Podcasts about schumann

German composer

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New Classical Tracks with Julie Amacher
Guitarist David Starobin celebrates one of his musical idols

New Classical Tracks with Julie Amacher

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2023 38:45


David Starobin — Giulio Regondi: A 200th Birthday Bouquet (Bridge) Jump to giveaway form New Classical Tracks - David Starobin by “I retired from playing four years ago,” guitarist David Starobin says. I didn't have all that much time to deal with my playing until I stopped playing. Despite retiring from performing, he still teaches at the Curtis Institute in Philadelphia and the Manhattan School of Music. He also runs an art gallery and produces records for his label, Bridge Records. One of those releases, Giulio Regondi: A 200th Birthday Bouquet, celebrates one of Starobin‘s musical idols, the Swiss-born composer, guitarist and concertinist Giulio Regondi. “As a composer, he wrote the finest romantic guitar music from the mid-1800s. This was when you had Mendelssohn, Schumann and amazing composers writing romantic music that we consider great repertoire,” Starobin says. “Everything about his music appealed to me,” he says. “His life story is unbelievable. He was a child prodigy who played before every European court by the time he was 9. He then emigrated with his stepfather to England and had a very successful career there, and then something strange happened. “He encountered a scientist, Charles Wheatstone, who had invented the concertina. Regondi was the first person to try this instrument when he was just 12. For the rest of his life, he alternated concerts between the guitar and the concertina, but he wrote most of his music for concertina.” Why did you transcribe his concertina etudes for guitar? “There's a real lack of repertoire, especially for my students who could play intermediate Regondi. This fills a gap in the guitar repertoire regarding learning romantic style and the necessary contrapuntal voicing that his music requires. “The best piece compositionally on the record is his second etude. It traverses all sorts of keys. It starts in a minor and works through a series of keys that ends in C-sharp major. That work, essentially a slow piece, offers the most opportunity to sing lyrically. “When I was listening to Fete Villageoise, for example, there's a beautiful melody, but the way it's played and presented has a lovely sense of delicacy. I don't know if that's the right way to describe it, but that's what I'm hearing. “One of the main reasons that I fell in love with this man's music was the certain intimacy that he achieves in expression. What Regondi does is give enough harmonic variety in the music so that it colors what he's writing in a very different way for the guitar than other composers of that period.” Watch now To hear the rest of my conversation, click on the extended interview above, or download the extended podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Giveaway Time For Three New Classical Tracks Giveaway You must be 13 or older to submit any information to American Public Media/Minnesota Public Radio. The personally identifying information you provide will not be sold, shared, or used for purposes other than to communicate with you about things like our programs, products and services. See Terms of Use and Privacy. This giveaway is subject to the Official Giveaway Rules. Resources David Starobin — Giulio Regondi: A 200th Birthday Bouquet (Bridge Store) David Starobin — Giulio Regondi: A 200th Birthday Bouquet (Amazon)

Dawg Walk Talk on Georgia Football
Glenn Schumann not going to Bama – what it means for the Dawgs

Dawg Walk Talk on Georgia Football

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 6, 2023 64:48


Glenn Schumann's decision says some things about the state of College Football's power balance. Plus: more on the Senior Bowl & Brock Bowers Follow DawgsHQ: Twitter Instagram Facebook Sweet Dawgs apparel and merch – the NIL Collection at BreakingT: https://breakingt.com/collections/georgia-bulldogs?rfsn=6311061.c4cc310 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Arabesques
La pianiste Beatrice Rana : itinéraire d'une musicienne prodige. De Clara Schumann à Béla Bartók (2/2)

Arabesques

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 3, 2023 88:52


durée : 01:28:52 - La pianiste Beatrice Rana (2/2) - par : François-Xavier Szymczak - Elle n'a que trente ans, mais déjà une carrière internationale exceptionnelle. De Jean-Sébastien Bach à Leonard Bernstein, la discographie de cette enfant des Pouilles nous offre des merveilles

CSO Audio Program Notes
CSO Program Notes: Muti, Fischer & Tchaikovsky Manfred

CSO Audio Program Notes

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2023 21:40


Tchaikovsky's turbulent Manfred Symphony takes its inspiration from Lord Byron's dramatic poem about a world-weary traveler who wanders the Alps and is bewitched by supernatural forces. German violinist Julia Fischer, acclaimed for her “pure and fine-spun tone” (Chicago Tribune), joins Riccardo Muti and the CSO for Schumann's poetic and autumnal Violin Concerto. Explore the music in the free preconcert conversation featuring Daniel Schlosberg in Orchestra Hall 75 minutes before the performance. The conversation will last approximately 30 minutes. No additional tickets are needed. Classic Encounter Thursday, February 23: Preconcert lecture hosted by Chicago's favorite radio DJ, WXRT's Terri Hemmert, with co-host John Yeh, CSO assistant principal clarinet and E-flat clarinet. You will have the opportunity to add Classic Encounter to your order after selecting your seats for the concert. Learn more: cso.org/performances/22-23/cso-classical/muti-fischer-and-tchaikovsky-manfred

Arabesques
La Commedia dell'arte

Arabesques

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2023 88:34


durée : 01:28:34 - La Commedia dell'arte - par : François-Xavier Szymczak - Pierrot, Arlequin et Colombine n'ont cessé de fasciner les artistes depuis le XVIème siècle. Nous revenons sur cinq cent ans de musiques inspirées de la Commedia dell'arte, de Roland de Lassus à Claude Debussy, en passant par Paisiello, Schumann, Fauré, Schönberg, Leoncavallo ou Richard Strauss

Countermelody
Episode 181. Nicolai Gedda in Song

Countermelody

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 84:08


Today's episode is a special request from one of my most dedicated listeners, and one with which I am happy to comply. It is already seven years this month since the death of the great Swedish tenor Nicolai Gedda (11 July 1925 – 8 January 2017). One of the most cultivated singers of the twentieth century, Gedda not only had a rock-solid technique and an instantly recognizable timbre, but he was a brilliant musician and a polyglot of the first order, singing a wide range of repertoire and styles in a host of languages. He was also a prolific recording artist. Though he sang an enormous range of operatic roles, in this episode, I have decided to focus entirely on a slightly lesser-known aspect of his career: his work in art song. Gedda was a master of French style, but also celebrated for his performances of Russian music. And one of the three languages he spoke while he was growing up was German, which lends his work in that language a real authenticity as well. In listening to recordings of song repertoire, I was struck by the frequent added spontaneity and commitment of his live versus his studio performances, so the episode features a large number of selections culled from Gedda's live recitals. Gedda is accompanied by some of the most exceptional pianists of his time: Alexis Weissenberg, Wolfgang Sawallisch, Gerald Moore, Geoffrey Parsons, Dalton Baldwin, Erik Werba, Hermann Reutter, and his compatriot and most frequent collaborator Jan Eyron. Another extraordinary aspect of Gedda's singing was his longevity. We hear him in songs by Strauss, Berlioz, Schubert, Janáček, Duparc, Grieg, Schumann, Fauré, Respighi, and Gounod, recorded over a period of nearly 40 years. Here is another singer who was active into the twilight of his life and sang into his seventies with both the intimacy and clarion power that were his musical trademarks. Countermelody is a podcast devoted to the glory and the power of the human voice raised in song. Singer and vocal aficionado Daniel Gundlach explores great singers of the past and present focusing in particular on those who are less well-remembered today than they should be. Daniel's lifetime in music as a professional countertenor, pianist, vocal coach, voice teacher, and journalist yields an exciting array of anecdotes, impressions, and “inside stories.” At Countermelody's core is the celebration of great singers of all stripes, their instruments, and the connection they make to the words they sing. By clicking on the following link (https://linktr.ee/CountermelodyPodcast) you can find the dedicated Countermelody website which contains additional content including artist photos and episode setlists. The link will also take you to Countermelody's Patreon page, where you can pledge your monthly support at whatever level you can afford. Bonus episodes available exclusively to Patreon supporters are currently available and further bonus content including interviews and livestreams is planned for the upcoming season.

The Midday Show
Is Todd Monken or Glenn Schumann more likely to leave Georgia Bulldogs next season

The Midday Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 1:14


DawgNation Daily Host Brandon Adams talks about whether he thinks Glenn Schumann or Todd Monken is more likely to leave the Georgia Bulldogs football program over the next year. 

Talking Dawgs: A UGA Football and Basketball podcast
Where Does Glen Schumann End Up?

Talking Dawgs: A UGA Football and Basketball podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 33:24


Glen Schumann may be out to Alabama, or is he? We honor Devin Willock and Chandler LeCroy as well as talk Mike White and this incredible basketball team so far. Daniel and Clint talk about the Dawgs the way you would if you had a podcast. M-F Everywhere podcasts are found. Football. Basketball. College Sports. Locked On Podcast Georgia. Your team, everyday. Twitter: dawgspodcast Grab some merch here! https://www.bonfire.com/store/the199/ We'd like to thank LinkedIn Jobs for being the official College Football Recruiting sponsor across the Locked On College Network. LinkedIn jobs helps you find the candidates you want to talk to, faster. Post your job for free at LinkedIn Dot Com slash lockedoncollege. Terms and conditions apply. LinkedIn LinkedIn Jobs helps you find the qualified candidates you want to talk to, faster. Post your job for free at LinkedIn Dot Com slash lockedoncollege. That's LinkedIn Dot Com slash lockedoncollege to post your job for free. Terms and conditions apply. BetOnline Today's Episode is brought to you by BetOnline. BetOnline has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts!   Channel List:   Sling CFB Networks: ACC Network ACC Network Extra Big Ten Network FOX FS1 FS2 Longhorn Network NBC Pac-12 Network SEC Network SEC Network+ TBS TNT USA   LinkedIn LinkedIn jobs helps you find the candidates you want to talk to, faster. Post your job for free at Linkedin.com/lockedoncollege Terms and conditions apply.   Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKEDON15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order.   BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts!   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

CURSO DE FILOSOFÍA
Curso de Filosofía: La extensión del Positivismo en el XIX.

CURSO DE FILOSOFÍA

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 22:25


Un saludo amigos. Hoy os propongo una introducción a la extensión del Positivismo por Europa y América. ¿Qué es el materialismo? El positivismo es materialista. Introducción del positivismo en Alemania. ***** Música de la época: composición de Schumann de 1850, su concierto para Violonchelo. ****** Pulsen un Me Gusta y colaboren a partir de 2,99 €/mes si se lo pueden permitir para asegurar la permanencia del programa ¡Muchas gracias a todos!

Get Better at Beach Volleyball
Episode #54: Damien Schumann's Rock Solid Techniques to Beat the Best Blocker of All Time

Get Better at Beach Volleyball

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 122:38


How to beat the best blocker of all time?! You have to master all these rock-solid techniques to make it possible for you to hit the ball through the blocking line of the opposing team successfully. Take a listen to the latest episode of the Mark Burik and Brandon Joyner coaching podcast with Olympian Damien Schumann.

C’est dans la poche ! Le podcast de l’Auditorium-Orchestre national de Lyon
Robert Schumann - Konzertstück pour quatre cors et orchestre par Clément Rochefort (France Musique) ๏ C'est dans la poche ! #55 ๏ Auditorium-Orchestre national de Lyon

C’est dans la poche ! Le podcast de l’Auditorium-Orchestre national de Lyon

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 8:36


๏ Épisode 55 ๏ Cor naturel, cor chromatique ? Connaissez-vous la différence entre ces deux versions d'un même instrument ? Dans ce nouvel épisode, Clément Rochefort retrace l'histoire de cet instrument ancestral considéré comme l'instrument romantique par excellence chez des compositeurs germaniques comme Wagner ou Schumann. Instruments majestueux à la sonorité magique et à l'imaginaire fort, les cors fascinent Schumann qui les met à l'honneur dans son très original Konzertstück et les fait dialoguer avec tout un orchestre dans une virtuosité ébouriffante ! ▂

From the Top
Schumann, Haydn, and a Joyful Gospel Choir

From the Top

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 69:24


Violinist Charles Yang returns as co-host. We meet a bubbly teen violinist, a pianist with a mission to connect with audiences, and a cellist who opens up about mental health. The Washington Performing Arts Children of the Gospel Choir sing us out with a performance that will have you on your feet and smiling!

The Empath Podcast
70 | Resting before you are tired — restorative practices for sensitive business owners (w/ Jamie Schumann)

The Empath Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023


Happy new year! To kick off this new year, I'm inviting Jamie Schumann (Collective Inner Garden) onto the podcast to deep dive into restorative practices for sensitive business owners. Jamie is a Breathwork Facilitator and in this episode we talk about resting before you are tired, remothering ourselves as business owners, creating from a place of sustainment + knowing how to nourish ourselves and the difference between acting and just ‘carrying busy energy out'. We also dive into Jamie's story through chronic illness to being here, now, offering Breathwork. To close the episode out, Jamie shares a breathing technique for opening up the throat chakra and helping with self-consciousness — definitely a tool you want to bring into your new year as you show up more + take up space with your work. LISTEN ON SPOTIFY or apple podcasts About Jamie:Jamie is a former career counselor turned Breathwork Facilitator who loves creating expansive experiences for herself and others through holistic, practical and radical self-care. She created Collective Inner Garden for sharing how she uses breathwork and other simple self-care practices as a way to build self-awareness, self-love, self-trust, and self-acceptance for embodying wholeness. It represents a garden of seeds she's planted for herself to help you along with watering yours. Learn more about Jamie + her work at www.collectiveinnergarden.com. New to the podcast? Hi! I'm Robin! Host of The Empath Podcast & creator of the Empaths in Business program. Empaths in Business starts again January 15th. Join us at www.empathsinbusiness.com

Le Disque classique du jour
Soirée de Vienne - Rudolf Buchbinder

Le Disque classique du jour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 14:30


durée : 00:14:30 - Soirée de Vienne - Rudolf Buchbinder - Le dernier album du pianiste Rudolf Buchbinder, Soirée de Vienne, présente des musiques de Beethoven, Chopin, Schubert, Schumann et Strauss et célèbre sa ville natale.

Georgia Bulldogs
Glenn Schumann, Bulldog Co-Defensive Coordinator

Georgia Bulldogs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 5:30


Dan Mathews sits down with the man ready to shut down the Buckeye offense and continue the legacy of the Junkyard Dawg defense.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WDR 3 Meisterstücke
Die Königin unter den Flussmusiken - An der schönen blauen Donau

WDR 3 Meisterstücke

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 12:57


Walzerkönig Johann Strauss komponierte 1866 nicht weniger als Wiens heimliche Nationalhymne - natürlich im Dreivierteltakt. "Alles, was über das Thema Wien Schmeichelhaftes gesagt werden kann", meinte ein Kritiker über das Stück, mit dem Strauss auch in den USA Triumphe feierte. (Autor: Dominik Mercks) Von Dominik Mercks.

Grandes ciclos
Grandes ciclos - Epílogo (VIII): Reverencia al cielo - 22/12/22

Grandes ciclos

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 56:51


BRAHMS: Sonata para violoncello y piano nº 1 en Mi menor, Op. 38 (Primer movimiento: Allegro non troppo) (14.32). J.-G. Queyras (vc.), A. Tharaud (p.). Sinfonía nº 4 en Mi menor, Op. 98 (Primer movimiento: Allegro non troppo) (12.43). Orq. Fil. de Viena. Dir.: C. Kleiber. SCHUBERT: Impromptu nº 2 en Mi bemol mayor D 899 (4.40). R. Lupu (p.). SCHUMANN: Myrthen, Op. 25 (selec.) (nº 5 Lieder aus dem Schekenbuch im Divan I, nº 7 Die Lotosblume) (2.42). D. Fischer-Dieskau (bar.), J. Demus (p.). Escuchar audio

Follow the Lieder
Schubert's Winterreise: Der Leiermann

Follow the Lieder

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 65:21


Finally the end is upon us! It's hard to believe that after 16 episodes we've finally reached the end of our winter wanderings. While you might shed a tear or two over our wanderer's perplexing conclusion, you won't be too sad when you hear about all the great stuff we have in store for season 3 of Follow the Lieder. Stay tuned at the end of the episode for a special interview with Samuel Martin, the artistic founding director of Cincinnati Song Initiative. A very special thank you goes out to Dr. Tyler Reece for his incredible vocal collaboration throughout season 2!With guest vocalist Dr. Tyler ReeceEmoji stories for each episode by @teodoro.pianoDer Leiermann

Wellness Force Radio
SOLOCAST | Emotional Frequency: The Missing Link Between HRV, RMR + Vibration For Vibrant Health

Wellness Force Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 22:49


Wellness + Wisdom Episode 504 Wellness + Wisdom Podcast Host and Wellness Force Media CEO, Josh Trent, shares what the true essence of vibrations is. Are You Stressed Out Lately? Take a deep breath with the M21™ wellness guide: a simple yet powerful 21 minute morning system that melts stress and gives you more energy through 6 science-backed practices and breathwork. Click HERE to download for free. Is Your Energy Low? Get more superfoods to improve your energy, digestion, gut health plus also reduce inflammation and blood sugar. Click HERE to try Paleovalley's Apple Cider Vinegar Complex + Save 15% with the code 'JOSH' *Review The WF Podcast & WIN $150 in wellness prizes! *Join The Facebook Group In this solocast, you will learn: The globe vibrates at a herz frequency. How our emotions affect our vibrations. What it means that emotions dictate our physiology. Everything you need to know about an emotional frequency chart. Why each of our emotions has its own frequency. How understanding the emotional frequency chart can make you a better human. David Hawkin's research to develop the emotional scale. How a higher allows us to express our true nature. Most of us fluctuate between different frequencies all day long. What resting metabolic rate (RMR), non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT), and heart rate variability (HRV) are. How unprocessed trauma leads to hypervigilance and how we project onto others what we feel about ourselves. What it takes to overcome low-frequency emotional states. Why low vibrations make it harder for us to be loving. The importance of looking within us with love and compassion. How to identify what frequency you spend most of your time at.   BREATHE: Breath & Wellness Program Get 25% off of the BREATHE: Breath & Wellness Program with the code PODCAST25   Boost your immunity and calm your mind with freedom from chronic stress in the modern world. A 21 day guided breath and wellness program using ancient wisdom to boost your immunity, calm your mind, and give you freedom from chronic stress in the modern world. Combining special breathwork infused with safe vape cannabidiol, BREATHE gives you everything you need to let go of old weight, de-stress, and build immunity so you can live your best life. In this special (limited time) offer, you will receive: - Lifetime access to BREATHE - Free upgrades to all future training modules - Free additional training modules - Special VIP coupons for safe vape, essential oils, CBD, nootropics and more - Private WF group access   Listen To Episode 504 As Josh Trent Uncovers The Connection Between Emotional Frequency, HRV, And RMR   [00:00] Levels Of Consciousness We've all heard the phrase "your vibe attracts your tribe", but what does that actually mean? What the heck is vibration? Today on Solocast, I'm going to answer that question in depth and so much more. As I talk about the true essence behind frequency. We all know about the levels of consciousness that we've heard about with the lower self-being 20 resonating shame or 1,000 for consciousness when you look at David Hawkins's work. But beyond Hawkins's work in the levels of consciousness, what does it mean when your nervous system, your mind, and really the essence of your soul get a good gut feeling or a bad guy feeling about a person, place, or thing? By the end of the Solocast, my promise to you is that you'll have a true understanding of Hawkins's levels of consciousness, how this relates to your own personal life, and most importantly what you can do with this concept of vibration to bring you more fulfillment in the five aspects of your wellness pentagon. If you're joining us for the first time, this may or may not be the best place for you to start you can check out our full guest interviews every Tuesday and on Thursdays, we do this Solocast, which is like the mental musings where I get to pontificate and project all the things that I am fascinated about when it comes to wellness. So if you're a wellness dork or if you're an enthusiast like me, every single episode on Thursday is going to be really really good because it's just me going forward with notes and kind of off-the-cuff, really authentic, sometimes vulnerable. I've cried in a few Solocasts, which is a good thing, especially for men.   [01:50] Emotional Frequency Scale So you heard that right? Everybody has a vibe that impacts us. What does frequency actually mean? Are you aware that in the world the globe vibrates at a hertz frequency that's either subtle, imperceptible, or corresponds to an individual vibration? Sometimes unnoticeable. You read that correctly. Everybody has a basal metabolic rate (BMR) and the rest but when life events occurred, and emotions are involved this vibrational rate changes dramatically and quickly. So, just like a child, which is the best way to learn; approach things with a heart and mind of a child, and as an adult with your own life experience, the big question for me is when it comes to frequency or emotional frequency: What is the missing link between heart rate variability, resting metabolic rate, otherwise known as RMR, and vibration to create vibrant health? Essentially, what can we learn about heart rate variability, resting metabolic rate, and the emotional frequency scale, or vibration in order for us to connect the dots and create better health from how our emotions dictate, and vice versa, our physiology? The snake eating its tail... Due to its potential to really make you a better version of yourself, it's crucial to comprehend the emotional frequency chart. Let's talk about this, I'm going to reference this at JoshTrent.com/504. There is a map here from nondualitylife.com to give them credit, it is a wonderful map. At the bottom of it is shame, at the top, it is full consciousness. What does that really mean? It means that every emotion has a frequency that it vibrates at and that we experience. In other words, a level of consciousness. I believe that Hawkins measured this in consciousness but you and I can also measure this in hertz. Hertz is something that tracks how many times something moves in one second. We've all heard about the Schumann resonance, or 432 frequency, or 556. There are many different frequencies that are used for Binaural Beats and Isochronic technology for giving people relaxation and the nervous system through sound. But how does understanding the emotional frequency chart help you become a better you? In today's society, people really aren't taught important life skills. Definitely not in school, and sometimes not at home, except for in our homes because you and I are very conscious so we do teach emotional frequency. And I'm going to unpack the layers of this today but a bigger question rises here as we pause.   [04:40] David Hawkins + Expression Of Our True Nature Now that you know the frequency chart from Hawkins and you understand that this level of consciousness can go all the way down to 20 Hz or 20 vibrations per second to 1000 vibrations per second for, a consciousness. What do all the stages between 20 and 1,000 truly mean? The victim abuse or consciousness from 20 Hz all the way to 200 the self-empowerment from 250 all the way to 400. And of course, the self-realization from 440 all the way to 1,000 is what allows people to go from hell to purgatory in between paradise and heaven. This is the conceptual framework that was developed by David Hawkins MD Ph.D. after a ton of research over 40 years of research. It looks at various mental states and psychological states as they connect to, and corresponds to the different levels of consciousness from 20 to 1,000. The approach is not very new anymore but it was new when it first came out. It is very much in line with the current wisdom traditions where higher levels of consciousness are used to correspondingly connect to greater psychological integration, and really just harmony with life. This conceptual approach delineates how one moves from the lower self or the smaller self. The lower one takes more scarcity-based states of consciousness to a higher self, or what Hawkins calls the absolute high. And through this journey, various conditionings, some scars along with different impurities, start to melt away. In the process really dismantles and purifies human beings allowing for a greater expression of our true nature, the level of the human. The model is an expression of the relative, so it is not to be taken as the expression of absolute truth, because we fluctuate through this level of consciousness, all day long. There are certain people, though that have certain characteristics of always being negative, always vibrating down at the victim consciousness, and we feel tired because I know you can relate to this when we are in their presence.   [06:57] Resting Metabolic Rate We know that the resting metabolic rate is a number that dictates how many calories a human being will consume completely at rest with no fidgeting, no exercise, just if you were to sit on the couch for the entire day, sleep, eat food, drink water, and literally not lift a finger for an entire 24 hour period. That would be your resting metabolic rate. So what is it that dictates are resting metabolic rate? Well, science would say it's your height, weight, age, gender, ethnicity, diet, activity level, and muscle... But I also believe that the thermic effect of food and a concept called the non-exercise movement or non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT), which is fascinating. This is knowledge from my old personal training days… So to calculate RMR, you would essentially put your factors into a calculator and you get a caloric number somewhere around 2000 cal or so depending on your physiology. So the answer to this, and this is what I'm going to prove to you today on this podcast... if somebody eats a perfect caloric diet and they are exercising well and they're doing the mouth of calories in calories out with their RMR then why is it that people still don't lose weight or gain muscle? What I'm going to hypothesize today is that you trust the connection between emotional frequency, HRV, RMR, and how every single one of them affects one another.   [08:33] Heart Rate Variability Let's go into an HRV. Now that we've talked about RMR, HRV is heart rate variability. It is the amount of time in between the beats of your heart and sciences show that a greater score of HRV can be in prime indicator of how long you live, how healthy you'll be, and even four diseases and afflictions like CHD, diabetes, and so many more. So now that you know what HRV is what increases your HRV score? In other words, what gives you a more diverse score around HRV? With HRV being the measure of variations in between each heartbeat measured in time, this variation is controlled by a very ancient part of the nervous system, called the autonomic nervous system, otherwise known as the ANS. We've talked about the autonomic nervous system very in-depth in our BREATHE: Breath & Wellness program, which you can be a part of. This conversation is geared towards that because I believe it is the breath that can set you free, and it is the breath that can increase your HRV, support your RMR, and be the fuel for your emotional frequency scale. I think they all connect, and I'm going to prove that today. So if the autonomic nervous system is housed in two compartments, one being sympathetic, one being parasympathetic, otherwise known as relaxation or fight or flight on the other side, then the brain is constantly millions and millions and millions of times per day processing information in a part of your brain called the hypothalamus. Here are the keys of vibrational habits which I'm in a moment going to tie to emotional frequency and the Hawkins scale. Here are the low-frequency habits that are coming from scarcity, coming from potentially just hedonism or apathy that drive a very low HRV score. The first is poor sleep, followed by alcohol, then smoking cigarettes, low physical activity, stress management, excessive caffeine, very poor posture, and of course, eating a diet that is not organic, and also genetics. There are some people that have a positive or negative impact via HRV and we know the HRV tends to naturally go down as we get older, but it doesn't have to it absolutely does not have to. As I mention chronic health conditions like diabetes, hypertension, anxiety, depression, and pulmonary disease, all of these things even medication's that people are taking or if you live in hot climates. I live in Austin and I would guess that most people's HRV score is lower because it's a super hot climate and makes you think about where you wanna live, right?   [11:05] Low Frequency: Hypervigilance + Unprocessed Trauma So now that we've unpacked HRV and RMR, and we've given you the beginning of the frequency scale, let me pull this all together, my friend. You're really going to enjoy this. Bare with me, we're about to go deep because we store unfavorable feelings very deep. We follow instructions and perform as intended until the program is terminated, and a new one is installed, but by the time we reach adulthood, we have so many unresolved issues that the majority of our reactions are inherently negative. These reactions are then in charge of unfortunate circumstances. That simply serves to confirm what we "already knew" from the past and distracts us in a vicious loop of emotional incidents, most of which are based on long-forgotten recollections from the past. So essentially the frequency of experiences, the frequency of emotions that are unfavorable from the past are literally driving the current moment because the body doesn't know any different, the body is a minor connected to all of this and this is what leads to hypervigilance. You can learn more about hypervigilance by going over to JoshTrent.com/490 where I go in-depth about the subconscious strategy for survival and what I believe mental illness is a symptom of in regards to hypervigilance and so much more than that. So these feelings of being a victim, combined with the assessment of others, evaluating oneself in relation to others, or comparing yourself to other people, is really a nervous system's tool for analyzing vibration. In other words, we project onto others what we feel about ourselves. So if I feel hypervigilant or non-trusting I'm going to unconsciously project that onto the person in front of me or the situation in front of me, and then that affects clearly my HRV and absolutely my resting metabolic rate because I'm going to need more calories, I'm not going to sleep as well, and I'm going to be shifted over to my sympathetic more throughout the day, which is the opposite of what the nature intended. But it's only when we embark on a journey of searching for the way of loving techniques and information and tools that we can begin, letting go of the lower frequency of these lower emotional reactions. This is a path that involves our whole lives and has a direct connection to love and complementing ourselves every time we manage to overcome these, potentially stressful situations, but really, they're not because we are choosing based on our past conditioning to make them three for 10 times more stressful than they actually are. So let's bring it home. Here the emotional frequency chart and Hawkins's work show the hertz frequency rate of this vibrational analysis all the way from low emotions to high. As the rate of vibration goes lower the extent of consciousness as well, and this is very key, the ability to deal with situations or things in a positive way is drastically reduced, which limits our discernment to respond or be responsible, which I've talked about many times on this podcast there is a difference between responsibility and being response-able. So when we find ourselves stuck in the spiderweb of the frequencies, like grief and shame and lying and deceit, it might seem so difficult and almost impossible to overcome things. But look, in this world, we are very fortunate to be here with each other right now. You are part of the solution, the fact that you were even listening to the Solocast means you are already on the way, my friend. You are already on the way and you are going through it because the only way out is through. Your resolve and your intelligence that was up leveled today now that you understand the connection between HRV and RMR, the academic science terms, and the actual emotional signature and quotient of the frequency scale. Combine these two things, and understand that you are a soul having a human experience inside of a body, and the more you can dive in and understand the emotional frequency chart the less you can put down your Oura Ring, put down your Woop, put down all the things that track your HRV and track your sleep and track your stuff. Because you and I both know those are external mirrors of mindfulness and all they're already doing is reminding you about the way that you already feel. It is only when we look within without judgment, with compassion for ourselves, that we can let go of the negative emotional attachments that keep us bathing in scarcity. And bathing at the bottom of the victimhood in those lower emotions of 200 all the way down to 20.   [16:40] What Is Your Emotional Frequency? So here is the action plan. First, take an emotional inventory I talked about that at JoshTrent.com/490. Take the emotional inventory to identify what beliefs you have or what emotions you're experiencing and then write your number down after each one and see where you fall. Are you in the category of victim, abuse, or consciousness? Are you in the category of self-empowerment? Are you in the category of self-realization the majority of the time? If you are, write to admin@wellnessforce.com and let me know. We'd love to interview you on this podcast so we can all learn from you. But for the rest of us, where we bounce around from 20 to 202, 50 to 440, with the occasional 440 all the way up to 1,000. What we all need is a deep breath, space and compassion, and love for ourselves so we can stop making science our God and start making the creator our God. Because the creator is all that ever has been what is here now and always shopping. Whether you're spiritual, scientific, religious, or atheist. It doesn't matter because the energy that brought you here is the energy that guides and loves all things. And so it is with that awareness that I leave you with a challenge. Listen to JoshTrent.com/490, and go and sign up for the Breathe program at breathwork.io. Use the code "PODCAST25" for 25% off and take yourself through three weeks of true emotional inventory, through breathwork, and unpack a lot of this victim abuse or consciousness from 200 down to 20. And then write to me at admin@wellnessforce.com. Know how you're feeling let me know the impact of this solo cast and let me know how much you love yourself and how much you love others with this new state of consciousness and this new awareness. I trust that was helpful. I know it was if you're still with me because there's a part of your soul that's absorbing this and taking this to heart. This is Food for your soul, nourishment for your heart, and an action plan for your mind. And until I see you again and I'm wishing you love and wellness.   Links From Today's Show  The Map of Consciousness Explained: A Proven Energy Scale to Actualize Your Ultimate Potential by David Hawkins Levels Of Consciousness (NonDualityLife.com) Letting Go: The Pathway of Surrender by David Hawkins Shop the Wellness Force Store breathwork.io PLUNGE – Save $150 with the code “WELLNESSFORCE" HIGHER DOSE INFRARED MAT - Get 15% off with the code “WELLNESSFORCE15“ Organifi – Special 20% off to our listeners with the code ‘WELLNESSFORCE' MitoZen – Save 10% with the code “WELLNESSFORCE” Paleovalley – Save 15% on your ACV Complex with the code ‘JOSH' NOOTOPIA - Save 10% with the code "JOSH10" Activation Products – Save 20% with the code “WELLNESSFORCE” NEUVANA - Save 15% with the code “WELLNESSFORCE” SENSATE - Save $25 on your order with the code "JOSH25" DRY FARM WINES - Get an extra bottle of Pure Natural Wine with your order for just 1¢ CHILISLEEP - Save 25% on Josh's favorite ChiliSleep products with the code "JOSH" ION - Save 15% off sitewide with the code ‘JOSH1KS' TOUPS - Save 15% with the code "JOSH" Feel Free from Botanic Tonics – Save 40% when you use the code ‘WELLNESS40′ Drink LMNT – Zero Sugar Hydration: Get your free LMNT Sample Pack, with any purchase BREATHE - Save 20% by using the code “PODCAST20” Essential Oil Wizardry: Save 10% with the code ‘WELLNESSFORCE' MY GREEN MATTRESS - Save up to $125 on your order with the code "JOSH" NEUROHACKER - Save 15% with the code "WELLNESSFORCE" ALIVE WATER - Save 33% on your first order with the code "JOSH33" M21 Wellness Guide Wellness Force Community Leave Wellness + Wisdom a review on Apple Podcasts   Shop the BEST Organic Snacks at PaleoValley   Save 15% with the code 'JOSH'   PaleoValley's 100% Grass-Fed Beef Sticks Paleovalley 100% Grass Fed Beef Sticks are the only beef sticks in the USA made from 100% grass fed/grass finished beef and organic spices that are naturally fermented. Their 100% Grass Fed Beef Sticks are unlike anything else on the market. In fact, they were recently voted in Paleo Magazine as one of the top snacks of the year. The reason is that they are committed to making the highest quality, clean products that are free from problematic ingredients. Their beef comes from 100% grass fed cows raised entirely on natural grass pastures by family farmers right here in the USA. As a result they are healthy and happy.   PaleoValley's Pasture-Raised Turkey Sticks Paleovalley Pasture-Raised Turkey Sticks were created to make healthy snacking easier. Their turkey sticks are made from turkeys who are allowed to live as nature intended... on organic grass pastures with plenty of sunshine, fresh air and room to exercise. The result of raising turkeys in such a natural way is a much healthier, clean protein with higher levels of vitamins, minerals, and omega-3s. Unfortunately, virtually all turkey in the USA is conventionally raised with a small portion being "free range" – a virtually meaningless term that simply means the turkeys were allowed access to the outdoors. However, most "free range" turkeys only have access to an outdoor dirt field with no pasture in sight. Their truly pasture-raised turkeys are given full access to outdoor, pesticide-free pasture with plenty of grass and insects for them to nibble on.   Death & Rebirth: Why I'm Saying Goodbye to Wellness Force...    

New Books in Biology and Evolution
Tom McLeish, "The Poetry and Music of Science: Comparing Creativity in Science and Art" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Biology and Evolution

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 35:27


What human qualities are needed to make scientific discoveries, and which to make great art? Many would point to 'imagination' and 'creativity' in the second case but not the first. Tom McLeish's The Poetry and Music of Science: Comparing Creativity in Science and Art (Oxford UP, 2021) challenges the assumption that doing science is in any sense less creative than art, music or fictional writing and poetry, and treads a historical and contemporary path through common territories of the creative process. The methodological process called the 'scientific method' tells us how to test ideas when we have had them, but not how to arrive at hypotheses in the first place. Hearing the stories that scientists and artists tell about their projects reveals commonalities: the desire for a goal, the experience of frustration and failure, the incubation of the problem, moments of sudden insight, and the experience of the beautiful or sublime. Selected themes weave the practice of science and art together: visual thinking and metaphor, the transcendence of music and mathematics, the contemporary rise of the English novel and experimental science, and the role of aesthetics and desire in the creative process. Artists and scientists make salient comparisons: Defoe and Boyle; Emmerson and Humboldt, Monet and Einstein, Schumann and Hadamard. The book draws on medieval philosophy at many points as the product of the last age that spent time in inner contemplation of the mystery of how something is mentally brought out from nothing. Taking the phenomenon of the rainbow as an example, the principles of creativity within constraint point to the scientific imagination as a parallel of poetry. Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Science
Tom McLeish, "The Poetry and Music of Science: Comparing Creativity in Science and Art" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 35:27


What human qualities are needed to make scientific discoveries, and which to make great art? Many would point to 'imagination' and 'creativity' in the second case but not the first. Tom McLeish's The Poetry and Music of Science: Comparing Creativity in Science and Art (Oxford UP, 2021) challenges the assumption that doing science is in any sense less creative than art, music or fictional writing and poetry, and treads a historical and contemporary path through common territories of the creative process. The methodological process called the 'scientific method' tells us how to test ideas when we have had them, but not how to arrive at hypotheses in the first place. Hearing the stories that scientists and artists tell about their projects reveals commonalities: the desire for a goal, the experience of frustration and failure, the incubation of the problem, moments of sudden insight, and the experience of the beautiful or sublime. Selected themes weave the practice of science and art together: visual thinking and metaphor, the transcendence of music and mathematics, the contemporary rise of the English novel and experimental science, and the role of aesthetics and desire in the creative process. Artists and scientists make salient comparisons: Defoe and Boyle; Emmerson and Humboldt, Monet and Einstein, Schumann and Hadamard. The book draws on medieval philosophy at many points as the product of the last age that spent time in inner contemplation of the mystery of how something is mentally brought out from nothing. Taking the phenomenon of the rainbow as an example, the principles of creativity within constraint point to the scientific imagination as a parallel of poetry. Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science

New Books in Literary Studies
Tom McLeish, "The Poetry and Music of Science: Comparing Creativity in Science and Art" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 35:27


What human qualities are needed to make scientific discoveries, and which to make great art? Many would point to 'imagination' and 'creativity' in the second case but not the first. Tom McLeish's The Poetry and Music of Science: Comparing Creativity in Science and Art (Oxford UP, 2021) challenges the assumption that doing science is in any sense less creative than art, music or fictional writing and poetry, and treads a historical and contemporary path through common territories of the creative process. The methodological process called the 'scientific method' tells us how to test ideas when we have had them, but not how to arrive at hypotheses in the first place. Hearing the stories that scientists and artists tell about their projects reveals commonalities: the desire for a goal, the experience of frustration and failure, the incubation of the problem, moments of sudden insight, and the experience of the beautiful or sublime. Selected themes weave the practice of science and art together: visual thinking and metaphor, the transcendence of music and mathematics, the contemporary rise of the English novel and experimental science, and the role of aesthetics and desire in the creative process. Artists and scientists make salient comparisons: Defoe and Boyle; Emmerson and Humboldt, Monet and Einstein, Schumann and Hadamard. The book draws on medieval philosophy at many points as the product of the last age that spent time in inner contemplation of the mystery of how something is mentally brought out from nothing. Taking the phenomenon of the rainbow as an example, the principles of creativity within constraint point to the scientific imagination as a parallel of poetry. Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books in Psychology
Tom McLeish, "The Poetry and Music of Science: Comparing Creativity in Science and Art" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Psychology

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 35:27


What human qualities are needed to make scientific discoveries, and which to make great art? Many would point to 'imagination' and 'creativity' in the second case but not the first. Tom McLeish's The Poetry and Music of Science: Comparing Creativity in Science and Art (Oxford UP, 2021) challenges the assumption that doing science is in any sense less creative than art, music or fictional writing and poetry, and treads a historical and contemporary path through common territories of the creative process. The methodological process called the 'scientific method' tells us how to test ideas when we have had them, but not how to arrive at hypotheses in the first place. Hearing the stories that scientists and artists tell about their projects reveals commonalities: the desire for a goal, the experience of frustration and failure, the incubation of the problem, moments of sudden insight, and the experience of the beautiful or sublime. Selected themes weave the practice of science and art together: visual thinking and metaphor, the transcendence of music and mathematics, the contemporary rise of the English novel and experimental science, and the role of aesthetics and desire in the creative process. Artists and scientists make salient comparisons: Defoe and Boyle; Emmerson and Humboldt, Monet and Einstein, Schumann and Hadamard. The book draws on medieval philosophy at many points as the product of the last age that spent time in inner contemplation of the mystery of how something is mentally brought out from nothing. Taking the phenomenon of the rainbow as an example, the principles of creativity within constraint point to the scientific imagination as a parallel of poetry. Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/psychology

New Books in Art
Tom McLeish, "The Poetry and Music of Science: Comparing Creativity in Science and Art" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Art

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 35:27


What human qualities are needed to make scientific discoveries, and which to make great art? Many would point to 'imagination' and 'creativity' in the second case but not the first. Tom McLeish's The Poetry and Music of Science: Comparing Creativity in Science and Art (Oxford UP, 2021) challenges the assumption that doing science is in any sense less creative than art, music or fictional writing and poetry, and treads a historical and contemporary path through common territories of the creative process. The methodological process called the 'scientific method' tells us how to test ideas when we have had them, but not how to arrive at hypotheses in the first place. Hearing the stories that scientists and artists tell about their projects reveals commonalities: the desire for a goal, the experience of frustration and failure, the incubation of the problem, moments of sudden insight, and the experience of the beautiful or sublime. Selected themes weave the practice of science and art together: visual thinking and metaphor, the transcendence of music and mathematics, the contemporary rise of the English novel and experimental science, and the role of aesthetics and desire in the creative process. Artists and scientists make salient comparisons: Defoe and Boyle; Emmerson and Humboldt, Monet and Einstein, Schumann and Hadamard. The book draws on medieval philosophy at many points as the product of the last age that spent time in inner contemplation of the mystery of how something is mentally brought out from nothing. Taking the phenomenon of the rainbow as an example, the principles of creativity within constraint point to the scientific imagination as a parallel of poetry. Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/art

New Books in Poetry
Tom McLeish, "The Poetry and Music of Science: Comparing Creativity in Science and Art" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Poetry

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 35:27


What human qualities are needed to make scientific discoveries, and which to make great art? Many would point to 'imagination' and 'creativity' in the second case but not the first. Tom McLeish's The Poetry and Music of Science: Comparing Creativity in Science and Art (Oxford UP, 2021) challenges the assumption that doing science is in any sense less creative than art, music or fictional writing and poetry, and treads a historical and contemporary path through common territories of the creative process. The methodological process called the 'scientific method' tells us how to test ideas when we have had them, but not how to arrive at hypotheses in the first place. Hearing the stories that scientists and artists tell about their projects reveals commonalities: the desire for a goal, the experience of frustration and failure, the incubation of the problem, moments of sudden insight, and the experience of the beautiful or sublime. Selected themes weave the practice of science and art together: visual thinking and metaphor, the transcendence of music and mathematics, the contemporary rise of the English novel and experimental science, and the role of aesthetics and desire in the creative process. Artists and scientists make salient comparisons: Defoe and Boyle; Emmerson and Humboldt, Monet and Einstein, Schumann and Hadamard. The book draws on medieval philosophy at many points as the product of the last age that spent time in inner contemplation of the mystery of how something is mentally brought out from nothing. Taking the phenomenon of the rainbow as an example, the principles of creativity within constraint point to the scientific imagination as a parallel of poetry. Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/poetry

New Books in Music
Tom McLeish, "The Poetry and Music of Science: Comparing Creativity in Science and Art" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Music

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 35:27


What human qualities are needed to make scientific discoveries, and which to make great art? Many would point to 'imagination' and 'creativity' in the second case but not the first. Tom McLeish's The Poetry and Music of Science: Comparing Creativity in Science and Art (Oxford UP, 2021) challenges the assumption that doing science is in any sense less creative than art, music or fictional writing and poetry, and treads a historical and contemporary path through common territories of the creative process. The methodological process called the 'scientific method' tells us how to test ideas when we have had them, but not how to arrive at hypotheses in the first place. Hearing the stories that scientists and artists tell about their projects reveals commonalities: the desire for a goal, the experience of frustration and failure, the incubation of the problem, moments of sudden insight, and the experience of the beautiful or sublime. Selected themes weave the practice of science and art together: visual thinking and metaphor, the transcendence of music and mathematics, the contemporary rise of the English novel and experimental science, and the role of aesthetics and desire in the creative process. Artists and scientists make salient comparisons: Defoe and Boyle; Emmerson and Humboldt, Monet and Einstein, Schumann and Hadamard. The book draws on medieval philosophy at many points as the product of the last age that spent time in inner contemplation of the mystery of how something is mentally brought out from nothing. Taking the phenomenon of the rainbow as an example, the principles of creativity within constraint point to the scientific imagination as a parallel of poetry. Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/music

New Books Network
Tom McLeish, "The Poetry and Music of Science: Comparing Creativity in Science and Art" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 35:27


What human qualities are needed to make scientific discoveries, and which to make great art? Many would point to 'imagination' and 'creativity' in the second case but not the first. Tom McLeish's The Poetry and Music of Science: Comparing Creativity in Science and Art (Oxford UP, 2021) challenges the assumption that doing science is in any sense less creative than art, music or fictional writing and poetry, and treads a historical and contemporary path through common territories of the creative process. The methodological process called the 'scientific method' tells us how to test ideas when we have had them, but not how to arrive at hypotheses in the first place. Hearing the stories that scientists and artists tell about their projects reveals commonalities: the desire for a goal, the experience of frustration and failure, the incubation of the problem, moments of sudden insight, and the experience of the beautiful or sublime. Selected themes weave the practice of science and art together: visual thinking and metaphor, the transcendence of music and mathematics, the contemporary rise of the English novel and experimental science, and the role of aesthetics and desire in the creative process. Artists and scientists make salient comparisons: Defoe and Boyle; Emmerson and Humboldt, Monet and Einstein, Schumann and Hadamard. The book draws on medieval philosophy at many points as the product of the last age that spent time in inner contemplation of the mystery of how something is mentally brought out from nothing. Taking the phenomenon of the rainbow as an example, the principles of creativity within constraint point to the scientific imagination as a parallel of poetry. Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Physics and Chemistry
Tom McLeish, "The Poetry and Music of Science: Comparing Creativity in Science and Art" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Physics and Chemistry

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 35:27


What human qualities are needed to make scientific discoveries, and which to make great art? Many would point to 'imagination' and 'creativity' in the second case but not the first. Tom McLeish's The Poetry and Music of Science: Comparing Creativity in Science and Art (Oxford UP, 2021) challenges the assumption that doing science is in any sense less creative than art, music or fictional writing and poetry, and treads a historical and contemporary path through common territories of the creative process. The methodological process called the 'scientific method' tells us how to test ideas when we have had them, but not how to arrive at hypotheses in the first place. Hearing the stories that scientists and artists tell about their projects reveals commonalities: the desire for a goal, the experience of frustration and failure, the incubation of the problem, moments of sudden insight, and the experience of the beautiful or sublime. Selected themes weave the practice of science and art together: visual thinking and metaphor, the transcendence of music and mathematics, the contemporary rise of the English novel and experimental science, and the role of aesthetics and desire in the creative process. Artists and scientists make salient comparisons: Defoe and Boyle; Emmerson and Humboldt, Monet and Einstein, Schumann and Hadamard. The book draws on medieval philosophy at many points as the product of the last age that spent time in inner contemplation of the mystery of how something is mentally brought out from nothing. Taking the phenomenon of the rainbow as an example, the principles of creativity within constraint point to the scientific imagination as a parallel of poetry. Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Lesart - das Literaturmagazin - Deutschlandfunk Kultur
#lockdownlyrik Romane aus Spanien: Der neue Trabanten Verlag im Porträt

Lesart - das Literaturmagazin - Deutschlandfunk Kultur

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 5:23


Schumann, Peter B.www.deutschlandfunkkultur.de, LesartDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

My History Can Beat Up Your Politics
Leap to Freedom: Hans Konrad Schumann's Story

My History Can Beat Up Your Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 56:19


One three-second period changed the life of an East German soldier. Stories of freedom and oppression feature heavily on this hodge-podcast episode, the Berlin Wall, the Uruguay dictatorship of the 70's and 80's, a bit about Grover Cleveland and a bit about Charles III. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

NDR Kultur - Neue CDs
CD der Woche: Argerich und Capuçon spielen Beethoven, Schumann, Franck

NDR Kultur - Neue CDs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 4:30


Eine Live-Aufnahme vom diesjährigen Osterfestival in Aix-en-Provence - unsere CD der Woche.

CURSO DE FILOSOFÍA
Curso de Filosofía: La Religión de la Humanidad de Comte.

CURSO DE FILOSOFÍA

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 22:12


Un saludo amigos. Hoy llega la exposición de los delirios místicos de Comte. Además hemos llegado al audio nº 200 del Curso (excluyendo extras). Una religión de corte sociológico y al servicio de los banqueros es la que inventa nuestro francés. Un audio muy interesante. Conociendo nuestro pasado entenderemos mejor nuestro presente. ***** Música de la época: Sinfonía nº4 de Schumann. ****** Pulsen un Me Gusta y colaboren a partir de 2,99 €/mes si se lo pueden permitir para asegurar la permanencia del programa ¡Muchas gracias a todos!

Follow the Lieder
Schubert's Winterreise: Mut! & Die Nebensonnen

Follow the Lieder

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 52:47


We are nearing the end kids! In this, the penultimate episode of our Winterreise season we discuss Mut! and Die Nebensonnen. Be prepared to hear a battle hymn, a Shakespeare re-enactment, a brief science bit, and if you listen all the way to the end you might even hear our co-host shed a tear or two! With guest vocalist Dr. Tyler ReeceEmoji stories for each episode by @teodoro.pianoMut!

Opinion Science
#68: Intellectual Humility with Tenelle Porter

Opinion Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 57:01


Tenelle Porter is a new colleague of mine at Ball State University. She's an educational psychologist, and one of the things she studies is intellectual humility, which is people's awareness of the limits of their knowledge and the fallibility of their reasoning. Intellectual humility offers a variety of handy benefits even though there has been some disagreement about what it is, exactly. I was excited to sit down with Tenelle and get her take on intellectual humility, what it does for people, and when we ought to have more or less of it.Things that come up in this episode:For a nice summary of a lot of the things we discuss, check out Tenelle's new review article in Nature Reviews Psychology (Porter et al., 2022a)Surveying different definitions of "intellectual humility" to clarify the content of this idea (Porter et al., 2022b)Intellectual humility promotes openness to other opinions (Porter & Schumann, 2018)Intellectual humility promotes mastery in learning (Porter et al., 2020)Classroom environments can shape students' intellectual humility (Porter et al., 2022c)For a transcript of this episode, visit this episode's page at: http://opinionsciencepodcast.com/episodes/Learn more about Opinion Science at http://opinionsciencepodcast.com/ and follow @OpinionSciPod on Twitter.

Jillian Greyse - The Spirit That Is You
Knowledge is POWER when two sides go to WAR/ This week AstroloCAST DEC 2-8

Jillian Greyse - The Spirit That Is You

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 9:53


CLICK HERE to Watch this week's AstroloCAST #brucelipton #astrology #astrololife #astrologypodcast Join the next AstroloCLASS- Become a Sharing light Tier Family member and gain FREE accesshttps://www.patreon.com/JillianGreyseLink to AstroloStar Salutationhttps://www.udemy.com/course/astroloyoga-starsalutation/?referralCode=02A9073438D0191AC28BLink to Bruce Lipton's amazing Quotehttps://www.instagram.com/p/Clj5_S_ySJt/2nd and 3rd Aries – Head – 3rd chakra4th,5th and 6th Taurus – Throat – 4th chakra7th and 8th Gemini * Full moon – Lungs – 5th chakraWe move up the ladder until we reach the throat. Passing through the anger and doubt to gain passage to the heart to and acces the first of the three higher chakras, the throat. This week's theme to harness this energy is ALL about calming the anger and the self-abuse enough to let the heart expand. Why is this important? Awareness of your emotions and the understanding that they are not all self-contained is important. It is a scientific fact that we are beings of energy and the molecules of your body originated from stardust This is not debatable. It is fact. You have electricity in your body and all of the molecules that make up who you are were sent down from space when supernovas and massive explosions of energy between stars occurred. Many famous Scientists are beginning to showcase the information that if we are made of stars and energy then we most certainly have a connection to them constantly flowing through us. This is called Astro Physiology as one of the Greatest scientists of our time, Bruce Lipton, recently stated.  Therefore, what if you can align with that energy signal before it hits? Avoid it “sneaking up on you”. That is why in this video I cover the emotional and physical warning signs you might be feeling as this alignment happens and give you all the tools you need to work through and attune to the spirit that is you.#gemini, #Gateway, #Aries, #Taurus, #Heart, #Love, #GreifFor More go to https://www.youtube.com/JillianGreyse For More, subscribe to our YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/JillianGreyse

Grooving Goddess
133. Schumann Shenanigans

Grooving Goddess

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 39:56


I analyze the recent Schumann events, the Mauna Loa eruption and break down some ways to process your C-PTSD activations with less long term effects. We've had some major timeline shifts in the last few days. Take extra good care of yourself and focus on your gratitude more than the chaos of change. You can find me on IG, FB & TikTok @grooving goddess or anchor.fm/groovinggoddess and groovinggoddess@gmail.com Book a service or podcast interview here: https://square.site/book/LFN770JVV1PV1/grooving-goddess

Au coeur de l'orchestre
Orchestrations, transcriptions, arrangements (4/4) : un compositeur s'orchestre soi-même

Au coeur de l'orchestre

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 28:16


durée : 00:28:16 - Orchestrations, transcriptions, arrangements (4/4) : un compositeur s'orchestre lui-même - par : Christian Merlin - De Ravel ou de Moussorgski, les Tableaux d'une exposition ? De Liszt ou de Beethoven, la version pour piano de la Symphonie héroïque ? Trahison ou amélioration, l'édition des symphonies de Schumann par Mahler ? Où l'on se demandera ce que veut dire orchestrer. - réalisé par : Marie Grout

Classical Music Discoveries
Episode 53: 19053 Iconic

Classical Music Discoveries

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 85:54


Deutsche Grammophon today unveils Iconic, a new album by genre-defying and multi-award-winning violinist David Garrett. Inspired by the legendary violinists whose dazzling showpieces and heart-melting melodies he fell in love with as a child, Garrett has recorded works by Bach, Dvorák, Gluck, Kreisler, Mendelssohn and Schumann, among many others. He is accompanied by his guitarist Franck van der Heijden – who also conducts the players of Orchestra The Prezent – as well as being joined in duet arrangements by his former teacher Itzhak Perlman, star tenor Andrea Bocelli, flautist Cocomi and trumpeter Till Brönner.Purchase the music (without talk) at Itunes or Amazon. Classical Music Discoveries is sponsored by Uber. @CMDHedgecock#ClassicalMusicDiscoveries #KeepClassicalMusicAlive#LaMusicaFestival #CMDGrandOperaCompanyofVenice #CMDParisPhilharmonicinOrléans#CMDGermanOperaCompanyofBerlin#CMDGrandOperaCompanyofBarcelonaSpain#ClassicalMusicLivesOn#Uber Please consider supporting our show, thank you!Donate (classicalmusicdiscoveries.store) staff@classicalmusicdiscoveries.comThis album is broadcasted with the permission of Crossover Media Music Promotion (Zachary Swanson and Amanda Bloom).

Au coeur de l'orchestre
Orchestrations, transcriptions, arrangements

Au coeur de l'orchestre

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 118:33


durée : 01:58:33 - Orchestrations, transcriptions, arrangements - par : Christian Merlin - De Ravel ou de Moussorgski, les Tableaux d'une exposition ? De Liszt ou de Beethoven, la version pour piano de la Symphonie héroïque ? Trahison ou amélioration, l'édition des symphonies de Schumann par Mahler ? Où l'on se demandera ce que veut dire orchestrer. - réalisé par : Marie Grout

Au coeur de l'orchestre
Orchestrations, transcriptions, arrangements (3/4) : un compositeur en orchestre un autre

Au coeur de l'orchestre

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 28:09


durée : 00:28:09 - Orchestrations, transcriptions, arrangements (3/4) : un compositeur en orchestre un autre - par : Christian Merlin - De Ravel ou de Moussorgski, les Tableaux d'une exposition ? De Liszt ou de Beethoven, la version pour piano de la Symphonie héroïque ? Trahison ou amélioration, l'édition des symphonies de Schumann par Mahler ? Où l'on se demandera ce que veut dire orchestrer. - réalisé par : Marie Grout

Au coeur de l'orchestre
Orchestrations, transcriptions, arrangements (2/4) : du clavier à l'orchestre (II)

Au coeur de l'orchestre

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 28:14


durée : 00:28:14 - Orchestrations, transcriptions, arrangements (2/4) : du clavier à l'orchestre (II) - par : Christian Merlin - De Ravel ou de Moussorgski, les Tableaux d'une exposition ? De Liszt ou de Beethoven, la version pour piano de la Symphonie héroïque ? Trahison ou amélioration, l'édition des symphonies de Schumann par Mahler ? Où l'on se demandera ce que veut dire orchestrer - réalisé par : Marie Grout

Au coeur de l'orchestre
Orchestrations, transcriptions, arrangements (1/4) : du clavier à l'orchestre

Au coeur de l'orchestre

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 28:00


durée : 00:28:00 - Orchestrations, transcriptions, arrangements (1/4) : du clavier à l'orchestre (I) - par : Christian Merlin - De Ravel ou de Moussorgski, les Tableaux d'une exposition ? De Liszt ou de Beethoven, la version pour piano de la Symphonie héroïque ? Trahison ou amélioration, l'édition des symphonies de Schumann par Mahler ? Où l'on se demandera ce que veut dire orchestrer. - réalisé par : Marie Grout

Strange Country
Strange Country Ep. 247: Mother Jones

Strange Country

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 37:36


Dearest Dashies: It's time to learn about the Most Dangerous Woman in the World, aka, Mother Jones. Have you ever heard of her? Do you read the magazine that has her namesake? Mother Jones is a worthy woman to know and love and maybe resurrect from the dead. She stood up for what was right as far as labor rights and wrongs go. When she showed up, everyone listened. Not only did she have important things to say, she said it in an Irish brogue, which Beth and Kelly can almost do. Thanks for listening. It is an act of love. Theme music: Big White Lie by A Cast of Thousands Cite your sources: Knights of Labor - Definition, Goals & Leader - HISTORY, 7 October 2021, https://www.history.com/topics/19th-century/knights-of-labor. Accessed 13 November 2022. “The History of Mother Jones – Mother Jones.” Mother Jones, https://www.motherjones.com/about/history/. Accessed 13 November 2022. Jones, Mother. “Mother Jones.” Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mother_Jones. Accessed 13 November 2022. “Mother Jones.” AFL-CIO, https://aflcio.org/about/history/labor-history-people/mother-jones. Accessed 13 November 2022. Roberts, Jacob. “Yellow Fever Fiend.” Science History Institute, 7 April 2014, https://sciencehistory.org/distillations/yellow-fever-fiend. Accessed 13 November 2022. Schumann, Larisa R., and Darrin Lythgoe. “Disease & Death in Early America.” Tully Area Historical Society, https://www.tullyhistoricalsociety.org/tahs/medical.php#yellowfvr. Accessed 13 November 2022.

Sticky Notes: The Classical Music Podcast
The Degenerates: Music Suppressed By The Nazis

Sticky Notes: The Classical Music Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 57:39


The center of Western Classical Music, ever since the time of Bach, has been modern-day Germany and Austria.  You can trace a line from Bach, to Haydn to Mozart to Beethoven to Schubert to Schumann, Brahms, and Wagner, and finally to Mahler. But why does that line stop in 1911, the year of Mahler's death? Part of the answer is the increasing influence of composers from outside the Austro-German canon, something that has enriched Western Classical music to this day. There was also World War I getting in the way.  But after the war, one could have expected that this line would continue again.  The 1920's in Germany and the rest of Europe were a time of radical experimentation, a flowering of ideas, a sort of wild ecstasy of innovation across all the arts. So why don't we hear of these Austro-German experimenters and innovators anymore?  Because of Adolf Hitler, Joseph Goebbels, and their Entartete, or Degenerate music.  Hitler's worst crime was by no means his suppression of dozens of German, Austrian, and Eastern European composers, but it is a fact all the same that from the end of World War I until 1933, classical music in Germany and Eastern Europe(especially Czechoslovakia), was flourishing, with composers such as Zemlinsky, Krenek, Korngold, Schreker, Schulhoff, Haas, Krasa, and Ullmann taking up the mantle of the giants of the past and hoisting it upon themselves to carry it forward.     The Nazis silenced, exiled, or  killed off many of these musicians during the twelve years of 1933-1945, and those voices are forever lost, but the music they wrote before, during the War and the Holocaust, and after it, some of it masterpieces quite on the level of their predecessors, has been preserved.  So why then are these composers not better known? I've chosen 12 composers, all of whom were writing music at the highest level.  Some of them may be familiar to you, but many probably won't be.  And through all of their trials and tribulations, one of the things I want to emphasize throughout these stories, even the bleakest ones, is that so many of them found the will to be able to compose this heart-rending, beautiful, and often optimistic music all as they witnessed unimaginable horrors. It may seem empty when the end for many of these artists was so horrific, but these compositions and the men and women who were behind them are a true testament to the resilience of the human spirit.  These artists created a life for their friends, neighbors, and fellow inmates in concentration camps.  They wrote music they knew would almost certainly not be heard in their lifetimes, from an urge that could not be destroyed, even by gas chambers. Join us to learn about them this week.

Classical Music Discoveries
Episode 51: 19051 Schumann - The Symphonies

Classical Music Discoveries

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 138:04


Deutsche Grammophon is proud to be honoring the supreme artistry of Daniel Barenboim as he approaches his 80th birthday on 15 November. The great pianist and conductor's remarkable legacy of recordings for the Yellow Label remains the focus of a major campaign comprising three albums, two DG Stage concerts, and a series of e-video releases. Today, DG will release Barenboim's latest readings of Schumann's four symphonies, recorded live with the Staatskapelle Berlin over three evenings at the Staatsoper Berlin and Philharmonie Berlin. The album will be available as a 3-CD set and in digital format, including a Dolby Atmos version.Purchase the music (without talk) at Itunes or Amazon.Classical Music Discoveries is sponsored by Uber. @CMDHedgecock#ClassicalMusicDiscoveries #KeepClassicalMusicAlive#LaMusicaFestival #CMDGrandOperaCompanyofVenice #CMDParisPhilharmonicinOrléans#CMDGermanOperaCompanyofBerlin#CMDGrandOperaCompanyofBarcelonaSpain#ClassicalMusicLivesOn#Uber Please consider supporting our show, thank you!Donate (classicalmusicdiscoveries.store) staff@classicalmusicdiscoveries.com This album is broadcasted with the permission of Crossover Media Music Promotion (Zachary Swanson and Amanda Bloom).

Par Jupiter !
Les feux de l'Amour, épisode 2 : dans la Famille Mendelssohn, je voudrais la soeur

Par Jupiter !

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 6:31


durée : 00:06:31 - La Chronique musicale de Marina Chiche - Marina Chiche nous offre le deuxième épisode de sa série : « Les Feux de l'amour de la musique classique ». Après Schumann, elle évoque la famille Mendelssohn et en particulier la grande sœur de Felix, Fanny.

Composers Datebook
Casals and Copland at the White House

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 2:00


Synopsis On this date in 1961, cellist Pablo Casals gave a chamber concert at the White House, at the invitation of President John F. Kennedy. The concert was given in honor of Governor Luis Muñoz of Puerto Rico, the home of Pablo Casals. Casals played works of Mendelssohn, Schumann and Couperin, with his own composition, Song of the Birds, as an encore. While eminent guests raved over the performance, the cellist's laconic comment was simply, “It went well.” Casals could afford to be blasé. After all, he had played at the White House before—for President Teddy Roosevelt back in 1904! Aaron Copland was also invited to the November 13th White House concert in 1961. In a diary entry, he noted: “Pierre Salinger and Senator Mike Mansfield were at our table. President Kennedy was in full view the entire time… I was surprised at his reddish-brown hair. No evil in the face, but plenty of ambition there, no doubt. Mrs. K. statuesque… After dinner we were treated to a concert by Pablo Casals. No American music. The next step.” That “next step” came the following spring. In May of 1962, the Kennedys presented Copland's ballet Billy the Kid at the White House for the visiting president of the Ivory Coast Republic, with Copland as guest of honor. Music Played in Today's Program Pablo Casals (1876-1973) Song of the Birds Patrick Demenga, cello; Gerard Wyss, piano Novalis 150117 Aaron Copland (1900-1990) Billy the Kid Ballet Dallas Symphony; Eduardo Mata, cond. Dorian 90170

Raised with Jesus
THIRSTY 43 (Schumann / Laitinen / Zarling)

Raised with Jesus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 62:25


Show Notes Contact the Podcast: RWJPodcast@gmail.com or www.raisedwithjesus.com/podcast  Click here to find a nearby congregation or church home.   yearbook.wels.net All rights reserved. Content used at this podcast comes from a variety of locations & sources.   Register today for the WELS Lutheran Leadership Conference:  http://lutheranleadership.com/  Grace Abounds Reading Guides:  https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/19Tw74cyqt4ZNRcGpwjJ6l1XsT0ldhyxj  CW21 Daily Lectionary:  https://drive.google.com/file/d/1PN_RWjgV4wnvFALd8f4Hu3MvWAo8Jgh-/view?usp=sharing  Casting Nets Podcast: https://castingnetspod.podbean.com/ Apple   Spotify Contact Casting Nets: castingnetspod@gmail.com  Impact Podcast - St. Andrew, Middleton WI https://st-andrew-online.org/impact/  RSS Link: https://feeds.libsyn.com/314675/rss  Prince of Peace - Thousand Oaks, CA https://www.princeofpeaceto.com  https://www.youtube.com/c/PrinceofPeaceTO/featured  Water of Life Lutheran Church - Caledonia & Racine, WI https://www.wateroflifelutheran.com  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcICs1dldnmZ-rcBqs4QtVQ  Life Challenges Podcast https://christianliferesources.com/life-challenges-podcast/  St. Paul Lutheran Church - Ottawa, ON, Canada https://www.stpaulottawa.org/  https://www.youtube.com/c/StPaulOttawa  Martin Luther College - New Ulm, MN https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCG3EyO6dSM4-5Ujr2HM9ExA  His Word 360 (WLS Prof. Rev. Stephen Geiger) https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCd542RpYW_KSrkEBUSNw-Lg  WELS Streams: https://www.youtube.com/c/welsstreams  WELS Congregational Services: https://vimeo.com/welscongserve  https://vimeo.com/wels  Point of Grace Campus Ministry https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsI7Z5KbPwLdHeIVj_l1z_A  Pilgrim Lutheran Church - Menomonee Falls WI https://www.youtube.com/user/pilgrimlutheran  Through My Bible readings by Rev. Martin Spriggs.  Audio accessed at https://wels.net/serving-you/bible/through-my-bible-archive/  Produced 2022 by Pastor Hagen: pastorhagen@icloud.com or (419) 262-8280  Music from Joseph McDade: https://josephmcdade.com #raisedwithjesus #lutheran #sanctification #toledome #toledo #welstoledo #jesus #bible #podcast #dailyjesus #jesusdaily #rwjpodcast #jesusfortoledo  Resurrection - Maumee: Family Bible Hour at 10:15 AM, Worship on Sundays at 9 AM & 11 AM 2250 S. Holland Sylvania Rd - Maumee, OH Contact RWJ: RWJPodcast@gmail.com (419) 262-8280 CCLI Copyright License 11582729 and Streaming License 20003552 

MTR Podcasts
Interview with bass-baritone Davóne Tines

MTR Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 41:09


Heralded as "[one] of the most powerful voices of our time" by the Los Angeles Times, bass-baritone Davóne Tines has come to international attention as a path-breaking artist whose work not only encompasses a diverse repertoire but also explores the social issues of today. As a Black, gay, classically trained performer at the intersection of many histories, cultures, and aesthetics, Tines is engaged in work that blends opera, art song, contemporary classical music, spirituals, gospel, and songs of protest, as a means to tell a deeply personal story of perseverance that connects to all of humanity. Davóne Tines is Musical America's 2022 Vocalist of the Year. During the 2022-23 season, he continues his role as the Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra & Chorale's first-ever Creative Partner and, beginning in January 2023, he will serve as Brooklyn Academy of Music's first Artist in Residence in more than a decade. In addition to strategic planning, programming, and working within the community, this season Tines curates the “Artist as Human” program, exploring how each artist's subjectivity—be it their race, gender, sexuality, etc.—informs performance, and how these perspectives develop throughout their repertoire. In the fall of 2022, Tines makes a number of important debuts at prominent New York institutions, including the Park Avenue Armory, New York Philharmonic, BAM, and Carnegie Hall, continuing to establish a strong presence in the city's classical scene. He opens his season with the New York premiere of Tyshawn Sorey's Monochromatic Light (Afterlife) at the Park Avenue Armory, also doubling as Tines' Armory debut. Inspired by one of Sorey's most important influences, Morton Feldman and his work Rothko Chapel, Monochromatic Light (Afterlife) takes after Feldman's focus on expansive textures and enveloping sounds, aiming to create an all-immersive experience. Tine's solo part was written specifically for him by Sorey, marking a third collaboration between the pair; Sorey previously created arrangements for Tines' Recital No. 1: MASS and Concerto No. 2: ANTHEM. Peter Sellars directs, with whom Davóne collaborated in John Adam's opera Girls of the Golden West and Kaija Saariaho's Only the Sound Remains. Tines' engagements continue with Everything Rises, an original, evening length staged musical work he created with violinist Jennifer Koh, premiering in New York as part of the Brooklyn Academy of Music's Next Wave Festival. Everything Rises tells the story of Tines' and Koh's artistic journeys and family histories through music, projections, and recorded interviews. As a platform, it also centers the need for artists of color to be seen and heard. Everything Rises premiered in Santa Barbara and Los Angeles in April 2022, with the LA Times commenting, “Koh and Tines' stories have made them what they are, but their art needs to be—and is—great enough to tell us who they are.” This season also has Tines making his New York Philharmonic debut performing in Beethoven's Symphony No. 9, led by Jaap van Zweden. Tines returns to the New York Philharmonic in the spring to sing the Vox Christi in Bach's St. Matthew Passion, also under van Zweden. Tines is a musician who takes full agency of his work, devising performances from conception to performance. His Recital No. 1: MASS program reflects this ethos, combining traditional music with pieces by J.S. Bach, Margaret Bonds, Moses Hogan, Julius Eastman, Caroline Shaw, Tyshawn Sorey, and Tines. This season, he makes his Carnegie Hall recital debut performing MASS at Weill Hall, and later brings the program to the McCarter Theatre in Princeton, Baltimore's Shriver Hall, for the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, and as part of Boston's Celebrity Series. Concerto No. 1: SERMON is a similar artistic endeavor, combining pieces including John Adams' El Niño; Vigil, written by Tines and Igée Dieudonné with orchestration by Matthew Aucoin; “You Want the Truth, but You Don't Want to Know,” from Anthony Davis' X: The Life and Times of Malcolm X; and poems from Langston Hughes, James Baldwin, and Maya Angelou into a concert performance. In May 2021, Tines performed Concerto No. 1: SERMON with Yannick Nézet-Séguin and the Philadelphia Orchestra, and with the BBC Symphony Orchestra. He recently premiered Concerto No. 2: ANTHEM—created by Tines with music by Michael Schachter, Caroline Shaw, Tyshawn Sorey, and text by Mahogany L. Browne—with the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl. Also this season, Tines performs in El Niño with the Cleveland Orchestra, conducted by composer John Adams; a concert performance of Adams' Girls of the Golden West with the Los Angeles Philharmonic also led by Adams; and a chamber music recital with the New World Symphony.Going beyond the concert hall, Davóne Tines also creates short music films that use powerful visuals to accentuate the social and poetic dimensions of the music. In September 2020, Lincoln Center presented his music film VIGIL, which pays tribute to Breonna Taylor, the EMT and aspiring nurse who was shot and killed by police in her Louisville home, and whose tragic death has fueled an international outcry. Created in collaboration with Igée Dieudonné, and Conor Hanick, the work was subsequently arranged for orchestra by Matthew Aucoin and premiered in a live-stream by Tines and the Louisville Orchestra, conducted by Teddy Abrams. Aucoin's orchestration is also currently part of Tines' Concerto No. 1: SERMON. He also co-created Strange Fruit with Jennifer Koh, a film juxtaposing violence against Asian Americans with Ken Ueno's arrangement of “Strange Fruit” — which the duo perform in Everything Rises — directed by dramaturg Kee-Yoon Nahm. The work premiered virtually as part of Carnegie Hall's “Voices of Hope Series.” Additional music films include FREUDE, an acapella “mashup” of Beethoven with African-American hymns that was shot, produced, and edited by Davóne Tines at his hometown church in Warrenton, Virginia and presented virtually by the Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra & Chorale; EASTMAN, a micro-biographical film highlighting the life and work of composer Julius Eastman; and NATIVE SON, in which Tines sings the Black national anthem, “Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing,” and pays homage to the '60s Civil Rights-era motto “I am a man.” The latter film was created for the fourth annual Native Son Awards, which celebrate Black, gay excellence. Further online highlights include appearances as part of Boston Lyric Opera's new miniseries, desert in, marking his company debut; LA Opera at Home's Living Room Recitals; and the 2020 NEA Human and Civil Rights Awards.Notable performances on the opera stage the world premiere performances of Kaija Saariaho's Only the Sound Remains directed by Peter Sellars at Dutch National Opera, Finnish National Opera, Opéra national de Paris, and Teatro Real (Madrid); the world and European premieres of John Adams and Peter Sellars' Girls of the Golden West at San Francisco Opera and Dutch National Opera, respectively; the title role in a new production of Anthony Davis' X: The Life and Times of Malcolm X with the Detroit Opera (where he was Artist in Residence during the 2021-22 season) and the Boston Modern Opera Project with Odyssey Opera in Boston where it was recorded for future release; the world premiere of Terence Blanchard and Kasi Lemmons' Fire Shut Up In My Bones at Opera Theatre of Saint Louis; the world premiere of Matthew Aucoin's Crossing, directed by Diane Paulus at the Brooklyn Academy of Music; a new production of Stravinsky's Oedipus Rex at Lisbon's Teatro Nacional de São Carlos led by Leo Hussain; and Handel's rarely staged Aci, Galatea, e Polifemo at National Sawdust, presented in a new production by Christopher Alden. As a member of the American Modern Opera Company (AMOC), Tines served as a co-music director of the 2022 Ojai Music Festival, and has performed in Hans Werner Henze's El Cimarrón, John Adams' Nativity Reconsidered, and Were You There in collaboration with composers Matthew Aucoin and Michael Schachter.Davóne Tines is co-creator and co-librettist of The Black Clown, a music theater experience inspired by Langston Hughes' poem of the same name. The work, which was created in collaboration with director Zack Winokur and composer Michael Schachter, expresses a Black man's resilience against America's legacy of oppression—fusing vaudeville, opera, jazz, and spirituals to bring Hughes' verse to life onstage. The world premiere was given by the American Repertory Theater in 2018, and The Black Clown was presented by Lincoln Center in summer 2019.Concert appearances have included John Adams' El Niño with the Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Berlin under Vladimir Jurowski, Schumann's Das Paradies und die Peri with Louis Langrée and the Cincinnati Symphony, Kaija Saariaho's True Fire with the Orchestre national de France conducted by Olari Elts, Beethoven's Ninth Symphony with Michael Tilson Thomas leading the San Francisco Symphony, Stravinsky's Oedipus Rex with Esa-Pekka Salonen and the Royal Swedish Orchestra, and a program spotlighting music of resistance by George Crumb, Julius Eastman, Dmitri Shostakovich, and Caroline Shaw with conductor Christian Reif and members of the San Francisco Symphony at SoundBox. He also sang works by Caroline Shaw and Kaija Saariaho alongside the Calder Quartet and International Contemporary Ensemble at the Ojai Music Festival. In May 2021, Tines sang in Tulsa Opera's concert Greenwood Overcomes, which honored the resilience of Black Tulsans and Black America one hundred years after the Tulsa Race Massacre. That event featured Tines premiering “There are Many Trails of Tears,” an aria from Anthony Davis' opera-in-progress Fire Across the Tracks: Tulsa 1921.Davóne Tines is a winner of the 2020 Sphinx Medal of Excellence, recognizing extraordinary classical musicians of color who, early in their career, demonstrate artistic excellence, outstanding work ethic, a spirit of determination, and an ongoing commitment to leadership and their communities. In 2019 he was named as one of Time Magazine's Next Generation Leaders. He is also the recipient of the 2018 Emerging Artists Award given by Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts and is a graduate of The Juilliard School and Harvard University, where he teaches a semester-length course “How to be a Tool: Storytelling Across Disciplines” in collaboration with director Zack Winokur.The Truth In This ArtThe Truth In This Art is a podcast interview series supporting vibrancy and development of Baltimore & beyond's arts and culture. To find more amazing stories from the artist and entrepreneurial scenes in & around Baltimore, check out my episode directory. Stay in TouchNewsletter sign-upSupport my podcastShareable link to episode ★ Support this podcast ★