more about American Idol, and how Kevin found himself mentoring other kids with type one. He has advice for parents too. This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. Welcome to another week of the show, always is so glad to have you here. Hi, I'm your host Stacey Simms. We aim to educate and inspire about diabetes with a focus on people who use insulin. And my guest this week is Kevin Covais, diagnosed with type one just as he turned 11. Kevin is best known for American Idol as you heard in the tease there and the Disney Channel show Good Luck Charlie, where he played the character Victor. He is a steadily working actor with roles in Transformers and this is us, the rookie, NCIS Los Angeles and more. I put some pictures of Kevin in the Diabetes Connections Facebook groups, you can kind of see him on set. And he is appearing in the new Netflix series on the verge, which is out this month. I thought it would be fun to just play a little clip of Season Five of American Idol where Kevin appeared and this was back in 2006. As I said he was one of the very youngest contestants. So here's a little bit of him from back then. (Kevin sings) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dc5ec3te75I Stacey Simms 2:44 used to watch idol all the time. And as I confessed to Kevin, it has been a while. But what a big show, right? And you'll hear Kevin during the interview mentioned Elliott Yamin who was also on season five and also lives with type one. I got to meet Elliot a couple of years ago at a touched by type one conference he is still performing writing music. He's now a dad, I'll put a link to Elliot stuff in the show notes as well. That of course will have tons of information about Kevin, but I just thought that was really interesting because to me, I don't know it seems like yesterday but of course 2006 was the year that my son was diagnosed, Benny was diagnosed right before he turned two. He is now almost 17 which is I mean, we've lived with diabetes. Now I've been part of this community for 15 years in just a couple of weeks. So 2006 kind of was a long time ago and kind of seems like yesterday to me. Alright, Kevin's interview coming up in just a moment. But first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Gvoke Hypopen and our endo always told us that if you use insulin you need to have emergency glucagon on hand as well. Low blood sugars are one thing we're usually able to treat those with fast acting glucose tabs or juice but a very low blood sugar can be very frightening which is why I'm so glad there's a different option for emergency glucagon it is Gvoke Hypopen. Gvoke Hypopen is pre mixed and ready to go with no visible needle. You pull off the red cap push the yellow end onto bare skin and hold it for five seconds. That's it. Find out more go to Diabetes connections.com and click on the Gvoke logo. Gvoke shouldn't be used in patients with pheochromocytoma or insulinoma visit Gvoke glucagon.com slash risk. Kevin, welcome to the show. I'm really glad to talk to you. Thanks for making some time for me. Kevin Covais 4:26 Stacey. Thank you for having me. I'm so excited to find we've been talking about this for a while I'm so I'm so happy to finally join the program. It's great. Stacey Simms 4:33 Awesome. Yeah, it's great that we finally connected Gosh, so much to talk about. We connected everyone We see each other every year add friends for life. Yeah. And I was so happy we were able to do that this year. We'll kind of see what happens going ahead. But before we get into all of that, do you mind if we just kind of take a step back and look back? I mean you haven't been on the show before and I'd love to kind of revisit the early days of Kevin Kevin Covais 4:59 Spacey. I would be disappointed if we didn't do that. So let's, let's dive in. Let's do it. Yes, please. Stacey Simms 5:04 As I was asking that I was thinking about American Idol but I should probably go back further. You were diagnosed when you were you were a kid. You were not even 11 years old yet, right? Yeah, it Kevin Covais 5:13 was just prior to my 11th birthday symptoms leading up. Yeah, my birthday is at the end of May. And I just remember that entire month of May so vividly. You know, obviously, you think back to childhood and, you know, memories here memories there. But that month just stands out in my mind so vividly. Symptoms throughout the month, parents wandering out what's going on with Kev? what's what's happening, you know, maybe an infection this that bring me into the doctor, several days prior to my 11th birthday to get the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. Yeah. Stacey Simms 5:41 Did you spend your birthday in the hospital? Kevin Covais 5:43 I think it was. So it was it was several days after my birthday. So yeah, it was the entire month leading up to the birthday. And then it was, yeah, right. At the start of June, I was putting so this was several days after my 11th birthday that I was in the hospital. And just you know, you hear the doctor tell you and your kid and I, you know, I immediately I broke down and cried. I didn't know, I didn't know what I was dealing with. I you know, you hear the word diabetes and you know, your mind escapes, you starts running around all these different things. And then he you know, the doctor, you know, kindly explained to me, now this is something you're going to be able to manage your life. It's obviously going to be a great deal of work. But this is something you live with and something you manage. And then from there, I learned everything over the course of the next week and being in the hospital and getting treated. Yeah, it was. It was a month like no other though. Yeah, that's for sure. Yeah. Stacey Simms 6:27 So your kid, you're diagnosed at a time when frankly, it's the as I recall that time that early 2000s. It's the time right before everything really started changing. Absolutely. As I look at I mean, Ben, he was diagnosed in 2006. They were like, we've got this amazing thing called Lantus. That's just been approved for kids. Yeah, you know, and now everything seems so different with the technology. What was the first kind of technology or routine that you were on? Gosh, you Kevin Covais 6:54 got me thinking back to the pre Lantus days of time? Yeah, it's it's wild. For me. Taking the injections, taking the daily injections, I will go ahead and say I'm not currently on the pump, that I am one of these those rare rare people that uh, that takes daily injections. I have a CGM. But that's, that's my preferred way of doing it have been doing it that way for years. But yeah, starting out being diagnosed taking human and human log each and every day. Yeah. And those pre Lantus days. And, you know, they think back to those syringes before you have the pens and the newer technology and the things that make it so easy now, so, so accessible, and thinking back to a time before, you know, we had some of those advancements, it was definitely interesting at the start for those first couple of years. Stacey Simms 7:35 Well, is that the kind of and I say technology to encompass whatever you're using shots? Oh, of course. Yeah. So when you're talking humulin, you have a log, did you have to kind of eat on a set schedule? Or were you okay to kind of inject when you want it to eat, Kevin Covais 7:51 you know, that really came with adulthood, that sort of injecting when I wanted to eat and the accessibility I remember, as a kid, it was, it was the preference of my doctors to have that set routine. I remember going in and you have a regimented schedule of three meals, several snacks, a snack at an after school snack at roughly 3pm. And, and one prior to bed 9pm at night. And yeah, that was for a while. It's obviously insulin matching. Exactly what you're what you're ingesting exactly what you're eating and set times. It was all very regimented. For me those first couple years of my life. Yeah. Something. I bet. I bet it's a trip to think back on it really is. Yeah, Stacey Simms 8:30 it must be I mean, I just think, you know, it's there's no easy age to be diagnosed with diabetes. But 11 you're just starting out that like, tiptoeing into independence. Yes. Middle School. Do you remember? Did your parents kind of give you a long rope? Were they very protective? I don't want to be too personal. Kevin Covais 8:48 Please, please. They were unbelievable. I'm so blessed to have the mother and the father that I do. And the support system that I do, I think they handled it differently. I think, with my mother, I think not that there was more trust, I think, was maybe a little longer rope and trusting me to do the things I think my father was, you know, very concerned at times, but you know, rightfully concerned about, you know, what I was taking and this and that. So there were I think there were several different schools of parenting going on. But together, they complemented each other so well. And it was I just knew that they were always there for me during those frustrating moments, those highs, those lows, quite literally, obviously, where it's just they were there All the while, but just like an amazing support system site. I think they went about it slightly differently. But we're, you know, managed to still be on the same page because, you know, nobody handles You know, one set situation quite the same. So, I was just incredibly fortunate. We just got informed, it's like we figured out what it was and there was a moment of kind of bowing our heads and being frustrated being sad. And then we were like, Alright, what do we do about this and got in the hospital and took care of and met up with all the doctors and got assigned the endocrinologist and and took it from there. Yeah, Stacey Simms 9:53 your parents must have given you a long rope because five years later, you auditioned for American Idol right when you're 16 Kevin Covais 9:59 I was a baby I mean, I'm still a baby. I'm just an older baby. I'm still probably just as immature. But now I'm in my 30s so I don't really get away with as much. I I was 16 years old SJC when I did the show, I can't believe I did it at all. And I can't believe I did it when I was when I didn't know any more. I was just a child. Yeah. It's so Stacey Simms 10:17 funny. So okay, so you're my son's age. Kevin Covais 10:23 And your son's a child. I'm sure he's way more mature than I was. Stacey Simms 10:28 But, you know, you did let him just go. You know, he took an international trip for a month but he was with you. But he was with a bunch of people who, you know, we're we felt very safe with of course, what was the deal with American Idol because you didn't just go to one city, right? I mean, audition different cities take us kind of through what happened. Kevin Covais 10:45 It was just the journey of a lifetime at 16. I audition in New York. I'm from from Levittown, New York, Long Island, New York, and I audition up in Boston, I turned 16. And as I tell the story, my mom and I would watch idol from the Kelly Clarkson days. I ultimately was on season five. But you know, Kelly Clarkson wins the show, season one, my mom and I, it's must see TV. We tune in every week to watch the show. And my father was never a big fan. And I was a singer, around the same time that I was diagnosed with diabetes at the age of 11. That's kind of when I joined the chorus and developed a love for singing and acting in the school plays and whatnot. And he'd walked through the room and we'd be watching idol. And I would tell him, I said, you know, one day I'm going to do this show. And he's like, yeah, okay, we'll see. And I turned 16. And again, just to echo how incredibly supportive my parents have always been, they've always been by my side, I turned 16. I go up to Boston to audition for the show. When there were no tri state area auditions in the Greater New York area. They take me up to Boston, they take me up to Gillette Stadium where the New England Patriots play, they're having massive auditions. 15 tents set up on a field, a judge at each tent and forward a time that bringing us down and they say Sing, sing, sing, sing, you sing a little bit of a song, they cut you off whenever they feel like you either make it or they send you to the exits, we see a herd of people go into the exits. And I was one of the lucky few that day who they said you know what, we're gonna give you another audition, we'll come back and see the executive producers, so on and so forth all the way up to the main judges in the city of Boston, I see the original three of Simon cow, Paula Abdul, Randy Jackson. And eventually I make my way out to Hollywood. I get past that round, and made it to Hollywood. It was my first time ever on the west coast. I get to go and I'm one of maybe 180 people auditioning out in Hollywood to try to get on those live shows where ultimately I landed and Gosh, got to somehow got to the top 12 my seats I don't even know I don't even it was honestly Stacy, it was all blur. I don't even know how I did it. I don't know. I mean, I remember it. But it was just such a roller coaster and such an emotional ride in such an exciting ride my lights? Yeah. Stacey Simms 12:39 When I'm researching to talk to you, you know, going through the American Idol season five and kind of looking at what was written around that time. There's no mention of you having diabetes? Kevin Covais 12:50 No, no, you hiding it. Stacey Simms 12:57 Right back to Kevin finishing that thought. But first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dario health. And one of the things that makes diabetes management difficult for us that really annoys me and Benny isn't actually the big picture stuff. It's all the little tasks adding up. Are you sick of running out of strips, do you need some direction or encouragement going forward with your diabetes management, with visibility into your trends help you on your wellness journey? The Dario diabetes success plan offers all of that and more. No more waiting in line at the pharmacy no more searching online for answers. No more wondering about how you're doing with your blood sugar levels, find out more go to my dario.com forward slash diabetes dash connections. Now back to Kevin talking about why he didn't share his type one with the American Idol audience. Kevin Covais 13:46 Absolutely not hiding it. This is how little I just knew about I just wasn't aware of anything. I was so green to the experience that like now as an actor of 10 plus years as a mainly transition to acting at this point, which I'm sure we'll get to a bit in a little bit. I didn't think about it from a perspective of Oh, wow, what a stage to raise awareness for this thing. I was on the show. I made it to the top 12. And one of my best friends from the show is Elliot Yamin, fellow type one, and you know, great guy, great personality and just just a heck of a voice. Oh my god, the guy can sing the doors off the place. He's unbelievable. And we auditioned in Boston together. I was so nervous until my final few weeks performing live on the show. I just think I went in and I would do the interviews and I would do this and I would do that. And it wouldn't even occur to me like man, you should really bring this up. I wasn't hiding it. I wasn't ashamed. I think for me, it was just such a normal part of my life that I'd been accustomed to for five years. And I was like, Oh, yeah, well, I'm you know, I'm no different than anyone else. I'm just dealing with my type 1 diabetes, you know, all the while. And it's it's a regret not from a sense because again, I wasn't hiding it. It's a regret because I realized how big that platform was and Oh man, I should have said something. And it was and it wasn't until after the fact that I was like oh wow, there's like a lot of opportunity here and when I you know start to do very As events for the jdrf are really dive into work with the Diabetes Research Institute several years thereafter. It wasn't until that point, when I kind of got older. I was like, Man, this is an incredible opportunity to raise awareness. And, you know, use your platform. And I wish I could go back and tell 16 year old Kevin that I really wish I could. Stacey Simms 15:16 Well, I wasn't even thinking of it in terms of advocacy, which is a terrific point that you make, but I was thinking about it as your 16. And, you know, to say, Well, I need extra help, or I need you to know that. Although you weren't beeping at the time, you probably didn't have a CGM. No, not yet. Right. You might not just you know, and I think and I can totally understand that, because that's how my son is, you know, he'll tell people to be safe, you know, spending the night and we're not there. And he'll say, Here's to this and that, but he's not gonna say, hey, by the way, just as dropping into the conversation, yeah. I don't think a lot of 16 year olds who are let's just say it like that, I think. And you've already kind of mentioned it, it just seems like it was such a normal part of who you were. I think that's very commendable. I think that's great. Kevin Covais 16:01 Thanks. Yeah, I'd like to think so as well. I'll tell you, every staff member on idol, the producer, the up to the producers, up to the big time people behind the show, they knew I had type one. I always made it a point to you know, school teachers, obviously, you're telling them okay, hey, look, if I need to go to the nurse, this is why I'm not. I'm not trying to get out of taking this exam. It's because I have a legitimate low right now. So the people in my life I was telling, it never occurred to me when the cameras started rolling to bring it up, because it just didn't occur to me. I was like, Oh, yeah, no, I'm telling the people that are directly affected in my life about this. It didn't, it didn't even dawn on me to inform the audience about Stacey Simms 16:36 it. Did you have any issues on Idol with diabetes? And I did, Kevin Covais 16:40 yeah. There's a story that stands out. I don't mean to laugh. It's just some hilarious stories. When we were laughing. We This is how we do it. This is how we deal sometimes, you know, you know, you know better than anyone as to why it's, it wasn't an issue, up until the live shows. Really, I think, for me, it was always Okay, we're testing constantly, we're making sure we're correcting prior to getting up for big performances, or whatever I got to perform during Hollywood week, I'm making sure I'm good to go in preparation for those performances. It wasn't until the third live show there were three weeks of semi finals on the show. And I get up there on the third week, and I'm waiting in the wings to be the next one up and I I know where my blood sugar is, you know, without the CGM. I'm one of the lucky ones who can, you know, 21 years of this thing I can tell where I am. If I'm running high in the two hundreds, I feel lousy, and I know it. I know where I'm at. If I'm low, and I have the shakes, and you know, you feel a little disoriented. I know that too. And I could feel myself dropping and dropping quickly. But I'm up on stage and it's live television. So I go up and I perform I perform. Don McLean's stories of Vincent starry, Starry Night old ballad that one of my favorites, Josh Groban read it, and in more recent years, and I'm singing, and I just like, I can't wait for this thing to be over. I can't wait to stop singing and get the critiques from the judges that I'm not even gonna really listen to because I got to get off the stage and I got to get some juice or I gotta get some tablets. I gotta take care of this. It was the most surreal thing to be experiencing that in that moment. I got through it. And the performance wasn't terrible. I think it was, I think was one of my better ones. So I was on for five weeks. And I I put it up in the maybe on the top two or three of them. And yeah, but that did happen on live television, which was just the most surreal thing. Yeah. Stacey Simms 18:18 Wow. When you got off the stage Did you like eat everything? Oh, yeah. Kevin Covais 18:22 I went to town state. Oh, yeah. Are you kidding me? I was like, Yeah, let's go. I was just, it was bizarre. It was just a bizarre, but it was just a wild, wild thing to experience. And that's kind of telling for anyone who deals with this is that you can prepare to the best of your abilities. And that you know, that unexpected lower high could still come about, you just have to do your best but there's no there was no shame. I didn't feel any shame after that. I know. Look, we're all human. And this is this is a normal part of the day in and day out experience. It's just so unique that to be in the position that I was in to have experienced that at that moment was very unique. Yeah, yeah, that's Stacey Simms 18:57 interesting, too. That I forgot. Elliot. Yeah, I mean, was the same season. Kevin Covais 19:00 Oh, yeah. Yeah, yeah. Oh, man. He was I was rooting for him after I eventually got bounced and got kicked out. You know, after I got eliminated from the show. I was I couldn't get kicked off now. I was a good kid. After I got eliminated from the show. I was I was rooting for Elliot anyway not I mean, obviously the bond we shared as as he was a fellow type one and we you know, related and became fast friends over that, but I just thought he had the best voice that of anyone that sees and I thought his voice was you know, another league but it was a it was a heck of a year and a heck of a ride for it really was Stacey Simms 19:30 Do you still forgive me? I don't know if it's even on the air. Do you still watch Kevin Covais 19:33 idol please? It is not really Oh, no, it's been going on a while sometimes it's like sometimes you gotta know when to let go. I like emotionally said goodbye to the show. I think it was about five or six years ago now when when Fox had its last airing of the show. So I kind of had my emotional goodbye with the show. Then I had a bunch of friends over to my place and we watched it and we were you know we're they were laughing about stuff. Remember in my time on the show years ago, we had a we had a grand time and then you Goes via Idol s off the air and then ABC is picking it up. Because you know, why not? Why not pick it up? And they've had some successes with the ABC run and some some very talented people on the show but I think there's just there's so many options now so many things to watch. You got the voice you got to America's Got Talent, things of that nature. It's tough. It's tough to keep up with all of them now stuck to keep up. Yeah. Stacey Simms 20:20 So right. So after idol, you change from being a singer to acting? What What happened? Like, what were some of your first jobs. I know you were at the Disney Channel, and you've been guest starring spots. So if you could tell me, like when you started? Kevin Covais 20:32 Yeah, I saw I finish idol. And I'm really honest about these things. I thought, going into the Idol experience as everyone does. I want to be a recording artist, I want to make records and I want to do this. And my love for music. And my love for singing is never escaped. It's really I'm just being honest, it's more of a hobby. At this point. It's more of something for me. And if I record something, it's more for me or potentially to work, collaborate with friends or right with fellow musician, friends. But I got into the acting I remember I got done with idol and I got management back, I found representation back home in New York, there was a real interest, I think people really found me to be a bit of a character on the show. And in a good way, not a bad way, of course. And that led to auditions. And I started going out in my first movie was a real silly kind of raunchy comedy, I wouldn't recommend anyone listening to this podcast, watch it, it was a movie called college. It was with a Nickelodeon star by the name of Drake Bell and various other funny people. And, you know, really funny people in the cast. And we had a blast making it. And this was my first taste of a film. And I came to know that Deb Hagen, our director on that project, she was at home with her family reading the script of this movie, she'd just been assigned as the director. And she's watching idol with her family and I'm on the show. And she's reading the script. And there's this you know, kind of nerdy character named Morris super this kid with, you know, part of gold sweet kid, but you know, just kind of reserved and whatnot. She's reading the character, and she's looking at me on the TV, and she's like, Man, this kid would be, I want this kid to play this role. And I never knew this and takes a while to make a movie. And about a year later, I within that year, I get done with Idol I go back home, I'm doing my senior year of high school now, because I did Idol as a junior in high school. I'm back in Levittown, New York, I'm back at Island trees, high school over there. And, and I'm doing self tape auditions, I get a manager at home who starts sending me out for acting, saying there'd be quite a bit of interest if I were to pursue this. And I put myself down for this movie college and put a self tape down and I got the roll, I got the roll, which offers self tape, which is like, You're so lucky to get that it's a rarity. And I was very fortunate. And I had a fun time making that one. And then that led to a bunch of other opportunities got to work with Lindsay Lohan on a on a television movie called labor pains, which was a blast, a really stacked comedic cast. And that one, you know, that's silly movie, but a lot of fun. And then since then, the big one was good luck, Charlie, for me got to be on the Disney Channel and work on eight episodes of good luck, Charlie, in the early 2010s. And, and then from there, just a slew of fun guest stars. And I've just I love it. I love every minute of it. I don't know how it all came about. I think for me, I always love to act adjust as much as I love to sing. But I never I wasn't savvy enough at the time of doing idol at 16. Again, I was so green, I didn't even think like oh, you can use this idol platform to maybe swing a few meetings or this or that and try to try to get your way into acting. I don't even think like that. If again, if it was today, if I was doing that in my 20s or if I was doing that today in my early 30s. Like obviously I would have had that mindset but you know, I didn't know I didn't know anything like that. So but just so fortunate that it came about and I love it. I love being on set. I love playing these characters escaping into these fun people that are nothing like me. It's fun. Stacey Simms 23:35 Yeah. And you've been you know, you continually work I mean, yeah, it's as you said their guest starring roles and you know, but they seem so fun. You were This is us. 68 whiskey, you know, the Yeah, I think the last thing I saw was NCIS LA or Los Angeles. I saw you did like a theme during COVID. How is production been? Have you been able to do anything? That's Kevin Covais 23:57 You know what? That's a great question. My last two roles, which as you previously mentioned it NCIS Los Angeles I got to do a again small role but part but a scene with with great actors and Chris O'Donnell and LL Cool J the leads of the show. And that was just so trippy because you know, you grew up watching lol and then you get to do a scene with them. I like that. It's like I've done this for over 10 years and you still get in those situations and you play it cool, but it's like I'm working with frickin Oh, cool. J This is not. But that was interesting. I'll tell you as it pertains to COVID they were coming off a hiatus to show and this was I believe this was their first episode of production back since COVID. I don't think I'm making that up. We go and we film at the Paramount lot you know the famous Paramount live in Los Angeles and and they took so many precautions. It's unbelievable. When you have a small you know, co star role such as myself, they give you a tiny little trailer whatnot. And everything's placed outside the trailer, your wardrobe, your sides like there. Nobody's coming into your trailer. It was a whole new world. Obviously you're wearing a mask the entirety of the time. You're filming just a little funny story, my character is wearing like some sort of alligator costume. He's like a sign spinner on the corner of the street or whatever, who they take in for interrogation at the NCIS headquarters in LA. And so they take me in and I'm still wearing this thing. And for the purpose of the scene, I have the first line and I'm wearing a mask during rehearsal we get in and obviously, you're not shaking hands with anyone, you're just meeting you're there for a day. It's a quick day, and I'm wearing a mask in this like weird out, you know, this weird, like lizard costume or whatnot. And then when they they start rolling, they're like, Okay, everybody take your masks off. Kevin, you can take the mask off. I'm like, okay, so I, I don't know what's going on. I'm just following their lead. I take the mask off. And I'm like, Where do I put this thing? I don't pocket somewhere in a lizard costume. I just like kind of stick it under my button, keep going with the scene. And then they call action and I run a scene with a local j was nuts. It was crazy. I was like, but it's a whole new world, you know. So they take the precautions, but then they call to action and you're back in a fictitious world that apparently doesn't have COVID-19 in it. And it was just bizarre. I was fortunate I had a small role A few weeks later on a show that is yet to be released a show with Elizabeth Shue called on the verge which I believe is upcoming on Netflix. And I didn't get to shoot a scene with her unfortunately, because she's amazing. But I had a really fun scene as a whole as like a funny, wholefoods worker, and I got to shoot on on that set. And again, they're taking all the precautions, you know, no contact and you're getting COVID tested every other day, because they need assurances that everyone on that sets safe. Everyone on that said this was pre vaccination. This was at the end of last year when I worked at magic, so nobody been vaccinated. Yep, you have to have assurances that nobody is has tested positive for covid. Otherwise, you got to shut the whole thing down. It was wild. But you know, it's a whole new world out there. And we got to be we got to be safe. And we got to be cautious, especially those of us with pre existing conditions, like type one. Yeah. Stacey Simms 26:47 All right. So we're gonna list in the show notes. We're gonna put your IMDb so people can figure out that they've already seen you a bunch of times. Yeah. You know, like, my husband. And this is? Well, it's not really embarrassing, but my husband is a big Transformers fan. Like all the Transformers movie. So I know you've been in those. So now I got to go back and like freeze frame and find you. Kevin Covais 27:07 Yeah, I just did one of the transformers. I had a funny, memorable scene with I think memorable with Mark Wahlberg and he would have been the fourth one. So it was I can't even keep track of it. He would know. I don't know. It was called Transformers Age of Extinction. Oh, yeah. The Stacey Simms 27:22 one with the dinosaur. Yeah, there's Kevin Covais 27:24 been five total, I believe. Yes, there's dinosaurs. Because Why not? Because anything goes in the transformers. You notice out? Yeah. And I think Shiloh buff did the first three. And then Mark Wahlberg took over as the lead for the next couple. And I was in the fourth one. And yeah, that was nuts. I had, it was that was such a surreal experience to Stacey Simms 27:42 get working on a big, big, big budget. That was the hugest gi crazy. I mean, it must have been wild. Kevin Covais 27:48 That was the hugest thing getting to shoot a scene with Mark Wahlberg and being directed by the very, very animated Michael Bay who was was cool to me, but it was just like it was I felt like pinch. I was like, how am I here right now? How did I get here? Like working on this with like, huge names like This is nuts. Yeah, heck of a time. It was a lot of fun. That's awesome. Stacey Simms 28:07 Well, I first met you ever saw you it friends for life? Yeah. You were a special guest one year. I don't think we met the first year that I saw you speak. And then you know, you've you've basically Kevin, they kind of they really adopted you. You were on staff. They did. Tell me a little bit about how you found the folks at friends for life, which I'm sure as you're listening, you're familiar with. They talk about it all the time. But the largest family diabetes conference in probably in the world at this point. Kevin Covais 28:33 Amazing. And the amazing work that they do over children with diabetes. Yeah, I was like you said I was kind of a stray dog who they like led into the house. They're like, Alright, well, let's domesticate this guy. And maybe he can become a part of this. I'm so blessed. One of my, you know, dearest friends, is Tom Kalia from the Diabetes Research Institute diabetes dad, as he's known. And Tom is one of the sweetest most generous guys I ever met. And I did American Idol, not to take it back to Idol . But I did idol and he reached out to my father because I was still a kid at the time. And he was a fellow long Islander and said, You know, I take part in this conference, and they do amazing work. And I would love to bring Kevin down. I had the summer free. I didn't make the American Idol tour. So I had this summer for and, and he asked to if I would come down to perform at the banquet for the 2006 friends for life conference in Orlando, Florida. And I was very excited. But I didn't know what I was getting into. I didn't know what this conference was. I didn't know that such an amazing organization existed. So I go down and I sing You Raise Me Up which was the Joshua again to bring up Josh Groban. The song that I sang on idol audition with and I sing it and it was just amazing. I had such an incredible time. And I learned more about this, what this conference was and learn of the support system that people had. And I think I was just so naive. I didn't realize that something like this even existed. And it just opened up my eyes. It opened up my eyes to how many people care about people in this world that I knew, you know, to an extent you know, around home in New York, you know, when I met these People when I met Jeff Hitchcock, when I met Laura, and all these amazing Lord bility, and all these amazing people at the conference, I was instantly just felt like family, I would go back several years thereafter, I think, in 2009, and then again, maybe around 2012 2013 as a special guest. And I kept going back as a special guest. And it was fun, because initially, I was there as kind of a guest who was promoting Idol and then, and then a younger generation of the kids that would go, I'd get to be a special guest and talk about good luck, Charlie on the Disney Channel. And that was a great fun, but then I would go and I would take part in in the conference a little bit. And then I would just kind of find myself walking around and saying hi to people and popping into the, you know, the exhibition room and popping into sports Central and playing basketball, the kids and I was like, I want to do more here, I want to do more. I got in touch with Laura. And they ended up asking me the next year like we've had just a special guest, would you want to come back and be a staff member here? And I was like, absolutely. Like I just wanted to, I wanted a bigger role. And they were so gracious as to offer me one. And now I'm just like part of the gang, which is always more fun for me anyway, because I never feel important. I never feel special. Like it's just like, I'm just one of the gang. I'm just like you. I'm just like this kid who has it. I'm just like this, you know, it's unbelievable getting to go there. Every year, they asked me to be on the team staff. And I think this past summer, yeah, was my fourth, fourth year on the team staff and I just want to go back every year, every year, they'll have me I want to go back out. Stacey Simms 31:15 It is amazing when you don't have that community connection, and then you find it, we were kind of by ourselves. I live near Charlotte, but I don't live in Charlotte. And it seems like everybody I knew with type one with kids with type one lived further away from me. And then in 2010, children with diabetes brought a conference to Charlotte, amazing. They used to have these regional focus on technology conferences, and I went, and that was where I realized, oh my gosh, there's all these other people. There's this community, and it really inspired me to get more connected. And now I'm so lucky, we have people not, you know, you hate to have more people diagnosed, but we have four people in my area, we have, you know, more connections. So I hear you, but working with the teams, as you said, Yes, I think that's a pretty hard group. What do you do? How do you kind of get through them or talk to them? Kevin Covais 32:01 It can be it can be I love it. Personally, I think I'd be more nervous to work with the younger kids, just in terms of not just holding their attention or whatnot, I think back to being 16. And I think back to the time I did I don't it's such a vulnerable time in your life. I think that more than anything else is that teenagers might act out or whatnot. But it's just stemming from insecurities or feelings of vulnerability, but a vulnerability about certain things in their life. And it's like, you just kind of have to, you know, give them a pass for that and try to break through the best you can. I mean, that's what I do. I you know, I never grew up a camp counselor. I never did any of that. So when I go to this thing, I look to friends of mine who were in the team group. Now, some of my best friends now who are on the team staff with me that I've met at the conference throughout the years. And I watched them do and I'm like trying to take notes because some of them are really good. And I'm like, yeah, it's tough. But it's tough to break through sometimes I think, yeah. Stacey Simms 32:50 I'd be curious to as a parent of a team, I don't know, one parent of a kid with type one of a teenager with type one who says, Oh, my kid is perfect. Right? They're doing such a great job. I'm so happy with all of their marriage course. You know. And I, I'm wondering if there's any advice that you have as being somebody who is closer to being 16 than I am? Certainly, and who has worked with these kids, you know, what can we as parents do to support them? Kevin Covais 33:15 That's an incredible question. I think I was naive, going into all this to see not that I didn't have struggles, but to have a support system at home like I did, where I think my parents, they were always aware of what's going on in my life. But I think it's such a give and take where obviously, my father, my mother spend 24 hours a day worrying about me as a kid with my diabetes, but not letting it show all the time and giving your child the space to sort of operate and trusting them in a way take off the training wheels and trust them to make their own decisions. Obviously, if if they need you, you're there. But also give them space, but don't smother them. I guess I it's a tough road. You know, I'm not a parent. So I'm not one to really comment on it. I can only approach it from that former teen perspective with my parents was I think my parents always did an amazing job on idol as well. I saw stage parents on idol I saw, you know, parents who were like, oh, you're gonna sing this song you're gonna do that. My folks always said to me, you know, Kevin, we're here for you. We love you. If you need help with something, let us know. But this is your thing. Obviously, you can't maybe take such a lacks approach in a certain way with diabetes, but it's informing your child to the best of your abilities always being present, always being there, but also letting them breathe and make their own decisions. I think if you can find that balance, it's really important because you see kids who don't necessarily have that are unique kids and I was naive. I thought everyone was like me who had and I thought everyone was like, you know had their ups and their downs and but good days and bad. But sometimes it's a rough road. And I I'd open my eyes to that just like going to the conference and just like going around and meeting people who have it. It's Yeah, it's not easy though. That's for sure. Stacey Simms 34:47 Before I let you go, Kevin, your type 1 diabetes if I've got my math right, is about to turn 21. Oh, yeah. Kevin Covais 34:54 Yeah, it's about Yeah. I could go out and go to the bars. type one. Yeah, I won't. But Stacey Simms 35:02 I'm certainly not going to ask you to, you know, to sum everything up and tell us what you've learned or you know, anything like that. But I am curious, you know, you now as I said, you use a CGM, you use it, you still have injections, you use multiple daily injections, but it's different insulin. You know, things have come a long way you found the community to support you. Anything you would tell your 11 year old self, about my guts done, you know what you've been through, Kevin Covais 35:26 I'd say Congrats. I mean, it's been a wild ride. And like, I haven't done things perfectly, and nobody's perfect. I think you got to give yourself a break. I think I've spent a lot of times kind of hard on myself from like a career perspective, as a singer, as an actor. And especially with my type one, it's easy to be hard on yourself, it's easy to, I think we go through these like ups and downs with this with this thing that we live with every day of our lives. And I can recall, like low points of like a really bad low or, you know, episodes that we all sort of experienced with this thing from time to time. I recall, like the immediate thing you feel is ashamed, ashamed that you allowed it to get to that point, I think if I could tell my younger self something, it's like, don't be ashamed. This is a part of the ride. Some days are amazing, some day stink, it's just a fact. No one's gonna be perfect. 19 you know, 100% of the time, it's just not it's not possible. So I think I would tell my younger self, I would say congratulations on achieving some of the stuff you've done, but also like, where to go, just, you know, get getting through it. And getting through this grind, you know? Yeah, I do know that. You know what, you know. So well. Yeah. Yeah. Stacey Simms 36:28 I know it as a parent, which is different story. But that's fabulous. too. Kevin Covais 36:32 Huge way to know it. Yeah. Well, Kevin, thank you so much. But it just thank you for having me. Yeah. Oh, it's Stacey Simms 36:37 been wonderful to talk to you. I hope you'll come back. Keep us posted. Let us look for you. I will Yeah. And hopefully time will go fast. And we'll see you next summer friends for life. Kevin Covais 36:47 That'd be amazing. Thank you so much for having me on. I really appreciate it. You're listening to Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. Stacey Simms 37:01 More information about Kevin and links to what he's doing now. And links to some performances from idol back at season five at Diabetes connections.com. Every episode from 2020 on has a transcription with it as well. I'm trying to go back and fill in the blanks on the previous episodes, but boy, there are a lot of them. So I'm doing the best I can. But you can always find the information that you need. Hopefully, for each episode, they're at Diabetes connections.com and pop in the Facebook group. If you have any particular questions for me, you can always reach me at Stacey at Diabetes connections.com and Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dexcom. And I was watching only murders in the building the other night. Are you watching this show? It's on Hulu. So not everybody gets that. But it's such a fun and interesting comedy. It's not quite as funny and silly as I thought it was gonna be. And that's not a bad thing with Steve Martin and Martin Short and Selena Gomez. And the reason I started watching it no surprise is because they have a podcast and some of the podcasting stuff is very silly. But it's fine. I love it. It's not really too far fetched. Let's just put it that way. And it's just a good show. But I got way off the subject. We were watching this I was watching by myself actually, when I got a Dexcom alert, and Benny was upstairs. He was playing video games or doing whatever he's doing upstairs. And you know, I was just thinking about how we had blood sugar checks on a timer, we had a schedule. I'm sure a lot of you did this too. Before CGM. We would check doing the finger stick the same time every day at home and at school. And whenever extra we needed to. It's amazing to think about how much our diabetes management has changed with share and follow. I mean, it didn't stop the show to get up and check him. I knew what was going on, I could decide whether to text him or if I needed to go upstairs and help them out using the share and follow apps have helped us talk less about diabetes, which I never thought what happened with a teenager, and he loves that part to trust me. That's what's so great about the Dexcom system. I think for the caregiver, the spouse, the friend, you can help the person with diabetes manage in the way that works for your individual situation. Internet connectivity is required to access Dexcom follow, separate follow up required, learn more, go to Diabetes connections.com and click on the Dexcom logo. Quick look ahead and a bit of a change in the schedule. I was set to go like many of you to the children with diabetes conference happening in White Plains, New York, the weekend of October 9, but they have moved that to a virtual conference. And I totally understand you know, you've got lots of kids uncertain situation with delta. So that will be in November. Now it is a virtual event. I will put information in the show notes. You can find out more about that we did virtual with them. Gosh, really all of 2020 of course, and it's a lot of fun. I think they do a great job. And one of the cool things they figured out early at friends for life and children with diabetes. You know children's diabetes is the organization friends for life is the event. They figured out how to help people socialize outside of the speeches and the reports and the talking which are all great. The presentations, I think are very valuable. But for me, the socializing is a huge part of why I enjoy these things. conferences, and they have these little virtual hallways where parents can drop in kids can drop in teenagers, young adults, that kind of thing. So worth checking out just for that. I'm disappointed, obviously, that we're not in person. But I'm still going to New York because this conference is 15 minutes from where my sister lives. And I haven't seen her in ages. So I'm going to go see her and hang out. And hopefully, Melissa, if you're listening, and I'm sure you're not, we're going to all the places where we ate in high school that weekend, so be prepared. We're going to Maria's pizza, we're going to diner, we're gonna make a list. So we grew up not too far from where she lives now. So that should be a lot of fun Later in the month, I'm going to be in Scottsdale, Arizona for she podcasts, which is a terrific female podcasting conference, as you would imagine, I'm really excited about that. And look, we'll just have to wait and see how these things go. Because certainly, events are touching go at this point, diabetes events, people are much more cautious and rightfully so. So we'll wait and see. But hey, that doesn't mean that we can't hang out. We can socialize. My Local Group is doing stuff online. I'm happy to come and speak to your group, virtually. I've still got my book to clinic program. I am working on Book Two. I am so excited. So still a lot going on. But man, I know I can't wait to read. We're gonna get back to normal. I don't know. But I'd like to get back to something else. Something we're socialized more. We hug more with each other more. Hang in there. Oh, my goodness. Thank you to my editor John Bukenas from auto editing solutions. Thank you so much for listening. I've got in the news every Wednesday live on Facebook, and then we turn that into an audio podcast episode every Friday. So please come back and join me for that. I'm Stacey Simms. I'll see you in a couple of days until then be kind to yourself. Benny: Diabetes Connections is a production of Stacey Simms Media. All rights reserved. All wrongs avenged

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
In the News.. BG trends during COVID lockdowns, diabetes sales fraud, A Dexcom G5 message, and more!

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 6:35


It's In the News... the top diabetes stories of the past seven days! This week, what did lockdown mean for BG trends, Provention Bio keeps fighting for Teplizumab, the FTC shuts down diabetes schlockmeisters and if you're still using the Dexcom G5 - you need to hear this... Join Stacey live on Facebook each Wednesday at 4:30pm EDT to watch live. Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Episode transcription and links below Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I'm Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days.  As always, I'm going to link up my sources in the Facebook comments – where we are live – and in the show notes at d-c dot com when this airs as a podcast.. so you can read more if you want, on your own schedule. XX In the News is brought to you by Real Good Foods! Find their Entrée Bowls and all of their great products in your local grocery store, Target or Costco. XX Our top story.. What did COVID lockdown mean for blood sugar trends? A new study says when they had to stay at home, people with type 1 significantly improved while the opposite happened for those with type 2. You should know these studies all come from European countries with pretty strict lockdowns and they're an aggregate – a look at a bunch of previously conducted studies. With type 1, time in range improved significantly in 83% of the studies looked at here.. with type 2, almost half of the studies showed a clear decrease in blood sugar control, with higher A1Cs. So what happened? There's a lot of speculation but these researchers suggest less exercise and more snacking and more stress is to blame for the type 2 numbers..  although in my opinion the same could be said for all people with diabetes. They also suppose that the lockdown gave parents more time to look after kids with type 1 and gave young adults a more predictable routine. I hope another study is done on this in the US where, frankly – access to insulin & health care providers may have become more of an issue during the pandemic https://www.news-medical.net/news/20210913/COVID-19-lockdown-linked-to-improved-glycemic-control-in-type-1-diabetes.aspx XX Bit of an update - Provention Bio moving forward to answer the FDA's questions and hopefully resubmit. This is for Teplizumab the first drug shown to prevent type 1 diabetes for – so far- up to three years.. although the FDA turned it down in July. Provention says they continue to collect data and are moving to set up what's called a Formal Type A meeting to submit that new information. The company's CEO says they believe they're making significant progress to address the observations cited by the FDA and continue to work with urgency.   https://finance.yahoo.com/news/provention-bio-provides-potential-timing-113000253.html?soc_src=social-sh&soc_trk=tw&tsrc=twtr   XX Bunch of schlock-meisters got called out last week by the US FDA and FTC – that's the Federal Trade Commission. 10 companies got warning letters alleging they were selling illegal dietary supplements to cure or prevent diabetes. Regulators wrote the products cited in the warning letters are considered unapproved new drugs – they include things like turmeric, bitter melon, ginkgo biloba and more.. The report cites the increasing cost of insulin and other diabetes medications as a reason why people are turning to alternatives, even if they aren't proven.. Please.. be careful out there. https://www.naturalproductsinsider.com/supplements/regulators-target-diabetes-supplements-recent-warnings-about-claims   Quick additional FTC note – they held a virtual open meeting today. Two people from the diabetes community spoke about rising insulin prices. If you'd like to learn more I'll link up the information. https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/press-releases/2021/09/ftc-announces-tentative-agenda-september-15-open-commission XX We don't talk a lot about shots – multiple daily injections – but here's some good news about the basics. New study shows rotating sites and using smaller needles really do help. You've likely heard of LY-po-hy-PER-tro-fee.. it's when lumps of fat or scar tissue form under your skin. These Belgian researchers did a six month study where they provided smaller pen needles and did a lot of education, including an online platform where they taught proper injection techniques, including not re-using needles. They reduced what they called unexplained high blood glucose significantly and glucose variability decreased as well. A1Cs stayed about the same. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/dme.14672 XX No surprise but still disappointing –  insurance is what's dictating whether young children are more likely to use a CGM regularly. This was published in Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics. Those on public or government insurance often face more obstacles. This was a study of children ages 1-6 years, within two months of diagnosis. 82-percent used a CGM at least once during the study period.. but they divided everyone into 4 groups – always used CGM, stable use, inconsistent use or never used. Families with private insurance were more likely to be in the always group or the stable group than those with public insurance. And.. The “always” group had an A1C that was 1.3% lower than the “never” group https://www.healio.com/news/endocrinology/20210907/private-insurance-determines-cgm-use-by-young-children-with-type-1-diabetes XX More to come, including a Dexcom G5 update! But first, I want to tell you about one of our great sponsors who helps make Diabetes Connections possible. Real Good Foods. Where the mission is Be Real Good They make nutritious foods— grain free, high in protein, never added sugar and from real ingredients—the new Entrée bowls are great. They have a chicken burrito, a cauliflower mash and braised beef bowl.. the lemon chicken I've told you about and more! They keep adding to the menu line! You can buy online or find a store near you with their locator right on the website. I'll put a link in the FB comments and as always at d-c dot com. Back to the news… Heads up if you're still – somehow – using the Dexcom G5. More than a year ago, Dexcom stopped selling the G5 and G4.. but – and thanks to the listeners who brought this to my attention – the G5 app is now sending out a notification.. On October 4th the Dexcom G5 app will no longer be available. As they've shared with us on the podcast many times, they've been transitioning everyone over to the G6 and will soon move on to the G7. No timeline on that btw I know you're going to ask. But as far as we know, it hasn't been submitted to the FDA and Dexcom has said it will go for European approval first. -- And finally don't forget to send me your Dear Dr. Banting audio! What would you say to the man credited with the discovery of insulin? All the details and how to send it to me is in the show notes. -- Please join me wherever you get podcasts for our next episode - The episode out right now is all about the new Walmart Insulin.. will it save you money? That's In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.  

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit
#238: Hormonal Imbalances Can Ruin Your Life, Here's How to Fix Them with Dr. Sara Gottfried

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 104:28


Hormonal Imbalances Can Ruin Your Life, Here's How to Fix Them | This episode is brought to you by ButcherBox and InsideTracker.Mainstream medicine often fails us when it comes to hormonal imbalances. Hormones aren't commonly tested, even when there is a high likelihood of an issue (like cortisol in our overly stressed culture). Since there are so many hormones that can become dysregulated, presenting with a wide variety of symptoms, many of the symptoms are written off to aging and never addressed. In this episode of The Dhru Purohit Podcast, Dhru takes a deep dive into the topic of hormonal imbalances with Dr. Sara Gottfried, along with what you can do to get them back on track. Dr. Sara Gottfried is a board-certified physician who graduated from Harvard and MIT. She practices evidence-based integrative, precision, and Functional Medicine. She is Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Integrative Medicine and Nutritional Sciences at Thomas Jefferson University, and Director of Precision Medicine at the Marcus Institute of Integrative Health. Her three New York Times bestselling books include The Hormone Cure, The Hormone Reset Diet, and Younger. Her latest book is Women, Food, and Hormones. In this episode, we dive into: -Common hormone imbalances that have become normalized in society (7:25)-Signs and symptoms of hormone imbalances (11:35) -Dr. Gottfried's personal journey of learning how to balance her hormones (20:25) -The top 3 things to prioritize when addressing hormone imbalances (34:46) -Understanding the unique biology of women when it comes to balancing hormones (44:12) -How to uncover the root cause of hormone imbalances (50:10) -How chronic cardio negatively impacts cortisol levels (58:39) -The top 3 mistakes when it comes to diet and how it impacts our hormones (1:05:59)-How to improve metabolic flexibility (1:10:11) -The key pillars of The Gottfried Protocol (1:23:21) Also mentioned in this episode:-Breathing Zone App - https://breathing.zone/ -Perceived Stress Scale Test - https://www.bemindfulonline.com/test-your-stress -Continuous Glucose Monitors - -Levels - levels.link/dhru-January AI - https://january.ai-ZOE - https://joinzoe.com/-NutriSense - https://www.nutrisense.io/-Abbott - https://www.abbott.com/-Dexcom - https://www.dexcom.com/-Keto-Mojo (ketone and glucose monitor) - https://keto-mojo.com/ For more on Dr. Gottfried you can follow her on Instagram @saragottfriedmd, on Facebook @drgottfried, on Twitter @gottfriedsara, on YouTube @drgottfried, and through her website https://www.saragottfriedmd.com. Get her book Women, Food, and Hormones: A 4-Week Plan to Achieve Hormonal Balance, Lose Weight, and Feel Like Yourself Again, at https://amzn.to/3lopln5. To learn more about becoming a patient in Dr. Gottfried's Precision Medicine practice, go to https://marcusinstitute.jeffersonhealth.org/For more on Dhru Purohit, be sure to follow him on Instagram @dhrupurohit, on Facebook @dhruxpurohit, on Twitter @dhrupurohit, and on YouTube @dhrupurohit. You can also text Dhru at (302) 200-5643 or click here https://my.community.com/dhrupurohit.Sign up for Dhru's Try This Newsletter - https://dhrupurohit.com/newsletter.Interested in joining The Dhru Purohit Podcast Facebook Community? Submit your request to join here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2819627591487473/.This episode is brought to you by ButcherBox and InsideTracker.It's really important to me to source my meat from a place I can trust. ButcherBox only partners with farmers and ranchers who believe in going above and beyond when it comes to caring for animals, the environment, and sustainability. For a limited time, new subscribers to ButcherBox will receive 2 lbs of 100% grass-fed, grass finished beef free in every box for the life of your subscription. To get this limited time offer go to ButcherBox.com/DHRU.InsideTracker looks at everything from metabolic and inflammatory markers to nutrients and hormones. It even tests your cortisol levels to help you better manage stress and you have the option to see how your inner age compares to your chronological age. Traditional lab tests can be hard to read on your own, but InsideTracker makes their results easy to understand and even provides tips on how to use food first for optimal nutrition. Right now, they're offering my podcast community 25% off. Just go to insidetracker.com/DHRU. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
The New Walmart Insulin: Everything You Need to Know

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 30:16


The term “Walmart Insulin” has always referred to cheap, older formulations. But now an agreement with Novo Nordisk means Walmart is selling own branded version of Novolog. It's the very same insulin, with a much lower cash price. What does this mean for us as customers and for insulin pricing overall? Stacey speaks to Michael Burke, Walmart's Director of Brand Pharmacy Merchandising. They talk about who can get Relion Novolog, how much it costs, what your endo needs to know and how insurers are reacting. www.getinsulin.org LA Times article Stacey mentions More info about Relion Insulin Dear Dr. Banting (we need your voice!) This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Episode transcription below  Stacey Simms  0:00 Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dario health. Manage your blood glucose levels increase your possibilities by Gvoke Hypopen the first premix auto injector for very low blood sugar and by Dexcom take control of your diabetes and live life to the fullest with Dexcom. This is Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. This week, the term Walmart insulin has always referred to cheap, older formulations until this summer, a new agreement with Novo Nordisk means Walmart is selling its own branded version of Novolog.   Michael Burke  0:38 real sense of pride for us at Walmart to hear the great feedback. Our pharmacists and pharmacy teams are very excited about the product and how they can help support patients.   Stacey Simms  0:50 That's Michael Burke, Director of brand pharmacy merchandising for Walmart. We'll talk about who couldn't get this, how much it costs. Why now and what's next. This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. Welcome to another week of the show. I am your host, Stacey Simms, and we aim to educate and inspire about diabetes with a focus on people who use insulin. My son was diagnosed right before he turned two back in 2006. And my husband lives with type two diabetes. I don't have diabetes, but I spent my career in broadcasting and that is how you get the podcast earlier this summer. As many of you probably remember, Walmart announced its new agreement with Novo Nordisk it is selling the same insulin that they make under the Walmart brand. So it's called ReliOn Novolog. And it's sold at Walmart and at Sam's clubs. This is not the older $25 so called Walmart insulin that includes older versions such as regular and NPH, which can be used safely if you know what you're doing very rarely used in pumps, and very rarely prescribed as a matter of routine. They're not the standard of care for modern day diabetes. But people do certainly use what many of you refer to as Walmart insulin, they still do use regular and NPH. But the vast majority of people who probably listen to this podcast and are regularly seeing an endocrinologist and have been diagnosed, let's say within the last 30 years are probably using novolog, humalog, And the the newer, you know, faster acting insulins. So because Walmart is selling novolog, we might have to change what we mean when we say Walmart, insulin. And now that the dust has settled a bit, I thought it would be a good idea to find out how it's going and what it really means for people who use insulin. Unfortunately, I don't think it's changed the marketplace a lot. What it did prove, at least to me is that the retail price of insulin with or without insurance is as arbitrary, as most of us suspected. I mean, pardon my cynicism here. I do appreciate the folks from Walmart coming on to talk about this. And I appreciate that they're doing something I'm sure this new pricing will help some it is $73 though for a vial when the estimated cost of producing that vial is maybe four to $6. So it is still quite high. And that is the cash price. By the way with insurance as you'll hear it is likely a lot lower. So going in, please know and most of you already know this bottom line, ask your doctor, Ask your pharmacist, make sure you are getting the insulin that costs the least for you according to whatever plan you have. There are so many hoops to jump through to ensure this if you don't have great insurance, you may want to go to get insulin.org that's a clearinghouse put on by beyond type one. And all it really does is bring all the coupon programs together. So it's one place where you can find out what you can get get insulin.org I will link that up in the show notes. We used it because as you'll hear in the interview, and I've shared this before, our current insurance does not cover the insulin that my son uses and wants to keep using and we needed to use coupons for that it did help us if you're struggling if you can't find these resources post in the Diabetes Connections Facebook group, you're more than welcome. We have a lot of great people who can help you figure this out. But you know, do what you need to do. as frustrating as it may be. Don't ration your insulin if you if you can possibly help it. I know that sounds ridiculous to even say that. But look, one in four people in this country do ration their insulin. So maybe there's something that we can do to kind of help you. As I said, jump through those hoops. Alright, Michael Burke, Director of brand pharmacy merchandising in just a moment, but first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dario health and we first noticed Dario a couple of years ago at a conference, Benny thought being able to turn your smartphone into a meter was pretty amazing. And I'm excited to tell you that Dario offers even more now. The Dario diabetes success plan gives you all the supplies and support you need to succeed. You'll get a glucometer that fits in your pocket unlimited test strips and lancets delivered to your door and a mobile app with a complete view of your data. The plan is tailored for you With coaching when and how you need it and personalized reports based on your activity, find out more, go to my dario.com forward slash diabetes dash connections. Michael, thanks for joining me a lot of information to get through and I appreciate you coming on. Thank you so much for having me. Let's just start with kind of an explanation, if you wouldn't mind, take us through what Walmart is doing here, what's the new version of insulin that Walmart is selling,   Michael Burke  5:28 we have recently launched analog insulins we can get into here in a second, the difference there, but it's an extension of our current line of insulin. So the insulin that we've had at Walmart for some time now is the human insulin, or the novolin products, our extension and new launch now is an analogue insulin, which are the newest version of fast acting insulin, and can help better regulate someone's blood glucose levels, very excited that we were able to get into this. It's been a large topic in the industry for a while on why we were just at human insulin as a private brand offering, and what more we could do so very excited that we got into the analog insulin, as it is the insulin to be used for a type one diabetic, and preferred in most cases and type twos.   Stacey Simms  6:19 Can you share a little bit about what happened here? Because this isn't something that Walmart could just do, right? This is a version of Novolog. I mean, this is an agreement with Novo Nordisk, can you kind of take us through what the process?   Michael Burke  6:30 Yeah, so we have had a long standing relationship with novo, they are the manufacturer of our human insulin, the Novolin ReliOn products that we've had on the market. And so with the changes of recent in the industry and a real focus, I'd say from across the board, from legislation to patient advocacy to patients, manufacturers, to pharmacies, to prescribers. There's been a large focus over the last two years on what more can be done in the space and so it allowed us an opportunity to work with novo and expand what we already had on the market is a private brand offering and bring a new private brand and new ReliOn offering in the Nova log in Nova log mix, both in a flex 10 and vile and offer a lower cost option for patients who had struggled with affordability to this point.   Stacey Simms  7:24 This is a branded insulin so you get ReliOn a brand novolog only at Walmart, am I Is that right? Is that how it works?   Michael Burke  7:32 Yes. So like everything healthcare, it's got to be confusing, right. So novolog is the branded name. That is the FDA filed and and trademarked products from Novo Nordisk. What we have done is partnered with Novo Nordisk to launch a ReliOn novolog and to ReliOn novolog MCs, same product manufactured by Novo Nordisk manufactured here actually in the US and comes off the same production lines is the same insulin, the difference being that it is branded with Walmart's private brand of ReliOn which enables us to bring that in house to self distribute to our stores help support our customers. So it offers us the opportunity to cut out some of the middlemen lower the cost, but still the same great product manufactured by Novo Nordisk still the same as their branded Nova log and Nova log mixes, just with a private brand twist from Walmart.   Stacey Simms  8:33 So this was announced in late June, as I remember, how has it been? Is it out now are people able to purchase it? What what's the roll up in like   Michael Burke  8:42 it is. So we started with the novolog vials and the Nova logs mix in our ReliOn brand, or sorry, the Nova log vials and the Nova log flex pins in our private brand of ReliOn. And then this last month, we were able to launch the mix in ReliOn flex pins and vials. So the regular novolog has been out a little bit longer. We're seeing really good traction, cut wonderful feedback from from patients, prescribers, various members of the industry, and has been really good reaction to this point, have a real sense of pride for us at Walmart to hear the great feedback. Our pharmacists and pharmacy teams are very excited about the product and how they can help support patients. We've heard lots of testimonials on where we've been able to save patients money and where patients were able to come to us and afford their insulin and not make different choices. And so it's for us been it's been wonderful since launch. Now. We're gonna keep that momentum going and make sure that we're reaching as many patients as we can and providing as much value and access as we possibly can in the insulin space.   Stacey Simms  9:50 It's some interesting questions for my listeners, if I could bring them to you. And the first one was, is there a limit to the amount that you can purchase per person per A month,   Michael Burke  10:00 there is not so these products, the newest launch the lion novolog and ReliOn Nova log MCs are prescription required. So as long as there's a valid prescription, there is no minimum or maximum that a patient can get dispensed at a time, a little bit different than our human insulin, which did have some limits on how much you could purchase at a time without a prescription, just due to some varying risks in an inability to keep in stock.   Stacey Simms  10:29 You've mentioned the mix a couple times what is the mix   Michael Burke  10:32 of it's a 7030 mix of analog insulin. So it's a fast and intermediate acting. And so for some patients, it is a better way to manage some of their peaks and valleys is to use an analog mixed insulin rather than just a single type of analog insulin and fast acting.   Stacey Simms  10:52 Is there is that again, pardon my ignorance is there isn't there a 7030 human insulin This is different or this is   Michael Burke  10:57 there is Yes, okay, insulin is a bit of a rabbit hole in the various types of insulin There are also mixes within them. So there are also long acting insulins. And there's some mixes in long acting or the parental insulin, their seeming insulin, which were the original insulins on the market that have mixes as well, and the analog insulin had mixes. And it's really just helped provide variety for patients and prescribers, that may not be seeing the right results with a single insulin, sometimes mix. Depending on what type of mix it is, is more beneficial and in lowering blood glucose, maintain the proper levels. Sometimes it's helpful in some patients without peaks and valleys. And I struggle with that   Stacey Simms  11:41 I just didn't realize it's my ignorance, I didn't realize that there was a 7030 analog. Alright, another question from the group. And another question, are they going to encourage providers to prescribe? Or is this solely an option for people with high deductible plans slash no insurance.   Michael Burke  11:57 So wherever there was a prescription, we will process whatever type of insurance where our goal is to have the lowest cost for a patient we possibly can. So may that be on our private brand insulin Navy on a brand or a different branded insulin? Every time a prescription comes to the pharmacy, we we do our best to make sure that we're going to give the lowest price. So our branded insulin continue to have some coverage today, our private brand does as well. So best opportunities is for patients to work with our pharmacy teams and make sure that they're getting the right Insulet at the lowest cost possible for them.   Stacey Simms  12:30 So I'm going to ask you a question you may not be able to answer and that's fine. But for clarification, so my son, our insurance currently covers novolog and doesn't like he doesn't prefer it. So if I were to get a prescription and go to Walmart, would my doctor have to write it for novolog? Would they have to write it for ReliOn novolog? Would I have to know could I possibly be saving more money if my doctor knew about ReliOn or does the pharmacist look at this at Walmart and say oh you want Nova log but it's gonna cost less if you use the ReliOn version   right back to Michael answering my question but first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by g Vogue hypo pen and you know low blood sugar feels horrible. You can get shaky and sweaty or even feel like you're gonna pass out there are lots of symptoms and they can be different for everyone. I'm so glad we have a different option to treat very low blood sugar Jeeva hypo pen, it's the first auto injector to treat very low blood sugar tchibo kaipa pen is pre mixed and ready to go with no visible needle before Jeeva people needed to go through a lot of steps to get glucagon treatments ready to be used. This made emergency situations even more challenging and stressful. This is so much better. I'm grateful we have it on hand, find out more go to Diabetes connections.com and click on the G book logo chivo shouldn't be used in patients with pheochromocytoma or insulinoma. Visit chivo glucagon.com slash risk. Now back to Michael Burke answering my question about how much the pharmacist can do for you if you bring a regular old Nova log prescription to Walmart.   Michael Burke  14:10 Yes, for a no blog prescription or ReliOn Nova log private brand is interchangeable by the pharmacy or by the pharmacist. So a patient who has a current Nova log prescription or pharmacist can check to see if our private brands through insurance or other means would be a lower cost for that patient and can do that interchange themselves for those products so just know belong to our private brand over log. If a patient has a prescription for a another type of analog insulin that is not interchangeable with our private brand insulin. The pharmacist can verify insurance coverage for the patient and work with the prescriber on if it's appropriate to switch to private branded Nova log or to remain on the inside there. On today, so we can interchange with the novolog branded products themselves. But for other products, there would be a conversation between the pharmacist patients and prescriber to make sure they're getting the right insulin at the best cost for them.   Stacey Simms  15:15 Mike, you're going to have to forgive me as we move forward, we're going to start moving into more of a cynical part of the questions here, because as you've already alluded to problems is the rabbit hole. And we know I mentioned Nova log and human log, I mentioned that our insurance doesn't like human log to the point where and I've shared this story in the show, my son has done really well with it for many years. So when we changed insurance, I did not want to change insulins. So we took a it took a long time and some fighting, but I was able to use the coupons for human log, and we get human log for about $35 a month for all of the insulin that my son needs, which would be less, I believe, then if I were to use my insurance coverage, and get novolog or ReliOn at Walmart, I still feel like even though this will save some people some money, it just kind of feels like we're moving pieces around on the board. I guess my question would be for Walmart is how did you arrive at this price? Did you have to do you know? Did you have to set it a certain way to get the deal with novolog? This is gonna sound terrible. Do you throw darts at a board? I mean, who does for some people, it's going to be more expensive than what they're paying now. And I get some people will save money. But how did you come up with the price.   Michael Burke  16:29 So for us, we are one piece of the equation. As we've mentioned, healthcare is very complicated, especially the financial flows of healthcare. And so Walmart is one part of the financial equation as the dispensing pharmacy. We also have a distribution network and other assets that we utilize within Walmart. And so what we have done is taken all of our assets, tried to remove as many of the middlemen as possible. And put all of that back into the customer savings, customer pocket. We can't control all the levers there are in healthcare, but where we can we put it right back into the customers price, we truly mean it and Walmart and especially Walmart, health and wellness of the lives better and save money, right? Save money live betters Walmart from from the core, that's the only way that we could do so was was to take where we could remove some of the excess costs, and put it into that cash price, very complicated on the back end of who's making what decisions on formulary, and additional savings and eligibility for manufacturer discounts and coupons and on down the line. We can't control all of those. But what we can do is continue to take whatever we can out of that cost that inflation cost in the insulin and put it right back in to the cash price. And in that effort, hope to continue to drive down the overall cost of insulin to the marketplace.   Stacey Simms  18:06 Can you share? Is this an exclusive contract with Walmart? This was another question from one of my listeners, do you In other words, could other providers like Express Scripts? Or even Amazon You know, one of these folks that's getting into the pharmaceutical, you know, medication supply side? Could this be a first step toward other people doing something similar or is this exclusive,   Michael Burke  18:27 so the ReliOn private brand and exclusive for Walmart, that is our our trademark brand at Walmart for insulin and diabetic supplies products. So others couldn't utilize our ReliOn but we hope that this is part of other stepping up and and also looking to see how they can impact the space, how they can drive down costs. For us, it would be a great win if there was competition in the space. And we started to see insulin prices across the board come down because the competitive market only benefits the patients. And that's what we're looking to do. So we'd be happy if others were able to get in the game and figure out different ways to drive down costs for customers. Because at the end of the day, if there's an affordability issue, we won't be able to curb the growth of diabetes.   Stacey Simms  19:17 I'm curious, again, this this might be a ridiculous question. But with your answer in mind, do you have an agreement with novo in terms of how low you could get that cost? Because I mean, let's be honest, if you knock the cost down, it's set. What is it? 7288 per glass vial or 8588 for five flex pens, if you could knock that down to $35. I mean, you basically corner the market, no coupons or anything like that. Was that even discussed?   Michael Burke  19:44 Our focus is always on? How can we drive the lowest cost lowest price possible? We'll continue to focus on that. Like I said, there's only so many of the financial levers in healthcare that we own at Walmart and so we will continue to do our part To to take out everything we can from our end to make sure we're driving down prices and costs. But we only own so many of the levers. So we continue to look to novo and other partners to help us continue to drive those prices down   Stacey Simms  20:15 with the pricing that I just mentioned a moment ago. Are any coupons accepted for that? If people have novolog coupons? Are they good for ReliOn novolog? Or is that something completely separate?   Michael Burke  20:26 Yeah, that's completely separate. That's for qualified programs for their branded product. We don't have those Today, on our private brand product, what we continue to look at is, is how do we take the cost of those programs and put it right back into our pricing, because every day transparent, low prices, what we're looking for, as you mentioned earlier, the different insurance coverage, and copay assistance and discount cards and manufacturer discounts on down the line just makes healthcare so complicated for the average patient. And so our goal is to not continue to build those additional steps and needs and trapdoors and not put that pressure on our patients to need to go out and hunt and find those. But rather continue to put that right back into our cash price and make sure that we're offering as low as we can price on these insulins, in a transparent way, that that will continue to be our focus, just making this more complicated isn't going to help patients with affordability, access, continue to simplify a very complicated healthcare arena, especially insulin is to the benefit of all of our partners.   Stacey Simms  21:44 Just to be clear, the end, the prices that I mentioned, is that someone who doesn't have insurance, that's just a cash price.   Michael Burke  21:51 Yes, that is that is our cash price. And that is the starting price. So if a patient has insurance, or different type of coverage, that we will process and see their eligibility and what their coverage will do, and where that will bring down the price. We're seeing pretty good coverage so far since launch across the board. But you know that that continues to change. And as you said, there are different formularies and different pricing tiers out there. So that what we say is the highest you're going to pay for that box and vile and those prices, but we'll try to do everything we can to run insurance and check for every possible way to save money from those prices.   Stacey Simms  22:32 Here's another question from my listeners, are there any plans to offer the in pen cartridges, which is a different product, then no, then flex pens,   Michael Burke  22:41 we don't have that today, we continue to look in the space for for whatever we can can continue to offer and do but today, we do not have that as a as a product offering   Stacey Simms  22:51 any plans to do this with other insulins, you know, long acting or different brands or humalog or Tresiba.  You know any other types of insulins that are out there,   Michael Burke  23:01 we continue to look for opportunities, kind of across the board, from our generic team to our specialty team to the branded team that I'm on, to figure out what are the best ways to save our customers money and make sure that they can be adherent to their medications. So I can say that we'll continue to look at opportunities. Diabetes is obviously a growing issue in the United States. It continues to create barriers for our customers, our patients, our families. So we'll continue to invest time and effort in the space and make sure we're doing everything we can to do our part to help increase access, decreased costs and support our patients in their journey and diabetes.   Stacey Simms  23:42 I appreciate you taking on my questions. I mean, I know you hear the frustration in my voice and my listeners comments and questions, because it just seems and I can't say this is Walmart's responsibility. But it just seems like we've been told for years and years that you know, the price is because of research and, you know, development and and then to just suddenly say, Well, you know what, we don't need to sell it for $300. We can sell it for 7288. It kind of seems absurd from where we all sit. And I know it's complicated. And I guess there's no question here, Mike, but I could just say to you, please, as you move forward, I know everybody needs to make money. I know that's how the system is. But if Walmart really wants to, you know, improve lives, improve access, please keep pushing to lower the prices, because it does make a difference. One in four Americans is rationing insulin right now. And while this helps, it also points out how frankly broken the insulin pricing system is. So I appreciate you doing what you're doing. And I appreciate you taking these questions on. And really just thanks for listening to me talk about that as well.   Michael Burke  24:44 Yeah, I appreciate your time. I appreciate you having me on. Like you said, we're here as Walmart to continue to do our part. We're invested in making our communities healthier, both from a customer standpoint and employee standpoint, community standpoint. So thanks for having me. I'm glad to talk to you I understand the frustration. I've lived in this world for a long time. So I've lived in the frustration, I feel it. I'm a pharmacist myself. And this has been a very complicated space that, quite frankly, we'd love to add some light to and make easier, make more affordable and continue to drive better outcomes for patients.   Stacey Simms  25:22 Mike, thank you so much.   Michael Burke  25:23 Appreciate you having me on and tell you we'll continue to do our part.   Announcer  25:33 You're listening to Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms.   Stacey Simms  25:38 More information at Diabetes connections.com. Of course, there's a transcript along with each episode now. And I will link up more information about the Walmart program. I'm also going to link up a column I thought was fantastic. From the la times by David Lazarus. He wrote all about this earlier in the summer, when it first came out, he lives with type one, he gets it. And it's an interesting look at the marketplace and what he thinks with Walmart entering what he thinks it shows about the price of insulin. He's a great writer, I'd love to have on the show sometime. But I'll link that up. Alright. Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dexcom. And you know, it is hard to remember what things were like before we started using Dexcom. I mean, I really haven't forgotten, but I guess what I mean, it is so different. Now, when Benny was a toddler, we were doing something like 10 finger sticks a day. Even when he got older, we still did at least six to eight every day more when he wasn't feeling well or something was off. But with each iteration of Dexcom. We've done fewer and fewer sticks. The latest generation the Dexcom g six eliminates finger sticks for calibration and diabetes treatment decisions. Just thinking about these little worn out fingertips makes me so glad that Dexcom has helped us come so far. It's an incredible tool, and Benny's fingertips are healthy and smooth, which I never thought would happen when he was in preschool. If your glucose alerts and readings from the G six do not match symptoms or expectations, use a blood glucose meter to make diabetes treatment decisions. learn more, go to Diabetes connections.com and click on the Dexcom logo. Before I let you go, a couple of housekeeping things please send me your dear Dr. Banting audio if you have not heard me talk about this, I am collecting from you what you would say to Dr. Frederick Banting, the man credited with the discovery of insulin. Of course, there were many people helping him. But the Banting House Museum has an exhibit of print, dear Dr. Banting letters, I thought it'd be really fun to do an audio version. So let me know. I'm gonna link it up in the show notes. There's a whole blog post on Diabetes connections.com, about how to do it's very easy, just use your phone, but you got to get those three by the end of September. And looking ahead, I'm doing a little bit of where are we going because we're starting to go places again, a little bit here. And there. I've got some virtual and some in person stuff coming up Delta permitting. So the virtual stuff I'm really excited next Tuesday. So if you're listening as this goes live, it was Tuesday, the 21st my JDRF local, but I think this is open to everybody nationally, and I'll put this in the Facebook group JDRF is starting something for older people with type one and I say older very judiciously because I believe I'm in this group with not with the diabetes, but in the older. You know, basically there's a lot of issues that people are facing as they hit, you know, middle age and older age. And it's not just Medicare. I mean, you know, but there's a lot of questions people with type one may have. And interestingly, I do a lot of research for this show my listenership very dedicated older folks. Again, I'm in this category now as I'm turning 50 in the month of October, but we're interested in issues pertaining to type one in their health as they get older. So I'm doing all of this to say next Tuesday, the 21st jdrf has a an online event that you can join in, I'm going to be doing a little bit of my in the news for this group. But it's going to be news that I have curated that is all to an older crowd. And I'm probably going to do it for 6065. And up I think that the the insurance, you know, cut off there makes perfect sense to try to find things that work for that group. But there is a Facebook group, I believe that they started as well. So more info on that. And then later in October, we've got the shep podcasts conference out in Scottsdale, Arizona. That's the other group that I take part in quite a bit. I'm helping them out. It's women podcasters. Obviously, big group really excited to hang out with them. And we'll see in terms of you know how many in person events happen in the weeks and months to come? Hopefully they start picking up again, but lots of virtual stuff going on as well. So if you want me to come speak to your group online or in person, please let me know. I'm always excited to do that. And we gear it to you know, whoever I'm talking to parents or adults with type one, whatever you need. Thank you, as always to my editor John Bukenas from audio editing solutions. Thank you so much for listening. We've got in the news live on Facebook every Wednesday at 4:30pm. Eastern and then that becomes the in the news episode. You can listen to right here every Friday. So we'll see you back here soon. Until then. Be kind to yourself.   Benny  29:59 Diabetes Connections is a production of Stacey Simms Media. All rights reserved. All wrongs avenged

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
Pulled from a meet for his CGM's tape, a high school swimmer with T1D speaks out

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 41:40


A high school swimmer with diabetes is told he can't compete at the state championships because of his CGM's medical tape. It's a story that's been all over social media and national news outlets. What really happened here? We talk to Ethan Orr and his mother, Amanda Terrell-Orr. They explain  what happened that day, what they'd like to see change and what we can all do to protect our rights when it comes to diabetes. Also this week! Send us your "Dear Dr. Banting" audio! Details here  This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Episode transcription below: Stacey Simms  0:00 Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dario Health. Manage your blood glucose levels increase your possibilities by Gvoke Hypopen the first premixed auto injector for very low blood sugar and by Dexcom help make knowledge your superpower with the Dexcom G6 continuous glucose monitoring system. This is Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. This week, you've likely seen the story of a high school swimmer with diabetes told he can't compete at the state championships because of the CGM, his medical team what really happened here, we talked to Ethan Orr and his mother.   Amanda Terrell-Orr  0:41 The whole point of the rule is to prevent a swimmer from having a competitive advantage. You would not have to be someone who understood type 1 diabetes to look at what even had on his arm and know that of course that would not cause the competitive advantage. Of course, it was just medical tape covering up a medical device.   Stacey Simms  1:00 Amanda Terrell Orr and 16 year old Ethan join me to explain in their own words, what happened that day, what they'd like to see change and what we can all do to protect our rights when it comes to diabetes. This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. Welcome to another week of the show. Always so glad to have you here. We aim to educate and inspire about diabetes with a focus on people who use insulin. I'm your host, Stacey Simms, my son, Benny was diagnosed with type one right before he turned two. That was almost 15 years ago. My husband lives with type two diabetes. I don't have diabetes, I have a background in broadcasting. And that is how you get the podcast. Before we jump in. I need your help. I am trying something for November. I want to hear your dear Dr. Banting stories and letters. I posted this on social media. If you're in the Facebook group Diabetes Connections of the group or you get my emails, you will be seeing this this week and for the next couple of weeks. Because all the month of September. I'm asking you to record some audio. It's very simple. Just do it on your phone. As part of the dear Dr. Banting exhibit. We talked to the folks at Banting house the museum where Dr. Frederick Banting had his eureka moment where he came up with the idea that led to the discovery of insulin with other people. But Banting house has an exhibit called dear Dr. Banting. And I go much more in depth on this. It's a Diabetes connections.com. It's on my social media. I'm asking you, what would you say if you could thank Dr. Banting for yourself for your child? Right, just thank him. So all the specifics are in the show notes. Basically just try to keep it to a minute. I'd like to play these back during the month of November. I'm really looking forward to what you have to say. Don't worry about making it perfect. Just try not to have too much background noise use your phone's voice memo app doesn't have to be anything fancy and send it to me Stacy at Diabetes connections.com I cannot wait to hear what you have to say. Alright if you haven't heard and boy this was all over social media last week and this week. Here's a quick synopsis of what has been reported. Amanda and Ethan will go much more in depth and and frankly set a few things straight that were reported a little bit inaccurately even has type 1 diabetes. He was diagnosed at age 10. He wears a Dexcom G6  he uses simpatch the brand of the tape is not important, but you should know that he wears the medical tape over the Dexcom as many people do, and that's pretty much what does that issue here. He also wears a Tandem t slim x two pump that he removes most of the time when he swims. Ethan swam all season for his high school in Colorado Springs. No issue he had the CGM on for every meet. But at the state championship, as you'll hear, it became an issue. And I'll let me tell that story. But you should know going in is that this is not a lawsuit. The family is not suing for damages or anything like that they filed a complaint with the United States Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division. This is not about money. And you may have also heard that the CHS at the Colorado high school activities Association, which is receiving the complaint here. They say that Ethan did not have a signed medical authorization to have something like this. Well, he has a signed 504 plan. So does that overrule? Or could that be looked at is in place of what they're talking about in terms of medical authorization to wear tape in the pool because it applies to his diabetes and his diabetes medical management plan, USA swim, that governing body does allow medical tape. So there's a lot going on here and I think it's more in depth. And then you've seen in certainly a lot of these media reports, as well done as they are, you know, these people don't speak diabetes, they don't cover diabetes on a regular basis. So it's really excited that Amanda and Ethan agreed to come on and share their story where we could really kind of drill down and figure out what happened here and more importantly to me learn what we can all do to prepare our kids for sports and to kind of learn what we can all do to stand up for ourselves when it comes to diabetes. Right. Okay, so quick housekeeping note, I'm nosy I like to talk to people so we set the table for a while here I talk about his diagnosis story how he adjusted to swimming you know all that kind of stuff. So if you're just here for the lawsuit stuff, we don't talk about the actual swim meet until about 12 minutes into the interview. So you could go ahead and skip ahead I'm not offended but just know that there's some getting to know you stuff that happens before we talk about the nitty gritty Alright, Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Gvoke Hypopen and when you have diabetes and use insulin, low blood sugar can happen when you don't expect it. That's what most of us carry fast acting sugar and in the case of very low blood sugar, why do we carry emergency glucagon there's a new option called Gvoke Hypopen the first auto injector to treat very low blood sugar Gvoke Hypopen is pre mixed and ready to go with no visible needle in usability studies. 99% of people were able to give Gvoke correctly find out more go to Diabetes connections.com and click on the Gvoke Logo. Gvoke shouldn't be used in patients with pheochromocytoma or insulinoma visit Gvoke glucagon comm slash risk. Amanda and Ethan, thank you so much. We did this on short notice I really appreciate you coming on and sharing your story.   Amanda Terrell-Orr  6:27 You're welcome. Thank you for having us. Thank you.   Stacey Simms  6:31 And Ethan, you got up pretty early to do this. I am East Coast, your West Coast. So I appreciate that very much.   Ethan Orrr  6:35 It's all good.   Stacey Simms  6:39 Let's back up a little bit before we jump into what happened here and the lawsuit and everything. Amanda, let me start with you. Tell me your diagnosis story.   Amanda Terrell-Orr  6:48 Sure. So Ethan was 10 when he was diagnosed, and our diagnosis story, I think is fairly typical of other people we had noticed, Ethan's teachers had noticed that we had noticed that he was going to the bathroom way more than usual. So I took him to his pediatrician and expressed some concern about that didn't really know what might be happening. They did a test of his urine. And it didn't show any kinds of problems with sugar or ketones or anything like that. So we just sort of stopped at that point. And then you know, weeks go by, and this is still happening. We went on a small vacation and even drank all the bottled water that we had, and was still going to the bathroom all the time. And then the day before Easter that year even had been kind of wrestling with a friend. And he started to be short of breath. And he also felt like really like something was wrong. So the morning of Easter, we wake up and I look in his mouth, and I see white spots in his mouth. And I say to him, it's time we need to go to urgent care. So in the back of my mind this whole time has been some education that I saw on a friend's Facebook post about type 1 diabetes, her son has type one. And she always posts educational information. And so in the back of my mind, I was thinking, I wonder if the test whatever they did at the pediatrician was wrong. So we go to urgent care, they test them for strep throat, of course. And then I mentioned to the doctor that I'm concerned because of these other symptoms. The doctor, of course, has someone test his blood sugar. And luckily for him, it wasn't extremely high. He wasn't NDK. But urgent care at that time, send us directly to the hospital. So Ethan really stayed a day in the hospital. And the next morning, we were able to connect with the Barbara Davis center part of Children's Hospital in Colorado. It's an excellent place for treatment of kids with type one. So we were able to go there and immediately start connecting with resources and other families and of course, like, like everyone after diagnosis, drinking from the firehose to try to figure out how are we going to live in this new life?   Stacey Simms  9:10 Even What do you remember that time?   Ethan Orrr  9:12 I remember during the day before with all the symptoms that I would wake up in the middle of the night like to use the restroom. I didn't know what diabetes was immediately in the car. So mom was tearing up a little bit on our way to the hospital. And she when I asked asked, like, what is diabetes? She's like, well, you're gonna be getting quite a few shots today. Because like home, right? No, I like I thought she was kidding. At first cuz I've never heard of some like that. The beginning is I was just in shock a little bit. But then like, I slowly edged in or wet or things will be good. Nothing's gonna change too much.   Stacey Simms  9:53 I don't want to fast forward too much as we're getting to, you know, the news story here, but you're 16 now, so Were those six years. Obviously you play sports, did things kind of go to a better place? Do you feel like you guys managed it pretty well?   Ethan Orrr  10:08 Right? When I got diabetes, I was still competing, swimming wise, and I was trying to swim for the Colorado torpedoes in Manitou. At the time I, I had my CGM, but it didn't work in the water was a different type of CGM. So my phone couldn't connect in I was in a spot where I was close to my honeymoon period. And so we had a we are way too many troubles, trying to like dangerous troubles trying to be able to swim that year. So I ended up just pulling out, you know, we made a family decision is too dangerous, because I could feel my blood, like when I went low or high or anything like that isn't that low? This year, at the beginning of the season, we are a little bit of a problem. Not a little, there's a big problem at the beginning of the season, because my body wasn't ready and adjusted for stuff like that. So I had a lot of very, very bad lows during some practice for like about a month. And then it finally picked up and I was completely fine after that. And I was able to swim very well with the rest of it without blood sugar issues.   Stacey Simms  11:16 Amanda, let me switch over to you. Tell me about that experience. Because I know with my son, every seat Well, first of all, he changes sports every couple of years, which is bananas, because we figure it out. And then he moves on. So what was swimming? Like? Yeah, you hear you,   Amanda Terrell-Orr  11:29 I hear you. Yes, we have that experience as well. It sounds like our kids are similar that way Ethan likes to jump around sports. So he had been even been competitive swimming for not an insignificant amount of time, I would say when he was diagnosed, and it was just in that honeymoon period and learning everything. And being just terrified of every significant low. You know, at the beginning, those things seem really insurmountable. Because even had a couple of really scary lows, it was also kind of affecting his confidence to stay in swimming. So sadly, something that he really loves. What we said is we put it on pause. We didn't think it would be on pause this long. But it was really Ethan's choice. And so we were really happy this season, when he chose swimming again. And then he started swimming, and everything that we thought we knew about management of his diabetes changed in some ways. And in Ethan's case, he was he's very active, he's very fit. But his body was not used to the kinds of energy that need to be expended to swim in particular. So we tried all the things, all the tricks, all the tips that everybody gave us. And he was still having really significant lows, having to be assisted out of the pool sometimes. But to his credit, and one of the things I'm so proud of him for is that he swam right through that he had to sit out of practice a lot because of low blood sugars. But he still kept going every day. And he believed us when we said your team is going to help you and by team I meant his endocrinology team, and also athletes with type 1 diabetes. So we threw out questions out there into the social media world and got great advice from other people, athletes with type one. And we combine that with the guidance from our endocrinologist and Ethan's body also adjusted to the swimming. And so at the end of all of that he was at the end of the season, he was really doing pretty well in terms of being able to swim safely. So we were very proud of how he came through this season. You know, to be honest, as a person without type 1 diabetes, and an adult. I don't think I would have done that. It was very, very hard, but he stuck it through and was fortunate enough to be able to go to the state championships.   Stacey Simms  14:01 He said I'm curious what worked. Looking back on all of that.   Right back to Ethan answering my question, but first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dario Health and bottom line you need a plan of action with diabetes. We've been very lucky Benny's endo has helped us with that and he understands the plan has to change. As Benny gets older, you want that kind of support. So take your diabetes management to the next level with Dario health. Their published Studies demonstrate high impact results for active users like improved in range percentage within three months. reduction of A1C was in three months and a 58% decrease in occurrences of severe hypoglycemic events. Try Dario's diabetes success plan and make a difference in your diabetes management could have my dario.com forward slash diabetes dash connections for more proven results and for information about the plan. Now back to Ethan explaining how they got his blood sugar more stable during and after swimming.   Ethan Orrr  15:03 So to be honest, the only reason it worked, I in my body got adjusted. At the beginning of it, I would have to take seven juices, maybe practice a, like during the entire thing, not not like a one point. But like throughout of like a one hour practice is really bad. But something that we did is I had gummies like little energy energy jam. Yeah, it's like the glucose gels. Yeah, we had glucose gels next to it. Because if you have too many fluids, with swimming, you can get nauseous, especially with it being juicing and eating granola bars before you, when something very hard tends not to work out very well to something that's like flexible with your stomach. So it's not like you're eating like a valley granola bar, and then you're going into pool and wanting to puke.   Amanda Terrell-Orr  16:03 Yeah, even some of the things that you're maybe not remembering because they just became so routine for us is suspending his pump. like two hours before practice making sure he didn't have any insulin on board keyword also, toward the end there where we were waiting for his body to adjust, he would have the equivalent of a meal, about an hour before practice with no insulin to cover it. And he would still getting into the water, those first bit of time would still go very low in a short period of time. So then he would have to sit out like he was saying, you know, have a lot of juice. And then he would be nauseous and not able to swim as well. What the doctor kept telling us is, you know, hang in there, we're going to figure this out, your body's going to adjust. And sure enough that ended up happening. But those are the kinds of things that we had to try in the early part of the season.   Stacey Simms  16:57 Sounds very familiar. My son's first wrestling practice freshman year of high school, he ate 85 uncovered carbs and still would not go above 70. Yeah, I was able.   Amanda Terrell-Orr  17:09 Yeah, the other thing that was really challenging that we had never experienced before, but we know that other people have since we reached out is overnight. Well, after practice, Ethan would have lows that would last for hours, no matter how many carbs we would give him. So then we would have to get to the point where we were micro dosing glucagon with the advice of his doctor in his circumstance to try to bring his blood sugar back up. But there were nights where my husband and I were up for four hours at a time just trying to get his blood sugar into a safe range. And this year, is the first time in all of those years, he's had diabetes, that we had to ask for emergency medical assistance for a very severe low. So it was a really, really difficult time. But what we like to think about that, and you know, he's very resilient, he got through that time. And you know, the type one community was really helpful in helping us come up with ways that we could try to address these big problems that we're facing.   Stacey Simms  18:14 So you brought up the state championships. Let's just jump into that now and talk about what happened and the basis of the lawsuit. And you know, what you hope to accomplish here, but start by telling me and Amanda, let me ask you what happened at the state championships.   Amanda Terrell-Orr  18:29 So the summary version of that, that I would say is that even had several events that day, they were all relay events, which means that he was competing as part of a small team of other swimmers. He had swam to those events. And the last event of the day would have been his final relay event swim. He was standing at the side of the pool with another student next to a referee, and the referee asked Ethan about what was on his arm. And so Ethan explained, of course, that it was a continuous glucose monitor that it measured his blood sugar that it was for type 1 diabetes, and that he had the patch over it to keep it on during swimming, which every athlete knows that everybody's body's different, but you are more likely to need extra cover over your CGM when you're sweating or swimming or that kind of thing. So the referee asked Ethan, who his coach was and who he swam for, and minutes before the event was scheduled to begin the referee address the coach. The coach told the referee all the same information that Ethan told him And in addition, said Ethan has an active 504 plan that allows him to have his medical equipment. The referee insisted that Ethan was in violation of what is commonly called the tape rule, which is essentially the fact that a swimmer can't wear something extra on their body to aid their speed boy The four body compression because those things could give the swimmer a competitive advantage. The coach tries to explain again everything that was going on. And that not one time in the 70s even swam prior to the state championship. Did any other referee believe that that rule applies even. It's always obvious in some of the videos that various news stations have used. You can see it on Ethan's are messy swimming. So clearly referees who are paying close attention to the swimmer to see whether their stroke is off or they're, you know, doing anything else that would be a violation saw this on his arm and no one said anything. So the referee was told that information as well. The referee insisted that in order to compete under that tape rule, he would have needed a doctor's note to say that it was medically necessary. The whole point of the rule is to prevent a swimmer from having a competitive advantage, you would not have to be someone who understood type 1 diabetes to look at what even had on his arm. And know that of course, it would not cause a competitive advantage. Of course, it was just medical tape covering up a medical device, the Dexcom G6  says on it what it is. And I timed it, it takes about 15 seconds on Google to figure out what that is. So if the referee did not believe the information he was getting, and the whole purpose of the doctor's note is to say, you know if needed, and so it doesn't give a competitive advantage. All of that together means that the referee heard all that information. And he either didn't believe it. Or he continued to believe that either was potentially cheating by wearing a foreign device or substance to aid his speed buoyancy or body compression. So at that time, the referee said that Ethan was not going to be allowed to swim. One of the important things that has happened in the news that I know the governing body is having trouble with is the use of the term disqualification. In my mind when the kid doesn't get to swim, the semantics of that don't matter. But it wasn't the fact that even swam in the meets in that final event and was disqualified, he was not allowed to swim the final or that. And so what the coach tells us happens from that point is that the referee says Ethan will not be able to swim, you were required to have this note, he's in violation of the tape roll. And so the referees scramble, because again, he's addressed minutes before the event starts and substitute another swimmer for Ethan. But what the coach told us is that in the rules, when you're going to substitute a swimmer, you have to go to, you know, like the administrative table and make that substitution in a particular kind of way. And so he was not able to do that in that time period. And the coach indicated to us that the relay team was subsequently disqualified for not having a proper substitution. Now, we learned for the first time when chafta issued their statement, that they are saying that the team was disqualified for an early start. And, you know, from our perspective, although it's really upsetting to us that the whole team would have been potentially disqualified on this substitution issue. The fact is, the crux of this is that Ethan was not allowed to swim, because someone incorrectly interpreted what he had on his body is potentially cheating and violation of the taping raw. That is essentially what happened in Ethan's case. And that just started all of the research and that kind of thing that our family did before we decided to engage a lawyer got it.   Stacey Simms  23:50 My question, I had a lot of questions. But one of my questions is, is it your belief, and I assume it is, since you're going to have with the lawsuit, that having a 504 plan, being covered by the American with Disabilities Act supersedes that tape rule.   Amanda Terrell-Orr  24:05 There are several points to what we're saying. So the first thing we're saying is the rule doesn't apply to even circumstance. And although the high school associations have not chosen to be this clear, the USA Swimming rules are very clear that taping for medical devices is not a violation of this taping rule is really about kt tape or therapeutic tape that would be used to support somebody muscles or joints or ligaments or tendons in a way that would give them a competitive advantage. Anybody who knows anything about swimming knows that when something protrudes from your body like a CGM, that it actually causes the disadvantage because we're talking about milliseconds of time and surface drag can actually make him slower. Additionally, we know the rule didn't apply because no other referee instead Prior meet even mentioned it as being possibly implicated by that rule. So let's say he even mistakenly believes that the rule applies, there are a couple things about that he did have a 504. We do think that's important, because the 504 says that he's able to have his medical devices at all times, in all school activities. Secondly, and I believe this is standard across the country, but even had to have a sports physical before he participated in sports that said that he was safe to participate in those sports. So there are lots of reasons that we believe the rule didn't apply. Even if it did, Ethan should have been fine without a specific doctor's note to prove he had type 1 diabetes. And further, the referee under the rules had the discretion to allow even to swim if he did not find that to be excessive. And he says, and he chose not to let even swim. So for all of those reasons, I think the way I described it to someone is there was a tortured reading of that rule to exclude a kid was type 1 diabetes isn't   Stacey Simms  26:13 how is your team reacted to all of this?   Ethan Orrr  26:15 Whoa, I didn't find out until I was literally walking to the blocks. My team was a little bit upset, but because they didn't know what was going on. At first, my friend, I was with one of my teammates. While that was happening, and he's like, going on well, the coaches talk or not the coach, the referees talking to me. And so I was walking to start the event, like I was walking around the pool, and they were like, Ethan, why aren't you sorry? I was like, What? What do you mean? And they're like, you're not swimming coach just said, Go talk to coach right now. We're starting to bet right now. Aren't we? Just like, yeah, go talk to coach right now. And we're gonna talk to him. And he was like, yeah, we're looking. I'm looking at the rulebook right now. And we're all looking at the rulebook really quick, but you're not able to swim. Because the CGM on time. And so everyone was like, why? because they didn't know it was forward. And the teammates that I was with is like, was it that coach, or, or the rapper or whatever? I was like, yeah, know what? He was like, yeah. I don't know what to tell you. I was like, Oh, okay. We were all upset about it. I was really dumb. Did   Stacey Simms  27:26 they support you? I mean, in these days in the time that has passed, tell me about that.   Ethan Orrr  27:32 Oh, yeah, no, they've always, I'm friends with everyone on the swim team.   Amanda Terrell-Orr  27:35 They're all super great. My coaches super great. The trainer for the cornado, the school that I stand for, is really great. My teammates are really supportive whenever I would have to get out, you know, they just, they'd make jokes, they'd be funny about it, like try and like lighten it up and whatever. They're really great. They're a really great team, they are really great team, I'm still going to swim for them this year, I'm still competing for I'm going to try and compete for state this year to this. I think the other thing, even in terms of the support even got, we we really can't say enough about this coach and the athletic trainer, it was a difficult season for them to of course, because of everything Ethan went through. So this happened, the state championship happened at the end of June, at the very beginning of July, the coach actually sent an email to chafa and laid out the situation of what occurred, asked if they would work with him, because he believed that what happened could potentially be a violation of even federal right. And I spoke with the coach kind of throughout that time. But at the end of July, I spoke with him more in depth and and I really wanted to know what kind of response he had received, he had received zero response to that email. So here we have a coach that's trying to act, you know, advocate for his student with diabetes and try to get something change. So this wouldn't happen again. And he received no response to that,   Stacey Simms  29:04 you know, Amanda, a lot of people are going to be really excited that you've done this and want to see this change and are rooting for you. But a lot of people are also going to be wondering why a lawsuit. There's just so much that happens to you all. When you file a lawsuit, you're going to get a lot of negative attention, you're going to get pushback, we file the lawsuit and what are you seeking in the lawsuit?   Amanda Terrell-Orr  29:26 So I'm glad that you raised that. That's one of the points that is confusing to people. We actually have not filed a lawsuit we filed a complaint with the Department of Justice alleging a civil rights violation. So that process is a different kind of process. That's not about monetary gain for anyone. That process is about the Department of Justice investigating whether or not there was a violation of even civil rights and if so, what kind of oversight is necessary over the governing body so that athletes with this abilities don't experience those kind of violation. So it's essentially a mechanism to enforce oversight and change, but not a mechanism whereby we would receive any funds whatsoever. Our lawyer is doing this pro bono. If we were to file a lawsuit, that would be a different circumstance. But it isn't our goal. To get money out of this situation, our goal has several parts to it, the main part of it is both the national and the state rules need to get with the times and make the kind of changes that USA Swimming has made. That makes it clear that taping of a medical device is not cheating. That is the primary thing that we need to see. I also truly believe that chafa in their rulemaking process needs to include the voice of athletes with disabilities, or people who have a lot of familiarity with those areas, I think that would help give voice to some of these areas where they clearly have not educated themselves. And I just think that voice is so important. So those are a couple of the main things that we're trying to get accomplished here. And, you know, in general, the governing body had the opportunity to say, we really care about this, we want to work with these folks to try to make change. We had one referee interpreted this way. This isn't what we believe as a system. But their statement, you can see, it's clear that they believe that discriminatory reading of that rule is the right reading of the rule. So we need some help from Department of Justice or other avenues to force the issue to get them to change. What kind of tape do you use? Do   Stacey Simms  31:45 you mind? I mean, you can share a brand name or just you know, because there's so many different overlays for the Dexcom. I'm curious what it looks like   Amanda Terrell-Orr  31:50 he was wearing the simpatch. Got it. And one of the things that I've been saying to people, if they're not swimmers, or athletes, they don't necessarily understand the difference between my kcca for therapeutic tape and Matt. But as you know, and as other people who use those overlay patches, now, that patch was specifically exclusively and obviously designed for that purpose. It has a perfect cut out just for made for the exact model of CGM that you have. And it's clearly obviously just holding that device on. So anyone who looks at the simpatch, or any other similar kind of patch, can easily understand what it's there to do. And not that and understand that it's not there to aid his speed, buoyancy or body compression, it can't do any of those things. And it's clear that it can't when you look at it,   Stacey Simms  32:45 he said you've said you're gonna start swimming again, you want to make it to the states again, why is this got to be very disruptive to you? This can't be a fun thing to be going through. Tell me why you like swimming.   Ethan Orrr  32:56 It's one of the hardest sports for you to be able to do. I really enjoy the individuality, but also how you work as a team. I mean, no matter what the points that you get for individually swimming, impact the entire team on in deciding if you win or lose the knee or event or competition, whatever, whatever composition, I really loved swimming, I've always loved swimming. But once I got diabetes, there's a we couldn't manage it properly without being safe. But nowadays I can. And I totally love to pursue it. I feel like it's great. It's great for the body. It's great. It's great in general, and just to get your mind off of whatever I mean, I think this is an amazing sport. And I'd love to pursue it. So even if we've had troubles, hopefully, we shouldn't have those same troubles. If the if we get the rule change that we need and want then I shouldn't have the problem, then I can swim and still compete. I don't hate chess or anything like that. I just want some real change. You know, before I let you go,   Stacey Simms  33:57 Amanda, let me ask you what I saw this story on social media. I feel like it's been in every diabetes Facebook group. Obviously it was local television and got picked up by national media. What's the response been like for you?   Amanda Terrell-Orr  34:08 What I want to focus on is the positive first because that is the overwhelming majority of response we've gotten. We've just received so much support. We've received support from jdrf. We've received some for support from Team Novo Nordisk we've received support we were contacted by Dexcom. So all of those are good, but also the heartfelt messages that we've received from other parents of athletes with type one have been moving and have really helped support us through a time where we're getting the kind of attention that we did not expect from this. We expected that we would file something that our lawyer would do a press release and a couple of local channels would be interested. And then we would just wait and see what happens. This has been way more of a response than we expected and the back much Already in that response has been positive and supportive. But as we know, in the public domain, there are always people who don't think about the consequences of what they say on real people. And they come after, you know, a 16 year old in their comments. And so early on, our lawyer told us don't read the comments. And that was really great advice. So now, we basically just engaged with people who have commented on, you know, like a diabetes, Facebook post, or some other kind of social, that's from folks who understand that better. And, you know, we've kind of asked those people who are supporting us, if they're reading the comments, they can address those issues, they can address people who are trolling us. And that would be really helpful to us, because we just can't be beat up that way. But I also think chaffles response was very disappointing to us. And it felt like they were minimizing denying and blaming. And they had the opportunity to look at this much differently in a way that was geared toward change that could allow student participation. And they chose not to do that. It felt like backlash to us that they chose to respond in that way. But by and large, boy, we really appreciate all the support we're getting, it's really the fuel that keeps us going. Because this is hard, it's really hard to be in the spotlight this way, and even made this choice themselves about whether we were going to do this after a lot of research. And so it's wonderful when people support him and say, Thank you, Ethan, for doing this, and lift him up around his struggle. That is just been wonderful.   Stacey Simms  36:44 He's gonna let you have the last word here. When you hear your mom say all this stuff, like what's going through your head? Did you think it would get to this point where it's not nationwide?   Ethan Orrr  36:53 Honestly, no, I was surprised that it got really big, really quick. I was not expecting that at all. So I'm really happy that that people are supporting it.   Stacey Simms  37:06 Well, thank you so much for joining me, keep us posted. love to know how this moves forward and plays out. But thanks for explaining. And, you know, we wish you all the best. Thank you both.   Amanda Terrell-Orr  37:16 Thank you so much for having us. You're listening to Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms.   Stacey Simms  37:30 More information at Diabetes connections.com. I'm gonna link up some of the stories about Ethan that some of you may have already seen most, we're gonna try to link up some follow up as the story progresses, because we're really just at the beginning here, you know, I'm going to follow through this complaint with the Department of Justice, see what the rule changes are like if they come through and see if other clubs and athletic associations follow suit, or do anything that is proactive. If you find something in your local community, let me know if there's a rule change because of this, or I gotta tell you, we've already talked to the coach about Benny's wrestling, and you know how he wears his equipment. I'm double checking, I just want to make sure that we're all good, because while he has been fine so far, and last year, we saw a ref wearing a T slim pump at a couple of the meats. I didn't go over. But Benny did go over after the meets and just say hello, when you just showed us pump and that kind of thing. But even if the ref has type one and wears a pump, you know, there still may be a misunderstanding of the rules. So I I'm definitely double checking all of that, to make sure that we're not gonna have any issues this year. It's complicated. I gotta tell you that my favorite part of the whole story is how Ethan's teammates have hung with him. Right. And they haven't made him feel different. They haven't made him feel like he's to blame for things. We've been so lucky with Benny that he's surrounded with people who support him as well. And if you heard the episode he was on a couple weeks ago. He says part of that is because he just doesn't want to be with people who don't support them. And we're really, really lucky that he feels that way. So Ethan is lucky as well. But Big thanks to Ethan and Amanda for coming on so quickly and sharing this story and making some time for me. All right, Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dexcom. And we have been using the Dexcom system since he was nine years old. We started with Dexcom back in December of 2013. And the system just keeps getting better. The Dexcom G6  is FDA permitted for no finger sticks for calibration and diabetes treatment decisions you can share with up to 10 people from your smart device. The G6  has 10 day sensor wear and the applicator is so easy. I haven't done one insertion since we got it Ben he does them all himself. He's a busy kid and knowing he can just take a quick glance at his blood glucose numbers to make better treatment decisions is reassuring. Of course we still love the alerts and alarms so that we can set them how we want if your glucose alerts and readings from the G6  do not match symptoms or expectations. Use a blood glucose meter to make diabetes treatment decisions. To learn more, go to Diabetes connections.com and click on the Dexcom logo. If you are listening to this episode as it goes live on September 7, then I wish you a very happy new year. It is the Jewish holiday of Rosh Hashanah. And as you probably know, these podcast episodes are taped and scheduled in advance. So I am not working today I am celebrating the new year with friends and family. And I don't mind sharing that. We always go to our same friend's house. I don't have any family locally here in the Charlotte, North Carolina area. And our friends this year, were probably having like 20 to 30 people, they bought COVID tests for everybody those over the counter COVID test as I'm taping, I haven't taken it yet. When you're listening to this, I will have taken it. But I thought that was really interesting. We're all vaccinated this group we've gotten together before earlier in the summer, it was actually the first group of people that I got together with in Gosh, I want to say maybe late May, you know, we'd all been vaccinated, but he's really excited. Nobody knew Delta was coming. And so we know we're all reacting to this in different ways. I'm really, I guess the word is interested that this is going on. I wonder how many other people are doing this for small private gatherings. I'm excited to be celebrating and may it be a sweet and happy new here because my goodness, we definitely need it. So I'm gonna leave it there. Big thanks to my editor John Bukenas from audio editing solutions for really jumping in here. We put this together much more quickly than our usual episodes. So thanks so much as always, John, and thank you so much for listening. I'm Stacey Simms. I'll see you back here on Wednesday for in the news. That'll be Wednesday live on Facebook at 430 Eastern Time, and then we turn that into a podcast episode for Friday. Alright, until then, be kind to yourself.   Benny  41:35 Diabetes Connections is a production of Stacey Simms Media. All rights reserved. All wrong avenged

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
In the News... CGM Disqualifies High School Swimmer, Dexcom Smoothing, T2 Remission and more!

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 7:12


This week "In the News...." Did wearing a CGM in the water disqualify a high school swimmer? What his family says happened and why they're suing. The ADA wants to start using the word "remission" instead of "reversed" for type 2 diabetes - we'll talk about why. Dexcom says they are no long smoothing data, new migraine and diabetes research and T1Interntioanl is out with their latest survey results about the price and use of insulin. Join us Live on Facebook each Wednesday at 4:30pm EDT! Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Episode transcript below   Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I'm Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days.  As always, I'm going to link up my sources in the Facebook comments – where we are live – and in the show notes at d-c dot com when this airs as a podcast.. so you can read more if you want, whenever you want. XX In the News is brought to you by Real Good Foods! Find them in your local grocery store, Target or Costco. Real Food You Feel Good About Eating. XX Top story this week.. A discrimination complaint against the Colorado High School Activities Association has been filed with the U.S. Department of Justice. At issue? A student was disqualified for wearing his continuous glucose monitor.  Ethan Orr is a 16-year-old swimmer whose team qualified for the state championships. According to his attorney Orr wore a blood glucose monitor taped to his arm during seven prior matches, including the one in which his team qualified for the state championships, with no issue. But at this meet, the ref said Orr would not be allowed to swim in his last race because of his glucose monitor and tape. They didn't have a sub so the whole team was disqualified. The attorney says, “This is simply blatant discrimination against a kid with a disability, and it led to unnecessary and unfair consequences to him, his teammates, and the school,” According to the lawsuit, Orr is protected under two federal laws – the Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. I've reached out to the local reporter on this story and hope to talk to the family soon XX People with type 2 diabetes should be considered in remission after sustaining normal blood glucose levels for three months or more without medication. That's a new consensus statement from the American Diabetes Association® and several other international groups. They recommend testing every year to determine long term maintenance. The real news here – as I see it – is trying to get people to stop saying “Reversal” or “cure” when it comes to diabetes. The statement here doesn't seem to be about the science, but says the word remission “strikes an appropriate balance” between the diabetes not being active and progressive, but also recognizing improvement may not be permanent. https://www.diabetes.org/newsroom/press-releases/2021/international-experts-outline-diabetes-remission-diagnosis-criteria XX Got lots of comments and questions about some changes noticed on the Dexcom G6 app recently. Turns out, Dexcom has removed what's called data smoothing from its most recent update. As of August 9th they say “The Dexcom G6 app used to smooth all but your current reading on your trend graph. With data smoothing, there can be some differences between the G6 reading you see in real time (the white circle) and the G6 readings you see in the past on your graph (black dots). I'm showing a photo here – I'll post this with the podcast episode for those listening.   To avoid these differences, we removed data smoothing from the Dexcom G6 app in the 1.9 release, but the Follow app and Receiver continue to smooth past CGM data. We will remove smoothing in an upcoming Follow app release to match the G6 app, but we don't plan to remove data smoothing from the Receiver.”   These differences don't affect the real-time glucose data, alarm, or alerts. Honestly, I'm not sure why they're doing this or why they smoothed in the first place.. but we'll follow up and try to find out more XX Not a lot of answers here, but this is interesting.. apparently, people with type 2 diabetes are unlikely to develop migraines and people who get regular migraines are less likely to develop diabetes. To find out why.. scientists are looking at two small proteins that are linked to migraine and drive production of insulin. This team from the University of Tennessee says some of the newer treatments for migraines could increase the risk of diabetes because of the use of these proteins. They want to figure out how to prevent that.   https://www.fiercebiotech.com/research/mouse-study-shows-how-causes-behind-migraine-pain-can-improve-diabetes-treatment XX T1International is out with results of their 2020 global out of pocket cost survey for people with type 1 diabetes. Worldwide, one out of every four respondents reported having under-used their insulin at least once within the last year due to high cost. 63.2% of participants reported disruption of insulin supplies and 25.3% reported an increase of insulin prices related to the COVID-19 pandemic. They've conducted this survey every two years since 2016, adding additional questions each year. This time, the Results were published as a research paper in the Journal of Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, linked in the show notes. https://www.t1international.com/access-survey/ XX More to come, including news about a rare form of diabetes, but first, I want to tell you about one of our great sponsors who helps make Diabetes Connections possible. Real Good Foods. Where the mission is Be Real Good They make nutritious foods— grain free, high in protein, never added sugar and from real ingredients— I was in Target this week and I saw the new Entrée bowls, I bought the Lemon Chicken and the Lasagna. The Lemon chicken was great! It uses hearts of palm pasta instead of regular noodles which I thought sounded odd but really tasted good. They keep adding to the menu line! You can buy online or find a store near you with their locator right on the website. I'll put a link in the FB comments and as always at d-c dot com. Back to the news… XX This is from the UK but I think it's an important reminder that there are more than 2 types of diabetes. It's new plan to discover and treat mono-genetic diabetes. That's caused by a single gene mutation – although the specific gene affected can differ. The condition occurs in two types, neonatal – which can occur within the first six months of life – and MODY that develops later, often before the age of 25. About 2% of all diabetes cases are thought to be monogenetic… the National Health System in England is forming a new training and treatment program to make sure these patients received the correct treatment sooner. https://www.theguardian.com/society/2021/aug/30/nhs-england-to-train-staff-in-all-trusts-to-spot-rare-type-of-diabetes XX And finally, thousands of people in the path of Hurricane Ida are still without power and possibly need help getting their medication. I want to make you aware of the Diabetes Disaster Response Coalition (DDRC). This is a coalition of lots of diabetes groups – if you need immediate help or want to plan for an emergency, they have the resources. Physicians and health care providers can call 1-314-INSULIN to report diabetes supply shortages and request support.  People with diabetes and their loved ones can call 1-800-DIABETES (800.342.2383) is available to support people with diabetes and their loved ones for more information. https://diabetesdisasterresponse.org XX Please join me wherever you get podcasts for our next episode -Tuesday –  we're talking to the folks from Walmart about their deal with Novo to sell their own brand of Novolog Insulin.. The episode out right now is with MannKind, makers of Afrezza inhalable insulin. That's In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.      

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
All About Afrezza Inhalable Insulin with CEO Mike Castagna

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 38:33


How much do you really know about the only inhalable insulin? This week, Stacey interviews the CEO of MannKind, makers of Afrezza. Mike Castagna talks about how Afrezza works, misconceptions about the product, the worldwide market, pediatric studies and lots more. This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. More about Afrezza Tim Street's blog Diabettech  Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Episode transcription below: Stacey Simms  0:00 Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dario health manage your blood glucose levels increase your possibilities by Gvoke Hypopen the first premixed auto injector for very low blood sugar and by Dexcom take control of your diabetes and live life to the fullest with Dexcom This is Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. This week all about Afrezza How much do you really know about the inhalable Insulet. I had a great conversation with the people who make it   Mike Castagna  0:34 For me, it's about using the right product to meet your needs to get you in control. And if you're doing well, great, we're going to avoid the long term complications. But if you're not doing your health, and you gotta really try to find the best set of tools, they're gonna make you successful and fit your lifestyle.   Stacey Simms  0:47 That's mankind CEO Mike Castagna. We talked about how Afrezza works misconceptions the worldwide market pediatric studies and lots more. This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. Welcome to another week of the show. We so glad to have you here we aim to educate and inspire about diabetes with a focus on people who use insulin. And this week, we're talking about the use of the only inhalable insulin, my son was diagnosed with type one right before he turned two, he is 16. My husband has type two diabetes, I don't have diabetes at all. But I have a background in broadcasting. And that is how you get the podcast, I have to say that personally, my family is very interested in Afrezza Benny really would like to try this seat. Of course, as I mentioned in that tease up there, they're looking at pediatrics, he is still under 18. So it's not proof for his age group. But we're watching it really closely. And I have a lot of friends. A lot of bloggers and people in the diabetes community have talked about this for years. And some things have changed. So I wanted to have them on the show and find out more. So a little bit of background for you. If you are brand new to all this, Afrezza was approved in the United States in 2014. And the company that makes it is mankind. For a while it was sold by Santa Fe, but then mankind took it back. It's one of those things where sometimes the business side seems to have gotten more attention than the product itself. So what is Afrezza it is a powder, it comes in cartridges, and you suck it in you inhale it with a special inhaler device. To me, it looks more like a whistle than a traditional inhaler like an asthma inhaler. It's not like a big tube. I'll link up some photos in the show notes. I'll also link up the Afrezza website so you can learn more and see their information. And my guest this week is Dr. Mike Castagna, the CEO of mankind now he has a Doctorate of pharmacy, he worked as a pharmacist behind the counter for CVS at the start of his career. But then he went back to school and he got an MBA from the Wharton School of Business. He's fun to talk to he doesn't mince words, and he truly believes in this product, I do have to tell you that Mike mentions monomeric insulin a couple of times, I'm going to come back after the interview and explain more about that give you a better definition. All you really need to know is that it's faster than how liquid insulin is made. And all of that in just a moment. But first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Daario. And over the years I find we manage diabetes better when we're thinking less about all the stuff of diabetes tasks. That's why I love partnering with people who take the load off on things like ordering supplies, so I can really focus on Benny, the Dario diabetes success plan is all about you all the strips and lancets you need delivered to your door, one on one coaching so you can meet your milestones, weekly insights into your trends with suggestions on how to succeed, get the diabetes management plan that works with you and for you, Daria is published Studies demonstrate high impact clinical results, find out more go to my dario.com forward slash Diabetes Connections. Mike, thanks for joining me, I'm really excited to catch up. And look, I'm stuttering because I can't believe this is the first time we're talking to you. But thanks for coming on. Oh, thank you, Rodney. I'm super excited before we jump in and start talking about Afrezza Can you give us some perspective kind of dial back because mankind is not. It's not a name that came out of nowhere? There's really important history. Can you kind of talk about that a little bit first?   Mike Castagna  4:14 Sure. Mankind comes from our founder named after Al Mann and Al Mann was a true innovator. He started I think 17 companies and everything from the cochlear implant to the pacemaker to insulin pumps that many of us know today as Medtronic used to be called mini med. And Al Mann built the insulin pumps over the 80s and 90s and was very successful and sold that company to Medtronic. And then he took literally $1 billion of his own money and invested in mankind. And he had put this company together through three companies he owned the technology to make Afrezza was really a combination of companies and the reason he was so dedicated as he saw in the pump market, which we now see today on CGM was that the variability in mealtime control was so high and the fluctuations you see that the influence takes about an hour and a half to kick in. And it's hard to get real time control if you can't get a faster acting insulin. And so he set out to make a real time acting insulin, so phrases and hailed as monomeric. And that was really what the magic was in our technology making a dry powder was was free dryness, if you heard of dippin dots ice cream, we have basically large dipping machines in our factory, but we free dry the particles to make a freezer and under stabilize the monomeric form. So when you're inhaling, you're inhaling influenza, as soon as it's in your blood is active, or when you inject it has to hold hexamer and has to break down there were about 45 minutes. And that's how you can make it stabilize an injectable form. But it has to break down and then it starts working. And that's why there's always this lag effect between we see injectable and foam in and help us is very different products were categorized with real time rapid acting, but the name mankind comes from elmen and the guy who probably 60% of people on pumps have their own pumps that he created. So amazing gentlemen, huge contributions to diabetes and millions of people were alive today because of his work and his generosity and roven to take that forward here and kids and frozen inhaled insulin.   Stacey Simms  6:06 I mean, never look at dippin dots the same again.   Mike Castagna  6:10 I see a large factory of they don't like it, you know, we can always make different types of things don't go well.   Stacey Simms  6:15 I love it. Let me ask you to go into a little bit more detail about how someone who uses Afrezza would actually use it. Can you talk a little bit about like a daily routine?   Mike Castagna  6:25 Yeah, I mean, I know, you know, well, you're in this disease. I mean, people sometimes graze all day, and they just kind of ride their sugars and take a little bit some along the way or many boluses. And some people you know, eat once or twice a day, or some people, you know, carb restricted and everyone has a different way. And I think that you know, the big thing difference was for the patients that I see is, it's in the moment, meaning you don't have to time your meal and your insulin, when you're going to take it and where you're going to be. As soon as your food arrives. You take your first dose.   Stacey Simms  6:50 Most people I know who use Afrezza take a long acting insulin with it. Is that pretty standard for people with type one?   Mike Castagna  6:57 Yeah, I'll take one year, right? Yeah, you need a basal insulin of some sort, you know, and, and a meal time was held, we do have some patients on pumps where they will use their punches for their basil, for example, and use a phrase for real time corrections. So you know, the average patient is very different. We have some patients that are type twos, you know not not on any basil, you'll need to be on basil for if you're type two. But if you're type one, you need to basil, long acting insulin, and you need your meal time. And we know the biggest problem in this country is still mealtime control is the number one thing people with diabetes struggle with. And it's a big reason why, you know, six, or seven or eight, you know, eight out of 10 people basically are not a goal on insulin because of the mealtime control. So it's a daily challenge for everybody.   Stacey Simms  7:39 Can you talk a little bit about how Afrezza is kind of measured out? Because when we think of mealtime, insulin, everything's a carb ratios. And especially as I mentioned, if you're on an insulin pump, you're you're putting in the carbs that you eat. So how does that work?   Mike Castagna  7:51 Yeah, it's funny, I get into many debates with people because, you know, I'm a pharmacist by training, but I'm not the smartest guy. But I couldn't do all the work people do every day to influence sensitivity ratios and carb counting and timing. And all I can tell you is everyone's masks off by 50%, one direction or another. And so we have this false pretense that we're that accurate. And dosing are influenced by down to the half a unit or one unit. And the reality is your angle of injection can decrease, you know, change your absorption by 25%, your site of injection can change absorption, your your stress level can change your impact with your insulin, there's so many things that go into your daily dosing of insulin, that, you know, being that precise, down to the unit is not as accurate as we all think. And I think that's that's one of the misnomers of, you know, the timing is what you really struggle with when you're using injectable insulin, and you just don't know what's going to happen. You know, when people I guess doctors often you know, you don't have to carb count with Afrezza . And they give me funny looks. And the reality is, you know, we've never done a study where you're carb counting to get your dose of insulin, that's, you know, so becomes a four 812 dose linear all the way up to 48 units, it's additive, and you just got to be close enough. And so it's about a two to one ratio, you know, there's no direct pulmonary equivalent to injectable insulin, unfortunately, but, you know, people are taking five units of injectable insulin per meal, they're gonna need about eight units of Afrezza and maybe even 12. And you're gonna figure that out, it's your first meal or two what what the right dose is for you. But you just got to be close enough. And that's a big misunderstanding for people of how accurate the dose has to be. This is the sixth dose cartridge is a big problem. I know plenty of type one patients who take for a 1224 meal, especially they haven't Chinese food or sushi, they just they dose a lot. So I think that's something people have been comfortable, so dramatically different than anything they've ever been trained or taught in their history of living with diabetes.   Stacey Simms  9:36 I would assume that a prescription for Afrezza comes with a doctor's visit where someone whether it's someone who works for Afrezza, or the endocrinologist talks to you about how to do this dosing. You said you figure it out, but I've got to assume that you're not just sending people home with this inhalable and say, just test it, I mean, right somebody, you're at a ratio   Mike Castagna  9:59 and I think That's the key thing is, you know, having patients understand because it's odorless and tasteless. So you inhale, and you're like, what did I get it? And I'm like, yeah, if you inhaled, and I have the second, it's in your blood, it's in your lungs, it's breath activated. So you can't really, of course, you can try to mess up something. But we have something called Blue Hill, where we can show proper inhalation technique in the office on an iPhone app or an Android. And so you know, we hope that patients are being trained either by our trainers or the doctors offices, and will propagation technique looks like that's number one. And then number two is the right dosing. And as you know, individualized dosing is important and fun. And, again, that's why I say we take a lot of the math out because it's either gonna be a four or an eight, and all of a sudden, you're like, Oh my god, I'm gonna take an eight units, it's a lot it's really not when you're taking inhalation units versus injectable units and that's what people got to get comfortable with if their first or second dose so they really do figure out this meal did this or pizza is going to take longer so pick another dose and now our people do figure it out pretty much within the first week. And then there's one thing actually I want to mention because I often forget this is because injectable insulin is such a long tail it's in your body for four to six hours before it's out and that feeds into your basal rate your long acting and so when people switch over presence pretty much out of your body in a net roughly an hour and a half. Sometimes people need to adjust their basil and that's something to watch out for if you do switch to Afrezza enter you're struggling with with some of the basil rates. Some patients you know I hear people anecdotally you know, we don't want to study their the bump up their basil 10 15% on Lantus. And I've heard patients on to see that because it does have that long tail of down there in front sometimes on the basil. So there are the other metrics patients have to watch out for when they are switching to the product. It's not just the uptime, it's also something that basil where you look at   Stacey Simms  11:38 I have a question and I i apologize because it's a it's a bit ridiculous. I'm gonna ask it anyway. Right back to the interview in just a moment. But first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Gvoke Hypopen. And our endo always told us that if you use insulin, you need to have emergency glucagon on hand as well. Low blood sugars are one thing we're usually able to treat those with fast acting glucose tabs or juice. But a very low blood sugar can be very frightening. Which is why I'm so glad there's a different option for emergency glucagon, it's Gvoke Hypopen. Gvoke Hypopen is pre mixed and ready to go with no visible needle, you pull off the red cap, push the yellow end onto bare skin and hold it for five seconds. That's it, find out more go to Diabetes connections.com and click on the Gvoke logo. Gvoke shouldn't be used in patients with pheochromocytoma or insulinoma. Visit Gvoke glucagon.com slash risk. Now back to my interview with Mike, where I will ask that ridiculous question.   You had mentioned it's tasteless, odorless, I recall hearing and I'll have to fact check this. But I recall hearing that years ago dandruff shampoo, they had to add like that tingly feeling because people didn't think it was working like it's totally fake. But people just didn't believe it was a medicated shampoo because it didn't have an unpleasant sensation. Have you thought or talked at all about adding like a flavor or a feeling to so people really know that they got it? Or is that just really bananas?   Mike Castagna  13:12 If somebody might company come and talk to you ahead of time? There's somebody internally who wants us to look at like cherry flavor Afrezza especially as they go into pediatrics? And the answer is, look, there's blueberry Metformin because the metformin smells awful and tastes awful, probably. So you know, those things are possible. We've never done them. And to my knowledge in this industry with dry powders, it is a question that came up recently. Is that should we be thinking about the cherry flavor Afrezza or some other flavor? And I think the answer is TBD. We I don't know what the date is on inhaling the food coloring dye or whatever. Yeah. But that's some of the stuff we have to justify that it's safe and effective. And along with FDA would want us to test but they come up recently and another internal discussion. And since you're asking, I think we'll look at it, even if maybe there's a way to even show a placebo, that's a cherry flavor or something right a one time dose to see what it's like. So I don't know. But now, but people like I said, it's sometimes you get a call, like you know, when you take a phrase of one out of four people will get a cough initially. And generally there were the first four weeks that cough goes away 97% of the people. So I always tell people, you're having a cough, like as long as not interrupting your life, it should slowly get to your first refill. And it should be mostly resolved by that your body's getting used to putting a powder in your lungs. But that's uh, you know, when people ask, what's the difference between injectable and inhaled in terms of safety, you know, you're putting a drug powder in for the first time in your body and your body could choose that. And the number one thing that's different, were injectable insulin. You know, you have other other things. You're dealing with injection sites and pump sites and scar tissue and things like that.   Stacey Simms  14:48 Does the body actually acclimate to the powder or is it just a question of someone gets better and used to the inhalation sensation?   Mike Castagna  14:55 You know, it's it's a good question. I don't know if I have a black and white answer here. bodies give. Yeah, my guess is the body's getting used to putting a dry powder in and just exit and you get used to like weed. You can drink a glass of water before and after and help you minimize it. But it's generally like that's what it feels like it's not a productive call frightening, there's not a call to happens 10 minutes later, it usually happens. We have to inhale.   Stacey Simms  15:17 You mentioned BlueHale , can you tell us a little bit more about what that is?   Mike Castagna  15:21 Yeah, so BlueHale  is to two different things. The first one that we're looking at is with the patient training device. So we can show you whether you had a good emulation or not a good emulation and show you that technique. The second version, actually, you can detect with those you put in the cartridge and hilar. So it has a proprietary software there that we can see what cartridge you put in for the adapter. And it'll tell you on your app, if you took a for a 12 or 16, how much you took in that session. And then we hooked integrate that with the CGM data. So now you can show those response curves on CGM one day and eventually I want to get into AI and predictive analytics. But we're not there yet. But we think that's the magic of what people really want, which is one that I use the thing when you live with diabetes, you just must remember and be that perfect to know exactly what those you did with them. You took it, what meal you were and then I simulated being a patient for a week. And I realized I could remember if I took a four and eight, I take a six or 620 is that 30 minutes or one hour like it was it was amazing. When you just think about life and people are human. They're there. They're human. So they're not keeping track. And they're not that accurate. They're just estimating. And that's when I talked about the dosing of insulin, like we're always estimating everything, we're estimating the time our food is going to come and how long it's going to work. You know, what the carbs are? How much am I gonna eat or drink? Like, it's all accurate? It's all off. None of it's that accurate. That to me is the thing I realized when I was thinking of doing one of those a disease, you don't you think they're perfect. They're not. They're human beings. And that's when I see one out of five doses of injectable insulin are intentionally missed. And the predominant one that's missed is actually lunchtime, which makes sense to wear out in a social environment. They don't want to inject. And by the time they get back, they forget it's probably too late. Or you're already high.   Stacey Simms  17:00 What do you mean by intentionally Miss? You mean? Like they people just forget?   Mike Castagna  17:03 No, no, they intentionally knew they should take a dose of insulin, but they're in a lunch conversation, or they forgot their insulin in the office. Or they'll have their CGM receiver on the bike, or they essentially don't they miss one of the five doses. So if you're missing 20% of your doses, it's really hard to get in control. And there's all kinds of reasons, but that's intentional omission versus unintentional. Which is I forgotten.   Stacey Simms  17:23 I'm curious what the sources on that that's, I mean, I don't doubt it. I'm just curious.   Mike Castagna  17:27 Yeah, I couldn't find it. follow up on that. I have your email, I'll look for it. Yeah, no, because I didn't believe it. And then there was a study done with one of the pens coming out that has digital connectivity. And I looked at it and I looked at the data and like, wait, if a person needs three times a day, seven days a week, that's at least 1721 doses, right? And I think the average person is taking like 1212 shots a week. And I'm like, Well, that doesn't make sense. But you realize, you know, again, we're human, people aren't always as compliant as we want, or they don't eat three times a day perfectly are the two big meals, you know, everyone does something different. So having insulin that meets your needs, and your lifestyle, I think is really important in the world. And you know, look, we like our products, obviously, we're here, we love the Afrezza. But But I also just for me, it's about using the right product that meets your needs to get you in control. And if you're doing well, great, you're gonna avoid the long term complications. But if you're not, you own your health, and you got to really try to find the best set of tools that are going to make you successful and fit your lifestyle. And, you know, obviously, we're not doing well when 80% of people on insulin on a boat. I mean, that's that, to me is the number one thing, I look at this country and say, well, despite all the adoption of pumps, and technology and CGM, we still have not made a meaningful difference in percent of people to go. And that's frustrating.   Stacey Simms  18:35 Way back in the beginning of this interview, we talked about Chinese food and pizza. And I'm just curious, you know, these are things that are hard to dos for, because they they kind of they come later, you know, what most people listening are very familiar with, and I think probably have their own system for dosing, whether it's an extended bolus or injecting more than once. How would you do something like that on a Friday? Is it a question of you would take what you think when you're eating, and then again, in a bit later, like, how do you account for those high fat foods?   Mike Castagna  19:02 Yeah, you know, I'm going to pick on Anthony Hightower, who I know you interviewed before. So I actually met Anthony on a bed over social media. And he had showed me your servers where he ate pizza. So I'll pick on him because I want the public discussion here, sir. He pizza and his sugars are basically flat over the two, three hours post meal. And I said, I'm like, shocked. He's like, this is something people cannot do naturally on the history of injectable insulin, they they always struggle. And when you eat pizza, you're going to struggle not just for hours, but potentially for the next day because just throws everything off. I think in his case, right? I've watched him he took a big dose up front, you know, let's say he's gonna take 12 units of injectable he took 24 units of Afrezza. And then he washed her wasn't an hour, and then an hour she was above where he started. He took another dose, maybe took a four and he has to tap it off. And then an hour later, just thought was too high or not right. But you can always keep your sugars in that kind of control. That's one of the studies we did back in 2018, called this test study was showing that you could do as soon as one hour with no more hyper risk. And that was a big concern of people, how can I do that one hour, well, pretty much hit its peak effect in one hour. So if your servers are still moving in the wrong direction, you can correct them at that point. And so that's where someone on pizza or Chinese food, like, yeah, it's a high dose up front and may manage it through the whole system. Or they may see an hour or two later, they're still high and to take another dose, that they can bring it down at some point.   Stacey Simms  20:20 Alright, let's talk about the big questions that people generally have. And that the one I hear the most is, Is it safe? Right? Is it? Is it okay to inhale this stuff into my lungs? Can you talk about the studies that you've done?   Mike Castagna  20:32 Yeah, I think if we were able to make inhaled insulin 100 years ago, we'd be scratching our heads those who would inject themselves three times a day. So I think it's just an unfortunate matter of 100 years of difference. But we studied a phrase that probably over 3000 patients 70, some trials $3 billion over 20 years, like, that's how much money time and energy is going into prove the safety and effectiveness of this product. And you know, and I tell people like you know, there is no data to say that it's not safe. We have all the rodent studies, all the CT scans that along looking for fibrosis looking for pulmonary issues, we found nothing. So it doesn't sit in the lung. There's an old product called exubera on the market years ago. And exubera was a sugar based manatal formulation which got absorbed over time into your lungs in a friend this case, the it's got water and human influence. So when we ask about what ingredients are you worried about the human influence, human influence, it's the whole AI base, but it's human influence characteristic, and water is purified. So we know that safe and the other only other carrier in our products SDK p which is a excluded product that is not metabolized in the body, it's just 100% extruded. So you know, there's three ingredients in our product. One is human insulin, one is water, and one is tkp. And SDK p comes out of the system. So I don't I don't think the body is afraid of human insulin. And what are so I think, you know, I always struggle with this topic. Because, you know, what happened is there was some lung cancer cases and Newser, were they there was a couple of our data. But you know, in the seven years since FDA approval, we've seen no safety signals come up in the postmarketing. We have almost 10,000 patients on the presidency. I know people in the drug for 1012 years. And so, you know, we don't see anything that gives us concern. And we're going into kids now, who would have to take the drug for 40 5060 years. So I think it's hard to prove something that you've never seen. But safety comes with time. And I think the good news is product has been approved by the FDA for seven years now. And we've not seeing any safety signals in our database, which we look every year, our rems program ended early by the FDA and and we've continued to show good data and all the studies we've done, we've not seen anything new come up in our anywhere safety issues. So if you're, you know, the populations, I would say if you have COPD, and asthma, this is not the right drug for you.   Stacey Simms  22:41 So a dumb question, though. If you have diabetes, and you smoke, can you get an Afrezza? prescription?   Mike Castagna  22:48 We would say you should not? Yes, we have a warning for that.   Stacey Simms  22:52 Well, I just wanted to be clear that there was an actual warning, it wasn't just a please don't because it's bad for   Mike Castagna  22:57 warning. Don't   Stacey Simms  23:00 tell me about the study with kids. Because I've got one, I've got a 16 year old who was quite interested in this product.   Mike Castagna  23:06 Yeah, no, I just found out Unfortunately, the dagga three year old cousin in the family have just come down with type one. And she will, she'll be four and our studies gonna go down to four years old to 17 years old, when we launch it. So I'm excited, we had to do a study to show that the pharmacokinetics and dynamics of inhaled insulin are similar in kids as it as adults. And so once that study was complete, we we wrote a protocol down to the FDA and said, We'd like to go into the next phase, and now run a larger study head to head against the standard of care. And the FDA has pretty much signed off on that protocol at this point. And we have contracted with a third party to now run that trial. And we'll be having our investigator meeting here in next month. And so hopefully, we'll see our first patient in the four to 17 year old range, probably here in September, October time frame. So super excited, long time to get here took too long from my perspective, but can't wait to help kids. But our founder Outman invested, he became very wealthy when he sold the insulin pump company. And he took $1 billion of his own money and made Afrezza inhaled insulin because he felt the problem with the injectable subcutaneous delivered insulin was it just took too long to work. And you know, somebody has an hour lag effects from food. That's real timing, it's always hard to catch those two even. And so he really wanted to make an inhaled insulin that really mimic a physiologic insulin that you see in the body. And he felt the only way you could get there was through a dry powder, lung delivered instantaneous insulin, you can also get there through an implantable pump. But that didn't work out when they tried that back in the 90s. I recall. So people got infections and things like that. So that would that didn't work. So they really were going to get a in my mind that physiologic inform that's gonna be monomeric stabilized is probably going to happen only through the inhaled route. So we have we have to get comfortable with this from overall efficacy and safety. Otherwise, you're not going to really ever get this control that people are looking for real time.   Stacey Simms  24:55 No man, he lived long enough to see Afrezza approved, didn't he?   Mike Castagna  24:59 He's All approved. And unfortunately, I'm here because he died on my daughter's birthday. So I was debating whether to come to mankind or not. And I'm very superstitious, the Al Mann pick the day he died. And he died February 25 2016. And then they made decision to join and help save the company and save a frozen kick on the market. Because I think, you know, I saw all these wonderful patients stories online. And I said, these patients like Anthony Hightower is one of them, what they did something that no one else did, they did something we never did in our clinical trials. And so I got to talk to them. And I realized we just didn't dose it properly. So you go back to the development of the product, a lot of the challenges were under dosing because everybody's trying to compare one to one to injectable insulin, and therefore one of underdosing patients, and therefore, they got equal outcomes didn't do any worse than injectable insulin per se. But could they have gotten better outcomes if we dosed improperly? Right? And I think that's, that's the state of we're now trying to generate to show that the kids buddy now be head to head, or if he knows him properly, what happens? Right, and that's we're really focused on right now.   Stacey Simms  26:01 Is there anything that you wanted to talk about that I haven't answered?   Mike Castagna  26:04 No. I mean, we're only available in the US, we're in the process of going to Europe. So I don't know if you have any. Yeah, we do. Though, so I know, we have patients on a name patient basis in Germany, and UK and Italy. So you know, their governments are actually important a president and pay for it. We're in the middle of filing for Australia. We were approved in Brazil, and we're going to India so so you'll see this more and more around the world. You have listeners in those markets. There's not gonna happen this year. And hopefully, the next year or the following year in some of these markets, we'll be looking at bringing it to more patients in those markets.   Stacey Simms  26:37 Well, and just got a big approval here in the United States for Medicare patients. Right.   Mike Castagna  26:42 Yeah. So that one, I, you know, we get a lot of questions on that one. And so you know, this market CGM patients were told you need to be injecting yourself, I think four times a day, we couldn't get your CGM. So then doctors were not getting patients Afrezza. And so we were able to ask CMS to change that, and they did to the year but rather haven't done they're not done. And so here we are a year later that that policy is now being updated. I want to thank CMS and all that you're helped make that happen. And I think it helps in people in CGN, because I understand that removes some of the other requirements to get CGM, even an injectable these patients so little mankind was the one who started that process. And then we're able to help a lot more people. So it's great. And we're trying to get Medicare $30 a month insulin. So we have Medicare listeners. And you know, we're trying to make sure we help get patients access that are on Medicare. I think that's important.   Stacey Simms  27:33 That doesn't stack up in terms of cost in the United States.   Mike Castagna  27:36 Yeah, I mean, you know, fortunately, the billion dollar debacle in this country is drug pricing, as we all know, and as a pharmacist, I know firsthand when people go through an LMS they're on how many co pays are on. And so we really have tried hard to make sure that no patients pay no more than $15. So we have copay card programs, we actually have a free drug programs, they really can't afford it, we'll give it to you for free. If you're going through the prior authorization process, we give it to you for free while you're going through that. So we all want payers and reimbursement to be the excuse of why a patient can't get access to our product, we think that people will do well on our product, we're willing to take that bet that they'll see good results. And if they see good results, the payers will usually pay for it. And it says you may or may not know that there's a monopoly in diabetes between two insulin players, and three payers, who are all working together to make sure there's no competition. You know, that's unfortunate, but they pay to make sure that patients have a difficult time getting Afrezza . And that's always one of my frustrations of competition or diseases. You know, 400 years, we've seen the precise the dispensing from 20 hours a while 95 and let's say miles, hundreds of dollars. You know, for me on the payer side, we want to make sure patients we try to bring it down to about $15 on commercial and Medicare, you know, they generally pay comparable to what they would and some Medicare plans a little bit higher I can you know, that's a hit or miss when you when you go to submit for reimbursement, but we try to do everything we can to make sure people will have access to our product   Stacey Simms  28:57 $15 for $15 for commercial patients, no, no, but what is it? What is it for? What do you get for $15? Is it a month? Is it a   Mike Castagna  29:05 my week? Yeah, whatever, whatever. You gave two boxes, three boxes, whatever is on that prescription for that month,   Stacey Simms  29:10 for the month. Okay, I didn't mean to interrupt you.   Mike Castagna  29:12 I don't think I know, I was gonna say I forgot we actually have a cash pay program. And people are paying cash for their insulin. And we do see several 1000 people a month paying cash for injectable insulin, we have influenced savings comm where it's $99 a month for frezza. And you know, can you a bigger box or more doses, you might pay 199 but we tried to make the cash price, you know, roughly $100 a month. If we if you had no insurance, for example.   Stacey Simms  29:37 I'm not sure you can answer this question. But I will ask it anyway, is the biggest challenge for you all the failure of exubera? Is it just people not knowing what this is? You know, as you move forward, you know, what is the big challenge to get more people to adopt us?   Mike Castagna  29:51 I mean, for me, the biggest challenge are the doctors. We created a program we basically gave it for free to patients for two years for 15 bucks. Like no no priority. Nothing, we just charge you $15. And that didn't change a lot of doctors from jumping on board. And doctors just don't know our data. And so they think this product doesn't have a lot of data behind it. And they don't know our data, they don't know. Like when I would ask a doctor, how fast from the time you inject your bolus, your pump to the time you look on a CGM, that your institute sugars are coming down, and I get in these endocrinologist, I'll get five minutes and mediate and 20 minutes an hour, the answers, I need 90 minutes, 220 minutes, that's the answer. And so they don't even know the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics differences between injectable insulin inhaled, and then you have doctors, right, you know, calling some of these ultra acting drugs faster, we'll look at the package inserts, they're no faster than their old products. And there's a lot of misperceptions out there some of these newer launches of old tracking insulin, and to me they're, they're really not that much different than the predecessor and look at the data, you know, there's not a faster, there's not dramatically faster onset or offset or, you know, a one c lowering or weight gains on very much the same. So, no, I think it's just a matter of doctors trying to really understand the data.   Stacey Simms  31:02 Before I let you go, are there any plans in the future to change anything about the way it looks? or different colors? I mean, I know it sounds kind of silly, when you're just trying to get people to adopt the new technology, but from a user standpoint, and look, I know, you've heard all the jokes of my friends who use this will make you can't comment on designers. They don't say anything, they'll make comments like, you know, taking a hit or whatever, right? I mean, it's it's inhaling, it's this little thing that you're, you're inhaling, it looks a certain way. I'm curious if the cosmetics of it are anything that are on your radar, or needs to be improved even?   Mike Castagna  31:36 No, I mean, I think when you spend, you know, $3,000,000,000.20 years doing a new drug development or taking 100 year old product and reinventing it, you had to get that right in terms of device design and airflow dynamics and consistency. And those. And I think all that's really important because, you know, misperception that oh, my God, it's going to be less can be more variable than injectable insulin. And the data just doesn't support that statement. And so for us, we have one of the world's most unique installation platforms across the entire pharmaceutical industry, we deliver more power to the lung, the most technologies out there. So that's why you can get consistency, those two those, and you don't have a lot of variabilities, because our technology and our device is called a low velocity inhaler. And what that means is there's a resistor that helps slow the powders as they're coming out of the inhaler. So they get deep into the lungs. And that's why you get that nice absorption curves that we see. And we're most inhalers or high gloss inhalers. So it's just enough sucking air as hard as you can, and hoping you get you know, 20 30% of lung drug into your lungs, and mostly stuck in your teeth to device in the back of your throat. That's most dry powder inhaler technologies out there today. And so that's something unique to us and our technology and our device, they all work really well together, you couldn't just take our powder and put into another inhaler, and or just as well would not work. So yeah, we're pretty happy with the device I we are going to other diseases. So you know, we're we're going down to the FDA with our partner for an approval in October for pulmonary hypertension patients. And we have several other orphan lung areas we're going into to help more patients with lung disorders. So you know, I think that's important, like our, our technology, our inhaler, our platform is gonna be used in more and more patients over the next decade than just diabetes.   Stacey Simms  33:13 Well, that's what I was gonna ask is, if it works, so well, you know, will you partner with other medications? That's great to hear.   Mike Castagna  33:18 Yeah, you know, we're really busy, we probably have about 10 to 12 formulations of products working on this year and five marone products in the pipeline. And so it's it's a really good time of mankind, we're super excited to be here. And it was a turnaround, the company struggled for many, many years. And we're on our way to success. And I think, firstly, you'll be you'll be hearing more about it. So I know it's been a long time. And maybe you didn't talk to us yet. But hopefully you'll talk to us more and more as we continue to generate new data and more more patients start using it.   Stacey Simms  33:45 I'd love to, I'd love to, especially with the kids programs. And like I said, I've got a 16 year old who is very curious about this. And, you know, once once safe and effective. Once we get all that safety stuff in here. It's mom says, you know, I'll definitely I know, I would like to check it out. So I really appreciate you coming on and spending so much time with me and my listeners and explaining all this and we'll definitely talk again. Thanks, Mike.   You're listening to Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. More information at Diabetes connections.com. Always on the episode homepage. I also have a transcription as well, sometimes those podcast players don't display the show notes and the links. So if you have any trouble, just go back to Diabetes connections.com. And I just want to say that I did reach out to have Mike or somebody from Afrezza on the show. And you heard him say, you know, it's been a while, um, you know, it just took a while to connect to the right person. Let's just say that, and I will have them back on because lots of good stuff is happening. As you heard. I want to take a second and kind of explain Monomeric insulin and, you know, I'll be honest with you. The scientific points here are really not my strong suit. I'm a communications major, right. So I did what I always do, and I am People who know a lot more than I do to help me explain it. I went to the Facebook group Diabetes Connections as a group. And you know, I said, How do you explain monomeric insulin I know it's faster. And Tim Street, who is just wonderful and runs the diabettech.com page that's like diabetes tech diabetic, and I'll link that up as well. He provided this explanation, which really brought it home for me, and boy, I hope I'm pronouncing everything correctly. So Tim wrote, insulin naturally links its chains together to form stable molecules. Typically it connects two together and then links three of those two chains together. Additionally, to create six This is highly stable and described as hexameric. In order to use these chains, you have to break the molecules apart to single chains, which are monomers. Typically fast acting insulins are stored as dimers, two monomers connected, which are easier to split, then hexamers. by storing the insulin as a single chain, a monomer, the body doesn't have to break the chains to instantly use the insulin molecule it receives. And that is why Afreeza wraps the monomeric form in the capsules, to make it ultra fast. Thank you, Tim, that actually made a lot of sense. I gotta tell you, we have the smartest people and the kindest people in this Facebook group. If you're not there yet, and you want to join, come on in, I highly recommend it. You don't have to be a Tim Street. You don't have to be able to explain these concepts. You do have to be nice. And you do have to not post a lot of drama. I'm very tough on my diabetes groups. I run two of them. They're very nice and friendly places for a reason. But Tim, seriously, thank you so much. That was a great explanation. And I really appreciate it. Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dexcom. If you're a veteran, the Dexcom g six continuous glucose monitoring system is now available at VA pharmacies in the United States. Qualified veterans with type one and type two diabetes may be covered. Picking up your Dexcom supplies at the pharmacy may save you a lot of time to connect with your doctor for more info Dexcom even has a discussion guide you can bring with you get that guide and find out more about eligibility. It's all@dexcom.com backslash veterans, and all the information is always at Diabetes connections.com. Before I let you go, just a quick note about back to school, I have never done less. I packed up a bag for Benny to bring to the nurse. He brings his daily supplies with him every day in his backpack. But of course, like most people, our nurse has backup supplies for him. So I put those together. He brought them in along with our plan or orders, you know from our endo. And that was it. I haven't set foot in the building. I'm not sure when I will go in or if I will go in probably when you forget something or they run out there. But I've never done less work. You know, I did a lot of work over the years to go to school and meet with people and he's got it. So not much to report. It feels very strange. All right. Please join me this Wednesday when we have our in the news live on Facebook every Wednesday at 430 and then we turn that into a podcast episode. I love doing that. It's been a lot of fun. I hope you're enjoying it. Give me your news tips. If you've got any from this week, just email me Stacey at Diabetes connections.com thanks as always to my editor John Bukenas from audio editing solutions. Thank you so much for listening. I'm Stacey Simms. I'll see you back here in a couple of days until then be kind to yourself.   Benny  38:27 Diabetes Connections is a production of Stacey Simms Media. All rights reserved. All wrongs avenged