Podcasts about clickfunnels

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Best podcasts about clickfunnels

Show all podcasts related to clickfunnels

Latest podcast episodes about clickfunnels

One Funnel Away: Stories
Troy Hitt - ClickFunnels Onboarding Manager

One Funnel Away: Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 29:00


Troy Hitt currently is the Onboarding Team Manager at ClickFunnels. We bring him on the show today to share his stories and insights of how impactful the One Funnel Away Challenge is for all ClickFunnels customers he speaks to on a daily basis.The way ClickFunnels is set up, allows customers to schedule an Onboarding Call to then prepare them to be better students when they decide to take the OFA Challenge.Listen and learn from one of the guys behind the scenes who receives customer feedback on a daily basis!If you would like to book an onboarding call after hearing what Troy has to say, head over to CFonboarding.com and schedule yours today!OneFunnelAway.com

The Corporate Dropout Podcast
60. Business Tip with Lauren Golden: The FREEDOM Framework

The Corporate Dropout Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 14:21


ClickFunnels' two-comma club member and founder of the Free Mama Movement, Lauren Golden, takes us through her framework to establishing freedom.Time Stamps: [1:10] About freelancing [4:05] F is for foundation [4:11] R is for relationships [4:25] E is for expertise [4:51] E is for exposure [5:47] D is for discipline [6:41] O is for overcoming obstacles [7:45] M is for momentum [8:32] FRE in more detail --Offers:Legal Templates from Not Your Father's LawyerWhat you track grows! Visit 90dayhabits.co and grow what matters in your business by grabbing a copy of the 90 Day Habits Journal today! Use code CITRO for 10% offConnect with Lauren:WebsiteFacebook PageFacebook GroupFree Mama TVInstagramLinkedInPinterestConnect with Alessia:Text me! 949.541.0951Instagram: @corporatedropoutofficial and @alessiacitro__TikTok: @alessiacitro__Show Support:If you enjoy this podcast please Rate, Review, Subscribe and SHARE this out on Apple Podcasts at The Corporate Dropout Podcast Big shout out to our team that makes this show possible!If you are looking to start your own podcast or join the network, hit up @upstarterpods on Instagram! 

MLM Rebels
Update: MLM Vs Everything

MLM Rebels

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 35:48


Update: MLM Vs Everything... www.MLMRebelsBluePrint.com You can join the FREE private group where we talk about all things Sales Funnels for MLM at www.mlmsalesfunnels.com. Enjoy the show! And if you did, leave a review on the podcast! If you do, email support@zacharyspear.com and we'll send you our very own free+shipping funnel which has been featured on the ClickFunnels' homepage and "mother funnel" which produces thousands of people contacting us to join our business. Yours completely for free when you leave a review and a 5 star rating. Plus one lucky reviewer each month will receive a FREE MLM Rebels membership, which includes private coaching, a street value of $25,000. All you have to do to enter is leave a 5 star rating and review on the podcast

The Marketing Secrets Show
Geometric Funnel Growth... The Real Secret To Scale

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 12:46


If you want to stop playing checkers and start playing chess, listen to today's episode. Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com Magnetic Marketing ---Transcript--- Good morning everybody. Welcome back to the Marketing Secrets Podcast. Today I want to talk about something interesting, about when you have a success and you have a win, how to take that and roll it on to geometrically grow everything else you did inside your business. So I hope you guys are awesome today. It's been snowing here in Boise, and then today it's been raining so it's all slushy, and I've had fun driving kids to school this morning. This is one of my favorite things, is to drive them and have a chance to talk to them. It makes me sad because my twins are about to get their licenses and then I'll probably not get to drive them anymore. But until they do, I'm enjoying it and it's just really fun. Just dropped off Aiden, my little man, at school and have a few minutes while I'm heading back to the office. And I was thinking about something that I thought would be helpful for all of you guys, because I don't see this happen enough. In fact, I noticed with a lot of us entrepreneurs, we do something that works really good and then we move on to the next thing as opposed to being like, "Hey, that worked really good. We should do more of that, or we should focus on that, or we should go deeper on that." A good example just happened recently. As you guys know, I bought Dan Kennedy's company and then we relaunched it last month. The relaunch went really, really well. And the way we launched it is we took ... it was a concept that Dan Kennedy and Bill Glazer did back 15, 18, I don't know how many years ago, when Bill first bought the company. The company's basically a newsletter company, it had the Magnetic Marketing newsletter. And so when Bill bought it, he was like, "I want to grow this" so he created something that he called the MIFGE. I talked about it on the podcast before, stands for Most Incredible Free Gift Ever. And they launched it and that's how the newsletter grew originally. And then they sold the company to private equity firms, who as a rule are not very good at actually marketing the way that we all market. And they ran the business to the ground over the next decade. So I had a chance to buy it out of that. And the first thing I did is, well, what worked in the past? Oh, the MIFGE, we should remake the MIFGE. So we built the MIFGE, we launched it, and from the MIFGE we added over 4000 new paying members into the newsletter. So I want to do the math on that for you, because it makes this really interesting. And obviously people are going to cancel, but let's just say they don't. So we added 4000 people at $97 a month. That's $400,000 a month, times 12 months in a year, that's an extra 4.8 million dollar-a-year business we launched in a weekend by creating a really good MIFGE offer. That's awesome. And again, like I said, there's going to be a churn and things are going to drop, we're also going to start buying ads to it. The funnel converted extremely well. I think I talked about that, if not... Hopefully you signed up through the funnel and you got the first January's newsletter because I break down the funnel. But we're averaging 200 and something dollars for every free trial. So I can spend $200 to get a free trial and still be profitable, which is insane. And now it's making that business where we can start growing it and scaling it, and I think by summertime I could have 10,000 members in there, pay $97 a month which is a million dollar-a-month business on info product, a newsletter. It's insane. And so for me, I am the worst at keeping secrets, that's why all my books are called DotCom Secrets, Expert Secrets, Traffic Secrets, because I just tell everyone my secrets. And on the podcast I shared this, in the first issue of the newsletter I'm sharing it. I'm not good at keeping secrets. But it's interesting because I'll share that with most people and like, "oh that's so cool, that's awesome." And then they don't do anything with it. I have somebody who I love and respect who I shared it with, probably one of the first people I shared it with, and I thought they were going to grab it and take it. And then I saw their next offer run out and they could have done the model that I did with the offer they did. It would've fit. It would've been a simple tweak to make it match that, and then they didn't. And they launched something and they didn't follow the model and I was like, "man, if somebody told me that they had a funnel that was averaging 200 and ... $230, it might have been ... Anyway, insane EPC, average cart value. It isn't my market, it's something similar. I would look at that, I would've funnel hacked it and I would've called an audible before I launched my funnel and made tweaks and changes based on it. But they didn't, they just said, "oh wow, that's amazing, that's so cool." And then they went on. And I'm sure a lot of you guys heard me talk about it and you're like, "oh, that's so cool" and then you went on. The way to leverage this stuff, to leverage my wins, to leverage your wins, to leverage what's working in the market is to not do that. So for example, we launched the MIFGE offer, it killed it. We had an urgency and scarcity where it closed down for two weeks or something like that. I think it just went back live a day or two ago. If you go to noBSletter.com, you can see the funnel. But after we shut it down, the first question was "man, that works really good. We should create a MIFGE for ClickFunnels." That was the first thing. "It worked here, let's do it again." Where most people are like "That worked awesome", and then they move on to the next thing and they forget about the success. So we sat down and said, "how would we make a MIFGE for ClickFunnels? What would that look like? How do we make it so the offers are irresistible, so it gets people to stick longer? So it gets our average cart value up front higher?" Right now, for me to get a ClickFunnels trial, just so you guys know, in paid media, for my paid ads, it costs me $300. Between 250 and $300, depending on a lot of things, to get somebody to sign up for free ClickFunnels trial. Which is fine because our lifetime value of a customer is really, really high so we can do it. But it's a float. It takes me three to four months. And honestly longer than that, because you have churn and breakage and all that kind of stuff. It takes a good almost a year to break even from me buying to get someone to sign up for a ClickFunnels trial, which is fine. But if I could tweak my front end funnel so that I was making 250, $300 for every trial we signed up, now I break even immediately and now guess what? I can out-scale everybody once again. And so I'm like, "how do I do that?" Well, we need a ClickFunnels MIFGE offer. And so that's what we did. We spent three hours, in a room, "how do we make a ClickFunnels most incredible free gift ever?" That's what MIFGE stands for. Most Incredible Free Gift Ever. And we structured it, we sat down and we mapped it out, and we're like, "now we have this, what's the hook? What's the story? Why are we doing this? What's the offer? What do we send them in the mail so we can get the physical address? How do we build community? How do we build culture? How do we weave all that stuff into an incredible offer?" And when it was done, we literally mapped it out. And I sat there and I was like, "oh my gosh, this will change ClickFunnels forever." And it's so simple. It's nothing complicated. All of us make good offers. We sell something. But looking at it through the lens of the most incredible free gift ever, and then looking at the funnel we built for the Dan Kennedy company and how high the average cart value and how high the EPCs were, how high everything was. It's like, okay, let's take this model and let's replicate it over here. And so for you guys, I just want you to understand when I share something, I'm excited and I'm ... it's not like, "oh cool, Russell. That's awesome." It should be like, "okay, how do I implement this in my business?" That'd be the first question I'd be asking myself instantly, is how do I take this and do it, because it's awesome? I want to put that out there, because I see a lot of people who don't do those kind of things. Like when we launched the Traffic Secrets book funnel, it was the highest converting book funnel I'd done to date. It was awesome. And so instead of being like, "man, that's awesome. The Traffic Secrets book funnel's great." I said, "okay, what did we learn on this? What was the layout? The style, design, the tweak… like what did we do different in this one than the other ones?" We took those things and we moved them and we took all those best practices, all things we figured out. And we did them on the other book funnels. We went backwards in time. Now all the book funnels match the model and they're all converting high. And right now we're in the process of re-tweaking with the book funnels to try to increase the cart value. And we're trying things and tweaking things and testing things. As soon as we get it to work, then guess what we're going to do instantly? Take those changes and roll them across all the book funnels. So I want you guys to understand that's how you double down on these things, how you get consistently better. Geometrically better, not just incrementally. A lot of people have incremental wins. They add this thing, they get a little better, add this thing, they get a little bit better. Whereas I'm looking at geometry, how do we geometrically grow what we're doing? Because I don't want to go from $150 million to $170 million. That's not inspiring or exciting or anything. I want to go from $150 million to $300 million. How do you do that? You don't do it by playing checkers. You do it by playing chess. Geometrically thinking differently, strategically. When you have a win, you got to compound that win upon the other win as opposed to just "oh, we had a win. Cool." And the moving on to the next thing. Everything needs to compound and increase and get better and get better. But to do that, it takes you becoming passionate about this. I've talked about this a lot over the years. You got to become more passionate about the marketing of your thing than you do about the thing. All of us have the thing that we're selling, that we're in love with, the reason why we got in this business. But if you really love that thing, whatever your product, your service, your message is. If you really love that, you have to become obsessed with the selling of that thing. One of the biggest mistakes I see influencers and people do is that they love their thing. They're having success and they want to go hire a funnel builder. They want to outsource it to somebody else. They want to ... "who do I hire to become a marketing team? Who can I outsource this to?" And it's like, "ah, you're missing it. That's the best part, to figure out how to get your thing into people's hands." If you become obsessed with that part of it, that's how you really grow and scale and dramatically grow your companies. So for all you guys who are listening, I wanted to look at that lens of number one, when I'm dropping gold, when I'm dropping like, "this funnel's killing it." Funnel hack it, look at it. And then look at your old funnels. "How do I weave this model in?" That's number one. Number two, same thing for yourself. When you have a win, don't just be like "cool. That was awesome." Go back and roll that win across everything else so you can geometrically grow everything you're doing. And number three, become obsessed with this game. Again, the ones who are winning at the highest level are the ones who obsess. They keep going into this and keep figuring things out and they have so much fun with it. And then they layer it on and they do the next thing and the next thing, and that's when you can really have fun and enjoy this. So I hope that helps. I hope that gets your mind thinking a little bit differently. If it does, and you enjoyed this, then please let me know. All right. Thanks you guys for listening, I appreciate you. Thanks for listening to this podcast. And by the way, if you haven't heard yet, with the launch of Danny Kennedy's company, we launched the Magnetic Marketing Podcast, which is basically, I found tons of old Danny Kennedy presentations from the last 20 years or so. Him speaking at info summits, him on the gold and the diamond CDs and all these things that were lost in the archives. I started going through them. I'm like, "these are amazing. I don't know how to sell these. 'Here's a CD interview of Dan talking for an hour about wealth creation or whatever'." It's amazing, but it's not a product, really. I was like, "what do I do with these things?" And so I decided to give them to you guys for free. And so we created a podcast called the Magnetic Marketing Podcast. And if you go to MagneticMarketingPodcast.com, you can subscribe to it there. And then you get hardcore raw Dan Kennedy interviews and audios once a week, which are ... they're really, really good. So I recommend doing that and diving into Danny. I love him. He's a little ornery, but man, he's brilliant. So anyway, there you go. There's an old Magnetic Marketing Podcast that the old company had ran, which was a bunch of people talking about Dan, which I did not love. And so if you search in the podcast search engine, you might find the old one. If you go to MagneticMarketingPodcast.com, that's the right one. And you'll know because there's a cool picture of Dan Kennedy in black and white, and looks amazing. He looks like the tough guy that he is. So anyway, that said, thanks, you guys so much for listening. Hope you enjoyed this podcast, hope you enjoy Dan's podcast as well, and I will talk to you soon.

The Marketing Secrets Show
How To Build A Great Team…The Right Way

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 17:01


The skill set for building an effective team is WAY different than the skills needed for marketing and sales. For one, you have to learn how to become a true LEADER. So the two key questions to ask yourself are 1. Who do you have to become to lead a great team? And 2. What are the critical strategies you need to implement to get your team onboard to follow your vision? Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com Magnetic Marketing ---Transcript--- Russell Brunson: What's up, everyone? This is Russell, welcome back to the Marketing Secrets Podcast. Today's episode, we're going to be talking about building a team. How do you do it? What are the pitfalls? What are the pros, the cons? And some of the things that I learned along the way. Hopefully this'll help you as you're building out your team to be able to do whatever it is you're trying to do in your life. Whatever your mission, whatever your goal, whatever the business you're trying to build. I hope that this episode will help you as you're thinking through it, to help you to build the team that's going to get you to the finish line. So with that said, I'm going to cue up the theme song. We come back, you have a chance to listen in on a cool interview, talking about how to build your team. What's up, everybody? Welcome back to the Marketing Secrets Podcast, I'm here today with Josh Forti and we've been having fun today. The last two episodes- Josh Forti: We have. Russell: We recorded went longer, but- Josh: It's been fun. Russell: I think they've been fun. So today will be a little bit shorter episode, but it's something that, again, Josh brings things that I don't ever really typically talk about. So it's been fun to talk about some of the stuff like I think about, but I've never really verbally shared. So do you want to set up what we were talking about today? Josh: Yeah, for sure. Yeah, so very specifically here, I want to focus for you specifically. The question is, well, leadership and team building, what are some of the biggest shifts around building a team and becoming a leader? Because as someone who built a team myself that failed miserably, it wasn't that we hated each other, but it's just like, it was chaos. When you're trying to manage like six or seven different people and they're all like contracting everywhere. And now I'm like kind of going back and rebuilding. And I'm building it right and I have full-time people that we're bringing in and going. And it's like, man, the skillset of making money, the skillset of being a marketer is way so totally different- Russell: Yeah. Josh: Than building a team. And even being like the attractive character and building a following, like building a following is a completely different skillset than it is of growing a team and being a leader and things like that. And so I guess like two part is number one, who did you have to become? And like, secondly, what are like some of the hacks, tips, or I know you like secrets. So what are some of the secrets that you use to build a team and really like sell them on the vision and like really make sure that they were thriving in that role? Russell: Cool. So I want to just second what you said, building a team is way different than all the other things. And I've struggled over the years. I have an amazing team, as you guys know, if you've seen everything. And I wouldn't say most of it's because of my own doing, I'll talk about some of the stuff I've learned along the way. But it's a different skillset. And I think making money is an easier skill, I think creating a movement of people that are following you is different. I always tell people, like I'm such a good leader and communicator to like my tribe and I'm not as good to my internal team. It's interesting. And so a couple things that I'll share again, I don't have this perfect. And if you ask people on my team, like Russell's not perfect at this because I'm not. But I'll share some of the things I've learned because I'm always trying to figure this out and trying to get better at it. One of the biggest lessons I had and I did a podcast on this probably two or three years ago. Was this realization that I had to make a transition. Because I was always like the All Star. Like if you look at basketball, like I was the All Star, like I was really good. I could write copy, I could build a funnel, I could drive traffic, I could sell from stage, I could do all the different things. And so I was like, Michael Jordan out there and I'd be on stage, I'd be doing, I'd be dunking and slamming and three points. And like just amazing and people would tell me how great I was and I loved it. And then I start building a team. And so I started building a team, but the problem is that as I was building a team, I still thought I was Michael Jordan. So I'd build the team and I'd be in there, all of a sudden, I'd have the person writing copy and they'd be going up with the ball, about to do the layup. And I'm like, "Ah, I could actually do it better." So I grab the ball from my own teammate and rip it out of their hands and I'd go dunk it like, "Ah." And I would get everyone cheering for me again. Or someone would be coming down ... I'm trying to get these analogies working. But basically what's happening is that I was the All Star and- Josh: That one worked. That analogy worked. Russell: That one did work? Okay, good. Josh: Yeah. Russell: And I was trying to bring in other All Stars. But the problem is I'd bring these All Stars in and then as they were trying to perform, I'd be like, "I can do it better." And I would take the ball from them because I want to be the All Star. And I had this realization, like for me to actually build a team, I cannot continue to be the All Star. And this is hard- Josh: Mm-hmm (affirmative). Russell: For achievers like us, especially for someone like me. Like I was the achiever, I had done all the roles because I had built the company by myself initially. It was me doing all the roles, so I learned all the roles, I got good at all the roles. And so as I started trying to like bring on these different All Stars, it was tough. It's kind of like if you watch the All Star game or like the dream team. Like all of a sudden you got like the best players on a team and usually they're not the best playing with each other because they're all the All Stars, they all want a ball hog and it gets really, really difficult. And so I had to make this realization, like if I'm going to be successful growing a team and getting click funnels from hundred million to a billion dollars, like I can't continue to be the All Star. I have to retire and I have to become the coach. That's a hard transition. Because now you're coming back and like you're successful, not now by your skillset, but you're successful by like cultivating other people's skillsets. And that's a different skillset to have, by the way. Like it's way harder. For me, it's always been easier for me to go and like to do the thing. Like I'm finding it now with I'm coaching my kids wrestling. And I'm watching my kids, I'm watching the team and like, man, I was such a good athlete. I'd go out there, I'd kill myself, I'd work so hard and I was an amazing athlete. But it's way harder for me to coach other athletes because I can't give them desire, I can't give them these different things. And so that was difficult. And so that's the first thing to realize is that if you're going to start growing a team, you have to be willing to like take your Jersey off and say, "I'm no longer the All Star, I am now the coach. And I've got new people." And that's been the hardest thing for me and I still struggle with that, I still like jump back in. I'm like, "Ah." But that's the key, if you want to get a good group people around you. Because otherwise if you're the one that's taking the ball from him, from the other people on the team, the All Stars are going to leave you. Like they're not going to stick around, they want to be the All Star too, they want the recognition, they want to be doing the thing. So that's the first big shift that you got to have. Any questions on that before I go to kind of- Josh: No, no. Super good. Yeah, you're good. Russell: Okay. So the second thing is you have to be good at hiring All Stars. I remember when we first started building ClickFunnels, Todd read an article or something and he was talking about ... in the article was like, there's A players, B players, C player, there's different levels. But what people don't understand, it's not like A players, like 100% and B players like 50%. Like the article said the difference between an A player and a B player is like 2200% difference. So it's like a B player, you can have like one A player going to give you the output of like 50 or 100 or how many B players. And so what most of us try to do, is try to come in and say, "Okay, I don't want to spend as much money getting the right person. So I'm going to find somebody who's cheaper. Maybe they're not going to be an A player, but they'll be a B player, but I can afford them." And that's like this mindset that most people have. I see it all the time, I see it in Facebook groups, in ClickFunnels Facebook group, like, how do I get a cheap funnel builder? Like, that's the problem, you're looking for a B player. Or you find an A player, you get 2200 times better thing. And so it's been interesting because we launched ClickFunnels the first time, like I had a couple A players, which is why it grew. We had a couple All Stars, we had some like Todd Dickerson. You guys know our team, like we had A players who were able to go and intergrow. But then from there, we had to hire whoever we could afford. Right now we're building ClickFunnels 2.0 and we're in a unique spot where it's like, we don't have to just hire who we can afford. Like let's hire the best. And so we're going out there trying to figure out who are the A players in each regard. And it's crazy because I look at the team that's building ClickFunnels 2.0, it's a small team. What they're accomplishing is amazing, but they're all A players. When we started like looking at rolling out Click Funnels 2.0 and our marketing team, we started trying to bring in A players and they're expensive. And so a lot of times the questions like, well, I don't have any money. How do I recruit the A players? Well, I recruited Todd and I was broke. A players aren't necessarily looking for money today. The A players are people who are looking for money in the future. They're the ones who are like, "I want to be part of a team. I want to build something cool, something I believe in. And I want to be able to get paid insane amounts of money over here. And I'm willing to give up that for this over here." The right people will be willing to do that. So as I come back, if I was to like be building my team over from scratch right now. There's number one, again, taking off the All Star, say I'm going to be the coach. And number two is like, if I'm going to be the coach and I'm out there building the team, like I'm going to try to build the dream team. And to do that, I've got to sell them on the vision of why this is cool and like where it's going to go, and what's the opportunity for them. Because just like you're trying to sell your customers on the opportunity of like funnels are the opportunity or whatever. It's like, you're selling your dreams team, like this is the opportunity. Like if you join the team, you're going to get paid nothing right now or very little right now. But this is how we're going to structure things so that it'll be worth it for you over here. And the right people will hear that because that's what they're looking for. Someday when I retire from this whole, whatever I'm doing. If I was ever getting a job again, it's not going to be based on money, I could care less about money. Someone's going to sell me someday on the vision. In fact, I just saw Sean Wayland just hired the dude who started Tapout- Josh: Yeah, I saw that. Russell: And like how powerful is that? The Tapout dude does not need Sean's money. He sold his company for insane amounts of money. But I'm sure Sean's like, "Hey dude, here's the opportunity. You help me do this thing and flip it like, this is what's possible for you." And now he's got literally like there's no better person that Sean could have hired to run that company- Josh: Yeah, I know. Russell: Than this dude. Josh: When I saw that one, I was like, "Oh my Gosh." Russell: It's brilliant. So for all of us, we got to start linking more strategically. Not like, who can I afford for this role? It's like, who is the person that's going to be getting a million bucks a year in five years from now in this role? And how do I sell them on the opportunity? How do I create an opportunity where they can grow and they can monetize? Where they can make this kind of money. And that's how you recruit the right people into your world, who are going to help you to actually have success. And so those are the things ... because you get a good A player, you don't have to be really good at managing, you don't have to be really good at micro- Josh: Yeah. Russell: All those kind things. Like you get the right people in place, they're going to do the things and it makes you look like the All Star, the coach of the year that you are. Because you built the right team. Building the team- Josh: Yeah. Russell: Is more valuable than all the other pieces, I believe. Josh: Yeah. Like getting the right people is more important. The systems, the process, like those are all important. But like if you have B players on the team, it's like you're going to get a mediocre result. Russell: Yeah. And then- Josh: Yeah. Russell: And B player, you're going to be one in charge if you know the process. We brought Todd and I didn't have to like sit down with Todd and like, "Okay, how are we going to manage the projects? How are we going to do this?" Like Todd came in, he's like, "All right, I got it." And he just ran and he was able to run and like, all right, he's done. Josh: Yeah. Russell: Like we just brought in this guy named Kevin Richards, who we brought him in into like be the CMO of ClickFunnels. And Kevin had worked for a whole bunch of really big companies doing this. And it's crazy because like he came in and we gave him the reins, he started running. And I was like, "Oh my gosh, this is way better than I was running." Like there's structures, organization. Because he's done it before, over and over and over again. He's going to come in and plug in and just do it. And I'm watching it right now, I'm like- Josh: Yeah. Russell: "Man, like he's an A player who I could hire." In fact, I have over the last decade, a whole bunch of B players to do this role and no one's been able to hit it. And it's been me being involved so much. Where now it's like literally the first two weeks I was like all nervous because I want to make sure that everything's perfect. And finally like gave him the reins and I stepped back and it's like, "Whoa, this is so much better than when I was running it." Josh: Yeah. Russell: And it's easier and less stressed on me and he's loving it and it's just powerful. So those are the key. Josh: Okay. Couple rapid fire questions here, so that we make time. Number one, have you ever run into challenges or how have you dealt with communication differences inside of a team? Because one of the things that I've noticed is like, I just thought everybody would communicate like I was if we're all part of a team. I'm like the most expressive person, like when I talk. Like I use emojis and exclamation points and like if I'm texting, if I'm going like my voice or whatever. And like someone on my team is like, "Okay." I'm like, "Ah, are you mad? Do you understand? Like what do you mean, okay?" Do you have systems in place? Or do you typically go and just try to like find people to do that? Or is that something you just learn? Because I'm sure like, Melanie, I mean she was with you for how long? Right before Shelia, I'm sure she had a very unique communication style and I'm sure your next assistant is probably not the same as her. Russell: Yeah. Josh: Right. So like how have you learned like how to deal with that? Russell: Yeah. A couple things. One is like personality profiling is huge. In fact, we're working on a whole project right now and that'll probably be a book and a membership side, bunch of stuff, all based on personality profiling. Because that's how you understand like what motivates people? How do they speak? How do they not speak? How do they understand? Because again, Melanie and Jenny are very different people. But I'm able to work with both of them because I understood their personality types, I understood like, what are the things that would light Melanie up? What are the things that'd get Jenny excited to work? And vice versa. Like, if you look at Melanie was a very high S, so very faithful. And so like she would like die for you to be able to get something done. Jenny on their hand has very low S, almost no S. And so for her, it's like, man, if she gets bored, she's gone. So I got to make sure that she's got 8,000 projects and she's juggling them all. The more things she's having, the more successful she's going to be. Similar to me. And so I give her tons of projects and she thrives that she's able to juggle all these things. Whereas if I treat her like I taught Melanie, she would've been here for a week and a half, like, I'm out, like this is horrible. So understanding those kind of things. Like DISC profile's big, Meyers Briggs is big. Those are my two favorites. I'm trying to learn to master all the other ones, but those ones help a ton when you're hiring and all also when you're managing people. Josh: Yeah. Russell: The other thing is, this is one that helped me. Actually, Julie Story actually was one that taught it to me initially. And I don't remember all the things, but there's these different hats. There's like a black hat and a green hat and a red hat and yellow hat and all these things like that. So I'm a very green hat person, so are you. Put on the green hat and it's like creative ideas and we're flowing. I'm like, we get so excited about sharing stuff. And there's people who have like a black hats, they're the ones who always like ... they look at what could go wrong. What about this? And what about this? Josh: They take away all the fun. Oh my God. Russell: Yeah. Josh: They ruin it. Russell: And then like the white hats. So there's all these different hats. The ones I really remember is like green and black because I'm green hat. And like, Jamie Smith's a good example of a black hat. I love Jamie, one of my favorite humans in the world. But when we would do meetings together, I literally wanted jump over the table and strangle him. Because I'm like, "I did, I did, I did." And he's like, "Well, you think about this? You think about this? Think about this?" And like you're sucking the life out of me. Josh: Yeah. Russell: My wife's a very black hat person, as well. I'm like, "We should take the kids and like fly around the world and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah." Like just brainstorming things that are probably never going to happen. She's like, "What about this, this, this?" And so we started learning like based on this ... this is something that Julie brought that was really powerful. It was like, "Hey, we're in now in a green hat phase. Well, Russell's going to green hat, we're talking about ideas. No one's allowed to black hat this at all. Let's just share ideas." So then everyone's just sharing ideas and like, we have a chance to be excited and creative and get these things out there. And after it's like all the creative steps out, it's like, "Okay, now let's put a black hat on, now it's black hat this." And now we can all look at it objectively you're like, "Okay, we're going to black hat this and go through the black hat things." And then we put on a different colored hat and go through those things. Josh: Mm-hmm (affirmative). Russell: And we go through different hats, but they're separately, they're not all happening at the same time. Because if it happens at the same time, it destroys my creativity and excitement and energy. I want to like strangle the person. But like, man, I need those people. I need Jamie to look at this and be like, "Here's 40 ways why this isn't going to work." Like, oh crap, I didn't think about that, that or that. We stack the different hats as opposed to doing them all at the same time and making us all want to kill each other. And that has been- Josh: That's so helpful. Russell: Huge for us. Like for me, it's huge. I always tell people like when I start brainstorming, like, "Okay, green hat time, no negative, no what ifs. Let's go." And then we just do that. And you see like the black hat people are like twitching and they're like, don't worry, you're going to get your shot, but not yet. Until everything's out and it's like, "Okay, black hat's on. What do you guys got?" And then they can go do their thing. Josh: You need some anxiety medication over there. Russell: Yeah. We can do a whole, like two day training on that, too. Because it's such a powerful thing. But conceptually, it's breaking those things in that way. Josh: All right, Russell. Well, in your other life, we'll just have an entire podcast where all we do is just do deep dives all day long. But in this life, we have to stick with constraints of where we're at. So anyway, thank you for sharing that. Super, super helpful. I appreciate it. Russell: No worries. Thank you, Josh. Appreciate you guys. Hopefully you enjoyed this episode. As you guys are building your teams, remember the principles we talked about. You've got to become the coach, you've got to attract A players, you got to put them in the right spots, figure out ways to make it profitable for them in the long term, figure out personality types, you can serve them the right way. Black hat, green hat, red hats. We should do an episode on just on all hat ... I have to go back to remember all the other colored hats. But anyway- Josh: All right, our next- Russell: There you go. Josh: Go around, I'll be like you have homework for this. Russell: Russell, prepare for this and we'll go. Josh: Prepare for this one. That'd be awesome. Russell: That'd be awesome. Thanks everyone for listening. Thank you, Josh. And we'll see you guys on the next episode.

Entrepreneurs on Fire
Uncommon Biohacks To Reverse Biological Aging And Optimize Your Daily Performance with Anthony Diclementi

Entrepreneurs on Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 48:27


Anthony Diclementi is a biohacker specializing in anti-aging and human optimization. His book The Biohacker's Guide To Upgraded Energy And Focus has sold over 30,000 copies worldwide and he is a 2-Comma Club Entrepreneur having done over 7-figures through ClickFunnels. Sponsors: Thinkific: Amplify is a free event that features 30+ expert creators who will show you how to make revenue selling content online! Visit Thinkific.com/amplify to RSVP for free! HubSpot: Start giving your customers what they deserve. Learn more about how you can transform your customer experience with a HubSpot CRM Platform at HubSpot.com!

Performance Marketer
Frameworks Within Frameworks - How to Get Traffic?

Performance Marketer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 68:00


How to find leads? How to get traffic?If I had $1 every time I heard these questions…Everyone asks me that all the time - people at conferences I go to, entrepreneurs, guys in my text community… It's wild! And I truly love it! Because that means people want to learn. Plus - they think that I have answers for them, which is great.Because I do!But first, I'd like to change the perspective slightly. Yes, you want to look for leads, and you need traffic. But I think the better question is how to find customers or potential customers. I don't think you just want to get leads. But leads that will convert into customers? That's a real thing! So in this episode, we're going to talk about a three-step traffic framework… and some frameworks within the framework. I've also prepared a little presentation with a ton of valuable info, so this could be called a mini-course - but this one is free!Then, tune in and find out how to determine who your customers are, where to find them, and how to position your product or service to your market.There are also a bunch of helpful tips within this overall framework, so let's dive right in!Key Takeaways:I don't need to make money by coaching (00:00)How to get traffic? (03:16)Defining marketing terms - market, leads, lead gen… (06:50)Three-step traffic framework - Step #1 The Who (14:50)Segmenting target market (20:22)Four types of market segmentation (27:47)Three-step traffic framework - Step #2 Where are they? (35:26)Performance market makers (44:39)Three-step traffic framework - Step #3 Market positioning (48:53)Perceptual Map (53:26)Recap (59:46)Additional Resources:- Eric Beer's One Affiliate Offer Challenge- Sign up for the SurveyDetective VIP Waitlist (Coming Soon)---Connect with Eric!- Join Eric's Text Community: 917-636-1998- Eric's website: https://ericbeer.com- Follow Eric on Instagram.- Subscribe to Eric's YouTube Channel.---Follow the podcast on Apple, Spotify, Google, Stitcher, TuneIn, or anywhere else you listen to your podcasts.If you haven't already, please rate and review the podcast on Apple Podcasts.

April Garcia's PivotMe
135. Internet Marketing Pioneer Rich Schefren Steal our Winners, Top Adviser to the Gurus, Shares Behind The Scenes Becoming Mega Successful.

April Garcia's PivotMe

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 56:37


On PivotMe today, we have Rich Schefren. He is widely recognized as the internet marketing pioneer and one of the world's top experts on online business strategy. He has coached the world's top online business gurus including Russell Brunson of Click Funnels, and has authored the first viral business report and - get this- invented the first automated webinar back in 2009. Today Rich runs Strategic Profits, which is a company on a mission to turn struggling opportunity seekers into profitable entrepreneurs. Rich explains how being passionate and not productive in whatever you do can drive you to success and happiness in life. He also explains the Steal Our Winners strategy, which revolves around creating a want and convincing people that they needed it. Listen in to learn about the importance of adopting a better and different system in your business to stand out and add value. You will also learn how to appreciate your journey by understanding that having and achieving goals won't make you happy or fulfilled because fulfillment is only found in the progress.  Pivotal Questions Asked: [7:46] How do you navigate those pivots without your ego getting attached to who you used to be? [25:50] Explain what Steal Our Winners is and who it's for? [50:26] If you could tell the world one thing, what would it be?  In This Episode You Will Learn: [12:59] How to tap into who you really are to find your purpose in life and business. [16:14] He explains some of the powerful exercises he's done for him and his clients to transform life and business. [25:57] Steal Our Winners – Rich explains how he creates new and winning tactics and strategies before the rest of the world finds out about them. [46:53] The importance of going through the hardship of growth to get to the other side of success. [50:36] Why it's always selfish to ask someone to sacrifice their happiness for you and never selfish to be unwilling to sacrifice your happiness for someone else.  Quotes: “It's not about where you end up as much as it is about the experiences that you have.”- Rich [8:26] “The single biggest productivity secret in the world for people who are not naturally productive is to be very passionate about what it is that you're doing.”- Rich [10:00] “The principles of marketing never change; the tactics of marketing constantly change and oftentimes something new and different when it comes to marketing generally tends to work better.”- Rich [25:57] “It's always selfish to ask someone to sacrifice their happiness for you and never selfish to be unwilling to sacrifice your happiness for someone else.”- Rich [50:40] “Fulfillment is found in the progress, not in the acquisition.”- April [53:04]  Connect with Rich: www.strategicprofits.com _____________________________________________________________________What can you do today? To Be Productive. Effective. Perform at your best. Even now. Are you struggling to stay focused? If you have the right framework, it takes the guesswork out of Productivity. Get our FREE mini-series 4 Steps: Doing More in Less Time. Visit pivot-me.com/4Steps to get it TODAY!

The Marketing Secrets Show
Money Mindset Secrets…

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 37:50


Did you know this may be holding you back from success in your business? Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com Magnetic Marketing ---Transcript--- Russell Brunson: What's up everybody? This is Russell Brunson. Welcome back to Marketing Secrets podcast. One of the questions I get asked a lot about, and I don't spend a lot of time talking about it, is actually money and mindset around money, and how that works, and things that can help you to make more money, things that hold you back from making money. They have nothing to do with your skill set, it just has everything to do with the conversations, the beliefs, the things inside of your mind. This interview with Josh Forti, it was really fun and hopefully you enjoy it. Hopefully it'll help you if you do have money blocks, to help you get unstuck. If you don't think you have money blocks, you probably do. And this hopefully, interview, will make you very aware of those things, and help you to find those things and knock them out in your life. That said, we'll keep the theme song, and when we come back, listen in on this interview with me and Josh Forti. What's up everybody? Welcome back The Marketing Secrets podcast. I'm here today again with Josh Forti, and we're having so much fun today. We just recorded one episode and now we're going deep into episode number two, which we're going to be talking about mindset as it relates to things that are very specific to you guys as entrepreneurs. I'll Josh talk more about this as he's going to be queuing up the question, but hope you guys enjoy this episode as well. Josh Forti: All right, man. First off, we got to talk about your shirt. I feel like there's got to be a story behind this. Guys, for those of you that are listening on audio, let me just explain real quick. It is a skull and crossbones, but it's not just a skull and crossbones. It's got bunny ears on the skull. It's got little waves off to the side. What does it say on the sleeve? Russell: It says, "Psycho bunny." Josh: Psycho bunny. Russell: This is actually a really cool brand called Psycho Bunny, and I bought a couple of their things. I'm like, "This is a cool brand." And then I was shopping with Bart Miller in Vegas, and they have a Psycho Bunny shop. I went in there- Josh: Oh dang! Russell: And they had shirts and jackets and suit jackets that have the Psycho Bunny inside. It's just a fun, cool brand, and I really like it. Psycho Bunny. Josh: Okay. There's no grand, huge story behind how you got it. You just liked it. Russell: I should buy the company because it'd be really cool. Anyway, nope. Nothing. Josh: Guys, when you're a funnel hacker and when you decide to take over the world and create empires, you can randomly decide on a podcast that you're just going to ... "I should buy the company." That's not a normal thing that most people get to say, but it's super dope. Russell: This could be a fun episode in the future because as we acquired two big companies last year and I'm learning about this and having more fun with it, there are some cool ... For most of us, we look at a company, like, "There's no way I could buy that company," but then like Tai Lopez who just bought RadioShack and he bought Pier 1 Imports and all these companies… Josh: Dress Barn. Yeah. Russell: Now, I bought a couple companies and I'm like, oh, my gosh, there's actually a really cool strategy where it doesn't technically cost you any money if you do it correctly. We bought Dan Kennedy's company for a steal. We've launched the first thing. Now we made our money back. And now moving forward, everything I do with Dan Kennedy's company is pure, unadulterated profit to the bottom line. And that's exciting because ... All of a sudden it's like, you can actually buy companies when you understand the core principles of what we do. Anyway, that's a topic for another day, but it's kind of a fun one. Josh: So much fun stuff. Topic for another day. We'll do many episodes. Now is not the time. We're going to dive into what I think goes really well with our last episode. Last episode we talked about goal setting and setting things up, and that last bit of it was around identity and beliefs and values and rules and things like that. I want to talk about mindset here, and specifically the mindset ... There's a couple core key areas, because what's interesting is a lot of times we think mindset is we have to train our minds to think a certain way, or we have to overcome false beliefs about bad things. Like, "I'll never be successful" or "I'll never be this." But it goes both ways, because often times we can have fear of success. We can have fear that, oh, my gosh, what happens if I actually achieve that goal? There's so many different things around that, that we could dive into, but I want to kick off with this one specifically around mindset around money. I do want to talk about not just money, failure, doing the impossible, things like that, but I want to start with money because I feel like money is one of these things that we all have some form of weird relationship with it. Very few people grew up in a home where their parents and everybody around them had a healthy relationship with money, because most people ... I would say 90 plus percent of the people that I've met do not have a healthy relationship with money. They don't understand it. They don't understand what it represents, how it works, any of the things with it. For you, I want you to take us back because one of things, and I've kind of told you this at the beginning, a lot of people in the ClickFunnels world, like Russell. I was talking to Brad Gibb the other day. Shout out to Brad. He's awesome. He's like, "Russell has come and he's taken these handcuffs off of us, to where now we just can print money." It's ridiculous. It's kind of a cheat code. When we talk about it to all of our friends, we go around and we're like, "Yeah, we just kind of make money on the Internet." They're like, "How do you do that?" We're like, "We don't know. We just do what Russell says and it just works." Russell: It's a magic trick! Josh: It just shows up. It's amazing. We've kind of unshackled the making of money, if we follow what it is, but keeping money. But our thoughts around money, our beliefs around money, how we perceive and value money, how we think money is going to change us. All of these different other things around money, those things are now new problems that a lot of us are running into, or have not yet applied the things that you've told us to do because of those beliefs. I think both of those are true. I've seen so many people ... I made not a ton, ton of money, but certainly 10 times more money than I'd ever made in my life when I first got started, and blew it all because of my poor, very unhealthy, almost toxic relationship with money. Take us back, what are the money shifts or the beliefs around money, specifically in mindset, that you had to go through. I'm just going to kind of leave that open ended and see where you take it. Russell: The first thing I think that would be useful for everyone is for everyone to actually, honestly sit down and look at their relationship with money and understand it ... It's funny because if you would ask Russell 15 years ago Russell if this was actually a real thing, I'd be like, "No, this is stupid. Just make money. It's easy." But I had a friend who I worked with, man, probably 12, 13 years ago on a project and he was someone who is super charismatic, super dynamic, super talented person. When he was younger, he used his talents and his gifts and he made a whole bunch of money really, really fast. Crazy, crazy money. Money that doesn't make any sense. When he got that money, he started doing stupid things with it. He got into drugs and alcohol and all the problems that are associated with when you make too much money too fast as a kid, and almost destroyed his life. He almost died. He almost lost his family and his marriage. All these things happened. He lost all the money, which was probably a blessing. And then he refixed his life. And then he got back to the spot where he's like, "I want to make money again." I watched him for probably 10 years of his life, where he would do all the right things, he would get close to making a bunch of money and then he would literally subconsciously destroy everything he had built, and it kept happening. At first I was so confused by it. I'm like, "You were so close. How do you keep messing this up? I don't understand it." Then he told me a story. He didn't know this subconsciously but we had a conversation one night where he told me a story. I was like, "Oh, my gosh. Subconsciously, you are linking the destruction of your family, your health and all these things to making money, because that's what happened the very first time. Now every time you get close to it, your whole subconscious mind is like, no, and starts making you do stupid things to destroy yourself from actually having success." I've seen ... Now, it's been a decade of me watching this. And as much as I love this person, I keep seeing him. He's so talented, so many gifts, and keeps not having any success because of this thing that happened in his youth. His is an extreme example, but this is happening to all of us. You think about when you were growing up, what are the things that your parents said about money? What are the things that you heard at church about money? What are the things you heard in different spots? There are so many things that have been ingrained in our head that we don't even know consciously. And also, we start having success in whatever. We start making money or we start getting close to making money, and all these warning signals are popping off in your head, like, don't get money because of this because you'll become a bad person and you're going to fall away from God. You're going to be doing this. You're going to be the bad person. You look at TV. Myron Golden is the first one that ever pointed this out to me. You look at every movie, every superhero movie, for the most part, the bad guy is the rich billionaire who is this horrible person. This is ingrained in our heads that money is going to make us evil. Those things are real, and even if you don't think that they're affecting you, they probably are. Josh: And then you don't consciously believe it. Subconsciously they control you. Russell: Yeah, it's affecting you. I've seen this in my own journey. When I first started making money, I thought everyone was going to be excited. I was like, "This is so cool." I was so excited to teach everybody else. I started making money. I start teaching people and try to show my friends and my family and what happened. The response I got was not what I thought it was going to be. It was not like, "This is amazing-" Josh: At all. Russell: "Let's try it." Instead it was weird, especially for my wife. My wife struggled with it even more so than me because I've had success in parts of my life in the past where ... In wrestling, I was a state champ, I was an all-American. I hit these different things, but there was this weird side of success you aren't expecting where the people around you who you think are going to be celebrating with you, they don't. In fact, I remember my mom when I bought my dream house ... My house is ... You've been to my house. Josh: Your house is insane. It's so awesome. Russell: It's like the coolest thing in the world. When I was growing up, I wanted an insane house. I remember I was finally at a spot where I could buy this house. In the reality, I didn't pay it off immediately. I could've just paid cash for it. I didn't. But within two years I think I paid it off, which was a big deal for me. But I remember when I was buying my house, I remember a comment my mom said. She was like, "You don't want to buy a house like this because then you're going to be one of those rich people up on the hill." I was like, "What does that mean, mom?" She was like, "They're the ones that are always looking down at everybody else." I'm like, "What?" All of a sudden I was scared to tell my mom about my success because my mom viewed the rich people as this thing over here. And then other people. It was this weird thing where all of a sudden it makes you want to shrink down, it makes you want to hide because you're like, "I don't want people judging me because of this thing." For all of you guys, for all of us, there's these things that may happen, where comments are made, when people we love and respect were to all of a sudden to ... The side of success that you think is going to happen doesn't. Especially in money. I think money is a big one because it's such a thing. Josh: Yeah. I also think that because of the stories that we're told by everybody else, like you're saying, subconsciously it's ingrained in our society, what money is and how it works, nobody understands it. Taylor Welch ... You know Taylor, right? Taylor Welch? Russell: Yep. Josh: He's the one ... He and I have become ... I don't want to say good friends, but certainly friends over the past little bit. He was actually the very first person I ever interviewed on my podcast. Russell: Very cool. Josh: He got me into money. He was like, "Study money. Because once you understand how it works, it'll completely change your perspective of it." I always joke around with my mom. I'm like, "Money's not real. It's all fake." In America specifically, the U.S. dollar is not real. It's all fake and it's all made up. She always pushes back. She's like, "It's not fake because I can guy groceries with it." I'm like, "That right there, that shows that I have a different relationship ..." And side note, I freaking love my mom. My mom and I have an amazing relationship. But my mom and I have a completely different fundamental relationship with money. That was a very interesting learning lesson for me. When you change your relationship with money, when you change how it works, when you understand it differently and when you change your relationship with it, it also becomes not hard to get or keep, because now you're not needy of it. Your relationship changes with it. I always think about ... Take it back to dating. I'm not even going to say the book because I don't want people to go ... It's not a great book, but I was reading a clip out of this book one time and the guy in it goes, "Money and ..." Let's say, relationship. Money and girls are kind of the same thing. Those are not the words he used, but money and girls are the same way. If you're desperate and needy of it, you'll never have it. But if you don't care, it'll come abundantly. That was a very interesting shift for me as well. Anyway, I didn't mean to interrupt you but that was very interesting. Russell: It's key. As I studied Tony Robbins, the biggest thing I learned ... One of the biggest things. I shouldn't say the biggest, but is just becoming aware of things. I think the first step for of any us is being aware of how this is actually affecting you. For a lot of us, at whatever level you're at, the reason you're not at the next level is because there's some belief around it that's keeping you from there. It's interesting, I remember when I had the goal, when I hit a million dollars in a year, I didn't hit it three years in a row. Every year I was within $50,000. Like, $75,000. How am I not hitting this? It was like, I had these weird beliefs around that thing. As soon as I broke it, I was like, this is easy. Going from million to 10 million was next. Getting to two, three, five, eight million was easy, but then 10 million was this gap where I was stuck. It's beliefs. What's easy? What's hard? A couple things ... Again, this is one of those topics. I've never taught this before so I don't have the, here's the Russell three step framework. Things have happened in my life that I became aware of this for myself. One of them was, I had a coach ... I've had her a couple times throughout my life. She's awesome. One of my favorite coaches of all time. Her name is Tara Williams. Tara ... It was interesting because I always thought ... Again, especially people who are religious, there's always this belief of is money going to make me evil? You hear these things on the side. I definitely had this subconscious fear around that. If I get too much money, I'm going to forget God. I'm going to forget my family. All these things couple happen. Because they do. They happen to so many people. We see it. I had that fear behind it. I remember, especially when I bought my house, I was like, I bought this house and it's crazy. Anyway, Tara was at our house, actually, doing a coaching session with my wife and I. It was an interesting thing. But she said a couple things in that meeting that had a big impact on me. One of the things was ... She asked my wife this specifically. "Do you think this is bad that he bought this house?" My wife is like, "Yeah." She has so much guilt associated with it, because she's like ... It was interesting because Tara brought back, "Because you guys have money, talk about things you've done. Last year you gave a million dollars to OUR. Last year you did this. Last year you did this. How many people have you helped? How many entrepreneurs have you empowered? How many jobs have you created?" We started going through this whole thing, and it was like, all these things you're doing has been creating wealth for you. You have this wealth. You can just give it away and you guys do give a lot away, but is it bad for you now to enjoy some of it, to buy a house? Still she was like, "I don't know. Is it bad or not?" She's like, "Now you have this house, what have you guys done with this house?" I was like, "We have our kids here and we have our family here. We bring people here. We're able to serve people at a different level because we have these things." All of a sudden it was like, oh, my gosh, this isn't a bad thing. I remember hearing Richard Branson, somebody asked him ... Who was it? It was another one of those moments for me that opened my mind. But someone asked Branson, "Do you feel guilty that you're not down at the soup kitchen helping feed these people?" Branson's response was so powerful. He said, "The people of the soup kitchen who are feeding people, that's amazing. We're so grateful for them. They're giving their time and their effort. It's powerful. I'm not going to go to the soup kitchen and feed people soup, but I can give the soup kitchen $50,000, and that's going to feed 10,000 people. It's different service but it's still service, and this is able to help even more people." I started thinking about that. Man, these tools that we create, like wealth and the things that we have can be so much more impactful if we use it correctly. It's not a bad thing. It's just understanding these are tools that we have. Anyway ... Josh: It's interesting you say that and phrase it that way because that was one of the things, actually, Brad Gibb, he's a very good friend of mine as well, and we talk a lot. And he's taught me probably more about money as far as investing how it works and how to use it and things like that, probably more than anybody else. Very, very smart. One of the things that he said is money is not all the same. He's like, "You can have a million dollars over here and a million dollars over here and one of them be used for good and to multiply and to be productive, and one of them be used just to indulge and be gluttonous and to be greedy. Is money good or bad? It's not good, it's not bad. It is. It is a tool for exchange. How you go and use it will determine whether or not it's good or bad for you in your own life." When he put it that way, I was like, if I have my money and I'm investing and I'm multiplying it and it's creating freedom and then I'm using that to be able to go out and give back, all of a sudden money is now good. It makes me be able to do my job better. But if I'm just going and I make a million dollars and I go to Vegas and I put 100 grand on black, cool. Maybe once in your lifetime. But that is not a good thing anymore. Now it's taking away from your gift. It can either be an amplifier or it can be something that takes away. That was a really, really big shift for me. It was like, how am I using it? Russell: It's powerful. Again, it just comes down to there's so many subconscious things that are weird about it. Next thing I want to talk about for entrepreneurs too ... And this is a trap with money that I got caught into for almost 15 years. When I stared my business, I remember I started making some money. I figured out what my wife and I needed to live. I think at the time it was $8,000 a month that was giving us the most amazing lifestyle ever. We set it up where our paycheck was eight grand a month and that's what was coming from the company. And everything else in the company I kept reinvesting back into the company. For a while that's important. That's where we're going to grow, where we're going to expand it. I look at my business for the next decade at least, maybe longer, I never pulled anything else out. It only kept getting reinvested, reinvested. And eventually ... Some of you guys heard my story. 10, 12 years ago we had this big crash where everything got shut down and we lost everything. And the thing that sucked is when it all was said and done, I had nothing. We never pulled money out. We never invested. We never did anything. It was all being reinvested back into the business. I got my guarantee, we had our certainty, eight grand a month coming in consistently every single time, but then nothing happened. I remember when we launched after that happened and everything crashed and we were rebuilding back up, during that time we had no money so everything is being reinvested back into the business because we had no business at that point. We started figuring this out. That's where I met Todd. We launched Click Funnels. When we launched Click Funnels, I instantly went back to my same pattern. Like, cool, all the money goes back into Click Funnels. That's how we're going to do this thing. Todd was like, "Dude, just so you understand, I did not build this thing to just have a good paycheck and let this thing keep growing. This is not worth it for me unless we pull money out." I remember I was like ... I had so much fear and I was like, "No. We can't do this." This is one of Todd and I's first and probably only real things where he was just like, "It's not worth it to me unless this is producing money that's being put over here for my family, for my church, for my faith, all the things I want to be doing." Again, we fought back and forth for a couple of months. The very first time we had some profit. I was like, "What do I do with this profit? Put it back in the business." Todd was like, "No, we need to pull it out of the business," and we fought back and forth. Finally, we figured out a way to make us both happy where we figured ... At the time, we need three months of money in reserve. Worst case scenario, that's there. But then after that's over, all of the money, 100% of the money needs to be pulled out and given to the owners. Otherwise we're going to be like you were, Russell, 15 years in and you've got nothing to show for it. All the stress, all the effort, all the energy, and nothing to show for it. That's how we set things up. I remember it was so scary for me. In fact, when we started pulling out and distributing out the profits every single month, I kept mine in there for two years. I didn't touch a penny of it because I'm like ... It's in my separate account. It's over there. What was crazy, though, is that all of a sudden this thing that I was doing started actually producing wealth for me, which took the stress down. I started seeing this thing happening, and all of a sudden it started giving me options where I had no options ahead of time. I think for a lot of entrepreneurs it's like, we have this thing ... It's funny because I see even big people like Gary Vee talk about this, like, "I don't care about money. I dump all my money back in. I'm just building this brand." I'm like, I thought that was the thing for a while too, but it's not. If the business is not producing wealth for the owners, what's the point of it? Eventually you got a job and that's it. It needs to be doing something or else it's not serving you, and therefore, it's not a gift. Josh: Was that the thing, though, helping you overcome that? Was it just doing it? Is that what helped you overcome it? Russell: Yeah, Todd forced me. If it wasn't for Todd, I would still be pulling out eight grand a month and that would be where I would be living. 100%. Todd forced me to do it and it stressed me out. I was so scared. For two years I didn't touch the money and all of a sudden it was like, oh, my gosh, there's this money here. Now I have the ability to ... This thing I had created, this value I was trying to put into the world was paying us back, and now we could ... Now we had all sorts of options. Especially when you're really pushing and you're working hard and you're grinding on something, if aren't seeing some tangible value back from it, it's not serving you. It's just taking from you. Again, this was my personal money, one of my personal issues I struggled with. This may or may not be that, but I would say for all of you guys, looking at this as you are creating a business and creating wealth, you need to be pulling things out. What you do with it is up to you. Like you talked about, use it for good, evil. You can give it to charity. You can do whatever. But if the business is just paying for itself, the business will continue to eat up all your money. It will. You leave money it, it's going to continue to eat it up and it'll disappear as fast as it can possibly happen. But if you start pulling it out and it's over here and it's different, man, it becomes more efficient. It becomes more effective. Everything becomes better because of that. Josh: It's funny, because my thing ... I had that same struggle except I wasn't even paying myself. I was literally just, what are my bills for the month, the bare minimum, and then that was it. And then I met my now wife and I started thinking about finances and she wanted stuff. I was like, but also the business. It was kind of like this thing. Katie came along and was like, "Josh ..." The very first ... She didn't give me a lot of tactical things. It was very mindset-focused. I remember one of the biggest tactical things that she gave me out of the very few that she did, she was like, "You need to pay yourself a paycheck, and that paycheck needs to not only be enough to cover all of your expenses, but it needs to in excess." When I started to put away multiple thousand dollars a month into savings or into being able to invest outside of the company, it changed my whole entire perspective. Weirdly enough, magically, the business made more money. It was like, made it every month. It was like, we're entrepreneurs. We figure out problems. Our brain programs for it. And then I started looking at it as myself as an expense. I was like, I'm a line item on the books. Just like I pay a contractor, that's me. All of a sudden, the business made enough money to cover that. But before that, it didn't. It was crazy. Russell: It's interesting because when you start seeing the results ... I've talked about this before. If you look at my Disc profile, there's the D-I-S-C, and then there's your values. My number one value is ROI. If I can't see the ROI of a situation, it makes it harder for me to do it. I was in business for a decade and a half and the ROI I was getting was good. I was like, "I'm helping people and having success, and it's fun to see the success stories." That was the ROI I was getting, and it was good. It kept me going. But man, I look at the last seven years of Click Funnel, it was like the pressure and the stress and all of the type of things. If it wasn't for the ROI, it took this pressure, but here's the ROI of it, I wouldn't have been able to do it. As soon as I started seeing the ROI and the ROI gets bigger and bigger and bigger, all of a sudden it's like, this becomes fun again and you get excited. How do I make the ROI ... For me, it's all about the ROI, the return on investment, any situation is the key. If you don't have the ROI, it gets hard. It's hard to be creative. It's hard to come up with the next idea, the next thing, and the stress and the pressure that comes. What's the return on investment for the effort you're putting into it? But if you see the ROI and you start amplifying it, then it becomes a more fun game. That's where you start growing from a million to a 10 to 100 and beyond because it's like, I see this game. I'm playing it. I'm getting the return on investment. But I never saw that before because the only return on investment I was getting was this one thing, and those things they feel good, but it's hard to keep score with the feel goods. You got to have a scoreboard to see, like, oh, my gosh, I'm winning. Can I win even more? What's it going to look like? And now it gives you options and opportunities… Josh: You mean you're telling me that all the stress and pressure isn't worth $8,000 a month? Russell: You know, I could get ... I was like ... Nowadays with all of the inflation, I can work at McDonald's for eight grand a month, I think. It's crazy. Josh: Man. Russell: But back then- Josh: That's crazy. Russell: That was the ... Anyway, it's crazy. Josh: You can buy Bitcoin and keep up with inflation. Bitcoin, the savior of money. One more. I kind of want to dive ... I wasn't going to make this a money episode, because that's kind of where it's been. When did you make the shift ... One of the big problems with entrepreneurs, talking maybe a little bit more established entrepreneur, is once they're making money ... I was talking with Brad about this and he was talking about in the inner circle. He was in there ... Or in Category Kings, right? The guy's like, "What's the main problem that you solve?" Brad was like, "So interesting. We thought we could answer that question." Then he asked us it and we try to do it, and it was like, dang, what is the main problem that we solve? What he said is one of the things that they came down to was entrepreneurs know that if they have money, it should be doing more. But they don't know what to do with it. This is something that you probably are an amplified example of this, because you're really, really good at making money. You don't even need to think about what your money should be doing because you can just go make more of it. Once again, that because you've unshackled us. It's like, "All right, want a new car? Go build a funnel. You want a palace? Go build a funnel. Want to take a vacation? Launch a funnel. Just do a funnel and you print money." For you, when did that shift happen for you when you actually started paying attention to, I can't just leave my money in an account right now? I can't just buy cars and houses because those don't make me ... You have houses, you've got the cars, you've got everything you've ever wanted and you still have money left over, so when did you make that shift of, my money needs to be doing more, and how did you solve that problem? Russell: Interesting. This is one that's been more recently solved for me, actually, which is fascinating. For a long I was just hoarding it. Just hoarding it, keeping it here. Then Brad and Ryan ... You have to invest it. I'm like, "I don't want to do that." They forced me to do ... I give them a bunch of money every year and they do whatever they do with it, and that's awesome. I'm like, "Okay, cool. Something is happening." But then the money kept adding up. I remember one day I was like, "I'm in a weird spot where I could buy almost anything I want. What do I want? I'm going to go and spend some money." I remember going to eBay and I was like, "I'm going to buy anything I want." I was searching for stuff, and I spent four hours on eBay when all of a sudden I spent three grand. I was like, "That's it. I got everything I wanted." I was like, "Oh, crap, now what do I do with it?" It was interesting, because for me, it was like ... Again, this is something ... It's been a recent development. I can't remember if it was this podcast or the one I talked about it, I was like, I didn't know what to do with this. Yeah, I could invest in real estate, but that wasn't inspiring to me. I have money in crypto, but that's not inspiring. What's the things that's going to inspire me to want to do more? Again, it's ROI for me. What's going to give me the ROI of now I got to create more money so I can do this thing? So I have a lot of things. Again, we give money to charity. All those things are good and they get me excited. But I was like, what would be the thing that, for me, would amplify? When we bought Dan Kennedy's company, it was the first time I felt it. I bought his thing. We reorganized it, cleaned it up, and I was like, "Oh, my gosh, I'm able to take these things that were so precious to me and I can bring them back to the world, and I can monetize them. I can actually make money off of this thing." I got really excited. I told you I started buying old books. I started investing in Napoleon Hill books and Charles Haanel and Orison Swett Marden and Samuel Smiles and all these people, the founding fathers of personal development and business and all these kinds of things. I've literally spent a small fortune ... I've spent a lot of money in the last couple months on these old, old books, because now it's like, I'm not investing in real estate that's over here. I'm investing in these things I don't care about. Now it's like I'm investing in something that I can take and that I can turn this into more money, and I can turn it into help. I can serve my entrepreneurs. I can do more things with it. For me, that's what's been stimulating for me. That was the investment of ... It was like, I can dump it back into things, but it was like something that's meaningful to me. For some people, crypto is meaningful. For some people it's NFT. Finding the thing that's not just like, I'm investing to invest, but what's the thing that you're passionate about it where it becomes more than just ... For me, that's what I'm geeking out on. You know this, next door I'm building a 20,000 square foot library to house all these books, to build an event center, to build all these kind of things because this is what I feel like my life's mission is. I'm curating all these ideas and I'm bringing them back to people in the simple new form to help these ideas and these concepts live on. For me, that's double fulfilling because it'll make me money, but it's also something that can serve the people I've been called to serve as well. Again, buying Kennedy's company, I'm serving these people, but I'm also making money, which gives me the ability to serve more people. It's kind of fun. Josh: What was the shift, though? For a while you didn't do that, right? Russell: For a while I just sat there. I didn't know what it was. Josh: Who or what got you to the point where you're like, "Okay, I've got to go figure this out"? Yes, this is what you ended up doing with it, but I think a lot of people, there's got to be that thing that's like, "This is when I realized I got to figure out ..." Or some people just let it sit their whole life, I guess. You know what I'm saying? Russell: I heard stories about ... I don't know how true ... But like Scottie Pippen or Mike Tyson, he made half a billion dollars and he's broke. I was like, I don't want to be that dude who made a half a billion dollars and is broke right now. I need to figure out ... I always joke with Brad and Ryan when we were writing their webinar page initially, I was like ... On 30 Rock, there's that scene where Liz Lemon is talking to Alec Baldwin and he's like, "I need that thing that rich people do where they turn money into more money." He's like, "Investing?" He's like, "Yeah. I want to do that." For me, it was like, I've got money here. I need to figure out how to turn money into more money, that's not just me doing the whole thing. How do we amplify what we're doing? How do we have that exponential growth? That was kind of the thing that got me into it. Again, initially it was doing the things that weren't exciting. I'd invested money in real estate and I hated that, so I had Brad and Ryan, I invested money with them. That was cool. It was passive. It wasn't passionate. I was trying to figure out what's the thing that I'm going to be passionate about, where now it becomes part of a game. Now I can see the ROI on this thing. I invested $40,000 this weekend on old books, how do I turn that into $400,000 or four million or 40 million? Can I do that? Now begins ... Now it's fun. Some people, real estate is that game. I got friends who own 100 houses, or 200 houses, and that's the game that they love. I look at Tai Lopez and he's buying these businesses. That's the game that he loves. What's the game you're going to love, the investing game you're going to love? There's a million ways to invest, but when you find one that you love, then it becomes ... Now it becomes a fun part of the game. I think it's understanding first off you need to do it, otherwise you're going to ... You mentioned this ... I can't remember if it was before we started recording, but people who have won Two Comma Club and they got nothing, or Two Comma Club X and they're broke. Entrepreneurs are good at generating money, but there's this other part that you got to learn how to invest it correctly. Otherwise, you're going to pull a Tyson or a Pippen and be broke in a couple of years from now. Yeah, I got 3 Two Comma Club awards on the wall, but I'm trying to figure out how to feed my family this weekend, and that's now where you want to be… Josh: That's so crazy that's a reality for people. It really, really is. I think that's one of the things that I am very, very thankful to have learned relatively early on, is ... Russell: They're two different skill sets. Making money- Josh: They are. Russell: And keeping money are not the same thing. Josh: Yeah. Russell: They are completely different skill sets. In fact, typically, the people who are good at making money are the worst at managing it. Josh: Keeping it. Russell: It's like yin and yang. Understanding that if you're good at making it, you find people around you, like Brad and Ryan, I was like, "Here's money. Do that thing you do because I don't want to mess it up." Josh: Yeah. Russell: In fact, it's funny, before I invested money with Brad and Ryan, I invested it in two different deals. I was like, "This is the greatest thing in the world." Both of them, literally both of them turned out to Ponzi schemes. I got to write off multiple of millions of dollars last year because I gave money to ideas that were so good that me as the entrepreneur was like, "This is genius. This is the greatest thing in the world." Ponzi scheme. I got sold on the thing. It's funny, one of my friends just sold his business for eight figures and he messages me. He was like, "All right. I want to ask your opinion. Where should I put this money?" I was like, "Dude, do not ask me. If I think it's a good idea, it's going to be a Ponzi scheme. Find someone who, that's their life, is that, like Brad and Ryan. Go give your money to them," or find something like I'm doing now with the books and stuff, where it's like now. This is something that fits into my skill set. I think it was ... What's the old dude who invests all the money? Warren Buffett, that said only invest in things you understand. It's like, I understand how to turn old information into money. I'm investing in information and intellectual property because I can turn that into more money, and so that becomes something I can invest in, because I understand the game. I don't understand- Josh: So interesting. Russell: This, but I do understand this, therefore, I will invest in the thing I understand because I can turn this into more money. Josh: That makes sense. Side note on Warren Buffett, you know 80% of his wealth or something like that came off of nine trades? Russell: Really? Josh: Nine investments that he made, it produced 80% of his wealth or something like that. Isn't that insane? Russell: That is fascinating. Josh: That's why when ... I read the quote from him, it was in the context of this quote. It was like, Warren Buffett is like, everyone thinks they have to make a bunch of good decisions. He was like, "I try to make three good decisions a year." I was like, "Oh, my gosh. What the heck?" And then I found out that 80% of his wealth came from ... It was eight or nine trades or something, or investments, and I was like, "All right. I guess that makes sense, then, if you only need to make ..." Anyway, last question, rapid fire question on money. Is there anything that you could do, if you could go back and change something about what you've done or your handling with money, is there anything that you would change, and if so, what's the biggest thing that would be? Russell: Good question. I think I would've started ... Number one, I would've started pulling money out of my business faster. Number two, I would've had a plan for what I would do with that money. I wish I would've said, "I'm going to pull out ... After three months of thing, pull out all the profit, I'm going to put 25% in real estate, 25% in crypto, 25% in something else, and just have that happening in the background, I'd be a much wealthier man today." It took me a long, long time before I did that. Todd forced me to start putting money into crypto, which was one of the greatest gifts ever for me. Brad and Ryan are now forcing me to put money over here. It's like taking that and putting it in spots where again, it's not going to be 100%. I'm going to fall for two Ponzi schemes a year probably, but if I can get one of them to win and three of them to fail, or whatever that is, that's the big thing. I always thought that I will start pulling money out when blah. When I hit Two Comma Club, when I hit a million. The problem is that win never comes. You got to structure from day number one. When money comes in, boom. Profits come out. This happens here. I pay myself first. From the money I pay myself, 10% is going to go for me to go do stupid things, 25% is going to go into real estate or Bitcoin or stocks or whatever. And dividing that stuff up so it's happening at a small level, because when that happens, I wasted a decade and a half before any kind of investments happening. Can you imagine if I had 15 years of the stuff I was doing, turning into something? I missed out on so much of that, that I wish I would've done. Josh: You just got to make sure that you have a small percentage there, which is dedicated to losing bets and Bitcoin to Josh. If you have that, then we're good. For the rest of your life, you're going to be losing bets, so that's how that's going to work. Guys, I hope you enjoyed this episode with money. I'll let you sign it off, but this was awesome. We get to hear Russell Brunson talk about money, which is something that, you make a ton of it, but you don't really talk about it, which is awesome. Thanks for sharing a little bit more. Russell: Thank you. I apologize I don't have a framework for this yet, but this gets me thinking, man, if I could figure out something for entrepreneurs, this is the next thing to do, so then I'll talk more about it as I figure things out. But it's fascinating. I remember I bought a Dan Kennedy course on wealth creation, and it was fascinating because I'd heard Dan talk about building businesses and all that sort of stuff, but it was the first time he ever talked about wealth. Again, same thing. Fascinating. I'm like, oh, my gosh. I never thought about that side of the coin because most entrepreneurs don't talk about it, or don't think about it. I think it's important for us to think and talk and do more with it because again, 15 years of never investing anything, man, it would've been nice. I'd be in a different spot right now than I am today, for sure. Thank you, Josh, for hanging out and talking about money. Hopefully you guys enjoyed this episode. If you did, let us know if you want more about money and wealth and these kind of things. Let us know and we'll go deeper on topics. Just take a screen shot of this on your phone, post it, and tag me and write your #1 question you want to hear, and maybe we'll talk about it on the next podcast. Thanks again. Thank you, Josh, and I will see you guys soon.

Bitch Slap  ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!
…I am committed to the “Table Rush!”

Bitch Slap ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 10:14


Yes, I did publish the last two episodes.   We need to be reminded of the basics.  Do the next indicated step.  What platform do I create the questionnaire on and then how do I deliver it?  As soon as it was clear that I had momentum and it was going to be done the next steps opened up.  The next indicated step frees me to commit to the “Table Rush!”Administrative: (See episode transcript below)WATCH the Table Rush Talk Show interviews here: www.TableRushTalkShow.comCheck out the Tools For A Good Life Summit here: Virtually and FOR FREE https://bit.ly/ToolsForAGoodLifeSummitStart podcasting!  These are the best mobile mic's for IOS and Android phones.  You can literally take them anywhere on the fly.Get the Shure MV88 mobile mic for IOS,  https://amzn.to/3z2NrIJGet the Shure MV88+ for  mobile mic for Android  https://amzn.to/3ly8SNjSee more resources at https://belove.media/resourcesEmail me: contact@belove.mediaFor social Media:      https://www.instagram.com/mrmischaz/https://www.facebook.com/MischaZvegintzovSubscribe and share to help spread the love for a better world!As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.Transcript: Mischa Zvegintzov  00:02The last two episodes were quite volatile with my emotions it seems.  Very curious to see if I've published them when I get to this episode. I, my coach Vince likes to remind me that one of the great things about well, two things, one is that we need to be reminded, as entrepreneurs, or whatever we're trying to do, we need to be reminded of the basics. Here's a reminder of the basics. Here's a reminder of the basics. And the next indicated step is such a great reminder, do the next indicated step. That's what I'm going to talk about on this episode. And then there was something else what was it? Oh, yes. This is funny. The other thing, which I'll talk about a different day, or perhaps this episode, is he reminds me that information has become commoditized. And the skill set that we can bring to the table is organizing information for people. That effectively all the informations out there a lot of it free, truly, or just about free. So being able to organize it for people and help them get through it is a is a skill set.Mischa Zvegintzov  01:58Yeah, so the next indicated step was in a bunch of turmoil trying to decide on the last episodes if I published them, but alright, what am I doing with this dang podcast and YouTube channel? Am I committed to Table Rush? Or am I going to stay strong with the Bitch Slap ...The Accelerated Path To Peace. And a lot of that turmoil was i by Tuesday, by the or by Thursday, by the day of this recording, on my to do list with my other coach, Coach, Stephanie. I'm all coached up. Was to have my questionnaire completed. I was creating...I am creating a questionnaire for my, for the, for people that I can help get their webinars and video sales letters together. So I created a questionnaire to gauge where they are, so I can meet them where they are, and then see if I can help them. And yeah, so that I've got, of course, I waited till the last minute on that. Pretty close to the last minute, I'd actually started. You know, over the past, I had two weeks to get it done. And I could have got it done. Day one. But I waited. I did over the two weeks start to look at how I wanted to do it. Was it going to be Google Forms? Was it going to be an alternative delivery method? And then ultimately, what I put it in a funnel? And should I start in a funnel? The question was, do I create the questionnaire in the funnel? Turns out, at least in Click Funnels, it's more effective to create the funnel in an alternate alternative application. And then you put the HTML frame into your funnel. So it in effect looks like it's created. And click funnels. So step one, well, step one, figure out delivery method. Step two, take action. And that already written out or penciled out, and another program notability the general framework of it with most of the questions. So anyhow, I just needed to get it into Google Docs and was it gonna hire someone to do it or learn how to do it and now Next time I'll hire somebody?  So I decided to do it myself super glad I did. I can hire somebody next time... or... I see the power in creating questionnaires.Mischa Zvegintzov  05:12Anyhow yesterday's turmoil was what am I gonna do? Like do I want to go old podcast name different avatar? Or you know different objective for the avatar? Let's say that avatar equals perfect customer. So I think I'm shifting objective of the perfect customer. I like that that's a great way to say that.  Same avatar new objective. Ooh, that's good. Or maybe same avatar in a different space?  I don't know doesn't matter. All I know is this as soon as I was pretty much completed with the questionnaire... and it took all day yesterday and I've been working on that a little today as I still have till noon pacific standard time to get it done. But for all intents and purposes it is done just doing little minor editing. But as soon as it was clear that I had momentum and it was going to be done the next steps opened up. Or the vision for next for next indicated step coalesced and I think that's so cool and so powerful. Mischa Zvegintzov  06:47Which also leads me to... I want to talk about my creative process.  And how the the the creative process... the shortening...in a good way.  Meaning the time from inspiration to creation and fruition... the pain loop shortening.  There's pain in there for me.  So there's your open loop.  Anyway, back to the next indicated step. Mischa Zvegintzov  07:17Once I had that the Google Form questionnaire done effectively my mind was flooded with new inspiration for Table Rush for interviewing next steps and it was not towards Bitch Slap and God bless the Bitch Slap it was like a Bitch SlapI got one hey don't forget focus on the next indicated step it's the next indicated set man I was future tripping and and all sorts of psychic pain. When get the next indicated step done. So as of this recording I am committed to the Table Rush. The Table Rush perhaps marketing and sales show. It's definitely going to be Table Rush tagline not sure yet. Oh, marketing and sales talk show. And in brackets, bracket... in bracket, pitch section...exit bracket "The Table Rush marketing, sales, marketing and sales Talk Show and pitch session". Or it might be build your way. Selling one to many something like that. I don't know definitely Table Rush enough out of neon babbling. Future episodes are going to be organizing information as a skill set. And what was the other one? Can't remember.

ClickFunnels Radio
How To Build Your Business With Affiliates In 2022 - Chris Cameron - CFR #609

ClickFunnels Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 19:26


Here to talk all things affiliates is none other than Chris Cameron, the Senior Relationship & Affiliate Manager at ClickFunnels. Dave and Chris are pumped to share some of the major benefits of having affiliates promote your business as well as being an affiliate for others (especially if you're not sure where to start as an entrepreneur). Chris and Dave also discuss the brand new, limited time affiliate promotion for the ClickFunnels software. (How does promoting a 30-day free trial sound?!) If you're not a ClickFunnels affiliate already, now is the time to join. Join the ClickFunnels Affiliate Program as well as the ClickFunnels Avengers Facebook group for affiliates! Connect with Chris Cameron: Instagram: @001chriscameron Facebook: Chris Cameron LinkedIn: Chris Cameron chris.c@clickfunnels.com (Senior Affiliate & Relationship Manager) turner.leslie@clickfunnels.com (Affiliate/Relationship Manager) Join our Messenger Tribe! https://m.me/clickfunnels?ref=cfpodcast-join-CF-tribe

Financial Investing Radio
FIR 140: Hey AI, Where Are MY RESULTS??

Financial Investing Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 17:22


Hey, AI where are my results? In this episode, we take a look at some of the fundamental principles to getting results for your business using AI. Hey, this is Grant, Welcome to another episode of ClickAI Radio. All right, so I've been thinking about this issue around AI and the ability or inability of businesses to get the results from their AI efforts. So I'm gonna quote here again from Bernard Maher's book, it's called artificial intelligence in practice, he actually points out some interesting, he's got a series of use cases, or case studies, I should say, with their various use cases where AI has been applied, and what some of the outcomes or the results of those arms is going to pull from one of these here, this was a Kimberly Clark experience, where they were looking to produce some, some AI insights based on their customer data. Alright, so customer segmentation problem, how do we go after the market and try to improve our targeting with our marketing efforts and use AI to understand where to go with that. So what they did was, as they applied the AI, they ended up increasing their signup rates by 17%. And then they ran some other campaigns to optimize targeting of customers, this was for their dipende brand, and they saw a 24% increase in conversions. So how did they do that? Well, they they did it mostly by producing content, that more closely aligned with the customer profiles, that the AI predicted would be more responsive. So there's a great a great use case here, right in terms of applying AI to to this sort of marketing problem and customer segmentation area. Now, these customers, what they also found, was it, they ended up becoming more likely to be long term repeat buyers. So it's one thing to have an increase in conversions and sales, but to turn them into longer term buyers. That's a real bonus. Certainly, it also had the had the downstream effect of making them more likely to give positive recommendations to friends and family. So this is a great example of of successes for AI, right, it's a great use case for where we would apply it, and the kinds of sort of long term benefits that we want from AI. Of course, what we're finding is more and more market leading companies are transitioning into tech companies. And if we're not thinking of becoming a tech company, it actually is continues to move to our disadvantage. So it's essential that we do that, of course, we want to be competitive and, and even stay ahead of the pack, if you will. But turns out that AI driven Analytics is a lot more powerful than the you know, traditional business intelligence solutions are out there previously, and still certainly in use today by a lot of organizations that are focusing a course on customer segmentation. But the real point is, by applying AI ultimately into the space of doing custom customer segmentation, the AI is able to see things of course that difficult for our brains to get get get wrapped around. But it's also has another impact that we're seeing, and that is that the businesses that are competing, of course, as our businesses each compete in the pool and the talent pool and the challenges we face at this time of year not producing this at the beginning of 2022 when we've got a lot of not only supply chain challenges, but resourcing problems and a lot of competition for talent in our businesses. You know, building our business in tech savvy ways and leveraging the the technologies such as AI, of course to help us to be more competitive. Those also tend to attract a certain type of talent to our to our companies also. So it's a it's important part of building our representation, a reputation and our branding. But I want to talk about But the other side of it, right, so that sounds like you know, roses and apple pie and motherhood and so forth, right? Everything's great. Turns out, of course, as we all know, AI has had its failures. But I found that particularly interesting view of this from the I triple e.org site, they were describing some AI failures. And it's interesting, as you look at the different set of failures, typically, it's it seems to be a lot in some of these areas where, where there's, you know, AI is being used in these use cases that are, you know, pushing the edge and the envelope, which, of course, is what we should be doing for our r&d. But you know, when I think about AI, my focus is more on how can I apply it to benefit my business, right, to improve my customer service to increase my revenues, my profitability, my efficiencies, and so forth? Well, it turns out that a lot of these are fairly r&d centric, use cases, that IEEE sort of points out not surprising, given that it's IEEE but I'm just gonna point out some of these right, and then and then take, hopefully point out some takeaways. Number one was brittleness, they felt like AI is quite brittle, especially this was in a computer visioning use case. And that as as the as the world of the imaging kept changing, then they had to do a lot of a lot of AI rework so so brittleness of AI models, in some use cases, that's That's true statement. So is that a failure? Well, it might be, I guess, right, depending on your use case, number two, the embedded bias problem, I touched on that earlier, especially when I was having a conversation recently with a couple of the organizations that I've done some interviews with, so I'm not going to drill more on to that. This is something that we have to be mindful of, as we're building our AI models to help our businesses. Number three, catastrophic forgetting, that's an interesting phrase right there catastrophic for getting in here, they point out the double deep fake problem, right. And, and here, they're discussing how, you know, bad actors in the market, who are doing this deep fake work. And, you know, organizations trying to compete against that the constant retraining of AI models to include not only new deep fake techniques, but also the need to deal with previous and older styles of deep fake. This certainly is critical. Is it a failure? I don't know, I kind of look at that as the cost of doing business conceptually, right? That if we're in that world, where we got to keep figuring out which we do, how to address this deep fake problem. But nevertheless, AI models are, you know, if you don't include the data in your retrained model, then yes, it can, quote unquote, forget old stuff. So it's not like our cognitive brains were well, I guess depends how old you are. Then you don't forget things as humans, right. Okay, number four explainability. This is a challenge with AI. And in particular, it's a challenge as it relates to giving X explanations for results. And predictions can sometimes be be difficult to do, right, where there's some of these questions. And predictions that come out are hard to to explain how it is that this was arrived at. And as a result, I'm going to give a suggestion on this here in a moment to help address some of this stuff. I think explainability is a real challenge for so is it a failure? It's it's it's a challenge for sure. Number five Quantifying uncertainty. So hey, here we go. Once again, having sufficient data sets that deal with fringe or edge use cases is critical. This is a, I guess, maybe a failure in the sense that sometimes as humans, we don't do that. And we focus on the Happy Day scenarios. But turns out, our brains and real life have to constantly be dealing with all the other fringe cases as well. So it does put the onus on us as business owners to make sure that we're collecting as wide a set of data as possible. And that not necessarily means more and more data means more coverage of you know, the different use cases of data out there that we have number six common sense this was a failure, the I triple C I triple E was pointing out common sense meaning turns out AI lacks common sense. Sometimes us as humans lack common sense in any event, the ability, of course, to reach some logical, acceptable conclusions, right based on our, you know, vast understanding and context of everyday knowledge. You know, a lot of times we take that for granted and well AI doesn't really have that at least in our current current maturity levels of AI, we just don't have that. as such. I think one of the things that I've seen and how I tend to view it as I work with organizations is this AI stuff really should be looked at as augmented intelligence. So the bottom line is, Do not throw your brain away, right this stuff is, is AI stuff in our Yes, we should look at it as it's going to be bringing insights Bhutia, challenge it, right. And so when it comes into us with some insights, we should look at in terms of the realm of possibility, as well, turns out one more number seven terms of failures, what I triple E was pointing out was math. He said, Well, look, you know, simple number crunching tends not to be handled so well with AI. So in addition to not throwing your brain away, don't throw away your old calculator, right? Or, of course, all of your old, you know, sequential linear software, right? That's doing real stuff today, running your business in the economy and such. So AI's got its place, and these seven, quote unquote, failure areas, I think, have that I think there's some some techniques that we can use to get around some of it. Not all of it, but some of it, but what it does is it pushes us into a set of use cases, where, excuse me, we can still get AI value. So to get the best insights from your AI, I think the net net is somewhere in this area, a letter A, I decided not to do a number one, letter A define your Chris questioning, right, which drives focused AI model preparation. So it means we got to think we got to think about the business and not about the technology. As we're as we're organizing, what we're going to go do with AI that has has to happen. Be not number two, but be I guess, here we go be. So when it comes to data, be prepared to continually add to your data set and rebuild your models, this notion that you know, build it once and it's done kind of thing that that needs to go away. And then see, use AI like an augmented intelligence tool, as I pointed out earlier, right? So use an AI platform as part of this that can take your feedback to influence the AI model. You are the brains. Alright, and so as you're getting some insight or predictions on things to do, be sure to come back and inform what was the impact of that was a positive? Was it negative that do what we expected? We need the AI models to continue to be informed and learn from this. Alright, so AI does a great job identifying insights on correlations, of course that are difficult for our brains to see, but we should review it as business owners within the context of our business. Right, we got to keep that in mind and evaluate the veracity of applying that insight to our business. I had to get the veracity word in there just shouted intelligent earlier look at the very the can we actually take this insight and apply to our business? Right? That's really what we're after, not just to have the, you know, the aha moment. Oh, that's great insight. But hey, can I make some concrete adjustments, it's going to change my business and actually bring some bring some benefits about so a I want its approach approached right, using the techniques that I mentioned above my experiences, it really can't help our business. But the industry is also gathering context on the failure scenarios. And so of course, we're going to be best served if we take that into consideration, no doubt about that. So I was looking at something else here. medium.com, you can find some interesting blog, articles and such out there. It pointed out, okay, let's say that, is there a single point of failure for AI. And I found this to be an interesting point that was made here on this particular piece here. Is there a single point of failure for AI and there was this blog on medium.com. That suggests there is and as I reviewed it, I thought, Hmm, interesting. So this piece suggests that to get started with AI, you should not choose a company wide AI implementation, but rather a proof of concept that gets the company accustomed to the new normal, right in my experience, the new normal includes the following activities. These are going to sound like the ABC items I just mentioned. I'm going to use 123. Now just switch it up number one, alright, the new normal if you're going to go apply AI Think about doing these things. Number one clarity in the questions, the business questions or seeking from the AI. Sound familiar? Number two, data curation doesn't have to be perfect, but you got to have for thought and organization on your data. And of course, its potential relevance to the questions you're asking. And number three, a mindset of iterative AI model refinement over time. Alright, so I think I've said those three things several ways in this episode. All right, so let's get to the point of this particular piece here. Is there a single reason for AI project failure? And you hear all sorts of stats out there, right? Maybe half of the projects fail? Or some say 85% of the projects fail? Is there a golden thread? According to this particular bar, blog, or article? They stay? They say, yes. And the answer is expectation management. Right? So organizations have of course, said amazing things to me about what they expect from their AI. This has to be managed early in the process. So I agree with the sentiment, right? It's certainly not as quantifiable, right? It's not to say, Oh, the, you know, common point of failure is you didn't have clean data or enough data or whatever. Certainly, the best practices are we got to have that data and etc, etc. But expectation management is really an interesting point on that. And I agree with that. As I've reviewed this thought about this right, I've developed a guide for smart steps to business outcomes with AI. If you're interested in that, reach out to me click ai radio.com Just join my email list. I'll make sure you get get that to you. Hey, everyone, thanks for joining and until next time, then edge manage manage your AI expectations to achieve the results which are there to benefit your business using AI. Thank you for joining Grant on ClickAI Radio. Don't forget to subscribe and leave feedback. And remember to download your free ebook, visit ClickAIRadio.com now.  

ClickAI Radio
CAIR 59: Hey AI, Where Are MY RESULTS??

ClickAI Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 17:22


Hey, AI where are my results? In this episode, we take a look at some of the fundamental principles to getting results for your business using AI. Hey, this is Grant, Welcome to another episode of ClickAI Radio. All right, so I've been thinking about this issue around AI and the ability or inability of businesses to get the results from their AI efforts. So I'm gonna quote here again from Bernard Maher's book, it's called artificial intelligence in practice, he actually points out some interesting, he's got a series of use cases, or case studies, I should say, with their various use cases where AI has been applied, and what some of the outcomes or the results of those arms is going to pull from one of these here, this was a Kimberly Clark experience, where they were looking to produce some, some AI insights based on their customer data. Alright, so customer segmentation problem, how do we go after the market and try to improve our targeting with our marketing efforts and use AI to understand where to go with that. So what they did was, as they applied the AI, they ended up increasing their signup rates by 17%. And then they ran some other campaigns to optimize targeting of customers, this was for their dipende brand, and they saw a 24% increase in conversions. So how did they do that? Well, they they did it mostly by producing content, that more closely aligned with the customer profiles, that the AI predicted would be more responsive. So there's a great a great use case here, right in terms of applying AI to to this sort of marketing problem and customer segmentation area. Now, these customers, what they also found, was it, they ended up becoming more likely to be long term repeat buyers. So it's one thing to have an increase in conversions and sales, but to turn them into longer term buyers. That's a real bonus. Certainly, it also had the had the downstream effect of making them more likely to give positive recommendations to friends and family. So this is a great example of of successes for AI, right, it's a great use case for where we would apply it, and the kinds of sort of long term benefits that we want from AI. Of course, what we're finding is more and more market leading companies are transitioning into tech companies. And if we're not thinking of becoming a tech company, it actually is continues to move to our disadvantage. So it's essential that we do that, of course, we want to be competitive and, and even stay ahead of the pack, if you will. But turns out that AI driven Analytics is a lot more powerful than the you know, traditional business intelligence solutions are out there previously, and still certainly in use today by a lot of organizations that are focusing a course on customer segmentation. But the real point is, by applying AI ultimately into the space of doing custom customer segmentation, the AI is able to see things of course that difficult for our brains to get get get wrapped around. But it's also has another impact that we're seeing, and that is that the businesses that are competing, of course, as our businesses each compete in the pool and the talent pool and the challenges we face at this time of year not producing this at the beginning of 2022 when we've got a lot of not only supply chain challenges, but resourcing problems and a lot of competition for talent in our businesses. You know, building our business in tech savvy ways and leveraging the the technologies such as AI, of course to help us to be more competitive. Those also tend to attract a certain type of talent to our to our companies also. So it's a it's important part of building our representation, a reputation and our branding. But I want to talk about But the other side of it, right, so that sounds like you know, roses and apple pie and motherhood and so forth, right? Everything's great. Turns out, of course, as we all know, AI has had its failures. But I found that particularly interesting view of this from the I triple e.org site, they were describing some AI failures. And it's interesting, as you look at the different set of failures, typically, it's it seems to be a lot in some of these areas where, where there's, you know, AI is being used in these use cases that are, you know, pushing the edge and the envelope, which, of course, is what we should be doing for our r&d. But you know, when I think about AI, my focus is more on how can I apply it to benefit my business, right, to improve my customer service to increase my revenues, my profitability, my efficiencies, and so forth? Well, it turns out that a lot of these are fairly r&d centric, use cases, that IEEE sort of points out not surprising, given that it's IEEE but I'm just gonna point out some of these right, and then and then take, hopefully point out some takeaways. Number one was brittleness, they felt like AI is quite brittle, especially this was in a computer visioning use case. And that as as the as the world of the imaging kept changing, then they had to do a lot of a lot of AI rework so so brittleness of AI models, in some use cases, that's That's true statement. So is that a failure? Well, it might be, I guess, right, depending on your use case, number two, the embedded bias problem, I touched on that earlier, especially when I was having a conversation recently with a couple of the organizations that I've done some interviews with, so I'm not going to drill more on to that. This is something that we have to be mindful of, as we're building our AI models to help our businesses. Number three, catastrophic forgetting, that's an interesting phrase right there catastrophic for getting in here, they point out the double deep fake problem, right. And, and here, they're discussing how, you know, bad actors in the market, who are doing this deep fake work. And, you know, organizations trying to compete against that the constant retraining of AI models to include not only new deep fake techniques, but also the need to deal with previous and older styles of deep fake. This certainly is critical. Is it a failure? I don't know, I kind of look at that as the cost of doing business conceptually, right? That if we're in that world, where we got to keep figuring out which we do, how to address this deep fake problem. But nevertheless, AI models are, you know, if you don't include the data in your retrained model, then yes, it can, quote unquote, forget old stuff. So it's not like our cognitive brains were well, I guess depends how old you are. Then you don't forget things as humans, right. Okay, number four explainability. This is a challenge with AI. And in particular, it's a challenge as it relates to giving X explanations for results. And predictions can sometimes be be difficult to do, right, where there's some of these questions. And predictions that come out are hard to to explain how it is that this was arrived at. And as a result, I'm going to give a suggestion on this here in a moment to help address some of this stuff. I think explainability is a real challenge for so is it a failure? It's it's it's a challenge for sure. Number five Quantifying uncertainty. So hey, here we go. Once again, having sufficient data sets that deal with fringe or edge use cases is critical. This is a, I guess, maybe a failure in the sense that sometimes as humans, we don't do that. And we focus on the Happy Day scenarios. But turns out, our brains and real life have to constantly be dealing with all the other fringe cases as well. So it does put the onus on us as business owners to make sure that we're collecting as wide a set of data as possible. And that not necessarily means more and more data means more coverage of you know, the different use cases of data out there that we have number six common sense this was a failure, the I triple C I triple E was pointing out common sense meaning turns out AI lacks common sense. Sometimes us as humans lack common sense in any event, the ability, of course, to reach some logical, acceptable conclusions, right based on our, you know, vast understanding and context of everyday knowledge. You know, a lot of times we take that for granted and well AI doesn't really have that at least in our current current maturity levels of AI, we just don't have that. as such. I think one of the things that I've seen and how I tend to view it as I work with organizations is this AI stuff really should be looked at as augmented intelligence. So the bottom line is, Do not throw your brain away, right this stuff is, is AI stuff in our Yes, we should look at it as it's going to be bringing insights Bhutia, challenge it, right. And so when it comes into us with some insights, we should look at in terms of the realm of possibility, as well, turns out one more number seven terms of failures, what I triple E was pointing out was math. He said, Well, look, you know, simple number crunching tends not to be handled so well with AI. So in addition to not throwing your brain away, don't throw away your old calculator, right? Or, of course, all of your old, you know, sequential linear software, right? That's doing real stuff today, running your business in the economy and such. So AI's got its place, and these seven, quote unquote, failure areas, I think, have that I think there's some some techniques that we can use to get around some of it. Not all of it, but some of it, but what it does is it pushes us into a set of use cases, where, excuse me, we can still get AI value. So to get the best insights from your AI, I think the net net is somewhere in this area, a letter A, I decided not to do a number one, letter A define your Chris questioning, right, which drives focused AI model preparation. So it means we got to think we got to think about the business and not about the technology. As we're as we're organizing, what we're going to go do with AI that has has to happen. Be not number two, but be I guess, here we go be. So when it comes to data, be prepared to continually add to your data set and rebuild your models, this notion that you know, build it once and it's done kind of thing that that needs to go away. And then see, use AI like an augmented intelligence tool, as I pointed out earlier, right? So use an AI platform as part of this that can take your feedback to influence the AI model. You are the brains. Alright, and so as you're getting some insight or predictions on things to do, be sure to come back and inform what was the impact of that was a positive? Was it negative that do what we expected? We need the AI models to continue to be informed and learn from this. Alright, so AI does a great job identifying insights on correlations, of course that are difficult for our brains to see, but we should review it as business owners within the context of our business. Right, we got to keep that in mind and evaluate the veracity of applying that insight to our business. I had to get the veracity word in there just shouted intelligent earlier look at the very the can we actually take this insight and apply to our business? Right? That's really what we're after, not just to have the, you know, the aha moment. Oh, that's great insight. But hey, can I make some concrete adjustments, it's going to change my business and actually bring some bring some benefits about so a I want its approach approached right, using the techniques that I mentioned above my experiences, it really can't help our business. But the industry is also gathering context on the failure scenarios. And so of course, we're going to be best served if we take that into consideration, no doubt about that. So I was looking at something else here. medium.com, you can find some interesting blog, articles and such out there. It pointed out, okay, let's say that, is there a single point of failure for AI. And I found this to be an interesting point that was made here on this particular piece here. Is there a single point of failure for AI and there was this blog on medium.com. That suggests there is and as I reviewed it, I thought, Hmm, interesting. So this piece suggests that to get started with AI, you should not choose a company wide AI implementation, but rather a proof of concept that gets the company accustomed to the new normal, right in my experience, the new normal includes the following activities. These are going to sound like the ABC items I just mentioned. I'm going to use 123. Now just switch it up number one, alright, the new normal if you're going to go apply AI Think about doing these things. Number one clarity in the questions, the business questions or seeking from the AI. Sound familiar? Number two, data curation doesn't have to be perfect, but you got to have for thought and organization on your data. And of course, its potential relevance to the questions you're asking. And number three, a mindset of iterative AI model refinement over time. Alright, so I think I've said those three things several ways in this episode. All right, so let's get to the point of this particular piece here. Is there a single reason for AI project failure? And you hear all sorts of stats out there, right? Maybe half of the projects fail? Or some say 85% of the projects fail? Is there a golden thread? According to this particular bar, blog, or article? They stay? They say, yes. And the answer is expectation management. Right? So organizations have of course, said amazing things to me about what they expect from their AI. This has to be managed early in the process. So I agree with the sentiment, right? It's certainly not as quantifiable, right? It's not to say, Oh, the, you know, common point of failure is you didn't have clean data or enough data or whatever. Certainly, the best practices are we got to have that data and etc, etc. But expectation management is really an interesting point on that. And I agree with that. As I've reviewed this thought about this right, I've developed a guide for smart steps to business outcomes with AI. If you're interested in that, reach out to me click ai radio.com Just join my email list. I'll make sure you get get that to you. Hey, everyone, thanks for joining and until next time, then edge manage manage your AI expectations to achieve the results which are there to benefit your business using AI. Thank you for joining Grant on ClickAI Radio. Don't forget to subscribe and leave feedback. And remember to download your free ebook, visit ClickAIRadio.com now.  

Ecommerce Empire Builders
Ecommerce Empire: The Definitive Guide To Starting & Scaling A Future-Proof Online Business!

Ecommerce Empire Builders

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 15:20


In this book, we teach beginner and experienced entrepreneurs how to sell products online more profitably, using future-proof tactics like sales funnels, monthly subscriptions, dropshipping, social media marketing, and paid advertising. If you are ready to start your online dropshipping business today, I cant point to a better resource to help get you started!▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬

The Marketing Secrets Show
BECOMING The Person Who Can Achieve Your Goals...

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 36:25


It's new years, and I know you have a lot of goals. Listen to this episode to find out how to become the person you need to be to actually achieve what you want! Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com Magnetic Marketing ---Transcript--- Russell Brunson: What's up everybody. This is Russell Brunson. Welcome back to the Marketing Secrets podcast. Today's episode, you guys have a chance to listening on a really fun actually interview that Josh Forti and I did today about goal setting and what that looks like. I know that we're... At the time we're recording this, it's almost the new year. And so he asked me the questions about how I set goals. How do I make sure I hit my goals and reach them? And what does that look like? And I was excited because it's actually a topic that I'm writing it sensibly about in my new book. And so anyway, a lot of things are top of mind, and we had some fun with it. It went longer than we thought. And so I had to go fast through some things. Someday maybe I'll do a three or five day or two week, two month long event teaching these topics. But hopefully it gives you a head start to kind of figure out what is you want in life? What kind of goals you want to set for this year, and then how you actually make sure you achieve those. Stuff that's fascinating to me and hopefully you guys will find some cool stuff in as well. And at the end of it, there's assignments, so make sure you do it. And if you do that, in fact, I'd block out two or three hours during this new year's break as you're figuring out what you want to with your life over the next 12 months and go through this audio and then actually do the assignment at the end. And if you that, your chances of hitting that goal will dramatically go up. All right, with that said, we're going to cue up the theme song. And when we get back, you have a chance to listen in on an interview with me and Josh Forti. What's up, everybody. Welcome back to the Marketing Secrets podcast. Today I'm here once again with Josh Forti, and at the time we're recording this it's a little after Christmas. We're getting ready for the new year and world domination. I think today we're going to be talking about how to focus and goal setting, all that kind stuff. Is that right? Is that the- Josh Forti: Yeah. Today's episodes a good one. I'm so excited for this because I mean, we get to listen to Russell Brunson tell us how he picks his goals, how he's going to plan the world. It's going to be great. Russell: I'm excited too because some of you guys know I'm actually working off and on, just depends on, but I have another book in the works that I'm working on and it's my first personal development book. But for me, personal development's definitely around picking a target and running towards it with definiteness of purpose and trying to accomplish the thing. And so as I've been not... I wrote 200 pages of the book, and I told you this when you were out in Boise. Josh: I know. I'm waiting for my copy, Russell. Russell: And then I said, I hated it. So I got... I didn't hate the book. It's actually good stuff. I'm putting it in the new behind the scenes newsletter. I'm putting the chapters in there. So it's being reused, but I wasn't happy with how it turned out as a book book. And so I'm starting over from scratch and rethinking it all. And so that's the phase I'm in right now. But a lot of it is tied around what we're talking about today, so it should be good. I'm excited for this. Josh: Heck yeah. Awesome. Well, let's kick it off and get started with that note. So whenever we sit down for podcast, I go and it's interesting because now that we are doing so many, normally when I do long-form interviews or because we record in batches, right. Normally when I sit down, I'm just like record go. But you can only do that so many times with somebody before you have to start planning topics ahead a time, right? So I'm on the plane yesterday or a couple days ago, whenever we flew back home, and we got to upgrade to first class for like $47. It was great. I'm there on my computer, just have room. And so I was thinking, walking through the topics that we wanted to cover over the next couple episodes and one that kept coming up and my mind kept coming back to is goal setting. Right? We're sitting here. We're coming to the end of this year. The last two years have really just been crazy, right? Like 2020 was super, super uncertain. 2021 was a little bit more certain, but we all know we're not back to reality yet. Right? With everything. And so I was like, all right, how do you set goals? Not only in the midst of just chaos, but just in general, right? Because there's so many different ways you can think about goals and set goals and do targets and all the different things. And so as we wrap up this year, as we bring this year to an end, and as we look ahead to 2022, what are the areas specifically that you look at as far as setting goals, and how do you set goals effectively that you're going to stick to? Because I think that's a big thing for a lot of people is they can write down, like I want to make $1 million this year, or I want to lose weight. You know what I'm saying? But how do we actually do that? Right? Do you break it down? How does that work? Russell: Yeah. So I'd say, again, this is like, we could write a whole 25 book topic on this. So I'll just go over some of the highlights of things I think about. One of them actually I got from Scharf and that was interesting. He spoke at Funnel Hacking Live Orlando, and we did a little session on stage, and it was interesting because he was talking about it from a team building standpoint, but I took this principle back, and I started implementing it with my family and then in my own personal life. And he talked about how a lot of people set a goal like I want to make a million dollars. And he said if you structure it and if you look at it like a football game or a football team, it's different, right? He said, if you sit and look at the goals, there's always the main goal of anyone who's a football player. They want to be in the Hall of Fame. That's their legacy, their legend. There's the Hall of Fame goal. Right? And so that's the first thing is what's the Hall of Fame goal? And then you break it down from there and say okay, now what's the Super Bowl? What do you have to do to win the Super Bowl in football, what the Super Bowl for you, what it is. And then from there you break down to like, okay, what are the things you've got to do to win this game, this quarter, this half and things like that. Right? So it's breaking things down like that. And so I did this with my family like two or three years ago. It was really cool. We said for our family, what's our Hall of Fame goal for our family? What is the big thing where we're like, I made it into the Hall of Fame. I'm a legend. This is amazing. So we set a goal for the family. And I've been thinking about that with ClickFunnels and with me and my mission. What's my Hall of Fame goal? So that's the first thing to think through because it's not something like I'm going to get this year, I'm going to get it. But it's like, I've got to be doing a lot of things to eventually when I retire, I did this thing and I'm in the Hall of Fame, right? What is that for you? Because if you don't know what that is, it's hard to reverse engineer everything backwards. A lot of times entrepreneurs are good at just running, ready, fire, aim, but we're not thinking, and I'm as bad as anyone else. Right? Again, I want to make a million dollars. Then 10, then 100. You keep looking at these things as opposed to what's the end goal of where you're trying to get to. So that's first thing, Hall of Fame goal. And then what's your version in the Super Bowl? And the Super Bowl is more like, in my mind, the next 12 months, like what are you going to do, right? Josh: Yeah. Russell: And so that's the bigger one I think a lot of people are thinking about when you're trying to January 1st setting your New Year's goal. This is your Super Bowl goal. Next 12 months, this is the thing I want to accomplish. And it's not 12 things. Football teams aren't like, okay, I'm going to win the Super Bowl, and I'm going to win this. I'm going to win this. No, there's just one goal. There's one thing that you're focusing on. And then underneath there, there's all the things you've got to do to be able to accomplish that. And that's where these sub-goals come in. Right? And so that's the first phase. Any questions about it before I move on to the next? Josh: Yeah, well, no, just a comment on that. I was reading. I don't have the book next to me. The book Essentialism. Have you ever read that book? Russell: Yes. Back in the day, I did. Josh: Okay. Super, super good. Right? And one of the things that he talks about there is he's like, it's always funny to me when companies say that their company has a lot of priorities. He's like, you can't have a lot of priorities. You can have a priority and then everything else comes secondary. Right? So whenever I walk into a company they're like, our priority is customer service and this, and then list all the other ones. He's like, then you don't have any priorities. Right? And so he is like, when you sit down, what's the number one thing? What is the thing that if that thing happens, it is a success? Right? The whole year, that's what the thing was. And so sitting down, I noticed that for me and my company, for us, our number one priority for next year is not, yes, we have a revenue goal and yes, we have quarter goals and all the different things. But for us, the number one goal is we want to build the very best product in the space for what we do. Right? That is the goal. For 12 months, that is our goal. And so now everything else comes secondary. And so when you're talking about that is like, what is the goal? I love football, right? So football is how I do all my analogies? Right? The Super Bowl is the 12 month goal. Right? And what's interesting about that is the Super Bowl is a collective team goal. The Hall of Fame is an individual goal. Right? Which is super interesting because then you can have your own individual, but then as a team, and as I'm starting to grow a team more, things like that, having that really clear goal, I think, was really cool. So no, just some comments, but no questions on that. '. Russell: I love that. Very cool. So then, and you could tell who I'm studying right now by some of my phrases. I've been going deep into Napoleon Hill and Charles Haanel and all the old time people right now. That's where my mind's been with. And it's interesting because as I study all them, especially Napoleon Hill, what he talks about all the time is you've got to pick a goal, and then you have to move forward with definiteness of purpose. And he uses that phrase, and took me forever. Finally I couldn't even like say the word right because it's such a weird word, but definiteness of purpose. And when I think about that definiteness of purpose is like, this is what I'm doing, the Super Bowl. I'm going forward. There's the goal. I'm not just dabbling and hopefully I'll figure out my way. I've got my sights on the goal, and I'm moving forward with definiteness of purpose. It means everything is going towards that thing. Right? And so, that's the biggest thing. And I was reading a Charles Haanel book last night, and he's the guy that wrote Master Key System and a bunch of other really cool old books. And what he talked a lot about is just desire. A Lot of people are like, oh, I want to go. I want to hit Two Comic Club, but then their desire isn't big enough to actually get them moving forward with definiteness of purpose. Right? And he shared this story, and I've heard this story a thousand times over the years. I'm sure everyone's heard it. I think my math teacher used to tell, he said it was Euclid that told this story. In this book it was someone different. I don't know what that story is, but basically the dude comes up to the gurus like, "I want to learn how to do whatever. I want to learn how to make money online. I want to learn how to whatever the thing is." Right? And so the guru's like, "Well meet me tomorrow morning at the beach, and I'll show you how to do that." So the next morning, meets the dude at the beach. The guru walks him out in the water, and they get deeper and deeper and deeper. And he gets the point where the water's up to the kid's head or whatever. And he grabs head and shoves it under the water, and he holds him there, and the guy's fighting and failing. And the point is where he is about to die. And then he pulls the guy out of the water and the guy's like, "What are you doing?" And he's like, "When you want the thing you want as bad as you wanted air, you're going to get it." And that's this desire thing. So we have the goal. We have to move forward with definiteness of purpose. That becomes the focal point of every thing we're doing. And then the last piece is that desire. Because most people that I find who don't have success, it's because they don't have desire. Right? For me, when I was wrestling, and I wanted to be state champ, I had so much desire. I couldn't stop thinking about it. It was day and night. I'd sit in class, and all I could think about was different wrestling moves and what I could do to increase my strength and my cardio better and how to get the moves better because my desire was so strong for that thing. And for me, business was the same one. When I got into business, I just wanted to figure this out and to make money and to grow a company. I had so much desire that it happened. Right? I think most people just don't have desire. Like, oh, let's just set a goal, and hopefully I make that. If that's what you're going into it, you're not going to be successful. What's the Yoda quote? Josh: Do or do not. There is no try. Russell: Yeah. If you ask him what's your goal? And they're like, "Oh, I'm going to try to whatever." It's like, you're not going to make it. Why not? Because you said I'm going to try to do it. Josh: Right. Russell: You have to be definiteness of purpose. I'm going to be a state champ. I'm going to hit it a Two Comma Club. I'm going to make a million dollars. I'm make 10, I'm going to make a hundred. I'm going to get to a billion dollars. I'm going to get to 200,000 customers. This is what I am doing. And my desire's high. I'm moving forward with definiteness of purpose, and that's where it begins with. Josh: Yeah, and I think part of the thing that goes with that is Tony Robbins. Gosh, every time you bring Tony Robbins in, it's never bad. Right? You could do that every single year, and it would never get old. Right? . Russell: Yeah. Josh: But he says this a million times. He's like, you have to be so specific with what you want. Right? He's like people come to me all the time and I've heard him say this a million times, but just, we got second row right behind you because Parker Woodward came over. Shout out, Parker. He's like staring into your soul. And he's like, you want a million? And he is like, you want more money? Fine. Here's a dollar. You have more money move. Get out of my way. Right? Or get out of here. I'm like, dang. Right? If you're not so specific with what you want, you'll get it. Russell: Yeah. Josh: Right? But it's not going to be what you actually want because you're not specific with it. And so with definiteness of purpose, I feel like one of the keys to that is to be very specific with what that purpose is. Russell: Yep. Yep. Josh: You know what I'm saying? Russell: Oh, I want to get better. I want to get, yeah. It's got to be something tangible. You can touch it. And you know when you got it. You know when you went to the Super Bowl if you got to the Super Bowl or not. You can be like where's your goal last year? Oh, did you hit it? Oh, I don't know. Therein lies the problem. Right? That specific goal, move forward with definiteness of purpose because your desire's not high enough. You don't know if you hit it or not? That's a problem. Josh: Yeah. One more thing on that. I think it also helps you if you can get really... Setting clear goals is like a muscle, I feel like. It's a skillset that's learned. And I was listening to Alex Becker, which I know you know Alex. And dude's like just a mega-genius man. His mind. If I can ever get him on the podcast, I'll let you know because- Russell: You'd get a 30-second podcast with him. Josh: Right. Right. It'd be a profanity-laced thing full of truth. And you'd be like, wow, I have to process. Anyway, I was listening to him. I was watching his training on YouTube Ads and going through. And he is like, what people need to understand is that all of marketing is the exact same thing when it comes to running ads. Right? And actually I still have it written up on my board. He goes, every single person wants the exact same thing. They want a result. They want a consistent system to get there, and they want it fast. That's it. Right? He's like, if you just are able to specifically call out the result, provide the specific system to get there, and do it faster than anybody else, you will win every single time. Right? I feel like a lot of goal setting is that. Right? It's what is the result that you're actually trying to go after and get to? If you're not specific on that result, try marketing something where there's no specific outcome. It's so hard. Right? And so the more clear you can get on that specific outcome, the more clear that you can get on the outcome that you're providing for your customer. I feel like that's a learned skill that transfers in other areas besides just goal setting. You know what I mean? Russell: Oh, for sure. That's awesome. Josh: Yeah. Russell: Becker's smart, man. I did one call with him one time, and it was literally like three minutes long. He's like, "Kid, it's all I got," and it was done. I was like, that was amazing. Anyway, so. Josh: Yeah. Yeah. Becker, he's a freak of nature. That's for sure. Russell: Yeah. Okay, I got four more things to talk about related to it. Josh: Okay. Russell: I got this from Tom Bilyeu because Tom's one of those people who is again, just brilliant. And he said something in three or four podcasts, just kind of like as a blah, blah, blah. Just went off on it. And I remember one day, so I finally, I messaged him on text message. I sent an audio message. I was like, okay, you said this. I want to make sure I understand this right. And he wrote back to me, and he messages back. He's like kind of, but you kind of got it all wrong. I'm like, what? So I scheduled a call with him because I was like, I'm writing this book and this thing you just shared was so powerful. I need to map it out. So I spent an hour with him on the phone and mapped it out. I drew it out. I was like, is this what you're talking about? He's like, "Oh yeah. That's what I'm talking about." So it's going to be in the new book because it's core foundational. I'm going to go through with you guys because a lot of times, and I didn't know this, there were things that I did unconsciously related to these things, but now that I consciously know this, I'm going deep in it. In fact, I'm planning our Two Comma Club X Managed Circle members are going to Mexico in March, and I'm thinking I'm going to do a three-day event in Mexico just going deep on this alone because this is the key to everything you want in life. So there's the pre-frame you guys ready for me to jump? Josh: I'm ready. I'm hooked. Russell: Okay. So what Tom said was interesting. He said a lot of times we set a goal, but what we don't realize is that for us to get the goal, we can't be who we are today. Because if we were, we'd already have the thing, right? We have to actually evolve and change and become something different if we're going to achieve the thing we do. So then how do you become something different? And that's where you're in this weird limbo thing. Right? And so there are four core things that really tie into this. And so I'll talk briefly on each one as much as we can in the time we have. So the first one is after you know this is the goal, very specific, definiteness of purpose. I desire to go there. The first thing we have to do is have an identity shift. Right? Our identity has to be different than what we are right now. If we don't shift it, then we struggle. So I started looking back at the things I've had success in life. For me, the very first one was a wrestler. And I remember I got into wrestling. I liked it. And I was good at it, but I wasn't great. I don't have time probably to tell the specific story, but I remember a specific story where something happened where that day I was like, I'm a wrestler. This is me. This is who I am. I'm a wrestler. And as a wrestler, I'm going to do what wrestlers do. Right? And Tom, when I was talking to him, I mentioned that. And he's like, now imagine this. Instead of saying I was a wrestler, what if you said I'm a world class wrestler or I'm a state champion wrestler. He's like just by changing the identity that you're putting on yourself, changes how you view everything. Right? And for me, I viewed myself as a champion wrestler, and I view myself like I'm someone who's a state champion. Therefore, I started looking at what do the state champions do? How are they doing it? What do they believe? What do they think? What do they do? What do they value? And I started matching my beliefs, values, and rules based on that. But the first thing is that you have to realize what's the identity you want to put on yourself? And I think most people don't do it consciously. I didn't do it consciously. But when you become aware of it, it changes things. At Funnel Hacking Live, Anthony Trucks talked about identity, and it was such a powerful thing. If we figure out how to put these identities on ourselves, it makes everything else become easier. So the first thing is understanding, okay, what's the identity I've got to put on my shoulders if I'm going to become the person who's going to be able to reach that goal? And we've got to think through that and strategize and figure that out because if you don't, if you pick the wrong identity, like, oh, I'm an athlete, that's good. But I'm not become a world class wrestler if my identity's an athlete. If my identity is I'm a world class wrestler, I'm going to become a world class wrestler. Right? You've got to... When I got into business, it was the same thing. I was dabbling and dabbling and dabbling until I figured out I wanted to be an entrepreneur. And then after that, it wasn't just an entrepreneur. It's shifting, and it's changed throughout time, but the identity is the key because everything struck. You start doing things differently when you have a different identity. One of the identities I've I've recently, and I did a podcast about this, that I've put on myself is that I'm not just an entrepreneur or I'm not like... I'm a curator. And just by me saying that, I've literally bought, I would say conservatively, probably 3000 books in the last three months that I'm buying that I'm going through them, curating old books, trying to figure out all these kind of things because I have the identity. I put the identity upon myself, and all of a sudden, it shifts my behavior because of that. Josh: Yeah. Russell: So identity's the first thing. And again, we could talk for a day on identity, but understanding what is the identity that you're going to have to have to be able to become the person who's going to go get that thing. Josh: Okay. Can I touch on that just really briefly? Russell: Yeah. Josh: Okay. Only because, I don't know, I've spent like a hundred thousand dollars in coaching on this exact topic. So it was so crazy, when I was working with Katie and lots of other people. Have you ever read the book Psycho-Cybernetics? Russell: Yes. Josh: Dude, that book changed. That was the first personal development book I ever read. Russell: I'm trying to find the rights to that book right now, just so you know. Josh: Dude. Dude, ah. Russell: It's so good. Josh: Why do you get to do all cool stuff, Russell? Russell: Curating, that's my identity. It's what I do. Josh: Yeah. But I read that book and it, I mean, it completely changed my whole perspective on life. Right? And for the premise of the book, for those of you don't know, there's a guy. He was a plastic surgeon. He rebuilds people's faces and stuff. And he realized that when he would make even the smallest tweaks in people's faces that it would change their entire life. Everything about their life and their change based on how they saw themselves basically in the mirror. Right? And so this whole premise of the identity, part of it is when you have an identity shift, you actually believe it now. And there's so many people that are like, they want something, but the reason they don't do it is because they don't believe it's possible. They see themself as the person that's able to do that. Right? And so one of the things I thought about doing with the podcast sometime down the road is openly Dream 100ing people. How cool would it be to have on the board of, "Hey guys, we're all Dream 100ing Elon Musk right now." Right? How cool would that? But if you have the identity I'm going to Dream 100 Elon Musk, then all of a sudden, it just becomes, oh, for the next three, five, 10 years, it doesn't matter if you haven't gotten there yet. That's just who you are. It's just what you're trying to do. It's just what you're doing. And by default, your brain starts thinking differently. So anyway, I love that. I don't want to take anymore out of that, but that one concept changed my whole entire life of understanding that if you shift your identity, by default, you'll get to where you want to go. Russell: Yeah. It's huge. And again, I look at the things I've been successful in my life in, and again, looking backwards, I was like, oh my gosh, I didn't realize that I had an identity shift tangible. And in fact, I remember the day that it happened, and it changed everything for me. It was the day I became a wrestler. It was the day I became an entrepreneur. It was the day... It shifts things. And so, ah, anyway, so that's number one. So identity. Now under identity, if you look at my graphic, identity is at the top, and there's three pillars that go underneath identity. And they're all super powerful, and they all have different purposes and things. So if you look at one of the legs under identity is beliefs. What do you believe? And beliefs are cool. Because beliefs, I feel like beliefs can change. I have to figure what are the beliefs I need to have to be able to achieve this thing, right? If I believe that making money's difficult, I am not ever going to make money. If I believe making money's easy, it's going to be really easy for me to make money. Right? If I believe that I'm a good athlete, I'm going to be able to be a good athlete. If I believe that eating healthy is going to make me have more success, I'm probably going to eat more healthy. And so in the second phase, figure out what are these beliefs that you need to have? And some of them you already have inherently, a lot of them you don't yet. And so that's why when you have this identity, it's like, well man, if I want to be a world class wrestler, what do world class wrestlers believe? If I want to be an entrepreneur, what do world class entrepreneurs believe? Right? What are those beliefs? That is sitting down physically, I've been doing this recently. This is part of my New Year's thing I'm doing now is I'm listing out here are all the things I either believe or I need to believe to be able to hit this goal. Right? And so I start writing out these beliefs. Now the thing about beliefs that's hard is just by you writing down I believe this thing, does not necessarily mean you're going to believe that thing. Josh: Yeah. Russell: And this is where like most of personal development is affecting this tier, this leg of this thing. If I knew to believe I need to be successful, like I'm going to go read a bunch of Tony Robbins books because he's going to help me instill this belief in me until I actually believe it. Or I'm going to listen to a bunch of podcasts or whatever that thing might be. Right? Or if I believe that eating healthy is going to make me more successful. You may say I know I need that belief, but I don't really believe right now. That's why I keep going back to cookies and candies and ice cream or whatever. Right? So you need to instill that belief, so this is where a personal development comes. If I believe this belief is going to help me get the thing I need to do, I need to go listen to everybody that's talking about health or fitness or whatever that is until that belief becomes so ingrained in my psyche that now I actually believe it. Because when I believe it, now it becomes really easy to do. When I believed in wrestling that if I got on top of anybody in this country that I could turn them, then guess what? As soon as I got on top of anybody in this country, I could turn them, right? Because I believed it at such a deep level. I always tell people my core job at ClickFunnels is be the belief cheerleader. If I can get you guys to believe in yourselves, that's it because it's not that difficult. All these things are not hard. The hardest thing is getting you to believe it's actually going to work. Right? And believe if I buy ads, it's going to work, believing that I'm going to lose money on the front end, but it's going to be successful. I believe that if I put myself out there, it's not going to be scary. I believe, so it's like, I've got to get you to believe those things, but if you can do it, then it becomes easy. So I look at who's already achieved what I want? What are the things that they believe? And then I've got to start focusing on getting those beliefs wired into my brain so that I actually believe them. Okay? Josh: Yeah. Russell: And I always tell people this, the biggest problem we have as humans is we always want to try to conform the world to what we believe, and that's not the right strategy. Especially, I see this in religion all the time where people are trying to convince like, this is what God should believe. It's like, no, no, no. If you really want to be successful in religion, you've got to figure out what does God believe? And then you shift your beliefs to that. You don't try to bend God's will to yours. That's insane. Why would you even think that's okay. We need to believe that he believes, it's not trying to get him to believe what I believe. Right? And that's the extreme example is religion in God, but it's true in anything. Right? If I was going to be basketball player, I would go figure out what Michael Jordan believes, and I would do everything I can to believe what he believes. I would not be trying to conform Michael Jordan's belief patterns to mine. Okay? Because he's done it, and I haven't yet. Right? And so that's the next step is figuring out what are the beliefs I have to have to be successful? And then I've got to go and start plugging the stuff into my ears and my head and be reading and listening and everything until these beliefs become so real that they become real. Because that's the hardest thing. The beliefs are the one, the other two I'm going to share are much more simpler, I think. Beliefs are the ones that are, they come and they go. And this is where it takes the mental mind power to make those things actually stick. Does that make sense? Josh: Yeah. Yeah. No for sure. No, I have so many thoughts on that. But for the sake of time, oh my gosh. Belief, I think that's the hardest thing. Like you said, it's one of the hardest things though. But I love the religion example because it's like, what was that? There's that one quote on it that says we will question everything except for the things we truly believe. Russell: Yeah. Josh: Right? And religion is a perfect example of this. I believe that Jesus came down to die on the cross for my sins. I believe that. Russell: Yeah. Josh: I've never even questioned it, and I've questioned pretty much everything in my belief. But I'm like, if I believe Christianity to be true, I by default believe that. Right? I believe that that happened. And so when I talk to people that don't have that world view, you're not even having the same conversation. It's not even worth debating on some particular topic about right or wrong or this because they don't believe this and I do. And it's a fundamental different thing about you. So yeah, anyway. Russell: Yeah. Josh: Talk a million years on it. Russell: That's true because, so when I'm on mission for my church, I, not to get religion, but I had that same thing. I was out there knocking on doors, telling people about God and about Jesus. And all of a sudden I realized, oh my gosh, most people don't believe in this. Josh: Right. Russell: And it was freaky for me. All the way back to do I actually believe in Christ? Do I actually believe there's a God? And I had to question those things and figure it out and get the belief. And then it was strengthening everything I was doing moving forward. But same thing in anything we're doing in life. So beliefs are beliefs. Josh: We'll do the Mormon episode because I have questions for you on that. I've got to finish the podcast first. We're not done all the way done yet. But that'll come once I know everything you believe, Russell, then I'm going to come question you on it. Russell: Yeah. I'm excited. One thing it'd be cool if you guys want, if you type in to Google type in Tom Bilyeu Impact Theory beliefs. He actually has a list that he makes all people who join his member site go through these belief patterns. And they're fascinating. And it's seeing Tom mapping out for his community here's the beliefs that we have as a community if we're going to have the impact. And so it's worth it to go look at his beliefs. It's as related to his members and his membership platform. But it's something you guys can use this as well if you are serving group of entrepreneurs or a group of whoever you're serving, when they come in, helping them to identify and strength. Like these are a the beliefs you have to have to be successful in our world. And Tom did it such a cool way. I've not yet done that in my world, but I'm planning on that because again, if people are joining my coaching program, they want to become more like me, therefore, what do I believe that got me here? I need to be able to identify those things and give them to people and then help drill those things into their mind because that's what's going to be successful as they believe those things. And so belief is just, anyway. We can go again, this is another three day event just on beliefs. Josh: All right, all right. Russell: Okay. I'll go through the other two. The other two are not simpler, but they're easier. Okay, so we have identity at the top, right? Identity shift, boom. Beliefs, and again, map these things out, you guys literally between now and New Year's or whatever you're listening to this, sit out and write out here's all the beliefs I have to believe to be able to be successful in this thing that I'm trying to figure out. And for me, it's funny as I've been doing this, I've been listening to a lot of Tony Robbins's stuff or reading Napoleon Hill. Tony will tell, like when he speaks, he's like, you've got to believe this, and he shares a belief. And I started putting those things in. Like I want to keep building up my belief. These are all things I believe in because if I can believe those things in myself, again, my likelihood of success. So this is an ever-going thing. It's not just like, here's my beliefs, and it's done. It's like if you're hearing speakers or podcasts or books or whatever, like, oh this is the belief I need to have. I see why this is such a powerful thing to start adding these things into your version of your beliefs. Okay? The next one. So you have your beliefs. The next one I'm going to go to is values. And values and beliefs are very similar, but values, I feel like, are more so... Beliefs are things that I've got to be working on to get myself the belief things to move forward. Values are what I actually value. For me, I value hard work. Okay? In fact, I have so many friends who their beliefs are different. One of my really good friends, John Jonas, who owns OnlineJobs.ph, super successful company, great entrepreneur. But he values being able to work as little as humanly possible and still make money. And he does. And he's been very successful. I value working my face off because my whole value system growing up was wrestling. We worked hard. We had at work everybody. So I value hard work, and I love it, and I enjoy it, and I'm never going to... My values are not John's, and that's okay. They're going to be different, but I need to know what my values are because if I'm going to go into something, if this is not aligned with my values, I'm not going to have success with it. So I need to know what my values actually are. And so what are the things you value? I value hard work. I value giving. I value creation. I value... Top of my head, I don't have my list here, but what are the things you actually value? Okay? And then as you're looking- Josh: We know hard work has to be close to the top of that list because that's the one that came out first when you can't remember anything else. Russell: And for sure, for me, it is. It's such a core value. But if me and John were both going after the same goal, which is let's grow our company by whatever, he's going to struggle because his value's not going to be hard work, and vice versa, for he's like I want to take four to five days of vacation every single month, that goal is never going to work for me because I don't value those things like he does. And so it's going to be constant odds with ourselves. Right? So listing out here's all the values you have and understanding those things and again, you can shift your values and values change. But values are harder to change, I believe. Beliefs, I can change, not faster, but those things are multiple whereas values, based on my life experience, these are things I value, and those things are there. They're not going to shift or disappear or leave. These are my values. Josh: Yeah, very rarely. Russell: Yeah. Josh: Yeah. Russell: But if I list those things then I can look at as I'm trying to become this person, do these fit in my values? If not, it's like, how do I structure this in a way where it still fits and it's still congruent with my values because otherwise you're going to be odds to yourself. And I know so many people who are like, they have one value but they have a goal and they're those things are at odds with each other. And that's why they never succeed because they're just, I want this goal, but I don't value this. Therefore, you can't hit it. Josh: Yep. Russell: So beliefs, values, and the last ones are your rules. Okay? And your rules are like, you set up these, it's almost like guideposts to get the thing. Right? So when I was wrestling, I had a lot of rules. My rules were I do not cut corners. I have a story behind that, but I do not cut corners. I don't drink carbonation. One of my other rules was I'll never go more than 24 hours without doing some kind of cardio because I had a belief that after 24 hours, if I haven't worked out that my cardio would drop down, and I didn't want to lose anything. So I had a rule saying I cannot work out. So I could take Sunday off, but I can't take Saturday and Sunday. Right? I had a rule of no more than 24 hours of no cardio. I had rules of what time I woke up in the morning, what time I went to bed. I had all these rules, and rules bleed into routines. Right? So you set these rules, and from there you create a routine. So looking back, here's the goal I have, I'm moving forward with definiteness of purpose. Here's all the rules I have to create to give me boundaries to make sure that I move forward and I hit those things. And so for me, my rules right now are like, okay, I have to make sure I write for two hours every morning before I come in. Because if I don't do that, none of my writing gets done. I have a rule about this and rule about this, and I have these different rules I create for myself to give me boundaries, to be able to actually hit my goal. And then the rules again, here's the rules. The rules are translating into routines. Right? So here's my rules. I tie these into my morning routines, my afternoon routines, my night routines. And now I've got the things I need to guide me to the goal. Whew. So there's a lot of stuff in there. Josh: That's really, really good though. I feel like if someone were to just go and apply that right there, that sounds simple, but it's not. Russell: Yeah. Josh: Right? If you were to actually go sit down like that, you could map out that for a while, and I see why you want to do a three day event on it or something like. That'd be awesome to go through each one of those because you're literally rewriting. So how I think of the mind is I think of the mind as a computer system, and then the story, the master story, ha-ha. The master story of your mind. Right? But the master story is the computer program that you program it. Right? So there's the Windows operating system inside of a computer, right? Or the Mac. And so the master story is like the operating system. And by going through and identifying and writing down those three things, it's like you're rewriting your operating system almost that by, or if you've never done it, you're writing your operating system because your subconscious mind by default then just carries that 80% of the way. Right? And that's the coolest thing is if you can just switch your subconscious mind, 80% of the work is done. It'll do it for you. Right? You've only got to battle that last 20%. So that's super cool. Russell: Yeah. So if we were to recap this really quick, for those who are like, I want to do this exercise with my kids or my family or by myself, I sit down and say, "Okay, what's the Hall of Fame goal?" Where do you want to go someday? Right? So you've got that, right? Then from there, say, "What's the Super Bowl goal?" That's what I'm going to accomplish the next 12 months. Here's my Super Bowl goal. And I have that, and say, "Okay, now to do this, I've got to have desire, and I've got to have definiteness of purpose." Meaning I have to really, really want the thing or it's not going to happen. Why do I want it? How do I amplify that desire in my head? And where am I going, right? Now we come back and say, "Okay, what's the identity I need to take on to be able to achieve this thing?" Right? And be specific with the identity. I'm a wrestler versus I'm a world class wrestler versus I'm an Olympic level wrestler. Right? So here's the identity to have. So write that down. And identity is just one thing. This is the one thing I am. Then now what are all the beliefs I have that I need to have to be able to be successful in this thing? Okay, I've got to believe this. I've got to believe this. I've got to believe this. This is what I already do believe, but a lot of it's new beliefs I need to create to be able to be successful. Right? And then who are the things I value and making sure I'm not out of alignment here. I value this. I value this. Here are the things I value. And then here's the rules I need to create for myself to make sure I actually move forward and hit that thing. And I'm going to take these roles, and I'm going to convert them into routine to make sure that I'm in the guardrails to my success. And so that's the pieces and ah, it's so much fun. Again, this will be a book someday if I ever get it done. But these are the pieces that are- Josh: Yeah, Russell, we need it. Come on, man. Not like your life's busy. Get it done. Russell: I'm working my fastest. It's going to be amazing. So anyway, I hope that helps you guys. As you're sitting down this year, this is literally what I'm doing. We're recording this December 28th. I've been mapping these things out. And my goal is January 1st, I'm waking up, and I'm just going to sit down and I'm going to flush these things and spend hours just putting it... Again, I've been percolating on them and taking notes on stuff, and I'm going to map it out, have it printed out. And this is the next 12 months of my life. This is the goal. This is where we're going and moving forward with definiteness of purposes. I'm going to just amplify my desire. Here's the identity I've got to take on to make it successful. Here's my beliefs, my rules, my values. And let's go and start running. So hopefully that helps. Josh: One more super rapid fire question then we can wrap it up. Russell: Okay. Josh: Do you have a coach that helps you with this, or do you do it all yourself? Russell: Oh, very good question. So during my life, I always go on and off with different coaches that have helped different parts. Right now. I do not have a coach. How do you say this right without being creepy. I don't have a coach who's living right now. Right now I am looking at authors as my coach. And for me right now, Napoleon Hill is the person I'm focusing on, who I'm literally going through so much of his stuff right out and having him accountable to me. I will in the near future rehire a coach to help me, but I'm still trying to, I don't know if that makes sense or not, but I'm trying to- Josh: Yeah, no, no, for sure. Russell: Yeah. Josh: That's awesome. That's good. Russell: Anyway. Josh: All right. Thanks Russell. That was awesome. Russell: Hope you guys enjoy it. If you enjoyed this episode with me and Josh, please let us know. Take a screenshot of the podcast on your app, tag me in it. Let us know your favorite thing, biggest takeaway. And with that said, I hope you guys enjoy the new year, planning it out. And I want you to all hit your Super Bowl goals over the next 12 months. So let's do it. If you do that, you'll change the world in your own little way, and it'll be awesome. So thanks, Josh. Thanks everybody, and we'll see you guys on the next episode.

Mi Primer Millón: Secretos Del Mundo Digital

Regístrate al grupo secreto de Facebook donde podrás aprender estrategias únicas para crear un negocio por internet exitoso. En este Episodio Sergio Perdomo te manda un saludo de fin de año. Te invita a que no vivas en piloto automático y crees metas.Suscríbete al podcast en Apple, Spotify, Google y Stitcher

One Funnel Away: Stories
Kat Rich - Real Estate Expert with 5 Script Secrets

One Funnel Away: Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 36:58


What a story you're in for today! Find out the wonderful journey from Teacher to Real Estate Expert, when you hear from Kat Rich on today's episode! We'll find out how she became interested in Real Estate by working abroad and just how she became familiar with ClickFunnels (the story is one you don't want to miss haha) as it has to do something with DotCom Secrets (the book) and where she found it. For Real Estate Agents, leads can be tough. It's hard to generate leads, so Kat spent time figuring out the missing formula from the time an agent gets a lead and to the time that lead converts. And that's what she was able to create in her funnel! Make sure to check out Kat's work as well by going to: 5ScriptSecrets.com  Instagram: @scriptsecretagentYouTube: Vegan Cyclist in Real EstateAnd make sure to head on over to OneFunnelAway.com to check out the challenge for yourself! We'll see you in there!

Bitch Slap  ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!
Interview #52. Dr. Ian Hoffman: Start a non-profit and wipe out your student loan debt!

Bitch Slap ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 64:10


Chiropractor Dr Ian Hoffman wants to help you start a non profit and wipe out your student loans.  He is an amazing man with an amazing story. His desire to help a 4 year old cancer patient and his need to solve his crushing million dollar debt load lead to his inspired business.  The Student Loan Eraser program.    The Impact: In the 6 years that he has been teaching The Student Loan Eraser Program his clients will have started over 400 charities that are taking care of over 10,000 nonprofit visits a month!  AND those doctors are going to save over $100 million from their student loans.Ian tells us how he built his business with webinars and how creating a non profit to serve their community can save a doctor tens of thousands of dollars off their student loans.There's “Google Slaps”.  The power of the email list.  The Avatar Process and the perfect customer.  Sorting out the who and not the how.And of course, the proven formula to saving hundreds of millions in dollars of student loan debts for his customers.Administrative: (See episode transcript below)Check out Dr Ian Hoffman's Student Loan Eraser Program hear!  https://www.erasemystudentloans.com/WATCH the Table Rush Talk Show interviews here: www.TableRushTalkShow.comCheck out the Tools For A Good Life Summit here: Virtually and FOR FREE https://bit.ly/ToolsForAGoodLifeSummitStart podcasting!  These are the best mobile mic's for IOS and Android phones.  You can literally take them anywhere on the fly.Get the Shure MV88 mobile mic for IOS,  https://amzn.to/3z2NrIJGet the Shure MV88+ for  mobile mic for Android  https://amzn.to/3ly8SNjSee more resources at https://belove.media/resourcesEmail me: contact@belove.mediaFor social Media:      https://www.instagram.com/mrmischaz/https://www.facebook.com/MischaZvegintzovSubscribe and share to help spread the love for a better world!As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.Transcript:Mischa Zvegintzov  00:10Welcome everybody to the table rush master class where we get back to the marketing and sales basics to help you the listener, the viewer to grow your business to $1 million and beyond. And I am very, very blessed today to introduce everybody to Dr. Ian Hoffman. Welcome Dr. Dr. Hoffman.Ian Hoffman  00:35Thanks, Mischa glad to be here.Mischa Zvegintzov  00:36Yeah, fantastic. So we chatted very briefly, maybe a week or two ago, when we were setting this up. And, and it's a big gift from for me to have you on here. Because whether you know it or not, you are a massive inspiration for me. And actually, ultimately, the creation of this show, because via mutual friends, you know, I started getting introduced to funnels, webinars, all this stuff. And, and, and this mutual friend was like, oh, yeah, you know, my buddy, effectively, Ian you know, has just doing amazing stuff. And I was just captivated. Right? I was like, "Oh, my God".  This is a two to three years ago. So to have you on. Super awesome. So thank you for joining.Ian Hoffman  01:27It's my pleasure. I'm so happy to hear that.Mischa Zvegintzov  01:29Yeah. So real quick. You have a you have a, a program, and it's called the Student Loan Eraser. Correct? Yeah. Fantastic. And so go ahead. Tell me quickly. Tell me about that. And then let's, let's talk about how you how you came to that and were able to bring it to market?Mischa Zvegintzov  01:54Sure. It's definitely a passion project of mine. You know, how it's a there are, I just feel like it was it was what I was put on this planet to do right now, which isn't an amazing feeling. So I'm actually a chiropractor to get into backstory. Yeah, dad's a chiropractor. Both of his brothers are chiropractors, I was born into that also. And I love being a chiropractor. And so what happened was, I was man, like three years into practice. My son was just born, I just came back to the office after taking a couple weeks off. And this, this pregnant mom came in as a new patient.Ian Hoffman  02:37And she brought her four year old daughter to the appointment. And this little girl had stage four cancer. That's the first thing that this mom said to me is my, my little girl. I lost it. I couldn't. I couldn't imagine no parent should have to go through that no child should have to go through that. So to make a long story short, that little girl really inspired me to actually start a nonprofit organization, a charity to expand access to chiropractic and holistic health care for underserved in my community.Ian Hoffman  03:09And as I was going through that process, it was right around the same time that I was really doing some research online about my student loans because I have a lot of debt. I remember having this. I hope I can say this this "Oh, shit moment."Ian Hoffman  03:28Because I remember I had I had just bought a house and between my wife myself, and our student loans, our cars, our mortgage, we had over a million dollars in debt. And that's a heavy weight? That's a heavy weight on somebody's shoulders. Yeah.Mischa Zvegintzov  03:44So how old were you at the time? Oh, man,Mischa Zvegintzov  03:47I'm 29, 30 years old. 30, 31. Something around there? Yeah.Mischa Zvegintzov  03:55And a young child. That's, that's heavy.Ian Hoffman  03:58Yeah, it was heavy.Ian Hoffman  03:59So when I started reading about this federal program called public service, loan forgiveness... I... I... My heart kind of skipped a beat. I had first read about it before I had even had this idea to start a nonprofit. And so there's only three requirements. But one of the major requirements is that you have to have qualifying employment, you have to work for the government or a nonprofit, to be eligible. And then once I had started my own nonprofit, I had this kind of Eureka moment that I might have reverse engineered my own eligibility. And that's exactly what happened. So, you know, fast forward a couple years from there, I wound up starting the student loan eraser, I put together this whole team, and we help doctors start charities with a dual purpose, which is to make the world a better place and get their student loans erased.Mischa Zvegintzov  04:52That's amazing.Ian Hoffman  04:54Thank you.Mischa Zvegintzov  04:54Oh, my gosh.Ian Hoffman  04:56Yeah, it's been quite a process. The transition wasn't easy. I was in practice full time, coming home, you know, having dinner with my family, they would go to bed, I'd be up till sometimes two, three in the morning.  Writing the webinars writing the emails, just getting the infrastructure together reading.com secrets.  Just feeding my, my, my my mind and getting educated on how to launch an online program because it's something I'd never done before.Mischa Zvegintzov  05:22So So you have the Epiphany, you're like, oh, my gosh, I can I am, you're in the middle of creating this nonprofit, you, you. You, you find out.Mischa Zvegintzov  05:34Here's a way for me to erase my debt, which if you don't mind me asking, What was that number for you? What was the chunk of that of your total debt?Ian Hoffman  05:42I borrowed around 150,000. And it was only going up because most doctors are on an income driven repayment plan, where their monthly payment is actually less than the than the debt, or I'm sorry, less than the interest. And so what happens is that on these income driven plans, they'll pay for 25 years. And at that point, anything that's left is forgiven, but the forgiven debt gets taxed as income. And so once once I heard that I'm like, Man, "this is a this is a black hole".  Because I'm gonna just pay for, you know, till I'm 5560 years old. And at that point, I would still have a six figure tax bill.Mischa Zvegintzov  06:27And you're at the 40%, maybe the your, your, whatever, the gradient tax bracket is 40%. SoIan Hoffman  06:35Oh, yeah, that's in California. So between federal and state taxes, it probably would have been closer to 50%.Mischa Zvegintzov  06:41Man.Ian Hoffman  06:42Yeah, crazy.Mischa Zvegintzov  06:43So we're talking about a real number here, perhaps 75,000 Plus, or since it's actually your debts incrementally growing, because you're paying less than the than the amount? You know, you've got 200, or whatever that number is?Ian Hoffman  06:58Yeah. So I tell most people to think about it, like their mortgage, over 30 years, whatever your purchase price is for, you know, on average, right? Interest rate plays a role, but most people are going to pay double, whatever their purchase price was over 30 years.Mischa Zvegintzov  07:13Yeah.Ian Hoffman  07:13And so that's the way I was thinking about my student loans is, if I borrowed 150,000, over 25 years, you know, it wouldn't quite double because I was making payments, but all of the monthly payment was going to interest only I wasn't, I wasn't actually taken care of any of the principal.Mischa Zvegintzov  07:31Yeah. So you have the reverse engineer moment. And, and your in the fire, right of this million dollar debt load, I've been there and it's heavy, right? That's a heavy load. When you're trying to build a business. You're, you've got a son, a son, right? That's that. Yeah. And so trying to balance, like, time with family with the, I get it. It's heavy. I've been there. But tell me about the moment of that. You go, oh, my gosh, a reverse enginer? Did you was it like an overnight epiphany? I could help people with this... And then or was that a slow build?Ian Hoffman  08:14It was it was an overnight epiphany. And then the infrastructure was a slow build.Mischa Zvegintzov  08:18Okay. Ian Hoffman  08:18Russell Brunson says it's, "it's the who not the how." So I needed to find the right people. You know, to put together the team. I needed to write the webinar.  I needed to really feel confident that at the end of the day I could deliver on the promise.  Because I know how much my student loans caused anxiety for me and sleepless nights.  And I didn't want to help anyone take that on; without really being certain that we could help them reach that goal, at the end of the day, of starting the nonprofit and then being able to qualify for you know, public service loan forgiveness. Yep. So it took quite some time.Ian Hoffman  08:19You know, it took me about a year and a half after starting my own nonprofit, to feel comfortable enough with the process to build the team because I'm not a lawyer. I'm not a CPA. I don't you know, I don't do those things. Yeah, so I need to...Mischa Zvegintzov  09:13Yeah.Mischa Zvegintzov  09:14So the we throw... love Russell Brunson, right. I love his Dot com secrets, expert secrets, all that stuff. I'm in his his high end coaching group so thriving in there.  But what about finding that like what what what was the journey to alright, I can help people.  How did you stumble across Russell Brunson? Or was that just was that like someone said, Oh, you have this great idea try this guy? And you're like okay.  Or is that was that a? Was that a rocky transition.Ian Hoffman  09:46I think that's the genius of Russell Brunson and his marketing. He's really good about getting in front of the right people at the right time.Mischa Zvegintzov  09:52Yes. Ian Hoffman  09:52You know what I mean? I don't even know how I came across his material. I'm sure I was just searching online for you know how how to "how to launch" or "how to write a webinar", "how to do an online program". And I had come across other you know, other teachers actually before Russell Brunson. And it's really funny. One of the people that I wound up doing a little work with early on, even before Russell Brunson, is Bailey Richert.  And I wound up hearing her on a podcast and then reached out to her and I did her in for infopreneur Institute, I think is what it's called. Yes. That was fantastic. So I had other mentors along the way. But you know, and she was she was fantastic.Mischa Zvegintzov  10:08You do her Summit, and all that, or No?Ian Hoffman  10:47I didn't do her Summit. But she has a an online training. You know, that teaches you how to go from I think almost nothing, just concept idea to just step by step how to how to get your first online program launched.Mischa Zvegintzov  11:04Yes.  Okay.Ian Hoffman  11:06So I did that. And it was fantastic. It really helped me to clarify my vision and who was I serving and those kinds of details.  And then it turns out later she wound up working with Russell Brunson. So brand and so it's a really small world in the online marketing space.Mischa Zvegintzov  11:24Yeah, fantastic. So so your entry into Russell Brunson land was was Bailey Richert your you take her infopreneur whatever it's called Academy. And, and that's how the idea for the webinar starts to come to fruition and use and you start crafting it there, then you end up in Russell Brunson land is that the?Ian Hoffman  11:48The timeline is a little hazy. Because I was doing a lot of things all at the same time. I was trying to educate myself. So I read a book. Also written by a chiropractor, I'm blanking on his name, but it was it's called social media made me rich. And I read, you know, I was really just trying to I was listening to podcasts, reading books, I was really just trying to trying to get an education on this space. So and at the same time, I was even... I live in Carlsbad, California. And there's an amazing podcast called... Oh, man, I'm blanking on the name of it, too. Anyway, there's an amazing podcast on I think it's the "online marketing made simple" or "Made Easy podcast". But she she teaches webinars and her strategies. And so I've gone through multiple iterations of my current webinar. Ian Hoffman  12:56I did probably eight or ten live webinars. Recorded them all made little notes. Figured out what questions people were asking, tried to, you know, answer those questions in advance as I kept going. And then finally got to the one where we had a really great response as far as sales and people staying to the end of the webinar. And that one eventually went on evergreen.Mischa Zvegintzov  13:21Fantastic. And so is this what we would call a high ticket webinar. So you're trying when I look at your webinar, or your landing page? Yes, reserve my seat now. Great news. It what? I'll tell you exactly what it says plus get a free phone called conflict consultation at the end of the web class. So you're driving phone calls? Or is your... Do you have a do it yourself? Course? A all help you course, I'll do it all for you course?  What's your...Ian Hoffman  14:03I only have one...Ian Hoffman  14:04It's it's not a traditional funnel from the standpoint of like... I only have one offer, and that offer converts. And so really, it's $5,000 to $7,000. And at that, that price point, I think that most people...Ian Hoffman  14:21I've had a few people who clicked an ad, they watched the webinar, and they signed up without ever talking to me. And that's super cool. And I was excited about that.Ian Hoffman  14:32But the truth is I wanted to also be able to qualify my clients. And so I don't mind jumping on a 15 to 30 minute call with prospects to really get a feel for who they are, make sure their hearts in the right place with all of this. I'm sure that we would work well together. And to answer their questions, make sure that they know that there's a human behind this you know.  So My funnel now is different. It changes over time, right? But my funnel now basically is register for the web class, that is the most important first step, because I want people, frankly, to be pre educated before they jump on the call with me. I want them to be able to ask the right questions to at least have a basic understanding of the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program.  About their student loans. About ways that we can help before they get on the call, so that when I get on the call answer questions, then it's a simple conversation of, you know, what's going on? How can I help what questions you have? Let's address those and then sign up?Mischa Zvegintzov  15:40Yeah, yeah. Ian Hoffman  15:41Yep.  Answering all the questions that that you know, you know, the top questions or the top, in sales line, let's call it rebuttals. Right. Ian Hoffman  15:41It saves me a lot of time. Because before I was spending between 30 minutes to an hour with each prospect, you know, sometimes multiple phone calls going over the same material. And that's where a webinar is really helpful in in kind of pre educating. And doing the sales process for me.Ian Hoffman  16:10Right.Mischa Zvegintzov  16:11But let's talk about it from it's more from a service standpoint, though, you're like, hey, I have this vision. This helped me, I want to help you. Not only are is it helping you the doctor, because it's saving you money and clearing debt and relieving stress and all this stuff. At the same time, you get to have a passion project and help the world right? We get satisfaction of the world. Yeah.Ian Hoffman  16:34Yeah, for sure. Most most doctors that I talked to, are already doing some form of this.Ian Hoffman  16:40I think most people got into health care, because they want to help people. You know that that's been really beautiful for me to see, as I'm talking and consulting with doctors. And it doesn't matter what the degree is dentists, chiropractors, naturopathic doctors, you name it. Most of them are already providing some level of discount or free care for, for people in need. And, and so they're just not doing it through a nonprofit. So we formalize that. We formalize their way of giving back, and they're able to qualify for student loan forgiveness as as a result.Mischa Zvegintzov  17:16That's amazing. I love that. That's, it's amazing. I just think it's my favorite thing. My goal is to help people help people, right. I'm like, I'm like, and so to hear you talk about the win win win scenario. That's like the best in the world right now. And I think that's what's genius about Russell Brunson, too, right. He's like, Hey, man, entrepreneurs are the people that are gonna save the world, shall we say, or make it better? Right?Mischa Zvegintzov  17:44And, and to have that win win win situation that you have created, or the universe helped you create, however you want to say it? Is, is beautiful. And inspiring. So thank you. I have a quick question.  Your frustration? Well, I want to start with the who, what? Not the how, because that's such a powerful concept. Building the team, and you set it like it was easy. Oh, yeah. I just needed to build the team and make this happen. Yeah, well, no, maybe you're like, I'll do this myself. And quickly, you realize this is going to be a here a Herculean effort. I need help or tell me about that sort of process?Ian Hoffman  18:26Sure.Ian Hoffman  18:26Well, I mean, I, I think it's a matter of, of taking inventory and knowing yourself and your strengths and what you're good at and what you enjoy. And also, what do you not want to do? What do you not enjoy? What what lowers your energy. And so for me, I love writing. So writing the copy, writing the webinar, that...I enjoyed that process.  But I didn't want to take on even the the the responsibility of filing these tax forms with the IRS and filing the articles of incorporation. And that legal work is something I knew nothing about and didn't really, I wasn't motivated to learn. So it's also it's also that is finding out, you know, where are the gaps between where you are and where you want to be.  And then filling in those gaps, either by educating yourself and then doing it or if you find that you're not motivated, you need to find someone else who that's what they do. So, so I wound up originally working with the the firm that started my own nonprofit, I brought this to them and they said, great, and we brought that to really to, to the scale that they could handle. They were a smaller firm, and then I wound up finding a bigger firm to work with and, you know, wound up transitioning over.  But yeah, I mean, I think that's the process is just knowing yourself and what you love and trying to to do that.Mischa Zvegintzov  20:03Okay, did you formalize that? Or was that all sort of intuitive for you? And when I say that I mean, did you? Were you like, Did you literally sit down and write out? Okay, this is what I'm good at. This is what I need help with? Or was it? Yeah, go?Mischa Zvegintzov  20:19I didn't do that I really, I wrote out kind of the curriculum and the steps of "what's the client's journey?" Right.Mischa Zvegintzov  20:30So once I, once I really went through the process of, okay, here's my modules, here's my, my, my system, my formula for the big promise of start a nonprofit and qualify for student loan forgiveness. What are the steps that people need to go through along that journey to really get that end end result that I'm trying to promise people? And then I was able to really clearly see what part of those steps can I teach? What can I help people with? What can we do for them? And then what do I need help with? You know, where can I fill in the gaps with other services?Mischa Zvegintzov  21:09Hmm, beautiful. Thank you. That's it. Thank you for that. Question in regards to Avatar. You mentioned that and everybody watching and listening avatar is "speak" for "your perfect customer".  The "the exact person you want to work with". I know for a lot of us, for me, that's an elusive concept, or can be shifting or, or the conversations I keep having are make it super narrow. And so I'll go super narrow, and then the people that are telling me to go narrow, inevitably say that's too narrow, or I get so tell me about your avatar process.Mischa Zvegintzov  21:47Totally. I'm a big believer in you know, for me personally, it was it was a little easier, I think, than some because I am my avatar.  You know, I was a doctor with six figures of student debt. And you know there are doctors with multiple, many multiple six figures of student loan debt. And so my avatar was was really anyone who... they I've worked with people that are not doctors, but really my avatar is anyone with over six figures of student loan debt who has a has a service based business.Ian Hoffman  22:28So, that's, that's the most general avatar. But the people who have the most student loan debt naturally are doctors and lawyers.  You know, people who went to grad school. So that's, that's where it went.Mischa Zvegintzov  22:28Okay.Ian Hoffman  22:28But the reason it's so important to have an avatar is because, um, you know, along this process of building a funnel, building a business, one of the most important aspects of that is where am I going to get traffic? How am I going to put my ads in front of the right people? And so for me, I know I can get my ads in front of chiropractors, naturopathic doctors, dentists, physical therapists, osteopathic doctors.  You know, those are my vertical markets. And in unless you have that avatar specifically drawn out, it's really hard to target.Mischa Zvegintzov  22:28Hmm.Mischa Zvegintzov  23:20And then then the ad process just is too inefficient. It did you can't you? Is that a good way to say it?Mischa Zvegintzov  23:29Yeah, absolutely. I mean, who wants to pay for ads that go to the wrong person that's not even interested? Or a qualified lead?Mischa Zvegintzov  23:37Yeah. Yeah. How was that? How was the do you do the ads? Or did you bring in? Did you bring in a who to do that for you?Ian Hoffman  23:46I've done both what I what I tend to do in my journey, my learning process is I want to learn as much as I can and try it myself first, and then hire an expert, so that I know what questions to ask. I know, I can get to a certain point, they better beat me. You know, they're going to get better results than I did if they're doing this as a professional. So you know, that's just how I am. Yeah. So that's how I started. I did really well, early on in Facebook ads. But then it became complicated because Facebook changed their marketing policy really related to student loan type advertising. And yeah, I mean, that people talk all the time about Facebook slaps and Google Slaps,Mischa Zvegintzov  24:30Google slaps. Yeah. You had one!  Tell me about it...Ian Hoffman  24:34So yeah, it happened. And so then, you know, again, it's the who not the how I didn't want to become a Facebook ads specialist on top of everything else I was doing. So then you find the right team who can get you back where you want to be.Mischa Zvegintzov  24:46And so was that a? Was that an overnight crack on the side of the head like your business effectively shut down?Ian Hoffman  24:54I wouldn't say it shut down.Ian Hoffman  24:55So that that is actually the power of having an email list. right? So that's where I'm really glad that I was collecting emails for people who joined my webinar, because there were a lot of people on my email list who didn't bought who hadn't bought. And so what I was able to do once traffic shut down, you know, as I was working on getting that back up with ads... I had an email list of about 4000 Doctors by that point. So I really started emailing my list more frequently.  And getting them back engaged and, you know, sending them more information.  And really just being more active with that. And that was able to drive sales for a considerable amount of time, as you know, rebuilding the apps.Mischa Zvegintzov  25:44That's fantastic. So let's dive into this email list a little bit. Are... You have a nurture campaign, which means do you email consistently? Or is it? So there's that question? And do you outsource that process that process or tell me about your nurturing of your list?Ian Hoffman  26:07Yeah, I don't outsource that... I do... I enjoy writing. That's one of the things that I enjoy. So for me, and I think those emails are so... those are really important. And I want people to get that kind of information directly from the source.  Directly from me. So I don't I don't hire out for that. And I also...Ian Hoffman  26:35I can probably be better about this. But when there's news when there's, you know, especially in 2021, there's been a lot of news, political news related to student loans.Ian Hoffman  26:53President Biden has already raised billions of dollars of student loan debt that President Trump never did for people who have, you know, for example, who were defrauded by their schools. And their schools shut down... they didn't get the you know, their degree. Or for people who have a total and permanent disability, now they can get student loan forgiveness. And so I follow these these things in the in the world of student loans. And I send, you know, information as it comes up to my list.Ian Hoffman  27:17One of the most recent developments in the world of public service loan forgiveness is that... before there were there was a very low acceptance rate into the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program. Hovering around 2%, actually, which is terrible. And that's because yeah, there are three requirements to qualify. There's actually four different types of federal student loans. Only one type qualifies for this program. There, there are like nine different repayment plan options. Five of those are income driven repayment, those are the ones that qualify.  And then you had to have qualifying employment with the government or nonprofit.   Ian Hoffman  27:57And the student loan industry is so complex. I personally believe it's designed to confuse so that people overpay. I mean, that's just that's just what it is. Right?Mischa Zvegintzov  28:08Yes.Ian Hoffman  28:08So unfortunately, unless people have done the homework and the research, like I did to say, most people don't even know what type of student loans they have, let's start there. So 15% of PSLF denials were because people just didn't have the right type of student loans. And they weren't being told that there's a free process that can turn any of the other types of federal student loans into the type that qualifies.Ian Hoffman  28:32So that's the first step with my program, I look at what type of loans they have, what repayment plan they're in, and we make sure that they meet those first two requirements. But because the program was so messed up... recently, there, I think it was President Biden or the administration said, "we're gonna we're gonna, you know, wipe away those first two requirements".Ian Hoffman  28:54So now any type of student loans and on any repayment plan, as long as you're a government and nonprofit employee, you can qualify for Public Service Loan Forgiveness right now. So they actually made it easier than ever before, to to enroll in this this program.Mischa Zvegintzov  29:11Wow. That's amazing. So you're disseminating information like that to your list and useful information. And obviously, strangely, it's either a blessing or a curse. You're fascinated by the by the, by the student loan process.Ian Hoffman  29:29Yeah. That was originally fascinated by it. But you know, I think originally when I, when I went to try to get my first mortgage, I was told that my income was good, but my debt to income ratio was all messed up because of the student loans.Mischa Zvegintzov  29:45Yeah.Ian Hoffman  29:45So I really got inspired to understand my student loans so that they didn't hold me back in life. You know what I mean? And then and then meeting that little girl with stage for cancer and everything else that came after it really was You know, the universe or something aligned? Yeah. To help this this product, this service come to fruition?Mischa Zvegintzov  30:08Yeah, I don't mean to go political, but I'm going to it almost seems to me, and I've had this thought that that a lot of these schools were, literally were created as a vehicle to create student loan debt. Right. Like, almost people with lots of money, we're like, we want to, we want to, you know, collateralize debt or securitized debt obligations, or whatever, you know, the bond market, right. And so they're like, alright, we got we want student loans, we can, the government will subsidize it. Right? So they got you got venture capitalists with billions of dollars that want to create CDOs, or collateralized debt obligations? There we go. And so they're like, how can we do this? This is just a theory. I don't mean to you, maybe you could speak to that for a second. You know, it's like,Ian Hoffman  31:11Yeah,Mischa Zvegintzov  31:12Yeah it's like... go ahead...Ian Hoffman  31:14I mean, I have heard a few different, you know, theories as far as the student debt crisis in America and how it came to happen. And, you know... I think that what we do know, is that part of the issue is that tuision, has just gone up and up and up and up far faster than the cost than the then the salaries that the degrees people are being trained in provide. And so...Ian Hoffman  31:50But the reason that they're doing that is because the schools know what someone can borrow. So if someone can borrow $10,000 a quarter, you know...They're gonna make their tuition, you know, whatever the the the very minimum that somebody can can have for, you know, room and board.Mischa Zvegintzov  32:10Yes. Ian Hoffman  32:11That, you know, plus tuition is $10,000. So, you know, that's, I think that's more of the issue is that it's not, it's not commensurate with what, what someone can expect to earn from that degree. It's not...Ian Hoffman  32:30There's a lot of unethical practices, I would say, but most importantly, is just that people aren't being educated on the responsibilities that they're taking on... when... you know, if... If I was 20, I'm trying to think of when I when I started at chiropractic school, graduated high school at 18. College at 22.Ian Hoffman  33:00So if I was 22 years old, and I went to try to get a mortgage for six figures, yeah, you know, there's no way but sure, you, we can give you six figures, you know, of debt for for college, right. So and it's an it's that it's a, it's a trap unfortunately, for a lot of people. I'm I'm, I value my education to no end. And I would do whatever it took to repay my debt. And and I was on that path. I was, you know, whether it was making my monthly payments, and then paying the tax bill.  Or earning more and paying it off more quickly, I would have done whatever I could, it wasn't about getting out of the debt.Mischa Zvegintzov  33:43Yes.Ian Hoffman  33:44But the fact that there's a federal program out there, that would erase my debt, because I was helping more people and providing a public service. I was all after that.Mischa Zvegintzov  33:54I love it. That's a great, great way to frame it, you are committed to like, Hey, I have this debt. If I took it on, I'm willing to be responsible for it. I as a matter of fact, I'm trying to pay it off sooner. So I can be a responsible consumer or whatever, you know, like... Reduce the lifetime interest on the damn thing or stuff. Right. Like and, and, yeah. But then you figure out an ethical way. I didn't even think about this. The you're like, oh, wait a minute, like, I'm trying to be responsible. Here's an alt solution to be responsible. And yeah, it's beautiful. Did I frame that right? Or did I say that right?Ian Hoffman  34:35Yeah, you did. You know, and, and...Ian Hoffman  34:35Why are we bailing out banks at three quarters of 1%? When a student who wants to become educated and become a doctor, we're gonna put them into student debt slavery for the rest of their life? You know, it doesn't make sense. So I do you feel, in some senses like Robin Hood you know... Trying to... cuz the student loan industry is huge.Ian Hoffman  34:35There's $1.5 trillion of student loan debt out there. It's more than credit cards and car loans combined. So it affects 45 million Americans, it's a huge issue. And that's why I feel really good about helping people to sleep better at night to get that student loan monkey off their back and to give back in the process.Ian Hoffman  34:37I go back to you know, you asked about the the student loan industry as a whole and I think what's crazy is when the banks needed a bailout, the federal government gave them that bailout at 0.75% interest rate. When I got my student loans, it was 6.8%.Mischa Zvegintzov  34:58Oh my god.Ian Hoffman  34:59So why that that feels backwards to me. Right?Mischa Zvegintzov  35:45Yeah, that's beautiful. Thank you for that. Let me ask you a question. As far as like, internally, you you're coming across these these professionals, medical professionals. Who are, you know, who have this burden who are trying to do the right thing and have a they're kind of doing the philanthropic thing, they might not even know it it sounds like right.  They have the activities and and you can wrap that, that nonprofit around it. What's like, the thing that, that they're thinking in their head that they're like, this doesn't make sense. What What's that? What's that? You know, what I'm saying? Like, how do you what is that thing that that, that that doctor in that situation internally is like, Yeah, but like, what's that thing?Ian Hoffman  36:35Regarding my program?Mischa Zvegintzov  36:36Yeah, regarding your program. Mischa Zvegintzov  36:39Yeah, like that internal, where they're like, they're thinking, like, well... I can't do it. Or I don't have the time. Or what is the what's like, what, what's the thing that stops people from taking advantage of this amazing thing internally? I guess, is what I'm trying to say. Right.Ian Hoffman  36:54Like, I mean, I think most often, it's that we have this silly phrase that, you know, if something sounds too good to be true, right? So I do hear that... And you know...there...Ian Hoffman  37:06Unfortunately, it's an industry where there are there are some scams out there, there are people taking advantage. And so I understand when my clients have questions, and they want to do their due diligence, and that's why I stopped selling the program directly from the webinar. And I want people to get on the phone with me. Because I want them to hear my heart and my purpose behind this. And I want to make sure that they're aligned with that. And I want to make sure that they understand that it's not me personally offering to forgive their student loan debt. And they do have responsibilities when they decide to join my program.  They have to run the nonprofit, effectively.  They have to learn the difference between how to run a nonprofit versus a for profit. We do all that training. But you know, there, I have this great quote, from www.nonprofitquarterly.org. Ian Hoffman  38:03They said six months of executive training for nonprofit professionals to on compliance costs between $4,000-$30,000. And that's included in my program, because I want people not just to help them start a nonprofit, I want them to be trained, so they can run it effectively in compliance with state and, and federal regulations. And so they're that means that they are taking on a different responsibility.  Instead of paying their student loan debt, they need to know that they are now going to learn how to run a nonprofit, and how to do that effectively, how to avoid conflicts of interest, and how to, you know, to meet the specific requirements for public service loan forgiveness.Mischa Zvegintzov  38:51So you help them do all that.Ian Hoffman  38:53We help them do all of that.Mischa Zvegintzov  38:55Is that like the biggest, the biggest sort of outside issue that that that a medical professional is going to feel when they when they come across this idea? Your your student loan? I forgot the name, I'm sorry, student loans eraser.Ian Hoffman  39:11Yes.Mischa Zvegintzov  39:12Is that is that is that the is that like the thing where they're like, wait a minute, this sounds too good to be true. But then they get you on the phone and they feel your heart? And they say, oh, no, this is real. I can do this. But then they're like, oh, there's this outside stuff. Like, is it that compliance piece? Or is it is it well, my wife's gonna think I'm crazy or what? What's that?Ian Hoffman  39:34So first, it's too good to be true. And then it's, it's the other two big ones time and money. Right. So how much is this going to cost? And how long is it going to take for me to get it set up? What are my time requirements in running the nonprofit? You know, what are those things look like? So those are all important questions that most people have.  That I addressed to a certain extent on the webinar, because I know everyone has those questions. Yeah, but then we We go deeper on the phone calls.Mischa Zvegintzov  40:01Okay, cool, cool, cool. And what's the what's like the epiphany moment for them where they're like, oh, my gosh, I have to do this.Ian Hoffman  40:09Yeah, um... Ian Hoffman  40:09Most people know they have to do it when when they look at how much student loan debt they have.  You know, when they look at their options.  Because you know, the truth is... I break it down. Ian Hoffman  40:09There's three, three ways to get out of your student loan debt, right? Number one, you can pay for 25 years, well, let's say four years, you can pay it off. But when you have multiple six figures of student loan debt, most people cannot do that in, you know, in a reasonable amount of time. Number two, you can go on an income driven plan, make the minimum payment for 25 years and save for that tax bill. That's, that's the way a lot of people go. Number three, you can qualify for public service, loan forgiveness, and get it erased in half the time tax free. That's the option I provide. And number four is die trying, you know, those, those really are the options. So between those four options, when you really break it down, people are able to see that, you know, if I can get out of debt in less than half the time tax free. That's really the way to go.Mischa Zvegintzov  41:23Thank you for answering. I want to know how many times did you almost quit in this process? How many times were you like, oh my gosh, this is amazing. And then the next day like, I can't do this another day? Yes. Because it's so hard building this.Ian Hoffman  41:40Yeah, I will say that I almost quit a few times before my first launch. Once I did my first launch. i i I've never looked back. So the first the the first year was really a challenge because that's when I was still full time in practice. Still, you know how to have had a new family.  You know, a lot lots of obligations. And I wasn't sleeping much because I was trying to get this thing off the ground. So it was stressful. It was stressful for sure. Plus, you know, I was running a for profit and nonprofit, you know, so I had a lot going on. And I did I did get to a few points where I'm like, What am I doing? What Why? Why am I doing this? Right? Yeah.Ian Hoffman  42:32But, uh, then I looked at that little girl with stage four cancer, you know, and I remembered my why. And she's now December of this year, she'll be six years cancer free. When we first met, she was as bald as me now her hair is as long as yours, you know. So yeah. And so now I realized that the the impact is what drives me my clients are taking care of over 10,000 nonprofit visits a month.  Which is amazing. So yeah, I wanted to quit early on. But...Mischa Zvegintzov  43:09Oh my god, thank you for that. Say that, again, what your nonprofit is doing what Say that again.Ian Hoffman  43:13So fast forward now.  In the five and a half for six years or so that I've been teaching this. We by the end of this year will have started over 400 charities, and those doctors are going to save over $100 million. And they're taking care of over 10,000 nonprofit patient visits per month. So those are the numbers that are important to me. Oh no, I know that as those numbers grow, so too, so does income.Mischa Zvegintzov  43:43You know what? I I literally wrote this down. And I wrote down it's an effort to create something like this. You deserve a standing ovation. Right? Just for the fact that no truly I mean, and I'm not even talking that's just on the creation and now that I hear like your impact. Oh my gosh, I just I you know... I need the... what I was gonna say is I need an applause but I need the standing ovation applause button.  So what great inspiration. um, so are you you're not chiropractic anymore? Or you do it a little bit or what's going on there?Ian Hoffman  44:22I'm not I'm not I really miss it. And so you know, one day I hope to have a little office with a box on the wall "Pay What You Can" you know that that kind of thing. That's That's my dream retirement. But for now...Ian Hoffman  44:39I also know that the the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program in and of itself is probably not going to be around forever. There's there's been over a million people that have submitted their employment certification form. There's a lot of interest in this program as complex and difficult you know, as as it is.  And so Every year in office President Trump asked Congress to close enrollment in public service loan forgiveness. And they never did. But it put the program on the chopping block where... there was always a grandfathering clause that said, once you're once you're enrolled, and once you have your student loans...they're not trying to take it away from anyone who is already enrolled. But they would close enrollment from that point forward to not let the program continue to grow. And Congress never changed it. They never they never did that. So the program survived. President Biden seems very in favor of all of the student loan forgiveness programs, including public service, loan forgiveness.  And they're making great strides to fix it and make it easier for people. So, you know, political shifts can change. And, you know, I'm, I'm in this for as long as I can be.Mischa Zvegintzov  45:58Does it keep you up at night at all? Are you ever Are you ever or do you have a connection or a trust factor that like, if this evaporates, "I know there's next"?Ian Hoffman  46:08Yeah, you know, the cool thing is that, because I was fortunate enough, I wound up getting a to two comma Club Award. This program, which was super fun, I got to shake Russell Brunson. And it was amazing. And, and get on stage at Funnel Hacking live in front of 1000s and 1000s of people.Mischa Zvegintzov  46:26Yeah,Mischa Zvegintzov  46:27What year was that?  What year was that?Ian Hoffman  46:292019.Mischa Zvegintzov  46:29Yeah, not Nashville was that which was Nashville? Yes. Yeah. Congratulations, another applause button.Ian Hoffman  46:38Thanks. That was super fun and a cool accomplishment. But since then, I think just naturally, you know, people hear about that. They find me online, somehow through to comic club or whatever. They I've had people reach out to me and ask me for help. Because they're trying to get an online program launch. They're trying to write a webinar, they're trying to go through this process. And the most common thing I hear is, I don't know what to do first. Okay, even if I do that, what do I do next? And so I've really had fun taking on a handful of select clients.   That, you know, are people who are doing something that I really believe in.  That are making the world better.  That are helping people with their product or service. And, you know, I've helped a couple of them get to market, get on Click Funnels and, and develop their, their funnel. So I do some of that coaching. And I think that if, if Public Service Loan Forgiveness went away overnight, I would probably have a lot of fun getting into that more.Mischa Zvegintzov  47:47Yeah, yeah, great, what a gift. But how cool is that? To know that that can shift there if necessary, or wherever the universe is going to take you.   Or however you...Ian Hoffman  48:01Yeah totally.Mischa Zvegintzov  48:02Yeah, that's super cool. Any upsells down cells along the way you have? Or are you? Or do you have like progression for your doctors? So you have your first $5000 to $7,000? Class? Is there a next step for them? Or no, you're pretty focused on that.Ian Hoffman  48:26There, there's not. There's no upsell, so to speak, as far as as that's concerned. But I do remember reading about how important it is to have a continuity funnel to have monthly recurring revenue instead of just one chunk at a time. And so I got together about two years ago now with the team that I use to do the legal work. So they write the articles of incorporation and bylaws send that to the state, they send the required documents to the IRS. And so they have a great team.Ian Hoffman  49:00And we put together a compliance program for my clients. Where we call it the "hands free 501 C three maintenance program". And so that includes help with bookkeeping, payroll, state and federal tax returns, help with their board meetings. You know, compliance questions, all of that. And really it that it's $157 a month, we tried to keep it really affordable. And it's it's an option. Some of my clients choose to keep their nonprofit, very low budget, and they do all those things themselves. But for the ones who are really busy, the ones who their nonprofit can afford it. We do have that as I would say kind of an upsell. Ian Hoffman  49:48And then as a down sell.  The first step in this whole process is making sure that people have the the first two requirements.  They have the right type of student loans.  And they're on an income driven repayment plan with the lowest possible monthly payment, because that helps us maximize their savings and cash flow.Ian Hoffman  50:08And so I do a custom student loan plan. For people who are on the fence, they're like, show me my numbers, how much can I save? Before I sign up, so that sometimes I have specials, that's usually somewhere between $297 and $497. But you know, that's a great way for people to get their numbers and see how much they're going to save before they jump into the full program. So really, it's about twice a year, I'll send some emails, you know, telling people about the the custom student loan plan. And that works great as well.Mischa Zvegintzov  50:46Fantastic. Thank you for answering it. And I next interview, I'm going to ask it more delicately because upsell and down sell can sound a little salesy, right. But really, oh, here's an added value. If you're a busy, medical professional, and you're, you're cranking away at your business, and you've created this nonprofit that's thriving. Or maybe more than they anticipated, or something, you're like, hey, we can we can maintain your compliance on a on a monthly basis. So you don't have to worry about it. It's beautiful. Right? Versus, and then you've also got, hey, someone's not ready to feel like you know what, I think I'll just start with like, let's clean up my my student loan debt, let's just clean it up a little bit. Make sure I'm maximizing, you know, interest rates and all that sort of stuff. Yeah?Ian Hoffman  51:38Sure.Mischa Zvegintzov  51:38Yes. Great.Ian Hoffman  51:39There are people that that start there. And I show them that they can lower their their payments enough where it pays for the full program in and of itself within two years, or whatever that is. So it's just a nice way to help people save money and provide value quickly. And then if they choose to get started with the full program, great. If not, they've had a great interaction with me. And hopefully they saved a ton of money.Mischa Zvegintzov  52:07Yeah, fantastic. And I'm looking over here a little bit as a, as we're talking, I'm looking at  your landing page, the introduction to the webinar. And there was something I saw on there about a group, there's you do you have a group associated with this? Where? Yeah,Ian Hoffman  52:25Yeah, so all my clients, one of the bonuses that they get is access to a private Facebook group. We have, I think there's, there's over 200 doctors in that group at this point, it might be 250 At this point.  But it's, it's a way for them to share resources and provide community support. Sometimes someone will find an article, even though I stay really up to date with the political stuff regarding student loans. Sometimes they find things before me, and they post it there, and then I get a chance to comment. So they're, you know, people will have questions about anything, you know, related to their student loans or related to the nonprofit, and we get to provide community support, share referrals, resources that way.Mischa Zvegintzov  53:14Cool. What's sort of the coolest thing you've seen on the group?  Where you're like, Whoa, I didn't expect that. That was amazing.Ian Hoffman  53:21Yeah. Um, to be honest, it was like, it was a, it was a fear that turned into a really cool, powerful moment. So I had somebody who posted that they were flagged for an IRS audit. And it was something that was totally unrelated to their student loans and to the nonprofit. But they wound up posting, you know, as they went through the process that the IRS, the nonprofit that we started for them got looked at, and it passed with flying colors. There were no the IRS had no issues with the setup or with with any part of that. So that was fantastic for everyone in the group to see. We cross our T's we dot our I's we teach it a certain way.Mischa Zvegintzov  54:10Yes. Ian Hoffman  54:11We do that because you know that that's the way to do it.Mischa Zvegintzov  54:15Yeah.Ian Hoffman  54:16There's, there's only one way in my opinion, if you're going to go down this path, and that's the rightMischa Zvegintzov  54:21way. That's beautiful. Ian, thank you so much. Um, I had one other question. It just escaped me. Um, maybe that means we should be done.Mischa Zvegintzov  54:32Oh, but I wanted to tell anybody watching and, and listening. Either go into the show notes or click below www.erasemystudent loans.com click on that link. And you can check out the webinar and just get all the quality information and if it makes sense and you want to reorganize your debt or start a nonprofit help save the world and wipe it off the books or or what have you click on that link and learn. I guess my next question is, is there like a breakeven point you have? So if someone's got, like $10,000, in student loan debt, obviously, you know what? Probably not, I'm not your guy, is it? Like, right? That's what's that number and above?Ian Hoffman  55:19It's not so much a specific number of an amount of student loan debt, although I will give you that number. Um, it's, it's their debt relative to their income, because, for example, if they have $50,000 of student loan debt, but they have no income, than the $50,000 is still gonna be there. Plus interest 10 years from now? Yes. Right. So, you know, that's why it's related to their income, versus if they have $50,000 of student loan debt, and they make $250,000 a year, they're gonna pay that off before they qualify for forgiveness, right. So that's why it's it's debt relative to their income. And for the most part, I would say, you know, if you're, if your monthly payment is at or below interest, meaning, if your debt is not going down, yes, then we that's how we know that this might be a good option for you. And I would say that, at a minimum, I typically want to see somewhere between $50,000 and $70,000, of student loan debt, you know, to take on a client. However, I have, I have had clients that have $750,000 of student loan debt. So it's no joke, you know, as as a naturopathic doctors right now are graduating with $400,000.  Dentists are graduating with $400,000.Mischa Zvegintzov  56:47What!?Ian Hoffman  56:48And some people have multiple degrees. So yeah, and then, you know, on top of, let's say, You graduated with $400,000 of student loan debt, and you didn't have a substantial income right out of school, five years later, that might be significantly higher. So that's why we start to see people who have half a million dollar plus a, you know, that's that those are really my favorite clients, because there's no way they're paying that off, you know, unfortunately.Mischa Zvegintzov  57:22Unfortunately, so they could actually be thriving as a practice and have a ton of income, but that the burden of that debt is just... It's heavy, right? Like it. Especially if you're growing a family and doing all that and have a house, totally things.Ian Hoffman  57:38There are statistic statistics now on student debt related suicides, and student debt related divorces, and student I mean, it's just, it's miserable. Um, so, you know, I would say, for anyone in those kinds of positions, um, you know, there's help.Mischa Zvegintzov  57:57That's amazing. Um, and so I just want to recap, one thing, if what I'm hearing you say is, if someone's making a million dollars a year, and they have $100,000, in loan debt, and they have no other debt, like that's not your guy, because they can just effectively pay it off. Quick anyway, right, like, pay it off, versus going through the hoops of paying me all this stuff? Is that effectively what I heard you say?Ian Hoffman  58:21Correct. Um, that being said, I do have clients who are earning in excess of $250,000 a year, so. But, again, if you're earning debt load, but you have half a million dollars of debt, that's why it's not just a picture of how much debt you have. It's debt and income,Mischa Zvegintzov  58:39I get it. It's like the debt to income ratio, if you wanted to call it like that. Right? And it's, it's the whole debt to income ratio, right? Like by the time you have your car payment in there, maybe some credit card payments in there, and maybe some, right when you put the whole picture together.  It's like yeah, you could be making a lot but but that total that load? Okay, you've answered the question. I don't mean to brow that any brow beat that anymore? Did you want to clarify there? Because I didn't mean to dilute that message. If I did,Ian Hoffman  59:07No, no worries. And and I'm happy to have people check out the web class, make sure that this is something that they want to pursue, get the information and if they're not sure, on their those numbers, you know, jump on a call with me, we can always start with the custom student loan plan. That's why I have that option to run the numbers for them.Ian Hoffman  59:27And I also provide two money back guarantees in my program because I want to make it a no brainer. So the first guarantee is that after they sign up, when I do the first step, and I look at what type of loans they have, what repayment plan they're in, I estimate how much they can expect to save by qualifying for public service loan forgiveness. And if I can't provide a you know, an estimate of 1,000% return on their investment, you know, basically meaning. The program itself is is $5000 If we if I'm not going to show them that they're going to qualify for at least $50,000 in savings, then I give them an opportunity to have a refund.Ian Hoffman  1:00:10And then the second guarantee that I make is that one, it's their responsibility from that point forward to complete the steps in the student loan eraser and go through the course and with my help and guidance, but once they complete the process, I the last step is that they send a document to the Department of Education, letting them know that they now have qualified employment, and they get a letter back saying, letting them know how many payments they've made, or how much how many months they have that count towards public service, loan forgiveness.  So they know they're in. If they get denied, they get we work with them until they get approved or they get a refund. So it has to work or I don't feel that I deserve to keep the payment.Mischa Zvegintzov  1:00:53That's amazing. That is amazing. That's amazing. And thank you for explaining it that way. That's that's clear and concise. Like that's almost if you fit if you fit the person that can use help that needs they can they can get you can help clean up their their debt load serve community. like they fit that model. If you aren't able to come through it's not it's it's a no lose situation. That's That's powerful. Wow. I know you're a busy guy. I know you've got a son out there still and all that and so I want to I want you to let you get back to your day. But I want to tell everybody again, erase my I'm looking at it. It's a beautiful it's a beautiful landing page very concise, easy to easy to figure out what to do https://www.erasemystudentloans.com/ The link will be in the show notes as well but absolutely click on it. And just the impact I'm I just getting the chills by the impact I just that you're bringing is really truly beautiful and inspirational. So thank you for that.  Ian. Dr. Ian Hoffman. I'm gonna hit stop, and then we'll say goodbye offline.Ian Hoffman  1:02:18Okay. All right. Thank you, Mischa, I appreciate the opportunity.Mischa Zvegintzov  1:02:20Indeed. Cheers.

Financial Investing Radio
FIR 139: The Data Privacy 2-STEP For YOUR AI !!

Financial Investing Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 18:39


In this episode, we take a look at some simple steps to protect the privacy of the data for your AI. Welcome everybody to another episode of click AI radio. Well, certainly data privacy has been on the minds of a lot of people and organizations and governments and governments and institutions, and so forth. No surprise there. One of the things though about AI is that, in general, it's not spent as much time if you will, putting a focus on that area. And it's been a bit of a problem and will become more of a problem if we don't do something about it. As we work with our application and use of AI itself. Now I was looking at several different groups and what they talked about and what they felt about it. At the end of this episode, I'm going to throw out two steps that I have seen that help us mitigate the challenges around this right to help to prevent some of the challenges of slippage, if you will, of getting the privacy of people's information out there that that shouldn't be now to frame that up. I want to introduce a framework for it. One of the one of the blogs, I looked at those, it was called beware the privacy violations and artificial intelligence applications it came from comes from is a see if I can say that is aca.org. There you go. A blog from there. Anyway, here, I'm gonna read an interesting quote here, right said, Look, artificial intelligence has been no different when seen through a privacy by lens design lens, as privacy has not been top of mind in the development of AI technologies. Yeah. All right. So end quote there. I agree with that that has been true. In fact, a lot of our efforts have been, can we just prove the viability of this technology in terms of helping people, individuals, businesses, certainly, there's been success with AI. And there's been some challenges. Now, they what what's introduced here is three interesting pieces to consider. When we're looking at privacy, one of those has to do with what's called data persistence. All right, so put your nerd hat on gonna be nerdy here for a moment, data persistence, that means the data existing today will last longer than the human subjects that created it. All right. And that's of course, driven by things like low data storage costs, and all the technologies that are available to allow our data to live a lot longer than us as people. So that creates a potential privacy challenge. There's another data privacy challenge. It's called Data repurposing, and that is, data that was originally created then gets used in ways that is beyond what it was originally intended. And AI is data hungry, we'll use that up, suck that up. Alright. And the third sort of area around privacy includes what's called a data spillover. And here's where, and this happens a bit in it actually drove a lot of the GDPR stuff, right, which is data collected on people who were not the target of data collection. And so of course, driving out of it was things like, you know, GDPR, out of Europe, certainly CCPA out of California, all of those things drive to or point to the need for having some regulation around it. Now, it's one thing to have regulation that's entirely different, to enforce it. And some of that comes upon us as business owners, it means that there are few things that we can and must do in order to protect the privacy of people's data and their information while still delivering value from AI. And that's that's certainly the balance that we're going for. One of the primary concerns, of course, with AI is its ability to replicate or reinforce or even amplify harmful biases, right? And this is a challenge because those biases can proliferate and then end up driving insights and and recommendations and predictions that of course, take you know, are wrong, right have have this human bias in it, there's there's another challenge to that we have with AI, let's say that we're going to try to fix that or solve for that. One of the problems, though, is that a lot of our auditing methods used today are based on the fact that something has already occurred, meaning in this case, with AI, that makes it even more difficult, right? Because it means that I've created an AI model, and I'm starting to then employ recommendations, insights and decisions, ways in which I work with people or deliver solutions, all with the incorporated bad behavior already. So it's kind of late, that doesn't mean that we shouldn't do the audits on the data. But they're post deployment by nature, meaning I've, I've already deployed it. So what we have to figure out is to find a balance, right, with privacy, as well as AI progress, it's finding the ability to say I'm gonna, I'm going to grow my my data usage in a way that that protects the privacy of the individuals involved. But I also need to allow AI to move forward and that right, there is, of course, a challenge that we're looking to pursue it some groups use consent today, right? It's a get someone to consent that they you know, you can be happy to share your information with them. That has some challenges with that those consents, not always as powerful as a tool as we might believe. And there's been examples where consent has been still misappropriated, right, what we thought originally what people thought originally was consent for certain use, then there was spill over into other areas, meaning people, you know, people didn't know their data was being used by AI for other purposes. So again, even though consent might be there, and organizations or people are well, intending, controlling, controlling the the, you know, the the boundaries of the consent, and enforcing that still is a real challenge, and relies on a lot of people to manually handle that, which means that there's more opportunities for us to mess up. I was looking at a report from the Brookings Institute, they were talking about AI Governance Initiative. And most interesting, there's this is some legislation that was pursuing this balance of how to pass privacy legislation, while while still allowing for AI to do the kind of work that it needs to bring about some of the benefits to humanity that we feel that we can do with this with this awesome technology. One of the techniques that that is mentioned here in this Brookings Institute report was, and you've heard it before, is all around what's called algorithm clarity, right? It's having clarity on how the algorithms using your information, right, that seems to be a useful piece to help dealing with it. But one of the problems with that is, you know, as an SMB owner, is that it ends up giving though, the burden typically on the backs of the of the SMB owner to say two things, one, I have to I have to make things transparent, so that my customers are aware that some aspects of their business information is leveraged by AI, right. And so that's, that's sort of the first incumbency is to say, I'm going to tell you, here's, here's what, here's what we're going to do with your data, it's going to be, you know, used in AI, and to draw the line on what information is not used. Okay? So that's what kind of comes out of this, right? It's, it's a, it's an activity or, you know, being forthright with, with our customers, on on what the intended use of the information that will or will not be used right in to draw that line. That's the first sort of consideration in algorithmic clarity. The second consideration, though, is explainability. Right. So that's, again, where you let your customers know what kind of algorithms are being used. Right. And this may include, you know, access to a human to provide that clarity, you know, okay. The thing I struggle with this, and of course, I that's all well and good. The thing I sometimes get challenged with here is what the heck does it mean to have one of the people in your team explain? Oh, yeah, you know, we use linear regression, or we use a particular classification model or, you know, a Bayes model, right, etc. We used all these different machine learning models and algorithms to that's what good is that right? 99% of people are gonna be like, What are you talking about? How did that help me understand any better? So this area of explainability, right, so the transparency Hey, we're going to use this kind of information or Not this kind of information in terms of the AI. So being clear with your customers on that. And then number two, coming up with a well Set Description for the kinds of algorithms being used, the, here's us maybe a simple way to think about it, you can break it into two buckets, right? When you're trying to explain AI to your customer say, we're going to be using this set of data for our AI algorithms. But we want to let you know that there's sort of two major areas, right. And what I'm gonna say here doesn't apply to all of AI, but for sort of vague, you know, AI for analytics, then then this applies. And it can be simply this. For those kinds of AI problems, where we're trying to determine yes or no answers, then we use what's called classification models, right? So it will be good for us to sell you this product or that product, yes or no? All right, classification kinds of problems. Then there's the other kind of problem, which is we'll use some AI algorithms to help us know, what might be the right price range, right? Now, of course, those are called more regressions, style algorithms. But you don't need to say that. It's simply we're going to use AI to help us understand yes, or no kinds of answers or questions to, you know, answer the questions. And the others, we're going to use it to understand, you know, proper pricing, perhaps right? Things that are not necessarily yes or no, but but degrees of difference, right? Those are two major buckets. And we can work on developing pretty simple language to explain this stuff. Otherwise, what good is it right if people can't, can't get it? Alright, I want to just point out one other thing here. So let me just summarize. So there's two things I think that an SMB can do to apply AI. Alright, so and to help solve for this problem of data privacy, after looking at and applying AI in multiple situations, or excuse me, over many years, come down to these two, two steps. They're a bit overly simplified, but I still think that if you print these out, put it on your wall, it could save you some real pain. Alright, so here's the first one. The first one is where I've seen a fair amount of pain. And this will sound really overly simple. First one is this. Start your AI journey with vetted questions and data oversight. Like what? Alright, I'll I'll come back to that. Number two, apply AI using smart steps. What? Alright, I'll come back to that. Awesome. Alright, so let me talk about number one here for a moment. So uh, number one here starting your AI journey with vetted questions and data oversight. It seems like an obvious first step, but when you examine the case studies of AI failures empirically, it looks like you know, this step has either been skipped or was not given the proper waiting look, a key technique here is to first vet what while you're doing this is to first bet by leveraging an independent party or going under NDA with someone, but what you want to challenge is the intended question you're trying to address with AI? Right, some of the biggest missteps with AI has been? No, that was the wrong question to be asking, this is the wrong use case to be pursuing right? There was inherently something that was either, you know, prone to lots of bias or was an unethical use of AI. Right. So in this step, the anticipated questions for AI. I know that sounds so simple, but it should be written down and evaluated in the context of the impact to your customers, and to other interested parties and to humanity for crying out loud, right? Just stop and do that simple stuff. I know, it sounds so doggone obvious. But alright, now, what does it mean to vet your AI questions? Well evaluate the AI implications to your customers, as well as look at some of those three elements that I introduced earlier. In other words, hey, will there be data persistence? What does it mean for the data that I'll be collecting to be in existence longer than the humans that created it? Right? What does that do in terms of in terms of privacy impacts or data repurposing? Wait a minute, are we going to be using the data beyond its originally you know, imagined purpose? And if so, you know, what obligation do we have to the people of all and number three data spillovers, right? Ask the question. Wait, are we collecting data on people that were not targeted those with whom we you know, initially intended? So stop and ask do I have the right question and then And then also, what's the impact of these two these three AI privacy areas of data persistence, repurposing, and data spillovers? All right, that's step one, stop and do a little vetted questioning, right and data oversight before you get too far. All right, number two is this. This in this one I call applying AI using smart steps. What this means is to iterate on the AI model and continue to refine and refactor and rebuild it as more as learned. What that does is it allows us to even adjust our AI models that might have some bias that we discover, right? So what it means is to build your vetted model, learn from experience, and then evaluate the impact to your business, your customers and then iterate. Right. So there's a book that came out not too long ago, it's by Bernard Marr. It's called "Artificial Intelligence In Practice". And what he's got in there is he's got 50 company use cases where AI was applied. Now I just want to pull something from that book, that's interesting. He goes, in that book, there's this one use case about Alibaba in China, right, who ultimately built a virtual platform that mimicked customer behaviors. And one of the reasons they did it was because it would take too long and too much effort to continually refactor their system. And so this virtual platform is used to allow the AI to continue to be refined and rebuilt and refactor. Now, you know, to do you know, to do lots of model rebuilding, in some situations, right, that's really heavy effort to do. So you either gonna have to put in the extra effort upfront to really ensure that you got the data privacy problem solved for or it well do that. And if you're able to then do the smart steps, which I found really helpful, which is, take the model Build it, try to apply it look for where a bias might be exposed, or privacy might be exposed when you didn't expect it. The lesson is this. Adjust your mindset as a business owner to refine your AI model over time, right take into consideration the changes in context, the changes in the economy, as well as lessons learned. And put in your mind that part of doing AI means that that will you know, continue to refine and improve and rebuild this AI model. Now when you combine these two steps, right, this first step is the vetted privacy aware questioning, right and looking at your data, as well as the mindset of smart steps where you simply refactor and approve you and model over time. What I found is that if you do those two things, you're in a much better position. For better privacy AI data privacy considerations. It puts you on a great path for both near term as well as long term viable business impact, you know, to your organization. Alright, everybody, thanks for joining and until next step. Until next time, use the two steps to ensure privacy for your AI that brings incremental business growth. Thank you for joining Grant on ClickAI Radio. Don't forget to subscribe and leave feedback. And remember to download your free ebook, visit ClickAIRadio.com now.  

ClickAI Radio
CAIR 58: The Data Privacy 2-STEP For YOUR AI

ClickAI Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 18:39


In this episode, we take a look at some simple steps to protect the privacy of the data for your AI. Welcome everybody to another episode of click AI radio. Well, certainly data privacy has been on the minds of a lot of people and organizations and governments and governments and institutions, and so forth. No surprise there. One of the things though about AI is that, in general, it's not spent as much time if you will, putting a focus on that area. And it's been a bit of a problem and will become more of a problem if we don't do something about it. As we work with our application and use of AI itself. Now I was looking at several different groups and what they talked about and what they felt about it. At the end of this episode, I'm going to throw out two steps that I have seen that help us mitigate the challenges around this right to help to prevent some of the challenges of slippage, if you will, of getting the privacy of people's information out there that that shouldn't be now to frame that up. I want to introduce a framework for it. One of the one of the blogs, I looked at those, it was called beware the privacy violations and artificial intelligence applications it came from comes from is a see if I can say that is aca.org. There you go. A blog from there. Anyway, here, I'm gonna read an interesting quote here, right said, Look, artificial intelligence has been no different when seen through a privacy by lens design lens, as privacy has not been top of mind in the development of AI technologies. Yeah. All right. So end quote there. I agree with that that has been true. In fact, a lot of our efforts have been, can we just prove the viability of this technology in terms of helping people, individuals, businesses, certainly, there's been success with AI. And there's been some challenges. Now, they what what's introduced here is three interesting pieces to consider. When we're looking at privacy, one of those has to do with what's called data persistence. All right, so put your nerd hat on gonna be nerdy here for a moment, data persistence, that means the data existing today will last longer than the human subjects that created it. All right. And that's of course, driven by things like low data storage costs, and all the technologies that are available to allow our data to live a lot longer than us as people. So that creates a potential privacy challenge. There's another data privacy challenge. It's called Data repurposing, and that is, data that was originally created then gets used in ways that is beyond what it was originally intended. And AI is data hungry, we'll use that up, suck that up. Alright. And the third sort of area around privacy includes what's called a data spillover. And here's where, and this happens a bit in it actually drove a lot of the GDPR stuff, right, which is data collected on people who were not the target of data collection. And so of course, driving out of it was things like, you know, GDPR, out of Europe, certainly CCPA out of California, all of those things drive to or point to the need for having some regulation around it. Now, it's one thing to have regulation that's entirely different, to enforce it. And some of that comes upon us as business owners, it means that there are few things that we can and must do in order to protect the privacy of people's data and their information while still delivering value from AI. And that's that's certainly the balance that we're going for. One of the primary concerns, of course, with AI is its ability to replicate or reinforce or even amplify harmful biases, right? And this is a challenge because those biases can proliferate and then end up driving insights and and recommendations and predictions that of course, take you know, are wrong, right have have this human bias in it, there's there's another challenge to that we have with AI, let's say that we're going to try to fix that or solve for that. One of the problems, though, is that a lot of our auditing methods used today are based on the fact that something has already occurred, meaning in this case, with AI, that makes it even more difficult, right? Because it means that I've created an AI model, and I'm starting to then employ recommendations, insights and decisions, ways in which I work with people or deliver solutions, all with the incorporated bad behavior already. So it's kind of late, that doesn't mean that we shouldn't do the audits on the data. But they're post deployment by nature, meaning I've, I've already deployed it. So what we have to figure out is to find a balance, right, with privacy, as well as AI progress, it's finding the ability to say I'm gonna, I'm going to grow my my data usage in a way that that protects the privacy of the individuals involved. But I also need to allow AI to move forward and that right, there is, of course, a challenge that we're looking to pursue it some groups use consent today, right? It's a get someone to consent that they you know, you can be happy to share your information with them. That has some challenges with that those consents, not always as powerful as a tool as we might believe. And there's been examples where consent has been still misappropriated, right, what we thought originally what people thought originally was consent for certain use, then there was spill over into other areas, meaning people, you know, people didn't know their data was being used by AI for other purposes. So again, even though consent might be there, and organizations or people are well, intending, controlling, controlling the the, you know, the the boundaries of the consent, and enforcing that still is a real challenge, and relies on a lot of people to manually handle that, which means that there's more opportunities for us to mess up. I was looking at a report from the Brookings Institute, they were talking about AI Governance Initiative. And most interesting, there's this is some legislation that was pursuing this balance of how to pass privacy legislation, while while still allowing for AI to do the kind of work that it needs to bring about some of the benefits to humanity that we feel that we can do with this with this awesome technology. One of the techniques that that is mentioned here in this Brookings Institute report was, and you've heard it before, is all around what's called algorithm clarity, right? It's having clarity on how the algorithms using your information, right, that seems to be a useful piece to help dealing with it. But one of the problems with that is, you know, as an SMB owner, is that it ends up giving though, the burden typically on the backs of the of the SMB owner to say two things, one, I have to I have to make things transparent, so that my customers are aware that some aspects of their business information is leveraged by AI, right. And so that's, that's sort of the first incumbency is to say, I'm going to tell you, here's, here's what, here's what we're going to do with your data, it's going to be, you know, used in AI, and to draw the line on what information is not used. Okay? So that's what kind of comes out of this, right? It's, it's a, it's an activity or, you know, being forthright with, with our customers, on on what the intended use of the information that will or will not be used right in to draw that line. That's the first sort of consideration in algorithmic clarity. The second consideration, though, is explainability. Right. So that's, again, where you let your customers know what kind of algorithms are being used. Right. And this may include, you know, access to a human to provide that clarity, you know, okay. The thing I struggle with this, and of course, I that's all well and good. The thing I sometimes get challenged with here is what the heck does it mean to have one of the people in your team explain? Oh, yeah, you know, we use linear regression, or we use a particular classification model or, you know, a Bayes model, right, etc. We used all these different machine learning models and algorithms to that's what good is that right? 99% of people are gonna be like, What are you talking about? How did that help me understand any better? So this area of explainability, right, so the transparency Hey, we're going to use this kind of information or Not this kind of information in terms of the AI. So being clear with your customers on that. And then number two, coming up with a well Set Description for the kinds of algorithms being used, the, here's us maybe a simple way to think about it, you can break it into two buckets, right? When you're trying to explain AI to your customer say, we're going to be using this set of data for our AI algorithms. But we want to let you know that there's sort of two major areas, right. And what I'm gonna say here doesn't apply to all of AI, but for sort of vague, you know, AI for analytics, then then this applies. And it can be simply this. For those kinds of AI problems, where we're trying to determine yes or no answers, then we use what's called classification models, right? So it will be good for us to sell you this product or that product, yes or no? All right, classification kinds of problems. Then there's the other kind of problem, which is we'll use some AI algorithms to help us know, what might be the right price range, right? Now, of course, those are called more regressions, style algorithms. But you don't need to say that. It's simply we're going to use AI to help us understand yes, or no kinds of answers or questions to, you know, answer the questions. And the others, we're going to use it to understand, you know, proper pricing, perhaps right? Things that are not necessarily yes or no, but but degrees of difference, right? Those are two major buckets. And we can work on developing pretty simple language to explain this stuff. Otherwise, what good is it right if people can't, can't get it? Alright, I want to just point out one other thing here. So let me just summarize. So there's two things I think that an SMB can do to apply AI. Alright, so and to help solve for this problem of data privacy, after looking at and applying AI in multiple situations, or excuse me, over many years, come down to these two, two steps. They're a bit overly simplified, but I still think that if you print these out, put it on your wall, it could save you some real pain. Alright, so here's the first one. The first one is where I've seen a fair amount of pain. And this will sound really overly simple. First one is this. Start your AI journey with vetted questions and data oversight. Like what? Alright, I'll I'll come back to that. Number two, apply AI using smart steps. What? Alright, I'll come back to that. Awesome. Alright, so let me talk about number one here for a moment. So uh, number one here starting your AI journey with vetted questions and data oversight. It seems like an obvious first step, but when you examine the case studies of AI failures empirically, it looks like you know, this step has either been skipped or was not given the proper waiting look, a key technique here is to first vet what while you're doing this is to first bet by leveraging an independent party or going under NDA with someone, but what you want to challenge is the intended question you're trying to address with AI? Right, some of the biggest missteps with AI has been? No, that was the wrong question to be asking, this is the wrong use case to be pursuing right? There was inherently something that was either, you know, prone to lots of bias or was an unethical use of AI. Right. So in this step, the anticipated questions for AI. I know that sounds so simple, but it should be written down and evaluated in the context of the impact to your customers, and to other interested parties and to humanity for crying out loud, right? Just stop and do that simple stuff. I know, it sounds so doggone obvious. But alright, now, what does it mean to vet your AI questions? Well evaluate the AI implications to your customers, as well as look at some of those three elements that I introduced earlier. In other words, hey, will there be data persistence? What does it mean for the data that I'll be collecting to be in existence longer than the humans that created it? Right? What does that do in terms of in terms of privacy impacts or data repurposing? Wait a minute, are we going to be using the data beyond its originally you know, imagined purpose? And if so, you know, what obligation do we have to the people of all and number three data spillovers, right? Ask the question. Wait, are we collecting data on people that were not targeted those with whom we you know, initially intended? So stop and ask do I have the right question and then And then also, what's the impact of these two these three AI privacy areas of data persistence, repurposing, and data spillovers? All right, that's step one, stop and do a little vetted questioning, right and data oversight before you get too far. All right, number two is this. This in this one I call applying AI using smart steps. What this means is to iterate on the AI model and continue to refine and refactor and rebuild it as more as learned. What that does is it allows us to even adjust our AI models that might have some bias that we discover, right? So what it means is to build your vetted model, learn from experience, and then evaluate the impact to your business, your customers and then iterate. Right. So there's a book that came out not too long ago, it's by Bernard Marr. It's called "Artificial Intelligence In Practice". And what he's got in there is he's got 50 company use cases where AI was applied. Now I just want to pull something from that book, that's interesting. He goes, in that book, there's this one use case about Alibaba in China, right, who ultimately built a virtual platform that mimicked customer behaviors. And one of the reasons they did it was because it would take too long and too much effort to continually refactor their system. And so this virtual platform is used to allow the AI to continue to be refined and rebuilt and refactor. Now, you know, to do you know, to do lots of model rebuilding, in some situations, right, that's really heavy effort to do. So you either gonna have to put in the extra effort upfront to really ensure that you got the data privacy problem solved for or it well do that. And if you're able to then do the smart steps, which I found really helpful, which is, take the model Build it, try to apply it look for where a bias might be exposed, or privacy might be exposed when you didn't expect it. The lesson is this. Adjust your mindset as a business owner to refine your AI model over time, right take into consideration the changes in context, the changes in the economy, as well as lessons learned. And put in your mind that part of doing AI means that that will you know, continue to refine and improve and rebuild this AI model. Now when you combine these two steps, right, this first step is the vetted privacy aware questioning, right and looking at your data, as well as the mindset of smart steps where you simply refactor and approve you and model over time. What I found is that if you do those two things, you're in a much better position. For better privacy AI data privacy considerations. It puts you on a great path for both near term as well as long term viable business impact, you know, to your organization. Alright, everybody, thanks for joining and until next step. Until next time, use the two steps to ensure privacy for your AI that brings incremental business growth. Thank you for joining Grant on ClickAI Radio. Don't forget to subscribe and leave feedback. And remember to download your free ebook, visit ClickAIRadio.com now.  

Ecommerce Empire Builders
How To Create & Sell Digital Products IN 2022! | 7 Figure Income Selling Info Products!

Ecommerce Empire Builders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 16:06


In this video, we go over how I started selling digital and information products! We talk about what it takes to run a 7 figure digital product business and how you can get started today. We also cover the funnels I use to sell info products, how you can make them, and what you need to do every day to be successful in a business like this.▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬

ClickFunnels Radio
Five Lessons For Growing Your Business In 2022 - Kevin Richards - CFR #607

ClickFunnels Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 22:03


Kevin Richards may have only been with ClickFunnels as the VP of Marketing for the past few months, but his experience in the marketing world spans the last 20 years. Working with big names and no names alike, Kevin has built an impressive knowledge base that has proved instrumental to his current success. Dave and Kevin discuss five of the most crucial, evergreen lessons Kevin has learned across the last two decades, as well as some of the exciting current marketing endeavors ClickFunnels just launched with the newly acquired Magnetic Marketing (Dan Kennedy's company)! This episode is a must if you're looking to see some growth in your business in 2022! Check out Magnetic Marketing's No BS Newsletter at: nobsletter.com Join our Messenger Tribe! https://m.me/clickfunnels?ref=cfpodcast-join-CF-tribe

Ecommerce Empire Builders
My 7-Figure Ecom Dropshipping BLUEPRINT For 2022! (Follow Step By Step)

Ecommerce Empire Builders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 13:36


In this video, we go over how to build a successful eCommerce business generating 7 figures a year. It's not as complicated as you might think, and once you have the roadmap you can then focus on the implementation. This business plan has served me well over the years and anybody looking to start their dropshipping business should watch this video before they go any further!▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬

Mi Primer Millón: Secretos Del Mundo Digital
Hablando De Ventas Con Marta De Francisco

Mi Primer Millón: Secretos Del Mundo Digital

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 20:38


Regístrate al grupo secreto de Facebook donde podrás aprender estrategias únicas para crear un negocio por internet exitoso. En este episodio Sergio Perdomo entrevista a Marta de Francisco, creadora de Ética Comercial y experta en ventas, para hablar de cómo puedes aumentar los porcentajes de cierre en cada venta. Suscríbete al podcast en Apple, Spotify, Google y Stitcher

Ecommerce Empire Builders
Building a 7 FIGURE DROPSHIPPING PILLOW FUNNEL FROM SCRATCH! | Storefunnels

Ecommerce Empire Builders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 60:47


In the last video we showed you a 7 figure ecommerce funnel and in todays video we go ahead and build it from scratch using StoreFunnels! Watch us build the funnel step by step, talk through how a one product dropshipping funnel should like like, and how you can sell products just like that! If you want to get started with the template above and many more, head over to storefunnels.net and sign up today!▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬

Mi Primer Millón: Secretos Del Mundo Digital
Un Pequeño Mensaje De Navidad

Mi Primer Millón: Secretos Del Mundo Digital

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 3:01


Regístrate al grupo secreto de Facebook donde podrás aprender estrategias únicas para crear un negocio por internet exitoso. En este episodio Sergio Perdomo te envía un mensaje de alegría y esperanza, deseándote una feliz navidad.Suscríbete al podcast en Apple, Spotify, Google y Stitcher

Bitch Slap  ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!
Interview #51. Molly Mandelberg masters the copy (and systems) of your niche!

Bitch Slap ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 68:21


You can watch this interview here! www.TableRushTalkShow.comMolly loves helping her clients to systemize their work and master the magnetics of marketing so they can experience more freedom and make an even bigger difference. ” She's got courses, coaching, and tarot cards that she's grown into a 6 figure business.  She can show you how to create a kick ass lead magnet.  ...and all from the comforts of her sprinter van.Molly is the founder of Wild Hearts Rise Up. Creator of Magnetic Influencer Collective. The writer and illustrator of the Wild Hearts Rise Up Oracle deck.  And the host of two podcasts. Tactical Magic Podcast. and the Reveal The Game of Life podcast.I love Molly and I always learn so much when I talk to her and come away inspired  This conversation was no different and I was blessed to be recording it for all of us to enjoy.We start with her breakthrough moment where she is given clarity on her gift and how she can bring it to the world.  And it all starts with a Karen.“And I actually had a moment where I was ready to quit my business. Hmm. I asked my friend, Karen, there are great Karen's in the world, I have to say, Karen, you know, would you just tell me what I'm good at? Because I clearly can't see my strengths myself, like, Would you tell me what the world actually needs for me. And she said, we need your help with that stuff, you have a capacity with creating content and writing copy, and building these systems and using technology that most of us that our coaches and healers don't have figured out and don't want to figure out.”We cover some basics.  Dial in your web based calendar/scheduler and start building your email list.How to be powerful with your email list.How to not be slimy with your email list.How to eloquently let your list know that you are moving in a new direction.  (she's had to do it a few times herself.  And a few times in rapid succession.)Her best strategy to build your email list!  Her Free/gift lead magnet that was generating 100 leads a week running a small add to her lead magnet.  And see can teach you how to do it.Molly is going to encourage you to charge what your worth for your service.And how to, in my words, fail forward faster! “…the one thing I like to remind people of is, you cannot easily cognate your way to clarity. But if you start testing and trying and exploring and actually putting things out in the world, you will get clearer a lot faster.”And then, in an ode to the original Bitch Slap …The Accelerated Path To Peach Podcast! she tells me about one of her bitch slaps from the universe…  Busted down vehicles.  Stepping out of the matrix. Redemption with her father!  Her list finally bears fruit.It turns out she gets her writing gifts from her mother.  Who just happens to be a successful screen writer.  And hosts writing retreats on cruise ships to Europe.  And who is Molly's biggest supporter and inspiration. And we finish up with the power of personal development work.  And she breaks down her favorite books, modalities etc. ENJOY!Administrative: (See episode transcript below)All things Molly Mandelberg!Wild Hearts Rise Up: https://www.wildheartsriseup.com/Magnetic Influencer Collective: https://wildheartsriseup.mykajabi.com/magicWild Hearts Rise Up Oracle deck: https://wildheartsriseup.mykajabi.com/oracle-deck-and-guidebookTactical Magic Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/tactical-magic-podcast/id1334995814Reveal The Game of Life podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/reveal-the-game-of-life/id1548076235Where she got some of her sales training.  Thrive! Academy.  https://thrive-academy.com/And Access Consciousness: https://www.accessconsciousness.com/Her quiz:  https://go2.bucketquizzes.com/sf/2c4a2f89The books she mentions.“Ask.” Ryan Levesque.  Ask: The Counterintuitive Online Formula to Discover Exactly What Your Customers Want to Buy...Create a Mass of Raving Fans...and Take Any Business to the Next Level https://amzn.to/3JhWFr5“Loving What Is” Byron Katie, https://amzn.to/3Fs42tE“Being You, Changing the World”.  Dr. Dain Heer. https://amzn.to/3mvIrc5Her quiz course: https://wildheartsriseup.mykajabi.com/quiz-mastery-greenMolly's resource page! https://www.wildheartsriseup.com/offerings/resources/Check out the Tools For A Good Life Summit here: Virtually and FOR FREE https://bit.ly/ToolsForAGoodLifeSummitStart podcasting!  These are the best mobile mic's for IOS and Android phones.  You can literally take them anywhere on the fly.Get the Shure MV88 mobile mic for IOS,  https://amzn.to/3z2NrIJGet the Shure MV88+ for  mobile mic for Android  https://amzn.to/3ly8SNjSee more resources at https://belove.media/resourcesEmail me: contact@belove.mediaFor social Media:      https://www.instagram.com/mrmischaz/https://www.facebook.com/MischaZvegintzovSubscribe and share to help spread the love for a better world!As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.Transcript:Mischa Zvegintzov 00:15Well Molly, how are you?Molly Mandelberg 00:17I'm well today Thank you.Mischa Zvegintzov 00:19Molly Mandelberg you are the founder of Wild Hearts Rise Up. Creator of Magnetic Influencer Collective. And you're the writer and illustrator of the Wild Hearts Rise Up Oracle deck. You're the host of two podcasts. Tactical Magic Podcast. which you just interviewed me on for on whatever the other day. which was amazing you just were held so much beautiful space and and at these great times you very eloquently recapped what I said and I was very impressed with that. So thank you very much. And then you've got the Reveal The Game of Life podcast. Is that still in action?Molly Mandelberg 01:03Oh, yeah.Mischa Zvegintzov 01:04Okay, fantastic. So you are managing two podcasts?Molly Mandelberg 01:09Yeah. And a business and social life somehow too...Mischa Zvegintzov 01:15...And a business and social life AND which on here I guess we'll get to that...  Well, I'll keep going because the best parts coming up I think.Mischa Zvegintzov 01:27After spending years mastering content creation and online marketing, and I'm going to interject here really quick, you, the few times I've got to interact with you.Mischa Zvegintzov 01:33You clearly have the copy and the content creation side of things... very intuitive around that. Very well experienced. When we've been interacting and I've been you know hedging or looking for words you very quickly and eloquently bring up... help frame it in a very cool way. So anyone listening needs to know that about Molly. Aifted and awesome. Mischa Zvegintzov 01:43So as I start creating funnels, there's a great chance Molly will be working on the copy.Molly Mandelberg 02:12Looking forward to it.Mischa Zvegintzov 02:13Yeah. Hopefully.  You never know, right? We get to pick our clients too, right? My guess is you're very good at picking your clients and being like, "Yeah, you don't fit Have a good day".Mischa Zvegintzov 02:28Molly finds her bliss in bridging the worlds of heart centered healing and transformation with the practical business strategies of levering leveraging a message into a global movement. You're a certified NLP coach. An Access Consciousness bars facilitator. And a transformational leadership coach. And a full time nomad.Mischa Zvegintzov 02:53Molly works with coaches, healers and conscious leaders to broadcast their messages with ease, so they can reach more people and make more money with less time spent. Hence, you do not mess around that you live by the schedule. She travels the world full time and runs her six figure business out of her self converted Sprinter van time and tiny home. Now, how fun is that?Mischa Zvegintzov 03:20Molly loves helping her clients to systemize their work and master the magnetics of marketing so they can experience more freedom and make an even bigger difference.Mischa Zvegintzov 03:35So how do you do this out of your van? Molly Mandelberg 03:39Yeah, however I feel like it...Molly Mandelberg 03:41I just want to say you said a couple times that I don't mess around. And I want to revisit that and just say "I built my business in such a way that I have time to mess around". So I definitely do have lots of travel and lots of play, and lots of exploring and adventures. And I think when we set our business up the right way, we can have that spaciousness and have that time, which is why being a full time Nomad makes it possible because I have systems set up to support me to do that.Mischa Zvegintzov 04:11Yeah. Tell me about that journey. Have you? Did you come out of the womb like I'm a Systems girl or a systems person?Molly Mandelberg 04:17And I actually had a moment where I was ready to quit my business. Hmm. I asked my friend, Karen, there are great Karen's in the world, I have to say, Karen, you know, would you just tell me what I'm good at? Because I clearly can't see my strengths myself, like, Would you tell me what the world actually needs for me.Molly Mandelberg 04:17I think I've always had a very engineering brain. And I like understanding how things work. And I like putting puzzles together. But it wasn't until really I started my business as a hypnotherapist and immediately started just geeking out on online marketing and trying to understand how how people who don't know me could learn to know me and like me, and trust me. and how I could create content that both adds value to people's lives and also sometimes invites them into my world. And as I started geeking out on that there was a period of time where there was this dissonance of, I just want to build things I just want to make content but If none of it is really landing, and it's not really aligning the business I'm running is not really aligning with who I feel like I'm becoming.Molly Mandelberg 05:26And she said, we need your help with that stuff, you have a capacity with creating content and writing copy, and building these systems and using technology that most of us that are coaches and healers don't have figured out and don't want to figure out. Because we want to keep doing just the healing work that the magic trick that we've mastered, the modalities that we are in love with.Molly Mandelberg 05:50And the words that came out of my mouth where "no one's gonna pay me for that. That's the fun part."Molly Mandelberg 05:54And if you ever hear yourself saying or thinking that that's probably the thing you're meant to be doing.Molly Mandelberg 06:00So what happened over time, is I was going hard into the technology and system development, like realm. That consciousness part of me, the healer that had started a business as a hypnotherapist was feeling under serving, I guess you could say it was feeling left behind. And so it's been a process to synthesize those two. So that's why I say I bridge the world between the heart centered healing and the tactics and strategy to grow business.  Because I think both of those are absolutely required to actually level up and to get the success and to reach the people that we want to reach.Molly Mandelberg 06:00Doing the technology and setting up the program. And writing the copy is only part of it. Getting ourselves aligned in such a way that our people can even find us that we take our invisibility cloaks off that we broadcast our light into the world, that we're willing to receive the income and the clients that want to come to us in a big way. That is a key component in this in the growing of a business like this. So I now teach both, I brought in the healing back into my business to help people uncover those limiting beliefs and break through those upper limits. So that they could do both.Molly Mandelberg 06:00And I had...we were at a workshop, when we had this conversation, I had a chance the next day, to give a talk, I had won a challenge, purely through tenacity, not through making money as a speaker, but I'd want to speak or challenge and I got to speak to part of the room. And I changed my talk overnight and made an offer for that basically, helping people develop their content and figure out how to leverage their message to be online. And hopefully, through courses and programs beyond just one on one services. And I made that offer. And I got three clients, which had been the first three clients in many months. So I was really it was a turning point, it felt like a sign from the universe that I'm supposed to go this way now. And those three clients, single sessions led to packages led to referrals. And that was four or five years ago that maybe six years ago, that I made that shift, and it's just expanded and grown.Mischa Zvegintzov 08:07Hmm. So it's almost as if the systemization, the copy creation, is a backdoor into, into Alright, let's look at your limiting beliefsMolly Mandelberg 08:22...or people show up for both now, which is great. Yeah. Yeah, cuz I mean, anyone out there who is an entrepreneur who has tried to share something with the world, you may have noticed that even if you set it up perfectly and do it, right, it doesn't always work. And sometimes that's because we don't believe it will work.  Sometimes that's because there's a part of us that's afraid it will work. I think it was who I'm forgetting her name Marianne Williamson that said, we're more afraid of our light than our darkness. Yeah, yeah, we're actually terrified of success. We're terrified of outgrowing our family and friends, and being too big into potent into powerful. And we have to get over that shit if we're actually going to make the difference that we're on this earth to make.Mischa Zvegintzov 09:05Yeah. What do you think? What do you think, is the biggest sticking point there? You'd you see from your clients? Like, what's the what's the biggest?Molly Mandelberg 09:19Like, usually with my clients, they come in saying, I want to make this bigger thing happen. And I just don't know where to start. Because there's so much information on the internet. You've been on YouTube, you know, there's 1000s of people trying to teach you the thing they know how to do. And there's so many different ways to grow a business. There's so many different strategies that will work for certain people. And it's really easy to get lost in a sea of too many tools, and too many techniques and too many different avenues to pay attention to.Molly Mandelberg 09:51So a lot of my clients come to me overwhelmed with all the ideas that have been thrown at them. And feeling like they're spinning their wheels going in circles, just to figure out what their business actually needs, how to bring their message forth. So I don't teach one size fits all business, I ask the person, what they're wanting to create. And then depending on what their strengths are, what their energetic brilliance is, we figure out the best way for their business to grow and for their projects to come to life. And how to create those in such a way that they're duplicatable, so that you run a program and it's not dead, and you have to start a new one, you can recreate it and launch it and sell it another time. And we want to systemize that process. So it's really easy to keep mastering the craft of whatever that new program or course is that you've created.Mischa Zvegintzov 10:40Hmm. And so do you have your a systems girl? And I hope that's okay, that I say that oh, yeah. Okay, cool. You're a systems girls. So someone rolls in. And they're like, I have a vision in what so what's your like, process, step one we go...Molly Mandelberg 10:59Depends on the business again. So it depends on where the person is at.Molly Mandelberg 11:02I will say the first tools that I recommend every entrepreneur in this kind of coaching and healing leadership kind of space. If you don't have a scheduler, and you don't have an email list start there. A scheduler is an online scheduler, so people can take a link and book themselves on your calendar. If you've ever tried to make an appointment with someone, and you've gone through six or seven emails back and forth, trying to find a time that works for both of you, and then somebody has to figure out the Zoom link, then somebody has to add it to the calendar. And all of that could be done in one click of a link. That is the first time saving tool, any entrepreneur or anyone who's working outside of you know, a regular nine to five job... that online schedule or if you need to make appointments with someone, that's the first thing that's going to save you a ton of time. You should not be responding and replying to five emails just to set one appointment.Mischa Zvegintzov 11:56It's ludicrous, right?Molly Mandelberg 11:57It's ludicrous.Molly Mandelberg 11:58And then the email list... beginning to build your audience.Molly Mandelberg 12:01People think email marketing is dead. Molly Mandelberg 12:03Email marketing, the old way it used to be done is definitely dead. People do not want 30 blasts hard selling them on something that they may or may not want. That's gone. But there are ways to use your email list to actually build a relationship with people. And if anybody was around, we'll say mid October, in 2021. Facebook and Instagram went down for half a day. Nobody could get in, nobody could see anything new. If you were building our marketing presence on those platforms, that was probably a scary day for you. Because nobody could see what you were doing. And you couldn't reach out to anyone. And you might notice that that could happen any time those platforms are not set in stone. They could die. Your account could be closed for no reason. It's really hard to get ahold of anyone.Molly Mandelberg 12:48So building an audience, on your own system, your own email list, where you're actually finding people who want to be in your inner circle, and having a chance to connect directly with them. Yes, not everyone will open every email. Yes, not everyone will want to buy your stuff. But you have an opportunity there to actually cultivate a connection with your people in a way that you don't on social media.Molly Mandelberg 12:48So building an email list and figuring out how to connect with them is the next one.Molly Mandelberg 12:58And one of the things I would put, I usually put on my clients, you know, priority list. Is to find ways to connect with those people when you're not selling. So a lot of people are like, Okay, I have a list, but I'm not growing my list. And I'm not really connecting with them unless I'm having something to invite them to. Well, there's this energetic. I call it an energetic bank account that we have with each individual that's on our list. And if we're just asking and inviting and making calls to action, and asking people to register and click after a while, it feels pretty slimy. It's like stop asking me for stuff. I don't want it. I don't know you, I don't care. And it feels like you're taking taking taking.Molly Mandelberg 13:59So the antidote to that is to make deposits in that energetic bank account by delivering actual value. And that could be your podcast, that could be videos you've put on YouTube. That could be just a note of like, here's what I'm thinking about. Here's a story about something that happened to me and what I learned from it. That's just I just want to share that with you hope you have a great day, adding little value contribution nuggets like that makes the energetic bank account feel better when you're ready to go and make a withdrawal, so to speak, ask people to click or to register or to show up to something.Mischa Zvegintzov 14:32Can I ask you a question?  A little nuance within that.  If you're... because you were talking to me... we had a conversation andI was like yeah, I'm trying to figure out how to increase my email rate to my list. And you're like, Well, you you, you do a podcast episode every day you could affect and I can't remember how you said it. You said you could do like you could say here's my here's this email... Here's this podcast episode that I did. Here's the main gist of it. Here's the highlight. Listen for the rest. Is that kind of what you said?Molly Mandelberg 15:11Yeah totally yeah.  That is both. I mean, because you're asking them to come over and click it. In some ways, it could be seen as an ask.  But because it's free. And you're not asking them to register or give them any give you any information, it is kind of just a value add. The reason I said put the little nugget, the juicy synopsis or whatever in there in the email.Molly Mandelberg 15:32Some of your audience wants to read stuff, some of your audience wants to listen to stuff, some of your audience wants to watch stuff. So giving them the option of receiving your juicy nugget of value in a way that works for them is how you kind of serve the whole people.Mischa Zvegintzov 15:48Yeah. love it. That's great. Do you what? What....Mischa Zvegintzov 15:53So a couple of things come to mind. And one is, you know, it's easy to stay, say start building an email list, saying it in the reality of one day at a time starting to build that email list are two different things. But I'm also intrigued how did you?  Well. So you're obviously building your list. Pre Karen, right? Pretty good Karen. You're you're building your list, but it's more focused on hypnotherapy, NLP, things like that more of the healing modality. You have the epiphany with Karen, your friend...Mischa Zvegintzov 16:29what was your friend's name? Who was like, Hey, speak at my thing. You remember his name, or her name?Molly Mandelberg 16:33The place where I won this where I had the speaking opportunity? That was called Thrive Academy, which is an amazing business growth thing for people who are early on in their business and want to find their niche and learn how to make find clients.Mischa Zvegintzov 16:45Cool. And so was it in their online? Yes. So was it an opportunity to present online?Molly Mandelberg 16:50No, it was years ago. So it was in person at a conference.Mischa Zvegintzov 16:54Hence the you were looking for the Table Rush it worked? Yeah, we'll tie that in. So. So you are going to you said...Molly Mandelberg 17:07You're asking how do I interact with my list when I'm changing my niche?Mischa Zvegintzov 17:10Yeah.Mischa Zvegintzov 17:11Well, well, hold on. hold. So if I'm interested... what was your presentation? You said I changed it overnight. Right? You had? Yeah. So was that easy? Or sticky? Or was it did it come quick? Or was it...Molly Mandelberg 17:25I was at a speaking conference where they were teaching me how to be a good speaker and make an offer. So I was using their template in their framework to rewrite my speech. So my speech beforehand was more... I forget I was changing my niche a lot that first couple years, or that first few months in Thrive Academy, but it was something like finding your purpose.Molly Mandelberg 17:47Which I had noticed over a few months, nobody actually wants to put down money to find their purpose, at least they didn't want to with me.  It was a little bit too vague and not really like hitting on a true pain point, which is, what do you actually want to be? Or how do you actually want to, you know... usually the niches that work very directly speak to being... finding more wealth.Mischa Zvegintzov 18:11YepMolly Mandelberg 18:12Being healthier, or feeling more beautiful, or healing or transforming your relationships. So being in a purpose niche, I wasn't quite nailing one of those directions. And that's why nobody was really showing up. So when you're talking about growing a business that's directly related to increasing my financial abundance, and so people are more likely to invest in working in something like that.Mischa Zvegintzov 18:36So you, you You're, you're pre that moment, you as you're taking... you're taking classes to learn how to present... Which I love. I think that's such a cool thing. I did not know that about you. So you're taking that to be more effective.Molly Mandelberg 18:51And at the beginning of my business, I was learning whatever the hell I could to help me.Mischa Zvegintzov 18:55So good. That's I think it's so powerful.Molly Mandelberg 18:57Yeah, it's important to to invest in mentorship of people who know how to do what you want to do is a really like, high level way to go about anything. If you don't know how to do something, learning it from somebody who really does know how to do it is a fast track to figuring it out.Mischa Zvegintzov 19:14So good. And I think you know, that was a that's been a hard lesson for me over my life. People will say invest in yourself and that can be a very ambiguous term but that is clearly an actionable way to invest in yourself, right?Molly Mandelberg 19:29Yeah. Monetarily investing in mentorship and also investing time in learning something new that could look like reading a book and actually trying to implement what it tells you... Yeah.Mischa Zvegintzov 19:40So is this outside of thrive? So thrive and you taking these classes are two different things?Molly Mandelberg 19:45I was taking many different paths Thrive was one of the big ones at the beginning of my business.Mischa Zvegintzov 19:50Okay. And I'm sorry to get granular granular on you. But are you learning how to speak on stage through thrive and you win one of their...Molly Mandelberg 20:00I was.  In 2015 or 2016 .Mischa Zvegintzov 20:03You get the opportunity to present cuz you are doing a good job.Molly Mandelberg 20:07Yeah, I won their game. Mischa Zvegintzov 20:09You won their game. perfect.Mischa Zvegintzov 20:10So... you have the epiphany moment and before your headline or your thesis of your talk is literally, "I'll help you find your purpose".Molly Mandelberg 20:21Something along those lines. Yeah.Mischa Zvegintzov 20:23Then it became... Do you remember fairly specifically what it became?Molly Mandelberg 20:26It became "I'll help you get your business online basically".Mischa Zvegintzov 20:30Fantastic. Thank you.Molly Mandelberg 20:31Yeah. And that's evolved a lot since then to to be more specific.Mischa Zvegintzov 20:34Okay, cool.Molly Mandelberg 20:36So what to go back to what we were talking about which is you're growing an email list, you've got this audience of people who want to hear a certain kind of thing from you. I had to pivot to say, "This is who I'm talking to now. And this is the kind of stuff that I'm coming to." And this is a great email for anyone who changes in directions. And I mean, I had changed directions enough times that year that some people on my list got number, a number of these emails. Molly Mandelberg 20:59You basically want to say, "Hey, I'm so and so I'm here you've been hearing from me, or maybe you haven't been, and I am moving in a new direction. And I want to give you the chance to stay or go.  Are you down to hear from me about these kinds of things?  This is kind of stuff I'm gonna be sharing with you, and and inviting you to and talking about. And if you want to hear about that, no action necessary.  If you think you'd rather not hear about from that from me or about that at all, or for me at all anymore. This is your invitation to unsubscribe, or you can hit reply, and I will unsubscribe you for you. And that's really generous, because it's saying, Hey, here's what we're doing. And are you in or are you out. And if you're out no hard feelings. And if you're in, let's go.Molly Mandelberg 21:03So you can do it in a really connected way. And usually, the people who stick around are now probably less...Molly Mandelberg 21:54Anytime you lose subscribers, it's actually a good thing. Because you've now condensed your list to being more passionate about you. More connected, more happy to hear from you.  Anybody who leaves is taking themselves out of it. And so you now have got a more potent connection with your list. And so that... I mean part of those years, I was trying to figure out how to build my list in the first place. And I had to recreate new strategies and try different things and different things work.Molly Mandelberg 22:22But people are generally less inclined to just put their email in a box for no reason. They're more likely, Same with the energetic bank account idea, they're more likely to put their name and email in a box, if they are going to get something that they want. So people don't really want a newsletter. People don't really want to simply stay connected, although sometimes they will, if they think you're awesome, especially if you have a podcast, they've been connecting with you. They want to know what else is out there. But giving them a reason. So some kind of a free gift, some kind of a video series, some sort of a tool for them to receive more magic, only available through that portal, they'll come through the portal to get the thing.Mischa Zvegintzov 23:06So what are you doing today? What's your little (Free gift)?Molly Mandelberg 23:10Yes, so I've got tons of free gifts. Anytime you buy a program, or course of course you end up on my email list. And then I've got a free gift called the "Money Machine Blueprint", which is sort of the framework of how email lists work and tells you how to make a free gift and stuff like that.Molly Mandelberg 23:25The best free gift or lead magnet that I've ever created, which I had to create a course to teach people how to do it because it works so well. Is a quiz. I call it "A Client Attracting Quiz." And my quiz is on my website, it's, "What level of thought leader are you?" And it lets people know of the five stages that I created this framework with archetypes from the Major Arcana of the Tarot. Are you the fool? Are you the magician? Are you the High Priestess? the Empress? or the higher fan? And depending on where you land on that, what's the invitation to start growing into the next phase. So people get this beautiful 16 page PDF all written up about how where they're at right now is perfect.  How it's really a beautiful part of the phases of growing a business and becoming a thought leader. And how to overcome their inner arch nemesis to begin expanding into the next level. So that quiz has gone through three or four different maybe five different iterations over the years. But after I saw it start really working. I started running a $5 a day Facebook ad to it. And I grew my list to like 10,000 after a year or two.Mischa Zvegintzov 24:33That is amazing.Molly Mandelberg 24:35So I was getting 70 to 100 leads every single week just by running a small add to my quiz. And that was the biggest list grow thing ever and I had peers of mine colleagues of mine that I've done other projects with tell me I was a damn fool for not teaching people how to do what I did with that. And so I created a course to do that.Mischa Zvegintzov 24:55Tell me the name of the course again,Molly Mandelberg 24:57Quiz mastery.Mischa Zvegintzov 24:58And it's all in your... they can go to I've got it over here. Is that on your where to go? Why? What's your website? Again?Molly Mandelberg 25:07www.WildHeartsRiseUp.comMischa Zvegintzov 25:09Yes, www.WildHeartsRiseUp.com. I'm looking over here anybody wondering what I'm looking at? And say it again, because I'm thinking we definitely want people to hear that again. So they can...Molly Mandelberg 25:24www.WildHeartsRiseUp.com. And if you go to offerings, and then programs, you'll find it.  Called Quiz Mastery. And on the home page you'll see the quiz if you want to take it and see how you like it. Nine questions. It's really fun.Mischa Zvegintzov 25:37Nice. And it's fun, how fun, it's fun, and educational.Molly Mandelberg 25:41That's the thing is people love to interact with a quiz because it's a game. And we've been playing games for 1000s of years, people want to be entertained, they want to be asked questions about themselves. And through the process of answering those questions. They're already learning something about themselves. So there's this introspection, this self awareness and this gamified experience, that is just more fun than other free gifts.Mischa Zvegintzov 26:05It's beautiful.Mischa Zvegintzov 26:06Question on the the inspiration to say, "I'm changing directions. This is it, if you want to hear about it. Fantastic. You don't have to do anything just to enjoy, learn whatever. Or unsubscribe." Was that taught to you? Or it was that inspiration?Molly Mandelberg 26:27I just sort of, I don't think I learned that from anyone.Mischa Zvegintzov 26:31Just intuitive at this point. Trial and error. You're like people... like people want to know this. They don't just...Molly Mandelberg 26:36Well, yeah, I mean, I wanted to feel authentic and sending them a different kind of content. So I wanted to let them know that things were changing, new stuff was gonna be coming.Mischa Zvegintzov 26:46And then the quiz thing was that a little combination inspiration... you'd heard of thatMolly Mandelberg 26:51That was from a book called "The ask method" by Ryan Levesque (https://amzn.to/3JhWFr5) who really designed that whole process from a lot of research and human psychology and stuff like that. So he came up with a system, and I just kind of reverse engineered what I learned from him.Mischa Zvegintzov 27:09Fantastic. So thank you for sharing that. Anybody who's listening? Watching. Is like, Oh, this is awesome. They can reach out to you. And you would be like, hey, I'll walk you through this. Let's, let's get your... I'll teach you even how to use the online calendar. And, and let's start building your list. And here's the quiz.  And you, you'd be like, alright, you would dig in and be like, alright, what kind of quiz are we going to make for you? Like, if I called you, you'd be like, alright, Mischa, what do you like? What are you passionate about? Let's get the quiz together. You could help somebody with that?Molly Mandelberg 27:46Yes, I do. I have the the quiz Mastery program is self guided. Sometimes I also run it live with q&a calls. And then I also have done for you services for quizzes where people can come to me and have the idea. And then I go and build the whole thing for them.Mischa Zvegintzov 28:01And you travel around in a van, which I'm looking at, which is incredible. It's... alright. Great. That's fantastic. Thank you. Alright, so...Molly Mandelberg 28:12I'm actually you just gave me a good idea I've been meaning to for a long time, I have a template for how to set up your scheduler, so you don't miss any steps. I'm going to put that as a free gift on my website, too. So if people need help getting the schedule or thing figured out, I'll I'll have that template up there soon.Mischa Zvegintzov 28:27Love it. That is a great gift. I'll jump in there and take advantage. I'm good at using the tool, but I don't have it. I've told you this myself and like I love the way you have all your little intricacies within it.Mischa Zvegintzov 28:41Cool. So all right, what if somebody kind of what's the next level? So there's that's like that's like bare bones basic get started, like what's next?Molly Mandelberg 28:49The next level usually is people. I sort of work with people who have been seeing clients for a while. So Thrive Academy is an amazing resource for somebody who's just getting started and needs to sort of figure out who their niche is. Start figuring out how to attract clients, how to do free consults, how to start really getting clear on who your people are and how exactly you serve them. Once people are clear on that there's usually a desire, there's often as desire to move from one on one services, to groups and online courses. So I'm really the best resource. Well, I'm the best resource that sounds really cocky. I am great for people who want to move from one on one to groups. and they already know who their clients are one on one and they're ready to systemize their process. or to develop an offering so that people who can't afford their one on one work have somewhere to go. or people who would prefer to be in a community setting learning the stuff from them have somewhere to go. and how to create that process so that it's easy, and so that it's not a pain in the ass to run so that it's easy to sell it. People can just click a button and take it. how to start writing copies so that you can actually sell this to your email list or you can post about it confidently.Molly Mandelberg 30:07So it's the copy and the content creation and the technology to just make it easier to broadcast your message. And I also work with people who are just trying to grow their one on one practice, like, that's definitely still in my wheelhouse. And it takes some showing up, it takes some broadcasting, it takes some marketing. And marketing is kind of a dirty word in the heart centered healer space. But the truth is marketing is where we simply allow our light to shine more broadly out into the world so our people can see it, and find their way to us. And that's an important thing to do, because I think more people on this planet could use support. We need the healers to go big now.Mischa Zvegintzov 30:49Hmm. Two beautiful way you said that, thank you for that. And that is a that's a rough edge for a lot of that healer, mentality space, right? I don't know, mode modality is a better word.Molly Mandelberg 31:01Yeah.Molly Mandelberg 31:02There's a myth in there that says if I have this tool. if I have this modality. if I have this capacity for healing and helping, then I should give it away for free. And I shouldn't, I shouldn't be too big about it, because that won't be humble. So there's a lot of, like I said, limiting beliefs. And there's a lot of programming inside of us that says, Stay quiet, stay small, just do it on the side. And I think that is innately serving less people. And if you're on this earth, to be a healer, to be a leader to be a guide guiding people to greater in their lives, then how dare you not go do that and as big of a way as you possibly can, so more people can receive it.Molly Mandelberg 31:47And to think it's a contribution in some way to not charge for your services, because people can't afford you. People get more healing out of things that they have invested in energetically. And the biggest way we energetically invest in things on this plane is monetarily.Mischa Zvegintzov 32:05Yeah. Molly Mandelberg 32:06Yeah. And if you are doing your work, your healing for free, you have to work some other job in order to make a living. So you're doing less of that healing work. And that does not make sense to me.Mischa Zvegintzov 32:17Hmm. Thank you for that.Molly Mandelberg 32:19Yeah.Molly Mandelberg 32:20Unless you're independently wealthy, wealthy, and then do whatever you want to do. Hopefully do more healing work.Mischa Zvegintzov 32:27Right? Why not? Yeah, do it for free that donation base wherever you want.Molly Mandelberg 32:32Yeah, and I'm not shaming or making wrong, anybody. Everybody's on their own path. I just had a client this week who had a huge breakthrough, and finally pricing her, like private retreats that she hosts on her property that she's been doing for many, many years. and severely undercharging. And she finally had the realization... that she was doing one this past weekend. And it wasn't enough compensation for the energetic thing she was delivering for this couple on her property. And she finally upped her rates. And I was like, very pleased that she came to that realization. Because you think, you know, I see you, I see the value you're delivering, and it is worth more than you're saying it's worth. And would you be willing to be supported by your work in a bigger way, and allow the people coming to you to be supported by your work in a bigger way? Because they're energetically shown up for it? By paying what it's worth?Mischa Zvegintzov 33:31Hmm.Molly Mandelberg 33:32Yeah. I'm on that side of the fence. But everybody gets to do what they want and thenMischa Zvegintzov 33:36Right? No, right or wrong? Like if you're inspired to one or the other, own it go with it, right? I think. So. When you... would you say your like hearts...when you like your avatar, right? The Avatar is a thing that's bantered around a lot. or your ideal client? Or how do you say it in what you're doing?Molly Mandelberg 34:00My ideal client is this spiritual woman entrepreneur who wants to make a bigger difference.  Who's ready to reach more people, and who wants to do that with more freedom and more light and aliveness than they thought that it was possible?Mischa Zvegintzov 34:16How do you feel about the people that are in that space doing what they're doing, trying to grow? Like you're encouraging them to grow, helping them grow, supporting them to grow clearly inspiring them to grow? What about using terms in that space of "heart centered"? Is that a legit term?Molly Mandelberg 34:37I use the term heart centered? Yeah, my, your money machine is one of my online courses, which is all about list creation and how to set that up. I think I'm going to rename it something like email marketing magic or something like that. Yeah, but its marketing is to the heart centered warrior goddess entrepreneurs. Yeah, I use heart centered a lot too.Mischa Zvegintzov 34:59Yeah. What do you call on the men's side of that? Or there isn't a lot of men doing that? Or what do you what do you like?  Go ahead.Molly Mandelberg 35:05I mean, I think spiritual men is clear. I don't know, I haven't spent a lot of time marketing to men. I've had clients who are men.  but I don't cater my marketing to men, because I think there's already a lot of business tools and support out there for men.Mischa Zvegintzov 35:20Hmm, it's interesting.Molly Mandelberg 35:23Yeah.Mischa Zvegintzov 35:24Um, I wonder too, sometimes if, like, the the, like, the the woman's space is more... or that that feminine energy, I guess, is another term that we would use, right? It's like, it seems to be more robust. Obviously, feminine energy energy is going to be females who are embracing it more is that would you say, looking at market size, those are a lot more women?Molly Mandelberg 36:01I don't know about market size or not? I think more so than looking at the market. It's important to look at who you are and what you're here to do. And I, I tend to resonate more with helping women leaders rise up.Mischa Zvegintzov 36:15No, for sure. And I'm not trying to pigeonhole you and say you strategically went after that. More of I'm asking an honest question of, you're in the space, you're helping healers, you have men clients. I'm just curious if you're opinion...Molly Mandelberg 36:29I think a lot of men in general, are, are more inclined to a different style of marketing than I produce. Yeah. Which is a little bit more. I don't want to make broad generalizations like this. But like, Click Funnels marketing is more geared towards men.Mischa Zvegintzov 36:46Yeah,Molly Mandelberg 36:46yeah.Mischa Zvegintzov 36:47Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. It's interesting. I was just interesting as I'm...Molly Mandelberg 36:51yeah. Well, because there are a lot of young men out there who are doing marketing successfully.  And I don't really need to compete with them when I'm serving slightly different audience.Mischa Zvegintzov 37:00Sure.Molly Mandelberg 37:01Yeah. Yeah.Mischa Zvegintzov 37:02Yeah. Yeah. Mischa Zvegintzov 37:04What's that?Molly Mandelberg 37:05And they do it well.Mischa Zvegintzov 37:07And they do it? Well, absolutely. And if you like, if your preference is to work with females? Great. right. Like I'm not, I think the worst thing to do is go, Well, I really like working with men, but it's the female markets bigger. That's for me in the way I do things could be a futile path. Right?Molly Mandelberg 37:33Right. It has to be something that you are passionate about. And that is true about any creative project, I think. And there are a lot of, I mean, there's a lot of women and men in the personal development space. And I think that the most important thing to pay attention to is who are you? And how will your people resonate with you? And how do you most want to serve them? And then carve your niche out of that? Usually, the best niche we land on? Is us a little while ago? Yeah, us two steps before now. Yeah, that's why we're able to help people because we're a few steps ahead of them on the same path.Mischa Zvegintzov 38:13Yeah, yeah, that's good. Tell me. So you find somebody rolls in. And they're, they're like, they have a robust one on one practice. And, and they're like, Alright, I'm ready to create some evergreen courses. That's another term that's thrown around evergreen or, or go one to many start doing group things. Like what are your steps to get people on that path?Molly Mandelberg 38:40I mean, usually, it's, you know, how much they have created already. figuring out what the best platform is that they want to do that on. If you're selling evergreen courses, or if you're wanting to streamline selling group programs, then having some sort of a sales page to check out cart to accessing a membership site software is going to be a great tool to create more ease with that. There are free ways to do it through, you know, PayPal link, and then Google Drive folder. And then there are more robust platforms like Kajabi, and kartra, and teachable and Thinkific and Podio is a cheaper one. On again, on my website, there's a Resources tab, which has all the software's that I recommend for these different levels of things.Molly Mandelberg 39:27I like Kajabi. And I also think kartra is very comparable and the offerings that it has right now. Yeah, but those are the higher level and for people who are maybe just starting out or who don't want to invest a lot in their first course or program because they don't know if it's gonna work yet. or because they're not sure that's the direction they really fully want to be moving in. There are cheaper options to.  and then once we have the platform, we start digging into the copywriting and what goes on The sales page, how are we going to welcome people and invite them in? How are we going to keep them engaged over the program? And how what do they need to know to show up and get it all done? And starting to build out the framework of how the user experience will be? And what are the pieces of the puzzle that need to get created? And then helping people put those pieces of the puzzle together?Mischa Zvegintzov 40:20Nice!Molly Mandelberg 40:21Yeah.Mischa Zvegintzov 40:22And depending on how committed someone is to that process, I imagine is how fast that.Molly Mandelberg 40:29How eager they are to create it, and how quickly they set a deadline. Like how soon they want to launch. Like I have one client right now who we've been working for, together for six or so months, and she hasn't really set a launch date yet, because she's still working on the program and wants to figure it out and make it perfect. And I have another client who we're working through like this third thing in two months, because she just wants to get stuff out. Yeah, it really depends on the person and how ripe the idea is.Molly Mandelberg 40:29Yeah, and I suppose how they like to... well I guess it is going to be a matter of trying, trying, trying until you find the till you find out how to connect your message with your...Molly Mandelberg 41:14And you will find that so much faster if you try. Yeah, the one thing I like to remind people of is, you cannot easily cognate your way to clarity. But if you start testing and trying and exploring and actually putting things out in the world, you will get clearer a lot faster.Mischa Zvegintzov 41:36This is a random question. But how many how do you have success selling your tarot cards?Molly Mandelberg 41:43I have sold about 300 decks? But I would say 150 of those were when I launched it. Oh, okay. Yeah. When I did an Indiegogo campaign to fund the initial printing of 500 decks. Yeah. And that was successful. And then I haven't pushed it a whole lot since then. But the people who love the deck, post about it on Instagram and share about it a lot. And I have a friend who's running a whole group program where he's using my deck as the topic for each of his classes. He pulls a card and then teaches about that energetic thing. And then yeah, one of my friends just texted me today that she gave another one of my deck away. So she buys them in five packs now.Mischa Zvegintzov 42:23Nice!Molly Mandelberg 42:24Yeah. So there's people who are really sharing it on my behalf. And then there's been a few podcast episodes where I just talk about my deck and that's helped too.Mischa Zvegintzov 42:32Yeah, cool. Um, when a previous conversation we had, I wrote down some notes van broke down, reclaim your power coincidence shifted relationship with your father, uh, you have a really sort of great...you know...Molly Mandelberg 42:48One of my Bitch slaps from the universeMischa Zvegintzov 42:50Yeah, bitch slaps from the universe. Why don't you? Why don't you tell me about that?Molly Mandelberg 42:54yeah, so I bought my van, three and a half, almost four years ago. And I started traveling it before I built it out. So it actually took me about two and a half years to finish the build inside because I didn't want to stay in one place and finished building it. I would just sort of drive to Colorado and build the bed and drive to Minnesota and put the solar panels on and drive to North Carolina and figure out the wiring of the solar panels. And so I was building it as I traveled around the country and did workshops and attended conferences and had speaking gigs and also just traveled to see friends and family. And on that first trip. Right after I left Oregon where my mom lives. I was about 1000 miles in and my turbo went out. I it was I didn't know it was a turbo yet they tried to fix the resonator. I made it on another 1200 miles. And what's interesting is the second time it went out I was listening to this book called busting loose from the money game. And if you look you have it.Mischa Zvegintzov 43:58I do I have it and I need to read it. Someone gave it definitely read it. Oh my books. What's that?Molly Mandelberg 44:02Read it? Yes. Okay, read it with caution after I tell you this story. So there's a process in that book. Basically, it's telling you how to step out of the matrix and recognize your the infinite being and take your power back from all the trauma and drama of this reality. And it tells you when you do this process, it's very likely that life or this reality, or the universe is going to hand you an opportunity to really walk your talk with this stuff. It's going to give you something to try and convince you that you are human and you're limited and this reality is real, and that you're a victim of it.Molly Mandelberg 44:43And so I'm listening to that process and he's basically telling me that and boom my turbo goes out again, or my van giant turbo dial diesel van goes into limp mode, and I'm on the highway and I'm just barely in Santa Fe New Mexico. So I limp off the highway I make it over a little crest and coast down to where I say there's a shop. And part of me is like, I'm doomed. I'm stranded. This is terrible. What am I going to do? And another part of me is like, wow, that happened real fast. So long story short, it's like $5,500 to fix the van, I don't have it. I, my mother, who I would normally borrow money from in a crisis is in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean on a ship, teaching her screenwriting class on a cruise crossing the Atlantic, unreachable. My father, who I had never asked for money for before, who's not a financial supportive person historically, in my life, I call him just to let them know where I'm at, and that I'm stranded and that I'm trying to figure this out. And he ends up being able to, like Pay Pal the money from a credit card to make it possible for them to start the repairs. Hmm. And so that's underway.Molly Mandelberg 46:01And I have this epiphany of like, Oh, I could email my list. My list was really small back then. But it was not tiny. And so this is an opportunity, I need money right now, why don't I put a flash sale out to my audience and see what happens. And so I sent an email. And within a few days, a couple people had bought a half price VIP day with me so that we can get a lot of work done on their business.Molly Mandelberg 46:24So those two things made it possible for me to get back on the road, I ended up having an awesome few days in Santa Fe going to 10,000 waves going to meow Wolf, which is why I was passing through Santa Fe in the first place. And my relationship with my dad completely changed. I now saw him as somebody who could support me in some way. And that was a shift, our relationship has been totally different. Since then, we're much closer and much, I don't know, I feel like more seen and held by him in a way that I didn't before that.Molly Mandelberg 46:58And I also got to know that, again, my email list is an amazing resource that, especially when I need to generate money really fast, it's there. And I can do that. And that's the whole point of having an email list and nurturing your audience is so that when you need to, you can press the button and find more, hopefully, create more income right then.Molly Mandelberg 47:21And in the process. This big scary upset of my van is broken and it's new. And I thought I was doing this big adventure. And now I'm screwed. And it's like, no, wait, I took my power back from that. Not only did I get these beautiful silver lining gifts, but I got my van fixed and back on the road and I am the infinite being creating my reality. Look at that. So it was a huge big lesson, which looks like to an outsider, A Bitch Slap From The Universe, but it ended up being a great thing.Mischa Zvegintzov 47:52Yeah, like what was a heavy, potentially gnarly time and probably very stressful in the moment scary in the moment. Yeah. Yeah. To just new, blossoming relationship with Father or new perspective for you and an opportunity for him to maybe do what he hadn't done before in a new way or whatever. And he took advantage, right. Like, how amazing is that? Yeah, seize that opportunity for your dad. God bless him. Right?Molly Mandelberg 48:20Yeah, totally.Mischa Zvegintzov 48:21And then, I think you told me if you don't mind me saying how big your list was at that time, is that al right?Molly Mandelberg 48:27It was like 600 or something.Mischa Zvegintzov 48:30Yeah.  So what was the offer that you made them? Do you remember? And is this...Molly Mandelberg 48:33It was a half price VIP day? So at that time, my VIP days were like 2500, I think. And so I was selling an eight hour package basically for 1250.Mischa Zvegintzov 48:45And this is like, this is post Karen. And so a few years post Karen...Molly Mandelberg 48:50yeah,Mischa Zvegintzov 48:51yeah, so you're at this point, likeMolly Mandelberg 48:53I had started to make a name for myself in the niche that I was in. And there were enough people on my list that were waiting for cheaper opportunity to work with me. Mischa Zvegintzov 49:03(Mischa cackling maniacally)Molly Mandelberg 49:03They took advantage of that, and I don't even do VIP days anymore. But if I did, they would be more than that. For sure.Mischa Zvegintzov 49:09That's amazing. Tell me tell me how do you nurture that moment? Because I think it's so beautiful and poignant and to see your father in a new light?  And you know I have kids you know. and so when they were born I'm like, Oh, I knew aware... knew appreciation for mom and dad right? Oh, my kids are now you know, smelly 10 year olds.  new appreciation for my parents, right whatever. This moment for you. How quickly do you... are you like that was that was a powerful moment? or was this like a year later? Or in the moment? Are you like, "oh my gosh!"?Molly Mandelberg 49:59No. I sobbed a lot when that happened, because in my story in my head was that my dad doesn't have my back in that way that my dad is more of a Brother Uncle figure than like a father who can support me. So, yeah, it was really big in the moment. And I recognized it right away. It was after the fact I think that I noticed my energy toward him had shifted to, over time, in the times that we've hung out since then.Mischa Zvegintzov 50:31Did you try to nurture that in a different way now?Molly Mandelberg 50:35I think I'm more forgiving of him as a person, more in allowance of him. I mean, I've also undergone another, however many years of personal development work and healing on my own to help that relationship. I won't say it was all from that moment. Yeah, he gets he's grown up more in the last few years to.  In his mid 70s.Mischa Zvegintzov 50:56(Mischa babbling for a couple seconds)Molly Mandelberg 50:57It was hard and, and, like challenging, especially when I was younger, and it has become more beautiful and better over time. And that was definitely a turning point for us.Mischa Zvegintzov 51:09It's beautiful. Thank you for sharing that. I can't let this one little thing that you said go by either. Mom was on a cruise. Great writing class. What?Molly Mandelberg 51:21Yeah, my mom is a wildly successful screenwriter. She's had a, like 40 plus year success as a writer. And she teaches she used to teach Screenwriting at UCLA Film School, and she moved to Oregon, when I was like seven. So that was like 28 years ago. So she's been teaching at PSU and out of her living room in Portland, Oregon for the last 20 years or so. And about 12 or 13 years ago, she decided to start doing it as a retreat. So she always takes a transatlantic cruise liner. And there's always at least six or seven days at sea before you get to Europe, and people right and take her class in the morning and write all afternoon on the at sea days. And then everybody goes in frolics around Europe on the days that they're in Port.  Yeah it's a pretty awesome retreat, especially for anybody who wants to be a writer. And if you decide to go on that retreat, tell her I sent you. And I've gone on it five or six times myself, and I always get a lot of writing done.Mischa Zvegintzov 52:20Wow, that is amazing.Molly Mandelberg 52:23That quiz started on the ship, or at least got a lot of creation done the quiz that I made, a lot of that writing happened on the ship. And when I was in my 20s, I was writing a novel a ton of that novel got written on the ship. And last two years ago, I started writing a book about my life as an entrepreneur.Molly Mandelberg 52:43And a lot of that got written on the ship too. It's a really beautiful way to get a lot of writing done because you don't have to cook anything. You don't have to go anywhere. There's nothing to do on a cruise ship. That's actually fun. So you're sort of forced to sit there and get things done.Mischa Zvegintzov 53:02And what a great conduit your mother. sounds like she is. and then also just being in the space with others to where like minded and...Molly Mandelberg 53:09collective consciousness of creation.Mischa Zvegintzov 53:12Beautiful. What do you think? Tell me the top three things you've learned from your mother over the years.Molly Mandelberg 53:20I've learned everything from my mother. I mean, I am most grateful for getting to witness her living a creative life successfully, that she was never someone telling me I should get a real job or I should pigeonhole myself into something that wasn't for me. She's been my biggest champion and supporter of living a very creative and, and conforming lifestyle. Which I'm sure was harder when I was younger and more crazy than the van life is really a stable life for me compared to who I used to be.Molly Mandelberg 53:55Yeah, a writer. I mean, I know so much about story crafting and about the process of letting a project come to life because of her. And most most grateful for the, the way she sees the world.  I was raised believing in the law of attraction. believing in many lives and believing in like a higher consciousness, then religion would give me a view of. and so I'm really grateful for the spiritual understanding that I was raised with. And I think that's shaped me into a lot of the person that I've become because I had those as answers when I was asking questions as a kid.Mischa Zvegintzov 54:34That's unbelievable.Molly Mandelberg 54:35Yeah.Mischa Zvegintzov 54:37Any tension points with you and your mom over the years?Molly Mandelberg 54:40Oh, sure. Yeah, I mean, we have to rebel against something. It's so much more confusing when you're rebelling against just too much love but yeah...Mischa Zvegintzov 54:48OMG!  that's amazing.Molly Mandelberg 54:50Yeah, she also remarried. When I was six she married very verbally abusive alcoholic who was her high school sweetheart.Molly Mandelberg 54:59So if You didn't see it at first. So a lot of my resistance with my mom was just resenting her for bringing that into our lives. But as I got wiser, I recognize that there was a part of me that chose that as my path so that I could arise from that. And that we were all... in my opinion... we all chose that dynamic coming in so that we could learn what we need to learn from it.  which is pretty far out for some people who have been through trauma to try and recognize like, oh, I chose this, that there's been a lot of freedom and taking responsibility for that part of my life having gone like that. and then getting to choose to evolve from it. And so I stopped blaming her for that being a hard childhood.Mischa Zvegintzov 55:40Hmm. Hmm.Molly Mandelberg 55:41Yeah.Mischa Zvegintzov 55:43You remember, when that shift started taking place?Molly Mandelberg 55:47Yeah, I was like 28. 29. When my business started is when I started seriously, doing a lot of personal development work and healing, and taking my power back and giving up blaming other people for my life. And that was part of that process.Mischa Zvegintzov 56:12What was your entree into that? Was it like Tony Robbins? Or was it like, I mean,Molly Mandelberg 56:18I forget, but I was going, I've been to so many conferences and workshops and read hundreds of personal development books on healing and transformation. So it was the process of all that.Mischa Zvegintzov 56:30Hmm.Mischa Zvegintzov 56:33Just quick question, just for fun, like, somebody who's in that space, right? And we all come to that point, I believe. well, I don't know. Maybe not everybody.  But I definitely come to those points have got to find forgiveness.  Gotta take accountability. gotta... Right? And that's sort of some of those.Molly Mandelberg 56:51Yeah,Mischa Zvegintzov 56:52Bitch slap moments. And I think there's a difference between reading and then applying. Right? So I can keep reading about the things that you're talking about. reading these books, going to these conferences. But like, which, what, you know what I mean, like some people get stuck...Molly Mandelberg 57:10get some of the tools that have worked best for me, the work by Byron Katie, which is books that I've read, "Loving What Is" is a great book by Byron Katie, which covers the work. I had a lot of personal development and growth stuff happened at Thrive Academy, which is a business training program. But there's a lot of transformational development that comes in there. Access Consciousness is a entire modality school of thought that has dramatically changed my life and helped me see my point of view and question it on a regular basis that most of the big shifts in my energetic and like emotional body, life space has happened through Access Consciousness, and I won't go into what that is because it's so hard to define. And it is limitless. But if the words Access Consciousness resonate with you at all, I highly recommend looking it up watching YouTube about it. I'm reading some books. Dain Heer wrote a great book called Being You Changing the world, which is about Access Consciousness. And then,Mischa Zvegintzov 58:11Quick side note. I did a thing called tools for a Good Life Summit, where I brought in all these different modalities. And I reached out to I want to Dane, I was like, I want Dave to be your guide, but whatever he was, he was like, yeah, yeah. Anyway, but go on. So... Molly Mandelberg 58:28Yeah, totally, um... NLP was out as a lot of great healing and tools. And hypnotherapy was hugely transformational. For me too. IMolly Mandelberg 58:35think the main thing is, if you're aware that you could be happier. that your life could be greater. that your relationships could be more deep, or connected or communicative. You are the only one who can change any of that. And so when you start to recognize that... if your life is hard and struggling, and you're willing to take responsibility and be at cause for that changing.  then you become the dowsing rod for the tools you're meant to use to get to where you want to go.Molly Mandelberg 59:03But staying in the stuck and staying in the story. And staying in the woe is me, everything's wrong, is just a continuation of the same wrongness on and on and on. And if you start to say, Okay, I'm willing to take charge now I'm willing to choose to change this, I'm willing to be aware of whatever I need to be aware of to make my life better or greater, or happier or more whole. Or stop being broke and have money now, whatever that looks like. You will b

One Funnel Away: Stories
Kimberly Maska - CEO of Spiritual Biz Publishing and Creator of Spiritual Biz Bootcamp

One Funnel Away: Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 35:58


Kimberly Maska is helping spiritual coaches create their own 6-figure businesses online and she used ClickFunnels and the One Funnel Away Challenge to help take it to the next level!In today's interview you'll find out just how Kimberly was impacted by the Challenge! Find out about how she was able to recognize the importance of an EMAIL LIST, which is something we all as entrepreneurs need to be mindful of!You'll also find out how Kimberly has created her very own Challenge to help her business and she'll elaborate on just how impactful challenges can be for your business!Make sure to check out Kimberly's websites and funnels at:KimberlyMaska.comSpirtiualbizsuccess.comAnd if you want to join the challenge yourself, just head on over to OneFunnelAway.com and join us as we'll be here waiting for you!

Marketing Ink: Big Ideas for Local Businesses
STUDENT SUCCESS: A Horse Fencing Business' Million Dollar Contest Strategy

Marketing Ink: Big Ideas for Local Businesses

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 47:23


In this exciting episode, I sit down with one of my very own coaching & mentorship students, Jeff Chandler, co-owner of Seven Peaks Fence & Barn, and a recent Clickfunnels 2 Comma Award recipient! Not bad for a rodeo cowboy from Mesa, Arizona! Jeff shares his humble beginnings, the contest strategy I helped him develop, and the strategy he used to generate over a million dollars in revenue from his sales funnel so far, and how you can use this same strategy to grow your own business! Check out Seven Peaks Fence And Barn: https://www.sevenpeaksfenceandbarn.com/ ________________ If you would like to schedule a call to see how we can help your business or agency, visit https://alliebloydmedia.com/local-call To apply for the waitlist of my upcoming mastermind, visit https://alliebloyd.com/mastermind ________________ Get the Offer Creation workbook For FREE: https://alliebloyd.com/offer-workbook ________________ Get 3 FREE Text Campaigns & 2 Weeks of Highlevel FREE: https://alliebloyd.com/sms ________________ Join My FREE Facebook Group: https://facebook.com/groups/remodel.your.marketing _______________ Get my Facebook ads ultimate jumpstart pack for FREE: https://alliebloyd.com/jumpstart

Ecommerce Empire Builders
This Dropshipping Business Makes MILLIONS SELLING PILLOWS?!!

Ecommerce Empire Builders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 15:23


We came across this business on facebook and had to show you how this one product dropshipping business is making 7 figures a month highlighting one particular product. We analyze its ads, analyze the funnel and even purchase it to have a look at the upsells. In tomorrows video we will build this dropshipping business for you and allow you to download and use the template!▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬

Ecommerce Empire Builders
I QUIT My Job & Started Earning 6 FIGURES When I Learned This...

Ecommerce Empire Builders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 13:01


Are you tired of not living up to your potential? As the year wraps up you're probably thinking about all the stuff you didn't achieve, all the goals you didn't meet and all the potential that went waisted. In this video I talk about the biggest mindset shift that allowed me to quit my 9 - 5 job, start my online ecommerce dropshipping business, and achieve my financial goals. I hope this video serves you well!▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬

Mi Primer Millón: Secretos Del Mundo Digital
Cómo Invertir El Dinero Que Generas Con Tu Curso Online

Mi Primer Millón: Secretos Del Mundo Digital

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 7:23


Regístrate al grupo secreto de Facebook donde podrás aprender estrategias únicas para crear un negocio por internet exitoso. En este episodio Sergio Perdomo hablará de cómo puedes crear un portafolio de ingresos pasivos que te permita llegar al siguiente nivel para que puedas lograr esa libertad y tranquilidad financiera, por medio de las ganancias de tu curso online.Suscríbete al podcast en Apple, Spotify, Google y Stitcher

Ecommerce Empire Builders
5 Day “Realistic” Dropshipping Challenge ($200 Budget) | PART 6/6

Ecommerce Empire Builders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 22:35


In part 6 of our challenge we go over all of the sales that occurred as a result of the challenge. With a $110 in ads invested we were able to more than double the amount in sales with a total of $226.58. We analyze what each customer bought and give our thoughts and insights into funnel design. We also go over the ad performance and give some final thoughts!If you have enjoyed this 6 part dropshipping challenge series we hope that you will leave a massive like and comment under this video! This way our realistic dropshipping challenge spreads throughout the ecommerce community so more people just like yourself can learn how to grow their own dropshipping business!▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬

Financial Investing Radio
FIR 138: Interview - How AI Turns Your Sharing Into BUSINESS GROWTH

Financial Investing Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 36:09


In this episode, we take a look at how AI turns your sharing into business growth. Grant Okay, welcome, everybody to another episode of ClickAI radio. So I'm very excited to have here with me today ShareThis business development leader. I think it got that right. Michael Gorman, business development leader. But before I go any further, Michael, would you introduce yourself? Michael You bet. Grant. Yeah, it's great to be here. Like you said, I oversee business development, but also product and marketing at ShareThis. I've been I've been with ShareThis for a couple of years. In that role. I have a background in data, really, data and analytics has been my passion. Also media and marketing sort of themes. I've worked for big data companies like Axiom, I've worked for an email marketing leader, digital impact, they got bought by Axiom. That's how I got there. And I've also worked for big consulting firms. And for ESPN back in the earlier days of my career. Grant Oh, wow. Could you maybe give us a play by play? I bet you could write ESPN. Interesting. Wow. Michaels It was a fun period. I was like years eight through 11 of the history of of ESPN, which, so is a fun time to be there. Grant How fun. All right. And he did some some consulting roles as well. So data and analytics, huh? Yeah. Right. All throughout all throughout the career. So what led you into this work was ShareThis what was it was the journey there? Michael Well, one thing is that, that I've worked with our CO CEO on the past, at axiom, so we knew each other, but ShareThis is a really, really special data asset. In a lot of ways, and within the world of the of the advertising that I've worked in for quite a few years. It's it was well known. So when I had an opportunity to do a little consulting for them, I jumped into it. And that led to the to the role. It's a Yeah, sure this is, you know, it's Well, shall I tell you a bit about the company? Or is that? Grant Yeah, yeah. I mean, yeah, tell me a little bit about how it got started. And its purpose and sort of the vision of it. Michael You know, well, like a lot of companies, it started with one purpose and, and things evolved a little bit over time, it, it started off in the early days of social networks, when Facebook was still a new idea and mind MySpace was, was beginning to slow down, it was with the idea of making it easy for any website to make to make it easy for their users to share content to all the social networks that they might have an interest in. And so a developer with a simple, taking, you know, taking a piece of code and pasting it on their website that they could then have sharing. We and so it was one of two or three tools that really started in those early days and became a leader in the space. We actually have a how to still maintain a trademark on that little little V on the site there. Yeah, I mean, that's what you're known for. Yeah. So it's a sign if that's there, it's a sign that sharing is you know, sharing tools are present. It's essentially the balance value for the for the publisher for the owner of the site who doesn't have to does no work to have sharing available will get some analytics as a result, sharing is valuable because it makes it attracts more people to the site new users more more content. And, and so it's it's grown up naturally. And we're, you know, so really well established. But a number of business models were tried over the years, but but about five years ago, we started focusing, moving towards being 100% about our data, is that really as a special asset, we have around 3 million publishers using us sort of our live arm 3 million now, that's been pretty stable, you know, half to three quarters and in the rest of the world, a quarter in the United States, a little biased towards English language, but we have every language in the world represented among the users on the sites. And, and so that data and and we'll talk more about this when we get into things like, you know, the the technology in the AI. Yeah, but we're really just, you know, it's like a window into what, what people are what's on people's minds? What are they looking for? What are they searching about online, and we can, you know, discern trends and also, you know, make sure that advertising is more relevant for for users. Grant So I have a question for you on that. So you've, of course, are familiar with the terminology of neuromarketing, right. And, you know, as a way of sort of tracking, how are people interacting with a site, right, and where do they go? And where do they point and click and, you know, there's organizations that look at, you know, extracting what the user is doing on the site, this feels like this starts to come into that world right that day. I mean, I don't know that it's tracking every single movement, but it's tracking, obviously, the event of I want to share something. Any thoughts on that? Michael Yeah, that's really interesting. I mean, there's a lot of different ways to make inferences about about people, we tend to focus a bit more on the on the broad, the broader picture, that the thing that's that, I mean, there's, like you say, so many choices. But the thing about online content is, it's very rich. So when a person visits a site, there's a lot of things there, there's a lot of things on the page they're looking at. And so what we've really focused on is using the page as a source of clues about what a person is interested in, we also might look at the link in and out of the page, and get a clue from, say, a search term as well, that's a that's useful, and clearly when someone shares, you know, content that's that that sort of zoned in on exactly what they care about on the page. But we've opted more for the broad picture of focusing, you know, taking all that richness and attributing some probability of interest that for you, for user to the things that are on the page. And that way we can we have just such a broad, you know, broad palette to work with. And I think also from the point of view of, of, you know, user consent and user experience, it means that what we're actually collecting is is relatively light, it's just that this user was on this page at this time. And any inference we make is not based on what he or she did, or how are their eye movement, there's no no personal collection, we just have the that event, and we get all the all the power. Grant So it's when they were there. Is it anything about how they got there? Or where are they left? Michael Yeah, exactly. We do. We do use the inbound links and outbound links when we can get them. And that sometimes, as I said, yields a search term, those can that was sort of part of the of the link the part of the information that what came with the user, you know, the referring search term or so that so there's some some useful data there as well. Grant Yeah. So so when you collect this, and then that's got to be a massive repository, I think I saw somewhere else and I'm looking at, was it three terabytes of raw data and 100 million keywords in 200 languages a day? Is that right? Michael It sounds roughly right. I haven't counted it lately. But, yeah, you're right. But But yeah, we we see about half a billion, you know, unique, what we call events, something, you know, something happened at a point in time, visits a share per day. Grant This is a grounds for, you know, a playing field for AI, right, just you have so much data. So tell me what it is you learn from it with the AI, right? What kinds of problems are you looking to solve? As you and I know, when we pursue AI, we, it would tend to be better served if we're going after a particular question or thought in mind. Now, obviously, we get surprised with AHA insights from Ai. But going intentionally after something makes a lot of sense. Can you give a scenario the kinds of things that you're looking for? Michael Well, the I would say that the theme that has worked for us so far, is to try to do is to focus on being the able to represent and reflect human interest, what are people interested in? And yeah, and so. So we, we use, and I guess where the AI comes in is that we use the latest techniques of language analysis and language modeling. So we capture all of the linguistic content on the page and then we represent it in a number of ways. What are all the prominent keywords? What are the what are the entities that are you know more that are Unusual, you know, a brand name, a celebrity name, a business name? What are the what is this page about the concept? Or what are? What are some of the concepts that accurately describe what this page is about. And then we have some standard categorization techniques are basically a taxonomy of topic interest topics that we we screen for, you know, and and it's not, it's not a yes, one of the nice things about this is it's not a, a, it's not a, it, we don't have to decide one thing, you know, we were able to say, all of the prominent keywords, and all of the interesting entities and several concepts and all the categories that this page is about. So it could be a page, it's about, you know, mountain climbing and and what shall we say? And Utah, and the, or the American West and, and road vehicles? And, you know, and beverages, you know, skiing or whatever? Right, right. Exactly. Grant Yeah, so some form of an ontology there, right, that allows you to sort of connect these together? Michael Yeah, we used a number of techniques that you said, One is, we built a custom ontology, using relative and you know, we're, we're not a huge company. So we, we try to wherever we can do something open source or free as the entry point we do that. And so we, we use some Wikipedia, it's slash DBPedia is a source for us. And, as is some Google free offerings that help us sort of the provide the raw material for building our customer ontology. We've also take great advantage of some of the latest open source language modeling tools. One is when it goes by the name of the Google released one, I forget what the what the acronym stands for, but one that's called Bert, and then more recently, one that's called Muse. Yeah, we use muse. Okay, that, that allows us to represent anything, either a word or a sentence, or the whole page as a as a set as a vector of 500 numbers. And if two pages have the same values for those 500 vectors, then they are about the same thing. Yeah, you got you have some affinity there right now, even though in practice, they might be in different languages use totally different, you know, different sets of words, but they're still about the same thing. That's, that's, that's really, for us that technology has been a real breakthrough. Because it's we've been sometimes keywords and can be very, you know, they can be false positives or No, yeah, negative. Grant I mean, there, yeah, there's nothing that governs some, you know, webpage designer to, you know, say, hey, are they using the actual right keywords? Right? Michael Yes, or even? Or even? How do you a lot of words have multiple meanings? How do you disambiguate to get the right one? Yeah. So this this, embedding technology, this Muse model helps us do that. And then Facebook is given we use a tool, they think it's called Facebook. Ai similarity search. Yeah. And both of these are open source tools, y'all you have to put in the effort and have the knowledgeable people to master their use. And that allows us because great, it's great that you've now got all these numbers you can compare, but that's a lot of numbers. That's you half a billion a day, you know, and we have we see 600 million unique pages every month. So so how do I great, I want to rank the 600 million pages to see which ones are most about skiing in Utah. Yeah, that's, you know, how do I do that quickly, and then and affordably? So fate, the Facebook tool helps us a lot with that. Grant So let me ask you a question that So so far, you've been talking about leveraging AI technologies to help you get your arms around that sheer volume of data on a daily basis and to try to extract some meaning and semantics and understanding from it. That's a good point that's on the side of ShareThis and the benefits to ShareThis. What about it from pivoted to the other side? What does it mean to it is, you know, I talk a lot with small medium organizations, how does that benefit them? What takeaways or values come over to help them through something like that? Michael Well, what the I mean, the industry that we started with, is was is advertising and programmatic online advertising as a place where we make our solution available. And so we were at this point, probably the leading source of the ability to target ads based on interest. So if if A small business were doing online display advertising and they went to Google's, if they use Google's platform or trade desk, or any of the major platforms, and they searched on, I want to find people interested in skiing in Utah, our data would be one of their choices to find that. And so it's designed to provide a broad set of individuals who in the last 30 days have shown some interest in that topic. And it could be, you know, it might be at the level of skiing, and they might, then they might, but but the nice thing about it is that we we've, I mean, it's hard, this is harder for the stats, that's what's available for the smaller business. That's, it's, it's right off the shelf, you can, you can use $1 worth or $10 worth or $100 worth if it works for you. But then on the big company side, we use some of those tools I talked about for is, well, what if, what if we don't actually have ski in Utah, we just have skiing, right? Well, we well, for an advertiser can can say, well, I need to skiing in Utah. In fact, I need to, you know, skiing in snow. But what is the alter? You know, we can create a segment using keywords and, and topics that is just about that is exactly what they need. Grant So if I were to look at maybe an advertising opportunity, leveraging, you know, this great insight that you have, does it allow me to target specific demographics, specific locations or locales? So like, you know, you're able to? Michael Absolutely, it's pretty much anything you could, I mean, because every kind of website needs sharing, we have our, our customer base, our base of publishers use our tool is pretty representative of the internet as a whole. And so if your interest is travel, we've got sites that are about, you know, traveling Las Vegas, traveling to Europe traveling to do outdoor activities, if you're interested in financial products, we can we can find things, you know, content that relates to whatever be at a mortgage or or FinTech to know. And we we represent those in about 1500 standard audiences that we distribute every day. And every day, the nice thing about our data, compared to a lot of datasets is we refresh it every day. Yeah, Michael I mean, it's every second, right? I mean, yeah, it could be, you know, people talk about real time, and we were always looking for people who've got a real time use case. But yeah, at this point, the the most frequently we refresh for a client, the customer is up by a by his hourly. Grant Oh, it's hourly, okay, that's, that's still really up to date. Yeah. I mean, if you had hourly insights on what the what's in the mind of people are the consumers that's really fresh data? Michael Yeah, yes. Yeah. Yeah, one of the areas that we that we are moving towards is trying to go beyond advertising and inform other activities like demand forecasting, you know, how much should we order for a store in a given location? Well, our data about how much interest is being shown on the products of that store, and in that store, in that area, we can sort that way, and provide that as an input. Grant That makes that makes a lot of sense. You know, there's, there's some retail organizations I've worked with with AI. And obviously, it always comes back to or not always, but most of it comes back to the supply chain, right, getting further and further left in terms of their their demand forecasting. And if they were able to understand you know, where that interest lies, it does almost gets to, oh, I know, this is a stretch in terms of language, but it's kind of a sentiment analysis, a play on that. Right. It's the ability Yeah, the ability to say I understand what the sentiment is in terms of where their interests are. And if I understood what that was, in terms of particular set of products or other things I'm offering, and I could get that further into my, into my supply chain, that would be really valuable to Yeah, Michael I mean, it's nice that you mentioned that we do we do actually score the sentiment of the content on the page. So we're sentiment is useful, either to only talk to the people who are in favor or opposed or the middle, we can we can build an audience that or provide that as a data element as well. Grant Yes. See, that's that's powerful to understand the the sentiment of the page itself, even how people are talking about it, or what they're doing, have you ever ran into the ability to use it in terms of IP tracking, right. So in other words, if there is an organization that had a certain set of IP and, and and really, yeah, they felt like oh, my IP, I've lost control my intellectual property, it's showing up in other places. Michael Oh, that's interesting. You know, I was thinking of I was thinking of the I the the IP address the Internet Protocol address. Yeah. Should have been more clear. Yeah, I'd love to answer that question. But that wasn't what you were asking. Well, yeah, answer. Oh, we'll start with intellectual property. Yeah. One sec. Regarding intellectual property? You know, we have it. Let me think about that. Let me give you the scenario. I had, one of the things I've thought about that we haven't taken on it, you know, is that is, is using using intellectual property as a data set? Yeah. If if we were to, to read to do the same kind of analysis I talked about earlier on trademarks. Yeah, it could mean be the means for discovering which, what sites were about branded products by seeing the correspondence between the trademark and the, because that's always you run into difficult How do you tell something's a brand? When is Jaguar a brand? You know? Exactly. Grant Yeah. Yeah, it's a fascinating problem. I had a company reach out to me and say, Hey, can you develop something in this area, and we did some work on that. I called it smart catch, but they were looking to protect their IP, their intellectual property, which was, we've got this corpus of information. And, and we've got others that are, you know, getting access to it and are promoting it, you know, elsewhere out into the, you know, online universe there, or metaverse. And, and I want to be able to discover, you know, when it's opportunistic, and you can use, you know, SERP and other technologies to try to find some of that stuff and do lots of scraping. But that's got its own challenges in terms of a solution. And where you've got this opportunity to listen. Right, right, to observe what people are sharing and to the to compare that against a corpus of protected material, right? Michael Kind of an intro you're giving, you're giving me a product idea. Seriously, one of the things that we've done this year, is to create what we what we call, you know, similarity scoring. So similarity, and that's gonna cause Yeah, you can literally give someone who was curious about the dispersing dispersion of intellectual property, give us a domain. Yep. And, or a, you know, the piece of content that describe their, their stuff, and we would rank our sites for which ones had it most. Right. And, you know, whatever the top 100, you know, and you know. Grant What I found interesting on that, when I built the initial piece on that was that I found that, in some of the discovery, in some cases, what I found was a foe. And in other cases, it was a friend. Exactly right. That, you know, okay, just because I found it doesn't mean it's an enemy. But, but it might be, and so you want to then notify them? Is this? Is this someone that's an ally or not? Anyway, interesting thought? Michael Because I think I think that sometimes there is a, you know, I don't know, there's a presumption that fraud detection or a bad actor detection is, is, you know, worth more, etc. But I do find that in a lot of cases, the pro cases are actually, you know, sometimes you just by suppressing something, you do more yourself more harm than good. Yeah. Yeah. Right. Right. That's another I wanted to touch on the other meaning of it. Yeah. Yeah. Now IP address. Yeah, yeah. So So an IP address is one of the four or five things that we capture for each case. And there's a lot that you can tell from an IP address, like, it can be translated into a location of origin, we approximate we resolve that to within half a mile. So that it's still relatively privacy compliant, and you know, not too revealing, but it certainly helps understand, you organize the data by where it's coming from example. And so the one use that is, has been an important one for us is business to business. So we, we have a number of the major companies that are in the business to business world license our data as one source where they're able to see people from a from an intellect Internet Protocol address that is owned by or been associated with a particular company. Oh, and then see what sites that that IP address is showing interest in? Oh, it just can be. Yeah, so it can be a signal that oh, it seems like you know, Chevron is interested in a new CRM system because they're you know, there's there's a big spike in that kind of traffic Awesome. Yeah, that's awesome. Yeah. Talk about so almost like a lead management. Yeah, solution for sure. That's, that's powerful. Yeah, to do that. that. Oh, there. Yeah. And that's yeah. And IP in general, I think the location implications are a really well, it's how I can, how we can do that demand forecasting I mentioned earlier, it's about looking at the origin of the data. Grant So some of the AI solutions that I've built take into consider location. So So in other words, okay, but in what I've been doing is more around, oh, some transaction occurred? Where was that transaction initiated? From? Oh, this, you know, here's the IP address. Okay, I know that where they are on the planet. Now, tell me what the context of what's taking place in you know, at that location? What is what's the weather like, right, what are other events that are taking place in that location? And then then use an AI to help draw inferences on, you know, to what degree are those factors affecting it? It sounds like you might be doing some similar things with that Michael I well, I think we could be a great contributor to any solution that was along those lines. I was adding that dimension of what are people looking at? What are people interacting? What topics? Are people in this location more engaged by then people in general, fascinating those comparisons? Grant Yeah, it's fascinating is okay. Very good. All right. So let me ask you on. Okay, so we've gone from the the big corpus of what you're collecting on a daily basis, or hourly, actually, hour by hour. And then we talked about the impact to, you know, maybe businesses organizations, when when is there a particular case or outcome that you feel like you could talk about some specific example where some organization used the advertising from that? What you did, and it had this sort of impact or effect on them? Do you have any sort of case study like that? Well, it's, Michael I guess that some of the ones that are coming to mind, I think, I mean, there's some of it's very straightforward. Yeah. An advertiser, like Western Union, is looking for people who want to make payments, you know, at a distance, I mean, wire wire transfers and payments, and we offer people showing interest in wire transfer, so that the simple act of being able to get your message in front of people who have recently shown interest in it is the is the, you know, it just doesn't need no explanation. We've taken that though, one of the things we did this year that I'm proud of is we were inspired by some of the events of last summer, to get more try to take a more active role and figure out what our data was good for. Beyond commercially, and, and we ended up creating a data for good part new part of our taxonomy, we call data for good. And so people interested in social justice loving people entered interested in veterans issues people wanted in. And so and those those segments, you know, have gotten are getting a growing amount of usage by advertisers who either, you know, wanting to demonstrate their commitment to the court to a cause, like, or to find or teachers or to, you know, communicate, right people who have concerns of that kind. So that's been one. Yeah. Another kind of it's, it's not in the mainstream of what we do. But we've, I think this data could be really great as a as a resource for educational institutions. So we've actually a major business school has has is testing I've taken a take taken a subsidiary six months of our data, and they're looking at using it in a project that they have to investigate unemployment. So fascinating. How could you How could you see earlier unemployment trends in a in a location or region that could help the for the process of forecasting the unemployment rate, and it sort of feed into it? Because I've, what I've, I think that lots of people govern organizations included, are somewhat frustrated by the fact that, you know, traditional means of forecasting that were invented before there were personal computers or barely work computers. Take a long time, you get to find out that 40 days after the month, what happened in the month, I love both data can be used to generate that much more quickly. Grant Yeah, Michael, that's I love how you're bringing that up. It seems like it has both the opportunities for not only the capitalistic aspects, but the altruistic aspects of this, the values and benefits that can help society and be pulled out of that. I think that's awesome. So all right. I've thrown a lot of questions at you. So let me ask you this, if you will. To direct direct my listeners to where to go to learn more, where would you send them? Michael Well, I would, I would love them to visit our site, because and in particular to, you know, to ShareThis.com, look, look at our news and our, our blogs, we we basically we publish both as you know, as a demonstration of our the value of our data. And and it's just a general service, we publish a lot of educational and informative information about trends in the economy, and, and public interest generally about how to do marketing well about trends in data. So so we we, we try to be a resource for people and I love I'd love people to visit that content, sometimes. Some of the best stuff is is not on on the nightly news. It's like putting some of it out. I could also you know, I can give you some examples. It would be fun. I go right ahead. Knowing that knowing this audience I we are getting a sense of who maybe was listening is interested in the show, I asked our team to identify some current trends. Yeah, I guess as we come to the end of 2021. Yeah. And so so we put these together. So what one is that, that, that while the world isn't, we're seeing the trend of the gradual resumption of events in person events, even though COVID continues to cycle up and down against the backdrop of COVID. So as of August, for example, 77% of advertised events were in person events, there was a period where, you know, year and a half ago, there was there, they basically no almost having anything, it was just shut down. It was virtual or nothing. That's interesting. So as we adapt, we are adapting. And so as you as you think about should I make plans for a virtual vet, should I invest in advertise? Should I invest in participating in virtual event? Yep, don't count them out. Even if you're nervous, you know, they, they're coming back steadily. Another thing, pattern we observed in finance, that again, you know, COVID is inevitably one of the backdrops to what any of us are thinking about, but people are continuing to be engaged with saving money. So, it so as you think about what, oh, you know, what is what's going on in the in the economy? As the, as virus uptake increases, as one of the things to extract is, is increased saving? And so if that's a, again, depending on your business, how that factors in if savings is your business? Yeah. When your could be good, good to you. If if, and then let's see, what's another one? Let's see. You know, we've heard a lot about supply chain issues. And you know, what, but what, if your retailer what a consumers most worried about? When and so the top concern is shortages and out of stock, and 51% a second costs, inflation and rising prices at 28%. And then staffing issues like worker shortages and strikes, 14, and last last of all shipping delays. So it's thinking about communication strategies, what's on people's minds that might make them not come to the store? That sort of thing? So I'm not surprised. Yeah, yeah. So and we're, we're putting out new new stuff of this kind every, every month in the blog. And and I firstly, look, I think we did we have Superbowl trends out, as of yesterday, I think. Grant So it's already started to build right. That's right. That's, that's amazing. So So you gather it on an hourly basis, and then you do the AI on it Michael Truthfully, truthfully, Grant, it's being gathered continuously. Okay, that's, that's what I thought, yeah, I thought we built we build it as it happens, okay. We literally, you know, record a record for each thing. That's, that's, that's filled out all the way with all the data that will that will need eventually. And then once an hour, we some or as we frequently as our we'll sum it up into a distribution and push it to someone but the most people get their get their data delivered overnight. Amazing. It's picking it up on their AWS bucket. Like Well, this is Grant Fascinating. Any final comments as we wrap up here? Michael Well, you know, I guess that I hope I've given you a sense of the I mean, AI is critical to our business. We are you know, we When we started on this track, we were about a 50 person company, we're approaching 100 person company. And so you don't have to be, you know, IBM to use AI AI to build a great business. So it's a combination of finding the right tools and a core of of talent, the right kind of talented people, and you can and and then, frankly, sustained effort over a period of years and you can build a business that is really hard to replicate, without without it, so very hard. Right. That's, that's my thought. That's, that's Grant Wonderful. Well, Michael, thank you so much for taking your time today. I appreciate you sharing your insights and guidance with us today, everyone. Thanks for joining another episode of ClickAI Radio and until next time, go get some ShareThis.com. Thank you for joining Grant on ClickAI Radio. Don't forget to subscribe and leave feedback. And remember to download your free ebook, visit ClickAIRadio.com now.  

Ecommerce Empire Builders
5 Day “Realistic” Dropshipping Challenge ($200 Budget) | PART 5/6

Ecommerce Empire Builders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 40:57


In part 5 of our challenge we go ahead and make the final touchups to the store and funnel to make sure everything was good for our customer traffic. We go ahead and show you the conversations we had with our influencer meme/viral style pages. Finally, we also show you the first sales that came as a result of our ads going live and break down the customer journey. If you enjoyed this video please leave a like and a comment down below so this gets shared with as many people as possible so many more individuals like yourself have the opportunity to build and start their own online business! ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬

Leverage
Building a $360m+ Business While Beating Cancer with Dave Woodward

Leverage

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 51:20


Dave Woodward is a world-class marketing expert, the CEO of Clickfunnels, and a stage 4 brain cancer survivor. Earlier this year, Dave was told he had a month to live—yet he's on the podcast today, cancer-free and on his way to a full recovery. Thanks to his neverending optimism, world-class doctors, and a strict health regimen Dave was able to beat cancer in just three months and get back to running one of the most successful funnel builders in the world. In this episode, Nick and Dave discuss Dave's history with cancer—from diagnosis to becoming cancer free—and how it has affected his outlook on life. Dave explains some of the health tricks he used to help his body overcome cancer and how they can also help people in their everyday lives. Nick and Dave then get into business talk, discussing some of the new features coming to Clickfunnels, what is and isn't working in digital marketing right now, and how to build meaningful relationships with your customers through the right communication channels.

Mi Primer Millón: Secretos Del Mundo Digital
Cómo Escoger A Tu Mentor Ideal (Busco Mentor Para El 2022)

Mi Primer Millón: Secretos Del Mundo Digital

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 8:40


Regístrate al grupo secreto de Facebook donde podrás aprender estrategias únicas para crear un negocio por internet exitoso. En este episodio Sergio hace una invitación para que cada uno prepare un plan para el 2022, cómo te gustaría que fuese el año que viene, cuales metas vas a trazarte para cumplirlas y mucho más.  Además te hará una invitación muy especial para un evento el Domingo 19 de Diciembre.  Para mayor información ingresa aquí  https://sabiduriamillonaria.com/evento-2022Suscríbete al podcast en Apple, Spotify, Google y Stitcher

Ecommerce Empire Builders
5 Day “Realistic” Dropshipping Challenge ($200 Budget) | PART 4/6

Ecommerce Empire Builders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 51:04


In part 4 we get to finding and researching the dropshipping viral style pages that we are going to be working with in order to launch the business! Also in this video we go ahead and create the actual dropshipping ad creative (images & videos) as well as write the ad copy that goes along with it. As always if you are enjoying this series and you've gotten value from part 4 make sure you smash that like button so more people like yourself who are building their ecommerce empire can learn and implement aswell!▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬

Ecommerce Empire Builders
5 Day “Realistic” Dropshipping Challenge ($200 Budget) | PART 3/6

Ecommerce Empire Builders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 61:11


This is part 3 of our 6 day online business challenge, in todays video we go over one of the most difficult parts of building an online business! The actual copywriting. Today you will learn how to write your dropshipping product copy with the help of our resources and also see step by step how your dropshipping copy is entered inside of your stores and funnels! If you are loving this series be sure to drop a massive like and comment to let us know how you are finding it and help spread this challenge so we can help people just like you build businesses the right way!▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬

Ecommerce Empire Builders
5 Day “Realistic” Dropshipping Challenge ($200 Budget) | PART 2/6

Ecommerce Empire Builders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 71:26


This is part 2 of our 6 part online business build challenge where my team and I build a completely new business from scratch right infront of you. Today is the best part in my opnion, actually building out the pages of your funnel! We use storefunnels to build out our entire dropshipping business and invite you to watch along and implement. If you found massive value and want me to do more of these challenges, smash the like button so this video is shared to all of those looking to start their online empires!▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬

Financial Investing Radio
FIR 137: Interview - How AI Ethics Affects Your Business !!

Financial Investing Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 36:48


Welcome to ClickAI Radio. In this episode I have a conversation with some AI experts on how AI ethics affect your business. Grant Okay, welcome, everybody to another episode of clique AI radio. Well in the house today I have got a return visitor very excited to have him and a brand new person. I'm excited to introduce you to Carlos Anchia. I've been practicing that I get that right, Carlos. Carlos Sounds great. Good to see you again. Grant Even old dogs can learn new tricks. There we go. All right, and Elizabeth Spears. Now I got that one easily. Right, Elizabeth? Elizabeth You did it? Yeah. I'm really happy to be here. Grant This is exciting for me to have them here with me today. They are co founders of plain sight AI. And a few episodes ago, I had an opportunity to speak with Carlos and he laid the foundation around the origin story of AI for vision, some of the techniques and the problems they're solving. And I started to nerd out on all of the benefits. In fact, you know what, Carlos, I need to tell you, since our last conversation, I actually circled back to your team and had a demo of what you guys are doing. And yeah, I think it was very impressive, very impressive, you know, a guy like me, where I've coded this stuff. And I was like, Oh, wow, you just took a lot of a lot of pain out of the process. You know, one of the pains that I saw come out of the process was the reduction in time, right that how long it would take for me to cycle another model through it. That was incredible, right? I can't remember the actual quantification of time, but it was at least a 50% of not even 80% reduction of cycle time is what I saw come through, there's even model versioning sort of techniques, there's just, you know, there's another really cool technique in there that I saw. And it had to do with this ability to augment or, or approximate test data, right, this ability to say, but but without creating more test data, it could approximate and create that for you. So now, your whole testing side just got a lot easier without building up, you know, those massive test cases and test basis for for doing the stuff So, alright, very impressive product set. And let's see, Elizabeth can you explain that? Elizabeth That's right, Chief Product Officer. So basically, kind of the strategy around what we're building and how we build it. And the order in which we build it is is kind of under my purview. Grant Okay, very good. Awesome. Well, it's so great to have both of you here today. So after I spoke with Carlos, last time, after we finished the recording, I said, You know what, I want to talk to you about ethics about AI ethics. And so as you heard in my previous podcast, I sort of laid the foundation for this conversation. And it's not the only areas of ethics around AI, but it's a place to start. And so we want to build on this. And we're gonna talk about these sort of four or five different areas just to begin the conversation. And I think this could translate certainly into other conversations as well. But to do that, could could one or both of you spend a little time giving the foundation of what is AI ethics as a relates to computer vision itself? What are some of the challenges or problems or misunderstandings that you see in this specific area of AI? Carlos Sure, I can take that one. So I think really, when we're talking around ethics, we're bowling any sort of technology, we're talking around how that technology is implemented, and the use of that, right and what's acceptable. So in the case of this technology, we're talking around computer vision and artificial intelligence, and how those things go into society. And it's really through its intended use on how we evaluate the technology. And I think really, computer vision continues to provide value to allow us to get through this digital transformation piece. As a technology, right? And, you know, once we start with, yes, this is a valuable technology, the conversation really now shifts to how do we use that technology for good, some cases bad, right? Where this is where that conversation arises around, you know, having the space to share what we believe is good or bad, or the right uses or the wrong usage just right. And it's a very, very gray area, when we look to address technology and advancement in technology against a black and white good or bad kind of a situation, we get into a lot of issues where, you know, there's a lot of controversy around some of these things, right, which is really, you know, as we started discussing it after the last podcast, it was really, you know, man, I really need to have a good podcast around this, because there's a lot to it. And you clearly said there was a previous one. And now there's this one, you know, I hope that there's a series of these so we can continue to express value and just have a free conversation around ethics in artificial intelligence. But really, what I'm trying to do is set the context, right. So like technology works great from the just the science of the application of that technology. And if you think of something like super controversial facial recognition, now, absolutely. I don't want people to look at my face when I'm standing on a corner. But if there's, you know, child abduction cases, yes, please use all the facial recognition you can I want that to succeed really well. And we've learned that technology works. So it's not the solution itself. It's how we're applying that solution. Right. And there's there's a lot of new ones to that. And, you know, Elizabeth can help shed a little bit of light here, because this is something that we evaluate on a constant basis and have really free discussions around. Grant Yeah, I would imagine you have to even as you take your platform into your into your customer base, even understanding what their use cases are imagined, at times, you might have to give a little guidance on the best way to apply our uses. What have you seen with this, Elizabeth? Elizabeth Yeah, you know, there's, it's interesting what Carlos is saying there's a lot of the same themes for evaluating the ethics and technology in general are similar ones that come up with when AI is applied. So things like fraud or bias is actually more can be more uniquely AI. But that absolutely exists in other technologies. And then inaccuracy and how that how that comes up in AI, and then things like consent and privacy. So a lot of the themes and we can we can talk about how AI applies to these, but a lot of the themes that come up, are really similar. And so one of the things that we try to do for our customers is, especially kind of your listener base, that's that small, medium businesses is take a lot of that complexity out of the, like, Hey, I just want to apply, you know, I just want to solve this one problem with AI, what are all of these concerns that I, you know, I may or may not know about. So, we try to do things like build, build things into the platform that make it so something like bias. So, for example, is usually comes down to data balance. So if we provide tools that really clearly show your data balance, then it helps people make unbiased models, right, and be confident that they're going to be using AI ethically, Grant So that I'm sure you're aware of this Harrisburg University in Pennsylvania case where they ended up using AI to predict criminality using image processing, right. And, of course, that it failed, right? Because it you know, looking at a an image of someone and saying, Oh, that person is a criminal, or that person's not a criminal. That's using some powerful technology, but in ways that, of course, has some strong problems or challenges around that. How do you help prevent something like this? Or how do you guide people to use this, this kind of tool or technology and in ways that are beneficial? Elizabeth Yeah. What's interesting about this one is that the same technology that causes the problem can also help solve the problem. So so when you're looking at your corpus of data, you can use AI to find places where you have data in balance and and just to kind of re explain the what happened in that case, right. So they had a data imbalance where it was Miss identifying Different races that they had less data for. So, you know, a less controversial example is if we're talking about fruit, right, so if we have a dataset that has 20, oranges, two bananas and 20, apples, then it's just going to be worse than identifying bananas, right? So one of the things that that can be done is you apply AI to automatically look at your data balance and say, and surface those issues where it can say, hey, you have less of this thing, you probably want to label more of that thing. Grant So I'll try to manage the data set better in terms of proper representation. And try finding, finding bias is a real challenge for organizations. And I think one of the things that your platform would allow or unable to do is if you can take off the pain of all of the machinery of just getting through this and and free up organizations time to be more strict in terms of evaluating and finally, oh, taking the time to do those kinds of things, I think you might have an opportunity to improve in that area meeting customers might be able to improve in there, would that be a fair takeaway? Elizabeth Yeah, it's something that that we're really passionate about trying to provide tools around. And, and we're kind of prioritizing these these tools. The other one is, is that has to do with your data is as well is finding inaccuracies in, in your models. So the one example is X ray machines. So they did. They've basically they had an inaccuracy in a model that was finding a correlation, I think it was for it was for the disease detection. So it was finding a correlation just when the X ray was mobile, versus when they went into kind of a hospital to get the X ray. And so, you know, these models are in many cases, really just very strong pattern detectors, right. And so one of the things that can really help to, you know, to prevent something like that is to make it easy to slice and dice your data in as many ways as possible, and then run models that way. And make sure that you aren't finding the same correlation, or the same sort of accuracy with a different data set, or a different running of the model in a different data set. So said, in other words, you would be able to say, I'm going to run all of the portable X-ray machines versus all of the hospital ones, and see if I'm getting the same correlation as I am with, you know, cancer versus not cancer, or whatever they were looking for. Grant A quick question for you on this. So in my experience with AI, I have found sort of two things to consider. One is the questions that I'm trying to get answered guides me in terms of, you know, how I prepare the model, right? I'm gonna first lean towards certain things, obviously, if I want to know that this is a banana, right, or an apple or what have you. So the kind of question that when I answer leads me to how I prepare the model, which means it leads me to the data that I select. And the question is, is do I do I? Should I spend the time really putting together the strong set of questions? And rather, rather than do that, just gather my data? And then and then execute that data, the build a model? And then Ben, try to answer some questions out of that, you see what I'm saying that way, maybe I'm not going to introduce any bias into it. Elizabeth So we we encourage a very clear sort of understanding of the questions that you want to answer, right? Because that helps you do a few things, it helps you craft a model that's really going to answer that question, as opposed to accidentally answering some other questions, right. But it also helps you right size the technology so far, for example, if you're doing if you're trying to answer the question of how many people are entering this building, because you want to understand, you know, limits of how many people can be in the building or, you know, COVID restrictions or whatever it is, that that solution doesn't need to have facial recognition, right. So to answer that question, you don't need you know, lots of other technologies included in there. And so yeah, So, so defining those questions ahead of time can really help in sort of a more ethical use of the technology. Grant So one of the first jobs we would then have a small medium business do would be get clarity around those questions that actually can help us take some of the bias out. Is that a fair takeaway from what you share? Elizabeth Exactly like the questions you're trying to answer. And the questions you aren't not trying to answer can also be helpful. Grant Oh, very good. Okay. All right. So all right, the opposite of that as well. All right. So while we could keep talking about bias, let's switch to something that is that I think comes right out of the movie iRobot, right. It's robot rights. Is this, is this a fluke? Or what, you know, is this for real? I mean, what do you think? Is there really an ethical thing to worry about here? Or what? What are your thoughts? Elizabeth You know, in most of the cases that I've seen, it's really more like, it comes down to just property, like treating property correctly, you know, like don't kick the robots because it's private property. So not really around sort of the robot rights but you know, some already established rules be in for the most part, I see this as kind of a Hollywood problem, more than a practical problem. Grant Maybe it makes good Will Smith movies. But other than that, yeah, fighting for rights, right. Now that seems like it's way out there in terms of terms of connection reality. Okay, so we can tell our listeners, don't worry about that for right now. Did you add something back there? Carlos Just an interesting point on the robot rights, right. While while it's far in the future, I think for robot rights, we are seeing a little bit of that now today. Right? When like Tesla AI day, when they came out, they decided that the robot shouldn't run too fast that the robot shouldn't be too strong. I think it's a bit. It's a bit interesting that, you know, we're also protecting the human race from for us building, you know, AI for bad and robots for bad in this case. So I think it's, it's, it's on both sides of that coin. And those are, those are product decisions that were made around. Let's make sure we can run that thing later. So I think I think as we continue to explore robots AI, the the use of that together, this topic will be very important, but I think it's far far away. Grant I'm wondering is that also blends into the next sort of ethical subtopic we talked about, which is threat to human dignity. And it might even crossed into that a little bit, right, which is, are we developing AI in a way that's going to help? protect the dignity of human certainly in health care situations? That certainly becomes important, right? You probably heard on the previous podcasts that I did, I played a little snippet from Google's duplex technology that was three year old technology, and those people had no idea. They're talking and interacting with AI. And so there's that aspect of this. So where's the line on this? When? When is it that someone needs to know that what you're interacting with is actually not human? And then does this actually mean there's a deeper problem that we're trying to solve in the industry, which is one of identity, we've got to actually create a way to know what it is that we're interacting with. And we have strong identity? Can you speak to that? Yeah, Elizabeth I think I think the there's two things that kind of come into play here. And the first is transparency, and the second is consent. So in this case, it really comes down to transparency, like it would be very simple in that example, for that bot to say, Hey, I'm a bot on behalf of, you know, Grant Larsen, and I'm trying to schedule a hair appointment, right, and then going from there. And that makes it a much more transparent and easy interaction. So I think in a lot of cases, really paying attention to transparency and consent can go a long way. Grant Yeah, absolutely. All right, that that that makes a lot of sense. It seems like we can get around some of these pieces fairly, fairly simply. All right, Carlos, any other thoughts on that one? Carlos The only thing there and then touches on the stuff you guys were talking about on the bias piece, right? We're really talking about visibility and introspection into the process. Right. And with bias, you have that in place, right? We can detect when you know there's a misrepresentation of classes within the the model. In some cases, there's human bias that you can get that right but it's it's having that visibility in the same case with the threat to human data. With that visibility comes the introspection where you can make those decisions. You see more about the problem. Grant Mm hmm. Yeah, yeah. So if we were to to be able to determine we have a bad actor, if there's not transparency, that would be a way that we could help protect the dignity of humans through this. Alright. That's reasonable. All right. So let's move on to again, sounds Hollywood ish, but I'm not sure it is weaponization of AI. Right? What are the ethics around this? I'll just throw that one on the table. Where do you what do you want to take that? Carlos, you wanna start with that one? Carlos Sure. I mean, so weaponization and and I think when we talk about AI and, and the advancements of it, you quickly go to weaponization. But really, weaponization has two different pieces to it, right? It's obviously it depends on which side of that fence you're on, on whether you view that technology is beneficial or detrimental. But in some cases, that AI that same technology that is helping a pilot navigate, it also helps for a guided missile system or something like that. So we really have to balance and it goes back to use cases, and how we apply that technology as a people. But you know, weaponization, the rise against the machines, these kind of questions. While they're kind of out there. They're affecting society today. And we have to be able to have productive conversation around what we believe is good and bad around this while still allowing technology to succeed. So there's a lot of advancements in the weaponization and AI in that space, but it's really, I think we have to take it on a case by case basis, and not like a blanket statement, we can't use technology in these ways. Grant Interesting thoughts? What are your thoughts there? Elizabeth? Elizabeth Yeah, you know, I it makes me think of sort of turning it on its head is, is when is it? You know, when is it unethical not to use AI, right. And so, some of those questions come up when we are talking about weaponization, you can also be talking about saving human lives and making it safer for them to do some of these operations. And and that same question can come up in some of like, the medical use cases, right? So here in the US, we have a lot of challenges around being able to use AI in medical use cases, and there's, and there's some where you can have really good human oversight of the cases, you can have sort of reproducibility of those models, they can be as explainable as possible. But it's still really, really difficult to get FDA approval there. So I, again, I think there's two sides to that coin. Grant And, yeah, it's it's an interesting conversation have stuff wrong, because like, in that medical case, you talked about, you could see the value of using the same kind of technology that would be used to identify a human target, and then attack it, you could take that same capability, and instead use it in a search and rescue sort of scenario, right? Where you're flying something overhead, and you're trying to find, you know, pictures or images of people that might be lost out there. Same kind of thing, right, so, so where how, go ahead, you're gonna say something was, but I can see. Elizabeth And there's even simpler cases in medical, where it's like, you know, there's a shortage of radiologists right now in the US and, and you can use, you can use AI to be able to triage some of that imaging. So, because right now, people are having to, in some cases, wait a really long time to get their sort of imaging reviewed. And so can can, can, and should AI help there. There's also another one along those same lines, where, with things like CT scans, you can use what's called super resolution or de noising the image. And basically, you can use much less radiation in the first place to take the imaging and then use AI on top of it to be able to essentially enhance the image. So again, you know, ultimately exposing the patient to less less radiation. So yeah, there's it's pretty interesting when when we can and can't use it. Mm hmm. Carlos Yeah. And I think just to add a little bit to the one we can and can't right, so, advancements through drug discovery have largely been driven through AI in the same fashion weaponization of various all drugs or other types of drugs have also benefited from Ai. So, I mean, from a society's perspective, you know, you really have to Evaluate not only greater good, but that that ultimate use case like, where where do you want to make a stance around that technology piece. And understanding both sides really provides that discussion space that's needed, you have to be able to ask really honest questions to problems that are, you know, what you can see in the future. Grant So is the safeguard through all of this topic around ethics? Is the safeguard, basically, the moral compass that's found in the humans themselves? Or do we need to have less, you know, legislative or policy bodies? Right, that puts us together? Or is it a blending? What do you what's your take? Elizabeth Um, it's interesting, the UK just came out with a national AI strategy. And they are basically trying to build an entire AI assurance industry. And, and their approach is, so they want to make sure that they're make, they're keeping it so that you can be innovative in the space, right? They don't want to make it so regulatory, that you can't innovate. But they also want to make sure that there's consumer trust in in AI. So they're putting together from a, you know, a national perspective, a guidelines and tests and, and ways to give consumers confidence in whether a model is you know, reproducible, accurate, etc, etc, while at the same time not stifling innovation, because they know, you know, how important that AI is for a essentially a country's way to compete and and the opportunities for GDP that it provides as well. Grant Hmm, absolutely. Yeah, I can go ahead, Carlos. Carlos No, I think it's his it's your question. Left alone, should we got kind of govern ourselves? I think, I think we've proven that we can't do that as a people, right. So we need to have some sort of regulatory, and committee around the review of these things. But it has to be in the light of, you know, wanting to provide a better experience higher quality, deliver value, right. And I think I think when you start with, how do we get the technology adopted and in place and deployed in a fashion where society can benefit, you start making your decisions around, you know, what the good pieces are, and you'll start your start really starting to see the outliers around Hey, wait a second, that doesn't kind of conform to the guidelines that we wanted to get this implemented with? Elizabeth And I think also to your question, I think it's happening at all a lot of levels. Right. So there's, you know, state regulation around privacy and use of AI and facial recognition. And, and there's, you know, some the FDA is putting together some regulation, and then also individual companies, right, so people like Microsoft, etc, have have big groups around, you know, ethics and how AI should be used for, you know, them as a company. So I think it's happening at all levels. Grant Yeah, like we said, that is a people we need to have some level of governing bodies around this to, and of course, that's never the end all protection, for sure. But it is, it is a step in the right direction to to help monitoring and governance. Okay, so last question, right? This is gonna sound a little bit tangential, if I could use that word tangential. It's given the state of AI where it is today. Is it artificial intelligence? Or is it augmented intelligence? Carlos I can go with that. So I think it's a little bit of both. So I think the result is, is to augment our intelligence, right? We're really trying to make better decisions. Some of those are automated, some of those are not we're really trying to inform a higher quality decision. And yes, it's being applied in an artificial intelligence manner, because that's the technology that we're applying, but it's really to augment our lives. Right. And, and we're using it in a variety of use cases. We've talked about a lot of them here. But there's 1000s of use cases in AI that we don't even see today that are very easy. Something as simple as searching on the internet. That's helping a lot from you know, misspelling things and, you know, not not identifying exactly what you want and recommendation engines come and say, you know, I think I'm looking for this instead. It's like, Absolutely, thanks for saving me the frustration. We're really augmenting Life in that point. Grant The reason why I asked that as part of this ethics piece is one of the things I noticed. And as I work with the organizations, there's a misunderstanding of how far and what AI can do at times. And and there's this misunderstanding of therefore, what's my responsibility in this. And my argument is, it's augmented intelligence in terms of its outcome, and therefore, we can't absolve the outcomes and pass that off to AI and say, Oh, well, it told me to do this, just in the same breath, we can't absolve and say, We're not responsible for the use cases either. And the way in which we use it, so we own as a human human race, we own the responsibility to pick an apply the right use cases, to even be able to challenge the AI, insights and outcomes from that, and then to take the ownership of that in what the impacts are. Agree, disagree. Carlos Yeah, I would really agree with that. And if you if you think about how it's implemented, in many cases, right now, the best use of AI is with human oversight, right. So it's sort of, you know, AI is maybe making initial decision, and then the human is reviewing that, or, you know, making a judgment call based on that input. So it's, it's sort of helping human decisioning instead of replacing human decisioning. And I think that's a pretty important kind of guiding principle where, where, wherever that may be necessary, we should do it. There's one, you know, the Zillow case that that happened recently, where they were using machine learning to automatically buy houses, and it was not. There was not enough human oversight in that, and I think they ended up losing something like $500 million in the case, right. So it's not really an ethics thing, but but it's just an example where in a lot of these cases, the best scenario is to have aI paired with human oversight. Yeah, yeah. Great, I think. Grant Yeah, no, go right ahead. Yeah. Elizabeth You mentioned you mentioned being able to challenge the AI, right, and that that piece is really important, in most of the cases, especially in the one that he just mentioned, around that. That Zillow case, right, without the challenging piece, you don't have a path to improvement, you just kind of assume the role, and you get into deep trouble, like you saw there. But that challenging piece is really where innovation starts, you need to be able to get back and question kind of, you know, is this exactly what I want? And if it's not, how do I change it? Right. And that's how we drive kind of innovation in the space? Grant Well, and I would say that that comes full circle to the platform, I saw that your organization's developing, which is to reduce the time and effort it takes to be able to cycle on that right to build the model, get the outcome, evaluate, oh, challenge, make adjustments, but don't make the effort to recast and rebuild that model such that it becomes unaffordable or too much time, I need to be able to iterate on that quickly. And I think as a platform you developed and others that I've seen, you know, continue to reduce that I think it makes it easier for us to do that in it from a from a financially responsible and beneficial perspective. 100% Elizabeth Yeah, one of the one of the features that you mentioned was the versioning. And that really ties into a guiding principle of ethical use as well, which is reproducibility. So if you are, if you want to use a model, you need to be able to reduce, reproduce it reliably. And so you're getting the same kind of outputs. And so that's one of the features that we've put in there to help people that versioning feature to help people, you know, comply with that type of a regulation. Grant I've built enough AI models to know it's tough to go back to a particular version of an AI model and have reproducibility accountability. I mean, there's a whole bunch of LEDs on that. That's exceedingly valuable. That's right. Yeah. Okay, any any final comments for me there? Yeah. Carlos I think for my side, I'm really interested to see where we go as people with ethics in AI. I think we've touched on the transparency and visibility required to have these conversations around ethics and our ethical use of AI. But really, in this case, we're gonna start seeing more and more use cases and solutions in their lives or we're gonna butt up against these ethical questions, and being able to have an open forum where we can discuss this. That's really up to us. To provide we have to provide the space to have these conversations, and in some cases, arguments around the use of the technology. And I'm really looking forward to, you know, what comes out of that, you know, how long does it take for us to get to that space where, you know, we're advancing in technology and addressing issues while we advanced the technology. Grant Excellent. Thanks, Carlos. Elizabeth. Elizabeth Yeah, so for me as a as a product person in particular, I'm really interested in these the the societal conversation that we're having, and the regulations that are starting to be put together and kind of the guidelines from larger companies and companies like ours that are, you know, contributing to this thought leadership. And so what's really interesting for me is being able to take those, that larger conversation and that larger knowledge base and distill it down into simple tools for people like small and medium businesses that can then feel confident using AI and these things are just built in sort of protecting them from making some mistakes. So I'm really interested to see sort of how that evolves and how we can productize it to make it simple for people. Grant Yeah, yeah. Bingo. Exactly. Okay, everyone. I'd like to thank Carlos Elizabeth, for joining me here today. Wonderful conversation that I enjoyed that a lot. Thanks, everyone for listening. And until next time, get some AI with your ethics. Thank you for joining Grant on ClickAI Radio. Don't forget to subscribe and leave feedback. And remember to download your free ebook, visit ClickAIRadio.com now.

Ecommerce Empire Builders
5 Day “Realistic” Dropshipping Challenge ($200 Budget) | PART 1

Ecommerce Empire Builders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 57:24


The Empire Builder team and I decided to record the entire process of building a dropshipping business from scratch and to show you what it really takes to build and launch an ecommerce dropshipping business and make sales. We have tried to show you the entire behind the scenes and we hope you learn alot and implement everything from this video. Please show this video massive love so that it can be spread to everyone trying to build there online dropshipping business!▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬

Mi Primer Millón: Secretos Del Mundo Digital
Cómo Encontrar Ese Diferenciador Que Haga Vender Tu Curso Online

Mi Primer Millón: Secretos Del Mundo Digital

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 8:36


Regístrate al grupo secreto de Facebook donde podrás aprender estrategias únicas para crear un negocio por internet exitoso. En este episodio Sergio hablará de cómo puedes descubrir cuál tema de curso online es el ideal para ti y qué pasos debes seguir para encontrar tu nicho y el factor diferenciador para tu curso online. Suscríbete al podcast en Apple, Spotify, Google y Stitcher

The Marketing Secrets Show
Forti, Funnels, and Football: A World View, Part 1

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 28:42


Russell and special guest Josh Forti dive deep into funnels,  storytelling, and building your own reality. Find out how to break free of what's expected, how to create your own rules, build your own world, and be OK with being different. Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com Magnetic Marketing ---Transcript--- Russell Brunson: What's up, everybody? This is Russell Brunson. Welcome back to The Marketing Secrets podcast. Today, I've got two things for you. Number one, I got kind of a cold so if I sound a little funny, that's why. Number two, is you guys loved our last three podcast episodes with Josh Forti, so we thought we should do it again. Today, we jumped on a call and we recorded three more episodes for you, and they've been a lot of fun. The first episode was all about just kind of... It was an interesting conversation, and I think it took us a while to get exactly to the point. But by the end, the end of of it wrapped with some really cool thoughts and ideas and I think some clarifications that'll help you guys a lot. But it was all about I'm in this world of funnels, and how has that affected my world perspective, my world view and, everything else happening around me? And how does that work for you with the thing that you're most passionate and most obsessed with? And so I think you guys will enjoy this conversation. With that said, I'll queue up the theme song. When we come back, you have a chance to listen in on a conversation with me and Josh Forti. What's up, everybody? It's Russell Brunson. Welcome back to The Marketing Secrets podcast. A little while ago, Josh Forti and I did a couple episodes. We've done this three times now technically. This is the fourth, but we did an episode a little while ago, just to see how you guys liked it. And the feedback was amazing. I got tons of good feedback. I think you did as well, right? You saw everyone. Josh Forti: I got tons. I sent you some of them. We convinced somebody to start a podcast over it. Russell: Because of the... Yes. Josh: Because of the podcast. Russell: ... podcast. We are having little podcast babies now because of what happened last time we hung out, and I'm pumped. We're jumping back in. We got three episodes of recording today. I know the title of the topics, but that's about it. I don't know where we're going, the direction, but I'm pumped and excited and just grateful for you, man, doing these. I really enjoyed it last time. I left afterwards pumped and on fire and had a ton of energy, so I'm excited for this. Josh: Heck yeah. That's awesome. Well, are you sick? Russell: Yes. I have a little stuffy nose, so I apologize in advance if I sound... My voice sounds deeper though, so I sound more masculine which is kind of cool. But yeah, definitely got a little bit of a cold. Josh: Oh, man. As long as it's not COVID. Russell: Oh, yeah. No, I did that. We're good. The antibodies are flowing through my body, so I'm pretty good there. Josh: Heck yeah. Russell: Well, what's the plan today? What are we talking about for this episode? Love to get kind of- Josh: Are we doing intros or are we just jumping in? Russell: This is the intro. I'll do intros. Josh: This is it, we're in. We're rocking and rolling. Russell: We're live. Let's go. Josh: All right, all right. Let's dive in. Dude, interestingly enough, as I went back and I started going... By the way, I actually listened to all three of our episodes, even though we did them. I actually went back and listen, because I'm that geeky nerd. I was talking to one of my friends. We were sending VOXs back and forth to each other and he's like, "I just listed to my vox back to you." And I'm like, "I'm glad I'm not the only one that does that." And he's like, "Oh, no, you are the only one. I just did that one time." I'm like, "Crap. Dang it." I go back through it. I listen to VOXs and I listen to podcasts. I'm trying to figure out how I could've made them better. But what's interesting is I wanted to take this one a little bit of a different route today, to kind of kick things off. Because normally, I'd say there's two types of podcasts. There's educational podcasts, which is you're talking on a very specific topic, and you're trying to educate people on that. And then there's entertainment podcasts. Entertainment is much more... Maybe it could be educational still, but it's not designed to educate you on one specific thing, and then break all the beliefs around that thing. And then do the whole perfect webinar thing on a podcast episode. Whatever. But rather, just kind have an open conversation. And I want to open this one up, talking specifically about funnels. And not funnels and how you build them, but I want to know is funnels a worldview for you? And what I mean by that is right now, I'm really, really big into storytelling. That's kind of my thing that I'm geeking out about, is how to tell amazing stories. And I call it the master story. That's the core thing that I'm trying to figure out right now, is the master story for me is what's the one story I got to get people to believe? After they believe that story, they'll do whatever I want them to do. It's the big domino statement of stories. But as I've done that, I've kind of gone out and everything in my life now revolves around stories. I'm like, "Oh, story there, story there. Oh, that's the story? Oh, that's the story." And my whole life now is just everything is stories. Obviously, I'm a huge fan of Expert Secrets and Dotcom Secrets, and you wrote those books and everything like that. You talk about kind of building this world and this identity, and bringing everybody in. And so I'm curious for you, where do funnels play into your life besides just marketing? Is this a worldview? Is this a lens upon which you view the world? Russell: Everything. Yes, for sure it is. It's interesting. I still remember back when I first got in this game, and I was learning marketing, and then I started studying Dan Kennedy's stuff and started... And I remember starting after I got that, some of the initial inputs of this world. What's the Matrix? The red pill or the blue pill. I took the pill and all of a sudden I was like, "Oh, my gosh, I see the world differently." And for me, it was fascinating. I started loving, I became obsessed. In fact, you can ask my wife this. We first got married, we listened to the radio and commercials would come on and she'd want to change. I'm like, "No, no, no. What are they doing? Did they do a good job did, they do a bad job, and how could they have done it better?" I started geeking out on that and I started watching more infomercials. I started watching as you go down the highway and you see the billboards. "Okay. That billboard, did it make me do anything, did it not? Was there a call to action, was there not? If there was, what did... " I'd get my phone out and I call the number and like, "What happened? What was the sales pitch?" And I started seeing behind the curtain of what was happening, and I became obsessed seeing that. And I remember, this is probably a little bit prior to this, but after I started seeing things I started realizing how things made me feel. I remember in high school, I was the wrestler, as you know. and I was into my health and fitness. I didn't understand it back then, but I do remember Bill Phillips had a magazine called Muscle Media. This is probably way before your time. But it was the first muscle building magazine that wasn't... All the other ones were these dudes who were just steroided out. And Muscle Media was the dudes and the ladies in it was who you want to look like. That guys looks amazing. And he had a supplement company called EAS he launched, and so I got into supplements and got into Bill Phillips. I got into his world, where I was reading his magazine articles and buying his supplementsm and it was cool. But I remember I wanted to buy some... I can't remember what the new supplement was. And there was a GNC close to my house.And so I remember jumping my bike, riding down to GNC, being so excited to buy a supplement. And I walked through the door, and as soon as I walked through the door of the GNC, the person came out and was like, "Hey, how can I help you?" And I'm like, “uh…”, and kind of freaked out. I was like, "Oh, I'm just looking." And I got all nervous and then I kind of wandered away, and then it felt like the person was kind of following me and everything. And I remember I came there cause I wanted to buy something, but I felt so uncomfortable, excuse me, that eventually I just snuck out and I left. And I was like, "I didn't get the thing." Because I felt so uncomfortable in the process that even though I came there with my money in hand, ready to buy something, I didn't because I didn't like the process. And I noticed, I don't know if you ever go into a GNC. As soon as you walk in, they always come and they pounce on you. And even to this day when I walk into GNC, it's one of my favorite stores. But I know the initial anxiety of the person pouncing on me asking if I can help them, or what I'm looking for. I'm like, "I don't know what I'm looking for. I want to literally read the back of every label of every bottle here. I'll come to you if I need help, but don't come and pounce on me." And I started realizing that and I started thinking, "If this was my story, how would I have wanted to be approached?" And I started thinking the script. And I started thinking if I came in the door and the person says something like, "Hey, welcome to GNC today. I'm over here. If you need anything, let me know." And it was more of a deflect, I would've felt more comfortable. I would've walked around, then I would've felt comfortable coming back the person. And I just started thinking through that. Anyway, that was before I learned marketing. I remember feeling that way, and as I started studying marketing I was like, "Oh, my gosh. I now know why I felt that way. The script was wrong and the process was wrong." And I started thinking through things more like that. And I'm sure it was annoying for my family. We'd go to a restaurant and I would notice how did the server do things, and what did they say? And it started opening up for me. In fact, my junior year in high school during the summer, I got a serving job and I was serving tables. And I remember, because I would split test different things to see what would give me more tips. If I said this to a person versus this. And I remember in fact, this is a 17 year old kid who's stuck on himself. I'd roll my sleeves. "If my sleeves are rolled up and they see more of my arms, would it be higher?" And literally would split test this thing to try to figure out how to increase them. And it's just weird. That was when I was young, and definitely it's messed me up nowadays, because it's hard for me when I see every ad, everything. I want to go deep into things, and I do sometimes but sometimes it takes me long rabbit holes. I don't know if that answers the question or not. Josh: Okay. Well, I want to kind of dive further down deeper into that, because I want to expand beyond just marketing as well. Because I think any of us as marketers when we have the light bulb turn on, you take the red pill or whatever it is. I remember for me, I had that first experience with money. I grew up in a very small, small, small town. The two towns collectively combined had 750 people in them, and one bank and a gas station. Very, very small world. And then I started learning about money, and I'll never forget the day that it clicked for me. I was actually out in... I had already moved to Nebraska, and I started to realize how money flowed. And I got done reading this book, and I remember I picked up the phone and I called one of my friends who had been teaching me about money. I'm like, "Dude, I get it now. I get everywhere around. I can't not see how money is flowing and where it works." I'm like this, and now I have all these questions about it. And so I totally understand when your lights come on, you start seeing the whole world through that, for that specific thing. But I want to know what about other areas of your life, and how funnels and your viewpoint of funnels has affected that. And what I'm trying to get at and understand, is you talk a lot about in Expert Secrets, we're building this identity, we're building this community, we're building this movement, this calling. And what's interesting for me I've noticed, is that when I first got into this space, I was so new that the preconceived notions of what people should do or should not do did not affect me. Because I didn't know anything. I was like, "I know I'm an idiot." people were like, "You're doing that wrong?" I'm like, "Probably." And there was no ego in the way of it. But then as I grew, I thought there were certain ways that I had to think, or there were certain things that I had to do. And then if I broke free from the mold that everybody else was doing, then somehow that was wrong. And I struggled with that. Thankfully for me, I didn't stay in there. But what helped me get out of it, is I gave myself permission and I literally was like, "I'm doing my own world over here. Everybody else, they can have whatever it is that they want. They can make more money than me, that's fine. I'm building this own little thing." And when I envisioned myself stepping into this world, then I was allowed to make my own rules. And so the rules had to follow everything else, but people would be like, "Josh, it's super weird that you think about everything in marketing." And I'm like, "But that's my world." And so everything about my life, from what I buy, to where I live, to who I hung out with, was all shaped around that. And for a while, that was weird. And whenever I would go to my friends it was like, "You're weird." And I struggled with that. But then once I gave myself kind of permission to be like, "Well, that's just literally how I think. That's my world, and it's okay to be different." That really freed me. And so I'm curious. How has funnels shaped your world outside of only marketing? And what would you tell somebody? Would you tell someone it's okay to like view the world through whatever their new opportunity is, in all aspects of life? Does that make sense? Russell: I think so. It's interesting, because I know you're trying to get outside of marketing, but it's fascinating because in my vision of the world, like everything is marketing. Josh: That's what I'm saying though. That's what I'm saying. Russell: When I meant my wife- Josh: How has that affected relationships? When you are dealing with a problem in your family, do like go like, "What's the funnel for this?" Does that make sense? Russell: How do we craft the story, the pitch, the thing. But it's true, because I think about when I met my wife. When I met her, there were multiple people who... She was the prospect and multiple people all competing for her attention. It was like, "Okay. I've got to create a better offer. I'm not the best looking guy, so I got to... What are the tools I have to increase the value of what I have to be more attractive to her?" And things like that. With my kids right now, it's tough because my kids have got so many distractions and there's things that are way cooler than dad. I'm always trying to think through that lens of, "Okay." Josh: Wait, there's people cooler and Russell Brunson? What? Russell: You could never be a prophet in your hometown, they say. You're never cool to your own kids. But it's tough though, because I'm competing against all of... For my kids, the rappers that are in their ears, and they're listening to all these people who... That part of the world. And they got their friends and they got these... There's so many things we're competing against. It's like, "Okay. Well, how do I take them on this journey to be able to help?" And you talked about universe building, which is true. In fact, I'm working on a project with Dan Kennedy right now, and it's all about that concept of universe building, and things like that. And you look at the big companies that have done it successfully, that's what they did. Walt Disney built this universe. In fact, I've listened to the interviewed me and Dan did on Funnel Hacking Live, and he talked about Walt Disney and Hefner were basically the same business. He's like, "One had bunnies and one had had rabbits or whatever. Or one had mice, one had bunnies." But it's the same business, right? They both had a universe that people came into. And I think about that. We're doing the same thing. You create a universe for your customers. That's a lot of what the Expert Secrets and everything is about, creating this customer universe. But it's true in your office with your team, it's true with your family, it's true with your relationships. You're kind of trying to craft this environment that makes people first off want to be there and to be part of it, and then to persuade people to hopefully get the things you're looking for. All of us are in a persuasion business, even we don't want to admit it. And people are like, "I don't persuade people. I don't manipulate people." But you are. What do you want to eat for dinner tonight? You got to persuade the other person. What movie do you want to go to? Are we going to go out tonight, or are we going to sit home on the couch? You're always in this thing of persuasion. And if you look at any kind of sales environment, is the number one. The biggest, one of the most important things when you're trying to sell somebody something, is the, the environment. The universe that you put them in. It's the reason why if I do a pitch on a virtual event, where somebody is at their own home, in their own environment, and I'm giving them a glimpse in my environment. I can convert and I can sell people. But I do the exact same presentation at Funnel Hacking Live in a room where I control the environment, they're in my universe. My sales were 5-6X, even though it's the exact same presentation, exact same everything because I'm controlling the environment. And so my home, same thing. How do I control this environment, my home? And how do I structure things? And how do we set the same things? You think about in the ClickFunnels ecosystem, we've got these awards. We got the Two Comma Club awards, Two Comma Club X. We have things like that. How do we create these things for people to strive towards inside of our families? Colette and I did that a couple years ago. We were trying to figure out what's our family goals. Do we have a goal? What does that look like? What's something that we can collectively all work towards together? And in the Mormon church, one of the biggest goals is you want to get married in the temple. But to get married in the temple, you have to be living worthily. There's all these things to do. And so as a family, we set a goal. How do you explain it? If my kids get married in the temple, their younger siblings won't be able to go, because they're not old enough to be able to go into the temple to actually witness the marriage. The goal we set as a family, we set a goal of when Nora... Because Nora is the youngest. When Nora gets married, the goal is we'd love her to get married in the temple, and we want all of our family to be there. Which means all of our family has lived in a way where we're worthy to be there together as the family. That became our family goal, and it's this thing we're all shooting towards. And it's fun, because now when I'm having family conversations with my kids, it's like, "Hey, you shouldn't be doing that." It's like, "Hey, these are things that are keeping us away from our family goal." We want to do this thing in 10 years from now, 15 years ago, Nora... But the way you're living, you're not going to be able to do that. And it's less of me trying to tell them what to do, as much as this is the goal we collectively set as a family. This is what we're trying to get to. Same thing in Marketing, we're trying to get the Two Comma Club award, cool. You can go listen to forty other gurus if you want, but this is the path. This is the process. We can get you there, but if you're distracted... It's just kind of a similar thing where, you set the things inside the universe, the goals, the steps. And hopefully, everyone... Not that they will or that they want to. Maybe my kids decide they hate the universe and they want to break out of it, and that can happen, too. People don't think funnels are cool, because they don't like me. I talk too fast or I'm annoying or whatever, and they enter different a different universe, but that's okay. Josh: Yeah. And I think entering a different universe, I think maybe what I'm trying to get at is I grew up, once again, super small town. Super small world, and I just figured there was a way the world worked. Singular. That's how it worked. And as I've grown up, I was striving to figure that out. I'm like, "What's the way the world works?" And I get out there and I'm like, "Oh, my gosh. There's five million different ways the world works." And depending upon whose world old that you're in. And so I was watching the football game last night. We had it on. It was the Steelers and the Vikings. I don't know. By the way, I know you don't watch football, but I'm going to make a prediction on here for all my football fans out there. Patriots are going to the Super Bowl versus Tom Brady. It's going to be Tom Brady and the Bucks versus Bill Belichick and the Patriots in the Super Bowl. Anyway, we're watching it last night and they have this documentary that's coming out. Do you know who John Madden is? Russell: Yeah. Just from the video game. Josh: Yeah. They have this whole thing on Madden and his whole life. And it's coming out, this documentary, and they do little clips, and there's all these different little people talking about it. And they're like, "This dude, you couldn't be around him and not love football. Because he just exuded football in every aspect of his life. At the dinner table, around his family, around his friends, at the... Football, football, football, football." And it got me thinking, because I'm preparing for this interview last night. And I'm like, "That guy's whole life was football. That's how it came about. He couldn't imagine a reality where football didn't exist. "Yet there's somebody else out. There's millions, billions of people out in this world who they never heard of or think about or want anything to do with football." And so here's a guy where his whole life revolves around football. All of his analogies, all of his stories, all of his strategies, everything was football all. And then I was like, "Oh, I wonder if that's what it's like living with Russell." Everything is funnels. And it's like funnels, funnels, funnels, funnels, funnels. I feel like sometimes as entrepreneurs, I know I struggled with this for a while, and I struggled with this a lot more when I didn't know what I wanted to do with my life. When I was still trying to figure out my voice and kind of everything like that. But I'm like, "I just can't be the X guy, because that would be weird. That's not how reality works. That's not how life works. You don't just get to just focus on all of this." But I feel like it is. And I feel like you don't necessarily have to be a single thing guy, but I feel like you can. In the sense of... And that's why I'm trying to get at with you, is I feel like you've gone into this world and you've found the thing that works. And you've said, "Hey, listen, basically, in life you have to know where it is that you're going and how it is that you're going to get there." That's essentially in life, and that's kind of my core premise of everything. I'm like, "I don't care how you live in life." But I'm like, "If you don't know where you're going and how you're going to get there, your life is going to suck. You're not going to have a very fulfilled life." And so I feel like for you, you've figured out, "Okay. Wherever I want to get, this is the vehicle I'm going to use." And you've built an entire reality and universe around that. Yeah? Russell: Yeah, for sure. And it's interesting though, too, because I actually was on a call last night with Stu McLaren at their prediction college here, and he was asking my predictions for the future. And it's interesting because yes, funnels is the thing. It's my lens. And that's what people come to me. It's the lens they come through. But what I think is fascinating, and I see this with... In fact, I told Stu, I'm like, "There's an evolution. People were experts for a while and then they became influencers." And I think the next phase, it won't stick. People will still call themselves influencers, because it sounds cool and they feel the significance of that. But I think the next phase is people are going to become curators more so. Which is someone comes to me for funnels, but it's interesting because my last inner circle meeting, people pay 50 grand to be in the room. There's 100 people in this room and they're here because they want to learn funnels from Russell. We're talking about funnels and then we open for Q&A. And guess how many funnel questions came through? Zero. The questions were, "Russell, I came to you for funnels, but I trust you. I like you." And they didn't say this, but this is what happened, is they wanted to figure out how I curate. They wanted me to curate other thoughts for them. "I trust you in this, therefore what do you think about religion?" And they want me to take all my years of curation of all the ideas like, "This is what I believe." Or they're like, "How is your family successful?" And so they asked me these other questions. And I was telling Stu last night. I'm like, "Stu, you're the membership guy. People come from your memberships. But after they come in, that's what brings them into the door, but then they're coming because they want your curation of other ideas." Dan Usher. I think Dan on our team. It was fascinating, because his favorite band is Rufus or something like that. I don't really know the band that well. But he's obsessed with them and their music, and so he follows them, he loves them and everything. And he just bought his first house out here in Boise, so he needed to get art on the wall. He's like, "Well, I love Rufus. I trust them. They've curated their favorite art." He went and bought everything that Rufus ever said they like for art and put it on his wall. He's like, "Cool. Because I trust them, therefore I want this." And then he bought the furniture that they have in their house, because he trusts their opinion on this and other things. And so I think it's with Madden, I'm sure the football is what brings people in. And they come in there, they sit at the table for that. But then if they like him and they connect with him, then they want to know, "What else do you know?” I want to go down these other rabbit holes with you, because I trust you and I trust your opinion. I trust because you've already kind of done that." I think for me, that's probably more so, is they come in from one thing, but then if they connect with you then they want to dive deep on all the other pieces, the things that you find fascinating. Josh: Yeah. It's almost like they need the in to step into your universe, and then you get to build the rest of the universe out for them simply because you've built trust in that one area. Russell: Yeah. And what's fascinating. If you rewind back in my history 15 years ago, it was tough because when I was trying to create my universe, I didn't know that's what it was called. But it was funny. If you look at the landscape in our industry back then, it was interesting. Jeff Walker was the launch guy, Frank Kern was the mass control guy, Filsaime was the butterfly marketing person. Everyone had a thing where they were the best. Brad Fallon was SEO, and then you had Perry Marshall was PPC, and everyone had their thing. And I came in, I was good at all of this. I'm like, "I'm the guy who do everything." And I'd go to events like, "Cool, what do you do?" I'm like, "What do you need? I'm good at copywriting, and I can do all the things." And people are like, "Oh, okay." But then they'd go and they'd sign up for Jeff for launch. And I'm like, "I can do launch. I've done tons of launches." Or they'd go to whoever for copywriting, John Carlton for copywriting. I'm like, "God, I've done all these things." But there wasn't a thing. It wasn't until I specialize in. "Okay. Funnels is the thing." And it was a narrow focus where people could attach a thing in their head like, "Oh, Russell is the guy who does funnels." And they do that. But they come into the... That's the doorway that brings them into my world. But inside the funnel world, what is there? You can launch a funnel. There's copywriting, there's traffic driving, there's all these other things. But I had to bring them in through a channel they could connect with, they could label me with. You know what I mean? But after they're in my universe, there's all sorts of stuff I can do with him. Josh: I feel like that right there was the core of what I was trying to get after. I think a lot of people struggle with or are afraid to claim their thing, because they're like, "I can't just claim it." Funnels. Russell could claim funnels because that was a thing, but was it a thing before Russell? Was there a funnel... You are the one that came in and nobody came to you and was like, "Russell, you're the funnel guy. Go." You were the one that had to decide that. You were the one that had to come in and be like… Russell: And it's fascinating, because I was the only one back then talking about it. There was a bunch of people. In fact, I remember Todd and I started building ClickFunnels. And I remember about that time it was T&C, so it was the T&C before we launched ClickFunnels. And we got T&C, we were sitting in the audience, and Todd and I are mapping things out, and we're talking back and forth. And the entire T&C, that event was about funnels. And so Ryan was on stage, Perry was on stage talking about funnels they developed. "This is the funnel framework for all funnels." They sold the $18,000 funnel coaching program and half the room signed up, and all this stuff. And I was like, "Oh, my gosh. That's what we're trying to go, but they just took it from us." And then it was crazy. After that T&C, then everyone was talking about funnels. And it was funny, because the next week everyone became a funnel consultant. All of a sudden, 2,000 little funnel consultants were running around the internet talking about funnels. And I remember Mike Filsaime had done something showing behind the scenes of one of his funnels, and I remember somebody else got mad. I'm like, "We're the funnel person. You shouldn't be talking about this us." And I remember Mike and him were fighting back and forth. I was kind of watching this and I was like, "We have this software coming out called ClickFunnels. And I have this book I'm writing that's almost done called Dotcom Secrets, which is all about funnels." And so I was stepping in this thing where there was a whole bunch of noise around this topic, and I could have been like, "Who am I? I'm not qualified." Whatever. But instead I was like, "You know what? This is what I'm obsessed with. And I'm just going to do my thing, and I don't care about everybody else." And so I just did my thing and came out there, and there were people who... I can't tell the actual stories, but there were people who were upset. "You shouldn't be talking about this, Russel. This is so and so's thing." And then at TNC the next year, there was some weird comments from stage made about stuff. Because in fact, somebody said from stage, "Because of what we talked about last year at T&C, Russell created ClickFunnels because of us." And they gave them credit for this thing. And it was just this craziness. But man, we were the only ones who took it and that were consistent, consistent, consistent, consistent. I'm seven, almost eight years into the consistency, which is how you define the path. That's how you get the... You look at Jeff Walker, who's been talking about product launches for 20 years. Therefore, he's the product launch guy. People try to come dethrone him, but he's been consistently talking about the same thing for so long that you can't. And so the biggest thing is picking the platform, and then you just triple down on it and you keep doing it, and doing it, and doing it. And eventually, you will rise the Victor. But most people don't have the longterm, the patients to keep just drilling in for long enough to make it stick. Josh: Yeah. And I think that a lot of times, at least in my experience, and it could be different for other people. But a lot of times, it's because you're just not confident enough in it. The only thing that's going to be the difference of whether or not it's going to stick or not, is whether or not you're confident enough to follow through. That's not necessarily true for every single product universally. Sometimes the market doesn't fit, and sometimes there really is... If you tried to launch a competitor to iPhone right now, you're probably not going to make it. But generally speaking, especially in our world with funnels and experts and a lot of online influencer marketing and things of that nature. It's basically whoever sticks at it the longest and then creates the clearest, simplest stories, the clearest, simplest frameworks, and the easiest way for people to be able to get results with it, are the ones that are actually going to make it and follow through. Russell: Yeah. That's the game, and it's so much fun. Josh: All right. Well, I'm ready to move onto topic number two here. We're about at time. Russell: All right. Josh: You ready to rock and roll? Russell: We'll wrap it up. Thank you guys for listening. If you enjoyed this, let us know. Otherwise, we'll never do this again, so if you loved it, tag me and Josh on Facebook, Instagram, wherever you guys do stuff. If you tweet, I probably won't see it there, but tweet it up and let us know, and we'll come back and do some more of this stuff.

Ecommerce Empire Builders
I LOST MILLIONS DROPSHIPPING BECAUSE OF THIS!! (Don't Make This Major Mistake)

Ecommerce Empire Builders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 6:47


The difference in profit is HUGE when you do this, vs when you don't. My advice to all those starting their dropshipping business is in this video! We recently did a challenge where we built a business from scratch and having this one little hack in our dropshipping funnel completely changed the results!▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬

Mi Primer Millón: Secretos Del Mundo Digital
El Primer Paso Que Debes Realizar Para Crear Un Curso Online Exitoso

Mi Primer Millón: Secretos Del Mundo Digital

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 7:42


Regístrate al grupo secreto de Facebook donde podrás aprender estrategias únicas para crear un negocio por internet exitoso. En este episodio Sergio Perdomo te va a explicar que es lo primero y lo más importante que debes tener claro a la hora de crear un curso online e incluso si ya tienes uno, te contará cuál es esa base que debes tener bien estructurada para que puedas generar más ventas.Suscríbete al podcast en Apple, Spotify, Google y Stitcher

MLM Rebels
What We Learned From Black Friday 2021...

MLM Rebels

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 13:24


What We Learned From Black Friday 2021... www.MLMRebelsBluePrint.com You can join the FREE private group where we talk about all things Sales Funnels for MLM at www.mlmsalesfunnels.com. Enjoy the show! And if you did, leave a review on the podcast! If you do, email support@zacharyspear.com and we'll send you our very own free+shipping funnel which has been featured on the ClickFunnels' homepage and "mother funnel" which produces thousands of people contacting us to join our business. Yours completely for free when you leave a review and a 5 star rating. Plus one lucky reviewer each month will receive a FREE MLM Rebels membership, which includes private coaching, a street value of $25,000. All you have to do to enter is leave a 5 star rating and review on the podcast

Lets Have This Conversation
Growing Your Entrepreneurial Messages Into Great Businesses with David Branderhorst

Lets Have This Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 27:44


Are you interested in maximizing your fullest personal or professional potential? All of us have a reason for being on planet earth. Things we were called to do. People we were meant to serve. Lives we were destined to impact. David Branderhorst is the Owner at Profectus Resources. Which helps entrepreneurs take their messages and gifts and grow them into successful businesses that change the world But none of this ever happens by accident. It is the result of careful planning, constant action, and daily strengthening of our skills and abilities. The best way to fulfill your life's mission is to chart your own course. When you leave behind organizations that expect you to serve their mission and purpose, you create room for your own destiny. That's what true freedom is all about and why I am so passionate about helping entrepreneurs Design, Launch and Grow businesses that create free cash flow and the ability to experience life in ways most can only dream of. Over the past decade, I've had the pleasure of creating multiple highly successful businesses generating millions of dollars in sales and won the 2 Comma Club award from ClickFunnels. He joined me this week to tell me more. For more information: https://davidbranderhorst.com/ LinkedIn: @David Branderhorst

#DoorGrowShow - Property Management Growth
DGS 148: The 3 Dominos To Knock Over To Close More Property Management Deals

#DoorGrowShow - Property Management Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 17:47


Property management growth expert and founder/CEO of DoorGrow, Jason Hull talks about three dominos that you need to knock over to close more property management deals. Jason discovered the three dominos concept in sales from Russell Brunson, a New York Times bestselling author that popularized sales funnels and co-founded ClickFunnels to help entrepreneurs get their message out to the marketplace quickly. You'll Learn... [01:25] Three Dominos Concept: How to pitch property management services. [02:19] The three dominos are the vehicle, internal beliefs, and external beliefs. [02:39] Domino #1: The vehicle is your service to get to what people want. [03:29] Competition: What are all the alternative vehicles for property management? [04:55] Lead Gen: Cold leads are costly and warm leads cost time but less money. [06:33] DIY Option: Takes much longer to do everything and get the same results. [07:12] Domino #2: Tackle all of the customer's internal beliefs by offering support. [09:58] Domino #3: Deal with all external and false beliefs that concern customers. [11:05] Logical Conclusion: Only thing left is to sign up with you and your service. [13:45] What is sales? Helps people get what they want, and what you desire, as well. Tweetables “There's three dominoes that you need to knock over in order to get somebody to buy your services and to sign up with you as a client.” “If you knock over all three dominos, the magic that happens is the only logical conclusion they have left and decision they have left is to work with you.” “Safety and certainty is really what these people want.” “I'm building trust, creating relationships, and I'm helping them see reality, and really, I think that's what sales is all about.” Resources DoorGrow and Scale Mastermind DoorGrow Academy DoorGrow on Instagram DoorGrow on YouTube DoorGrowClub DoorGrowLive Russell Brunson Trello Transcript Welcome, DoorGrow hackers, to the DoorGrowShow. If you are a property management entrepreneur that wants to add doors, make a difference, increase revenue, help others, impact lives, you are interested in growing your business and life, and you are open to doing things a bit differently, then you are a DoorGrow hacker. DoorGrow hackers love the opportunities, daily variety, unique challenges, and freedom that property management brings. Many in real estate think you're crazy for doing it. You think they're crazy for not because you realize that property management is the ultimate high trust gateway to real estate deals, relationships, and residual income. At DoorGrow, we are on a mission to transform property management business owners and their businesses. We want to transform the industry, eliminate the BS, build awareness, change perception, expand the market, and help the best property management entrepreneurs win. I'm your host, property management growth expert, Jason Hull, the founder and CEO of DoorGrow. Now, let's get into the show. So today's topic, I was hanging out with my coaching clients today. We had a great call, lots of people, and we had a brand new client. He was asking about, how do I pitch? Basically, the question was, how to pitch property management services? One concept or principle that I related that I would like to relate to everybody listening today is the concept of the three dominoes. I don't think I've chatted about this before. If I have, then you can hear it again. Anyway, the three dominoes concept in sales, I got that idea from Russell Brunson. I've heard him talk about it. I just grabbed one of his books off the shelf here. In this book, he mentions it. He probably mentions it in his others, but there are three dominoes that you need to knock over in order to get somebody to buy your services and to sign up with you as a client. These three dominoes are the vehicle, internal beliefs, and external beliefs. If you can knock over all three dominoes, the magic that happens is the only logical conclusion they have left and the decision they have left is to work with you. Let me explain these. So the vehicle is the first domino. This is important. The vehicle is your service. Your service is the vehicle for them to get to what they want. If you're selling property management, the vehicle that you're selling or offering is your business doing their management. For me, the vehicle is our DoorGrow and Scale Mastermind, that's the vehicle that we offer. Now when looking at vehicles, if you want to knock this domino over and accomplish the goal of them recognizing it, your vehicle is the best vehicle for them to get into. You have to throw stones at all the other vehicles. You have to destroy all the other vehicles in their mind so that the only logical vehicle left standing is your vehicle. So if you want them to use your business for property management, you have to look at what are all the alternative vehicles? Write these down, figure out what are all the alternatives. They can self-manage. They could go to a real estate agent and ask them to do it. They could go to the big box company and franchise company down the street. They could go to the small mom and pop company that competes with you that's down the street. There are lots of different vehicles. After you've looked at what are all the possible vehicles that exist for management and you make a list of these, you have to figure out, how can I throw stones at these? Why is my vehicle better than them self-managing, than them using the big box company down the street, the small mom and pop shop down the street that I compete with, or whatever? If you don't have a good answer to that question, then you don't have maybe the best vehicle. How can you make your vehicle better? Sometimes you just need to work on your product and improve it. So you need to have the best vehicle. With my vehicle, the DoorGrow and Scale Mastermind and the coaching program that we offer, the alternative vehicles people have for growing their management companies could be hiring some other coach, it could be doing SEO, it could be doing pay-per-click, it could be doing content marketing, it could be doing social media marketing, or it could be pay-per-lead services. In my training that convinces people to sign up with us and work with us, I go through and explain why all of these vehicles generally are all cold lead advertising, and why cold leads are not as effective as warm leads. Why the close rate is typically 10%, or worse for most property managers with cold leads. Why cold leads are really expensive. You have to pay for these marketing services. You have to pay agencies, then you have to pay for ad spend, and it's really costly. I contrast that to our opportunity, our vehicle, which is based on warm lead generation, which is based on things that don't really cost you money. It does cost time, but it actually takes less time than dealing with cold [...] leads and prospects that are just time wasters and tire kickers, that are at the end of the sales cycle, that are searching on Google, that are super price-sensitive, and are the worst. They're the scraps that fall off the warm lead or word-of-mouth table that my clients get to eat at. This is how I attack the vehicle. For me, that's easy because it's true and it's obvious, I feel like. So I explain it, and then when people get it, they go, wow, that vehicle does sound better than these other vehicles and you might have written in some of these other vehicles. You might have tried them and you know from experience, they're not working really well. In fact, most of the companies that are trying to do those other vehicles to grow their business are losing more doors than they're getting on right now due to the sell-off that's happening in the marketplace. A lot of the larger companies are down at least 200 doors over the last couple of years. That might be you. So the vehicle, so you have to know how to attack all the other vehicles. I also have the alternate vehicle that is challenging or that I deal with, that clients will focus on which is DIY, just like you as property managers. We have people that are like, I can just read business books or I can just watch a bunch of videos on YouTube, I'll do it all myself. Awesome, I used to be that guy too. You could do that. And it will take you 10 years longer to get the same result. I've seen it and I've been that guy. I've been that guy that thought I knew everything and could do it all on my own. Until I started getting coaches and mentors that collapsed time. So I'm attacking that vehicle. You have to figure out how do I destroy and attack all the other vehicles. Once your vehicle is the only vehicle left standing, the next domino that needs to be knocked over in order for them to work with you is the internal beliefs. These are beliefs about their own internal self, beliefs about their own abilities to execute on this opportunity, beliefs about their concerns internally. You need to figure out what are all the internal beliefs and concerns that might prevent them from becoming a customer and from working with you, becoming a client, and signing the contract. Any internal beliefs like, well, I don't know, maybe they have a need for price anchoring. They don't know what the price should be for property management, you've told them your pricing, and they don't feel safe. So you need to solve that challenge. Maybe they don't know what your values are or things like this, and they're nervous that they might be blind to something or missing something. You have to figure out, what are all the internal beliefs that come up for your prospects? Make a list of these and you have to figure out, how can I throw stones and knock all of these internal beliefs down during my pitch? You've already knocked down all the external, third-party, and alternate vehicles. Now you need to deal with all those internal beliefs. A lot of times, internal beliefs have to do with levels of support. In our program, we deal with the internal belief, concern, or challenge like maybe I can't do it. Maybe this works for others, but maybe I'm not good enough, maybe I'm not charismatic enough, maybe I'm not cool enough, maybe I'm not smart enough, or maybe I'm lazy. We have to figure out how can we attack those internal beliefs. One of the ways is we focus on support. You get direct access to Jason. You can schedule a one on one with Jason as part of the mastermind. You're going to get telegram access to Jason so you can send him messages through Telegram—video, voice, and text throughout the week. If you get stuck or have questions, we also have Adam, Maddie, and others on my team that are supporting you as you move through certain processes like branding, web design, or some of the things that we help clean up in a business. They're there to support you as well. What other internal beliefs? Maybe I need to learn more. Awesome, we have DoorGrow Academy. We have a repository of training material we built up over the last decade of stuff that you can learn if you need to learn more in order to get the results. Cool, what about action? We have accountability and we have weekly check-ins that you're filling out each week to figure out whether you're doing it. We've taken a look at all the internal beliefs that we could think of that clients had challenges with or that were preventing clients from getting results, and we figure out, how do we tackle that and how do we deal with that? We're always looking to improve in that area. Once internal beliefs are handled, there are no internal beliefs left, then people tend to go external. So now the last domino that we need to knock over are all of their external beliefs. These are all the false beliefs they have about outside forces that could keep them from having success, things beyond their control. This could have to do with time, which keeps rolling on. It could have to do with the economy, which could be shifting. It could have to do with the real estate market at large. It could have to do with local laws and municipalities. It could have to do with the federal government. All of these are external beliefs, COVID hitting. What if this happens? What if that? All these external things that they might have concerns about, how will this be dealt with? What will happen here? If you can tackle all the external beliefs that this investor might have and knock all of those down, you make a list, like I said, of the previous two dominoes. Make a list, figure out what all of them are, and figure out how am I going to deal with these so that I can make them feel safe. Once you've eliminated all the external beliefs, you've thrown stones at all of those, the only logical conclusion left. They know that there's only one vehicle that makes the most sense. You've dealt with all their internal beliefs and concerns. You've dealt with all the external beliefs that they might have. The only logical conclusion left once those three dominoes are knocked over is to sign up with you, is to use you. There's nothing else that would make as much sense. So if you build trust through this process, safety and certainty are really what these people want. This is a big secret for sales and property management. Nobody gives a shit about property management. This is not what they want. They do not want to buy property management. They don't wake up in the morning and say property management is sexy and awesome. They don't read blogs about it and follow social media accounts about it. Unless they're property managers, they want safety and certainty. They want peace of mind. That's important for them. So having the best vehicle, having dealt with all their internal beliefs, and dealing with all their external beliefs, they're going to have a high level of trust, safety, and certainty in you and in their ability to work with you. They know that you're going to be able to deal with all the external factors that they were concerned about. So there's nothing left to really prevent them from signing up. Then you just say, if I can deal with all your concerns—internal beliefs and external beliefs—and I can explain why our vehicle is the best, would it be fair to say that you'd be wanting to sign up today? Is that fair? They'd say, yeah, probably. If I can help you see how we're the best company in the market for you, how we can make sure that you feel safe and taken care of, that we can make sure that all of your external concerns are dealt with, and we have answers to those, would you be willing to sign up today? Is that fair? Then you say, yeah, that makes sense. That's basically it. So put together your pitch. Go to the drawing board, you could write out each belief on a post-it note and get a whole list of all the internal, whole list of all the external, and figure out where all these vehicles—internal, external. Get clear on this. You could build it out on a Trello board on trello.com and have each of these. This is how I put together my framework and my training for DoorGrow Secrets or the Seven Frameworks training that we give to potential clients for free that sells them on signing up. Some watch that training and then they just sign up. It's like two hours long and I'm teaching a bunch of concepts, frameworks, and ideas for free, and adding value. I'm building trust, creating a relationship, and I'm helping them see reality. Really, I think that's what sales is really about. Sales isn't about manipulation. It isn't about control. It's about helping people see the real issue, the real problem, and helping them see the real path and how you can help them get what they want. Sales really isn't about you getting what you want. It's about them being able to get what they want and you get what you want. This is that mutual thing. Your business is this magic bridge between your desires being fulfilled and their desires being fulfilled. Hopefully this is helpful if you want to compound this. Once you have your pitch put together, add some images to it to drag this home. Don't fill it up with a lot of text, but some people have a hard time digesting all of this. So you'll notice in my training, I have slides and I have images to help people see and get these concepts quickly. So making a visual can help them understand these things quickly. Have an image for each vehicle, have an image for each internal belief, each external belief, and you can crank right through these, explain them, and they'll get it. By the end, they'll feel like they have a lot more clarity than if you had no visual imagery. So you can put together a little slide deck or pitch based on these three dominoes. Then, of course, you can end it with a close or a call to action to solicit that. Hopefully, this has been helpful for those listening. If you're wanting to take things to the next level, you want to become a badass at sales, you want to feel like you could close anybody that you talk to if you want them, and you want to shift from being the person that's trying to get everybody on to being the sexy guy or girl at the bar that does not feel the need to get with everybody, but you're a high value and people want to be with you. If you want to shift that, then reach out to us at DoorGrow, and let's get you that Seven Frameworks training and our DoorGrow Secrets training and get you moving into our program hopefully. You'll be learning how to be really effective at closing more deals more quickly and doing things that are far more efficient than all those other vehicles. I'm Jason Hull. I hope this was really helpful for those of you that are struggling during your pitch, losing deals. If you're dealing with anybody that is not a hot, warm lead, and your close rate is lower than you want it to be, then try applying this three dominoes principle to point them towards your ultimate opportunity or vehicle to help solve their problem. That's why businesses exist, to solve a real problem in the marketplace. What if they don't have a problem? Then they don't need you. So you don't even need to pitch to them or sell to them. So identify the problem and then go into this pitch with your three dominoes. Knock them over and get some doors. I'm Jason Hull and I'm out. Bye, everybody. Until next time to our mutual growth. You just listened to the DoorGrow show. We are building a community of the savviest property management entrepreneurs on the planet in the DoorGrow Club. Join your fellow DoorGrow hackers at doorgrowclub.com. Listen, everyone is doing the same stuff, SEO, PPC, Pay-Per-Lead, content, social direct mail, and they still struggle to grow. At DoorGrow, we solve your biggest challenge getting deals and growing your business. Find out more at doorgrow.com. Find any show notes or links from today's episode on our blog at doorgrow.com. To get notified of future events and news, subscribe to our newsletter at doorgrow.com/subscribe. Until next time. Take what you learn and start DoorGrow hacking your business and your life.

The Rainmaker Family Show
38: Why We Just Invested $50,000 In This...

The Rainmaker Family Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 65:06


Hey guys! Stephen and Chelsey are back with another episode of the Rainmaker Family podcast. It's our passion to help families all over find financial freedom and avoid trading time for money so you can be fully present with your family.  Today we are going to give you a peek behind the curtain at our Rainmaker Inner Circle community. During this candid conversation, we are going to share the best and biggest “golden chicky nuggets” we have learned from a new mastermind we joined! If you follow the Rainmaker Family on Instagram, you may have seen our recent family pictures from Funnel Hacking Live 2021. This is event is one of the biggest and best gathers of entrepreneurs and has always given us the key insights and takeaways we needed to take our business (and mindset) to the next level…however, this event challenged us in a  whole new way.  When our mentor, founder of Click Funnels, and host of the event, Russell Brunson made an offer we couldn't refuse, we knew we had to rise to the occasion together. Listen in to hear our experience with investing $50K in a program, what we have learned since then, and the million-dollar tips we have picked up along the way that you can start using in your business! We hope this conversation leaves you motivated and inspired to reach your own goals along with the confidence to keep investing in yourself no matter what! PS: Be sure to subscribe or follow the podcast on your favorite app to hear some incredible episodes coming your way from all the high-performing entrepreneurs and business owners we have met on the journey so far.    More Of What You'll Hear: How we made the decision to spend $50K  A look into the Rainmaker Inner Circle Mastermind Our biggest takeaways from #FHL  What we've learned about the importance of mentors How Chelsey found her place in the Rainmaker Movement Planning for success Stepping into abundance and going all-in on YOU A quick recap of our time at the 100X Conference Our launch with a room full of millionaires Expert level tips you can start applying today And Much More!    RESOURCES:    Get our Naptime Business Guide - 7 Ways To Start A Business For Busy Moms: https://therainmakerchallenge.com/naptimefreeguide    Connect with us: The Rainmaker Challenge: https://rainmakerchallenges.com/join ► Subscribe To Our YouTube Channel: https://bit.ly/33EdgBs ► Website: therainmakerfamily.com ► Facebook: www.facebook.com/diazfamilylegacy ► Instagram:   instagram.com/chels_diaz instagram.com/steezdiaz instagram.com/therainmakerfamily     ► Get Free Stuff On Amazon: stephensfreestuff.com/sfs Episode Minute By Minute:  1:27 How it all started 6:54 Inside our lunch for millionaires 14:45 The power of teaming up with your spouse 21:15 What was included in our mastermind 27:53 Stephen's takeaway 34:34 Why Chelsey is passionate about Rainmakers 39:29 Tips for structuring your offer 41:41 Our 10 min talk competition 45:20 Marketing stamina  52:12 Learning from the YouTube master 58:00 A new approach to positive mindset shifts