Podcasts about uighurs

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Turkic ethnic group of Central and East Asia

  • 283PODCASTS
  • 380EPISODES
  • 36mAVG DURATION
  • 1EPISODE EVERY OTHER WEEK
  • Sep 29, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about uighurs

Latest podcast episodes about uighurs

Trend Lines
The Most Fearless Country in Europe

Trend Lines

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 26:01


The government of Lithuania caused a stir this summer when it announced that it would allow Taiwan to open a de facto embassy in the capital, Vilnius, with plans to open a reciprocal Lithuanian representative office in Taipei. China responded by withdrawing its ambassador to Vilnius and demanding that Lithuania do the same. And in May, the Lithuanian parliament passed a resolution labeling China's treatment of the Uighurs in Xinjiang as a “genocide.” China is not the only authoritarian power that Lithuania is facing off with. Vilnius hosts the Belarusian opposition leader, Svetlana Tikhanovskaya, who fled her home country last year after running against the dictator Alexander Lukashenko in a rigged election. This week on Trend Lines, Edward Lucas, a nonresident senior fellow at the Center for European Policy Analysis and a former senior editor at The Economist, joins WPR's Elliot Waldman to discuss the roots of these recent moves by Lithuania, and how the country always finds itself leading the charge against powerful authoritarian states. If you would like to request a full transcript of the episode, please send an email to podcast@worldpoliticsreview.com. Relevant Articles on WPR: Lithuania's Conservatives Return to Power by Ditching Austerity Are China's Inroads Into Central and Eastern Europe a Trojan Horse? How Lithuania Is Doubling Down on NATO to Counter Russia Threat NATO Is Focusing on the Wrong Russian Threat in Eastern Europe Trend Lines is produced and edited by Peter Dörrie, a freelance journalist and analyst focusing on security and resource politics in Africa. You can follow him on Twitter at @peterdoerrie. To send feedback or questions, email us at podcast@worldpoliticsreview.com.

The Slavic Connexion
Afghanistan: A Strategic Failure with Ret. Col. Robert Hamilton

The Slavic Connexion

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 36:50


Dr. Robert Hamilton of the U.S. Army War College returns to the show to speak with hosts Lera and Zach about the future of Afghanistan and the fate of the region's security architecture. Currently on leave to serve as advisor to the Georgian Ministry of Defense, Dr. Hamilton discusses the role of the Georgian military in the Afghanistan War and what the U.S. withdrawal (and Taliban rule) means for Georgia's future as well. He poses three questions concerning the regional security architecture: (1) What's the role of the SCO (the Shanghai Cooperation Organization), (2) What is the relationship between Russia and China going forward, and (3) How will Russia and China step in to fill the vacuum created by the withdrawal of US presence from Afghanistan? Thanks for listening and we hope you enjoy! ABOUT THE GUEST https://www.fpri.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/bio-book-photo-march-2019-819x1024.jpg Colonel (Retired) Robert E. Hamilton, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Eurasian Studies at the U.S. Army War College and a Black Sea Fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute. In a 30-year career in the U.S. Army, spent primarily as a Eurasian Foreign Area Officer, he served overseas in Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Germany, Belarus, Qatar, Afghanistan, the Republic of Georgia, Pakistan and Kuwait. He is the author of numerous articles and monographs on conflict and security issues, focusing principally on the former Soviet Union and the Balkans. He is a graduate of the German Armed Forces Staff College and the U.S. Army War College and holds a Bachelor of Science degree from the United States Military Academy, a Master's Degree in Contemporary Russian Studies and a Ph.D. in Political Science, both from the University of Virginia. Dr. Hamilton is currently on leave from the U.S. Army War College and serving as advisor to the Georgian Ministry of Defense in Tbilisi, Georgia. https://www.slavxradio.com/guests/hamilton Follow him on Twitter: @bobham88. NOTE: This episode was recorded on August 24, 2021 via Zoom. CREDITS Producer: Lera Toropin (Twitter: @earlportion) Producer: Cullan Bendig Assistant Producer: Zach Johnson Assistant Producer: Kathryn Yegorov-Crate Executive Production Assistant: Katherine Birch Recording, Editing, and Sound Design: Michelle Daniel, Charlie Harper Music Producer: Charlie Harper (Connect: facebook.com/charlie.harper.1485 Instagram: @charlieharpermusic) Main Theme by Charlie Harper www.charlieharpermusic.com Executive Producer & Creator: Michelle Daniel (Connect: facebook.com/mdanielgeraci Instagram: @michelledaniel86) www.msdaniel.com DISCLAIMER: Texas Podcast Network is brought to you by The University of Texas at Austin. Podcasts are produced by faculty members and staffers at UT Austin who work with University Communications to craft content that adheres to journalistic best practices. The University of Texas at Austin offers these podcasts at no charge. Podcasts appearing on the network and this webpage represent the views of the hosts, not of The University of Texas at Austin. https://files.fireside.fm/file/fireside-uploads/images/9/9a59b135-7876-4254-b600-3839b3aa3ab1/P1EKcswq.png Special Guest: Robert E. Hamilton.

Spectator Radio
Holy Smoke: Joe Biden and the betrayal of religious freedom

Spectator Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 26:27


Religious freedom is already being mercilessly attacked in Taliban-run Afghanistan: Muslim women in particular face a living hell unless they're happy to submit to their new rulers' psychotic brand of Sharia.  The United States is required by its own laws to do everything it can to champion religious liberty around the world. But Afghan's moderate Muslims, China's Uighurs, Myanmar's Rohynga and Christians in dozens of countries would be foolish to trust President Joe Biden, whose administration can't wait to dismantle the First Amendment Rights of conservative Christians back home.  My guest is Andrea Picciotti-Bayer of the Washington-based Conscience Project, which speaks up for people of faith who commit the thought crime of not subscribing to liberal gender ideology. Like many people, she's worried by Biden's partisan choice of personnel for US international religious freedom posts. None of them are Christians. It's an enlightening but alarming discussion. Don't miss it. 

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK
China on the Rise

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 59:16


70 to 90 percent of America's over-the-counter medicines are manufactured in China. Many Fortune 500 companies like Apple, Google, and Walmart have huge footprints in China. There is even talk that one of the world's largest financial institutions, JP Morgan Chase, is looking to establish a major presence in the country. Michael Johns, a co-founder of the Tea Party, said there is a litany of concerns the United States should have when it comes to doing business with China. Johns joins "After Dark With Rob and Andrew” to discuss China's increasing influence around the country and world. He said the ever-growing dependency on China should be met with skepticism along with the lack of transparency over the origins of Covid19 and human rights violations against the Uighurs. In addition, unfair trade practices and environmental abuses should be reviewed. Michael Johns is a conservative public policy leader and business executive. In 2009, he co-founded the U.S. Tea Party movement and has since served as one of its leading strategists and spokespersons. He has served as a White House speechwriter to President George H. W. Bush and frequently appears on cable news networks as a guest analyst.

Heart and Soul
The Uighur Poets

Heart and Soul

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 26:29


Uighur poetry is and has been for centuries a fundamental part of the culture and members of the community write poetry and often recite part poems that have been passed down the generations and learn off by heart. As the community face widespread persecution by the Chinese authorities and at a time of great despair and fear for them, Uighurs speak to us about the ways in which poetry offers ways of support, succour and resistance. The programme features the voices and works of Uighurs, poets and experts from across the world.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
The Ayaan Hirsi Ali Podcast: Winston Marshall on Speaking Up (#24)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 64:55


Ayaan speaks with Winston Marshall soon after he left the band, Mumford & Sons. They discuss his work helping Hong Kongers integrate into the UK, his interest in speaking up for the Uighurs in China, and much more. This episode was recorded on June 28th, 2021. Winston Marshall was the banjo player in the popular […]

The Ayaan Hirsi Ali Podcast
E24. Winston Marshall on Speaking Up

The Ayaan Hirsi Ali Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 64:55


Ayaan speaks with Winston Marshall soon after he left the band, Mumford & Sons. They discuss his work helping Hong Kongers integrate into the UK, his interest in speaking up for the Uighurs in China, and much more. This episode was recorded on June 28th, 2021. Winston Marshall was the banjo player in the popular rock band, Mumford & Sons, from 2007-2021. In March, Winston tweeted “Congratulations Andy Ngo. Finally had the time to read your important book. You're a brave man.” Facing strong backlash from the Left for his tweet, he apologized to protect his band members. In June, he wrote an article on Medium where he explained the difficult decision to leave Mumford & Sons. Winston is the co-founder of Hong Kong Link Up, a non-profit organization which aims to link up British residents with Hong Kongers arriving in the UK. Follow him on Twitter @mrwinmarshall.

American Institute for Economic Research
Didi Chuxing's IPO, Crackdowns in Hong Kong, and a China at Odds With Itself By John Tamny

American Institute for Economic Research

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 4:28


In any conflict between the U.S. and China, the most open country will be the winner. And China will be the loser the more that it treats its people and its greatest city badly. Let's just not forget in the U.S. that the most effective way to reverse the CCP's errors vis-à-vis the Uighurs and Hong Kong would be to remain as economically and personally free as possible.

The Federalist Radio Hour
Communist China Is Using Big Tech To Aid Its Oppressive Surveillance State

The Federalist Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 39:11


On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, reporter and author Geoffrey Cain joins Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss his book “The Perfect Police State: An Undercover Odyssey into China’s Terrifying Surveillance Dystopia of the Future” and how the communist government in China is using American technology to oppress people and Uighurs in Xinjiang.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Federalist Radio Hour: Communist China Is Using Big Tech To Aid Its Oppressive Surveillance State

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 39:11


On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, reporter and author Geoffrey Cain joins Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss his book “The Perfect Police State: An Undercover Odyssey into China’s Terrifying Surveillance Dystopia of the Future” and how the communist government in China is using American technology to oppress people and Uighurs in Xinjiang.

The Explainer
Who are the Uighurs and what is going on in China?

The Explainer

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2021 32:22


For the latest instalment of The Good Information Project we are joined by Clifford Coonan to talk about claims of human rights abuses in the Xinjiang autonomous region of China.

The Take
A Uighur love story, derailed by China's crackdown

The Take

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2021 22:28


Mehray Mezensof's husband is one of an estimated million Uighurs being detained in China. Several countries accuse China of committing crimes against humanity, including genocide. Starting Friday, a people's tribunal in the UK will meet to decide if that's true.In this episode: Mehray Mezensof (@Mehray_T), wife of a detained Uighur man; Sir Geoffrey Nice, chairman of the Uyghur Tribunal (@TribunalUyghur)Connect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

Radio Islam
Rohingya and Uighurs plight goes off the Media Radar

Radio Islam

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2021 11:05


Rohingya and Uighurs plight goes off the Media Radar by Radio Islam

Global Security
China now allows 3 kids per family, but many couples say they can’t afford it

Global Security

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2021


When the Chinese government announced a relaxation of the two-child policy, allowing couples to have three children, reactions were not quite what the government was hoping for. “We all thought it was a joke. ... It was so funny, so unbelievable. Nobody took it seriously.”Christina Wang, teacher, Shanghai, China“We all thought it was a joke,'' said Christina Wang, a teacher in Shanghai. “It was so funny, so unbelievable. Nobody took it seriously.” Related: Sterilization abuse of Uighurs in China meets international legal criteria for genocide, experts sayAfter the announcement, the internet exploded with jokes about couples “dying under the pressure” of taking care of aging parents and raising three kids at the same time. But the situtaion is no joke for the government. As the largest population in the world, China now also has the lowest birth rate in decades, according to the latest census. Wang and her husband love kids. Nine years ago, before the government allowed couples to have more than one child, she quit her university job and angered her parents by having a second child, illegally. But she’s ruled out having another. Related: China's Gen X moms turn to IVF in desperate quest for second baby“I certainly won’t be having a third child,” she said. “Even if I was 10 years younger, I wouldn’t consider it.”Wang’s not alone. Right after the news broke Monday afternoon, the state news service Xinhua put out an online poll. The response was overwhelming: 23,000 people said they didn’t want a third child; 1,200 said they did. The poll was abruptly taken offline and the comments section removed.Related: Ugandan archbishop breaks with tradition to promote birth controlAshley Fu, a new mom in Shanghai, thought that was hilarious. Her six-month-old daughter is waking six or seven times a night, and she’s exhausted. She recently quit her corporate job because of lack of sleep. Her husband wants a second child, but Fu says that would be a stretch.“I don’t think this policy is for people like me. It’s for people who need the policy … for super rich people, or people in the village, but not people like me."Ashley Fu, new mom, Shanghai, China“I don’t think this policy is for people like me. It’s for people who need the policy … for super rich people, or people in the village, but not people like me,” she told The World. For people in the village — in other words, rural areas — another child is an extra pair of hands. But most people live in cities now, and having children is expensive.Jiang Tian, a stay-at-home dad in Shanghai, is raising two kids.“I don’t even want to think about having a third child,” he said. Related: Mothers and newborns pay the 'price' during Zimbabwe medics strike“Two kids are already taking up my whole life. How can I even consider a third? Time, experience, energy, mental capacity, finances … I’m maxed out on all of these."Jiang Tian, stay-at-home dad, Shanghai, China“Two kids are already taking up my whole life. How can I even consider a third? Time, experience, energy, mental capacity, finances … I’m maxed out on all of these,” he said. All of this is a huge problem for China, whose population is aging, while its workforce is also shrinking. From 1980 to 2015, the government allowed most families only one child. Beijing then realized the one-child policy had worked maybe too well. The government tried to correct the sliding birth rate by allowing everyone to have up to two kids, but by then, it was too late. An entire generation of only children were simply not interested in having a second child. With marriage rates also dropping, even one child is a stretch for some.Iris Pang, an economist studying China, said the government is extremely worried.“They may also believe that this is not the best solution to increase the population, but for now, this is the quick solution,” she said. She also said it doesn’t matter how many kids the government allows.“It's not about the number. It's about the monetary resources and the time resources to raise a child."Iris Pang, economist focused on China“It's not about the number. It's about the monetary resources and the time resources to raise a child,” she said. Young people are being pragmatic, Pang continued. If they were raised without siblings and married another only-child, they’re probably already worried about time and money. They know they’ll be taking care of their aging parents, raising their own kids, and then helping out with their grandkids.Jane Zhang grew up in rural Ningxia, but now lives in Shanghai with her husband and one-year-old son. She said at home, most of her friends and family have two or three kids. It’s very normal. But she’s not considering another child, yet.“The pace of life is much faster here in Shanghai, and the cost of living is so high. You need a lot of resources, so a second child would be much more expensive."Jane Zhang, mother of one, Shanghai, China“The pace of life is much faster here in Shanghai, and the cost of living is so high. You need a lot of resources, so a second child would be much more expensive,” she said. Christina Wang, the teacher with two children, said the new policy fails to take those expenses into consideration.“It’s like, the number of young people is decreasing, the factories don’t have enough workers, so you need to be patriotic and have more kids,” she said. “It’s just not fair.” Even in smaller cities, she said, parents need financial support to help with child care, schooling and apartment costs that come along with having a larger family.   Jiang Tian, the work-from-home dad, said pure patriotism isn’t enough to sway him."Let the people with financial resources be patriotic then. The rest of us can be patriotic in other ways, unless the government gives us something in return. How about some extra points on the college entrance exam for having a third child? Then, maybe I’d think differently. If you don’t give us help, and just ask us to be patriotic, I just don’t think anyone is going to be that selfless,” he said. These days, young people are focusing more on themselves, says Iris Pang. “For the urban population, especially the middle-income class, they are more reluctant to have children, not even one,” she said. Jovial Zhou, 29, is one of them. She’s single and works as a maternity nurse in Shanghai. When asked how many kids she plans to have, she doesn’t even skip a beat: “zero.”"I don’t want to have kids and waste my time. Some people will think this sounds very selfish. But, sorry, this is my decision.”Jovial Zhou, 29, maternity nurse, Shanghai, ChinaRelated: Millennials in China are starting to save as economy recoversShe doesn’t care about the pressure from her parents. “‘Cuz I only have one chance to be myself. So, for now, I don’t want to have kids and waste my time. Some people will think this sounds very selfish. But, sorry, this is my decision.”Many people feel that it always should have been their decision.The government may now find out that they can keep people from having children — but they can’t make people have more.

Counting the Cost
Why China's exploitation of Uighurs implicates Western brands | Counting the Cost

Counting the Cost

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2021 25:40


The Reconnect with Carmen LaBerge
China's Continued Genocide of the Uighurs | Social Media and the Prevalence Para-Social Relationships

The Reconnect with Carmen LaBerge

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2021 42:48


Today’s Guests Matthew Hawkins – Former Policy Director for the ERLC The Uighur people in China are under persecution and they are particularly being targeted through policies restricting their birth rate. In the United States, the first refugees have arrived o be resettled, the first in 8 months. Chris Martin – Terms of Service Blog […] The post China’s Continued Genocide of the Uighurs | Social Media and the Prevalence Para-Social Relationships appeared first on The Reconnect with Carmen | Engaging Culture from a Christian Worldview.

PBS NewsHour - World
Western companies face nationalist backlash in China over criticism from home countries

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2021 6:54


A new report released Friday details a pattern of abuse of Chinese workers along Beijing's global development initiative, the Belt and Road. The West also accuses Beijing of exploiting ethnic minority Uighurs, using forced labor to produce cotton. Nick Schifrin reports how that Western criticism sparked a nationalist backlash in China, directed at Western companies. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Western companies face nationalist backlash in China over criticism from home countries

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2021 6:54


A new report released Friday details a pattern of abuse of Chinese workers along Beijing's global development initiative, the Belt and Road. The West also accuses Beijing of exploiting ethnic minority Uighurs, using forced labor to produce cotton. Nick Schifrin reports how that Western criticism sparked a nationalist backlash in China, directed at Western companies. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

RNZ: Saturday Morning
Darren Byler: Big Brother vs China's Uighurs

RNZ: Saturday Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2021 15:36


Constant surveillance, cultural suppression and 're-education' are a day-to-day reality for the approximately 12 million Muslim minority Uighur people who live in the Xinjiang Autonomous Region of northwest China. Activists and UN rights experts accuse China of using torture, forced labour and sterilisations. China denies rights abuses in Xinjiang and says its camps provide vocational training and are needed to fight extremism. Technology has become a cornerstone of the government's control methods. Uighur are required by the police to carry their smartphones and IDs listing their ethnicity and are tracked by face surveillance checkpoints located at jurisdictional boundaries, entrances to religious spaces and transportation hubs. University of Colorado anthropologist Darren Byler has been researching and writing about Uighur dispossession and also edits the website: The Art of Life in Chinese Central Asia.

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
AS HEARD ON NH Today WGIR-AM 610:Leaked personal Facebook data and What is DHS thinking by Having Private Contractors to Compile Watch Lists

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2021 12:39


Welcome, Craig Peterson here.  This morning I was on with Chris Ryan on NH Today. We discussed first the big data dump of 533 Million Facebook user accounts available now for free online. Then he hit out of the park with this new news from the DHS who are now going to contract BIG TECH data and private contractors to compile lists of dissidents and create watch lists -- OMG what could possibly go wrong with this?  It is outright dumb! Here we go with Chris.  These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit. - CraigPeterson.com ---  Automated Machine Generated Transcript: Craig Peterson: [00:00:00] Well, there's another animated Monday morning with Christopher Ryan. We had a chat let's say, you can tone it down a little bit here, about two different things. One, the hackers that leaked the 533 million Facebook users online just posted it up there. We talk about why? What happened? Why aren't they selling it? We talked about, as well as I think Chris understood what I meant when I sent him this article. He hit it out of the park Homeland security. They're going to be using private contractors, big tech, it appears here to help them track down citizens that they feel might be dangerous. What are the repercussions of that?  We're getting into it all here with Mr. Chris Ryan. Chris Ryan: [00:00:54] It's right now Craig Peterson. He is the host of Tech Talk, which comes up at 11:30 AM on Saturday. So, I am the opening act for Craig Peterson.  Craig Peterson: [00:01:05] Wow. I've got to follow you.  Chris Ryan: [00:01:08] Yeah. Me and Gucci. Yeah. Good luck, pal.  So let's start with this, Mark Zuckerberg's cell phone number was among leaked personal data for 533 million Facebook users. Hackers were able to get into Facebook and get a hold of Zuckerberg's cell phone, along with personal data from 553 million users. Quite a story there.  Craig Peterson: [00:01:35] You heard about that? Yeah. Did you see the response from this Facebook spokesman? He said this is old data, we fixed it in 2019, in August 2019? Yeah. I think is a very, very big deal. It has been sold and resold amongst cybercriminals for quite a while. It's a lot of data. Saturday's leak that happened makes it all essentially free now. That's probably because the hackers just can't sell it anymore. Anybody that wanted your personal information already has it. Right.?  Chris Ryan: [00:02:13] It also shows the lack of transparency from Facebook. Right? I mean, that answer is wanting to make it seem like, Oh yeah, everything's fixed now. That was two years ago. But they In my view and to my knowledge did not release that they had been hacked in this substantive way in 2019. If memory serves and now it's like, Oh yeah, this has happened a long time ago. Now that the information has been released because of the lack of ability to sell it. Only now, are they making a public correct?  Craig Peterson: [00:02:42] Yeah. That's exactly right. This is information from people, Facebook users in 106 countries. It includes their phone numbers, Facebook IDs, full names, locations, that's addresses, by the way, birthdate, and email addresses.  What this data's been used for, are these phishing scams that we've talked about so many times where people are getting an email, it looks legitimate and it sounds legitimate and it might even be happy birthday from Facebook.  In reality, it's a Nigerian Prince that's behind that kid.  Chris Ryan: [00:03:17] What do you do if you feel like you've been hacked? You're getting these types of emails. We all get phone calls or text messages, at times, from scammers. What do you do in those circumstances where you feel like you are in jeopardy, but you don't feel like there's a recourse. You call the FBI and you'll be like on hold for eight years and then no one ever gets anything. Local police don't have jurisdiction. Is there any recourse for a person that feels that they're vulnerable and that they've been hacked and that they're getting these types of scams set in their direction? Craig Peterson: [00:03:51] Well, this is just you and me talking here, Chris. The reality is there's not much you can do. There are apps that you can put on your phone to help stop those calls. Things like, Hiya, H I Y A that's what I use. That has a scammer database. You can go to the internet. Crime complaint center online. This is the FBI's center, and you'll see that at ic3.gov. IC3.gov, again. All you have to do is go there. You can report an internet crime, but the reality is there's not much it's going to happen.  It's very, very upsetting to me. Sometimes I felt like screaming about this and we'd talk about it frequently on my weekend show, but the problem is you have lost your personal private information.  Most of us, don't move every few months. So, that address that they have of our home, that we may have lived in for years, that's not going to change. Our name's not going to change most likely.  The social security administration will not give us a new social security number, even when it's been stolen. By the way, probably all of ours have been stolen. Right?  So, all you can do is grin and bear, keep an eye out, watch out for your privacy. In fact, this week, I'm starting a course on privacy for windows users, what to do to lock down your windows machine.  All you can really do go to I c 3 dot gov report it. If you have had money stolen, it'll tell you about this on this FBI site, but you're going to have to file a police report depending on what has happened.  Overall, almost all of our information is out there and you know what, maybe it's okay because all of those people from Equifax, they're all in prison now, aren't they for like 20 or 30 years? Oh, well, nothing happened to them. There were no teeth behind these laws. Our lives are getting just upturned, and then not to add one more thing to this. Chris, we are now looking at some of the use of other ways of authentication. Right? They're talking about having these passes for the Coronavirus vaccine. They're looking to use things like our eye scans, retinal scans, face scans, fingerprint scans. Look at the people at the airports. You might remember that from a year plus ago would go through them, the super-fast lane. Right. Just go up and it would scan their eyes. Well, you think it's hard to change your social security number? How hard is it to get new eyes? Right?  We're now in Tom cruise territory here where you can't change your eyes. You can't change your fingerprints. You can't change your face. And yet we're going to use those as identifiers. We should have learned just by having our social security numbers, et cetera, stolen and no real consequences, not just for the people that stole it, but from the people that weren't protecting it. Chris Ryan: [00:06:52] Right. I want to get to a huge story that NBC News is reporting on, but we have not really seen a rise to the forefront of the public consciousness. That is the US Department of Homeland Security. Is getting set to hire public companies and individual contractors outside of government to get data and information on individuals to compile new terrorist watch lists.  DHS is going to pay big tech, Google, Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, Snapchat, Twitter, the contracts to hire and organize internal monitoring teams to assist the government by sending information on citizens, they deemed to be Quote dangerous. NBC says that the developments are taking place. The US intelligence apparatus is preparing to go live with the assembly of lists of Americans who could be potential threats to the government and need to be watched. Again, the question here is in regards to where the line is drawn. Are you a dissident, if you use language that is in opposition to the government? The current administration? The past administration? In regards to the president, if you don't like the way the government operates or if you are vociferous in regards to that? Where does the line get drawn? To me, this is a significant piece that the US Department of Homeland Security is engaged in.  Craig Peterson: [00:08:14] You hit it out of the park, absolutely. As you're out of the park. The red Sox couldn't hit it out. You just did.  The problem here is where is that line? You know what that line of, Oh my gosh, you're obviously a dissident cause you're planning on bombing the world trade center using an airplane. Okay, that's an obvious line, but as it continues to slide, that's a matter of interpretation. So if you have somebody making the decision about something that someone else said, and deciding, well I'm, I'm the decider and I think this is hurtful. This person might be a terrorist. This doesn't work.  Look at what we've already had for proof. Some of these horrific things where there have been shootings at school, et cetera, where that shooter, that murderer had been on the police radar. It had been reported. They were threatening to kill people and nothing happened.  So now we're going to take an action here that we've never before really done much with and we're going to apply it to the entire nation. We're going to use algorithms that are going to look at what people are saying and classify them as to the degree of risk and then what are we going to do with those people? Are people gonna end up like the Uighurs in China and end up in camps?  This is absolutely huge.  Chris Ryan: [00:09:41] We got to run, but, I look at this from my perspective as an individual that is often critical of the government. I also am an individual that will use social media and Google in order to do research. So, if there's a pipe bomb that is laid outside of the RNC or the DNC after the insurrection of the US capital during, or actually before, I'm going to research that well. What is a pipe bomb? How does it go about being assembled? What's its lethality? So, now I am a potential dissident who is doing research online about pipe bombs. See what I'm saying, see where this is going.  I am Chris Ryan. This is New Hampshire today. Craig Peterson is with us. Thank you so much.  Craig Peterson: [00:10:16] There's a hard cut. Hey, you should check your email box. If you haven't already. If you are interested in Improving Your Windows, privacy, and security, I have a course we've been working on it for months. We've gone through multiple iterations. We wanted to make this the best course you have ever had. If you're on my email list, you already know. If you were on it before this whole thing started that I am, in fact, giving you guys a great, great, great, great, great deal. So, check your email box. If you haven't already.  Let me know, respond to me, this isn't a click-through autoresponder type thing. This is Karen and I that write these. I want to make these things personal, and I have a communication with you guys, right?  I'm tired of all of this tech stuff and trying to twist people's arms and fool them into buying things. So, that will not happen. It does not happen with me. In fact, we were already working on what are we going to do next? We've got some great ideas in place, but right now it's Improving Windows Security. Of course, privacy is the emphasis here in this first set. It is five modules we're releasing over the course of about a month and you can get all of that.  I'm even going to throw in, and I haven't told anybody yet, but I'm going to have a couple of live Q&Acalls too, for people if you are a member of this course. If you've bought it you can be on those calls and I'll answer your personal computer questions that is live and on a webinar, you can call in on your phone too. If you're not into the whole, how do I use my camera? I don't even want to use my camera. Isn't this a privacy course? Why are you making me use my camera? You can just go on your phone as well.  All right. Everybody keep an eye out for that.  If you are not on my email list, if you don't know about this, you can just go to Craig peterson.com/subscribe. You'll get on my list and you'll get some follow-up emails. But this is going to be a busy week for me and I am going to be out for almost two weeks coming up the week after. So busy, busy, busy times. All right, everybody, take care and we'll talk again soon.

Thought Behind Things
075 | What’s Happening With Uighurs In China? Ft. Shahid Raza

Thought Behind Things

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2021 94:19


Be part of our community by joining our Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/thoughtbehindthings In conversation with Shahid Raza, this episode further explores strategic relations around the globe and how it affects Pakistan. What is meant by superstate? How important Iran Turkey rail link is for Pakistan? What’s happening in Middle East today and in coming years how things will unfold? With UAE’s and Israel’s agreement, how geopolitical situation will change? What’s happening with MBS’s kingdom and USA? Have they become frenemies? With the world becoming multipolar, Europe is looking at post-American order. Where Shahid sees Europe in this new Eurasian dynamics? What’s happening between US and China? Will USA’s new form of propaganda work in 21st century? What’s happening with Uighurs in China? Tune in to know more on where Shahid sees Pakistan today and in coming 30 years! Follow us on Instagram: • https://www.instagram.com/thoughtbehindthings • https://www.instagram.com/muzamilhasan Shahid Raza’s Twitter: https://twitter.com/schaheid --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/syed-muzamil-hasan-zaidi3/support

What the Hell Is Going On
WTH is going on with the Beijing Olympics? Rep. Mike Waltz on why the US should boycott the 2022 Olympic Games

What the Hell Is Going On

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2021 34:43


The International Olympic Committee awarded the 2022 Winter Olympics to Beijing, providing the Chinese Communist Party both an economic and diplomatic platform to further the party line while ignoring its abuses against the Uighurs, Covid cover-up, and brutal crackdown on Hong Kong protesters.   With the Games just eleven months away, there is a growing debate in Congress about whether the US should send its athletes to Beijing. On this episode, Rep. Mike Waltz joined Dany and Marc to explain why he believes America should boycott the 2022 Olympic Games.    Congressman Waltz represents Florida’s 6th congressional district. He graduated from the Virginia Military Institute and served over twenty years in the US Army. Rep. Waltz is a combat-decorated Green Beret and former White House and Pentagon policy advisor. https://www.aei.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/3.31.21-Mike-Waltz-transcript.pdf (Download the transcript here.)

The Cyberlaw Podcast
Can Editorial Middleware Cut the Power of the Big Platforms?

The Cyberlaw Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2021 75:06


Our interview this week is with Francis Fukuyama, a fellow and teacher at Stanford and a renowned scholar and public intellectual for at least three decades. He is the coauthor of the Report of the Working Group on Platform Scale. It's insightful on the structural issues that have enhanced the power of platforms to suppress and shape public debate. It understands the temptation to address those issues through an antitrust lens – as well as the reasons why antitrust will fail to address the threat that platform power poses to our democracy. As a solution, it proposes to force the platforms to divest their curatorial authority over what Americans (and the world) reads, creating a host of middleware suppliers who will curate consumers' feeds in the way that consumers prefer. We explore the many objections to this approach, from first amendment purists to those, mainly on the left, who really like the idea of suppressing their opponents on the right. But it remains the one policy proposal that could attract support from left and right and also make a real difference. In the news roundup, Dmitri Alperovich, Nick Weaver, and I have a spirited debate over the wisdom of Google's decision to expose and shut down a western intelligence agency's use of zero day exploits against terrorist targets. I argue that if a vulnerabilities equities process balancing security and intelligence is something we expect from NSA, it should also be expected of Google.  Nate Jones and Dmitri explore the slightly odd policy take on SolarWinds that seems to be coming from NSA and Cyber Command – the notion that the Russians exploited NSA's domestic blind spot by using US infrastructure for their attack. That suggests that NSA wants to do more spying domestically, although no such proposal has surface. Nate, Dmitri, and I are united in thinking that the solution is a change in US law, though Dmitri thinks a know your customer rule for cloud providers is the best answer, while I think I persuaded Nate that empowering faster and more automatic warrant procedures for the FBI is doable, pretty much as we did with the burner phone problem in the 90s. The courts, meanwhile, seem to be looking for ways to bring back a Potter Stewart style of jurisprudence for new technology and the fourth amendment: “I can't define it, but I know it when it creeps me out.” The first circuit's lengthy oral argument on how long video surveillance of public spaces can continue without violating the fourth amendment is a classic of the genre.  Dmitri and Nick weigh in on Facebook's takedown of Chinese hackers using Facebook to target Uighurs abroad. Dmitri thinks we can learn policy lessons from the exposure (and likely sanctioning) of the private Chinese companies that carried out the operation. Dmitri also explains why CISA's head is complaining about the refusal of private companies to tell DHS which US government agencies were compromised in SolarWinds. The companies claimed that their NDAs with, say, Treasury meant that they couldn't tell DHS that Treasury had been pawned. That's an all too familiar example of federal turf fights hurting federal cybersecurity.   In our ongoing feature, This Week in U.S.-China Decoupling, we cover the “Disaster in Alaska” evaluate the latest bipartisan bill to build a Western technology sphere to compete with China's sector, note the completely predictable process ousting of Chinese telecom companies from the US market, and conclude that the financial sector's effort to defy the gravity of decoupling will be a hard act to maintain.  Always late to embrace a trend, I offer Episode 1 of the Cyberlaw Podcast as a Non-Fungible Token to the first listener to cough up $150, and Nick explains why it would be cheap at a tenth the price, dashing my hopes of selling the next 354 episodes and retiring.  Nick and I have kind words for whoever is doxxing Russian criminal gangs, and I suggest offering the doxxer a financial reward (not just a hat tip in a Brian Krebs column. We fewer kind words have for the prospect that AI will soon be able to locate, track, and bankrupt problem gamblers.    I issue a rare correction to an earlier episode, noting that Israel may not have traded its citizens' health data for first dibs on the Pfizer vaccine. It turns out that what was deidentified aggregate health data, Israel offered Pfizer which with proper implementation may actually stay aggregate and deidentified. And I offer my own hat tip to Peter Machtiger, for a student note in an NYU law journal that cites the Cyberlaw Podcast, twice! And more! Download the 355th Episode (mp3)   You can subscribe to The Cyberlaw Podcast using iTunes, Google Play, Spotify, Pocket Casts, or our RSS feed. As always, The Cyberlaw Podcast is open to feedback. Be sure to engage with @stewartbaker on Twitter. Send your questions, comments, and suggestions for topics or interviewees to CyberlawPodcast@steptoe.com. Remember: If your suggested guest appears on the show, we will send you a highly coveted Cyberlaw Podcast mug! The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not reflect the opinions of their institutions, clients, friends, families, or pets.

Moderate Rebels
Debunking US accusation of China's 'genocide' against Uighurs

Moderate Rebels

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2021 30:32


Max Blumenthal documents the deceptions behind the US government's accusation that China is committing "genocide" against Uyghur Muslims in its Xinjiang region, picking apart NED-funded studies that rely on botched statistics and exposing extremist Adrian Zenz and his error-filled research. This was part of a panel discussion held on March 19, 2021, hosted on Daniel Dumbrill's channel. VIDEO: youtube.com/watch?v=qZkxaEC1xjY  

Whiskey and The Surfer
Zuckerg's Chicom Censor REDO1

Whiskey and The Surfer

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2021 19:59


Removed by Spotify. Zuckerberg's Chicom Censor Episode was removed due to a Takedown Request. I will have it up again on Monday along with a new Episode of Whiskey and The Surfer. Today we talk about today's Nazis joyfully demanding your compliance for your Safety as the Corporations prepare us for Eternal Global Climate Based Lockdowns. They have 1 Gimmick. Create Panic, Profit and Steal your Freedom and Wealth. It's 1 Gimmick in different forms they've used for 150+ years. The Variants gimmick is failing, will the Global Climate Emergency Hoax be scary enough to get you to abandon your faith in God and join the Forced Earth worship and The physical enslavement or mass murder that the Globe Cult will demand. See you on Monday with another Whiskey and The Surfer where we will break down the Satanic Symbolism and Global Dominance I found embedded inside of Disney.

Global News Podcast
China hackers 'target Uighurs on Facebook'

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2021 30:38


Social media giant says platform used to spy on activists, journalists and dissidents living abroad. Also: India halts AstraZeneca vaccine exports, the saliva test that detects concussion on the spot and are food apps killing the restaurant business.

China Unscripted
#110 Is China Committing “Genocide” Against the Uyghur Muslims?

China Unscripted

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2021 67:03


The world debates whether what the Chinese Communist Party is doing to Uyghur Muslims in Xinjiang, China is genocide. The US China relationship is strong thanks to decades of elite capture in Wall Street and Capitol Hill. Will the Biden Administration stand up for the Uyghurs? On this episode of China Unscripted, joining us is writer, linguist, Uyghur activist, and President of the President of the Uyghur Help Organization, Abduweli Ayup.

UnCommie Goods
EP24| Uighur You Goin?

UnCommie Goods

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2021 30:12


Today's show introduces listener mail, and a new tool called "The UnCommie-ometer" Listen to learn more. Use the Cultivate Chrome Browser Extension https://www.wecultivate.us/ to easily determine what is American Made on A China is systematically trying to depopulate and change the lifestyles of their Uighur minority population by splitting the young from home, putting them into labor and re-education camps thousands of miles from home, and not allowing many of them to leave the workdplace I discuss this issue covered by the BBC Article 1) 'If the others go I'll go': Inside China's scheme to transfer Uighurs into work https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-56250915 2) The study uncovered by a Uighur researcher proving the existence of the program to move Uighurs from their homeland into labor and re-education camps. Use a translate tool. http://web.archive.org/web/20200507161938/https://ciwe.nankai.edu.cn/2019/1223/c18571a259225/page.htm 3) The trade war comes to Walmart, Target and Macy's - This Article covers what percentage of goods are chinese made and sold from Target and Walmart. https://www.cnn.com/2019/05/23/business/china-tariffs-trump-trade-walmart-retail 4) Over 40 Percent of Amazon's Sellers Are Based in China https://www.pcmag.com/news/over-40-percent-of-amazons-sellers-are-based-in-china The UnCommie Good of the week (Not a sponsor), is the Sleep Master®Sleep Mask. https://amzn.to/3rbklD0 I have personally bought two of these, I left one in a hotel on a vacation, and I immediately bought a replacement. I love this thing, and as a light sleeper, the Sleep Master® Sleep Mask is essential for my well being. The Sleep Master® Sleep Mask really fits in with the theme of the last three episodes, which interviews with entrepreneurs that all happened to be in the fitness world. One important factor in being as fit as possible. Is good quality sleep! I've always been a light sleeper, and need to make my conditions as optimal to get a good night's sleep, and that's why i use the american made Sleep Master® Sleep Mask eliminates light and reduces sound, and I”ve been using it for years, way before I started this show, trying to make sure everything I buy is an UnCommie Good. The Sleep Master® Sleep Mask is lightweight, made of a soft, cool satin fabric mask, that is comfortable and breathable. Seriously, if you're a delicate sleeper, you're going to love the Sleep Master® Sleep Mask and it's around 20 bucks. Go To https://www.uncommiegoods.com/buy to see all the american made goods mentioned on this show. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lars207/message

Kings and Generals: History for our Future
2.42. History of the Mongols: Three Bad Ministers of Khubilai

Kings and Generals: History for our Future

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2021 26:14


"You must know that, as we shall tell you later on, the Great Kaan has entrusted to twelve men the task of attending, as seems best to them, to all territories, governments, and everything else. Among these twelve men, there was a Saracen, [Ahmad] by name, a shrewd and capable man, who above all others enjoyed great power and influence with the Great [Khan], who loved him so much that he gave him every liberty, for, as was found after his death, this [Ahmad] laid such a spell over the Kaan with his sorceries that the latter placed absolute faith in his words, paying them the closest attention. Thus he was able to do all that he wished. He it was who distributed all governments and offices, and punished all offenders. And every time he wished to encompass the death of someone he hated, whether justly or unjustly, he would go to the [Khan], and say, “Sire, such a man is worthy of death, for he has offended your Majesty in such a way.” Then the [Khan] would say, “Do what thou thinkest most fitting.” And straightway he would have the man put to death. Hence, seeing the complete liberty he enjoyed, and that the Lord placed absolute trust in his words, no one dared cross [Ahmad] in anything whatsoever.”   So the Venetian traveller Marco Polo, in the Benedetto translation, introduces Ahmad Fanakati, the famous “evil finance minister” of Khubilai Khan. Ahmad, the first of Khubilai’s “Three Villianous Ministers,” as they’re termed in the Chinese sources, is often used to symbolize the decay and corruption of Khubilai Khan’s final years. Where Khubilai had once been a vigourous monarch attending to every detail of state, by the 1280s  his interest and energy for governing declined with every year. Having taken you through the inconclusive, expensive and disastrous foreign miltiary expeditions of Khubilai’s last years, we shall now take you to the political and personal failings of Khubilai’s twilight, beginning with the Three Villianous ministers- Ahmad Fanakati, Lu Shih-Jing and Sangha. I’m your host David, and this is Kings and Generals, Ages of Conquest.   Ahmad, the first of the “Three Villianous Ministers,” was a Muslim from Central Asia who had been a favourite of Khubilai’s wife Chabi. Appointed to Khubilai’s Central Secretariat in 1262, Ahmad’s power and influence rapidly rose through his canny ability. For  a refresher on the secretariats and government structure of Khubilai, you can check back to episode 37, “Kublai Khan’s Reign.” By 1264, Ahmad was Vice-Chancellor of the Central Secretariat, and in 1271 was even briefly appointed as head of  the newly made Supreme Secretariat. His primary responsibility in Khubilai’s service was as a finance minister, tasked with providing the Great Khan more and more revenues. In this position he promoted trade, particularly with Central Asia and sought to increase the number of taxable households in the empire- usually by tracking down those who had escaped prior registration. Ahmad also oversaw further progress on implemention of regular land taxation, one of those ever-present problems of the Mongol administration in China, as well as new taxes on merchants. One of his most noteworthy efforts was the expansion of government monopolies; iron producing regions would have to provide yearly quotas of iron to the government, which would be turned into tools and farm implements to be sold back to farmers. After 1276 Ahmad forbade the private production of copper tools, making it a privilege of the government to produce and sell these, usually in exchange for grain. The yearly revenue from the strictly enforced salt monopoly increased dramatically over the 1270s and early 1280s, and monopolies on tea, liquor, vinegar, gold, silver - all traditional monopolies of the Chinese state- were enforced under Ahmad’s supervision.        None of Ahmad’s financial policies in and of themselves indicated an expectional cruelty on his part or hatred towards the Chinese. Rather, he was enacting the will of Khubilai, who was making ever increasing demands for income. Ahmad had to choose between more state revenues or looking to fail the Great Khan, and judged, rather wisely, it was better to come up with more revenue. Ahmad carried out his mandate thoroughly, and for this earned as much love as any thorough tax collector will- i.e, not very much. If we are to believe the sources, the Chinese at large hated and cursed him for his policies, and the fact that he was a foreignor. Khubilai, as Ahmad’s backer, thus found his own standing harmed in their eyes. However, whatever “public opinion” was regarding Ahmad does not particularly matter: the Mongols never showed themselves really concerned with how the masses viewed their ministers. The fact that Ahmad was bringing in the revenue streams and trying to handle the tricky task of incorporating the former Song territories into the Yuan Empire mattered more to Khubilai than the cursings of merchants.       The reason that Ahmad has become so infamous comes not from his taxation policy and treatment of the lower classes, but his treatment of the elite and other members of government: the ones who wrote the sources we use for learning of Ahmad’s career. Khubilai over the 1270s seems to have given minimal oversight to Ahmad, trusting him to get results and engaging less and less often in meetings. Left to run things how he desired, Ahmad sought to secure his position, placing  his friends, allies and family in government positions. One of his sons was placed into the lucrative position as darughachi of Hangzhou, the capital of the late Song Dynasty. He also sought to run his political foes out of the bureaucracy; in at least one case, a political enemy was hounded into execution. Often he butted heads with Khubilai’s other advisers, especially Confucians and Buddhists. The Chancellor of the Right, Antung, blocked an attempt by Ahmad to place a son in prominent position in Khubilai’s capital of Dadu; respected advisers like Shi Tienzi fought Ahmad’s tax policies. Their resistance brought the dissolution of Ahmad’s brief post as Administer of the Supreme Secretariat, and their collective complaints about a lack of oversight over Ahmad forced Khubilai to grant his son Jinggim authority over Ahmad’s actions. But as many of these most stalwart adivsers died off in the 1270s, Ahmad’s  power increased, and fewer voices were there to whisper against him. His influence grew so great that Rashid al-Din, a contemporary who served as vizier of the Ilkhanate, described Ahmad as the vizier of Khubilai’s Yuan Dynasty.       . Ahmad accused his remaining foes of embezzlement, adultery and “unbecoming personal conduct,” which succeeded in driving a number from office. Similar accusations were hurled back at Ahmad himself, pointing to cronyism, personal enrichment, taking bribes and manipulating gold and silver rates for his own gain. Detractors accused him of allowing and even promoting abuses in the system, and that his continued issuing of paper money was causing inflation and therefore encouraging the subjects to hoard their own gold and silver. The most famous accusation against Ahmad, repeated in the Yuan Shi, by Marco Polo and Rashid al-Din, is that he was a lechourous pervert, stealing wives, daughters and mothers for his insatiable sexual desires. To quote Marco Polo,    “There was no fair lady whom if [Ahmad] wanted her, he did not have at his will, taking her for wife if she was not married, or otherwise making her consent. And when he knew that anyone had some pretty daughter, he had his ruffians who went to the father of the girl saying to him, What wilt thou do? Thou hast this daughter of thine. Give her for wife to [Ahmad]  and we will make him give thee such a governorship or such an office for three years.”   Rashid al-Din for his part, is hardly more subdued in his description of Ahmad’s  “female interests,” stating simply that Ahmad had some forty-one wives and four hundred concubines. There was likely a bit of truth in these accusations: it seems Ahmad was engaging in cronyism, personal enrichment and a bit of adultery on the side, but the  scale of the issue was almost certainly overstated by his unsympathetic chroniclers. Further, none of these would be vices unique to Ahmad’s service in government. Regardless, it’s clear that there was a  lengthy conflict going on in the upper uchelons of the Yuan bureaucracy over the 1270s and 1280s, one which Khubilai seemed content to turn his gaze away from.       Notably, Ahmad had an openly poor relationship with the crown prince, Khubilai’s son Jinggim. According to Rashid al-Din, Jinggim’s dislike was so open for the finance minister that one day Jinggim struck Ahmad on the head with his bow, causing him to bleed profusely. Ahmad went before Khubilai, who inquired as to what had happened. Attempting to be diplomatic, Ahmad answered that he had been kicked by a horse, to which Jinggim, standing nearby, shouted “art thou ashamed to say that Jinggim hit thee?”, and then proceeded to punch Ahmad a number of times, right infront of Khubilai. Rashid al-Din and Marco Polo both agree that Ahmad lived in fear of Jinggim, which seems rather reasonable.   Interesting for this anecdote, Rashid al-Din is silent on Khubilai’s response to Jinggim’s assault, surprising given his usually pro-Khubilai stance. Rashid may have been uninterested in commenting on Khubilai allowing mistreatment of a long serving Muslim servant, or  it may have been that Khubilai, characteristic of this period, offered no response. Khubilai was either ignoring the open disputes rocking the top levels of his government, or completely oblivious to them, and remained content to focus on the revenue Ahmad was bringing in. Either option speaks to Khubilai’s growing disinterest in governance and dereliciton of his duties. Marco Polo, who adored Khubilai, sought to explain away his hero’s inaction by stating that Ahmad had bewitched the Khaan.        The tension with Ahmad and his foes reached a breaking point in April 1282. Every year, Khubilai and most of the royal court, including Jinggim, made the trek to the steppe to spend the summer in his secondary capital, Shangdu, the famous Xanadu of Marco Polo. It’s likely the Venetian accompanied them on the trip this year. While the Khan and crown prince were absent from the imperial capital of Dadu, Ahmad’s foes made their move- possibly with the tacit approval of Crown Prince Jinggim. The conspiracy was led by a Chinese fellow named Wang Zhu, who, if we are to believe Polo, had his mother, wife and daughter all fall prey to Ahmad’s urgings. One night the conspirators sent a messenger to Ahmad, telling him that Jinggim had returned unexpectedly and demanded to see him. The worried Ahmad came forth at once to the palace, where he found the conspirators sitting in a dark room lit by sparse candlelight. Bowing before whom he assumed to be Jinggim, the conspirators swung their swords and removed Ahmad’s head. The guards were quick to the scene and killed the perpators, sending a message at once to Khubilai of what had happened. A furious Khubilai returned quickly to Dadu and unleashed hell upon the conspirators still alive and buried Ahmad with full honours. But the survivors in time finally convinced the Khan of Ahmad’s digressions and lechery, though it seems the defining moment came when one of the “lost” jewels from one of Khubilai’s crowns miraculously turned up in the late Ahmad’s private residence. Marco Polo, who writes that he was at Khubilai’s attendance on his return to Dadu, vividly describes the Khan’s reaction. Roaring with anger, Khubilai had Ahmad’s sons and wives rounded up; those found guilty were flayed alive and their fortune confiscated. Ahmad’s body was exhumed and placed on display, it’s head removed and crushed by a cart; and the rest fed to Khubilai’s dogs.        So ended Ahmad’s tenure as finance minister and a purging of a number of his associates. Ahmad’s actions seem to have furthered an anti-Muslim policy Khubilai had been developing since 1279. The original incident which brought this on, according to Rashid al-Din, was a refusal of Muslim merchants to eat non-halal meat offered to them in Khubilai’s court, an offense which Khubilai took personally. Khubilai ordered that whosoever slaughtered animals in the Muslim fashion would in turn be killed and their family and property given over to whoever informed on them. Circumcisions were likewise forbidden, on pain of death. It also may have been an effort by Khubilai to placate some of the Chinese or even Mongols by making an appearance to restrict the privileges of Muslims in the government, and further encouraged by his anger at Ahmad Fanakati. Regardless of the cause, it resulted in a number of greedy individuals using Khubilai’s decree to kill Muslims and seize their property. Rashid al-Din indicates that a number of powerful and wealthy Muslim merchants in the 1280s chose to flee the Yuan realm, or refused to travel there in the first place, rather than face the Khan’s scruple-less enforcers. This reflects Khubilai’s inability to handle any religious matters carefully in these years. The man who had once headed a famed Buddhist-Taoist debate in the 1250s, now  responded to perceived abuses by Taoists in the 1270s and 80s with violence. A conflict between Taoists and Buddhists turned bloody in the streets of the imperial capital, and a group of Taoists attempted to frame Buddhists for a fire attack on a Taoist temple in Dadu. When the plot was discovered, Khubilai had the Taoists involved variously executed, their noses and ears chopped off, and others exiled. Continued circulation of certain Taoist texts banned after the earlier debate resulted, in 1281, with Khubilai ordering all Taoists texts other than Lao Tzu’s Tao Teo Ching to be burned and their printing blocks destroyed.  Restrictions were imposed on Taoist charms, incantations, and magic, while some Taoist monks were forcibly converted to Buddhism.        After Ahmad’s death in 1282, Khubilai promoted one of his associates, a Chinese named Lu Shih-Jung, to the post of Chancellor of the Left. In this position, he took over many of Ahmad’s former financial responsibilities, and subsequently earned himself the place as the Second of the Three Villianous Ministers. One may have assumed placing a Chinese in this position was intended to placate some of the anger felt at the Yuan financial system, though it did little good. While vitriol could be hurled at Ahmad for his actions, Ahmad himself  was not the source of the problems. The immense revenue demands of Khubilai and the Yuan government were not abating as more military expeditions were launched; the second invasion of Japan was undertaken in 1281, in 1282 Sogetu’s army landed in Champa and in 1283 an attack was launched on the kingdom of Pagan, in addition to the expenses of the court, the government and public works. It was  a thankless task to try and cover this, and Lu Shih-Jung found himself no better off than Ahmad. More monopolies were enforced, salt licenses were made more expensive, and rich households that were avoiding monopolies were cracked down on. He increased the issuance of paper money and tried to increase government control of the copper coinage and silver, which only contributed to the inflation. In an attempt to secure his position and actually carry out his policies, Lu Shih-jung sought to place his allies in power and run his enemies out of office. All this succeeded in doing was stiffening resistance against him, until finally Jinggim himself grew frustrated with him. Khubilai was finally forced to interact, having likewise turned a blind eye to the minister and court conflicts as long as the money kept coming in. On Jinggim’s urging, in early 1285 Khubilai dismissed Lu Shih-jung from office, had him arrested and by the end of the year, executed.       The last of the so-called Three Villianous Ministers was a Buddhist named Sangha, either a Uighur or Tibetan. Having supported Lu Shih-Jung and been in the staff of the ‘Phags-Pa Lama, Khubilai had long taken a liking to the experienced and capable Sangha. By 1275 he was placed in charge of the Office of Buddhist and Tibetan Affairs, and in 1280 successfully crushed a revolt in Tibet. After the deaths of Ahmad and Lu Shih-Jung his importance increased dramatically, culminating in his appointment as Chancellor of the Right in 1287 and expansion of his influence across the entire government. Like Ahmad and Lu Shih-Jung, Sangha also had the undesirable task of paying for Khubilai’s expenses, and likewise enforced monopolies and new taxes, to the ire of many. He tried to tackle the matter of inflation head on via currency reform instead of just printing more money. In 1287 he persuaded Khubilai to replace the existing paper money with a new unit, which the subjects were to exchange their current paper money for on a five-to-one basis. To put another way, Sangha was seeking to reduce the amount of money in circulation, and thereby reduce inflation. No matter how well meaning it was, it succeeded in angering many who felt they were devaluing themselves for notes of lesser value.        Perhaps the most notable project Sangha oversaw was the expansion of the Grand Canal to the capital of Dadu. Canals had long been a part of Chinese trade networks; as China’s many rivers generally flow west to east, speedier movement could be attained by digging north-south canals to connect them. Under the Sui and Tang Dynasties, when most of China’s north and south were unified, came the first great connections of these canals, tying the Yellow and Yangzi Rivers- China’s two great arteries- together in what  came to be called the Grand Canal. After the fall of the Tang, the division of China between Liao, Song and Jin had left little reason for the maintenance of these north-south canals, and the route was largely left to silt up. With unification under the Mongols, there was once again an impetus to restore it. While Khubilai had been quite  forward thinking in many respects to the requirements of his great capital of Dadu, he found that supplying it with its necessary grain was proving difficult. Khubilai wanted to use the great production regions of southern China and the former Song territory to supply Dadu, and initially hoped to rely on the coastal route, with ships making the long journey bearing the foodstuffs. While there was some successes here, the route was perilous. Shallow waters and storms off the Shandong Peninsula and Gulf of Bohai brought many of these shipments to the bottom of the sea. Such was the fate of over a quarter of the fleet bearing the grain in 1286. With the sea route too unreliable, it was decided to dig a proper canal to connect north and south- not only better supplying Khubilai’s capital, but tying his empire closer together as well. Some canal projects had started as early as 1283, but it was Sangha who suggested a massive, 217 kilometre, or 135 mile, expansion of a vast Canal to bring supplies right into Dadu. By February 1289 the bulk of the work was completed, with expansions over the 1290s which allowed ships to sail from Hangzhou right into the heart of Dadu. The Canal was an impressive structure- much of the Yuan canal system, with upgrades and expansion, remained in use until the 1850s when flooding irreparably damaged much of it. But it was a massive expense; some three million labourers had to be mobilized for the construction, and it required even further expenditure for basic maintenance to prevent it from silting up. Though it served its purpose in providing for the supply of Dadu, it was another cost that men like Sangha had to try and cover.       Another area Sangha found to help bring in further resources was to try to revitalize the Central Asia trade and increase taxes on merchants. In order to do this, Sangha needed to encourage the travel of Muslims to China, something hamphered by Khubilai’s anti-islamic promulgations. It took until 1287 for Sangha to succeed in getting Khubilai to rescind his bans on halal slaughter and the like- convincing Khubilai not on the basis of compassion, but on the revenues they would provide. In the following years Sangha did receive Khubilai’s support for schools for educating on Muslim languages and scripts to assist in trade contacts. This was rather typical of Sangha, who on a whole favoured many of the men from the ‘western regions,’ of China, what we today would deem ‘non-Han’ peoples. Muslims, Tibetans, Uighurs, all found protection and patronage from Sangha. All of his major-apointees to positions of power came from these non-Chinese groups, which of course did little to endear him to his Chinese enemies. Like his predeceassors, he forced his enemies from their offices and appointed his friends and allies. In the increasingly faction divided Yuan government, with little direct interference from an ever-more out-of-touch Khubilai, removing enemy voices and appointing friendly ones was one of the best means to not just stay in office, but actually enact some policies before they became bound up in intrigues and infighting. Of course, Sangha therefore suffered from the standard accusations of cronyism, enriching himself as well as intense sexual perversions. A particular offence which Sangha was said to have given support to, was when a Buddhist monk in his service descrecated and looted tombs of the former Song Emperors, and turned former Song palaces into Buddhist temples. Here was an issue which angered former Song subjects and literati combined and did little to endear the new Yuan masters in south China. With mounting pressure building against him, Sangha’s enemies conveniently “found” stolen pearls in his private residence. Khubilai had him removed from office, stripped of rank and title and executed over the course of 1291.       So ended the period of the “Three Villianous Ministers.” As the histories of these men were largely written by parties antagonistic to them, we should take many of the accusations with a grain of salt. Ahmad, Lu Shih-Jung and Sangha certainly had a little issue making the same accusations towards their political foes. What these episodes highlight is the ever widening divide between Khubilai Khan had the demands of government and the start of issues which would plague all of Khubilai’s Yuan successors: the seemingly impossible task to govern China while dealing with the costs of a top heavy court and military expenditure. None of them would be up to the task, and it is no wonder that Ahmad, Lu Shih-Jung and Sangha could not find the balance between meeting Khubilai’s demands and placating court opinions, particularly when Khubilai refused to intervene. The Three ministers became scape-goats for the issues of Khubilai’s government and served to illustrate the failures of the last years of Khubilai Khan. Our final episode on Khubilai looks at these years, so be sure to subscribe to the Kings and Generals Podcast to follow. If you’d like to help us continue bringing you great content, pelase cosnider supporting us on Patreon at www.patreon.com/kingsangenerals. This episode was researched and written by our series historian, Jack wilson. I’m your host David, and we’ll catch you on the next one. 

HARDtalk
Jewher Ilham: Fears for her Uighur family in China

HARDtalk

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2021 22:58


A combination of personal testimony, leaked documents and satellite imagery points to a systematic policy of repression of the Muslim Uighur population of Xinjiang province in China. Jewher Ilham, a young Uighur woman, currently living in America, tells Stephen Sackur about her campaign to save her father who has been imprisoned for the past 7 years. The fate of the Uighurs has become a geopolitical issue - but is anything going to change?

All Things
Episode 50: What's Going On Behind the Uighur Genocide?

All Things

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2021 32:30


The news is full of eye witness accounts and survivors’ testimonies of torture inside Uighur “reeducation” camps in Xinjiang, China. Last month the BBC released especially gruesome details of the extent of the human rights violations there. The US, Canada, and the Netherlands have called the actions “genocide.” On this episode of All Things I take a deep dive into understanding who the Uighurs are, the bigger picture behind why the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) is committing such heinous acts, and what the CCP’s goals are for cultural homogeneity and global domination. It becomes very personal as we come to terms with the reality that our insatiable appetite for consumer goods has played a role in the sinister cycle of human rights violations. Corporations like Disney, the NBA, and Apple all have a role too—not to mention the Olympics, which are slated to be in Beijing in Winter 2022. The world must act. What can be done? The following resources were used in the creation of this episode: Ask Your Congressperson to Support the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention ActThe Dispatch Podcast: China and the Uighur Genocide BBC The Real Story Podcast: Is China erasing Uighur culture? The Capitol Conversations Podcast: A Deep Dive on the US China Relationship with Micheal SobolikBBC News: 'Their goal is to destroy everyone': Uighur camp detainees allege systematic rapeThe New York Times: Disney Wanted to Make a Splash in China With ‘Mulan.’ It Stumbled Instead.World Magazine: Beijing’s Olympic reckoning?Uyghur Human Rights Project: What You Can DoCNet: Apple, like Coca-Cola and Nike, is lobbying on China forced-labor bill in CongressForbes: What China Is Really Up To In AfricaGenerous Justice Sermon by Tim Keller

The Women's Podcast
Ep 480 China’s detention of Uighur Muslims: “It’s a state of emergency”

The Women's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2021 49:18


China is facing mounting global criticism over its treatment of the mostly Muslim Uighur population in the north-western region of Xinjiang. Rights groups say China has detained more than a million Uighurs over the past few years in what the state says are "re-education camps". However there is evidence that Uighurs in these camps are being used as forced labour, that families are being separated and that women are being subjected to human rights violations including rape, forced marriage, torture and forced sterilisation. Countries including the US, the Netherlands and Canada have accused China of genocide and crimes against humanity, while more than 50 Irish faith leaders have signed a statement condemning the persecution of the Uighurs and other Muslims in China. But activists say the international community must take action to end what they say is the biggest concentration camp system since World War II. In today’s podcast, Róisín talks to Yara Alagha, a parliamentary researcher in Seanad Éireann for the Civil Engagement Group, and to American Uighur and activist, Aydin Anwar, about the horrendous situation for Uighurs in the formerly independent Republic of East Turkistan and what the international community can do to help.

Finding Humanity
[S02E05] Indoctrination and Torture: Stories of a Genocide From Uighur Women in China | Nursimangul Abdurashid and Mihrigul Tursun

Finding Humanity

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2021 37:55


Nursimangul Abdurashid and Mihrigul Tursun, two Uighur women, are risking their lives to share harrowing accounts of discrimination, death and torture suffered by the Uighur community in China. In the province of Xinjiang in northwestern China, it's been reported that at least one million Uighurs are detained in "re-education" camps — where Chinese authorities have committed human rights abuses against ethnic Uighur Muslims. Despite making up less than 2% of the national population, Xinjiang's prison population grew eightfold from 2016 to 2017, making up 21% of all arrests in China. Between 2017 to 2019, more than 80,000 Uighurs were forced to work in factories across China for little to no pay. Many argue that what the Uighurs are enduring is not simply a violation of human rights or even ethnic cleansing, but meets the United Nations definition of genocide. But who are the Uighurs? And what actually happens in these re-education camps? In this episode, we answer these questions and unpack the complex history of the Xinjiang region. We discuss cultural intolerance and how an anti-Islamic rhetoric after 9/11 led to the Chinese government's detention of ethnic Uighur Muslims. Featuring policy and advocacy insights from experts: Nury Turkel, Commissioner of United States Commission on International Religious Freedom and James A Millward, Professor of Inter-Societal History at the Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. -- Finding Humanity is a production of Humanity Lab Foundation and Hueman Group Media. Subscribe, rate, and leave us a review. For more information, visit findinghumanitypodcast.com. Follow us on Twitter @find_humanity and on Facebook @findinghumanitypod.

The New Yorker Radio Hour
Clubhouse Opens a Window for Free Expression in China

The New Yorker Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2021 14:57


Clubhouse is an audio-only social-media platform offering chat rooms on any subject, allowing thousands of people to gather and listen to each other. Jiayang Fan, who often reports on China, tells David Remnick that the chance to talk in private and without a text trail has opened a window of free expression for Chinese users. (Recently, some questions have been raised about whether the app is as secure as its makers claim.) Suddenly, in chat rooms with names like “There is a concentration camp in Xinjiang?,” Chinese users are able to address politically taboo subjects out loud in large groups. A Clubhouse chat-room moderator explains to Fan that for Han Chinese, who are the beneficiaries of the government’s persecution of Uighurs and other ethnic minorities, the app offers a space for reckoning and protest comparable to America’s Black Lives Matter movement. The government has clamped down on Clubhouse, but tech-savvy young people are used to finding workarounds.

The New Yorker: Politics and More
Clubhouse Opens a Window for Free Expression in China

The New Yorker: Politics and More

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2021 14:02


Clubhouse is an audio-only social-media platform offering chat rooms on any subject, allowing thousands of people to gather and listen to each other. Jiayang Fan, who often reports on China, tells David Remnick that the chance to talk in private and without a text trail has opened a window of free expression for Chinese users. (Recently, some questions have been raised about whether the app is as secure as its makers claim.) Suddenly, in chat rooms with names like “There is a concentration camp in Xinjiang?,” Chinese users are able to address politically taboo subjects out loud in large groups. A Clubhouse chat-room moderator explains to Fan that for Han Chinese, who are the beneficiaries of the government’s persecution of Uighurs and other ethnic minorities, the app offers a space for reckoning and protest comparable to America’s Black Lives Matter movement. The government has clamped down on Clubhouse, but tech-savvy young people are used to finding workarounds.

SkyWatchTV Podcast
Five in Ten 2/24/21: The Pope and the Moon-God

SkyWatchTV Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 24, 2021 18:00


Pope Francis will hold an inter-religion prayer service next week with Muslims, Yazidis, Mandaean-Sabaean, and other Iraqi religious minorities at the Great Ziggurat of Ur—a temple to the ancient moon-god of Sumer, Nanna. 5) SCOTUS punts on American election integrity; 4) Congress prepares to print another couple of trillion; 3) Canada declares China’s treatment of Uighurs a genocide over PM Trudeau’s objection; 2) New website offers interactive map for parents and students to track which universities teach Critical Race Theory; 1) Pope to host inter-religion prayer gathering at temple of moon-god in Ur.Pope Francis will hold an inter-religion prayer service next week with Muslims, Yazidis, Mandaean-Sabaean, and other Iraqi religious minorities at the Great Ziggurat of Ur—a temple to the ancient moon-god of Sumer, Nanna.  

Demography Unplugged with Neil Howe
GOP in Trouble, End of Split Ticket Voting, and the Plight of the Uighurs

Demography Unplugged with Neil Howe

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2021 86:32


In this latest issue of my weekly podcast, we discuss the current state of the GOP. Last week, ten Republican representatives voted to impeach--and seven Republican senators voted to remove--Donald Trump. That is the largest number of other-party senators voting for removal from office in U.S. history. A day later, Trump excoriated Mitch McConnell, calling into question his leadership. The GOP once prided itself on unity while the Democrats struggled to pull together. Now the tables have turned. The GOP needs Biden to do very badly to have a good chance in 2024--or maybe even 2022.The number of split delegations in the Senate has fallen to its lowest since the direct election of senators began in 1914. Only six states now have senators from different parties; for most of the last century, this number hovered between 10 and 20.Three Covid-19 Mutation Takeaways: 1. The newest variants have become mostly resistant to the sera of people infected with older variants. 2. The newest variants are becoming increasingly resistant to the sera of vaccinated persons. 3. The newest variants clearly mutate in real-time in response to changes in the human environment.Is China committing genocide? In Northwest China, one million Uighurs have been forced into "re-education"/concentration camps. The Uighurs have been forced into factory work with reports of sterilizing the women and separating children from their families. The US and other Western nations have debated whether what is happening in Xinjiang Province is a full-fledged genocide or a (perhaps less sinister?) cultural genocide. This debate coincides with Biden and China clashing over other flashpoints like Honk Kong, Taiwan, and oh yes coup-stricken Myanmar, a "friend" of China that is facing its own genocide charges. **********The content featured here is a small part of Hedgeye’s Demography Unplugged, a game-changing market intelligence product brought to you by historian, demographer and best-selling author Neil Howe. Visit us to find out more and subscribe.

The Glenn Beck Program
Coke Says Be Less White | Guests: Joe Bastardi & James Kitchen | 2/22/21

The Glenn Beck Program

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2021 122:01


The Democrats’ new COVID relief bill would send tons of aid to Silicon Valley for electric trains. What would a $15 minimum wage actually do to small businesses? WeatherBELL chief forecaster Joe Bastardi joins to discuss how the Left has weaponized climate change to dictate policy. Attorney James Kitchen brings the latest on the Canadian pastor who was imprisoned for breaking lockdown rules. Is the globe heading down the same path as the 1930s in ignoring China’s treatment of Uighurs? Some Coca-Cola employees were given a training asking them to be less white. Dr. Karlyn Borysenko, who exposed the training, joins to discuss how widespread it actually is, as Coke tries to explain away its decision. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Michael Knowles Show
Ep. 705 - Being Less White

The Michael Knowles Show

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2021 48:36


A corporate training enjoins employees to “be less white,” Joe Biden writes off China’s genocide of the Uighurs as a “cultural norm,” and Dr. Fauci won’t let you hug grandma.

The Grimerica Show
#480 - John Neira

The Grimerica Show

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2021 126:14


Atlantis Teaser - 27:50 Interview starts at 37:25 John Neira from China joins us again for an update almost 1 year from when the Kung Flu made it’s way around the world. We chat about how China seems to be more honest in their stats yet their freedoms are still within certain boundaries. Small freedoms abound but are they really?    Most of the people their don’t even know about the Uighurs situation. We talk about social credit, tracking through the apps, kids in schools and when they will crack down on dissent.    We also chat about new forms of kickstarter, autonomous zones, health care coins, Tom Woods show on healthcare directly through the doctors,  Rife machine, running away from censorship, and patents on the block chain.    See link to his ymop   http://www.ymop.us/   In the intro we talk about launching on Rokfin after getting two more YouTube strikes. They are coming after everything Big Pharma / Covid related it seems. Welcome to the dystopian novel we are living in. We talk about listener feedback and synchronicities and a letter response from the Government about the masks and lock downs. Rokfin.com/grimerica   See links to stuff we chatted about during the show and the intro:   http://www.royal-rife-machine.com/   https://tomwoods.com/ep-481-how-capitalism-can-fix-health-care/     Please help support the show…. Grimerica’s DoBeDoBeDo List: Grimerica is fully and solely listener supported. We adhere to the Value for Value model.  0 ads, 0 sponsorships, 0 breaks, 0 portals and links to corporate websites… just many hours of unlimited content for free. Thanks for listening!!   Get your Magic Mushrooms delivered from: Mushroom Spores, Spore Syringes, Best Spore Syringes, Grow Mushrooms   Spores Lab   Other shows: https://www.grimericaoutlawed.ca https://www.13questionspodcast.com/  - 13 Questions ran by Adam and Bill.    Audio Book page: www.adultbrain.ca   Join the chat / hangout with a bunch of fellow Grimerican’s: www.grimerica.ca/chats and/or  www.grimerica.ca/social   1-403-702-6083 Call and leave a voice mail or send us a text   Support the show directly: http://www.grimerica.ca/support https://www.patreon.com/grimerica  http://www.grimericaoutlawed.ca/support   GrimericaFM  https://s2.radio.co/s053ed3122/listen   Check out our next trip/conference/meetup - Contact at the Cabin www.contactatthecabin.com   Leave a review on iTunes and/or Stitcher https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/the-grimerica-show/id653314424?mt=2# http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-grimerica-show    Sign up for our newsletter http://www.grimerica.ca/news Leave a comment, ideas and guest/topic suggestions under any episode or blog http://www.grimerica.ca/   SPAM Graham = and send him your synchronicities, feedback, strange experiences and psychedelic trip reports!! graham@grimerica.com InstaGRAM  https://www.instagram.com/the_grimerica_show_podcast/    Tweet Darren https://twitter.com/Grimerica   Connect through other platforms: https://www.reddit.com/r/grimerica/  https://gab.ai/Grimerica    Purchase swag, with partial proceeds donated to the show www.grimerica.ca/swag Send us a postcard or letter http://www.grimerica.ca/contact/ Check out https://www.champignonmagique.ca http://www.lostbreadcomic.com/ link to Napolean Duheme's site  Felix’s Site sirfelix.bandcamp.com   Christmas Carol Video   MUSIC Grimerica Theme - Lock & Key  Should I - Sir Felix Ortega II

The Dispatch Podcast
China and the Uighur Genocide

The Dispatch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2021 61:13


In a call with European foreign ministers on Thursday, Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken said he would begin steps to restore the 2015 Iran nuclear deal that was abandoned by the Trump administration. Today’s guest, Tom Josclelyn, thinks a series of upfront concessions to Tehran before the country’s leaders even come to the negotiating table would be an unwise foreign policy move for the Biden administration. “I’ve taken to calling it ‘servile diplomacy’ because it is very much from a submissive position,”Joscelyn tells Sarah and Steve. Tune in to hear our hosts’ take on China’s ongoing genocide against the Uighurs in Xinjiang, and the latest rocket attack on a U.S. airbase in Iraq.   Show Notes: -“Biden Administration Formally Offers to Restart Nuclear Talks With Iran” by Lara Jakes, Michael Crowley, David E. Sanger and Farnaz Fassihi in the New York Times. -“Biden dismisses Uighur genocide as part of China’s ‘different norms’” by Emily Jacobs in the New York Post. -“‘Genocide’ is the wrong word for the horrors of Xinjiang” by the Economist. -Tom Joscelyn’s Vital Interests newsletter. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Todd Herman Show
Hour 1: Conservative News

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2021 36:20


WA Dems try to create unemployment program for illegal immigrants with almost no vetting. The important Olympia stories that were only reported by Conservatives in the State. // Fauci Awarded $1 Million Israeli Prize For 'Speaking Truth To Power' Amid Pandemic // Joe Biden on China’s human rights violations and genocide against the Uighurs: “culturally there are different norms” -- Shameful. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Neoliberal Podcast
The Uighur Genocide ft. Megha Rajagopalan & Alison Killing

The Neoliberal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2021 79:16


How and why is China imprisoning millions of Uighurs in their western province of Xinjiang? BuzzFeed News journalists Megha Rajagopalan and Alison Killing join the podcast to talk about how their reporting uncovered a vast network of secret internment camps in Xinjiang.  We discuss how they found the camps despite coverups from the CCP, what life is like for Uighurs and other ethnic minorities in those camps, and why China continues to commit human rights violations in Xinjiang at a massive scale. Read Megha and Alison's groundbreaking work on BuzzFeed News: https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/meghara/china-new-internment-camps-xinjiang-uighurs-muslims https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/alison_killing/china-ex-prisoners-horrors-xinjiang-camps-uighurs https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/meghara/inside-xinjiang-detention-camp https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/alison_killing/xinjiang-camps-china-factories-forced-labor To make sure you hear every episode, join our Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/neoliberalproject. Patrons get access to exclusive bonus episodes, our sticker-of-the-month club, and our insider Slack.  Become a supporter today! Got questions for the Neoliberal Podcast?  Send them to mailbag@neoliberalproject.org Follow us at: https://twitter.com/ne0liberal https://www.facebook.com/groups/1930401007051265/   Join a local chapter at https://neoliberalproject.org/join  

What Next | Daily News and Analysis
TBD | How Clubhouse Cracked China’s Firewall

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 12, 2021 26:52


For most of the last year, Clubhouse—the audio-only social media app—has been dominated by conversations about business, branding, and Elon Musk. But as users picked up the app around the globe, something extraordinary happened.   Censors in mainland China overlooked it. And for two weeks in February, it hosted a series of unusual, unfiltered conversations. Han Chinese, Hong Kongers, Taiwanese, and Uighurs all flooded to the app to speak freely about authoritarianism, democracy, and propaganda.  Here’s what happened when the censors looked the other way.  Guest:  Melissa Chan, journalist with the Global Reporting Centre Host Lizzie O’Leary   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Slate Daily Feed
What Next TBD: How Clubhouse Cracked China’s Firewall

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 12, 2021 26:52


For most of the last year, Clubhouse—the audio-only social media app—has been dominated by conversations about business, branding, and Elon Musk. But as users picked up the app around the globe, something extraordinary happened.   Censors in mainland China overlooked it. And for two weeks in February, it hosted a series of unusual, unfiltered conversations. Han Chinese, Hong Kongers, Taiwanese, and Uighurs all flooded to the app to speak freely about authoritarianism, democracy, and propaganda.  Here’s what happened when the censors looked the other way.  Guest:  Melissa Chan, journalist with the Global Reporting Centre Host Lizzie O’Leary   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Real Story
Is China erasing Uighur culture?

The Real Story

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 12, 2021 49:28


This week, lawyers in London concluded that the genocide of Uighur Muslims in Xinjiang province by the Chinese government is a ‘very credible’ allegation. The London based court also said that it is ‘plausible’ that the country’s president, Xi Jinping, is driving that policy. The allegation of genocide - levelled by Uighur activists, international human rights groups, as well as the US Secretary of State Antony Blinken - stems from an industrial scale crackdown in China’s Xinjiang province which has seen more than a million Uighurs and other ethnic minority Muslims imprisoned in a vast network of camps, where people say they have been subjected to rape and torture. The Chinese government has vehemently rejected the claims. It says measures are necessary to put an end to violent attacks in the region and it describes the facilities as re-education centres. So, what do we know about what is really going on in Xinjiang? Is there any merit to China’s argument about the need to defeat violent extremism in the region? Why is the Communist party intent on assimilating Uighurs into Han Chinese cultural traditions? How much is Xi Jinping’s vision for China behind it, and to what extent is Uighur culture - with its unique history and traditions - at risk of being destroyed in Beijing’s plan? Ritula Shah and a panel of expert guests discuss whether China is erasing Uighur culture.

Issues, Etc.
0414. President Biden and the Persecution of Uighurs in China – Nina Shea, 2/10/21

Issues, Etc.

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 10, 2021 22:57


Nina Shea of the Hudson Institute’s Center for Religious Freedom Biden’s Choice in China The Hudson Institute’s Center for Religious Freedom

The Audio Long Read
'Our souls are dead': how I survived a Chinese 're-education' camp for Uighurs

The Audio Long Read

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 5, 2021 30:03


After 10 years living in France, I returned to China to sign some papers and I was locked up. For the next two years, I was systematically dehumanised, humiliated and brainwashed. By Gulbahar Haitiwaji with Rozenn Morgat. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

Axios Today
Biden's civic challenge

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2021 10:53


Today, Joe Biden and Kamala Harris will take the oath of office and begin their terms as President and Vice President of the United States. It's a historic inauguration without crowds or celebrations but one that Axios' managing editor Margaret Talev says fits the tenor of the moment. Plus, Trump's final move on China. Guests: Axios' Margaret Talev and Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian. Credits: "Axios Today" is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Dan Bobkoff, Carol Wu, Cara Shillenn, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Naomi Shavin and Alex Sugiura. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. Go deeper: Trump gives farewell address: "We did what we came here to do" U.S. declares China's actions against Uighurs "genocide" Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Apple News Today
The fate of the Senate comes down to Georgia

Apple News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2020 9:44


Politico reports on why President-elect Biden is campaigning for Democrats in Georgia’s runoff election. And Politico also reveals that President Trump is using the Georgia race to fundraise for his own PAC. The Guardian dives into a recent report that found significant evidence that China may be forcing members of ethnic minority groups, including Uighurs, to pick cotton on a scale far greater than previously thought. The jihadi group Boko Haram claimed responsibility for kidnapping more than 300 schoolboys in Nigeria. The Wall Street Journal has the story. The Wall Street Journal says there are major delays to package deliveries, and warns that with the backlog only set to worsen, it’s past time to finish up online holiday shopping.