Podcasts about Moves

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  • 836PODCASTS
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  • Nov 23, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Moves

Show all podcasts related to moves

Latest podcast episodes about Moves

TK's Juicy Pod
Makeup Can't Fix An Ugly Work Ethic with Alexis Oakley

TK's Juicy Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 65:42


This week on Making Moves, TK is joined by celebrity makeup artist Alexis Oakley! The two bond over midwest boys and talk about how they navigated building their careers without knowing anyone when they first moved to LA. Alexis dishes on her favorite clients and reveals the biggest difference she's noticed about doing makeup for influencers compared to traditional celebrities! Get 20% Off and Free Shipping with the code MOVES at Manscaped.com. Get your man a gift you'll both enjoy, the gift of MANSCAPED. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Kolbecast
Episode 73: Through Beauty and Technology

Kolbecast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 41:36


AMDG.  Early in the podcast comeback, we talked with Kolbe drama teacher Dolores Mihaliak about the timeless significance of dramatic arts and timely capabilities of technology.  Dolores rejoins Bonnie today to have a conversation about a new way to experience the Camino de Santiago, a pilgrimage route in Spain which dates back to the days of the apostles.  Homeschool graduate and current Ave Maria University student Leila Castillo tells Bonnie and Dolores more about this cinematic pilgrimage, as well as how she honed her communication and media skills while homeschooling and how she chose to rise to opportunities in her path.  Learn more about the movie and Ahava Productions via these links:   "Santiago: THE CAMINO WITHIN" -- watch the trailer and rent the film (English & Spanish)!  ECHO series (2016) on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults that Leila assisted with (English & Spanish)  Music that Moves the Soul  Consider hosting a Pilgrim Party to enjoy the film with friends, relatives, and parishioners!    Follow Ahava Productions on Instagram @ahava_productions   Follow Ahava Productions on Facebook @AhavaProductions    Videos Leila produced with her siblings in 2020:  "The Five First Saturdays Devotion" and "Visiting Jesus!" Documentary (Scroll to the bottom, under "Castillo Kids CK101 Channel)  "Visiting Jesus!" Documentary also found here (first video on this page)    Other relevant links:  Kolbecast Episode 3 with Dolores Mihaliak   Camino pilgrimage page on Google Arts & Culture  Interested in Kolbe Academy's offerings? Visit kolbe.org.     Look for the Kolbecast in your favorite podcast app and subscribe for effortless episode delivery.  Have a suggestion or question for the Kolbecast team? Write to us at podcast@kolbe.org. 

The Talking Shop Podcast
117. Stories from Matt Solomon, Netherlands Olympic Strength and Conditioning Coach

The Talking Shop Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 49:27


Matt Solomon coaches Olympic and Paralympic athletes for Team NL (Netherlands), has accumulated coaching experience all over Europe and the Middle East, and hosts the Science for Sport Podcast. In this episode we discuss: 2:40 Moves from following his wife's career to becoming a strength coach for a soccer team in the United Arab Emirates 14:03 His "financial getaway" receiving 4 months salary only hours before leaving a country to move back home 25:35 How sets and reps don't matter and why you're really there as a coach, learned from all athletes but mainly Paralympic athletes IG @MattSolomonStrength ; Twitter @Matt_Solomon110

Rethink Your Money
Ken Griffey Jr. Rookie Card - November 12, 2021

Rethink Your Money

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 25:21


Today's F-Bomb discusses the following: - Happy Veteran's Day - The Stock Market Says the Pandemic is Over - Gold is Still Awful - What's a Simple 401k? - 457 Plans - Be a Scout not a Soldier - 1 Thessalonians 5:16 - Money Helps, but Won't Make us Happy - 10-Year end Moves to Lower Your Taxes - Semifinals against our league's "Aaron Rodgers" Sources: Animal Spirits Podcast, Kiplinger, WSJ, Morningstar

Money Savage
Book Club featuring Brant Cooper

Money Savage

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 20:33


On this edition of the Book Club, Brant Cooper talks about his book Disruption Proof: Empower People.  Create Value.  Drive Change. We talked about Brant's experience working in San Francisco during the DotCom bubble, working with big companies and realizing he wasn't cut out for it, going to work for startups and finding his place.   We discussed what makes startups so attractive and fun to work for, how everyone there is wearing so many different hats all the time, and how it's easy to find purpose. We talked about dramatically things have changed in business, the speed at which change happens, how to manage through disruption and why disruption is going to impact your business whether you like it or not so you're better off being prepared.   We discussed the value of taking the principles that make startups successful and applying them to already successful large companies, how adopting those principles can help with new innovation and how to start the process. We talked about how most employees are interested in doing important and meaningful work, the trick is figuring out how to unlock them so they're able to do it. We discussed what Brant is hoping people get out of reading the book, how long it took him to write and the things he prodest of!  Get a copy of his book HERE Brant is a New York Times Best-Selling author of the Lean Entrepreneur, the CEO of Moves the Needle, a speaker and podcaster.   You can learn more about Brant at MovesTheNeedle.com, BrantCooper.com, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and LinkedIn. If you'd like to take part in our discussion group, you can learn about it here as well as MoneyAlignmentAcademy.com. Thanks, as always for listening!  If you got some value and enjoyed the show, please leave us a review wherever you listen and subscribe as well.  You can learn more about us at MoneyAlignmentAcademy.com, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, Pinterest, YouTube and Facebook or you'd like to be a guest on the show, contact George at Contact@GeorgeGrombacher.com.

Crunch Time Presents: Men of Steel Podcast and On Deck on CSR
#SteelersvsBrownsRecap & #Trade&ReleasePredictions

Crunch Time Presents: Men of Steel Podcast and On Deck on CSR

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 43:09


Previously on the #ShowBlitz #SteelersvsBrowns #WeekEight #PostGameShow with Charles, “The Prodigy,” Richey the #Steelers no longer find themselves in the #Basement of the #AFCNorth. Ben Roethlisberger manages to escape Cleveland perhaps for the last time with his 24th Career Victory & 12th Overall on the Road. Also will there be any Moves made by tomorrow's #TradeDeadline or any Releases? All that and much more. You can follow me on #Twitter and #IG @ProdigyRichey and for the #MenofSteel Podcast on #Twitter @MenofSteelCJR and on #IG @menofsteelnation. For more of the #MenofSteel Podcast be sure to check them out on #MixCloud #SoundCloud and by searching on #Anchor Crunch Time Presents: Men of Steel Podcast and On Deck on CSR which shares my Podcast to: #BreakerAudio #GooglePodcasts #Overcast #PocketCasts #Radiopublicpbc and #Spotify. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/charlestheprodigyrichey/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/charlestheprodigyrichey/support

Artfully Told
Episode 075 - Kelsey Aicher

Artfully Told

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 45:55


In today's episode, I welcome Kelsey Aicher! Kelsey is a trapeze artist and coach, as well as the Artistic Director of Aerheart and the Training Company Program Director for Kansas City Aerial Arts. She shares her experience with mental health issues and why she's so passionate about opening conversations about it. She shares with us her heart behind her latest show "n0rmal" (premiering in Kansas City and on livestream soon!) and some of her exciting future plans. (Fun fact: the cover image for this episode is part of the show image for "n0rmal"!)   Get in touch with Kelsey Aicher: www.kansascityaerialarts.com | kelsey@kansascityaerialarts.com Enroll in Lindsey's dance and wellness courses: www.elevateart.thinkific.com  Support Artfully Told: www.paypal.me/elevateart Artfully Told links: www.facebook.com/artfullytold | www.artfullytold.podbean.com | elevateartskc@gmail.com Get a free audiobook through Audible!  http://www.audibletrial.com/ArtfullyTold Schedule your own interview as a featured guest with Artfully Told! https://calendly.com/artfullytold/podcast-interview   Episode 75 - Kelsey Aicher [00:00:00] Lindsey Dinneen: Hello, and welcome to Artfully Told, where we share true stories about meaningful encounters with art. [00:00:06] Krista: I think artists help people have different perspectives on every aspect of life. [00:00:12] Roman: All I can do is put my part in to the world. [00:00:15] Elizabeth: It doesn't have to be perfect the first time. It doesn't have to be perfect ever really. I mean, as long as you, and you're enjoying doing it and you're trying your best, that can be good enough. [00:00:23] Elna: Art is something that you can experience with your senses and that you just experiences as so beautiful. [00:00:31] Lindsey Dinneen: Hi friends, whether you are just getting started or you're a seasoned professional looking to up your game, I have an exciting opportunity for you. Did you know that I am actually the creator of 10 different courses online that range from ballet, jazz, tap. They also include a mindset detox course and two Stretch and Tone courses. So if you're looking to start a new hobby or get a little bit fitter, or you're looking to do a deep dive into your mindset, really perform a true detox, I have the course for you, and I would love to help you out with that. So if you go to elevateart.thinkific.com, you will see all of the different courses I've created. [00:01:26] You don't have to step in a classroom to take your first dance class. I teach a signature 20 Moves in 20 Days course that allows you to learn 20 steps in just 20 days. It's a lot of fun. We have a great time together. And I think you're going to absolutely love the different courses. And Artfully Told listeners get a little something from me. So if you go, you'll sign up and use the promo code "artfullytold," all one word, and when you do so you'll get 15% off the purchase of any and all your favorite courses. All right, listeners, enjoy that. Again, it's elevateart.thinkific.com. See you there. [00:02:11] Hello and welcome back to another episode of Artfully Told. I'm your host Lindsey and I am very excited to have as my guest today, Kelsey Aicher. She is a trapeze artist and coach. She is the Artistic Director of Aerheart and also the training director for Kansas City Aerial Arts for their training company. She's the director for that. And I am just absolutely thrilled that she is joining us here today. Thanks so much for being here, Kelsey. [00:02:43] Kelsey Aicher: Thank you for having me. [00:02:44] Lindsey Dinneen: Of course. Well, I would love if you wouldn't mind sharing just a little bit about your background, maybe how you got involved in art in general, and then specifically in aerial arts and let us know a little bit about what you're doing now to, if you don't mind. [00:02:58] Kelsey Aicher: Yeah. So I have a very strange accidental journey to where I am right now. I've always been really good at math. And that's honestly what got me into art was, I was just, I skipped a grade in math and in third grade and was always advanced. And I was so bored in all of my math classes in high school because I just felt it was too easy. So I started writing short stories instead of paying attention in class. And that's when I fell in love with writing. I started taking creative writing classes, realized I love writing short stories and wondered if I could make a profit or like make a career out of it. So I started studying screenwriting by reading every book that I could. And when I was a junior in high school, I took a summer screenwriting camp at Drexel University and studied screenwriting intensely with the professors and fell in love, went to NYU at first and then switched to Columbia College to finish my Bachelor's in Screenwriting. [00:04:01] And then my life pulled me into Portland. My ex-husband got a job there and I didn't know what to do. And so I was freelancing as a screenwriter doing commercial scripts. I started taking aerial classes to do something, to feel, to feel productive. It was just a hobby. And then a year later I started performing and coaching. And a year after that, I was hired professionally to perform trapeze and just somehow accidentally became a trapeze artist. I don't think that's most people's journey. And now moving to Kansas City, I moved here four years ago. I've been able to combine my love of writing and my aerial arts by writing circus stage shows for the training company, student company, and the professional company. [00:04:54] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. That's amazing. I love that you've been able to incorporate both of your passions into this one cool endeavor that you've been able to undertake. So that's, that's really interesting. So, like you said, sort of the accidental everything coming together, but it sounds like it, it came together pretty, pretty, perfectly, so that's, that's great. So you talked about, you know, starting with the background in, in writing. And so I'm curious how that transition has been, because you were talking about screenplays and whatnot. So, so how have you found that background to be obviously incredibly helpful as you plan out shows, but then also, how has it changed or evolved over the years just because it's necessary to do so with producing a, an aerial show versus let's say a movie? [00:05:45] Kelsey Aicher: So starting at NYU for college, they have your freshman year, you have all the --all dramatic writing students are combined to a class. So it's playwrights, TV writers, and screenwriters. And the first semester, all we did was study plays. And then the second semester we started moving into TV and films. So I actually got a lot of training in playwriting as well as part of my education into screenwriting. When I write a show: one, I think just in general, any type of writer, whether it's short story, novels, whatever, there's still always standard structures of a story. They're generally three acts and character development, multiple plot points. So just understanding story, I think, helps with creating any type of show on stage. Even if it's silent, like ours are-- I shouldn't say silent, but free of dialogue, like ours are-- in a circus show. But having the playwriting understanding actually helps me more. I treat it like I'm writing a musical, so I still outline all my habits and stuff like that like I do for screen writing. I write like my treatment, my outlook. [00:07:01] But then when I think about it, conceptually, I think of it like a musical, because a musical has this narrative story, but then the idea of having a musical number where you're just singing is so removed from reality that it's like a large moment that's just capturing one tiny little feeling. And that's kind of what I do with aerial is like, okay, we're having this story flowing through. And now we have this character locks eyes with this character. And instead of singing a song about it, we're going to have three aerialists on silks doing a whole dance that's showing how these two characters have just fallen in love at first sight. [00:07:41] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh, I love that. Yeah. I can completely see that. It's so helpful to have that background of understanding the, the building blocks of creating a story in order to translate it to an art form that you really can't do as much with as far as-- well, you could, I suppose with dialogue-- but traditionally you don't. So yeah, I think that's, that's really neat. And I'm curious, has there been one show in particular that you've worked on, perhaps that has been the most difficult to translate from your concept in your head and like, "I know I want to get these messages across" to put it on, you know, an aerial production where they can, they can interact with each other? Yes, you can see those very human moments and these connections, but still to get across your main point, you know, what was, what has been one of the most challenging that you've experienced so far? [00:08:36] Kelsey Aicher: I think the one that has not actually been released yet. I wrote a show for the training company, Kansas City Aerial Arts called "The Spaces Between," and it's very conceptual. I started writing it-- honestly, I think it was the first show I started to write. But it just didn't make sense to have them start with the students, start with like a really highly conceptual show. And so I put it on hold for several years and we finally were doing it to debut on April 3rd, 2020. So we spent six months building up for this show, getting everything ready. And the three weeks before the show, we shut down the whole studio. And so we actually just filmed it in this past April, April 2021, and it's still in the editing process, so I haven't seen it yet. So that's why I'm interested to see if it goes across. [00:09:33] In the past I've written really, really narrative shows. We've did one about the story of Prometheus and the one that we did before "Spaces Between" was called "Masked: A Superhero Love Story." And it was very clear that here's our hero, here's our villain. And they fall in love and like everything that's happening. So generally I go very narrative where like one person is playing a character and it's the whole through line. With "The Spaces Between," there was a narrator that was just telling the story about growing up, dealing with parents' divorce and death of her sister and escaping, using her imagination to escape what was the stress of what was happening in her life and going to your imagination by thinking of like the worlds that are created in the space inside of bubble or the space between two pages of a book. So it's interesting to make things really, really highly conceptual, where people are just like in normal clothes. And it's not really obvious. They're not heavy characters. Even if the narrator is talking about bubbles beforehand, will people be able to tell that these three lyra performers are supposed to be fairies come to life in this magical world between bubbles? [00:10:46] So I, I think that that's the hardest one, but I also don't know yet the end results, since it hasn't been released yet. It's not fully edited. So I'm when we interested to see if the whole concept and idea that comes across. I hope it does, but I know that that's definitely-- it's a lot harder to convey a concept, especially when we're doing everything very conceptual anyway. Like falling in love is easier to do with dialogue than with aerial, but at least we can create a lot of set up with the right music and costuming and movement to convey it, than trying to convey something like-- I'm trying to think of an example. Oh, there's one where it is-- they're portraying the space between notes in music and on trapeze. And whether that's going to come across or not, I don't know. [00:11:45] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Yeah. You know, on some level I think every time I write and produce a show is, you know, I, I have some level of confidence having been able to produce shows that I'm proud of in the past, but there's always that, you know, when you produce something new, is it, is it going to read, is it going to come across to your audience or did you just create this cool thing in your head that everyone's like, "oh yeah, that was interesting," but they don't quite get. So I can certainly relate to that. But I'm excited for that, that show. That sounds really interesting and unique. And I think, I think that will be a really cool concept to watch. Well, a series of concepts to, to watch in a, in an aerial show specifically. Well, I know that you're currently working on a show that is coming up pretty quickly here, just a few weeks away. And I would love if you wouldn't mind sharing that. I know it's a very, you know, personal thing for you. And I don't want to give anything away ahead of time. I want you to speak to it, but I would love if you would share just a little bit about maybe your next upcoming production that is finally live again. So exciting. [00:12:56] Kelsey Aicher: I am very excited to be back to live theater. It is, I don't enjoy filming things that were meant for stage, despite my screenwriting background. Yeah. So I am making, I've directed the student company before. This is my first time directing our professional company, Aerheart. It is also my first time directing a show that I'm performing in since I'm in Aerheart, but the show is called "n0rmal." Doesn't sound so exciting, but I want to spell this out. We're spelling it lowercase n, the number zero, r m a l. I put the zero in because I wanted to show that like no one is free from mental health or no one is untouched by mental health topics. Like everyone is affected. We're not alone. So I put the zero in there, one, to make the spelling a little bit quirkier, but to, to show that like we're all in this together, no one is exempt from dealing with mental illness or mental health issues. And that's the subject of the show we are talking about trying to normalize talking about mental health and suicide prevention. [00:14:07] Yes, you mentioned that it is a more of a personal story or personal project for me. One, in the pandemic, I saw a lot of my friends have more mental health issues. And for me, I went deeper into my depression, which I've been dealing with since I was 14. And more on a very personal level, I had an addiction to self-harm, to cutting specifically when I was in high school, and I struggled a lot with it. I was hospitalized in college for self harm and I have struggled on and off, but I've been pretty good in my adult years. And during the pandemic with everything being as hard as it was and depressing that it was, I picked up the habit again and it was a struggle and it was a thing that I didn't like. And so I resumed therapy and got back out of the, I stopped it before it became an addiction or a habit again. So I was already dealing with like, "okay, I'm having a tough time. And I know I'm not the only person having a tough time, but none of us are talking about it." [00:15:17] And I'm coming from a place of privilege like that I get to create art all the time. I have been in therapy. I am willing to talk about my own struggles with anyone. But not everyone feels that safety because there are so many reasons to feel like talking about having depression or having suicidal thoughts is taboo. It's going to be a sign of weakness or people just don't understand. And people end up feeling isolated and alone for that reason because they feel like they're the only one feeling what they're feeling. So I wanted to create a show that was to say like, "Hey, you aren't alone." We all experienced this thing in different ways, but it's okay to talk about it and there is support out there. So that's kind of how "n0rmal" started. [00:16:09] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Well, first of all, I just want to say, you know, for me personally, but just for, for the world, for people in general-- I, I'm so thankful that you are willing to, to address this and to address it in a way that brings people together and says you're not alone, that, that many of us struggle daily with various, you know, mental health concerns. And I think that, you know, I agree with you a lot of times we're led to feel like we're the only ones experiencing something, and that's just not true. And I've noticed for myself that the more honest and open I can be about my own struggles with, you know, with the appropriate people-- not, not everybody-- but with the appropriate people that there's this extremely supportive community in the feeling of, if I can be honest, that allows other people to be honest too. And then we can support each other, but if we don't know what's going on and we can't be honest, then we're stuck in this loop of, of feeling like we're alone because clearly nobody else is going through this. Everybody else has their lives together when that is so not true. So, yeah, I, so I really commend you for, for doing this, and I'm really curious to me, this sounds like one of those concepts that is extremely difficult to translate to an aerial show. So I'm curious how that process has gone for you. And are you sort of tackling different aspects of mental health per piece or is there like a very clear running narrative throughout the whole? [00:17:55] Kelsey Aicher: It is more the former. So I have a description that has some statistics and my, my apologies if this number is wrong. If you come see the show, the correct information is on the program, but it's-- I have a two paragraph description, one paragraph for each act, and the first act talks about some statistics. Like the first piece is called-- and I'm going to get this number wrong, I'm so sorry-- 48,481, I think is the number, which is the number of lives lost to suicide in the year 2020 in the US. Wow. Which is a lot. And so I start with the first act being a lot of statistics and things like psychosis, depression, and substance use disorder are three of the highest risk factors for suicide. Things like being a member of a minority community, especially LGBTQ, or having experienced post-traumatic stress disorder, veterans. There are a lot of risk factors that show signs like that go into complete suicide. And so the first act kind of covers a lot of the different warning signs or common risk factors that can lead to suicide. [00:19:28] And then in what I think is the hardest piece in the show, like not hardest physically, but the hardest piece to watch is an acro number where-- I'm in this piece, of course, my partner and I at the end commit suicide. And then the second act is more about like, okay, so we know that there are these problems that people are facing. There's these mental health issues. There are these risk factors. There are certain groups that are more at risk than others and it's really prevalent. So then the second act is about like, okay, so people might be drawn to suicide because they feel like they're a burden to other people or because they want their pain to end and we can support them. And what you're talking about with the, having the conversation to find out, like, by actually saying like what's going on and you end up finding that you're not alone and that there's a support system. The second to last piece-- which I'm also in-- apparently I'm in the hard pieces emotionally. [00:20:29] It's called "Honest Conversation." And it's performed with my duo partner, Elena Sherman, and my real life best friend. And we are-- our piece is duo lyra, and we're having an honest conversation where in this piece we are through aerial saying like, "Hey, I have been feeling this way." And then all of a sudden hearing, "oh, I've been feeling this way too, and I love you." And we love each other and maybe we can like support each other. So having that honest conversation, just talking about it. So it's very conceptual because there isn't like a strong through line, but I did have these two paragraphs written in the program. And the title of each act is in bold and caps in the paragraph. So if you want to kind of follow along, so you're just like, "I don't even know what's going on right now," you have that safety backup to find out like what we're talking about with psychosis, hopefully like in the piece specifically about psychosis, where we have two people that are kind of like the same sometimes, and then moving further away from each other at other times, hopefully you can kind of get that sense of having -- not multiple personalities-- but having conflicting feelings and manic and depressive states that are sometimes together and sometimes battling each other. Hopefully in the piece about depression, you get the sense of just feeling defeated and depressed. But there is that option of go back and look at the paragraph and you can figure out what we're doing. [00:22:00] Lindsey Dinneen: That's awesome. Yeah. And I know this show is coming up pretty quickly. So do you want to share the details of how we might be able to watch it, whether we're local to Kansas City or not? [00:22:12] Kelsey Aicher: If you are local to Kansas City, we are going to be performing this show live at City Stage at Union Station on November 18th, 19th, 20th, and 21st. You can buy tickets at kansascityaerialarts.com. There'll be a link to our EventBrite page. If you are not local to Kansas City, and you want to check out the show, we are going to do a live stream on the Friday, November 19th show, and you can buy tickets through our same EventBrite page there. And if you do the live stream, you'll be able to not only watch it live on Friday, but you'll have access to watch it at another time after that, that weekend. So I know some of my students that are coming to see the show in person that have family members that are in different states are also gifting a live stream to their family members so that everyone they want to share it with can see this show. [00:23:06] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh, that's a perfect option. Thank you for sharing all about it and the process and all of that. And I'm wondering how it's been for you personally, and you can go into as little or as much detail as you want, but this is obviously-- like, we've kind of touched on something near and dear to your heart. And I, I, I know from my own personal experience that sometimes taking something that is really, really difficult, and frankly, even just difficult to talk about regardless of your comfort level of it, it's just still hard. I'm, I'm curious how that's been for you to translate that for yourself as a performer and then watching your creation come to life. How has that process been for you? I mean, I can only imagine that you are, you're needing to do a lot of self care on the side to really you know, not go down a rabbit hole of, of, of you know, reliving some of those harder moments, but, but, but still able to portray it. Do you mind speaking to that? [00:24:11] Kelsey Aicher: Yeah, of course. Yeah, I feel like I've been sharing my story more in the last few weeks than I ever have in my life, but I have, I've decided about five years ago that I was going to stop worrying about covering up my scars and not worry about telling people that I have depression, like not trying to hide it. I grew up in a Catholic small town, rural Wisconsin, conservative family. And when the school counselor told my parents that like I had talked about suicide ideation and that I should seek counseling, my parents were really upset that I would need extra help. My mom would drive me to and from therapy in silence and she would always like give me a doctors' note, like that I had a doctor's appointment. Like she would not let the school know that it was for counseling. I was told that I was not allowed to tell anyone, like none of my friends. So I went through my teenage years, dealing with an addiction to cutting, dealing with depression, dealing with starting meds for major depression and anxiety. [00:25:24] And my parents wouldn't talk to me about it. And I couldn't talk to any of my friends. And so I grew up being like, everything that I'm dealing with is something to be ashamed about. And even when I was hospitalized in college, it was only because some one saw --a neighbor in the dorms. I started like bleeding through my shirt and I didn't realize I was bleeding through my shirt from all of my wounds that I had self-inflicted, and they're the ones that took me to the hospital. And then coming back from that break, my parents and I really didn't talk about it. So it's just been like this whole, like life of like, you're supposed to be ashamed of having depression. You're supposed to hide it. You're not supposed to talk about it because like it's improper and it reflects poorly on your family and everyone else around you. [00:26:09] And in Portland, I had a coach who was wearing tank tops all the time and I could see her scars. And I asked her about at one time, like really like hesitantly about like, "Why do you feel comfortable showing your scars?" And she's like, "I get hot easily. I don't want to wear sleeves when I'm training." And it was just like this whole idea of like, "oh, this isn't a big deal." And so I made it a goal for myself that once a week, from them that point on, I was going to wear either shorts or short sleeves or something that revealed at least a scar once, once a week. And it wasn't necessarily around people I knew, or to like my aerial classrooms, and that it would be like to the grocery store, but I was just going to like gradually become okay with like having my scars exposed because I would like literally wear long sleeves and pants. And I like cover absolutely everything. [00:27:02] And so when I started getting comfortable with like my body and people seeing this, and I started like realizing. There's this other person that has this thing. And then we start talking these other people and they have depression. I was like, "oh, I'm not alone." And "Hey, I can start talking about these things." And I've found for me that the best thing for my own mental health and my own control of my problems with self harm has been being honest in talking about it. So I think for me, because I have been now for like, six, seven years been very open. Like if anyone asks me about something that's going on or my past experience, I will tell them. I will be honest. And it's just been something that's been so helpful for me. So I think along this journey, working on this show, even though it is so personal to me and personal to all the performers, I've already-- I don't want to say made my peace but it's the best phrase that's coming to my head right now-- made my peace with that that I don't feel super vulnerable to it. [00:28:00] That said, I am reading something on stage that I wrote. And I have found that when I listened to myself say these words, I have a really tough time. That's when I get triggered. So I have to, there's a piece where I'm reading something I wrote while a contortionist is performing to my words on stage. And anytime she sends me her videos to show me like, "oh, this is what I'm working on," I have to turn the sound off because if I hear myself saying these words, these about having anxiety and feeling stressed out, I get like, I have a physical reaction. So I have found that like, that's my one like trigger in this show, everything else I've been okay with. I've seen a lot of the performers, so many of the performers, if not every performer in this show has started putting their own emotions, their own feelings and their own experiences into this show as well. And so I've seen it more, I've seen more reactions from the other cast members seeing like how their real feelings are getting into the pieces and sometimes disrupting it. [00:29:09] And so I've talked to some of the newer performers. And the way that I keep my, the way I picture it is, you want to be you adjacent. So I think like, there's this character and then there's yourself and you want to have them next to each other so that they're just touching enough that you can pass the emotions and the feelings of your own experiences into your character, but you don't want them to be overlapping and you don't want them to be the same. Because if you are now becoming your reality into this piece, it's going to be so hard as a performer. It's going to be too easy to break down and to not actually separate yourself from the art that you're working on. So I talked to someone else about this and they just decided that they described it as a mask work, where you don't want your mask to be so tight fitting that it's yourself. You want to have a little bit of space between you and your mask that you're presenting. I think of it as being adjacent. Either way, it's this idea that you need to put all of your feelings and your experiences and your person next to your character that you're being. So pull on your experiences of self-harm and depression in this piece about depression, but don't make it actually your real experiences. If that makes sense. [00:30:25] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, and that's great advice. And I wish I had heard that advice a few years ago. I performed a piece where my character was the subject of some pretty intense bullying and, you know, a lot of gossip swirling around the character and the character had to deal with it. And, and it was very difficult to, to be adjacent to that character, having experienced some, some similar kinds of-- not the same obviously things-- but similar things to have those feelings brought back up, right? And so, yeah, that is such a good piece of advice. Yes, draw on your own experience to be able to portray it, to be able to share with the audience, "this is how this feels to me," but not so much that you get to a point of reliving the difficult, like-- I mean, trauma is a strong word-- but you know, things are traumatic, so don't relive the trauma exactly. But yeah, but, but be willing to sit with the feeling. And stay a little bit separate. I like, I like the way that, that you talked about that. Yeah. That's really important. [00:31:33] Kelsey Aicher: And you don't want to completely remove yourself from it because then your performance is inauthentic. Like you still want to give an honest portrayal, but that's why I always think of it, like as adjacent, like touching but not overlapping. [00:31:46] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. That's, that's fantastic. And I'm sorry to hear that you didn't have that support system growing up. I think there-- there's still is-- but there were for many, many years just so much stigma surrounding any sort of mental health difficulty. And I'm so thankful that you have a great support system now, from the sounds of it. And again, we, we are all touched by it. I love what your concept of that is, is nobody has been untouched in some way, whether it's you yourself or, or somebody that you love deeply or whatever. It's, it's there. And so being able to have those honest conversations and draw on the support of others and professionals. And I'm a huge advocate for therapy. I, I think therapy is for absolutely everyone. [00:32:30] Kelsey Aicher: Yes. I think that is something that everyone should experience at least once in their life. Like we go to the dentist twice a year to make sure that our teeth are still okay. We go to the doctor to make sure that everything's okay. Why don't we do this same thing for our emotional and mental wellbeing? Like everyone should be just at least once in their life should get that like tune-up. We do it for our cars. We do it for everything. But we should do it for our brain as well. [00:32:54] Lindsey Dinneen: Yes. Amen. Fully on board with that. Yes. So I'm sure that you're a pretty wrapped up in, you know, everything that is "n0rmal" right now, but then what is on the horizon for you? Where do you see yourself heading to next? [00:33:12] Kelsey Aicher: Well, always more things. I'm sure you already know that our training company is doing this production in December with VidaDance, called "Cracked!" So I'm simultaneously working on training and getting everything together and directing "n0rmal" while also doing some choreography and coaching for the training company for "Cracked!" And the training company at KCAA is already starting to work on our spring show which is a pop goth, gender neutral fairytale retelling, called "The Glass Combat Boot." So I'm already doing auditions for that and choreography and getting everything lined up. That will be in May, again at City Stage. And then, because I'm always thinking so far ahead, I'm getting the concept ready for their Fringe show and I'm already working on Aerheart's show for next year, next fall. So I'm constantly, I always like to stay one year ahead when it comes to writing the show that we're going to do. [00:34:17] So I kind of have a system of "alright, idea for next year's show needs to be done at least one year in advance. I need to have an outline at least 10 months in advance. I need to start auditions and choreography" by the time that we have started by the time we're in production of the previous show. So I'm going year-round constantly thinking of like what the next project is. It helps that I always like to create, so I get excited about things and the people I work with, both in Aerheart and in the training company, they're so inspiring. And so sometimes they'll just say something or do something and I see an image and that sparks a whole entire show. [00:35:02] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, absolutely. Well, and I have the privilege of actually knowing you in real life, not just, you know, over the, the podcast. And so, yeah, you are one of the most organized people I've ever met, which obviously you have to be, considering you always have like 15,000 things on your plate, so kudos to you. [00:35:21] Kelsey Aicher: I don't usually feel that way so thank you for the compliment. [00:35:24] Lindsey Dinneen: Well, yeah, and I understand that the not feeling that way, but clearly, you know, you are very. So good, good for you, but yeah, that, that is awesome. And for those who haven't had the chance to experience Kansas City Aerial Arts yet-- first of all, I just have to say the company, the professional company Aerheart, and then of course the training company, but the students in general are just amazing people first and they're amazing performers second, but they are just-- you have to watch, you have to watch their shows, frankly. Just shameless plug, but like, it just, you have to do it because they're, they're so good. And one of the things that I enjoy so much about watching them perform is how much they enjoy performing together. It's just obvious. [00:36:11] Kelsey Aicher: Yes. Yes. 100%. This is the most supportive community I have ever known. Like, I am constantly baffled by them. We hold auditions and it's almost like people get more excited to find out that they didn't get a solo because they're excited that someone else got the solo. It's, it is so crazy how much they all support each other and love each other. And like you said, it just shows on stage. [00:36:38] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. It's, it's magical. It's a really special atmosphere that you all have obviously carefully curated and support, but it is awesome the kind of people that you draw in and the way that they interact with each other. It's, it's always a blessing when we get to interact with y'all, but just in general, it's so much fun to watch you. And I would highly also encourage that if anybody is local to Kansas City and has any interest in aerial art, definitely that's the way to go. Like I said, they're extremely supportive people. Even if you've literally never done anything aerial before, they're not going to make you feel goofy or anything. I mean, I did an intro lesson one time and I was so like, I, you know, don't have the upper body strength or anything, and everyone was just so supportive and sweet and you know, that's the way to go. Well Kelsey, you know, thank you so much in general for, for being honest and open with, with us and specifically with the show. I'm really excited that you're doing this and I commend the work. I think it's extremely important that you're doing it. So thank you so much for that. I do have a couple sort of generic questions that I like to ask my guests if you're comfortable with that. [00:37:50] Kelsey Aicher: Yeah, of course. [00:37:51] Lindsey Dinneen: Awesome. Well, first of all, what is one change that you would really like to see in the art world? It could be really anything-- could be a very serious sort of change that you feel like needs to be made or something fun. Just what's one thing you would like to see changed about the art world? [00:38:10] Kelsey Aicher: One thing that I really struggle with is I don't feel that artists receive the same respect as someone that works like a standard nine to five. Like we're constantly asked to work for experience or do work for free promotion, but you wouldn't ask an architect to build a design your building for free, just for exposure. And I think that artists frequently thought of as, "oh, you're just doing it because you love it. And so you should just do it for the love and you don't have to worry about getting paid or getting paid equally." And I don't know, I feel like it's kind of like, you know, people that are computer programmers, they don't just write code because they want to make money. They do it also because they enjoy it, and artists do their work because they enjoy it. But why are we expected to just enjoy it and not seek compensation? So I do wish that there was a little bit more respect financially for artists. [00:39:12] Lindsey Dinneen: Yes, yes. And amen. Yep, absolutely agree. And then is there something arts related that you still want to explore that you haven't yet? So maybe another form of art that has it kind of, you know, prodded you here and there that, "oh, try me!" But you haven't had the opportunity or, or haven't gone for it yet? [00:39:38] Kelsey Aicher: Hmm. That is a really good question. I tend to be a person who-- I don't want to say impulsive, I'm impulsive light. So if there's something that interests me, I usually go for it and I dive in to it. So most things I feel like I have tried. I do still have the goal and it's not new. I, I love writing and I still write regularly. I still have the goal of writing a novel someday. But I'm trying to think of other art forms that I haven't dabbled in that I had just like really would like to try. I can tell you that one of my favorite art forms to watch is, I love watching dance. I love watching all types of dance and I just get mesmerized by it. And when there's an aerialist and a dancer on stage at the same time, the audience is almost always watching the aerialist because that's the thing that they haven't seen so much. And for me, I'm always watching the dancers cause I'm like, "But, but the dancer!" But I, I have tried dancing. I'm not great at dancing. I really respect everything that you guys do. Because I, I'm not a great mover on the ground by any means. [00:40:43] Lindsey Dinneen: But maybe something to further explore someday if you feel like it! [00:40:46] Kelsey Aicher: Possibly. Yeah. I mean, things in the circus arts, I know I want to get better at hand balancing and I've even considered-- it's just like, not professionally-- but like, I'm like when I retire from aerial, I think I might try to get a little bit more into contortion. You know, cause someone just gets into contortion for fun. But yeah, I think that my art, I just like to, I like being creative. I like, I like to move my body a lot, so I think it'd be something along those lines or even in the martial arts, I know. Not everyone considers that to be an art, but there certainly is a movement and an art form to things like Tai Chi or TaeKwonDo. So I think maybe the martial arts would be something I would try out. [00:41:30] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, absolutely. Great. And then my final question is-- so at the end of your life, what is one arts related experience that you would want to experience one last time for the last time? [00:41:45] Kelsey Aicher: Directing a show with aerialists. It's funny that I have fallen in love with it in the last few years, because I, when I was in film school, I really just wanted to be a writer. I had no ambition to be a director, almost everyone I was in classes with was like director, director, or writer, director. And I was like, no, I really do not want to direct. And the last four years with Kansas City Aerial Arts and working with the student company in particular, like being able to see us, all that team effort put in heart and soul from choreographers and performers and coaches and make a vision come to life. And it's not just like this vision that I have, like, I love seeing their reaction. Like "Masked" was my favorite show that we've done so far on stage. And after "Masked," so many of the students came up to me were just like, "We can do this again, right? Like we should just like, get the, the theater again next week and just keep performing this show." And that joy and that excitement of "we did this together as a team, we got this concept, we were the best artists we could be and we executed a vision." It's just so incredible. And so I imagine that like at the end of my life, I just want to direct one more show with this community again. [00:43:06] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. I can understand that. Certainly relate to that. Yeah. Well, Kelsey, thank you so very much for being here today. I'm just so inspired by what you've been talking about and your courage in speaking out about things that are important, that matter to you, that matter to everyone. So thank you for doing that. And if, if people are interested in connecting with you specifically, is there a way for them to do? [00:43:33] Kelsey Aicher: Yes. You can go to kansascityaerialarts.com and you'll be able to find my bio and my contact information. If you want to email me, it's kelsey@kansascityaerialarts.com. I am not very good about social media, but I do have an Instagram account, which is mindfulaerhead. Airhead is A E R. So M I N D F U L A E R H E A D. So mindfulaerhead because I am really into mindfulness while being in the air. And yep. So you can follow me on Instagram there and message me that way as well. I will do my best to respond. I'm working this year on improving my social media presence, but it has been a thing that I have been removed from for several years. [00:44:23] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh, I can relate to that. Well, thanks again so much for being here. I really appreciate it. And if you are feeling as inspired as I am after listening to this episode, I'd love if you'd share this with a friend or two, and we will catch you next time. [00:44:41] If you have a story to share with us, we would love that so much. And I hope your day has been Artfully Told. [00:44:51] Hi friends. I wanted to share with you another podcast that I think you're going to fall in love with just as I have. It's called Harlem with a View, and it is hosted by Harlem Lennox, who was a previous guest of mine on Artfully Told and a dear friend. Just because it looks easy doesn't mean it is. There is so much that goes into the work of your creative. She wants to know how the artists got into their line of work, what inspires them, but most importantly, what keeps them going? She'd asked them about how they make it through the blood, sweat, and tears. She wants to know what it's like to live this creative life: the good, the bad, the ugly, and even the magical. So she goes behind the scenes with creatives, from different genres and she explores their history, their take on life and talks about the business of art and the dedication of making art. She has a brilliant, brilliant platform. I think you will fall in love. I highly recommend that you search for Harlem with a View. Thanks!

I Don't Speak German
96: Catching Up With Cantwell (and The Failures of the Prison Industrial Complex)

I Don't Speak German

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 88:49


Sines v. Kessler is finally underway, and Christopher Cantwell is representing himself.  Need we say more?  Actually, yes.  And hence, this episode. Content warnings. Podcast Notes: Please consider donating to help us make the show and stay independent.  Patrons get exclusive access to one full extra episode a month. Daniel's Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/danielharper Jack's Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=4196618 IDSG Twitter: https://twitter.com/idsgpod Daniel's Twitter: @danieleharper Jack's Twitter: @_Jack_Graham_ IDSG on Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/i-dont-speak-german/id1449848509?ls=1 Show Notes: Vice News, Charlottesville Race and Terror (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RIrcB1sAN8I) Christopher Cantwell transferred to Communication Management Unit in Marion, IL. (https://twitter.com/socialistdogmom/status/1402292133483196422?s=20) Pro Se Letter regarding change of address by Christopher Cantwell.(https://storage.courtlistener.com/recap/gov.uscourts.vawd.109120/gov.uscourts.vawd.109120.968.0_1.pdf) Hilary Sargent coverage of the Cantwell criminal trial at The Informant. (https://www.informant.news/people/1157338-hilary-sargent) Cantwell Criminal Trial Testimony Day 3 (https://storage.courtlistener.com/recap/gov.uscourts.nhd.53269/gov.uscourts.nhd.53269.118.0.pdf) Cantwell Criminal Trial Testimony Day 4 (https://storage.courtlistener.com/recap/gov.uscourts.nhd.53269/gov.uscourts.nhd.53269.119.0.pdf) Jordan Green at Raw Story: ‘Crying Nazi' Christoper Cantwell is getting legal assist from a white supremacist as he prepares for Charlottesville trial (https://www.rawstory.com/crying-nazi-trial/) While serving his sentence, Cantwell met Hale along with another man named William A. White, who has played an even more significant role in helping him prepare for his upcoming trial in Charlottesville. White, in turn, is in prison for soliciting violence against the foreman of the federal jury that convicted Hale. According to the US Justice Department, White created the now defunct Overthrow.com website in the late 2000s as a platform for the American National Socialist Workers Party. He used the website to post derogatory comments and personal information about the jury foreman, including their home address and phone numbers. "Anyway, so I run into these guys," Cantwell told a white supremacist podcaster during an interview last week from an Oklahoma prison where he is awaiting transfer to Charlottesville to stand trial. "And allegations against them notwithstanding, they're good to me."   Sines v. Kessler at Courtlistener (https://www.courtlistener.com/docket/6168921/sines-v-kessler/?filed_after=&filed_before=&entry_gte=&entry_lte=&order_by=desc) Document 1108 (https://storage.courtlistener.com/recap/gov.uscourts.vawd.109120/gov.uscourts.vawd.109120.1108.0.pdf) In addition, it has now become apparent that Cantwell, who has been proceeding pro se and has been afforded its corresponding protections and leniency, may be using another inmate, William A. White, to participate in this litigation and “ghost-write” his recent filings. See ECF 1063 at 1 (“Christopher Cantwell ... Moves this Court ... To Provide Cantwell and his Lay Counsel, William A White, Adequate Access to The Electronic Materials...”); ECF 1063-2; compare ECF 1055 (handwritten filing written largely in first person) with ECF 1063 (typewritten filing written in third person). That provides yet another basis to deny these motions. Ghost writing plainly violates legal rules and only reinforces the inappropriate and harassing nature of Cantwell's numerous recent filings, including ECF 1062, 1063, 1064, 1065, 1066, 1077, 1078, 1084, 1085, 1086, 1087, 1088, 1089, 1090, 1096, 1097, 1098, 1099, 1102, 1103. See Wojcicki v. SCANA/SCE&G, 947 F.3d 240, 244 (4th Cir. 2020) (“Allowing individuals to represent themselves pro se reflects a respect for the choice of an individual citizen to plead his or her own cause, but so does the bar preventing individuals without legal expertise from representing others.” (quotation omitted)); Greene v. United States Dep't of Educ., No. 4:13cv79, 2013 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 143678, at 26-27 (E.D. Va. Oct. 1, 2013) (“During the course of this appeal it came to the Court's attention that Greene, although proceeding pro se and receiving the forbearance afforded such status, was utilizing the services of a ghost writer for many of her filings. The Court emphasizes that the practice of ghost-writing is in no way permissible in the Eastern District of Virginia, or any federal court for that matter. Even if the ghost writer is not an attorney, such practice is still considered the unauthorized practice of law. Those who proceed pro se are afforded certain amounts of leniency that are not afforded represented parties. Ghost writing inexcusably abuses this leniency."). Document 1134 (https://storage.courtlistener.com/recap/gov.uscourts.vawd.109120/gov.uscourts.vawd.109120.1134.0_1.pdf) Document 1185 (https://storage.courtlistener.com/recap/gov.uscourts.vawd.109120/gov.uscourts.vawd.109120.1185.0.pdf) Document 1306 (https://storage.courtlistener.com/recap/gov.uscourts.vawd.109120/gov.uscourts.vawd.109120.1306.0_1.pdf) While Plaintiffs remain adamant that any further delay would be extremely prejudicial given the fact that this case was filed four years ago, jury questionnaires have already been sent out, and many parties, counsel, and witnesses are already in or on their way to Charlottesville, see, e.g., ECF Nos. 1108, 1113, 1196, Plaintiffs are also aware that Mr. Cantwell likely will continue to assert these arguments, which could complicate the issues on appeal. As a result, Plaintiffs have concluded that the best way to resolve the tension between the need to proceed to trial and Mr. Cantwell's due-process arguments would be for the Court to sever Plaintiffs' claims against Mr. Cantwell from their claims against the other Defendants in this case for a separate trial pursuant to Rule 42 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. Document 1307 (https://storage.courtlistener.com/recap/gov.uscourts.vawd.109120/gov.uscourts.vawd.109120.1307.0.pdf) (Kolenich on behalf of Kessler, Damigo, and Identity Evropa) The Court has been aware of Mr. Cantwell's objections since at least April 2021. The plaintiffs have been opposing Cantwell and not caring about his allegations of procedural or substative rights for at least that long. See ECF 945 filed April 26, 2021. Defendants object to the Court flip flopping on its Cantwell rulings, at the mere letter based request of the plaintiffs, less than 48 hours before trial. The defendants have invested considerable time and expense into preparing a defense strategy that assumes the presence of Mr. Cantwell as a party defendant at trial. Document 1309 (https://storage.courtlistener.com/recap/gov.uscourts.vawd.109120/gov.uscourts.vawd.109120.1309.0.pdf) (Smith on behalf of Parrot, Heimbach, and TWP) Plantiff's counsel want to take a “mulligan” here because, prior to Friday's final pretrial conference, they had their army of jury consultants analyze the jury questionnaires, and concluded (rightly) that they have very little chance of winning their case in front of the eventual jury (even with adverse inferences). In order to manufacture a basis for their mulligan, they've been intentionally not caring about Mr. Cantwell's situation, which they've known about for many months now; that way, if they drew an unfavorable jury pool, they could fake a sudden onset of empathy and concern for Mr. Cantwell's predicament, and bait the Court into postponing the trial with their ridiculous “two Charlottesville trials” (i.e., the regular one, and then some kind of Cantwell-only “mini-trial” a couple years from now) proposal. Document 1314 (https://storage.courtlistener.com/recap/gov.uscourts.vawd.109120/gov.uscourts.vawd.109120.1314.0.pdf) (Bloch reads the amended letter.) Document 1328 (https://storage.courtlistener.com/recap/gov.uscourts.vawd.109120/gov.uscourts.vawd.109120.1328.0.pdf) Cantwell pro se defendant woes Document 1329 (https://storage.courtlistener.com/recap/gov.uscourts.vawd.109120/gov.uscourts.vawd.109120.1329.0.pdf) More Cantwell pro se defendant woes Document 1330 (https://storage.courtlistener.com/recap/gov.uscourts.vawd.109120/gov.uscourts.vawd.109120.1330.0.pdf) THIS IS NOT FAIR document Molly Conger Twitter (https://mobile.twitter.com/socialistdogmom) Molly Conger Patreon(https://www.patreon.com/socialistdogmom/posts) Molly's Trial Coverage Day One (https://twitter.com/socialistdogmom/status/1452622192555053069?s=20) Jury Selection Day Two (https://twitter.com/socialistdogmom/status/1452977775749500930?s=20) Jury Selection Day Three (https://twitter.com/socialistdogmom/status/1453344852016607234?s=20) Jury Selection Day Four (https://twitter.com/socialistdogmom/status/1453699603879141381?s=20) Opening Arguments Day Five (https://twitter.com/socialistdogmom/status/1454066857418362880?s=20) Plaintiff's first two witnesses Emily Gorcenski and Molly Conger. White Supremacists Have Returned to Charlottesville in Another Attempt to ‘Unite the Right'(https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2021/10/with-the-charlottesville-trial-white-supremacists-try-again-to-unite-the-right.html) Christopher Cantwell opening statement (https://twitter.com/socialistdogmom/status/1453795094591639562?s=20) (Paraphrase) "If you've ever had the intellectual curiosity to read Mein Kampf then you know this case is Mother Jones level nonsense." Trey Garrison dox at the SPLC (https://www.splcenter.org/hatewatch/2019/01/18/spectre-unmasked-racist-alt-right-podcaster-used-be-local-reporter)  

Creative Capital
Creative Capital Podcast 110: Seeking Out Partnerships with Tim Vitale

Creative Capital

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 67:24


Tim Vitale is the Founder and Owner of Upside Capital based out of Charlotte, NC. He is the AVP of Finance for an F500 Insurance Company and specializes in underwriting, analysis, and budgeting. Tim was born into a commercial real estate family and has owned rental property in the Charlotte area. He is also an active investor and syndicator in the Southeast USA. Tim runs his own Facebook group Makin' Moves in Multifamily in which he provides value to other investors and syndicators through educational and inspirational Facebook events and posts. He is also an Admin and Moderator for the My First Million in Multifamily Facebook group.   In this episode, Tim talks about how important relationship-building has been for his real estate investing journey. He talks about how providing value to your partners without expecting anything in return will help you open more opportunities and create more success in the field of real estate. Tim also shares how you can find partners that will help you get closer to your real estate goals. Listen in! [00:01 - 06:58] Introduction     A preview of the episode Tim shares his background How his experience in finance helped him on real estate investing   [06:59 - 16:36] Making the Leap from Finance to Multifamily Real Estate   Tim on quitting his job to invest in multifamily Entrepreneurship is about taking risks What it took for Tim to make the transition How long it took him Getting educated about real estate investing Networking   [16:37 - 42:13] Creating Success by Building Partnerships   Tim talks about his current portfolio Building partnerships There's a who for every how How Tim was able to find his partners Providing value “The Ant Mentality” On relationships that don't work out Every partnership has a termination date Execution is key Why partnerships are critical in the pursuit of your real estate goals   [42:14 - 55:18] The Pod Decks Segment   Share your most embarrassing moment ever What's something weird that you recommend everyone tries at least once? [55:19 - 01:07:24] The Core Four   What is your favorite real estate-related book? Multifamily Millions by David Lindahl (link below)  What do you think your unique skill is that helped you become successful? Talking with people Tell me something that's true about real estate that almost nobody agrees with you on Real estate is easy What one piece of advice would you give the listeners wanting to succeed in real estate investing? Start networking now! Connect with Tim! A summary of the episode Closing words Key Quotes:    “If you're going to be an entrepreneur, it's all about risk and taking risks. Big risks, big rewards. If you have the opportunity and the means to do it, what are you waiting for?” - Tim Vitale   “Your network is your net worth. I hate that everyone says that saying and it's so cliche, but so true. If you don't have something, there's somebody out there that has what you need. There's a who for every how, and the more who's that you can connect with, you'll be able to accomplish anything that you want.” - Tim Vitale   “If you are seen as a pillar of the industry where you are helping other people constantly, you're providing value to people constantly, then the law of reciprocity will come back and pay you tenfold, because you've helped others achieve what they're trying to achieve.” - Tim Vitale Resources Mentioned:   Multifamily Millions by David Lindahl Connect with Tim on LinkedIn, Instagram, and Facebook! You can reach and connect with me on Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Youtube  For more information about Ferrari Capital visit us on our website https://www.ferraricapital.com   SUBSCRIBE to this podcast for more episodes on how to create your own future through smart and lucrative investments.  LEAVE A 5-STAR REVIEW and share this podcast with someone you know who wants to experience massive growth and success in their business.   Listen to our previous episodes here 

KOIN PODCAST NETWORK
The Daily 6: 10/27/2021

KOIN PODCAST NETWORK

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 3:10


Moves to better protect kids online, neighbor sues neighbor over business fire, and debating COVID vaccine mandate for Portland school students

Live Your Spa Life
#224: The Existence of Higher Dimensional Beings - with James Gilliland!

Live Your Spa Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 52:35


James Gilliland is a best-selling author, internationally known lecturer, minister, counselor, multiple Near Death Experiencer and contactees. James is recognized worldwide as the founder of the Gilliland Estate, previously referred to and commonly known as the ECETI Ranch (Enlightened Contact with Extraterrestrial Intelligence) where he documents and shares amazing multi-dimensional contact phenomenon which can be viewed at www.eceti.org. His weekly As You Wish Talk Radio program on BBSradio.com draws an audience from around the world who are interested in truth and Higher Consciousness. Important Topics -What's new on their ranch and what's happening in terms of disclosure -How his book “Anunnaki Return, Star Nations and the Days to Come” came about-On chaos that is happening and why it's part of the healing-The 7 multi-dimensional level-Why it's so important to create sacred space-What are the ways or tools to help people awaken faster-On taking personal responsibility for our health and well being-What the dark arts are doing-The level of censorship of mainstream media and social media-Why do character and action establish who we are-How to stay in contact with him and how to find his books-What are his most favorite places are and why-How is he a “Force For Good” in the worldQuotes“It's so important to create sacred space because if you don't, anything can come in.”“Enlightenment means to be in knowledge of both sides of the coin; the light side and the dark side.”“A man or a woman's character is established by their actions.”“The higher dimensional beings are always going to empower you to make your own personal connection with prayer, that's their agenda.”Connect with James:ECETI Website: www.eceti.orgECETI YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/ECETIStargateOfficialYouTubeChannel/featuredECETI RUMBLE: https://rumble.com/c/c-836083 ECETI Telegram Channels: https://t.me/ECETI_OFFICIAL_CHANNEL, https://t.me/ECETI_OFFICIAL Check Out All of the Best-Selling Books by James Gilliland: http://eceti.org/books.html As You Wish Talk Radio On The BBS Radio Network http://bbsradio.com/asyouwishtalkradio/

The Modern Manager: Create and Lead Successful Teams
176: Make Your Team Disruption-Proof with Brant Cooper

The Modern Manager: Create and Lead Successful Teams

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 30:16


Between technology, globalization, and a pandemic, it’s no wonder that businesses are experiencing disruption faster than ever. Regardless of industry or location, teams and organizations need to develop the skills to navigate regularly changing environments and increasing ambiguity. Today’s guest is Brant Cooper. Brant is the CEO of Moves the Needle and New York Times bestselling author of The Lean Entrepreneur and his new book Disruption Proof: Empower People. Create Value. Drive Change. Brant has a unique take on disrupting our current way of thinking in order to be closer to customers, move faster, and act bolder. With over two decades of expertise helping companies bring innovative products to market, he blends agile, design thinking, and lean methodologies to ignite entrepreneurial action within large organizations. Brant and I talk about the 5 E’s of becoming disruption proof and what you and your team can do to make better decisions and be prepared for whatever the future brings. Get a downloadable reference of the 5-E’s which you can print and display in your office to help you remember to embrace Empathy, Exploration, Evidence, Equilibrium and Ethics in your work. Get it when you join the Modern Manager community. Subscribe to my newsletter to get episodes, articles and free mini-guides delivered to your inbox. Read the related blog article: How To Prepare Your Team To Weather Any Storm KEEP UP WITH BRANT LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/brantcooper/Twitter: @brantcooperWebsite: https://brantcooper.com/Book: https://brantcooper.com/disruption-proof/ Key Takeaways: Disruption-proof teams learn to navigate the uncertainty and changes of business life. They are able to thrive within unstable conditions. You can’t execute through a crisis. It requires innovation and experimentation. The five E’s to disruption-proof teams are Empathy, Exploration, Evidence, Equilibrium, and Ethics. Teams need to listen to what their clients want. This is best done by observing real life, with the person interacting with the tool or experience rather than from surveys or interviews. People are terrible at predicti

PayPod: The Payments Industry Podcast
The Gig Economy And Financial Services With Matt Spoke Of Moves: Ep 202

PayPod: The Payments Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 31:29


The continually growing numbers of gig workers has transformed the way many think about careers themselves. But gig workers have different needs, particularly on the financial and banking side than many traditional workers. Fortunately, fintechs are stepping up to directly service them and the gig economy itself. But how is it being done, and what's to come in the future? Matt Spoke, CEO of Moves, the only all-in-one financial app helping gig workers manage their business and get ahead, joins to discuss. Find show notes and more: https://www.soarpay.com/2021/10/moves/

Opinions May Vary
Episode 437 With Brandon Boone and Nichole Goodnight: Music, Speedrunning, and "The No Sleep Podcast".

Opinions May Vary

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 112:26


Ok so it took us a little longer than normal to get to our usual spooky-filled episodes but we promise it was worth the wait because this episode is jam-packed with so many rad things. This week, we had the absolute pleasure of talking with not one, but TWO contributors of the insanely popular ""! For those unaware, "The No Sleep Podcast" is an award-winning anthology series of original horror stories. They've been making content and releasing episodes since 2011 and are set to begin their 17th season soon! First up, we were joined by composer Brandon Boone. Brandon has been scoring the show for the past 8 years and has created over 5,000 individual pieces of music in that time with no signs of slowing down. He's a self-taught musician with an immense talent for creating spooky and haunting tunes that perfectly compliment the show. When he's not creating music for NoSleep, he's hard at work writing and producing his own albums, or creating soundtracks for videogames like "Scarlet Hollow".  Check out his for tons more! Following our chat with Brandon, we were then joined by voice actor Nichole Goodnight who gave us all the inside info on how she got her start with NoSleep as well as some tips and tricks of the voice acting trade. An avid gamer and Twitch streamer, Nichole is also regularly involved in the bi-annual "Games Done Quick" events acting as both host and speedrunner! You can find her Twitch channel or subscribe to NoSleep for even more of her work! We can't thank Brandon and Nichole enough for coming on and getting spooky with us. The NoSleep team really seem to have put a great group of people together and if there's anything we're taking away from recording this episode it's this: Shoot your shot. Do the thing. Submit the audition. You never know what might happen! Enjoy! -Jr. Audio tracks provided by Brandon Boone. "Vibrate with Adrenaline" and "Don't Answer The Door" found on his latest album "Night Fall", available now!

Midnight Slumber
E37 - Car Thief

Midnight Slumber

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 8:55


Welcome to Midnight Slumber! We have a fun short story for you. In this story, a car is stolen by an unexpected person. Sit back, relax, enjoy this short story, and thanks for listening! Written and Narrated by Zack Miller. Follow us on Twitter @The_MNS_Podcast, Instagram @midnight_slumber_podcast, our YouTube Channel - Midnight Slumber, and on Facebook – Midnight Slumber.Also we have made a new show on YouTube called "Mini Horror Stories". It is premiering for the spooky month of October, so be sure to check it out under Miller Media LLC 

B.J. & The Bear
10/21/21 - HR 2: KB (Co-Host, Drew & KB) - Are Packers moves with Smith & Mercilus really all-in? - Halloween over & under

B.J. & The Bear

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 40:58


Always a fun start to the second hour as KB swings by to talk all things "Stuff" including today where we found out there isn't much he sucks at except home improvement projects. B.J. and Brian look at the moves by Green Bay and don't necessarily believe the moves for Jaylon Smith and Whitney Mercilus indicated 'All-In' moves. They feel like they are more high reward/low risk financial moves. Plus what is the over under for houses hit by trick-or-treaters? If you can bet on it B.J. and Brian will find a way to put a line out.

The Digital Executive
Entrepreneur Launching Major Support for the Gig Workers During the Pandemic with CEO Matt Spoke | Ep 403

The Digital Executive

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 10:23


Moves' Founder and CEO, Matt Spoke, joins Coruzant Technologies for the Digital Executive podcast. He shares how he launched his company during the pandemic to support the gig workers, making it easier to make a living in the gig economy.

Action and Ambition
Matthew Spoke Paves The Way For Gig Workers With The First All-In-One Financial App To Support Businesses

Action and Ambition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 31:11


Welcome to another episode of the Action and Ambition Podcast. We have on the show is the CEO of Moves, Matthew Spoke. Spoke is regarded as a thought leader at the forefront of game-changing technology, having spoken at dozens of innovation conferences and written for Forbes.com, Coindesk.com, Financial Post.com, and TechCrunch. He is a major proponent of the societal advantages of decentralized technologies and founded the Open Foundation, a non-profit dedicated to advancing blockchain technologies. Spoke took stock of what the organization had done and the lessons learned in late 2019. Spoke noticed a need for a new type of product-centered on empowering gig workers after having a conversation with an Uber driver. The following day, he began shifting the company toward addressing the systemic issues confronting the rising gig workers — and Moves was born. Moves is a social finance product for gig workers obsessed with two things: building a world-class financial product for gig workers and forming a collective to help gig workers through shared social experiences. Efforts to rebalance the gig economy in favor of its workers took place. Gig workers now make up the majority of the American workforce, numbering an estimated 50 million people. However, no one is looking out for their best interests or giving them the tools to capitalize on their collective scale. Find out more by tuning into this episode. You're going to love it!

Thoughts on the Market
Special Episode: The Podcasting Industry Comes Into Its Own

Thoughts on the Market

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 12:48


Moves toward scale and consolidation show promise for what is already a burgeoning content industry. ----- Transcript -----Andrew Sheets Welcome to Thoughts on the Market. I'm Andrew Sheets, Chief Cross Asset Strategist for Morgan Stanley Research. Ben Swinburne And I'm Ben Swinburne, Equity Analyst covering Media, Entertainment, Advertising and the cable/satellite industries. Andrew Sheets And today on the podcast will be going a bit meta, as the kids say, as we talk about some interesting upside for podcasting and advertising. It's Tuesday, October 19th at 2pm in London. Ben Swinburne [00:00:25] And 9am in New York. Andrew Sheets So, Ben, you recently wrote a research report titled, a bit surprisingly, “Mic'd Up. Is Podcasting the Next Big Thing?” I say surprisingly, because podcasting has been around for quite a while now. So why do you think that it's now where it's actually going to be it's time to shine? Ben Swinburne You're right. Podcasting has been around probably for at least 15 years, but what we're really seeing is a significant increase in engagement by consumers, investment by platforms and content creators jumping into this space. We think we're at a point now where the business model, at least from an advertiser ROI point of view, has been proven out. You know, advertisers are paying $20-$25 CPMs, or cost per thousand listeners, to access a podcast audience, particularly through host-read ads, that's as high as linear television. And that just shows you that advertising on podcasting works for advertisers. So, what the industry needs from here is significant growth in adoption, which we believe is going to come given the investment we're seeing in content. Wrapping it all up, we think the industry can grow at a 30% CAGR through 2025 and become a $6-7 billion market globally, which is meaningful for the companies that are in this space. Andrew Sheets So to kind of put those numbers in context, if I have a podcast that has 4,000 regular listeners, you know, if I'm getting paid by an advertiser $25 per thousand, that'd be about $100 for that $4,000 advertising block. Is that a good way to kind of think about those numbers. Ben Swinburne Per spot, yes. And then obviously, it's a question for you on your podcast, how many ads you want to run per hour. Andrew Sheets Podcasting is now charging, was it similar advertising rates as local television? Did I hear that correctly? Ben Swinburne You did. You did. Andrew Sheets Would you say though, investors believe in that? Because you cover a wide range of media companies in your equity coverage here at Morgan Stanley, how is the market pricing that advertising opportunity? And do you think the market believes that podcasting can be this major advertising vehicle? Ben Swinburne I think the market's skeptical, frankly. Part of that is because as we talked about earlier, podcasting is not new as a media. But also because even at 15-years-old with a lot of excitement around it, it's a very small market. You know, estimates range from a billion dollars to maybe $2 billion in 2020 of global ad revenue on podcasting. That is a low single digit percentage of the global ad market. it's just been a very slow rise in monetization. And I think the market is skeptical that it can really break out from here. Andrew Sheets So I imagine another area where the market might be skeptical is a lot of people have been stuck inside as a result of the pandemic. They've been listening to more podcasts. But as things normalize, maybe that listening trend will shift. Can you just kind of give us some numbers around, what percentage of the U.S. population listens to podcasts and do you think that that engagement will decline or rise as we look ahead over the next couple of years? Ben Swinburne In 2020, the reach of podcasting in the U.S. accelerated to 25% of the population. If we think about that level of adoption, in a lot of other instances, Andrew, that's a part of the S curve where we start to really see the adoption rate accelerate. In other words, you're going from sort of early adopter to mass market. So that's our expectation here. We actually saw that in streaming music years ago. So, we're optimistic that we're going to see that from here. And frankly, when I look at the investment, the amount of money companies are pouring into content and monetization technology, I'd be really surprised if we don't see it accelerate. The other thing I would add is that even though podcasts consumption held up well in 2020, it was still negatively impacted by the pandemic. People were not commuting, not going to the gym, not going to work. All of that reduced the amount of time people were consuming audio content on their phones. So that is still the primary use case for all audio consumption but including podcasts. So we have started to see already improving data in the last several months on audio consumption as people have started to go back to work and go to school and hit the gym again. Andrew Sheets So then, Ben, can you talk a little bit more about what's been happening on the merger and acquisition front in podcasting? And how this media is getting reshaped by some of the changes that we've seen? Ben Swinburne Absolutely. Yeah, it's a very active market. You can sort of break down the M&A into two broad areas: content and sort of advertising technology. If you think about the media business, in the sort of the pre-internet days, you had media producers and media distributors, it's a pretty simple value chain. The internet, by its nature, but also because it's much less regulated, has created an environment for more vertical integration. Podcasting is rapidly moving in that direction, with distributors buying up podcast IP and creators rapidly. Now, that can probably only go so far because, like music, podcasting is a business built on ubiquitous distribution. So, where we've seen exclusives, they just haven't really worked, and that makes sense from an advertising monetization point of view. On the monetization front, there is a lot of work left to do. I mean, we're still looking at a very, while attractive media for advertisers, pretty old school in the way the ad products actually work. Now this is starting to change. We're seeing more things like advanced measurement, attribution, programmatic buying-- all wonky things us media people like to talk about. But the most popular ad format in podcasting is host-read ads. It's Bill Simmons reading a promo code to go to a website and buy a product. You know, this is like Howard Stern 25 years ago. So, from that point of view, it's still early days. Andrew Sheets So, to kind of put some numbers around that, I mean, could you give us a sense of how much is currently being spent on podcast advertising versus other types of advertising that are out there? Ben Swinburne Oh, yeah, absolutely. I mean, the video market is $100 billion in the United States. Between linear television and streaming video, the radio, traditional radio market in the United States is sort of $15 to $18 billion. And as I mentioned before, podcasting, we think will probably be around 2 billion this year. Andrew Sheets Got it. So, it's still even as ubiquitous as it's starting to seem. It's still very small, still very nascent relative to some of these much bigger areas where companies are already spending a whole lot of money. Ben Swinburne That's right. Andrew Sheets So, Ben, you cover a large number of the largest entertainment and media companies. What do you think is going to be their strategy for podcasting going forward? And do you see this as more of a US opportunity, a global opportunity or something in the middle? Ben Swinburne We think the strategy going forward is primarily one that monetizes podcasting through advertising. And to be successful in that, you're going to need a significant content offering. But also, importantly, a scaled and advanced technology platform. And so, we're seeing companies that are going after this opportunity really invest aggressively in both. In terms of U.S. versus global, we definitely see it as a global opportunity. However, if we think about the TAM for podcast advertising, radio is the obvious one. Radio is very much a U.S. marketplace. A lot of radio outside the U.S., think of BBC One in the U.K., is in fact ad free. So, the global radio advertising opportunity skews very much U.S. That's why it's so important that podcasting can attract digital advertisers or buyers of digital advertising - those that might buy search or display ads - that opens up podcasting to a much larger opportunity and global. Andrew Sheets And Ben, I was hoping you could also talk a little bit about what are the demographics of podcast listeners and how does that impact the advertising landscape? Ben Swinburne So as you can probably guess, particularly since we're in the early adopter phase of podcasting, it does skew, sort of technology savvy, educated and often higher income from an audience point of view. That's part of why advertisers are so attracted to the space and why the ad rates are so high. Clearly, the long-term bull case is widespread adoption now as reach goes from 25% of the population to hopefully 50% and 75%, by definition the audience is going to look much more representative of the overall population, which will bring with it, you know, lower income or advertising targets that have lower propensity to spend. So that will get reflected in ad rates and probably different kinds of ad products. But ultimately, even if that puts some downward pressure on ad rates, we think the growth in engagement will more than offset that, creating a nice growth story over time. Andrew Sheets Ben, I thought you made a really interesting point about just the types of advertising that are most effective here, you know, often, host read, often funny are very engaging. I mean, is there a good precedent in advertising for something that feels that personal? And, is there any other, implications for that just about how advertising feels and sounds, more broadly going forward? Ben Swinburne It's a great point, and it's a good news, bad news situation, I think, for the industry. The good news is that host read ads are incredibly effective. The demand outstrips supply, frankly, and the more widespread, highly popular podcasts that can be developed, the more opportunities there will be for monetization. The bad news is that to really scale the business host read ads are just it's hard to scale them. You can only have so many in an hour. And if you want to start really doing sophisticated, digitally driven ad buys and ad provisioning, you've got to automate all that. And doing host read ads in an automated fashion across the long tail of millions of podcasts really can't be done. The industry now is working on lots of technology and ad products to try to create an ad product or an ad unit that is hopefully not as effective as host read, but more effective than traditional radio. Andrew Sheets So, Ben as somebody whose father back in the day used to sell advertising for a radio station. What do you think are the questions that companies who want to advertise in a podcast should be asking to try to maximize that effectiveness? Ben Swinburne Well, a lot of the measurement in attribution technology today remains pretty early stage, frankly. Most of the podcast business historically has been measured by downloads. But just because you download a podcast doesn't mean you listen to it. And frankly, nobody really downloads podcasts anymore because they're all streamed. That just gives you an example of a key area like measurement that needs to evolve. You can go even beyond that when you think about multichannel attribution. For example, let's say I listen to a podcast ad and then I go online and I buy that product. How does the advertiser know that I went to buy that product because I heard that ad? Those things are all happening at a pretty sophisticated level online in general today. But podcasting is not plugged into that ecosystem in a real way yet. Andrew Sheets And finally, Ben, you know, based on your work and your forecasts, what do you think the next five years hold for the podcasting industry? Ben Swinburne We expect to see continued substantial investment in podcasting content, monetization technology and also personalization and curation. I think one of the challenges that consumers have, as I mentioned earlier is there's well over two million podcasts in a lot of these major platforms, so figuring out what to listen to is challenging. Sampling a song which might be 3 or 4 minutes long is a commitment. Sampling a 30/45 minute podcast is a whole different situation. And so those companies that can help consumers find what they want to listen to, that could be a huge advantage in the marketplace. And I'd say, much like we've seen in streaming video, we think we'll see an explosion of compelling podcast content across genres and across countries. There is so much talent out there which, when combined with the global growth and connectivity and connected devices, means we will all be plugged in all of the time, hopefully feeding our minds and hearts with information and stories from around the world. Andrew Sheets Fantastic. I think that's a great place to leave it. Ben, great chatting with you. Ben Swinburne Great speaking with you, Andrew. Andrew Sheets As a reminder, if you enjoy Thoughts on the Market, please take a moment to rate and review us on the Apple Podcasts app. It helps more people find the show.

Live Your Spa Life
#223: How to Uncover Your Strengths Through Your Stories - with Sarah Elkins!

Live Your Spa Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 41:28


How to Uncover Your Strengths Through Your Stories - with Sarah ElkinsSarah Elkins is your guide to uncovering the right personal stories for the right audiences so executives, leaders, public speakers, and job seekers can clearly and effectively demonstrate their character, values, and vision. As a Gallup certified StrengthsFinder coach, Sarah uses that tool and story sharing strategies as the foundation of her work.Hosting her highly engaging podcast, Your Stories Don't Define You, How You Tell Them Will, for more than 180 episodes was the inspiration for her book of the same name. You'll find magic in her ability to uncover the stories that are holding you back, the stories that created the internal messages that are keeping you from exploring your magic and making the impact you're craving at work, at home, and in every relationship.Important Topics -How she distinguishes epic vs. meaningful story-Her favorite meaningful stories -How she got into story business-How did she choose StrengthsFinder as the lead tool in her business-How did she consciously creates her life-On her diverse personal board of directors-On creating playlists that encourage and inspire her-What her favorite room is and why-What authenticity is overrated means-How is she a “Force For Good” in the worldQuotes“Sometimes other people see our talent before we see them, and see what we can contribute before we see that.”“Music isn't just about our own soundtrack. We help create soundtracks for the people around us.”“As long as we are living within our values, then whatever we do is authentic.”Connect with Sarah:Sarah's Website: https://elkinsconsulting.com/Sarah's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thesmileisfree/Sarah's Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/elkinscommunication/Sarah's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sarahlynnelkins/Sarah's Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/your-stories-dont-define-you-how-you-tell-them-will/id1329558957Other links and resources:Free Gift from Diane (5 Moves to RESET Your Power) - https://ResetYourPowerGift.comFree Gift from Diane (Life RESET Quiz) - https://LifeResetQuiz.comBANKCODE - https://MyBankCode.com/VictoryDiane Halfman's website - http://www.DianeHalfman.comWant to know more about yourself?Some people ask me how to RESET their life.Some people ask me how to be more sensual.Others are wondering how to make more money.How to be more successful.How to start a business.All of these questions and more are what I answer in my programs!Come see me at http://www.DianeHalfman.com

180 grados
180 Grados - Lori Meyers, Morgan, Jack White y The Mysterines - 19/10/21

180 grados

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 58:34


'No hay excusa' es la nueva canción de Lori Meyers que suena en exclusiva en este podcast, mientras tenemos la sensación de que Noni canta mejor que nunca. Con una atmósfera que está preparada para envolverte y conquistarte y unas armonías que simplemente son preciosas. 'No hay Excusa' se publica mañana pero en Radio 3 te la ofrecemos antes que nadie. Y mañana habrá otro estreno, será Julio Ródenas en Turbo 3 y el jueves, uno más con Leyre Guerrero, en Na Na Na. Así seguimos desgranando 'Espacios Infinitos', el disco que Lori Meyers publican este viernes, 22 de octubre. Aparte, escuchamos dos nuevos pasajes del tercer disco de Morgan y lo nuevo de Jack White y de The Mysterines. COURTNEY BARNETT - Smile Real Nice THE MYSTERINES – Hung Up MORGAN – Paranoid MORGAN - On And On (Wake Me Up) FEROE – Salvajes THYLA - 3 BAND OF HORSES – Crutch LORI MEYERS – No Hay Excusa LORI MEYERS – Punk X AMBASSADORS – Palo Santo JOY CROOKES - Feet Don’t Fail Me SUKI WATERHOUSE – Moves JACK WHITE – Taking Me Back MI CAPITÁN – Comanche LOS VINAGRES – Me Pone Rabioso Tu Forma de Andar CAROLINA DURANTE – 10 ELBOW - Six Words Escuchar audio

Artfully Told
Episode 073 - Sandy Woodson

Artfully Told

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 30:06


In today's episode, I welcome Sandy Woodson! Sandy is a filmmaker and photographer who recently quit her 9-5 to be a full-time documentarian. She discusses her experiences helping to share the stories of those whose voices have been historically silenced in Kansas City, including in the LBGTQ communities, and also about her passion for widening the audience for all artists in KC, whether they produce art for major companies or for their own small shows. (Fun fact: the cover image for this episode displays a tulip flag from Womontown, which you can read more about in the full episode notes.)   Get in touch with Sandy Woodson: sandywoodson12@gmail.com Enroll in Lindsey's dance and wellness courses: www.elevateart.thinkific.com  Support Artfully Told: www.paypal.me/elevateart Artfully Told links: www.facebook.com/artfullytold | www.artfullytold.podbean.com | elevateartskc@gmail.com Get a free audiobook through Audible!  http://www.audibletrial.com/ArtfullyTold Schedule your own interview as a featured guest with Artfully Told! https://calendly.com/artfullytold/podcast-interview   More about Sandy's project "Womontown:" In the late 1980s, Drea Nedelsky and Maryann Hopper had a vision.  They imagined a neighborhood where they could be themselves without fear,  a place where women could walk hand in hand down the street without the judgments and criticisms normally encountered in the straight world. Drea picked the Longfellow / Dutch Hill neighborhood from 30th to 27th, Harrison to Charlotte, because it was cheap. This was a neighborhood that had once housed Kansas City's elite but had fallen on hard times by the time the 80s rolled around.  Drea saw the economic benefits and security home ownership could provide and wanted to make that available for the people like them who were on the edges of society and faced countless discriminations not only because they were lesbians but because they were women.  In the late 80s and early 90s, a woman in Kansas City could not get a home loan on her own.  She needed a parent or husband to cosign. Being handy, Drea had no fear buying a house with no windows, electricity or plumbing even though it was next to an apartment building that housed drug dealers. Drea could see a future of like-minded women, buying these beat up, cheap houses and helping each other fix them up to make homes.  So Drea and Maryann put the word out and lesbians from all over the United States responded by coming to KC, buying houses and setting up a new community. As an organized effort, it lasted about 5 years, but the ripple it created is something that 30 years later can still be seen and felt.   Episode 73 - Sandy Woodson [00:00:00] Lindsey Dinneen: Hello, and welcome to Artfully Told, where we share true stories about meaningful encounters with art. [00:00:06] Krista: I think artists help people have different perspectives on every aspect of life. [00:00:12] Roman: All I can do is put my part in to the world. [00:00:15] Elizabeth: It doesn't have to be perfect the first time. It doesn't have to be perfect ever really. I mean, as long as you, and you're enjoying doing it and you're trying your best, that can be good enough. [00:00:23] Elna: Art is something that you can experience with your senses and that you just experiences as so beautiful. [00:00:31] Lindsey Dinneen: Hi friends, whether you are just getting started or you're a seasoned professional looking to up your game, I have an exciting opportunity for you. Did you know that I am actually the creator of 10 different courses online that range from ballet, jazz, tap. They also include a mindset detox course and two Stretch and Tone courses. So if you're looking to start a new hobby or get a little bit fitter, or you're looking to do a deep dive into your mindset, really perform a true detox, I have the course for you, and I would love to help you out with that. So if you go to elevateart.thinkific.com, you will see all of the different courses I've created. [00:01:26] You don't have to step in a classroom to take your first dance class. I teach a signature 20 Moves in 20 Days course that allows you to learn 20 steps in just 20 days. It's a lot of fun. We have a great time together. And I think you're going to absolutely love the different courses. And Artfully Told listeners get a little something from me. So if you go, you'll sign up and use the promo code "artfullytold," all one word, and when you do so you'll get 15% off the purchase of any and all your favorite courses. All right, listeners, enjoy that. Again, it's elevateart.thinkific.com. See you there. [00:02:11] Hello, and welcome back to another episode of Artfully Told. I am so excited to have as my guest today, Sandy Woodson. She is a documentarian, which I am so excited to hear all about how that journey came about. But thank you so much for being here, Sandy. I'm really excited to talk with you about art. [00:02:35] Sandy Woodson: I'm excited to be here. Thanks for the invite. [00:02:38] Lindsey Dinneen: Of course, absolutely. Well, Sandy, you know, you and I met through Kansas City Fringe Festival, which I have talked about many, many times on this podcast because I think it's such a special thing. But I would love if you wouldn't mind, maybe we could start there, sharing a little bit about how you've helped the festival over the years and even your own participation and then go from there. [00:03:01] Sandy Woodson: Okay. Yeah, it was somewhere around 2009 or 2010. We haven't really been able to remember between Cheryl and I, but early on, I was in a freelance mode. I was contracting with KCPT or KCPS. But I was just contracting and I had some open time and somehow or another, I think I first talked to Cheryl because I wanted to create an app that all the festivals in Kansas City could be listed on. I knew through the film festival, Kansas City Film Festival, introduced me to Cheryl to talk about that. And then as always, you know, if you talk to Cheryl, you become a volunteer pretty quickly for the Fringe Festival. So that's what happened. And at the time I had extra time, so I got involved with, you know, I jumped in with both feet and also, that was the first time I really started displaying photography. I've always been interested in it. I've always had it as a hobby. And I actually did some photography for Fringe that year. I believe it was that year. And I've pretty much done it every year since then. I haven't been as involved in the last couple of years, but in all the years leading up to that, I was pretty involved in the organization side of it. [00:04:17] Lindsey Dinneen: For sure. Yeah. And, oh my gosh, I know you, you know, basically once, well, even beforehand, but certainly once the festival starts, you're hitting the ground running like literally almost 24/7. [00:04:30] Sandy Woodson: Yeah. For a lot of years, it was like that. And then, like I say, the last couple of years, I kind of stepped back a little bit because my work started to get more intense. And so I didn't have as much time as I used to. [00:04:44] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, for sure. Well, are you planning to still, you know, participate in some ways and, and continue to exhibit your own work? [00:04:53] Sandy Woodson: Yeah, absolutely. And hoping to get now that I'm not nine to five, full-time somewhere. I'm hoping to get more involved with the festival next year, too. I'm happy that it looks like we're going to be able to meet in person again. That'll be awesome. [00:05:09] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh, hallelujah. I'm so ready for that. Okay. Yeah. Well, yeah. Thank you for sharing a little bit about that. And then, you know, specifically with your artwork, do you want to share what you kind of focus on as far as your photography? [00:05:26] Sandy Woodson: Yeah. So early on, my big thing was kind of spawned by the fact that I've, you know, had the way I put it-- I went to one too many bad photography exhibits where it's nothing but naked women. And I was like, so where all the naked men, you know, so I kind of got started on that path and did that for quite a few years. I was helped by that with not only Fringe where I could literally post, you know, or hang whatever kind of photos I want to do. At the time April McInerney, who I love, had a gallery called Slap and Tickle Gallery. And so she really opened things up for me. There was one time where she let me take over the whole gallery space and I hung, I had probably four or five different themes or years of work that I hung up. And then I set up a little area with rope and stanchion and a TV and a recliner and a cooler. And I said, I had a sign that said the "North American Male in his Native Habitat." And I had different guys show up every half hour to sit in the chair and do whatever they wanted to do. I was like, I don't care what you do. We just kind of want to here's guys. And here's what they do because that kind of went with the theme of all the photography I'd been doing the years leading up to that. [00:06:46] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Well, and that is an interesting thing. Again, native habitat. I like it. Yeah. And what a cool opportunity to get to take over that gallery, so to speak and that's awesome. [00:06:56] Sandy Woodson: Oh yeah, she was so awesome. I mean, she let the gallery go a few years ago. But you know, with Fringe, I was always able to do two sets of photography every year because they had a blue gallery or the gallery where the naked stuff went and so for Fringe, I'd always have something everybody could see and then something people not everybody could see. And April, her gallery, it was like whatever I wanted to put in there. Yeah, so it was an awesome time. And in the years since then, particularly in the last couple of years, I have been documenting LGBT history in Kansas City or what I'm hoping, you know, history in the making, things that are happening now that in the future, hopefully somebody will want to look back at and see, but so that's mostly what I've been doing with my photography since I haven't. Since Fringe has been virtual-- well I say that-- this last Fringe, I hung ballroom photos, and I can talk about that too. That's one of my documentary, documentary projects that I'm kind of working on. [00:08:04] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh yeah. I'd love to hear about that. [00:08:07] Sandy Woodson: Well, and when you hear ballroom, people think of men and women dancing in a kind of a formal way. This is more the African-American trans community ballroom. And like, if you ever saw the documentary, "Paris is Burning," from the eighties or what really kind of brought it all back up was the "Pose" series that was on FX, I think. And that's really how I got to know the people in Kansas City that are part of that community is I went to that screening. They were screening it at Tapcade, a weekly show for, I don't know, 6, 7, 8 weeks. And so I would go and, and I started to meet the people who do ballroom in Kansas City. And they've been very nice in letting me. There was a ball two years ago that they let me videotape and photograph. And for Fringe this last year is when I hung those ballroom photos. So that's been a big interest of mine over these last couple of years. [00:09:06] And I met Michael Robeson, who was co-creator of "Pose" because he's related in the ballroom community to a guy here in Kansas City named Xavier and Xavier is actually the Grandfather of Ballroom in Kansas City. So anyway, it's been an awesome experience. The people I've met are amazing and very kind and letting me poke my nose in their business. And now that COVID is getting better. I hope to get a couple of more. You know, recordings of balls that I know are coming up. [00:09:49] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. How exciting and what a cool opportunity. And it's great that you're keeping track of, of history there because, you know, we, we would want to be able to look back on that and really, you know, dive in. So yeah. Yeah. I definitely think so and well, and that's a perfect segue. I know you've had, you know, a really amazing career in a lot of different ways and venues and all sorts of fun stuff. But I know now you're kind of on a, on your own trajectory again, you know, as far as I know, not working for other, for a specific other person anymore or other company. And so, you mind sharing a little bit about your kind of dreams and plans for your future? [00:10:30] Sandy Woodson: There are so many right now. I'm just loving everything right now. So I worked at KCPBS off and on for the last 25 years or so. And there were two other times where I went freelance and contracted with the station and did some other things that I was working on at the time. So this time I, the station had approved me, given me the go-ahead to do a Womontown documentary. And I can explain that topic in a second. And so what I did is I got all of it, everything's shot and kept not being able to spend the time editing it because my full-time job was too crazy for me to be able to do that. So I was going to buy a house. I took some money out of my retirement account, the house didn't come through. And I was like, "Hey, I got enough money in there. I could live for a while off of that." So that's what I'm doing. And I have four documentary projects ahead of me. [00:11:29] Well, and, and if you don't mind, I'd like to explain. I mean, so a couple of years ago for Fringe, I was in San Francisco. I was walking down the street and in the sidewalk, I saw a heart with two men's names in it, and I thought, "Wow, I've never seen that before." And it got me started down a path of trying to document men who'd been together 20 years. And I did that as a photography project. I did audio- recorded interviews with these men as to how they met, their favorite things about each other. I was keeping it short and sweet because when you were at Union Station looking at the photos, you could scan a QR code and it would go to the site where you could listen to their interview. So when I was interviewing them, all of them had had met at the Cabaret Bar. And I started hearing about the Cabaret, which I'd never been to. When the Cabaret was around, I was, you know, living north of the river and having kids. So I didn't really know anything about it and got very interested in that. [00:12:33] And then somewhere down the line, I decided I wanted to talk about HIV aids in the eighties because I didn't, you know, I know people have done documentaries on that for other parts of the country, but not for here in Kansas City. So I got excited about doing that. And then I was talking to Rashaan Gilmore and he's like, "This is not just a history thing in my community. This is happening now." Because in the African-American community, if the rate continues as it is from what he told me, there will come a time where one out of every two African-American men will be HIV positive. So it became the history and the current state of HIV/AIDS in Kansas City. [00:13:16] So because I'm straight and I don't know anything or didn't know anything at that time, a couple of years ago when I first started this, I just started meeting people, talking to people. I'm talking about the Cabaret, talking about what it was like to be gay in Kansas City in the early days, what's it like now. I started documenting Drag Queens and female impersonators and that met the ballroom community, started documenting that. So it's just kind of taken off from there. And I think for me, I'm real passionate about this because I feel like the people in the LGBT community until somewhat recently, it wasn't safe for people to be coming out. So all of this history that's gone on for all of these decades, very little documenting has been done about it, particularly with video. And I started partnering with the Gay and Lesbian Archive of Mid-America with Stewart Heinz and just meeting tons of people. And so that's been, that's how all of that kind of got started. [00:14:20] Lindsey Dinneen: Wow. That's amazing. Yeah. Well, I'm, I'm so glad that you're choosing to tell stories that are, have traditionally not been told and, you know, historically have been sort of, like you said, kind of underground, hidden, whatever. You just didn't talk about it. So I think it's, it's cool that, that your endeavor is to, you know, meet these people and tell their stories. [00:14:43] Sandy Woodson: Well, and it's been really awesome for me. I mean, I'm glad that I was doing all of this on my own and, you know, outside of my full-time job and, you know, because of that, it has been a couple of years since I really began all of this, but you know, still in all it's, you know, there are still people who are afraid to talk about it. There are people who are afraid of talking about HIV/AIDS. There's, I mean, the thing that blew me away when I started thinking about it was every person I spoke to about the HIV/AIDS crisis and about those early days, they started to cry. I mean, it's, it's one of these things that no, it's almost been 40 years and nobody's really talked about it. You know? They, it's not a general topic of conversation and it's just kind of a, such a sad thing that it's not talked about as much. And I think it's, it's almost like opening a wound. And I've asked people when they've gotten teary, whether they regret having agreed to talk to me. And they said, "Actually, it's kind of therapeutic." So 'cause they hadn't thought about it or talked about it in almost 40. [00:15:58] Lindsey Dinneen: Wow. Wow. Oh my gosh. Yeah. That's, that's great that you're doing that and, and yeah, telling your personal story really does matter to someone who's willing to listen and not just listen, but like, ask questions, and "how was this experience for you and be empathic and that's, that's cool. So, awesome. Well so I'm, I'm curious then-- so going back, what got you involved in art and photography and all of those things, you know, at, at the beginning, what got, what sparked your interest? [00:16:32] Sandy Woodson: Well my dad does photography and so growing up, I was always looking at photography books and museums and artwork and reading. And my grandma, one of my grandmas painted. So there was always a lot of that for me when I was growing up and, but I got, I got pregnant and married very early at 18. And so-- well I was going to say things were put on hold, but they weren't. I got, I went right into theater at that point and got very involved in sets and props and doing tech backstage, sound and lights, and anything and everything really. I just loved being involved in theater and I love the process and the team effort that goes into it. And I just loved everything about it, but at one point 10 years later, I was going through a divorce and I thought, "Oh, I'll never make any money in theater. So I better stop that." [00:17:33] And I went into video and I started in corporate video. But all the things that I had learned in theater, some of those things translated, you know, these still need costumes, you still need props. You still need sets. You still need to organize how this all is going to come about and schedule people and crews and all of that. So that's how I became a video producer. And, but I didn't really do much except, you know, like I say, kind of playing around as a hobby with, with photography or writing or any of that until I got involved with Fringe, which was another 10, 20 years after that. And it's because, you know, as you know, Fringe is so accepting and they're all about, you know, we're not expecting everything to be perfect all the time. I started to understand what it means, what it means to go through the process. I mean, you have to get doing to grow and Fringe is so accepting of all of that, then it made me feel comfortable enough to start trying to do some things a little more seriously when it came to photography. [00:18:42] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, that's awesome. Yeah. I'm, I'm such a big proponent of the Fringe Festival concept of, you know, these are unjuried, uncensored projects or shows that are being put forth. And so it is a very welcoming audience of, you know, it's, it doesn't have to be perfect the first time or, you know, you can experiment at Fringe and still have ,yeah, and still have such a great audience. And their feedback is so helpful, but you know, they're, they're there with you cheering you on, I would say. And so it's a really place to produce art. [00:19:24] Sandy Woodson: Yeah. Yeah, definitely. And like you say, to experiment. I mean, I've seen people try a lot of different things that they wouldn't have any other place to do that. [00:19:35] Lindsey Dinneen: Absolutely. I completely agree. Yeah. So I'm curious, I'm sure that there are many moments that might come to mind, but are there any specific stories that you can think of, of times of when either you were witnessing some artwork that really touched you or you witnessed someone witnessing your artwork and, and sort of a story of, of maybe those moments to remember, just because they're really special? [00:20:00] Sandy Woodson: Well, the most recent one that I can remember is, I went with a group of people to Italy and I'm a huge museum freak. I just love museums. I could spend all day in museums, not only because of the artwork, but they're just as a whole, they're very peaceful, beautiful places. So, but we went to-- gosh, what was the guy's name? It was some famous Italian guy, it was his villa. And I saw the Botticellis. They're like 10 foot tall by 10 foot or 20 feet wide. And it was "Spring Primavera," which I think I've always thought of as a Venus in a half shell or something. I saw that and another one and I was just like, "This is the most amazing thing I've ever seen." And, you know, I actually felt the same way one time when I was in Amsterdam and saw Van Gogh. There is --it's called "Apple Blossoms". I think it's "Apple Blossoms" and it was the first time I'd ever seen it. Now, since then, I see it all over the place in posters. I have an iPad that has a cover that has that artwork on it. [00:21:08] But I realized as much as I see this artwork in books, it is nothing to compare to when you get to actually see it in person. And the Van Gogh was one of the first-- well, my first and all of these happened in Europe. I know there are things in Kansas City that I've seen at the Nelson that every time I go, I have to go by and look at it. But the ones that made the biggest impact were the ones in Europe, because I had a whole series of books on art museums. And I would just go through those things over and over again. And to see these things in person just blew me away. So, oh gosh. And "Winged Victory." I love sculpture. "Winged Victory" at the Louvre just stopped me in my tracks to just-- things like that, that you just see them, it's like, "Oh my God. That's beautiful." [00:22:01] Lindsey Dinneen: Wow. Yeah. I, I agree is it's like, I mean, I can definitely relate to what you're saying about, you know, artwork and seeing it in person and the originals and such versus a photo. And I feel that way about art in general is just, if you can experience it live, there's nothing like that. It's so much better than, you know, it incorporates your senses and you just have these special-- I think it's cool too, because you often have-- I mean, I have many times gone to an art museum by myself and wandered around and, you know, enjoyed it thoroughly. But I think some of my favorite moments are connecting with people with art. I think that's a really special moment, you know? [00:22:43] Sandy Woodson: Yeah. And a lot of that for me is more like when I'm going to a play or going to an art movie or something that, yeah, there's definitely-- you can't compare watching it at home on TV or listening to it by yourself at home then that communal... That's I always love Shakespeare in the Park here in Kansas City. I love that, you know, all of us sitting outside and usually dying of heat, but you know, I, I really liked those experiences too. [00:23:15] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, absolutely. Well, this has really been a lot of fun. I have a couple of questions that I like to ask my guests if you're okay with that. [00:23:24] Sandy Woodson: Sure. [00:23:25] Lindsey Dinneen: Okay. So first of all, what is one change that you would like to see in the art world? Whether that is, you know, specifically through one of the mediums that you have enjoyed and, and worked on over the years or whether that's like, you know, art in general, just what's one change you'd really love to see? [00:23:48] Sandy Woodson: I don't think-- probably because my experience with Fringe, I get really tired of the fact that we in this community, we seem to focus on what is considered "high art." You know, it's not like I dislike any of these people or anything, but I'm just going to say it, you know, with the Ballet and Opera and Symphony, those people get enough support. I mean, I know they need to raise money every year, but when you're looking at these artists that are part of the Fringe Festival to me, that's real art, you know, and I don't think it gets enough attention and I think people poo poo it. And I think I've seen some of the most amazing things. [00:24:28] There was something I saw that Kyle Hatley did. I think it was called "Head" one of my first few years at Fringe. And I, I was so blown away by it. You see amazing things being done by high-end artists in Kansas City during Fringe, and they're just as amazing there as they are anywhere else. And they're helping to support their friend who's writing a play for the first time or somebody who's doing some choreography for the first time. And, and, and /or people like Kyle Hatley who wanted to experiment with a play idea that he had. So I just, to me, that's where the real art is, and I don't think it gets enough attention. [00:25:09] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Oh, I love that answer. And yeah, attention and funding, I think are our biggest complaints. [00:25:16] Sandy Woodson: One comes with the other. You get the attention first and then hopefully the funding. [00:25:22] Lindsey Dinneen: Yes, exactly. And then also, is there something arts related that you've wanted to try? Maybe another form of art, but you just haven't yet. Or, you know, it's kind of been intimidating to, to start. What's one other art thing that you'd love to do? [00:25:38] Sandy Woodson: Absolutely. When I saw-- well first I saw it here-- Nick Cave did it during open spaces using multiple projections. And then I saw it when I was in France. That was an experience with-- in fact, right now there's something going on in Kansas City with Van Gogh, that's doing multiple projections in a space. But the one in France was an old hollowed out quarry with 50 foot walls. And I don't even know how many projectors they had in there, but anyway, it was such an amazing-- that kind of an immersive experience. I love projections, Stephen Goldblatt, who does this stuff for quixotic. I love that. I think it adds so much to the performance when, when they use those projections. So video projection is probably something I would like to try at some point. [00:26:28] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, that sounds awesome. I did see an ad for that Van Gogh experience and I was like, "Oh man, I, I, if I can get up there, I'm have to do it." [00:26:38] Sandy Woodson: Yes. [00:26:40] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, absolutely. And then my final question is, at the end of your life, what's one art-related experience that you would want to experience again for the last time? [00:26:52] Sandy Woodson: Gosh, I mean, to me, I almost see art everywhere. I mean, I love architecture. I love fashion. I love jewelry design. There's so many things I love. Probably it would have to be going back to the Louvre, maybe? The last time I went, I dedicated two full days to going top to bottom. That was freaking stunning. So I'd probably try to go there one more time. [00:27:19] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Yeah. That's on my a definite bucket list. I haven't, I haven't made it there yet, but it's coming. [00:27:27] Sandy Woodson: You got to go to Napoleon's apartments. I also love furniture and decorative arts, and good lord, that stuff was amazing. [00:27:37] Lindsey Dinneen: Awesome. Yeah, no, I will definitely have to do that. Well, thank you so much for sharing your stories and know what you're up to and, and all these exciting things, I'm just, I'm so thrilled for you. I'm glad you're in a place where you can really follow these passions of telling people's stories that need to be told. So I think this is really cool and congratulations on this new adventure. And is there a way for people to stay in touch with you or if they have questions or anything like that, is there a way for them to connect with you? [00:28:08] Sandy Woodson: Sure. You can email me at Sandy Woodson, S A N D Y W O O D S O N12@gmail.com. [00:28:18] Lindsey Dinneen: Well, thank you so very much, Sandy, for everything that you have brought to the world. Thank you so much for continuing to explore art and to share people's stories and to be a voice for those that haven't had that opportunity. And thank you again so much for being here today. And to everyone who has listened to this episode, if you're feeling inspired by it, I'd love if you'd share this with a friend or two and we will catch you next time. [00:28:52] If you have a story to share with us, we would love that so much. And I hope your day has been Artfully Told. [00:29:01] Hi friends. I wanted to share with you another podcast that I think you're going to fall in love with just as I have. It's called Harlem with a View, and it is hosted by Harlem Lennox, who was a previous guest of mine on Artfully Told and a dear friend. Just because it looks easy doesn't mean it is. There is so much that goes into the work of your creative. She wants to know how the artists got into their line of work, what inspires them, but most importantly, what keeps them going? She'd asked them about how they make it through the blood, sweat, and tears. She wants to know what it's like to live this creative life: the good, the bad, the ugly, and even the magical. So she goes behind the scenes with creatives, from different genres and she explores their history, their take on life and talks about the business of art and the dedication of making art. She has a brilliant, brilliant platform. I think you will fall in love. I highly recommend that you search for Harlem with a View. Thanks!

Touchdowns and Tangents
The Game is Fine Until You & Somebody Son Gotta Run Fades or Resign

Touchdowns and Tangents

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 90:03


#LetsTalkAboutItOn the latest episode of white people getting exposed for their racist bullshit, The Las Vegas Raiders FORMER Head Coach Jon Gruden gets fired only when his homophobic and misogynistic emails from 12 years ago to Bruce Allen get leaked. The emails where he made racial attacks on NFLPA Director DeMaurice Smith lips and intelligence weren't enough to garner much outrage at first. This backlash is the cause of the WTF investigation that's going on. There's over 6,000 emails. Tampa Bay Buccaneers remove him from their Ring of Honor. Defensive end Carl Nassib takes a personal day. Thursday Night Football Juju Smith-Schuster out for season with dislocated shoulder. Talks about it at his Foundation dinner.#CollegeFootballNewsDown goes Bama. Texas A & M upsets Alabama. 41-38. Bill O'Brien shit down his leg again Iowa beats Penn State is is ranked 2nd behind Georgia. Georgia plays Kentucky. #1 vs #11LSU loses two more key players for the yearLincoln Riley vs School paperJustin Flowe signs with Marshawn Lynch's Beast Mode Marketing. Currently out for the year with injuryUSC long time Sports Information Director Tim Tessalone to retire. Considered one of the G.O.A.Ts. Coastal Carolina senior tight end Isaiah Likely has 8 catches for 232 yards & 4tds against Arkansas state last week. Set a bunch of school records. Moves faster than Vernon Davis. #TakeOrTangentWTF to retire Sean Taylor's 21 jerseyReports say Urban Meyer never had the teamMyles Garrett builds Halloween tombstone graveyard of opposing QBs.Bengals Packers game had 5 missed kicks and some extra pointsLamar Jackson ascends to historical levels on Monday Night Football comeback#TouchdownOrTurnoverHNFLPA requests full release of emails from WTF investigation Meme of the week: Is Saquan Barkley the Carson Wentz of running backs?Lamar Jackson finally gets roughing the passer call after 2 yearsChiefs got their ass beat by the Buffalo Bills#UnnecessaryToughnessRants

Live Your Spa Life
#222: How to Live a Life With Happiness and Fulfillment - with Trey Kauffman!

Live Your Spa Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 30:22


Trey Kauffman is an entrepreneur, a podcaster, and an advocate for demanding better for ourselves. His goal is to empower others to look inward and find the happiness they deserve. His spiritual awakening occurred after realizing others don't hold the key to his happiness, and through ridding himself of corporate toxicity, he was able to build a business and life he can reflect on daily with extreme gratitude.Important Topics -His definition of happiness-What are the limits he set around happiness-On happiness as getting to a place of being contented-How he captures his memory-What he does to move past fear-What learning means to him-His insights around change and his mentality of doing better-How he came about stoicism-What his favorite room is and why-How corporate toxicity impacted his work environment-What every conversation that he has is the best conversation of his life means-How is he a “Force For Good” in the worldQuotes“Happiness is so holistic."“The only person that I need to be better than is the person who I was yesterday.”“If we're not learning every single day we're not going to grow.”“We have the opportunity within this life to feel fulfillment and to feel contentment.”Connect with Trey:The Mosaic Life Podcast: https://www.onemosaic.life/Trey's Instagram: https://instagram.com/TreyKauffmanOther links and resources:Free Gift from Diane (5 Moves to RESET Your Power) - https://ResetYourPowerGift.comFree Gift from Diane (Life RESET Quiz) - https://LifeResetQuiz.comBANKCODE - https://MyBankCode.com/VictoryDiane Halfman's website - http://www.DianeHalfman.comWant to know more about yourself?Some people ask me how to RESET their life.Some people ask me how to be more sensual.Others are wondering how to make more money.How to be more successful.How to start a business.All of these questions and more are what I answer in my programs!Come see me at http://www.DianeHalfman.com

The
WiM059 - The Saylor Series | Episode 15 | Bitcoin's Seven Layers of Security #2

The "What is Money?" Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 74:59


Michael Saylor joins me to discuss anthropology, energy, and technology from first principles as we build the intellectual foundation necessary to truly grasp the historic significance of Bitcoin.Be sure to check out NYDIG, one of the most important companies in Bitcoin: https://nydig.com/GUESTMichael's twitter: https://twitter.com/michael_saylorMichael's company: https://www.microstrategy.com/enMichael's website: https://www.hope.com/CHANNELPodcast Website: https://whatismoneypodcast.com/Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast...Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/25LPvm8...RSS Feed: https://feeds.simplecast.com/MLdpYXYITranscript:OUTLINE00:00:00 “What is Money?” Intro00:00:05 NYDIG00:01:25 The Fourth Layer: Financial00:04:16 Bitcoin Mining's Capital Intensity Recruits Large Investors00:08:04 The Fifth Layer: The Mining Network00:10:01 Bitcoin Miners as an Early Warning System00:11:35 Bitcoin Miners as “Motors of Sovereignty”00:12:55 The First Five Layers: Inertia, Antifragility, and Capital Attraction00:15:00 “Bitcoin is a Swarm Creature”00:16:43 Proof of Work as a Thermodynamic Bridge Between Worlds00:18:54 The Sixth Layer: Spatial00:20:38 Proof of Work as a Self-Distributing Security Model00:21:28 Proof of Work Self-Decentralizes Away from Attack Vectors00:23:26 The Seventh Layer: Temporal00:24:59 Bitcoin's Spacetime Parameters: “You Only Get to Play God Once”00:26:29 What Happens if you Change Gravity?00:29:29 “Bitcoin is Like the Granite Underlying Manhattan”00:31:06 The Universal Consequences of Spacetime Constants00:33:17 “A Shockwave is When You Attack the Air Faster than it Moves”00:35:05 “Foolish to Risk the Immortality of Bitcoin for Bigger Blocks”00:36:40 Proof of Stake: A Closed, Controlled, Non-Darwinian System00:39:50 There Are No Successful Proof of Stake Networks00:42:11 Central Banks as Proof of Stake Networks00:44:52 Bitcoin is Both Digital Money and Digital Property00:45:42 Robert's OutroSOCIALBreedlove Twitter: https://twitter.com/Breedlove22WiM? Twitter: https://twitter.com/WhatisMoneyShowLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/breedlove22/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/breedlove_22/TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@breedlove22?l...All My Current Work: https://linktr.ee/breedlove22​WRITTEN WORKMedium: https://breedlove22.medium.com/Substack: https://breedlove22.substack.com/WAYS TO CONTRIBUTEBitcoin: 3D1gfxKZKMtfWaD1bkwiR6JsDzu6e9bZQ7Sats via Strike: https://strike.me/breedlove22Sats via Tippin.me: https://tippin.me/@Breedlove22Dollars via Paypal: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/RBree...Dollars via Venmo: https://venmo.com/code?user_id=178435...The "What is Money?" Show Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=328431...RECOMMENDED BUSINESSESWorldclass Bitcoin Financial Services: https://nydig.com/Join Me At Bitcoin 2022 (10% off if paying with fiat, or discount code BREEDLOVE for Bitcoin): https://www.tixr.com/groups/bitcoinco...Put your Bitcoin to work. Earn up to 12% interest back on Bitcoin with Tantra: https://bit.ly/3h3lL0jIBAC assists central banks and sovereign wealth funds succeed in their digital asset investments: https://www.ibac.io/Automatic Recurring Bitcoin Buying: https://www.swanbitcoin.com/breedlove/

Artfully Told
Episode 072 - Giovanna Salas

Artfully Told

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 32:18


In today's episode, I welcome Giovanna Salas! Giovanna likes to create, and she has dabbled in and become proficient in multiple medias, including art, literature, and film. She is the founder and owner of Heart of Hollywood Magazine and Motion Pictures, and in this episode, she shares about the importance of making opportunities more accessible for artists along with her heart and passion for helping others' succeed. (Double fun fact: the cover image for this week's episode is not only a recent cover of Giovanna's Heart of Hollywood magazine, but it also featured Sandy Rodriguez, one of our former guests!)    Get in touch with Giovanna Salas: https://www.heartofhollywoodmagazine.com/ | https://www.hohmp.com/ Enroll in Lindsey's dance and wellness courses: www.elevateart.thinkific.com  Support Artfully Told: www.paypal.me/elevateart Artfully Told links: www.facebook.com/artfullytold | www.artfullytold.podbean.com | elevateartskc@gmail.com Get a free audiobook through Audible!  http://www.audibletrial.com/ArtfullyTold Schedule your own interview as a featured guest with Artfully Told! https://calendly.com/artfullytold/podcast-interview   Episode 72 - Giovanna Salas [00:00:00] Lindsey Dinneen: Hello, and welcome to Artfully Told, where we share true stories about meaningful encounters with art. [00:00:06] Krista: I think artists help people have different perspectives on every aspect of life. [00:00:12] Roman: All I can do is put my part in to the world. [00:00:15] Elizabeth: It doesn't have to be perfect the first time. It doesn't have to be perfect ever really. I mean, as long as you, and you're enjoying doing it and you're trying your best, that can be good enough. [00:00:23] Elna: Art is something that you can experience with your senses and that you just experiences as so beautiful. [00:00:31] Lindsey Dinneen: Hi friends, whether you are just getting started or you're a seasoned professional looking to up your game, I have an exciting opportunity for you. Did you know that I am actually the creator of 10 different courses online that range from ballet, jazz, tap. They also include a mindset detox course and two Stretch and Tone courses. So if you're looking to start a new hobby or get a little bit fitter, or you're looking to do a deep dive into your mindset, really perform a true detox, I have the course for you, and I would love to help you out with that. So if you go to elevateart.thinkific.com, you will see all of the different courses I've created. [00:01:26] You don't have to step in a classroom to take your first dance class. I teach a signature 20 Moves in 20 Days course that allows you to learn 20 steps in just 20 days. It's a lot of fun. We have a great time together. And I think you're going to absolutely love the different courses. And Artfully Told listeners get a little something from me. So if you go, you'll sign up and use the promo code "artfullytold," all one word, and when you do so you'll get 15% off the purchase of any and all your favorite courses. All right, listeners, enjoy that. Again, it's elevateart.thinkific.com. See you there. [00:02:11] Hello, and welcome back to another episode of Artfully Told. I'm your host Lindsey and I am very excited to have as my guest today, Giovanna Salas. She likes to create, and she has dabbled in and become proficient in many multiple medias, including art, literature, and film. She also is the founder and owner of Heart of Hollywood Magazine and Motion Pictures. And she also has a streaming platform that is in development, I believe. And I can't wait to dive in and hear all about the different things that you are up to. So thank you so much for being here. I really look forward to our conversation today. [00:02:57] Giovanna Salas: Hi Lindsey! [00:03:00] Lindsey Dinneen: Hi! Well, I was wondering if you don't mind just starting us off by telling us maybe a little bit about your background, how you got involved in art and kind of go from there. [00:03:11] Giovanna Salas: Absolutely. Well, first of all, I want to thank you for inviting me to your podcast. It's a pleasure for me to be here and well to make a story short, I started as a painter. You know, I, I love art. I use that oil media. That's that's my favorite. And one thing take to the other, I am visual person. And so I dive into learning photography and video. And so I have an interest later on into becoming a filmmaker. And so that's how everything is. [00:03:43] Lindsey Dinneen: Wow. Yeah. Okay. And so then you decided to become a filmmaker, which is a huge endeavor and undertaking. So can you tell us about that and what led you to that interest in that passion to create even your own company? [00:03:59] Giovanna Salas: Well, I wanted to become a film director. And so once I came to Hollywood, I saw there was very difficult. It's a lot of difficulties. And in word, it was not going to be easy. And the best way was to learn the business and learn what happened behind the scenes. So I began working with a couple productions and after that, I decided it was time to open my own company because I wanted to bring opportunities for people, they just started. Artists are underground, I feel. They, also people that were foreigner. Okay. And so for everyone, I just wanted to make it a place they have a door open for everyone that they need. It. [00:04:47] Lindsey Dinneen: That's amazing. And so now with your company, and I realized that there are three sort of branches to it. Can you tell us a little bit about each one and sort of who you, you serve as a result of the different branches and, and how that all works together? [00:05:04] Giovanna Salas: Sure. So, well, the company is called Heart of Hollywood Motion Pictures. And from that we had three different divisions. The first division, that's how we started in post-production. So the services that we offer was like color corrections, you know, edit of scoring. We've put together different individuals working in the industry and sometimes here and there, you know, behind the scenes, maybe a project that was already done, but they needed to do something where we can help with some of those services. And also giving consultations such as like screenplays, you know, like a script doctor, I had different consultants. So sometimes I do consultations, but it's more like a producer restructure. And we have a modern consultant. So it's along, all the kind of what it takes to, to get your, your project or package in a, in a better format. I think that's, that's the first one. [00:06:01] The second one is that the vision for the Heart of Hollywood Magazine. And this has started because we want, we have members within the company and we're gonna, we want it to give more exposure to the members. Well, when we published the first magazine, everybody was very positive about and now that became three years of publications. So we are very happy of what we're going. And I believe that the magazine is like a car for everyone to share the stories, get into the car and get more exposure. But also the purpose of this magazine is for our to get inspiration and motivated. [00:06:43] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, absolutely. And then the third branch is something you're still in development for, or is that also live? [00:06:51] Giovanna Salas: No, we, well, I mean, working the third is a, an a streaming platform of Heart of Hollywood Cinema, and I been working with my engineer team. And it's not easy. It's been for a couple of years, like I say, but we have tested. We created last year. We tested with production. The, I was a producer for a, the Brain 19 Fashion Films. Okay. We did it virtually during COVID and we use the streaming platform to for, for the films. So I think it would take us a little bit longer to, to make it available for all the public, but the finally will be an option for all the filmmakers. They need to put their films in other platform. It's good to have different platforms such as, you know, Amazon and Netflix and all of that other ones that we already know. But it's also good to have another option and where you can put your films as well. [00:07:52] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, that's amazing. Well, it sounds like you are making such a difference for so many different people in so many areas, so yeah. Kudos to you for doing that. That's just amazing. And, you know, you mentioned at the beginning that you personally felt like it was, and I'm sure you're not alone, that it was really difficult to to kind of get into that world. Do you mind telling us a little bit more about your own story of how, you know, some of the challenges that you faced as you were starting off in Hollywood? [00:08:27] Giovanna Salas: Well, I will say one of my first challenges was the language because my first language is not English. It's a Spanish. And so I think the not, I didn't grow in the US, like I came here and I start, you know, working here in the entertainment. And one thing that I know is, is if you don't have connections in LA or people working in the industry, it's very difficult. And a lot of those connections are not easy to build. You have to be in the right place, meet the right people that have family members sometimes. And sometimes you don't, you don't have, you know, family members, so you don't have any connection. So, and then you have the problem with an artist trying to showcase but nobody wants to listen. So I think the why, because people pay more attention. I go rather with a person that has 30 more years experience or 20 years experience, or how are they going to get the experience if they don't get the chance to showcase what they can do or what they can bring to the table? [00:09:34] And so my, I don't, I feel there is not many companies that perhaps are really seriously approaching this issue. And at the beginning of my company, my number one priority was to approach this issue, was to make an statement that this company, it was going to be for the artist that needed. Yes, we're welcoming everyone. There is very well-known, you know, celebrity or a producer, but I think that we all, as artists, we have a responsibility and especially with work in the entertainment about helping all of them, it's about bringing that talent. Otherwise, we cannot move forward. [00:10:20] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, I think that's incredible. Thank you for sharing that story. And I love what you're doing because I've not personally been in that particular world, but, you know, as an artist, as well, I certainly understand some of that initial struggle of kind of getting basically getting your, especially your first job, because that can be, you know, the most challenging and because you know, you're new and I understand that. So yeah, no, that's incredible what you all do. And so congratulations on all of your success and the fact that it just keeps growing and growing is, is huge. That's so exciting. [00:11:01] Giovanna Salas: Yes. I feel very happy about what everything that has been developing and working. And I can tell you how many times I, I thought about quitting, closing the company, not pursuing because it was so many challenges. So the beginning, I just was myself and my ideas and my beliefs, and if what's going to work or not, and my personal finances. So it was a lot of the things to take into consideration. Also to make sure the, I, I do not fit all. There are people, you know, you have family members, you have things all around there, and sometimes all those things can work against you. But if you truly have the passion and that desire to see a three-year vision and you want to pursue that. Don't give that, that don't, don't stop. You have to, to make it happen because otherwise I don't think they, eh, we can end up truly happy. And every, every morning when I wake up, I feel very happy or what I'm doing. [00:12:09] I feel happy that through the years I am developing a team, you know, a more people and I had to train them. I had to explain, and I had to, for example, with the magazine, it's a thing behind it. And then I have a graphic designer. Sometimes it's new. Sometimes I had to explain a lot of things. Sometimes I had to train a customer representative that share, you know, who we are, but in a way, not of we are selling our market. And we, I just tried to tell him, you know, we are dealing with relationships with, with people. And, and I think that, that it has to be community. And so I never taught the, I will be sending magazines in another state, so, or even in another countries. And so that to me is incredible because the first time that I decided to make the magazine, I made the first magazine and it took me seven months just to plan, to get to the first draft in order to communicate my ideas to a graphic designer. And then looking for a team is not an easy challenge. You had to see many people strive to see who sees this issue and who just wants a job for a job, you know, who really cares or not. [00:13:27] And so I would say that in my theme, everyone is not this. My magazine editor is amazing. The contributors are, you know what I can say. They have seen something in the magazine. They wanted to be part of it. We just did a cover shoot in the Netherlands with a whole production team. We have the videos behind the scenes. So you guys want to watch it on the website. Is there any, so other, other things coming along. And so I'm constantly working. I think that would be one of the first ones say I would like to get a clone. But anyway. So I think my one thing that is very important to me right now is my time. I believe the time is very precious. You have to be very careful. You have to think about who you were spending your time with, who you are given your time, and make sure that that time is viable because sometimes people think that what we have time and the truth is that we don't, what we don't have is time. [00:14:28] And so every second, and every minute and you know, doing hours. I think we should try to enjoy ourselves. We should try to do those simple things about walking outside, you know, create an art. And when I started in the entertainment, I, I quit painting pretty much. I mean, not completely. I would make a painting once in a while or once every three months and not long ago because of the COVID and everything that has happened. I was feeling, I am very positive person. I always encouraging the people to do things and helping them in the projects, giving consultations. And then not long ago, like three months ago I started feeling depressed. I started feeling, what am I doing, where my life is going, like what I need to do, you know? [00:15:21] And so I started to paint again and I started to write as well, and I felt I gained a life and this is important for me because if I'm okay, and I can be a creative person as well, and then I can be more productive for my clients, I can be more productive for the team and for the company. And so, because I'm a workaholic, so I saw marriage my time, like working all the time and, and just lately I'm also beginning to learn and understand to take some time for me for, I can be more productive for all. [00:15:57] Lindsey Dinneen: Yes. And that is such an important realization to come to. I'm so glad that you're prioritizing yourself because you're absolutely right. You can't pour into someone else's life with an empty cup, so you have to start full yourself and, and so I'm so glad that you're doing that and prioritizing. That is so, so important. And again, you are just doing such amazing things for people. And so I'm, I'm curious, do any stories in particular come to mind of maybe people that you've helped, clients that you've helped that, you know, really may not have had a different opportunity had you not been there? [00:16:39] Giovanna Salas: Yes. I, I, I feel very happy with the, with the people that I have work. So one of the, in our, my team members, I think, eh, they sometimes when people come in and work for my company and things like that, I always tell them, you know, you have other opportunities or, or, or job opportunities and they can, you can you know, at that. Yes. So let me know, you know, and some in that happen and I feel very bad, you know, but at the same time, if they can grow better, you know, I I'm happy with that. That's, that's part of the team members. I always feel very sentimental when, you know, someone goes to another company. It is like that. And the reason is perhaps because one day I will be able to have their resources for my team. Right. And sometimes so they're big, big, big companies, you know, they, they do have those resources, but that's all about timing and about we, we maintain very good communication. [00:17:35] I like to, you know, be be in contact with, with everyone that has been part of the company, because I see them as family. For, for my clients, I have helped different people, like all the way from like models, I have helped. Well, one of them that I remember, I I was working with an actress and she wanted to have a manager, and at the time I was working with, with a talent, talent and management company. So I was helping her and, but I was producing something else. And then she got curious about that. And so I trained her to be a casting director. Lately I was working with a client and when he asks for consultations, you know, kind of personal coaching and his personality is great and he can do multiple, multiple things, but sometimes when you do multiple things, it's hard to focus and one thing, right. [00:18:30] Or what it will make you some type of income or how the finances. So he found me on LinkedIn and he approached me. And I go, look, yes, I can, I will do a consultation, but I had to charge a fee because right now my time is very important. So I sent in an email is very, very professional, and oh, my! Well, I was surprised he did took the consultations. We worked for a couple months together and he organized his acting career. He, I helped him to do an structure for a podcast. I thought I helped him to do the structure of the memberships, how to, you know, get the, his packages and all of that and making company. So I'm not, I like to develop structures and business models. And so he was very happy. He's, he really just became a big supporter of my company telling all their people how they, he feels great about, about the consultation. That those were his words. Yeah. Yeah. For the magazine. Yes, this is a producer, eh, they told me that his, that his film, his documentary film, it was getting better and more publicity after he was published in our magazine. [00:19:49] So the local newspaper from his state decided to do an interview with, with him and, you know, sales are going up and things like that. So we hear a lot of good feedback from clients, eh, besides to, you know, get a publication in our magazine. And that makes me very happy because one thing that I want is also the advertisement that we put there. I always suggest, you know, make sure that whatever, even in our own articles there, the information is clear. It's focused, it's inspirational and is useful because if it is not useful, people not going to pay attention. [00:20:24] Lindsey Dinneen: Yes. Yes. Yes. Well, like you said, you have to choose how to spend your time and you have to be wise about it. I mean, like you said, until you have your clone, you're just one person. I'm so glad that you have a team to, to help support you now, though, that that's such a, what, what a relief. [00:20:42] Giovanna Salas: Oh, and that was very hard. It was very hard to find a theme and it was very hard to find the consultants. It, it just, it took me probably like a year, a year and a half to, to put that together because people comes and goes and, but if someone shares they, and they are, they are good in what they do and they want to pursue what they want to do best as a part of a team is incredible. Magic happens, things happen, and everybody is happy. Yeah. And I, I'm very trying to be very social, fun, you know, I always ask, "how do you feel, how do you feel working with me? What would you suggest? Can you brainstorm?" So I like to have that interaction with, with the thing that I have, because there is not better way to know if you are doing something proper or offering good services to the audience, your own team doesn't like it or like it, right? [00:21:46] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. Well, that's, that's good. Again, I'm glad you have, you have good people to cheer you on. I am curious-- is, are there any moments that kind of stand out to you, that have an encounter with art, whether it was, you know, you experiencing someone else's art or watching somebody experience something that you've created that really kind of is a moment to remember? [00:22:15] Giovanna Salas: Yes. Yes. Well, several moments to remember. [00:22:19] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh, for sure. [00:22:21] Giovanna Salas: To be honest with you, but the, I have I guess was when someone requests me to paint something for them. That's a very special moment for me because I started as a painter and, I, at that time years ago, my dream was just to become an oil painter, go to France and live like an artist. But all the things change it and I wanted to now being the entertainment and I'm doing this because I know I can do it. I know I can help others. And that's very important in, but I think that going back it, when someone see something and my artwork, that's very special to me, that means something. [00:23:12] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, absolutely. Well, I I'm sure that there are going to be some of our listeners who would love to reach out to you or get involved with your work or, or at least follow what you do. Is there a way for us to connect with you? [00:23:28] Giovanna Salas: They can go to the Heart of Hollywood Magazine dot com. They can go also to H O H M P, which is our productions for production. One of the, one of the things that I want to mention now that we're talking about art, it's been eight years probably that I have not make a proper, eh, exhibition, art, art exhibition. So, and I'm preparing, I'm painting new artwork is completely different from what I have painted in the past and I'm going to make an art exhibition, in Los Angeles on 2022 in March and the location, we're looking for a location and all of that. But I would like to invite everyone to go to the art show. [00:24:13] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh, how exciting. That is so exciting. And you said in March is when you want to do that? [00:24:19] Giovanna Salas: Yes, I am planning to, well, you will be the first one. I'm going to send you a link for that in a yes, because this it's so much, it's so much that I'm being, I'm keeping for myself during this time. And it has been a very challenges years. And I will like to share not just my mind, but also my heart with people and with the with those ones, they have a love for. [00:24:50] Lindsey Dinneen: I love that. That's, that's really special. Good. Well, I'm excited about that too. So thank you for all of those links that we can go and check out. And I do have a couple of questions that I like to ask my guests if you're okay with that? [00:25:04] Giovanna Salas: Of course. [00:25:06] Lindsey Dinneen: Perfect. So my first question is what is a change that you would like to see happen in the art world? Whether that's, you know, about creating art or displaying art or or making it available to people or basically what's, what's one thing that you would love to change about the art world? [00:25:30] Giovanna Salas: Hmm. That's a difficult one. I think there, I would like to see more united platforms of artists where they can come together. I'm trying to, we, we added a section in our magazine for artists they will like to sell their paintings or their sculptures or some sort of art, okay, media in the magazine. And so, but I would like to know. I think it needs to be more opinions for, for artists where they can display their artwork besides being in the galleries. But through that a little bit more with respect, because sometimes when you see our work in restaurants or see artwork in coffee shops, you really don't get an appreciation for the art. Sometimes you really pay attention. But I don't think that the public is, has information. So I, I, one thing that I would change I guess, is if it is a coffee shop, if it is a place or a location where there is not the, the location is not a gallery, but you want to exhibitit artwork, I think that there is a way to do it and it can be helpful for the artist and it can be helpful for the business. [00:26:56] So I believe that that can be something that is possible and to be done, but I think that those businesses that have those artwork in the locations, they should do like kind a spotlight on the, on the artist or make it a little bit more visual for the clients to see that in half of their operation. Because I think the ones that are they so powerful, the ones that you are in that, that they are in the wall of the restaurant, the coffee shop, boutique, or anything like that, it, you think that it's just part of the wall. You think they're just part of that, because it just kind of belongs in. I don't know how to explain it. It just was meant to be there or something like that. [00:27:43] Lindsey Dinneen: Right. [00:27:44] Giovanna Salas: But it's, but it has a, so that's why another is bad. It's actually very good, but that's why I believe there needs to be more on spotlight of the artwork and say, "Hey, you know, we do have these, you know, feature or something, you know, a newsletter." Because I don't see that much. The other day I enter into a coffee shop. I saw some paintings from a local artist here in Hollywood. He was doing more like an, a street artwork. It was painting people crossing the street, Hollywood signs, things like that. But I thought it was pretty cool. And I didn't see like an expo, like of the artists in that location. And so anyway, I know it took me a while, but I was thinking I have to give you a better response. And I think that, that w that would be the one I think, I think they, the locations can do much better. [00:28:35] Lindsey Dinneen: I think that's a great response and I absolutely agree with you. Okay. And then my second question is, is there a form of art that you have personally not tried yet either just because you haven't had time or you felt intimidated or whatever reason but that you would love to explore at some point? [00:28:57] Giovanna Salas: Yes, it is one form of art that I would like to explore and that would be sculpture. And I think it would be more of that time if I had the time to do it. But that always interests me. [00:29:11] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, absolutely. Nice. Okay. And then my final question is at the end of your life, what is the one art related experience that you would want to experience for the last time? [00:29:25] Giovanna Salas: The smell of the art supplies, the smell of the paint. [00:29:29] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. I like that. Yeah, it's possibility, right? That's like, what's going to come out today. I love that. That's a great answer. Well, oh my goodness. This has been amazing. I'm so just so amazed by you and what you bring to the world and your, your company and how much impact it has. Thank you so much for doing what you do. I'm really excited that you're still painting and you're going to be exhibiting. I think all of that is just fantastic. So it was amazing to talk with you today. Thank you so much. I really appreciate your time. [00:30:09] Giovanna Salas: I appreciate your time because without you and you know people they have contacted also somehow, at least in about the Heart of Hollywood Magazine, all the company, without, without you Lindsey, we really cannot go far because, eh, there is so many people, so many company, entertainment companies in LA, you know, so it's it's not easy, but with your help, you know, we are letting people know about Heart of Hollywood motion pictures, Heart of Hollywood Magazine. And I'm very, very thankful they you're taking the time to interview. [00:30:46] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh, of course it's been an absolute pleasure. Well, and thank you so much again to everyone who has listened to this episode. And if you're feeling as inspired as I am, I would love if you would share this with a friend or two and we will catch you next time. [00:31:04] If you have a story to share with us, we would love that so much. And I hope your day has been Artfully Told. [00:31:13] Hi friends. I wanted to share with you another podcast that I think you're going to fall in love with just as I have. It's called Harlem with a View, and it is hosted by Harlem Lennox, who was a previous guest of mine on Artfully Told and a dear friend. Just because it looks easy doesn't mean it is. There is so much that goes into the work of your creative. She wants to know how the artists got into their line of work, what inspires them, but most importantly, what keeps them going? She'd asked them about how they make it through the blood, sweat, and tears. She wants to know what it's like to live this creative life: the good, the bad, the ugly, and even the magical. So she goes behind the scenes with creatives, from different genres and she explores their history, their take on life and talks about the business of art and the dedication of making art. She has a brilliant, brilliant platform. I think you will fall in love. I highly recommend that you search for Harlem with a View. Thanks!

Five By The Fire
I Want It, NOW! | Five by the Fire - Ep. 281

Five By The Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 7:35


In today's podcast, We talk about our ambition and our humility.Today's Reading: 1 Kings 11; Philippians 2; Ezekiel 41; Psalm 32 For more great entertaining and inspiring content--- https://PastorFury.comWatch the Fury and Friends Show: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0TiMyrCEBe-2QbMF8P2hlBsIaksxEnB3Watch more episodes and other videos--- https://Pastorfury.com/videosFor more information on the reading plan--- https://Fivebythefire.org/plan

Five By The Fire
He Will Finish It! | Five by the Fire - Ep. 280

Five By The Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 9:27


In today's podcast, We talk about finishing what has been started.Today's Reading: 1 Kings 10; Philippians 1; Ezekiel 40; Psalm 31 For more great entertaining and inspiring content--- https://PastorFury.comWatch the Fury and Friends Show: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0TiMyrCEBe-2QbMF8P2hlBsIaksxEnB3Watch more episodes and other videos--- https://Pastorfury.com/videosFor more information on the reading plan--- https://Fivebythefire.org/plan

The Small Business Show
Choosing Accounting Software and the Best Books and Podcasts for Small Business Owners

The Small Business Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 43:45


How do you choose the best accounting software for your Small Business? What's right for one business may not fit the needs of another. Today on The Small Business Show we talk Accounting software during our introduction and then it's on to books and Podcasts! What business books are your hosts Shannon Jean and Dave Hamilton reading? Join us today to learn about the books that have made an impact on the Small Business success of your hosts. Dave and Shannon also dive into their current favorite Podcasts that they are listening to. Listen in and learn! 00:00:00 Small Business Show #348 for Wednesday, October 6, 2021 00:01:00 Quick Bambee Discussion 00:01:26 Selling Your Business… To the Government? 00:05:09 1202 Small Business Stock Gains Exclusion 00:07:50 What Accounting Software Do You Use for Your Business's Bookkeeping? QuickBooks FreshBooks AccountEdge (formerly MYOB) feedback@businessshow.co What features does my business need? FileMaker Server for Linux FMPHost 00:17:53 SPONSOR: NetSuite. NetSuite by Oracle is the #1 Financial System - no matter how big your business grows. NetSuite is offering a one-of-a-kind financing program only for those ready to switch today! Head to NetSuite.com/sbs 00:19:26 SPONSOR: Bambee – Let Bambee help with your dedicated HR Manager! Go to Bambee.com/SMALL right now to schedule your free HR audit. 00:21:16 Business Books and Podcasts 00:21:20 Book: The Slight Edge by Jeff Olson 00:22:59 Podcast: Marketing Over Coffee – Christopher Penn and John Wall. Link-building, SEO, and Mailing Lists! Moves fast, and the hosts stay right with each other. Great stuff! Tip: LinkedIn 60-seconds, 3x/day, 5 days. Fixed! 00:25:08 Book: The Power of Positive Thinking by Norman Vincent Peale 00:26:36 Podcast: The Business of Story – Park Howell understands the (super!) power of story, and interviews folks who have lived the same. He often talks about “living into” your story. 00:28:29 Book: The E-Myth by Michael Gerber — Learn how to work on your business, not in your business. Create an org chart for every job you do! 00:30:01 Podcast: As Told By Nomads — Tayo Rockson interviews folks with a global, big picture. Good for inspiration and also for zooming out and seeing the world from outside of our little bubbles. Hustle, innovation, and the importance of marketing are recurring topics here. 00:32:02 Biography Books: Andrew Carnegie, Biography by David Nasaw; The People's Tycoon (Henry Ford) 00:35:19 Podcast: Focused — David Sparks and Mike Schmitz are as obsessed with being productive-not-busy as we are, and they attack it from efficiency angles twice a month. Awesome stuff. 00:37:02 Book: Influence — The Psychology of Persuasion by Robert Cialdini - Focusing on Reciprocity, Social proof, Scarcity, and more. 00:38:34 Book: The Dilbert Principle by Scott Adams — Great inspiration for solo-preneurs, persuasion. 00:42:24 SBS 348 Outtro BusinessShow.co/survey

FantasyLand Football - Fantasy Football Podcast
Week 5 Trade Targets + Rams at Seahawks! - Fantasy Football Podcast (EP.147)

FantasyLand Football - Fantasy Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 48:26


Week 5 is here! We are giving you our TRADE FOR & TRADE AWAY Targets for this week. It's time to make MOVES. See ya there!

comedy football nfl new orleans saints super bowl league alabama moves tom brady cleveland browns seahawks seattle seahawks miami dolphins trade fantasy football cmc relaxing nfl draft chicago bears rams targets kansas city chiefs tampa bay buccaneers carolina panthers dallas cowboys denver broncos arizona cardinals atlanta falcons new england patriots lamar jackson mock draft new york giants green bay packers james robinson philadelphia eagles baltimore ravens head coach houston texans buffalo bills american football minnesota vikings nfl playoffs pittsburgh steelers detroit lions new york jets indianapolis colts cincinnati bengals los angeles rams josh allen roll tide jonathan taylor patrick mahomes todd gurley david montgomery jacksonville jaguars conference championship kyler murray justin herbert kirk cousins saquon barkley ryan fitzpatrick alvin kamara las vegas raiders mac jones matthew stafford justin fields fantasy football draft nfl mock draft deshaun watson dj moore christian mccaffery ryan tannehill los angeles chargers julio jones zach wilson good morning football cooper kupp my guys football league washington football team espn fantasy gmfb miles sanders dk metcalf fantasy football league calvin ridley fantasypros fantasy football podcasts tenessee titans fantasy football awards najee harris justin jefferson antonio gibson kyle pitts jared goff lions football pod trevor lawerence wr breakouts super bowl 55 bucs vs packers mock draft nfl chiefs vs bills fantasy football podcast ep
Live Your Spa Life
#221: How to Rock Your Way to Recovery - with Sonny Mayo!

Live Your Spa Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 31:28


Sonny Mayo spent most of his adult life as a guitarist, major-label recording artist, and music producer. In 2013 he joined his former bandmate in the non-profit org, Rock to Recovery®. Sonny is a board member, brand ambassador, and program administrator for Rock to Recovery®, as well as a Breathwork facilitator. In his work, he uses music as a catalyst for human transformation by writing and recording original songs with people in various stages of recovery; ranging from substance use disorder to veterans with PTSD, mental health issues and more.Important Topics -What music as medicine means-How music helps pull people through the tough times-On his transition from his substance use disorder-His advice to his teenage self before he started substance abuse-On his daily routine and habit-What his favorite room is and why-What rad is about-His relationship with his sister-How is he a “Force For Good” in the worldQuotes“This medicinal value of playing music is what we harness in rock to recovery.”“Recovery lies is based in spiritual practice.”“Be rad!”Connect with Sonny:Sonny's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sonny_mayo/Rock to Recovery Website: www.rocktorecovery.org Rock to Recovery Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rocktorecovery/Rock to Recovery Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rocktorecovery/Other links and resources:Free Gift from Diane (5 Moves to RESET Your Power) - https://ResetYourPowerGift.comFree Gift from Diane (Life RESET Quiz) - https://LifeResetQuiz.comBANKCODE - https://MyBankCode.com/VictoryDiane Halfman's website - http://www.DianeHalfman.comWant to know more about yourself?Some people ask me how to RESET their life.Some people ask me how to be more sensual.Others are wondering how to make more money.How to be more successful.How to start a business.All of these questions and more are what I answer in my programs!Come see me at http://www.DianeHalfman.com

Artfully Told
Episode 071 - Ashey Taylor

Artfully Told

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 46:11


In this week's episode, I again welcome Ashley Taylor! Ashley was our very first podcast guest and we're delighted she came back to share about her manifesto to artists about the importance of intentionality in every choice when creating and sharing their work. She offers blunt yet insightful advice about how artists can be meaningful in their works' presentation. (Fun fact: the cover image of this episode is of Ashley & Lindsey when they were promoting the 2019 premiere of "Cracked! A Reimagined Kansas City Nutcracker.")   Get in touch with Ashley Taylor: https://www.ashleyrebeccataylor.wordpress.com  Enroll in Lindsey's dance and wellness courses: www.elevateart.thinkific.com  Support Artfully Told: www.paypal.me/elevateart Artfully Told links: www.facebook.com/artfullytold | www.artfullytold.podbean.com | elevateartskc@gmail.com Get a free audiobook through Audible!  http://www.audibletrial.com/ArtfullyTold Schedule your own interview as a featured guest with Artfully Told! https://calendly.com/artfullytold/podcast-interview   Episode 71 - Ashley Taylor [00:00:00] Lindsey Dinneen: Hello, and welcome to Artfully Told, where we share true stories about meaningful encounters with art. [00:00:06] Krista: I think artists help people have different perspectives on every aspect of life. [00:00:12] Roman: All I can do is put my part in to the world. [00:00:15] Elizabeth: It doesn't have to be perfect the first time. It doesn't have to be perfect ever really. I mean, as long as you, and you're enjoying doing it and you're trying your best, that can be good enough. [00:00:23] Elna: Art is something that you can experience with your senses and that you just experiences as so beautiful. [00:00:31] Lindsey Dinneen: Hi friends, whether you are just getting started or you're a seasoned professional looking to up your game, I have an exciting opportunity for you. Did you know that I am actually the creator of 10 different courses online that range from ballet, jazz, tap. They also include a mindset detox course and two Stretch and Tone courses. So if you're looking to start a new hobby or get a little bit fitter, or you're looking to do a deep dive into your mindset, really perform a true detox, I have the course for you, and I would love to help you out with that. So if you go to elevateart.thinkific.com, you will see all of the different courses I've created. [00:01:26] You don't have to step in a classroom to take your first dance class. I teach a signature 20 Moves in 20 Days course that allows you to learn 20 steps in just 20 days. It's a lot of fun. We have a great time together. And I think you're going to absolutely love the different courses. And Artfully Told listeners get a little something from me. So if you go, you'll sign up and use the promo code "artfullytold," all one word, and when you do so you'll get 15% off the purchase of any and all your favorite courses. All right, listeners, enjoy that. Again, it's elevateart.thinkific.com. See you there. [00:02:11] Hello, and welcome back to another episode of Artfully Told. I'm your host Lindsey and I am extremely delighted to have as my guest today a returnee. She actually had the very, very first episode that I ever released with a guest was with Ashley Taylor. So thank you, Ashley, for being back. I'm just beyond excited. Ashley is a dancer. She is a choreographer, teacher. She is also a writer. In fact, maybe sneak peak. Can I say that you're working on a novel? [00:02:47] Ashley Taylor: Of course you can! [00:02:49] Lindsey Dinneen: Awesome. Yeah. And then also, goodness gracious. I think your artistic list goes on and on. You can paint, draw, what can't you do? Maybe we should start there. [00:03:02] Ashley Taylor: Well, I'm going to answer that question later. [00:03:04] Lindsey Dinneen: Okay. Fair. That's true. Anyway, artist extraordinaire, very creative and very good at what she does. So, Ashley, thank you for being back. [00:03:17] Ashley Taylor: Thank you for having me. I'm super excited to chat with you again about artsy things. [00:03:22] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, absolutely. Well, first I'm really curious to know sort of what what you've been up to lately, especially considering, you know, when we did our recording last year, of course it was COVID central and it kind of still is, but things have changed and opened back up. So I'm curious how you've been able to navigate sort of getting back into more artsy things? [00:03:50] Ashley Taylor: Yeah. So I would not say I'm fully back in, in the way that I would like to be, but that's fine. I've had the time to explore a lot of writing and editing and found a community of creative writing people, which is great. So we meet virtually once a week and read each other what we're working on and give feedback, which has been wonderful, highly recommend creative community as a side note. So yeah, I, as you said, I have been working on a novel. I, I am editing it. I think this is my third draft right now. I've got some feedback recently from some readers, so I'm editing it. And the goal is to get it sent to some agents and see what the possibilities are there in the next couple of months. [00:04:44] So that'll be, that'll be an adventure for sure. In addition to that, I am starting to gather ideas for another writing project, which would be my own and other people's stories about being in the professional dance world and the good, the bad and the ugly of that. But focusing on the good hopefully. And so, yeah, writing, lots of writing. As far as dance goes, that's my other main thing. And I am starting to do some auditions and have a performance with you coming up, which I'm super excited about. And yeah, I that's pretty much it for now. I will see if any other opportunities arise, but I am trying to go with the flow. [00:05:33] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Well, and by going with the flow, obviously you are also very involved in lots of things. So that seems like quite a bit to keep you busy, not to mention, you know, you're a wife and mother and, you know, details. Well, congratulations on finishing or working on draft three of the novel. I mean, first of all, that's a huge undertaking to finish, let alone to get to this next point. So congratulations on that. And obviously I'm wishing you the best in your publishing journey and I'm sure our listeners are as well. And once that happens, you'll have to be on again and talk all about your book. [00:06:15] Ashley Taylor: I would be glad to do that. [00:06:17] Lindsey Dinneen: All right. And then so you mentioned getting back into various forms of art. And then I'm also curious because when we talked last time, you were essentially a brand new mom. And now you-- I mean, I guess you'd maybe consider yourself still kind of a brand new mom, I don't know-- but... [00:06:44] Ashley Taylor: It changes every day pretty much, a little bit. [00:06:49] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. And I'm curious how that has impacted your either expression of art or I mean, obviously ability to do art changes a little bit I'm sure. Or a lot, but I'm just curious if it, if you feel that also being a mom or having a little one has, has impacted just the way that you express yourself through art. [00:07:13] Ashley Taylor: Hmm. That's a great question. I think, I think I have two answers to that. So the first thing is now that I'm a mom, I obviously have additional demands on my time and energy. So that's, it can be a difficult thing, but it's also a good thing in the sense that I am a lot pickier now about what artistic endeavors I spend time on. So early on in any artistic person's career or foray into artistic things, just kind of taking whatever opportunities come your way, because you want to get out there and get recognized and build experience. And I've done that. And I've spent a lot of time doing that in the past. And I-- it's not that I have every experience I'd ever want under my belt and you know, I'm an expert now-- certainly not, but I think I am a little less willing to just kind of do whatever at this point. I'm interested in spending time on projects that I find really meaningful, which means I weed things out very quickly if I see audition listings or whatever it may be, and I think that's good. [00:08:25] I think, I think it's good to have that perspective now. Like I'm not, I'm not desperate enough to just do whatever. So that's good. And then as far as how it affects the expression of art, I do think it's not like I'm thinking about my son all the time while I'm making art, but I, I do think you, there's less pressure to throw your entire identity onto your art, because you know that you have other more important things waiting for you at home. Just gives you a different perspective and you realize you are more than, you're more than being a mother. You're also more than being an artist. You are all of those things at once. And you get to use the wholeness of that. You bring the wholeness of that into whatever you're doing at the moment, if that makes sense. [00:09:15] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, it absolutely does make sense. And I think that's really an amazing perspective to have, because it is so easy to get caught up in, you know, I'm, I'm a dancer. I've always been a dancer. I, you know, struggled with that myself quite a bit last year with COVID and not dancing for a year. I mean, not performing for a year and feeling like I've always identified myself, you know. When people meet me and I tell them that I'm a dancer. They're like, "Oh yeah, that makes sense." You know, it's just part of my DNA. And, and so there were many times last year I sort of had these like identity crisis moments of, "Well, who am I without this?" And, you know, and what, what do I need for my soul to, to feel like I can still identify as a dancer? Yeah. So I definitely relate to that, but I love the perspective that you have of sort of there's, there's more to you. Like you have, you have a myriad of sides to you and they're, they're important and they're all valuable, I guess. So, yeah, like that. [00:10:30] Ashley Taylor: Yeah. And I think we, we do ourselves a disservice by identifying as only one thing, honestly. Because we're all so much more than that. [00:10:39] Lindsey Dinneen: Absolutely. So earlier you had alluded to the fact that you're writing more about dance and people's experiences and things like that. And I know recently you wrote a really intriguing blog post that I kind of wanted to dive into a little bit. It was a manifesto of sorts, if that's fair, about some trends that you've been noticing in, I suppose, the dance world in particular, but in general in the arts world. And I'm curious if you don't mind sharing what you wrote about and sort of your thought process behind all that? [00:11:19] Ashley Taylor: Yeah. So I think the idea for this stemmed from, you know, I haven't performed in a while either, and, but I have seen over the past year or two, I've seen a few companies' virtual performances. And even that prompted me to think back to performances I've been involved in in the past. And I mean, I'll just be blunt. I'm pretty blunt in the blog post. There are times when I'm watching dance and I'm a dancer and I am actually bored. And I was trying to figure out why is that? Because it's not that it's not at all that the dancers aren't talented, they're very talented. And I came to realize it's because the choreography is rather mediocre. And I, you know, I have to couch this by saying everybody sees something different in a piece of art. And some people will find a piece of art meaningful that another person will not, right?. We all know it's, it's very subjective. [00:12:24] However, what I think, what I think people get caught up in sometimes is, you know, somebody who is not familiar with dance, might watch a dance and think, "Wow, they're so talented." Or, "Wow, that looks so hard," or, "Wow, that was beautiful." And those are all good reactions, right? But as a dancer, myself, I might have similar reactions, but I also might ask, "Okay, well, what are you trying to say through this dance?" I'm like, "What's the point of this? Why are we doing this?" And what I kind of argue for in the, in the post is like, I, I'm not always sure that artists are actually asking that question, 'cause especially dancers, we love dancing. We love doing our art. We love it. So we do it because that's what we do and we've trained, we've spent years studying it and we think, well, we have to dance. That's what we worked all this time for. And so then we end up putting out these dances that might be fun to do as performers, they might be meaningful personally as performers, and the audience might be wowed by our talent. [00:13:35] But did they actually get something meaningful out of it? Like, did you communicate through that dance? And I don't know. I guess I've been, I've been thinking lately that we really need to do a better job of being clear about what we're trying to say and what our intent is. So like, if the intent is, I just want to entertain people. So it's like, I don't know if the Radio City Rockettes say, or a fun movie. That's like a goofy chick flick. Okay. Entertainment. Great. No problem with that. But I think what we do is forget that there is a difference in some regard between entertainment, and art or between just like pure creative expression and art. So entertainment is, you know, you walk away and you're like, "Wow, I feel relaxed. I got out of my head for a minute." So it was great. They were talented. That was fun. Creative expression is like, any, anything that you do that's, that's creative, artistic, which is always great. [00:14:32] And it's like, I baked some cookies. I painted a sunset. I, I made a dance, right? That's all great, but I, I feel that a primary-- what's the word-- a primary purpose of art is to communicate something, to express something. And it has to be something from which the viewer can glean meaning, and it doesn't have to be the exact meaning that the artist intended, but there should be something like you should react to a piece of art in my opinion. So I questioned the approach of artists who don't, who are not clear about what they're trying to communicate. And therefore are not even editing it appropriately in order to communicate that more. So an example that I use in the, in the post is just because you know how to write words down and you find some interesting words and then you put them on a page that does not mean that you've actually written a story, right? [00:15:37] There's a lot that goes into writing a story with characters and plot and you know, development and all of this, right? So you can't just put words on a page and say, "I made art now. You know, enjoy it, pay for it." It's like, well, why, why would anybody do that? They could have written the page, the words on the page. So in, in dance, similarly, I feel like we pick some music and we're like, well, we have to dance because we have a show coming up and we gotta make money. So we'll make a dance about something random and put it up, put it on stage. And like here's talented dancers and here's like a couple of interesting moves. And we put it on stage and we call it art and then people don't come and we lament the fact that people just don't get it. It's like, well, was there anything there for them to get? Like, that's really my question. It's like, I don't think with the amount of content there is these days, like I just don't think it's realistic to assume that people will want to come watch you just because you're talented. Like there, the world is full of, the world is full of art and entertainment and all these things. So what makes yours different? Like, why are people gonna want to come and then come back? Are you giving them something transformative or something meaningful? Beyond just a spectacle. Does that make sense? [00:16:57] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, absolutely. No, I resonate with everything that you're saying so much. Good gravy. Yeah. I, yes, that definitely makes sense. And I think, you know, gosh, a lot of thoughts were forming in my head as you were talking about it, but working kind of backwards. One thing that I just thought about too, is that with COVID one of the lovely things to come out of it, I suppose, is the fact that the world opened up even more. And so art that may have only been accessible to a certain geographic region is now being live-streamed across the world, you know, or, or it's been recorded and made into a film that's then, you know, again, available literally anywhere. So I think you touched on a really good point. That's even more relevant today. And that is that there's a lot, there's a lot of art. So what makes you different? [00:17:57] Ashley Taylor: Yeah, exactly. Yeah, I think artists sometimes sort of have this sense of entitlement, of like, well, I have years of training and I spent money and time and energy to do this. So you should come watch me because of that. And it's like, that's not fair. I mean, I don't know. I think that's unrealistic and I would love, I would love it if people came just to watch us because we're talented, but it's unrealistic. And so we need to give them something more than that. Okay. [00:18:28] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Yeah. No, absolutely. And I think sort of to that point, I mean, you would hold any other profession to that too, right? So just because a doctor has trained for years and years, super highly educated, if he constantly misdiagnosis and, you know, or treats people terribly, you're not coming back. There's plenty of doctors in the world, or, you know, if a plumber doesn't, you know, again, highly educated probably, you know, years of experience, but if they can't fix the problem, you don't go back. [00:19:03] Ashley Taylor: Yeah. [00:19:04] Lindsey Dinneen: So I think, you know, there's a lot of, I agree that, that there is some entitlement of sort of like, well, I have devoted my life to this, so then you should devote your life to me, you know, or whatever. [00:19:18] Ashley Taylor: Yeah. [00:19:19] Lindsey Dinneen: Well, and I think it's, it's actually something I've thought about before. You also have to be really careful as, as an artist. And as, let's say, you know, a show director, a company director, or whatever that you just recognize the fact that it will always matter more to you than to anyone else. So if you're going to be effective at what you do, you, like you said, you have to have a message that you can, that can be translated that that's not. [00:19:48] Ashley Taylor: And I think in order to do that, you really have to, you have to have an editing eye, and/or you need outside perspectives telling you "I'm not getting it" before it goes out to a wider audience. And like, think of the book publishing industry, you know, your book goes through multiple rounds of edits and proofreads and suggestions before it ever hits the shelves of a bookstore, unless you're self publishing, but you still should go through those steps if you're self publishing. So there have been many outside eyes looking at this project and saying, "I'm not quite getting it" or like "that character needs something more," but with the average dance company, in my personal experience, that doesn't happen. So there's no accountability to make sure that what you're trying to say is coming across. And again, you don't always have to have a message, but, but there needs to be, you need to be clear about the fact that you don't have a message, then you can't try half heartedly to put some kind of message in there. And it just doesn't go anywhere. If that makes sense. [00:20:57] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. So I'm, I'm gathering you're not a fan of the whole Untitled Number One concept. [00:21:03] Ashley Taylor: Oh my gosh. [00:21:04] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh. Oh man. I think that should be banned in the art world, man. You have to come up with something. [00:21:12] Ashley Taylor: Yeah, good grief. Yeah, that just seems, it seems lazy to me and I, yeah, again, I said this would be blunt. [00:21:20] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, no, no, for sure. And, but I think that's, that's actually really interesting. I actually, I think you touched on something that's important and it is blunt, but I think that essentially part of what you're getting at is if you don't do this self editing or outside editing, it is lazy, right? Like you aren't doing your due diligence, you aren't kind of respecting the art form in a way. [00:21:46] Ashley Taylor: Yeah. Yeah. I agree. Or you're assuming that the art form is so sacred or something that people will come anyway. I'm trying to think of an example that's not dance, but I don't know. I mean, even, you know, modern art, a lot of people don't get modern art, visual art. So I, and I feel like sometimes modern artists are like, "Well, I painted this, so you should look at it because it's painting and because I'm talented and I'm an artist and here it is. It's art." And, to which I would respond "Fine, but don't expect anybody to feel the same way about it than you do." I mean, I don't know. I think you have to communicate something, even if you're communicating everything is meaningless. Like, okay. That's, that's a message. But anyway. [00:22:40] Lindsey Dinneen: Yes. That's a choice. Yeah. It's interesting that you put it kind of like that, because that is something that-- yeah-- so our friends over at Kansas City Aerial Arts, apparently in their rehearsal process when they're actively choreographing and then sort of doing the edits like you're talking about, their sort of funny catchphrase is, "Well, that's a choice." And, and I love it because it's true. You, you have lots of choices along the process of creating art and editing art. And you know, you can make a choice that ends up needing to be changed in the future. I mean, that's, that's what happens a lot too. I mean, goodness, actually a real world example is in going back and looking at some of the choreography that I've previously done, or right now that I'm resetting on our dancers, is looking back and going, "What was that, you know, you know?" [00:23:39] Ashley Taylor: We all do it. [00:23:40] Lindsey Dinneen: Right, and perspective. And you go, "That doesn't make sense. Why would I have that person come on from that side of the..." You know, just it's so funny, but it is so important to go back and, and improve every time I think too. [00:23:54] Ashley Taylor: I was going to go off on another little rant-- not a ranch-- just a tangent. Yeah, I, yeah. So back when you were saying, talking about choices, "Well, that's a choice," so I don't have a problem with choices and I, and again, I don't think every piece of art is meant to be loved necessarily. So if you're choosing to communicate everything is meaningless and it's this very dark piece of art about that. You know, I don't have a problem with that as long as everything you do has a reason behind it and it supports your message. And I think a lot of times people miss that part. So I feel like, I think that we should start with the why and then go to the how and the what, and, and I'll explain that in a second, but I think a lot of people start with the what. They're like, "Well, we have to make a ballet." [00:24:42] And then they go into the why sort of, if they even get there, but more or less, it's just, well, we had to make a ballet. So here's a fun little piece of music. And, you know, we'll put people on stage versus, to say, to go back and say why first? Why am I even doing this? Why am I here today? What am I trying to say? And, and once you know that, then you can say, "Okay, now how best do I say that?" So, personal example really quick. I have started writing things before and I thought it would be in prose form. And like, as soon as I started, I thought, "You know what? This wants to be a poem." And I can't explain it other than that, it was like this wants to be poetry, not prose. And I think, you know, in that case, it worked out better to express the idea that way or, you know, I know we're a ballet company. I know we normally dance on pointe, but this piece really needs to be danced barefoot, and that will enhance the vision of what I'm trying to say. So again, it's like your why is informing your what ,or your how versus the other way around, if that makes sense. [00:25:48] So again, it's just, it's just about like every, every choice you make artistically needs to have a reason behind it and you need to be evaluating how that fits into your broader vision for this piece. Everything should support it. I remember in college my professors saying every, every person on stage needs to have a reason to be there. And if they're doing the exact same thing as everybody else, you need to question why they're there. So again, just having a reason. I'll stop there. [00:26:18] Lindsey Dinneen: No, no, that's great advice. I love that. Actually I remember in choreography classes in college, them talking about if you're going to use the prop, you have to use the prep. You can't just have a random bench on stage that you don't interact with except for the beginning, or maybe the end. Like there don't do that. Or, you know, 'cause again, and what I've been trying to actually communicate to my choreography students is intentionality is everything, right? So you have everything has to have intentionality because I agree with you once you start being like, "Oh, whatever," you run into all the issues that emerged from that of, okay, but so there's no thought put into that. And you, I think you do need to constantly be asking yourself and or what you're editing, "well, why?" Like, as a, as an artist, you should be able to answer that very clearly. [00:27:16] Ashley Taylor: Right. And if the answer is, " well, I just wanted to have them dance on a chair or, well, I just needed to use four couples instead of one." It's like, that's not a really good answer, frankly. So basically what you're saying is you had to adjust or water down the art in order to accommodate some limitation. And like, there are times to do that, but if you don't have to then, for heaven's sake, don't like, anyway, that's my thoughts. Or like, or people will say, "well, the music I want to use is 12 minutes. So this is going to be a 12 minute piece." And it's like three minutes in you've said everything you needed to say. I get it. And now I have to sit here and watch the repetition for another nine minutes. And like, I'm bored out of my mind. It's like, again, not that the dancers aren't good, but I don't need to, I didn't need to see that for 12 minutes. So cut the music, you know, make your, make your art or make your artistic choices work for the art. [00:28:17] Lindsey Dinneen: What a brilliant little way to sum that up. [00:28:21] Ashley Taylor: Thanks. [00:28:22] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Yup. I like that. So I am curious when, okay, so we've talked about, you know, obviously you need to be communicating something, you need to be doing it well, which means a lot of editing and evaluation and re-editing again or whatever, but how do you feel about someone who's like, especially in the dance world, somebody who might produce a piece and their whole thing is, " I just want to make this as abstract as possible." Do you still feel that they need to communicate that that is the intention behind it? Or do you just not care for that style? [00:29:07] Ashley Taylor: I-- this is my personal preference-- if you're going to do that and say this has no story, this has no message, it's just movement on stage, personally, if I'm going to watch a piece that has no meaning, I want it to be still moving. And what I mean by that is, I want the music to be interesting. I don't want some soundscape, you know? You know what I mean? It's like the sort of tuneless music during massage. Exactly. Yeah. It's like, yeah, I don't want that because that's, that doesn't do anything for me. And then, and then, so I want some interesting music and I want the movement to respond to the music or enhance it and I want it to be memorable movement. So if some, so that if a piece is so beautiful or so dynamic or so in your face, whatever it is that I stopped caring if there's a meaning behind it, I think you've still made art because you've, you've managed to say, to use a metaphor, the earlier metaphor-- you've managed to make really amazing sentences, just beautiful sentences with beautiful words. And I don't care what you're saying, if that makes sense, but so, but that's a challenge. Like that's really challenging to make a dance so interesting that like everybody's just mesmerized, right? [00:30:37] So, and what I, so what I feel often happens is people will say, "Well, I'm going to make this abstract dance and then it's like nothing. Not only is it not communicating, but it's not interesting or unique or dynamic enough to, to move somebody." Like I could probably count on one hand the number of abstract, totally abstract dances. I've seen that I didn't care that there was no meeting. So, and like, I'm not even sure that I could make one. So like it's a challenge, but that's kind of how I would respond to that. Like if you're going to make that choice, fine. But then the art has to be like really different or just really moving. I keep using that word "moving." [00:31:19] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Dynamic moving. Yeah. I agree. I actually think it's probably a harder artistic challenge to go that route well than it is to be communicating a specific message or story and, and that kind of touches back into what we were talking about with intentionality of, I absolutely agree. So I always say that I love tap dancing because you can't do a sad tap dance. And, and that's, that's the thing about tap is it just would be so absurd and ridiculous. Like you wouldn't be communicating well, if you tried to do that, I suppose trying to do a comedically tragic piece, right? But you know, which I think that could be fun. But my point is that, you know, if, if my goal is to communicate happy, then, you know, tap is a good choice. If my goal is to communicate sadness and loneliness, probably tap's not the best choice. So what would best communicate that? So I, I agree with you. I really liked the idea of starting with the why, and then working backwards. It's like Event Planning 101, right? You know, you, what's the, what's the date of the event and what are you trying to do with that event? Why are you hiring you and then you work back, right? [00:32:38] Ashley Taylor: How do you want people to feel when they walk away from this event? [00:32:41] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Yeah, exactly. What do you want them to have gained or learned or, yeah. Yeah. I love that. Right. Very cool. Well the manifesto is very well written and really worth the time to read as are Ashley's other musings. Do you mind sharing a link to your blog? [00:33:01] Ashley Taylor: Yeah. So I'm at ashleyrebeccataylor.wordpress.com. And that's Ashley with a Y, Rebecca with two C's, ashleyrebeccataylor.wordpress.com. And if anybody is interested, on the contact page on my blog, I also have links to my YouTube channel, which is for dancing and also my Facebook page, which is for basically all the arts that I do. [00:33:29] Lindsey Dinneen: All of the things. [00:33:30] Ashley Taylor: All the things. Yes. [00:33:32] Lindsey Dinneen: Yes. Awesome. I love it. Yeah, cool. Well, thank you for sharing about that, that particular post and kind of your, your musings and your feelings about, about, you know, an artist process and, and I really, I, you know, like you said, it's blunt, but I think it is a good gut check for any time that you do sort of want to just make a quick decision rather than a intentional decision or, you know, so I do think there's a lot of value to that. So thank you for kind of also bringing that back to awareness. I think especially maybe during COVID there were many of us who were like, I just need to create something, but you know, and that there's, there can be a lot of value in that and there can be a lot of value in doing so for you, but if you're going to be doing it for an audience of some kind, then, you know, let's, let's put that intentionality in it. Yeah. I really liked that. Exactly. All right. Well, I have three questions that I would love to ask you if you don't mind answering them. [00:34:45] Ashley Taylor: All right. [00:34:46] Lindsey Dinneen: So, first of all, what change would you like to see in the world of creating art or displaying art? Or making it available to people. So it essentially, what's, what's one big change you'd like to see in the art world? [00:35:03] Ashley Taylor: Well, I think I've spent most of our time talking about it. But actually I, so I have a different answer which is more about the artists themselves in a way. So I don't know about other forms of art so much, but in the ones that I'm involved in, I feel like the message that we get as we get more serious about pursuing them is there's kind of one right way to pursue a career in this field, or, you know, even a serious hobby or whatever. So, you know, if you're a dancer, you kind of get the impression-- it's like, well, if you don't dance in a company or you're not appearing in commercial music videos or whatever it may be, then you're not, you haven't really made it, right? And I think so, you know, this is something I've been wrestling with a lot over the past few years because I don't have a regular dancing gig at the moment. [00:36:00] And I feel like that message is harmful because it kind of makes you feel like you've failed if you either can't do that or don't want to do. And not wanting to go that route is totally valid. So how can we find more creative ways to make the art that we that we're passionate about, which may not be that traditional career route, right? So what I would like to see change is more people feeling the freedom if they don't see what they're looking for, the opportunity they're looking for, go make it right. I mean, create what isn't there yet. And give opportunities to other people who might feel the same way as you do about the career path that you've chosen or are up to not to choose. [00:36:52] Lindsey Dinneen: Amen to that. Yeah, no good answer. But I really, obviously, I personally resonate with that because, you know, I had gotten to a point in my career where the opportunities to be apart of a full-time company here locally, we're just not the right fit anymore. And so that's exactly what I did. I, I didn't see something that could continue to work well, so I created a company. And thankfully there were enough people who were like, "Yes, we agree. We, we like this. Let's go that route." And we, we don't dance all the time. We, we do, you know, two big shows a year and then little gigs here and there throughout. But yeah. And I think that's, I think that's great. [00:37:38] Ashley Taylor: Yeah, and it's, it's great because you don't, you know, there isn't one definition of what a dance company is or there shouldn't be so just because yours doesn't look like someone else's doesn't mean it's not a valid way to make art. Maybe might be an even a better atmosphere for making art. So why not try it, you know? [00:37:58] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, absolutely. And I, yes, exactly. Well, and I, I try to especially tell my students this. But I just think in general, so true what you said. I think that there are many avenues to a dream and if you can remain open to it, to them, to the other options, then you're going to be a lot happier and a lot more fulfilled, you know, in the long run, because there are a lot of ways to do it. Yeah. [00:38:34] Ashley Taylor: Yeah. And you might even be more impactful. I mean, you never know. [00:38:37] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. So, absolutely. Yes. Well, great answer. And then my second question is, is there something art related that stands out to you as something that you would love to do that is completely outside of your wheelhouse and maybe you've so far felt intimidated to try it and maybe that kind of held you back from trying it? So essentially, is there something that you artistically would like to venture into, but maybe haven't for whatever reason? [00:39:10] Ashley Taylor: Yeah, there are many things. I mean, if I had my way, I would be good at everything, but I'm not. So I feel like the primary one is I would love to play the violin. I'm not really that musical. I mean, I am as a dancer, but not in the sense of playing an instrument. And I've, I have tried with, with disastrous results to play a few notes on other friend's stringed instruments before, so I would need some training, but yeah, but I would, I would love to try that, that instrument. And I think that'd be really fun. I, so that's very outside of my wheelhouse. The other one that comes to mind is musical theater which is more related to dancing and what I have experienced doing, but it's, it also feels very intimidating to be that well-rounded and sort of that showy in a way, but it sounds like a lot of fun. It always looks like they're having fun. So I'd love to try that too. [00:40:07] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, that's, that's really cool. I totally relate to the musical theater thing. I just love watching it so much that I always thought it'd be really fun, but I am so intimidated by the idea of having to be a triple threat and like, yeah, well, maybe we should audition for something together at some point, just, you know, at least for the experience of it. [00:40:31] Ashley Taylor: What? Abject failure? [00:40:34] Lindsey Dinneen: We can pick each other off the floor. It'll be fine. That'll be fine. Awesome. And then my final question is, at the end of your life, what's the one art-related experience you would want to experience again for the last time? [00:40:52] Ashley Taylor: So this is such a hard question because there are so many. So my answer is kind of funny because there's a, there's a piece of music that I have choreographed to. And I think it's probably the most beautiful piece I've ever heard, although that's hard to say, but it just moves me every time I hear it. And so I started telling people, I want this played at my funeral, which sounds like super morbid, and people would always sort of laugh awkwardly and be like, "Okay." Well, I think what I'm trying to get at with that statement is it's, it's so transcendent to me that that's kind of how I want to go on like thinking of, I'm thinking of a higher plane, I suppose, and something bigger than me and like kind of what lies ahead of death or what lies beyond death. So anyway, that's my little manifesto about it, but the piece of music is "Nearer My God to Thee," by The Piano Guys. So it's an arrangement of a hymn done on cello, multiple cellos, harmonizing with each other, and it is gorgeous, highly recommend listening to it. [00:42:03] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Yeah. That is a gorgeous, gorgeous piece of music. I, I agree with you. It's, it's amazing. There are, I mean, there's a lot of beautiful music out in the world, but there are certain ones that stand out as just every time I hear them, I'm like transported, or you said transcended, are you feeling like that? But yeah, that's yeah, you know, in fact it's really interesting. There was, there was somebody recently who was suggesting to do-- so, so I think there's probably a lot of us that find it difficult to just sit still and meditate. You know, come back to your breath, come back to your breath or whatever, you know, it's, it's hard to do that. [00:42:47] But one suggestion that I heard recently was to put on a piece of music like that. And it's, that's just that you just listen to it and you don't do anything else. You close your eyes, you know, let that experience sort of envelop you and that's what you kind of not like necessarily meditate on, but the idea of like clearing your head and not being distracted by other things and things like that. And yeah, I did it once and it was really amazing because it's just, you know, you get sort of distracted if you're alone, even if you love the piece of music, if you're not like solely focused on that, it's easy to sort of let it not wash over you, right? [00:43:29] Ashley Taylor: Oh yeah. But to bring your full focus to it. Yeah, I can, yeah, I can attest to that as meditative. [00:43:35] Lindsey Dinneen: Yes, indeed. Yeah. Awesome. Well, Ashley, this has been amazing as I fully expected. So thank you so much for being here. And I know we have the information for your website and that's probably a good way for people to connect with you or to at least follow your work. [00:44:03] Ashley Taylor: And I have an email on there too, so I'm always happy to chat about artistic things if that's desired. [00:44:10] Lindsey Dinneen: Awesome. Perfect. Well, again, I really appreciate you. Thank you for sharing your heart and thank you for being blunt, and, and for challenging us to, to be our best and, and do our best. I think that's really important and I am very excited to follow the path of this novel and can't wait to purchase it when it's available for purchase. [00:44:39] Ashley Taylor: And you'll be the first to know. [00:44:42] Lindsey Dinneen: Excellent. All right. And thank you so much to everyone who has listened to this episode, and if you're feeling as inspired as I am right now, I'd love if you'd share this with a friend or two and we will catch you next time. [00:44:57] If you have a story to share with us, we would love that so much. And I hope your day has been Artfully Told. [00:45:07] Hi friends. I wanted to share with you another podcast that I think you're going to fall in love with just as I have. It's called Harlem with a View, and it is hosted by Harlem Lennox, who was a previous guest of mine on Artfully Told and a dear friend. Just because it looks easy doesn't mean it is. There is so much that goes into the work of your creative. She wants to know how the artists got into their line of work, what inspires them, but most importantly, what keeps them going? She'd asked them about how they make it through the blood, sweat, and tears. She wants to know what it's like to live this creative life: the good, the bad, the ugly, and even the magical. So she goes behind the scenes with creatives, from different genres and she explores their history, their take on life and talks about the business of art and the dedication of making art. She has a brilliant, brilliant platform. I think you will fall in love. I highly recommend that you search for Harlem with a View. Thanks!

I Love Neuro
77: Your Rogue In Motion Bonus For NeuroSpark Members!

I Love Neuro

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 22:49


Get a sneak peak at the amazing bonus our NeuroSpark members get from Rogue In Motion, Claire's online Parkinson's exercise program. She and her instructors have created several video clips for their online members with PD. She is sharing these videos with anyone who has joined NeuroSpark so that they can use them in their clinical practice and share them with their clients. These videos have already been helping her clients with knowledge translation using PWR! Moves and other strategies from class into their daily lives.  

LET IT OUT
Managing Energy and Healing with Energy Worker Jessica Lyda

LET IT OUT

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 97:19


Show notes: - Find Jessica on the Web | Instagram- Follow @letitouttt on Instagram- Check out Katie's one-on-one Creative Clinic- You can book a free consultation with Katie here, and if you don't see a time that works for you please email her at katie@letitouttt.com- Subscribe to our newsletter to get show notes sent straight to your inbox-Full show notes here If you liked this episode, try out:Episode 324: Artist Camilla Engström on Creative Process, Habits, Routines, Moves, and More (part 1)Episode 325: Artist Camilla Engström on Style, Relationships, Dance, Husa, and Other Mediums (part 2) Sponsor:Treat yourself to affordable, carbon-neutral, contemporary jewelry at Ana Luisa. Go to shop.analuisa.com/letitout and enter code LETITOUT at checkout for 10% your order!

Modern Leadership with Jake Carlson
The Lean Entrepreneur

Modern Leadership with Jake Carlson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 30:36


Today's Guest Expert: Brant Cooper Brant Cooper is the New York Times bestselling author of The Lean Entrepreneur and CEO of Moves the Needle. His newest book, Disruption Proof: Empower People. Create Value. Drive Change is out in a couple of weeks. Brant is an entrepreneur and intrapreneur mentor who's leading organizations out of dated, […] The post The Lean Entrepreneur appeared first on Jake A Carlson.

Artfully Told
Episode 070 - Rachel Moore

Artfully Told

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 42:21


In this week's episode, I welcome Rachel Moore! Rachel is a licensed marriage and family therapist, specializing in psycotherapy for the creative community of writers, artists, and musicians. As a prolific artist herself--having trained in piano, voice, improv, writing, acting, photography, and more--Rachel brings a unique perspective to her therapy practice in a way that authentically connects with artists. Her episode is full of great stories and sage advice. (Fun fact: the cover image for this episode is one of Rachel's photos!)   Get in touch with Rachel Moore: https://www.rachelmoorecounseling.com/ Enroll in Lindsey's dance and wellness courses: www.elevateart.thinkific.com  Support Artfully Told: www.paypal.me/elevateart Artfully Told links: www.facebook.com/artfullytold | www.artfullytold.podbean.com | elevateartskc@gmail.com Get a free audiobook through Audible!  http://www.audibletrial.com/ArtfullyTold Schedule your own interview as a featured guest with Artfully Told! https://calendly.com/artfullytold/podcast-interview   Episode 70 - Rachel Moore [00:00:00] Lindsey Dinneen: Hello, and welcome to Artfully Told, where we share true stories about meaningful encounters with art. [00:00:06] Krista: I think artists help people have different perspectives on every aspect of life. [00:00:12] Roman: All I can do is put my part in to the world. [00:00:15] Elizabeth: It doesn't have to be perfect the first time. It doesn't have to be perfect ever really. I mean, as long as you, and you're enjoying doing it and you're trying your best, that can be good enough. [00:00:23] Elna: Art is something that you can experience with your senses and that you just experiences as so beautiful. [00:00:31] Lindsey Dinneen: Hi friends, whether you are just getting started or you're a seasoned professional looking to up your game, I have an exciting opportunity for you. Did you know that I am actually the creator of 10 different courses online that range from ballet, jazz, tap. They also include a mindset detox course and two Stretch and Tone courses. So if you're looking to start a new hobby or get a little bit fitter, or you're looking to do a deep dive into your mindset, really perform a true detox, I have the course for you, and I would love to help you out with that. So if you go to elevateart.thinkific.com, you will see all of the different courses I've created. [00:01:26] You don't have to step in a classroom to take your first dance class. I teach a signature 20 Moves in 20 Days course that allows you to learn 20 steps in just 20 days. It's a lot of fun. We have a great time together. And I think you're going to absolutely love the different courses. And Artfully Told listeners get a little something from me. So if you go, you'll sign up and use the promo code "artfullytold," all one word, and when you do so you'll get 15% off the purchase of any and all your favorite courses. All right, listeners, enjoy that. Again, it's elevateart.thinkific.com. See you there. [00:02:11] Hello, and welcome back to another episode of Artfully Told. I'm your host Lindsey and I am so excited to have as my guest today, Rachel Moore. She is a licensed marriage and family therapist based in San Diego and she works primarily with creative people and artists, which is most of us. So I'm so, so excited that you're here, Rachel, and so excited to chat with you. Thank you for being here too. [00:02:38] Rachel Moore: Thanks so much, Lindsey, I'm really excited about it too. I can't wait to just chat with you about fun, artsy things. [00:02:45] Lindsey Dinneen: Right? It's my favorite. All right. Yeah. Well, I would love if you wouldn't mind sharing just a little bit, maybe about your background, kind of what got you interested in art and then of course, a little bit about what you're up to these days. [00:03:00] Rachel Moore: You bet. Gosh. Yeah. So actually my first intro into the creative world was through music. And so when I was seven, I started taking piano lessons, really liked it, did not like practicing, but that's another thing. And did piano from seven to 14, started playing a saxophone and in, in middle school and then went into high school and continued with that and jazz band and stuff. And then also started playing auxiliary percussion in marching band and met some really great friends there. So lots and lots and lots of music, instrumental music. And meanwhile, I forgot this other track this whole time. I was always a writer. Pretty much been writing since I was like five and I made my first little book or whatever. So writing and music, sort of the more performative arts, have always been something I've been interested in and good at. [00:03:53] I not a great drawer. I tried my best, but this art isn't quite what I do with it. So, you know slap something together. But yeah, for me, music and writing and I actually, my first career was as a newspaper copy editor. So when I was in college, I got a degree in creative writing focused mainly on poetry. And I think it's kind of cool actually that I then went on to a 14 year career in newspapers where I would do editing. I would do design of the news pages. And I also importantly, would write headlines, which required the skills of finding the best words and also looking at line breaks, right? And if you're writing a headline. So that was going on. And then in the meantime, I, I finally went into singing when I was like 30. I lived in LA, I went to this great community college program. They had an applied music program. I was still working and also doing this program where I got private lessons, singing lessons for the first time. And really it was able to kind of develop my voice and learn a lot of technique that was just super helpful. And so that's been really fun. [00:04:57] And so that's kind of all of the basis of the, the fun, creative stuff I like to do. Then when I was about 35, 36, I decided to become a therapist, went back to school, got my master's degree. All that had to do 3000 hours of supervised internship before I could get licensed. And meanwhile, thinking to myself like, well, who am I going? Who are my clients going to be? You know, what, what am I going to focus on? Who am I going to serve? When actually it was kind of right in front of me the whole time, which is people like me, people who were into art. And I can talk more about kind of what that's like from my perspective as a therapist and why I think that's important, but that's, that's kind of the, the quick and dirty version of my life. There you go. [00:05:41] Lindsey Dinneen: Perfect. Oh my goodness. I love it. So many questions based off of that. I love it, but, but let's, yeah, I would love to hear more about what you just talked about with your practice and working with creatives and things like that. I would love to hear more about that whole thing and how that became your focus as opposed to, I mean, therapists are needed all the time. So I'm just curious how that kind of became your, your niche. [00:06:07] Rachel Moore: Sure. Yeah. I actually had a particular therapy experience with my own therapist when I was trying to explain to her that I went to a friend's house and I sat down at her digital piano. And, you know, I live in San Diego. It's kind of hard to like haul pianos around. I don't really have a lot of access to pianos. With that piano, the piano was my first instrument and it really means a lot to me. And so explaining to my therapist, how I sat down with this digital piano. And I had no idea that they, they've improved them so much now that they really do feel a lot like a piano when you sit at it. And I felt like I was playing a piano and, and what that meant to me, you know, how it felt in my body and how it felt emotionally and, and all this stuff. And my therapist, like, it's, you know, she didn't do anything wrong. There's nothing wrong with her, but she was just kinda like, oh, okay. Like she just didn't get it. You know? [00:06:59] I thought, wow, wouldn't it be cool to just off the bat, be able to have that connection with my clients where I understand, generally speaking-- you know, it's different for everybody, but I understand that for them, art may be like a life or death type thing. Art may be the reason that they are alive and, and the most important thing in their life. I just thought it would be cool to be that type of therapist who could serve people like that. And, you know, the most practical thought there is that it just saves a lot of time. You know, I'm like, okay. Yeah, I get it. Great. You know, I don't have to, they don't have to explain it to me on a deeper level. I think it's just cool to be able to be a person who gets it on some level and when it comes to being a creative. [00:07:45] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Yeah. I absolutely agree. And I can even just hearing you tell that story, I can definitely relate to, you know, it, it's totally fine when you, when you're talking to people who don't have the same experiences and, you know, and being able to share like, well, this art means this to me because, and you can sort of explain it, but until you have experienced it yourself, it's just not the same. So I can totally see that. So, and I'm curious too, do you find, or have you found that-- I'm trying to figure out how to word this exactly-- that I guess, like I've said, I, I'm a firm believer in therapy, but I think that I'm just curious, how has it been to attract creatives to your practice? Is it, is it helpful because you're also an artist and that's sort of, again, how they've connected with you? Because I still feel like there's a little bit of stigma, even in the art world of like, "oh, you know, I can't, I can't do that because you know that that's not for me," I guess. [00:08:46] Rachel Moore: Yeah, that's a really good question. I mean, I think that, you know, when it comes to, you know, by the time people are finding me, they know they want to go to therapy, I guess, really, you know? And so it's like, well, who, who do I want to see? I mean, I've had, you know, prospective clients say to me, oh, I saw immediately, for example, that you work with writers and I'm a writer. So I want to work with you. Like, because you just-- I'm shocked actually that I don't see more people working with people in the arts. I mean, maybe they are, and I just don't know where to find them or I'm not looking in the right places. I don't know. But like, I think it's really, and it's, you know, you talk about the stigma, even as I say that out loud, I'm like, am I saying like, artists need more help? It's, it's not so much even that it's just that I think that again, like, and I wish I had better ways to explain it too, but there's something about, you know, somebody who again has that, has that experience with art really gets on a deep level. [00:09:46] I mean, even, I was just thinking also in a practical ways, like, I know what it's like to have stage fright. Like literally I have it all the time because I'm performing a lot or I used to, you know, before the pandemic and, and yeah, there, there's, there's a connection there that I think is, can be really important and really vital in the relationship with my clients. And I will say that it's been, you know, there've been studies showing that the relationship between the therapist and the client is actually the healing part of therapy, which I think is pretty cool, like, or the most healing part. There's other things that are important too, but the relationship and the rapport is the most important part. [00:10:24] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. I can personally relate to that. I absolutely agree. And I think, you having that experience like you, like you were saying, even just the stage fright element. It's huge. So being able to also affirm the way that somebody is feeling, you know, and, and acknowledge the fact just also, you know, how much hard work goes into it. And I feel like there's a lot of misunderstanding about the art, about artists. And I joke about it a lot because people will say to me, "oh, you know, you have such a glamorous job." I'm a professional dancer and I'm like, "well, ninety of the time, not glamorous at all, you know?" [00:10:59] Rachel Moore: Yup. Most of the time, like I was just thinking about it today. I don't, I don't know if I mentioned to you before, but I'm actually been doing an "improv for therapists" class online. I've been participating in that as it as a an improv and it's been so fun, but today we did our dress rehearsal for our show and it reminded me how, you know, oh, I'm like, oh yeah --most of the time in a production, you're just sitting around like waiting. Right. So true. Preparing something. I know I'm just like, okay, all right. This week, not really glamorous. No. [00:11:32] Lindsey Dinneen: Right. It's all those long days in the theater where you're just like, oh my gosh, how is it midnight? And we're not done. But I think it's just nice to have somebody to be able to talk to, somebody who, who totally gets it, like on a fundamental level. You've been there. You've done that. I love that. I think that's super cool. [00:11:49] Rachel Moore: Well, that's great. Cause that's what I'm going for. Yeah. [00:11:51] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, I just love that. So, you know, you had mentioned starting to sing, you know, a little bit late, well having voice lessons, I'm sure you were singing here your whole life, but having voice lessons and really pursuing it as an adult. And I'm super interested in that. Was that kind of a leap of faith? And I asked partly because like is always been this like thing in the back of my mind, "oh, someday I'll go take voice lessons," but I haven't because I'm like, "oh my gosh. That's so nerve wracking." Tell me about your experience. [00:12:22] Rachel Moore: Okay. Yeah. Well, a friend of mine at the newspaper I was working at told me that he was in this program and how fun it was and, and he's also the person who introduced me to yoga. So I knew that he's like, he's got some good stuff going on. So I was like, "okay, I'll check it out." And the first time I ever performed in my group class, my hands were shaking so hard. I was up on the little stage in the classroom and I could not stop them, just shaking, shaking, shaking. And I'm like, okay, I guess that's what we're doing here. I'm happy to say that it got better, but yeah, it is, it can be scary. I think that the coolest part of that experience was that I learned a lot of technique that I had no idea about and actually made singing easier and made it easier for me to perform in a way where I felt confident. And, and, and even made it easier like on my body. Cause you know, when you're singing, just like when you're dancing, your body is the instrument. So to find a technique that, you know, I know how to sing really loud without hurting my voice, stuff like that, you know, was really cool. [00:13:22] And I will say I had a really interesting experience when I was kind of wrapping up my, my time with that. And I will admit to you-- to admit, I know there's an interesting word. My therapist brain just caught that. I stopped pursuing it because I didn't want to do it as a career. And my, my teacher at the time was encouraging me to continue and I didn't want to have the life of a singer, whatever I imagined that would be. And I have never gotten paid for singing, and I don't want to get paid for singing. It's too close to me as a human. I don't know how to explain it, but I had this experience where I was working on an aria from "Samson and Delilah" and the mezzo soprano. And I was, I was working on this aria for, for like a few months you know, really, really working really hard, like you said, because that's what we do as artists. We work really hard and finally sang it for my teacher and I, she was on the piano accompanying me. And I'm just getting chills thinking about it right now. Cause we got to the end of the aria. I got to the end and she looked at me and she said, "you could sing that on any stage in the world." And I looked at her and said and said, "I know." [00:14:40] And you know, what's so funny about that. I was, I was done. I was good. I didn't have to-- I was like, "okay, I've, I've done it. I've reached my potential and now go try something else." It was really cool. [00:14:53] Lindsey Dinneen: Surreal! What a moment! And I just, you know, and I actually think that is so important too, because I think there are a lot of people who wouldn't, who would discount being an artist on some level, because they don't make money off of it, or they-- that's not for other people, it's for themselves. And that doesn't discount anything. I mean, it's, it's okay. Like if that's not what you want to pursue, then that's fine. You know, so even having that perspective too. Yeah, I think there's a lot of discreditation that happens with... [00:15:27] Rachel Moore: I think you're right. Like, there's that word? And I, I don't know that I pronounce it right. But dilettante, I think is the word, like, you know, it's sort of a derogatory word saying like, oh, you're just a person who dabbles in things. And you know, I've tried to really embrace that. And I'm like, yeah, I do, because I, I have one life and I want to do a lot of stuff. I want to do a lot of different stuff. I want to do a lot of different art now. And I mean, I've had two different careers, you know, so I don't know. I mean, I, that's not to say on the other hand too, I really do admire people who dedicate their lives to one form of art and, and perfect it in, you know, in the ways that they do. And that's what they want to do. That's great too. I, you know, I think you're right. That it's like, it's different for everybody. And it doesn't, we don't have to discredit people just because they're not like an expert. That's a very, Hmm. It makes me wonder, you know, it's just kind of a very Western, so to speak, way of looking at things, you know, just like it's a little patriarchal, to be honest with you, just like, well, if you're going to do this, you better get paid for it. That type of thing. [00:16:23] Lindsey Dinneen: Right. No, I agree. Yeah. And, and I do love that perspective and yeah. Well, thank you for sharing about that experience. It was actually really encouraging. [00:16:33] Rachel Moore: Oh good. [00:16:33] Lindsey Dinneen: I was like, maybe I could do it, and my hands could be shaking the whole time, but I still tried. [00:16:39] Rachel Moore: Yes. Well, that's the thing. The more you do it, just like it's true, you know, the more you do it, the more confident you get, the less your body rebels and thinks you're going to die. So it'll be, it'll be fine. Yes. [00:16:49] Lindsey Dinneen: It's so funny too, because it depends on the performance that for myself, even when I go out into stage and I've been doing this for years, I'm a very confident performer. I love it, but I'll go out on stage for that first like opening thing. And I'm like, what? My legs are jelly now. Like... [00:17:07] Rachel Moore: Yeah. That adrenaline always gets you, right? Yeah. The adrenaline rush right at the beginning. Right. Like, okay. Then we settle in. Yeah. [00:17:16] Lindsey Dinneen: Yup. Oh man. Oh, that's fantastic. Okay. And you kind of briefly mentioned this improv project that you're a part of. So first of all, I love the concept --improv for therapists or therapists improving or whatever. That's super fun, but yeah, tell me a little bit about, oh my gosh. How did you get into improv? [00:17:35] Rachel Moore: Well, I actually got into improv in the real world. I don't know how to, we're talking about it these days, but before the pandemic-- oh, I actually got into it through music because I had always been wanting to try improv. I thought it'd probably be okay at it and have fun with it. But it always kind of felt really intimate. And so the first improv class I took in person was musical improv. And it's great. You just go on stage and you make up songs and you sing and it's awesome. I don't know how awesome it might feel for you at this point. But for me it was like, right, if you told me to get up and dance, I don't know how I do-- but the singing, I was like, yeah, I can do this. And it was so fascinating to me because I can tell when I'm doing musical improv or like regular talking improv, I can honestly like literally feel the different parts of my brain being activated. [00:18:22] And for some reason, for me, it's a lot easier to make up stuff as I'm singing than to make up stuff as I'm talking. It must be just literally different parts of the brain. So anyway, that's how I got into it was through musical improv. And then I decided to take like the whole series of improv classes locally here. We had a a show a December 2019. And that was just like the most fun thing ever. And yeah, and then later I think on a Facebook ad or something, I, I found this improv for therapists group. It's actually run by some folks out of Second City in Chicago. One of the cool things about the pandemic is now we can do things on Zoom and have a lot more access that way. And so it's a zoom class and it's been really fun. [00:19:04] Lindsey Dinneen: That sounds like so much fun. I love that you're doing that. Yeah. Well, and you know, your background has been so diverse and I just love the fact that you are not stopping. Like you said, you have one life, but you're, you're choosing to dabble in a lot of different things, I think. Yeah. So much value to that. You're, you're constantly learning and growing and, and just, I know it's funny to say this as an outsider, but I just keep thinking like, "oh man, kudos to you for just continuing to like push yourself." Cause it's easy to get comfortable, you know? [00:19:35] Rachel Moore: No, I don't know what that feels like. I don't know. Yeah. Thank you for saying that. Like, yeah. I, I can't imagine what it would be like to stop creating and performing. And I mean, I don't know about you. Like, it's just where, Hmm. How do I put this? Like, this is where I feel like life is. That's where I find that, you know, life, spirit or whatever you want to call it. There's probably so many words for it, but you know, to me, that's what life is about. I remember watching this documentary on a plane randomly, but I'm watching this documentary about-- oh my gosh. Her name is escaping me. " Take a Little Piece of My Heart." That singer. What's her name? [00:20:14] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh no. Oh man. You're asking the wrong person. Everyone knows that song. And I'm like, probably! I have no idea. [00:20:22] Rachel Moore: I'm refraining, I'm refraining from breaking out. It's a song, but I will not do that right now. There was this documentary about her and she was a very troubled person. And one of those people who died at 27, like in the sixties, you know, there's like a lot of people who died of overdoses and things like that. I can't remember exactly how she died and I can't remember her name. Anyway, I'm watching it. The important part is I'm watching this documentary and they said, yeah, the, the trouble, the trouble she had in her life was that when she was on stage, she thought that was, you know, the real life in the real world. And I remember sitting there, oh, it's not. I was like, oh no. I didn't realize that stage was not like the actual real world and everything else was something else in between times you're onstage. But anyway, that's kind of how I see life sometimes. [00:21:07] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, no, I love it. When you, when you said that line, something about, yeah, life, life is not unsafe, but I'm like, but it is. [00:21:14] Rachel Moore: I felt so strange. Cause they were like, you know, for her, for this person, this analysis was saying like, "oh, well she got so many accolades and people loving her" and I could see how, you know, it might be a problem in life if you're not understanding the difference between like people liking your art, as opposed to people responding to you as a human. I mean, you know, that's something that can get a little weird. I think sometimes for us creative folks too, having that healthy separation. But, but yeah, but just that general idea of life, real life is onstage. I'm like, "ah, I don't think I, I don't think that's true for me." Nope. [00:21:50] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Nope. I would agree with you. And I definitely resonate too with, with what you were talking about of like, yeah. I don't, I, I can't relate to the idea of not continuing to learn and grow and try new things. Yeah. Literally somebody the other day in social media was talking about being bored. And I was like, man, I have no concept of bored. Like I don't remember being bored since I was maybe five. You know, I just there's so much to explore. There's so much to learn. How can you be bored? [00:22:19] Rachel Moore: I know. Sometimes I think it's so funny, and it's funny to me because I don't think it's true and I don't think it'll happen, but my husband will say like, "what if we run out of things to talk about?" and I'm like, "what are you talking about? Like, do you know how many things there are in the world that we could talk about?" [00:22:36] Lindsey Dinneen: Right. I love that. Yeah. Well, I know a few specific stories had kind of come to mind when you were contemplating how art has impacted you and I'd love if you wouldn't mind sharing some of those? [00:22:50] Rachel Moore: You bet. Yeah. I mean, I did have on my list singing my art, that aria, for my teachers and other performance things, which maybe we'll have time for, maybe not. But I think there were a couple of things that like, yeah, I really wanted to, to talk about, and I guess talking about visual art, like I remember the first time I got to go to a real art museum. So I grew up in Idaho and when I was growing up, like especially then, you know, now there's more stuff there to do, but when I was growing up, one of the bummer things was, you know, nobody would come to our town to perform. Like no big names or anything like that. That wasn't even a thing. And like the closest city to us was Salt Lake City, which is five hours away. [00:23:30] So it's like, I didn't have access to a lot of, you know, First-class high quality art or whatever. That was the bummer part. The good part was that, that meant that kind of like we're talking about like, my friends, my siblings, like we would make stuff ourselves. You know, we were, I would, they just encouraged me to like, make my own little videos and shows and stuff. So that was cool. The first time that I went to a real art museum, I had a layover in Chicago and I had time to hang out with a friend. That was in 1995. And we went to the Art Institute and I saw paintings who I love and I, and I saw like, like all these people and that's actually reminded me of another memory that I hadn't written down, but I thought about. So I told you I studied poetry in school and creative writing and stuff. A few years after this, I went to London and I went to Westminster Abbey and, you know, saw the people buried there. [00:24:22] And then, you know, Geoffrey Chaucer, I think is buried there, but then they also have memorials to like Shakespeare and Keats and Shelley. And I was just in tears, like realizing that these people actually existed. You know, I was like, oh, wow. Yeah, it's real. You know, the, they did live, you know, these, these things that they created, like are from actual people. And here's the proof, I don't know. It just hit me. Yeah. Like I said, it was just crying and happy. And so anyway, that's just a couple of little stories yet. [00:24:55] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, I love that. I've also been to Westminster Abbey and it is a very surreal experience when you're, you're reading these names and you go, oh, my word, like it is, it's like a transformative experience. You're like, there's hundreds of, thousands of years of history, like here, right here. It's the most crazy experience. I relate to that. Yeah. Those stories are powerful. And you know, I'm also curious and obviously you don't have to be specific at all, but I'm wondering if you've experienced-- I'm sure you have some really like interesting breakthrough moments from some of your clients that you've worked with, where it was sort of like, "oh wow. I needed that today." You know? [00:25:41] Rachel Moore: Yeah. You know, I think I actually, this kind of ties into what we were talking about earlier about, you know, maybe being a dabbler in different things or, you know, or do you have to be an expert or blah, blah, blah. I have had with a couple of clients who have, have come in and they've told me, like, I need to do this particular, you know, I need to reach this particular artistic pinnacle. And if I don't, it means I'm not an artist. And I remember, you know, early on when I say things to them, like, you know, if self-expression is something that's important to you. If, if that's, you know, what you are really going for here? Which, which it sounds like it is as opposed to sort of the ego idea, right, of being a, a whatever artist. I said, you know what, there's lots and lots of different ways that you can do that. That means that look nothing like that. You know, maybe, I don't know. I'm just going to throw this out there. Like, you know, being a symphony musician for, you know, for example, some that you may even like better. And when I, when I say that early on to some of my clients, they just look at me like, so pitifully, like I have no idea. [00:26:43] And then eventually, sometimes there'll be like, "Oh, yeah. Okay. Maybe I can do my own thing and create my own artistic life and do the things that I want to do that really speak to me that maybe other people may look at and say like, oh, that's not real art or, oh, that's, you know, I don't see that as legitimate." It's like, you know, "Hey, in my opinion, I'm like, who cares about them? This is not about them. This is about you and your life and what again, what you want to do with your one life." Right? So yeah, that's always an interesting experience. I just love it. You know, with, I know what they're thinking. They're like, "oh, poor Rachel. She just has no idea what it's really like," which that may be also be true. I wouldn't say that's not true, but yeah, it's, it's always a good discussion at least. [00:27:34] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh, I love that. I'm so glad that you bring that into your practice because I think there's-- that something that I've talked about a lot with my students, because I also teach is, you know, sometimes they'll come to me and yeah, "I have this starry-eyed vision of like, oh, I just want to dance with X company or whatever." And you know, a lot of times I talk about how there are a lot of avenues to your dreams, to reaching your dreams. [00:27:57] Rachel Moore: Oh, I like how you say that. Like I'm gonna borrow that. [00:28:01] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Cause there's not one straight path. And even if you would like there to be, it just doesn't exist. So I think that having the idea in your mind of, there are lots of ways to accomplish your dreams if you're open to different opportunities, because, you know, if you're so stuck on one avenue, you're going to miss all the different spikes out that that are all of these other options too. So I love that you do that because I think that's just so important. I mean, I'm maybe not exactly exhibit A, but I have to say that, like, you know, I had the privilege of getting to dance for other companies, but it wasn't really until I branched out and started my own, that I finally was fulfilled. And that's a very risky thing to do in the dance world, just because it's like starting something from scratch, and nobody knows who I am and why should they come to see my shows and all that? And it's a lot of hard work, but oh my gosh, I've never felt more fulfilled, you know? And, and so sometimes just being open to like a different avenue, you know. [00:29:08] Rachel Moore: That's being creative, right? You know what I mean? Yeah. That's the spirit of the soul of creativity right there. Right. It's like, oh, maybe I don't have to do it like everybody else does. Or like people say I have to. [00:29:20] Lindsey Dinneen: Right. Exactly. And I just love that. Yeah. So I'm curious, I'm sure you have a lot of, well, I'm totally extrapolating so let me start over. I imagine that you have people that come to you who are maybe more in the beginning stages of their careers. And, and what advice would you have for somebody who's either kind of trying to make this happen? And it's like super nervous or whatever, or maybe they're at a point, maybe they're at a turning point in their career or they're ready to do something else. I mean, what kind of advice do you have for people who are kind of on that path. [00:30:03] Rachel Moore: Hm. Wow. You know, I'm not sure. And this, this actually might kind of open up another can of worms, which is to talk about kind of the type of therapy that I do. Because it's true that I work with therapists. A lot of people think I'm an art therapist by the way, which I'm not that's a whole nother thing, but I actually do a type of therapy called EMDR, which is Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing, which is such a mouthful. But honestly what I, what I would actually do is we would start a treatment plan on that issue. So I would ask like, "okay, what's the issue you want to work with, work on? Tell me more about it." They would explain to me like, like you're saying, you know, like maybe like, "I'm not sure what I want to do. Do I want to keep pursuing this? I've got this and this issue, you know, about it." And then we would look at maybe some memories, some past history that might be affecting how they feel right now. We would talk about some present triggers that are affecting them. And then we would talk about how they want to deal with it in the future. [00:31:00] So I've just kind of given you like a little brief summary of what EMDR is like, but the idea of EMDR-- we may have traumas in the past that are affecting us now. And what happens with trauma is that it just doesn't get processed in our brain. So, I mean, I have some early artistic traumas. One of them, you know, caused me to not write a song for like 30 years after it happened. You know, I wrote a song when I was eight, got this great response from my family and then wrote another song and they kind of ignored it and said they didn't like it as much. And that caused me to not write again for like 25, 30 years. That for example, would be a good memory for me to try to reprocess. And I can tell you about what that reprocessing is like, if you want to know, but that's a whole nother thing. [00:31:45] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah! [00:31:45] Rachel Moore: But. Well, yeah, well, okay. So here's the idea is that they think that they're not sure why EMDR works, but they think that perhaps when we're sleeping and our eyes are moving back and forth in REM sleep, that that is actually the brain processing memories, you know? So like, oh, let's see. I had a sandwich for lunch today. I think I can put that long-term storage. We won't need to grab that anytime soon, you know, that type. But when there's trauma, like, oh, I had a sandwich for lunch today and like it had a cockroach in it or something, if there was a lot of trauma around that, what can happen is that that memory will just kind of be floating around and not really have a place to land and not be processed. And then later you might find you get triggered and it's almost like you're back in that old memory and you can see, hear, feel, see the things as if it's happening right now. That's kind of the way that trauma works in our minds and our bodies. [00:32:35] And so we literally will, you know, sort of bring it, the memory and then literally do eye movements. And so I've been doing this online, but you could do it in the office too, you know, kind of with different ways to have people move their eyes back and forth to reprocess that memory. And then I'll ask them, "okay, what do you notice?" They'll tell me. I say, "okay, go with that." So we reprocess, we bring down-- that's the desensitization or part, we bring down the distress of that memory so that they can just think of it like any other memory. You don't forget it, but you're not totally freaked out about it anymore. And then the next part is like, they may have some negative connotations that come with that memory. [00:33:12] So like, you know, "I'm not good enough or I'm unsafe," things like that. We work with that, reprocess that, do the eye movements with like a more true statement, like "I'm safe now," or, you know, "I'm, I am a good person." And then the last part, which you may like this part too, being a dancer, the last part is that we pay attention to the body. So I'll ask, "okay. When you think of this memory and maybe the words, I'm a good person, where do you feel in your body?" They'll tell me, "well, I feel some tightness in my throat or my chest," something like that. And then we'll do eye movements on that. Reprocess that until the body is clear. And then we move on to the next memory. [00:33:49] So once we're done with the memories, again, you know, we talk about present situations and then we talk about how you want to deal with it in the future. So in this case, dealing with it in the future, it might be like, "okay, how do you want to approach your next your next audition," for example, and "let's talk about the positive belief you want to have about yourself in that moment." And then we work through that. So that's kind of what it's like, that's what I do. [00:34:13] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh, I love that. Well, and that's the perfect segue because I know that you are fully booked. You are obviously a very effective therapist, which is fantastic. But I know that you are now kind of in the process of creating sort of an online opportunity. So I would love if you would tell us more about that. [00:34:33] Rachel Moore: Sure. Sure. Thanks for asking. Yeah. I have done for like 10 or 12 years groups based on the book, "The Artist's Way" by Julia Cameron. We just go through like each chapter. There's 12 chapters, so it would take 12 weeks and go through each chapter. Up to this point, all the groups have been in person. Now, you know, after the pandemic or during, or wherever we are when we're recording this, I feel ready to do a program or workshop, 12 week workshop based on "The Artist's Way" online, feel comfortable enough in that venue now to do that. So I'm super excited about it and it's always, it's honestly, like one of my very favorite things to do in life is to run these. [00:35:09] Lindsey Dinneen: Awesome. And where could we maybe find out about that or, or connect with you so that when it is live, we could jump on board with that? [00:35:19] Rachel Moore: Sure. You can go to my website at rachelmoorecounseling.com. And there is the, you'll find a link to "The Artist's Way" group. You'll also find a button where you could set up a time to chat with me and I'll talk with anybody, you know, about it. We'll do a free 15 minute chat about whatever I can help you with. So if you've got questions about "The Artist's Way" group, if you need to find a therapist in California to work with, I love helping people with referrals because it can be really hard to find a therapist for various reasons. So I'm super happy to help out. [00:35:49] Lindsey Dinneen: That's awesome. Thank you. And then I do have three questions that I always like to ask my guests if you're okay with that. [00:35:56] Rachel Moore: Ah, yeah. Sounds great. [00:35:58] Lindsey Dinneen: Awesome. So first of all, how do you personally define art or what is art to you? [00:36:04] Rachel Moore: Oh, that's a great question. Wow. The first thing that comes into my mind for what it's worth is, is, is actually my friend's definition of music. And she says that in order for something to be music, it has to have a rhythm. And I, yeah, I kind of feel like I could apply that to almost all art forms, right? Like I like to do a lot of photography too, you know, just, just like in, you know, amateur photography, whatever. But I like to find like, okay, what's in the front of this photo, what's in the back? What are the patterns of this flower that I'm taking a picture of? Right? Like what's the rhythm of this. There's something in there and I could probably write or talk more about this at some point, but there's something in there about the rhythm of music or visual art or dance or writing, especially I definitely, I, when I was a newspaper copy editor, I always have to check myself because I tended to like the headlines that sounded the best rather than maybe were the best written. So I'm like, okay, wait, it has to be accurate too, not just sound great. So yeah, something about that, that the rhythm and the sound. Yeah. That's the best I can do for an answer to that question. [00:37:14] Lindsey Dinneen: I love that. I love that. Okay. And then what do you think is the most important role of an artist? [00:37:21] Rachel Moore: I know it's kind of a, that's been kind of a weird idea lately --the truth, but I think to shine a light on things that maybe for various reasons, society or people have said, you know, we can't look at this to shine a light in a way that is accessible. I think that if we just like, you know, shove things in people's faces like, eh, that's not really doing the job of art in my opinion. To invite people to see things differently, that's what I think the role of an artist. [00:37:50] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Yeah. I love that. And then my final question, and I'll define my terms a little bit, but do you think that art should be inclusive or exclusive? And what I mean by that is inclusive referring to an artist who puts their work out into the world and provide some context behind it, whether it's a title or program notes or the inspiration versus exclusive referring to an artist who puts their work out into the world, but doesn't provide the context, so it's left solely up to the viewer to determine what they will. [00:38:22] Rachel Moore: Right. So I used to be a journalist. You might be able to guess where I would fall on this. I love learning about things. So for me personally, yeah, I think I'd have to go with inclusive because then I thought about this, of course just like every, I guess creative person does, you know, do we need to know the story, but like, I always want to know the story. I always want to know more about where it came from, what the context was, what it means. And I love how that can always change too. When we find out different things or we have different perspectives as a culture, like, yeah, I don't, I don't think that art ever exists in a vacuum nor do I think it should. So I'd have to land on inclusive for that, that answer. [00:39:03] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Yeah. Very good. That makes sense. Yes. I guess I would have probably been surprised having talked to you if you went the other way, but yeah. Oh, I love that. Well, oh my goodness. Rachel, you are just so amazing and inspiring and I just really just want to commend the work that you do and not just for yourself. And you know, like I know even a lot of your art has been a little bit, maybe more for yourself, but you're just constantly-- I just love that you're kind of still learning and growing and you're still performing and you're doing all these cool things, but then you also have this practice and that is seriously helps other people. And obviously, you know, as an artist, I'm, I'm partial. So thank you for focusing on artists. I think that's just a gap in the market and I appreciate that. So thank you so much for what you bring to the world. I, I just want to say that I know you're making a difference and it's so obvious just even talking to you. So thank you. Thank you. Thanks for being here. [00:40:07] Rachel Moore: Thank you. Thank you. Thank you, Lindsey, for saying that. I really, really appreciate it. And it means a lot to me that, that you can see the value of having a therapist for artists, because I really think there is a lot of value in that. And thank you for doing this podcast, it's so much fun and I'm so glad that you're doing it and, and bringing artsy things into the world. It's great. Love it. [00:40:25] Lindsey Dinneen: Thank you. Yes. Oh yeah. It's, it's my happy place. And thank you so much to everyone who has listened to this episode. Please definitely check out Rachel's website and if you're so inclined, like she said, she offers these awesome 15 minute calls that you can take advantage of and really, you know, get some advice or learn more about this upcoming group that she's going to be hosting and jump on board with that too. Obviously, like I said, Rachel brings a lot of value and inspiration to the world. So definitely want to hop on with that. And if you're feeling as inspired as I am right now, I would love if you would share this with a friend or two and we will catch you next time. [00:41:07] If you have a story to share with us, we would love that so much. And I hope your day has been Artfully Told. [00:41:16] Hi friends. I wanted to share with you another podcast that I think you're going to fall in love with just as I have. It's called Harlem with a View, and it is hosted by Harlem Lennox, who was a previous guest of mine on Artfully Told and a dear friend. Just because it looks easy doesn't mean it is. There is so much that goes into the work of your creative. She wants to know how the artists got into their line of work, what inspires them, but most importantly, what keeps them going? She'd asked them about how they make it through the blood, sweat, and tears. She wants to know what it's like to live this creative life: the good, the bad, the ugly, and even the magical. So she goes behind the scenes with creatives, from different genres and she explores their history, their take on life and talks about the business of art and the dedication of making art. She has a brilliant, brilliant platform. I think you will fall in love. I highly recommend that you search for Harlem with a View. Thanks!

The Football Manager Show by The Athletic
32. Moneyball Myth Busting And Crusader Kings...

The Football Manager Show by The Athletic

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 40:01


In this episode, Alex Stewart off the TIFO runs the rule over using the Moneyball philosophy in Football Manager. There's a Position Of The Week as CJ Ramson pulls the strings in the middle of the park with the Deep Lying Playmaker. Your letters touch on Player Preferred and Moves and, unexpectedly, The Good Friday Agreement... Plus we've got a new feature where we talk about games we like to play when we need to consciously uncouple from FM for a bit. First up it's Iain and Crusader Kings III.

Radio Sweden
Government moves forward with Cementa law change, kids vaccine start date in October, oil spill in northern Baltic

Radio Sweden

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 2:11


Radio Sweden brings you a round-up of the main news in Sweden on September 21st 2021. Presenter: Frank Radosevich Producer: Kris Boswell

Faith Move Podcast
Faith Move: Katina Washington

Faith Move Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 59:02


Faith Move:  Katina Washington Wow- Intentional - done with intention or on purpose; intended: Dope Faith- Sharmaine Cooper of Public House Indy! Do you or someone you  know have Dope Faith?  Shout them out! Do you have show ideas?  Let us know! Do you need to check your faith?  We can help! Contact us at: EMAIL: info@faithmovepodcast.com FB: @faithmovepodcast IG:  faithmovepodcast

CTO Studio
Ep.139 Communication Flow for Handling Inventions

CTO Studio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 15:17


Check out the latest CTO Studio episode featuring Brant Cooper who is the New York Times bestselling author of The Lean Entrepreneur and CEO of Moves the Needle.  Buy Brant's new book Disruption Proof here: https://www.amazon.com/Disruption-Proof-Empower-People-Create/dp/1538720191  Learn more about 7CTOs at https://7ctos.com/

Artfully Told
Episode 069 - Natsune Oki

Artfully Told

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 39:03


In this week's episode, I welcome Natsune Oki! Hailing from Japan, Natsune is an author, speaker, and entreprenuer, who has reimagined herself and her career multiple times. Her unique perspective about creativity and art allow her to inspire others with a positive mindset coupled with business acumen. (Fun fact: the cover image for this episode is of Natsune and the book she wrote!)   Get in touch with Natsune Oki: https://www.lifeupeducationtv.com/ Enroll in Lindsey's dance and wellness courses: www.elevateart.thinkific.com  Support Artfully Told: www.paypal.me/elevateart Artfully Told links: www.facebook.com/artfullytold | www.artfullytold.podbean.com | elevateartskc@gmail.com Get a free audiobook through Audible!  http://www.audibletrial.com/ArtfullyTold Schedule your own interview as a featured guest with Artfully Told! https://calendly.com/artfullytold/podcast-interview   Episode 69 - Natsune Oki [00:00:00] Lindsey Dinneen: Hello, and welcome to Artfully Told, where we share true stories about meaningful encounters with art. [00:00:06] Krista: I think artists help people have different perspectives on every aspect of life. [00:00:12] Roman: All I can do is put my part in to the world. [00:00:15] Elizabeth: It doesn't have to be perfect the first time. It doesn't have to be perfect ever really. I mean, as long as you, and you're enjoying doing it and you're trying your best, that can be good enough. [00:00:23] Elna: Art is something that you can experience with your senses and that you just experiences as so beautiful. [00:00:31] Lindsey Dinneen: Hi friends, whether you are just getting started or you're a seasoned professional looking to up your game, I have an exciting opportunity for you. Did you know that I am actually the creator of 10 different courses online that range from ballet, jazz, tap. They also include a mindset detox course and two Stretch and Tone courses. So if you're looking to start a new hobby or get a little bit fitter, or you're looking to do a deep dive into your mindset, really perform a true detox, I have the course for you, and I would love to help you out with that. So if you go to elevateart.thinkific.com, you will see all of the different courses I've created. [00:01:26] You don't have to step in a classroom to take your first dance class. I teach a signature 20 Moves in 20 Days course that allows you to learn 20 steps in just 20 days. It's a lot of fun. We have a great time together. And I think you're going to absolutely love the different courses. And Artfully Told listeners get a little something from me. So if you go, you'll sign up and use the promo code "artfullytold," all one word, and when you do so you'll get 15% off the purchase of any and all your favorite courses. All right, listeners, enjoy that. Again, it's elevateart.thinkific.com. See you there. [00:02:11] Hello, and welcome back to another episode of artfully told I'm your host Lindsay. And I am so excited to have as my guest today, Natsune Oki, who is an author, speaker and entrepreneur. And she actually is coming to us from Tokyo, which is awesome. I'm super excited to chat with you about art. Thank you so much for being here. [00:02:36] Natsune Oki: Hi, Lindsay, thank you so much for having me today. I'm also very excited as well. [00:02:41] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, of course. Well, I know you have a super interesting background. I mean, obviously what you're up to nowadays is amazing. So of course I'd love to hear maybe how you got started and, and how it led to what you're doing now if you don't mind sharing. [00:02:59] Natsune Oki: Yes. My name is Natsune Oki. I, I was born and raised in Japan and so well, not Tokyo, but Japan and I decided to study abroad when I was 18. And then I went to the United States and I finished my business degree. Well, I would say I didn't finish my business degree, but basically I did like halfway on my college and I decided to work like getting work experience in America. And at that time, like my English was broken. I didn't even have a degree. I didn't have enough money, like nothing, but I just decided to just put myself out there, right? And then see what I go to get. And then very fortunately this time turned out to be one of the best time that I had in the States where I, I was able to work in like startup, entrepreneur- heavy like community. Because back then I lived in Seattle and Seattle was such like a hippie community for tech startups. [00:03:59] So during that time I was able to network with lots of entrepreneurs and investors who were working around technology and then who were really being in the possibility of with technology and expanding that possibility further. And I was really intrigued by it. I was really inspired by the vision that they had and that story kind of delays to later what I'm doing today, but I'm going to come back to it later. And then after that time kind of ended, I decided to go back to school to get my economics degree. And then I finished economic study and once again without like no plan, I didn't even have money or job lined up or anything, but I just decided to move to Florida and you know, without having anything really like no connection, no place to live, like it was really tough, but I just wanted something different. [00:04:57] So I moved and, yeah, some like really hard things happen because it was just really random, right? But I did it anyway and I was able to get like a consulting job. And then I worked as like a consultant, like digital marketer, marketer kind of role, the business agency. And then after that, I, after a while, I decided to come back to Japan for a little bit, because, there was opportunity with Olympics that was supposed to happen last year. So I came back and then I was still working with the same company, but then I always had this like tremendous interest in entrepreneurship. And I knew that I was going to have that like entrepreneurship experience at some point. And I think it was going to be actually, I was going to, I knew that I was going to be entrepreneur for like a very long time. I don't say I just needed to like time, like when that was going to happen. And that was the perfect timing. [00:05:56] So I decided to go like individually, like I just stopped the contract with the previous company and basically I'm doing what I was doing at my previous company. I do it like individually now. And that's how Foreign Connect to basically started. And I explain Foreign Connect as a business service that helps Japanese companies to expand their business launch and expand their businesses in America, and also Latin America because I have some connections in Florida. And Florida is like full of like, like Spanish speaking people. But basically that's what I do with Foreign Connect. And then I also have another very, very exciting media channel, which is the platform that I reached out to you from. It's called the LifeUp Education TV. And coming back to the earlier story, the reason I started that I started LifeUp Education TV is because I was really inspired by all of these tech entrepreneurs, their ambition toward like expanding the possibility of humanity. [00:07:02] And I mean, of course it's a business, so they do have this like money mentality and business mindset behind it. But I was more intrigued about it how they were so visionary and excited about the possibility of a technology, how that can make impacting people's lives more than like making money necessarily. That's why, like I made this tonight, the shift from studying business to economics, because economics, you have more space for broader thing than just money, but you know, it has consideration for economics. It has constellation for education, political science, and more things that has to do with people element of the society. So I, I made that size shift. And then, so today how that relates to like LifeUp Education TV. So like I said, I was really fascinated by how people were so excited about the future. [00:07:57] And when I think about future, I think of it as possibility and creativity, something that we haven't seen yet, right? And then in the same token, I guess in the opposite side of it is a past. There's a past. What is past? The past is what we already know what we already know as, for example, data, knowledge, or the history we already recorded it. And with having that, to being the opposite side of the spectrum, I believe that future is existing already inside of us. We tend to look at future as like external thing that we were searching for, right? Like the humanity is searching for the future, but I think vice versa. Like we already have the potential, we already contain the potential for the future. We just need to dig into it. And we just need to find the possibility and the future inside of us from our creativity we already have and what prevents us to do. So it's sometimes it's data and knowledge and experiences and the limits, so to speak. And how, because, you know, the limits tells us something is impossible, right? [00:09:16] Because, and then by the data we've already done it. It's impossible. Like that's the forest that we are against. So that's why, like, that is why I'm so excited about the future and really talking about pushing the limit. And when I talk about pushing the limit, I think like great connection between creativity has to do with like creativity and like art, our ability with like creating something from nothing, right? And I call that as a form of art. So this is why, like my channel LifeUp Education TV heavily promotes the idea that the potential that put the full potential of humanity really lays on our art capability. And that's what we like to talk about in this show is how can we unlock it? How can we stimulate it? How can we take the most advantage? [00:10:13] Lindsey Dinneen: Wow. That sounds amazing. Well, first of all, oh my goodness. So much of your story is so incredibly inspiring. I, I'm so impressed with you for coming, you know, all this way. And then starting kind of from scratch a couple of times just trying to, yeah, kind of discover what fits you, where you're meant to be kind of thing. And working with all these different people, I mean, kudos to you. That, that could not have been easy on any level. So I'm just really impressed with you for, for just being so brave and bold and going for your, your dreams and your goals. [00:10:50] Natsune Oki: Thank you so much. That is a very kind thing to say. Thank you so much. [00:10:53] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh, of course, of course. [00:10:55] Natsune Oki: Yeah. I think one thing I learned that definitely helps me to go through this, you know, bold journey is because at the core I understand, like that's probably why the top of these and why I'm so like out there is because I know that fundamentally my success doesn't mean anything to anyone but for me, and the same token, like my failure doesn't mean anything to anyone as much as it does to me, you know? And when I start believing in that thought, when I started subscribing in the thought, like all the sudden I'm not so afraid of what people think about me. And I have the courage to try everything that just makes me happy and other than makes me look like I'm successful. And I figured everything out, you know? [00:11:48] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Oh, I love that perspective too, because that gives you so much more freedom to explore and try things and not, yeah, not worry about the outward facing appearance of anything. It's, it's for you. So I love that outlook. Oh my goodness. So yeah, so obviously, you know, you've gotten to do you-- well, you've gotten to because you've created these, these amazing opportunities for yourself-- but you've gotten to do some pretty amazing things. So I liked what you were talking about in that you feel like creativity is the future. I mean, that's what makes you excited is there's so much potential for the future when we allow ourselves to be creative. So I wonder if you don't mind elaborating a little bit about that and talking about how your platform allows people to, to explore their creativity. [00:12:41] Natsune Oki: And I think just like, just like arts themselves, what's so interesting about arts is that there's no one answer, you know, like arts are, is like so subjective. It's so different to one person to another, like what's valuable, it's so different. Like so absolute different people. And then I think it doesn't have to have only one fit it, like one size-fit-all kind of answer. But to me, what works for me or what, what speaks to me now, they're the loudest. And also the gift that I have is definitely and like the mindset, managing the mindset and also helping others to do that. So with my channel, we focus a lot on psychology. We focus a lot on like managing the mindset part, which really has to do a lot with emotion, which is once again, it's very subjective matter and we don't have to have like one size fits all answer to what is happiness, for example, right? [00:13:51] So we can discover different perspectives. And then we can encourage people to also explore different concepts with us. And then I'm hoping like that can lead it to some sort of realization that can like fertilize your creativity in your way. And that's something that I can't decide for the audience, you know? So I'm just creating everything of like what I think is helpful for people to have a good mindset, to have a good psychology for them to feel quote unquote motivated or I guess willing, willing to pursue whatever they want to pursue. And then the rest is up to them because I can't teach them how they should grow, but it's up to them, you know? So, yeah, that would be my answer is my way of contributing to that conversation is talking about mindset, which is something that speaks to me. The nowadays for me, like that's how I learn in terms of even creativity, but also that's the gift that I have for other people, like how I can contribute to others. So that's what I would say. [00:15:03] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. And I love that because I think you're absolutely right. The mindset. I mean, you can, in theory, be as creative as you wanted to, but if you don't have the right mindset, it's just so much harder to, to, to really be successful in the long term. And, and like you mentioned, you mean success kind of looks different to different people as it should, but, but even just to maintain a low level of creativity, yeah, having, having your mind in a good, healthy place is definitely a big, big component of that. So, yeah. I love that. [00:15:41] Natsune Oki: I, I think when I look at, I guess, creativity or like creating something from nothing. That's something that I'm good at. And that's something as an industry wise that I have been involved with, with my business posts also with my experiences, like a lot of those businesses have been startups, like starting from scratch is my spirituality. And when it comes to that, I think there's no much difference between like creating art, to like creating a new business for instance, or creating a new venture. And creating something from nothing is very exciting, but at the same time, it takes tremendous amount of like a mental management, like a mental focus. Because things happen that disappoint you. And I'm not talking about like creating one piece of art, but for instance, like if you're artist, maybe you are in the stump of like, you can't come up with some creative idea, you're feeling down, like you're even doubting yourself as an artist. What can you do? I think it really comes down to managing your mind, to bring yourself to like never give up during those times. And that's kind of how I see, see it when it comes to creating something from nothing. Because it's not going to be like easy all the time, you know, like whatever you're working on, whether that's art, whether that's like starting a business from nothing, or really like just creating a family, like starting from nothing, I'm talking about, I think it takes mental strengths and that's, that's something that I'm good at talking about. So that's how I contribute. [00:17:29] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. I love that. I love that a lot. And I know that you have also written a book and I would love to hear about the book. Yeah. And also just sort of your journey to create that, because I know that that's a really big undertaking and, and another kind of step in the creative direction. So yeah, I'd love to hear about that. [00:17:49] Natsune Oki: Yeah. So it started from me being a business. Mine is how the book started. Like I never really thought like one day I'm going to be an author. Like I didn't plan for it. I just thought what made sense was like, I, I little bit earlier, I said, you know, I have the humility to not assume how I can impact other people's life because that's like up to them. And then, you know, even if I have my mission and I have my hope or the romance of how my channels should have speak to others, at the end of the day, I can't control what people think of it, or I can't control what people think of my art or I can't, right? So the same way I, I have the humility to understand that the judger is my audience. And when I have that mindset behind how I create LifeUp Education TV, the practicality understanding of how I should my marketing, it just made sense for me that I have a many, as many outlets as I can because some people learn the different contents through video, but some people also like to learn it from through readings. [00:19:10] Some people also like to learn it from audio listening, like how we are doing today. So in terms of like, why I may come up with the idea of big was mostly because of the strategy, but I'll also, I wanted to write it because I shared my method that I had, that I talked about in my book to my friends. And yeah ,they implemented it and they really liked it. And I never really talk about the method, like the method part that I talk about in my book seems to be very, very interesting to many readers that read my book, but that, that wasn't like something that I pushed with my marketing, for example, like that, wasn't the main point that I wanted to push. It just happened and a lot of people liked it, but basically that really the main, main point that I want to with a book is really the message I'm pushing with LifeUp Education TV to be with, just to tell people like it, it can be scary, but you know, as long as you manage your mind, you can literally achieve anything, right? I mean, it sounds kind of not allowed to talk right here, but I talk about it in a perspective of like how one person, how someone can create mental transformation in three different phases in my book. [00:20:27] So in this book, I talk about phases, as I mentioned. How can you make that mental transformation? The first phase I talk about. Commitment. The first phase is all about building up emotion. So in this space you don't need anything logical, like, because when you think everything logical, you will never try anything. So in this phase, I really want you to focus on finding what it is that gives you the burning desire. Like something that really excites you. And then I give you a different questions to consider and then really understand what it is. And then one full meter that I talk about in this chapter is you have to have two things. One is inspiration, like something that you are so excited about once again, and then you also need to have desperation. What does that mean? That this desperation in essence, that you have to be sick of whatever you are right now. Like you have to have organized that frustration you have for the fact that you're not achieving something that you truly wanted to, and then you need to organize it and then you need for, for you to come to the commitment phase, you have to have inspiration that's exceeding that inspiration because if the inspiration is bigger than the inspiration, you don't feel like, like, if you don't believe that whatever you are dreaming of right now is possible to achieve, you're not going to try it, right? So that's the first phase I talk about. This is a very short description. [00:22:04] And then in the second phase, I talk about perseverance and more specifically, I also talk about, I call it identity circle, but what it is is really talk of, talk of self-awareness. Like, what do you really want? Like we talked about what you want to achieve in a first chapter, but now let's face it with some logical thinking. Like let's, let's change our perspective. In the first phase, we inspire you to think of the leavers that you're getting from the dream, whatever you created. But in a second phase with the logical thinking, now I'm going to say to change the perspective and ask you, you're not really working toward the new world that you thought about in the first phase, but in reality, you're working for those journey. Like you're working for that you had to go through for you to get to wherever you are. So think about all the possible failures you're going to have. And can you have like going through that failure, like let's align who you are, what you want with like what you want to achieve. So we really dig deep into like, identity of like what you think you want and if who you are sort of going through different questions. [00:23:24] And you also talk about how to manage our mind when we go through hardships, rejections, because things like that happen. And then finally, on the third phase, we speak about what is happiness and what is success? And because in the second we talked about the most important thing, which is let's need to find failure. So regardless of the hardships and rejections, you might go through like, here's how you think of them, right? So that I can keep track of like, you know, it doesn't matter. Like even if these things happen, like it doesn't matter, I'm going to do my thing and I can keep going. Like, that's, that's my goal of like how I want your mind to be. But because I want this whole journey to be like really thoughtful and reading like a deep journey that I guess I, I want people to think about what they want, and then what they want in their life in a very, very deep sense. In the third phase, we talk about the definition of success and happiness this time. Because we already done that for the failures. [00:24:29] And actually this is what a lot of people miss and a lot of people, a lot of people by that, I mean like a lot of books also, we don't talk much about the definition of happiness and success, but in, in reality, this is very important topic that no one, like people often forget to talk about. And we just assume that this is something that, that's common among many people, and we don't really have. We don't really take the time to think about them in a customized manner to what feels right for us to each one of us, right? And it can be completely different answer to person to person. So in a third phase, we really talk about it and that basically summarize the whole bit. [00:25:14] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Yeah, that's fantastic. And I, I really love what your book addresses, because I think it's so important. I love the way that you were describing it. I definitely want to read it because, you know, just like you were talking about going through those three stages and they're each so important and how mindset is kind of woven through each and deciding what success is, deciding what happiness is for you. I think that's such a key component that a lot times is overlooked ' cause we're so eager to sort of define it by other people's standards. So yeah, I love, I love the way that you're going about all of that encouraging creative people to, to be creative and to, to be brave and to go for it. But, but that, you're also giving them that framework. And like you were talking about with the second section, you know, like you said, disappointments that are going to happen, failures are going to happen. So how do you deal with that. And I, I think that that is so great because it sounds so practical. That's very cool. Well, so I know, again, that sort of, that creativity has always been kind of a part of your life. Is there, are there particular art forms that you practice regularly now? I mean, what you're doing is an art form too. I mean, speaking, writing, but also, are there other things that you also like to do yourself? [00:26:37] Natsune Oki: Yeah. Actually everything I do is kind of creative because even Foreign Connect, my services more marketing and it has a lot of art elements to it. And with that, I LifeUp Education TV, obviously, like you said, like it's a speaking and that's a form of art. I like to speak and recently I started doing this thing called NFT. So I decided to talk, I decided to build some media around it as well, as well as publishing some arts myself. And I also like in LifeUp EducationTV, really the purpose of it is I want to talk about culture, arts, marketing, business. So a little bit of business side, like practical, like a business insight, but I definitely heavily, heavily like interested in talking about culture and arts. And one of the thing actually I started doing is I am putting out BDOs that has nothing to do with business, actually, something that just feels fun for me. [00:27:40] And I eventually want to turn this into like entertainment platform as well. So a little bit of business education for that matter. But also I want to have some sort of like art, like music elements to it. So now if you go to my website, for example, you do see different channels talking about different things, but one channel, I have a committee plus life and they're there. And in that channel I sing. And I just talk about life because life is not one dimensional, you know, like you, you have different, you can have different interests and that's what makes you more interesting than just having one dimension of things to talk about. So, you know, as much as I'd like to talk about NFT stuff, which is like my mindset and somewhat serious stuff, I also put out some fun contents in there as well. [00:28:36] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh, I love that. That is so fun. And that must be kind of a nice balance too, because obviously you're, you're super into the entrepreneurial world. So having kind of an outlet that's just much more, maybe a little light, more lighthearted and fun is, is wonderful. I love that. [00:28:53] Natsune Oki: You know, the thing is like my, my, another intention here is like, I think it's actually super, super smart move too in terms of PR and marketing as well in terms of business. You don't want to beat it out of them, you know? Being relevant to the current society is very important to me. And I needed to take out a advantage of the fact that I'm woman and young, like I'm in the best position in terms of being relevant to the current society, you know? Yeah. I can't let that opportunity slide for the sake of my ego of like how I should have looked, because in the end, like market is what decides and just like Kardashians, like they understood, like people make fun of them and stuff like that, but like they understood, you know. So for me, it's kind of like what works in a business is more important than my ego. And I think so, given that being said, I think being relevant to the current society is essentially currency, but in a different form. [00:30:01] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. That makes complete sense to me. So yeah. So, well, you have an amazing story that kind of has led you to where you are, and obviously I'm sure there are so many more twists and turns, but I just, yeah, I'm so impressed with how brave you've been and bold you've been. And then, and, and then how you've just sort of, you know, dived headfirst into these, these adventures and these opportunities and, and really made them your own and then have now shared. Now you're sharing what you've been learning with others, and that's just really cool. So thank you for, you know, doing all of that, 'cause I know it makes a difference in people's lives. And I'm just curious, I'm sure that there are some of our listeners who are gonna want to connect with you and read your book and things like that. Is there a way for us to do that? [00:30:53] Natsune Oki: Yes. So my name is once again, it's Natsune Oki, and that is a nice setup because if you search Natsune Oki, you're going to pretty much find everything about me. And my media channel is called the LifeUp Education TV. And in that a website, lifeupeducationtv.com. You can find all my social media, which I'm active on TikTok, YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn, and my book as well in there. So, and then my book is called "The Game of Self-Domination." I want to start hosting this show, like a Q and A show and I, I have this Facebook group that people can join to ask me questions and I, I can ask literally, any, any question people want to ask for, I just want to have like a real, more real, like interaction, like one-on-one level interaction, because I feel like that can help people more like a real question then, you know, me coming up with topics. So that's something that I, I'm starting to do so if anyone is interested, you can definitely join up the LifeUp Tribe, which is the name of the group. And then ask me any question you have about mindset and business and marketing like anything. [00:32:10] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh, that's great. Awesome. Thank you so much for sharing that. I'm sure that, yeah, that sounds great for me personally, but I'm sure that there are definitely some of our listeners who are going to be interested in all of that. So thank you for sharing. I do have three questions that I always like to ask my guests if you're okay with that. [00:32:28] Natsune Oki: Yes. Yes. I mean, yeah, please. [00:32:30] Lindsey Dinneen: Awesome. So first of all, how do you personally define art or what is art to you? [00:32:37] Natsune Oki: Yes. And I think I would have to go with, so we already talked about, but since I'm such like so heavy into what I do with it, I thought education may be the only thing that I can think of when I think about art is our possibility and our future. [00:32:56] Lindsey Dinneen: I like it. That's, that's so unique, but I, and I just really like that answer. Okay. Second of all, what do you think is the most important role of an artist? [00:33:09] Natsune Oki: I don't want to start sounding boring, but I really think that there's a key. Artists are the key player in terms of creating something new and creating a future of a future. Like it really like, you know, until now it's it was an engineer, but because now we've built some infrastructures for people to be more creative, possibility is unlimited, like with the artists combined with technology, like it's, it's going to be like crazy. Like it's going to be our future. [00:33:41] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Yeah. I agree. I love that. And then finally, and I'll define my terms a little bit, but do you think that art should be inclusive or exclusive? And by inclusive, I'm referring to an artist who puts their work out there and provide some context behind it, whether it's program notes, title, the inspiration, whatever, just to give a little bit more context, versus exclusive referring to an artist who puts their work out there and doesn't provide context so it's left solely up to the viewer to determine what they will? [00:34:16] Natsune Oki: Hmm. I think if I answer this, according to what I believe in business, I say exclusive because, you know, there's a one story that I share often, which I learned because I studied economics. There's this concept in economy that was created by the father of economics, Adam Smith. He talks about invisible hand, which is really to say like, economy is at the optimal state when there's no government intervention. And which means that the economy is the healthiest when there's a fully, truly free competition in the economy like that, that was his, one of the theory that he had. And I often talk about that, like, you know, in terms of mindset, I think accountability is such an important thing. Like we can come up with all the reasons of like, why you fail, why you like, why you are not feeding it, whatever, like, whatever it is like, but in the end of the day, like the result is the results. Like if you fail, it's your fault that you didn't catch that the failure was coming. Like I'm not necessarily stating it as a fact, but I'm stating it as like, that's how the mindset should it be, you know? And so how does this relate to your question is that I was just looking at it from the different context here, right? Like I, I looked at your question from the, what I believe in business context, but I think we can to decide how people see. Like it's a free competition and it's up to consumer. Like, I don't assume that my content is good for everyone, you know? And I can't tell you like, like my contents, you know? So that's kind of how I see it. [00:36:21] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. I like that. Well, and that's a really unique perspective that you bring and I, I appreciate that. I appreciate you coming at it from more of a business, like you said, economics background and talking about it that way, because I agree with you. That makes a lot of sense to me. It's just a different way of looking at it. So thank you for that. I really, really liked that answer. Well you, like I said, are just so incredibly inspiring. Your story is amazing. What you've been able to accomplish is fantastic. I'm super excited to check out some of your work myself. I'm sure our listeners will be as well. You're just, just such a inspiring person. So thank you so much for what you are bringing to the world and I know you are just very humble in your approach. You, you want to put it out there and you want to hopefully, you know, make an impact, but you're, I just am so impressed with the way that you do that and the way that you just let it speak for itself. So thank you so much for what you do. Thank you so much for being here today. I really, really appreciate it. [00:37:26] Natsune Oki: Awesome. Thank you so much, Lindsey, for doing such an amazing job so also as a host, like thank you so much. [00:37:33] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh, I appreciate that. And thank you so much to everyone who has listened to this episode. And if you're feeling as inspired as I am right now, I'd love if you would share this with a friend or two and we will catch you next time. [00:37:49] If you have a story to share with us, we would love that so much. And I hope your day has been Artfully Told. [00:37:58] Hi friends. I wanted to share with you another podcast that I think you're going to fall in love with just as I have. It's called Harlem with a View, and it is hosted by Harlem Lennox, who was a previous guest of mine on Artfully Told and a dear friend. Just because it looks easy doesn't mean it is. There is so much that goes into the work of your creative. She wants to know how the artists got into their line of work, what inspires them, but most importantly, what keeps them going? She'd asked them about how they make it through the blood, sweat, and tears. She wants to know what it's like to live this creative life: the good, the bad, the ugly, and even the magical. So she goes behind the scenes with creatives, from different genres and she explores their history, their take on life and talks about the business of art and the dedication of making art. She has a brilliant, brilliant platform. I think you will fall in love. I highly recommend that you search for Harlem with a View. Thanks!

Risky Business
Risky Business #638 -- Licensed to Pwn

Risky Business

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021


On this week's show Patrick Gray and Adam Boileau discuss recent security news, including: Apple 0day has everyone freaking out So much more 0day in the wild American Project Raven staffers settle with DoJ Two absolutely bonkers Azure security problems SEC tells corporate America to spill on breaches Much, much more In this week's sponsor interview Gigamon's security product manager Fayyaz Rajpari will be along to talk about some of the work they've been doing to integrate their NDR product with Crowdstrike. Links to everything that we discussed are below and you can follow Patrick or Adam on Twitter if that's your thing. Show notes Apple iPhone security update points to growing problem of 'zero days' Apple urges security update after new iMessage flaw disclosed Apple patches an NSO zero-day flaw affecting all devices | TechCrunch (8) Shane Huntley on Twitter: "@riskybusiness Let's not jump to the conclusion that NSO have an endless supply of zero click exploits and there is nothing that can be done. Security nihilism and learned helplessness plays into attackers' hands. We can make progress here." / Twitter Warning: Update Chrome Now As Hackers Attack Two Major Vulnerabilities In Google Browser Microsoft Windows 10 Windows Server Office CVE-2021-40444 0day attack Microsoft patches Office zero-day in today's Patch Tuesday - The Record by Recorded Future CISA warns of Zoho server zero-day exploited in the wild - The Record by Recorded Future “Secret” Agent Exposes Azure Customers To Unauthorized Code Execution | Wiz Blog (8) Ami Luttwak on Twitter: "@GossiTheDog This is even more severe. The RCE is the simplest RCE you can ever imagine. Simply remove the auth header and you are root. remotely. on all machines. Is this really 2021? https://t.co/iIHNyqgew4" / Twitter Cross-Account Container Takeover in Azure Container Instances VMware denies allegations it leaked Confluence RCE exploit | The Daily Swig US fines former NSA employees who provided hacker-for-hire services to UAE - The Record by Recorded Future Three Former U.S. Intelligence Community and Military Personnel Agree to Pay More Than $1.68 Million to Resolve Criminal Charges Arising from Their Provision of Hacking-Related Services to a Foreign Government | OPA | Department of Justice Hacking Team Customer in Turkey Was Arrested for Spying on Police Colleagues [or: The Spy Story That Spun a Tangled Web] - by Kim Zetter - Zero Day Exclusive: Wide-ranging SolarWinds probe sparks fear in Corporate America | Reuters Chad Loder on Twitter: "Anonymous has just announced a massive hack of Epik, long known as the hosting provider of choice for neonazis, right-wing extremists, and other Internet trash. Anonymous are releasing a decade's worth of detailed Epik customer & domain data, passwords, emails, and private keys. https://t.co/3rbfonegtq" / Twitter Anonymous Claims It Hacked Everything From Nazis' Favorite Web Host Wikimedia bans seven Chinese users citing "security risk" - The Record by Recorded Future Report: Beijing, Moscow step up efforts to control the Internet's backbone - The Record by Recorded Future Australia supplants China to build undersea cable for Solomon Islands | Solomon Islands | The Guardian Indonesian intelligence agency compromised in suspected Chinese hack - The Record by Recorded Future OWASP Top 10 ranking has a new leader after ten years - The Record by Recorded Future Encrypted Phone Firm Ciphr, Used by Criminals, Moves to Cut Off Australia Technology giant Olympus hit by BlackMatter ransomware | TechCrunch U.S. Cyber Czar: Too soon to tell if Russia ransomware has stopped - The Record by Recorded Future 'No indication' Russia has cracked down on ransomware gangs, top FBI official says - The Record by Recorded Future Groove ransomware gang is a motley crew of disgruntled hackers, researchers say Bail services affected in South Africa after ransomware attack - The Record by Recorded Future Hackers stole Puma source code, no customer data, company says - The Record by Recorded Future WhatsApp adds end-to-end encryption to chat backups, locking up data in the cloud New CPU side-channel attack takes aim at Chrome's Site Isolation feature - The Record by Recorded Future Fortinet warns customers after hackers leak passwords for 87,000 VPNs - The Record by Recorded Future New York State vaccine pass shortcomings offer lessons for other coronavirus app developers | The Daily Swig (5) Thái "thaidn" Dương on Twitter: "Hanoi citizens currently have to apply for a COVID movement pass in order to go outside. Each pass is QR code containing the holder's name and dates they're allowed to go out. The data are signed with RSA, to prevent fake passes. @0xfatty found that it's using 512-bit keys =)" / Twitter (4,319) Find a vaccination clinic in New South Wales - COVID-19 Near Me (5) ken tsang (@jxeeno) / Twitter Why I decided to build my own vaccine booking search engine instead of using the Government's one | by Ken Tsang | Sep, 2021 | Medium

Experience Design with Tony Daussat
How to be "Disruption Proof" with NYT Best Selling Author, Brant Cooper

Experience Design with Tony Daussat

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 28:08


Brant Cooper is the New York Times bestselling author of ‘The Lean Entrepreneur' and CEO of Moves the Needle. With over two decades of expertise helping companies bring innovative products to market, he blends agile, design thinking, and lean methodologies to ignite entrepreneurial action within large organizations.Get his new book, ‘Disruption Proof'!  https://brantcooper.com/How to be “Disruption Proof”-Join the Bottle Rocket Team! Check out all job openings here: https://www.bottlerocketstudios.com/careersUntil next time, friends...stay curious.

Christian and Damon's Amazing Nerd Show
Ep.192 Marvel's What If? Ep.5 Breakdown! Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings Film Review! The Matrix 4 Trailer Reaction! Rick and Morty S5 Review! PlayStation Showcase Recap! & AEW's All Out!

Christian and Damon's Amazing Nerd Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 121:42


Time stamps Venom 2 Moves up Release!-00:00 Matrix 4 trailer reactions- 07:48 Shang Chi Movie Review!- 13:53 Rick and Morty Season 5 Review- 19:40 Marvels What if Episode 5- 22:31 Playstation Showcase Breakdown!- 48:07 AEW All Out!- 58:53   Big thanks to this weeks sponsors Smile Brilliant, Manscaped, Hello Fresh, & Liquid Death for helping make this show possible!!   The Lawnmower 4.0 is here! Go to manscaped.com and use our code 20AMAZING at check out for 20% off! Go to your local 7-11 today to buy  yourself a refreshing can of ice cold mountain water from liquid death or Murder your thirst and get 2 free Koozies at purchase when you use promo code "amazingnerd" at checkout on Liquiddeath.com   Hello fresh is the #1 meal kit! Get 80$ off plus free shipping by following the link! Use the Code: HFAFF80 Link: https://hellofresh-ca.o5kg.net/c/2544961/791027/7893   Huge thanks to this week's sponsor Smile Brilliant!  Head over to www.smilebrilliant.com and use “NERD” at checkout for an exclusive discount!    #theshowyouneverknewyouwanted is now on all your favorite platforms. Catch us on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Play, Player FM, Iheart Radio, and more! Like and Subscribe to stay up to date with all future episodes.  For Advertising opportunities or to just get in contact with the show Email us at:  Amazingnerdshow@gmail.com Want to support this podcast and wear some sweet "Nerd-Swag"? Come check out our New Merch on Teepublic and Pro Wrestling Tees!! http://tee.pub/lic/1Gm1QGHqxQo https://www.prowrestlingtees.com/amazingnerdshow  HEY NERD! Be a part of our community! You can find ANS on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and now Twitch! Get cool content, news updates and plenty of gaming gameplay by following us on your preferred social media hub!   Facebook: https://goo.gl/83GZxh Twitter: https://goo.gl/CirBM8 Instagram: https://goo.gl/ArNaJ9  Twitch: https://goo.gl/MWaQFW Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCGVHvGPvroAGyZbb-vTGZ8g?view_as=subscribe  

Rebels For Joy
Grief, Regret & Joy

Rebels For Joy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 23:16


“The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ, Moves on: nor all your Piety nor Wit Shall lure it back to cancel half a Line, Nor all your Tears wash out a Word of it.” Today's episode is a little more serious; it's all about grief. All of us either have had an experience with grief or inevitably will experience it in the future. Grief is not something that any of us can escape from. If you've ever loved a parent, a sibling, a friend, an animal, a job, an idea, you will undoubtedly come into contact with grief. This episode will end with the opportunity to reclaim your joy, to be able to move quickly through the stages of grief, and allow you to come back to this place of peace, happiness, and gratitude. In this Episode: [ 2:45 ] I'm going through a thick season of grief   [ 5:15 ] Recognize the different ways grief can show up [ 8:20 ] Acceptance is when joy can return [ 13:00 ] When we get stuck, life cannot breathe [ 15:30 ] How do we find joy again during grief?     Joy Filling Quotes:  “We have an expiration date; we know that it's coming, and it gives all of us time to wrestle with our emotions.” “It's through acceptance that our joy returns.” “When grief comes, regrets are going to follow.” “We have to move through these emotions; we have to keep that process moving.” “We cannot harbor and stay stuck. Otherwise, life does not breathe through us.” Resources: True To Your Core: CLICK HERE Free Affirmation Downloads: https://rebelsforjoy.com/hip-hop Free Forgiveness Quick Start Formula : CLICK HERE Free Boundaries Quick Start Formula: CLICK HERE IG: www.instagram.com/rebelsforjoy IG Personal: @Bonniekelly.me Facebook Group www.facebook.com/groups/rebelsforjoy YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/rebelsforjoy