Podcasts about Family business

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  • 2,071PODCASTS
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  • Nov 26, 2021LATEST
Family business

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Best podcasts about Family business

Show all podcasts related to family business

Latest podcast episodes about Family business

The Authors Unite Show
Nike Anani: Taking Away The Dysfunction In Family Businesses

The Authors Unite Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 35:42


In this episode of The Tyler Wagner Show with Nike Anani shares Taking Away Dysfunction in Family Business. This episode is brought to you by Authors Unite. Authors Unite provides you with all the resources you need to become a successful author. You can learn more about Authors Unite here: https://authorsunite.com/​​​​​​ Thank you for listening to The Tyler Wagner Show! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/authorsunite/support

Black Entrepreneur Experience
BEE 273 Award-Winning Family Business Strategist, Speaker, Author Nike Anani

Black Entrepreneur Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 37:21


Nike Anani is taking away the dysfunction in family businesses by connecting generations. Bridging the generational gap exclusively for future-focused families. Website: https://nikeanani.com

The Family Business Podcast
Family Business Week - HMG Paints

The Family Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 64:01


To celebrate Family Business Week here in the UK we are looking back over some of our favourite interviews with UK family businesses. Today's interview is with Jonathan Falder of HMG Paints. We talk about how their culture is embodied throughout the business with multiple generations of the same families working for HMG. We also hear about Jonathan's experience of coming face to face with an alien! About Family Business Week Family Business Week is a week long celebration of family businesses as a force for good The pandemic has once again highlighted the vital role that businesses play in supporting their local communities, and it is these community-focused values that are at the heart of family businesses. Rooted in their local communities, family businesses provide a long-term, sustainable model which views business as a force for good.  Family Business Week 2021 is a week-long celebration of family businesses, particularly in relation to supporting local communities across all parts of the UK, and providing a platform to highlight the role of business as a force for good.  Led by the Institute for Family Business (IFB), the voice of the UK's family business sector. Find out more at https://my.captivate.fm/www.familybusinessweek.co.uk (www.familybusinessweek.co.uk) Support the Show The podcast is entirely self-funded by me. I am not looking for sympathy as it is something that I love to do and I have a passion for providing great content for family businesses across the world. Some listeners have asked for ways in which they can support the show, be that through reviews, sharing with friends or a donation. As such I have set up a page that outlines all the ways that you can support what I am doing. https://my.captivate.fm/www.fambizpodcast.com/support (www.fambizpodcast.com/support) Work With Russ If what I have spoken about in the show resonates and you want to discuss how I can help you and your family business drop me an email: russ@familybusinesspartnership.com or head over to https://my.captivate.fm/www.familybusinesspartnership.com (www.familybusinesspartnership.com) Sign up to the Newsletter You can get podcasts, videos and blogs delivered directly to your inbox by signing up to the newsletter. Head over to https://my.captivate.fm/www.fambizpodcast.com (www.fambizpodcast.com) and sign up now Support this podcast

The Other Side Of Potential
Episode 166: Family Business and Planning for An Exit with Ahmie Baum

The Other Side Of Potential

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 52:12


Owning and running a multi-generational family business can be challenging, but also extremely rewarding. You want your children and grandchildren to be able to generate the same level of wealth while also leveraging their unique strengths, allowing them to fulfill their potential. But miscommunication and family dynamics can cause unforeseen challenges that are difficult to solve from the inside. It can also be challenging for a founder to relinquish control and prepare the business for new leadership. Here to help us unpack this complicated topic is Ahmie Baum, CEO, and Founder of Interchange Capital Partners. Interchange Capital Partners is a family business that has honed a comprehensive and collaborative process over its 40 years of practice in financial services and is dedicated to helping clients and their families build financial safety nets. In our conversation with Ahmie, we discuss the mechanics and nuances of running a family business as well as the necessity of a well-planned exit strategy to ensure adequate reward for your years of hard work, ingenuity, and dedication. A major part of Ahmie's expertise lies in helping family business owners and entrepreneurs focus on the impact of their business value, and how it will affect their family's personal wealth and legacy.Tuning in you'll hear us cover a host of important elements you should be considering to ensure generational wealth and an effective strategy. Ahmie explains how siloed thinking can happen in business, why it's harmful and breaks down why you need a well-functioning advisory model. He also shares his insights on adequate tax planning and mitigation as well as the unforeseen challenges that can come with a transition into retirement. This episode is jam-packed with critical information that will arm you with the knowledge you need to ensure the longevity of your wealth and an exit strategy that is conducted on your terms. Tune in today to hear it all! What you'll learn about in this episode:Introducing today's guest Ahmie Bahm.Why you need to be prepared for transition and change in business.Ahmie's early experiences with cold calling as a stockbroker.How Ahmie discovered his affinity for financial planning.Why it's so difficult for people to realize they need an exit plan.Why you need to plan for an exit at least five years in advance.The difference between effective tax preparation and tax planning and mitigation.The types of questions businesses should ask to make sure they're prepared.The role of temperament in working with clients and their exit plan.The trouble with siloed business structures and advisors not communicating.Why you need someone to facilitate communication between your advisors.How to gain clarity and understanding before you take action on your exit plan.A breakdown of a functioning advisory model and why you need one.The four dimensions of family capital: social, financial, intellectual, and human.How to recognize and utilize the other dimensions of capital, separate from financial.How miscommunication and dynamics within a family can affect the family business.The challenges of succession within a family business.Why retirement is often a much more difficult transition than anticipated.How to get in touch with Interchange Capital Partners.

The Family Business Podcast
Family Business Week - The Arbikie Distillery

The Family Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 52:00


To celebrate Family Business Week we are selecting some of our favourite interviews with family businesses here in the UK. Today's interview is with Iain Stirling from Arbikie. We discuss the collaboration that led to them creating the worlds first carbon positive Gin. About Family Business Week Family Business Week is a week long celebration of family businesses as a force for good The pandemic has once again highlighted the vital role that businesses play in supporting their local communities, and it is these community-focused values that are at the heart of family businesses. Rooted in their local communities, family businesses provide a long-term, sustainable model which views business as a force for good.  Family Business Week 2021 is a week-long celebration of family businesses, particularly in relation to supporting local communities across all parts of the UK, and providing a platform to highlight the role of business as a force for good.  Led by the Institute for Family Business (IFB), the voice of the UK's family business sector. Find out more at https://my.captivate.fm/www.familybusinessweek.co.uk (www.familybusinessweek.co.uk) Support the Show The podcast is entirely self-funded by me. I am not looking for sympathy as it is something that I love to do and I have a passion for providing great content for family businesses across the world. Some listeners have asked for ways in which they can support the show, be that through reviews, sharing with friends or a donation. As such I have set up a page that outlines all the ways that you can support what I am doing. https://my.captivate.fm/www.fambizpodcast.com/support (www.fambizpodcast.com/support) Work With Russ If what I have spoken about in the show resonates and you want to discuss how I can help you and your family business drop me an email: russ@familybusinesspartnership.com or head over to https://my.captivate.fm/www.familybusinesspartnership.com (www.familybusinesspartnership.com) Sign up to the Newsletter You can get podcasts, videos and blogs delivered directly to your inbox by signing up to the newsletter. Head over to https://my.captivate.fm/www.fambizpodcast.com (www.fambizpodcast.com) and sign up now Support this podcast

The Family Business Podcast
Family Business Week - Maurizio Bragagni

The Family Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 61:39


To celebrate Family Business Week here in the UK we are selecting some of our favourite interviews with family businesses here in the UK. This episode is a fantastic discussion with Maurizio Bragagni who is the CEO of Tratos, a multinational, multi-generational family business. We discuss the importance of looking after your local communities and highlight how family business can be a force for good! About Family Business Week Family Business Week is a week long celebration of family businesses as a force for good The pandemic has once again highlighted the vital role that businesses play in supporting their local communities, and it is these community-focused values that are at the heart of family businesses. Rooted in their local communities, family businesses provide a long-term, sustainable model which views business as a force for good.  Family Business Week 2021 is a week-long celebration of family businesses, particularly in relation to supporting local communities across all parts of the UK, and providing a platform to highlight the role of business as a force for good.  Led by the Institute for Family Business (IFB), the voice of the UK's family business sector. Support the Show The podcast is entirely self-funded by me. I am not looking for sympathy as it is something that I love to do and I have a passion for providing great content for family businesses across the world. Some listeners have asked for ways in which they can support the show, be that through reviews, sharing with friends or a donation. As such I have set up a page that outlines all the ways that you can support what I am doing. https://my.captivate.fm/www.fambizpodcast.com/support (www.fambizpodcast.com/support) Work With Russ If what I have spoken about in the show resonates and you want to discuss how I can help you and your family business drop me an email: russ@familybusinesspartnership.com or head over to https://my.captivate.fm/www.familybusinesspartnership.com (www.familybusinesspartnership.com) Sign up to the Newsletter You can get podcasts, videos and blogs delivered directly to your inbox by signing up to the newsletter. Head over to https://my.captivate.fm/www.fambizpodcast.com (www.fambizpodcast.com) and sign up now Support this podcast

The Great Scott Podcast
Jasper Cole

The Great Scott Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 26:25


Jasper Cole has been dubbed Hollywood's bad guy. Jasper is known for such roles as Crackhead Bob and currently stars in "The Family Business" and "The Church of Mike".

The Family Business Podcast
Family Business Week - Interview with Josie Morris MBE

The Family Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 54:20


To celebrate Family Business Week we are re-releasing some of our favourite interviews with family businesses here in the UK. In today's episode we revisit the conversation that I had with Josie Morris MBE from WoolCool. We talk about their journey to becoming a Certified B-Corp and Josie's experience of being awarded the MBE. About Family Business Week Family Business Week is a week long celebration of family businesses as a force for good The pandemic has once again highlighted the vital role that businesses play in supporting their local communities, and it is these community-focused values that are at the heart of family businesses. Rooted in their local communities, family businesses provide a long-term, sustainable model which views business as a force for good.  Family Business Week 2021 is a week-long celebration of family businesses, particularly in relation to supporting local communities across all parts of the UK, and providing a platform to highlight the role of business as a force for good.  Led by the Institute for Family Business (IFB), the voice of the UK's family business sector. Support the Show The podcast is entirely self-funded by me. I am not looking for sympathy as it is something that I love to do and I have a passion for providing great content for family businesses across the world. Some listeners have asked for ways in which they can support the show, be that through reviews, sharing with friends or a donation. As such I have set up a page that outlines all the ways that you can support what I am doing. https://my.captivate.fm/www.fambizpodcast.com/support (www.fambizpodcast.com/support) Work With Russ If what I have spoken about in the show resonates and you want to discuss how I can help you and your family business drop me an email: russ@familybusinesspartnership.com or head over to https://my.captivate.fm/www.familybusinesspartnership.com (www.familybusinesspartnership.com) Sign up to the Newsletter You can get podcasts, videos and blogs delivered directly to your inbox by signing up to the newsletter. Head over to https://my.captivate.fm/www.fambizpodcast.com (www.fambizpodcast.com) and sign up now Support this podcast

The Family Business Podcast
Family Business Week - Sir James Wates

The Family Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 34:43


On this weeks show I am joined by Sir James Wates as we discuss Family Business Week. Sir James is the Chairman of The Wates Group and also the Institute for Family Business. Family Business Week 2021 is a week-long celebration of family businesses, particularly in relation to supporting local communities across all parts of the UK, and providing a platform to highlight the role of business as a force for good. We also discuss The Wates Principles. In late 2017, Sir James Wates CBE, was invited by the Government to lead the development of corporate principles for large private companies. The resulting code – now known as the https://www.wates.co.uk/articles/insight/the-wates-principles-report/?hub=who-we-are--corporate-governance (Wates Principles) was launched in December 2018 and provides a framework to help companies to meet legal requirements while promoting long term success. The Wates Principles encourage these companies to adopt a set of key behaviours to secure trust and confidence among stakeholders and benefit the economy and society in general. Follow Family Business Week on Twitter https://gbr01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Ftwitter.com%2FFamilyBizWeek&data=04%7C01%7CRuss%40familybusinesspartnership.com%7Cf666ae09d51e418a5e9808d9a5bf3dc4%7Ced114aa32143426d8a82e3851f091c9a%7C0%7C0%7C637723064551017563%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C3000&sdata=SuI%2Bv1%2BusKJ7gTy2t6ntMBOLFV9F6qA476q3mGEEqfQ%3D&reserved=0 (@FamilyBizWeek) Join the conversation using the hashtags #FamilyBizWeek and #WeSupportFamilyBiz You can read fascinating case studies or download content to share on social media at https://gbr01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.familybusinessweek.co.uk%2F&data=04%7C01%7CRuss%40familybusinesspartnership.com%7Cf666ae09d51e418a5e9808d9a5bf3dc4%7Ced114aa32143426d8a82e3851f091c9a%7C0%7C0%7C637723064551017563%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C3000&sdata=%2FhItrY7UG%2FjdIp3iAbca%2FjBMLXfjpnmLhUnMFBpzctk%3D&reserved=0 (www.familybusinessweek.co.uk). About Family Business Week Family Business Week is a week long celebration of family businesses as a force for good The pandemic has once again highlighted the vital role that businesses play in supporting their local communities, and it is these community-focused values that are at the heart of family businesses. Rooted in their local communities, family businesses provide a long-term, sustainable model which views business as a force for good.  Family Business Week 2021 is a week-long celebration of family businesses, particularly in relation to supporting local communities across all parts of the UK, and providing a platform to highlight the role of business as a force for good.  Led by the Institute for Family Business (IFB), the voice of the UK's family business sector. Find out more at www.familybusinessweek.co.uk Support the Show The podcast is entirely self-funded by me. I am not looking for sympathy as it is something that I love to do and I have a passion for providing great content for family businesses across the world. Some listeners have asked for ways in which they can support the show, be that through reviews, sharing with friends or a donation. As such I have set up a page that outlines all the ways that you can support what I am doing. https://my.captivate.fm/www.fambizpodcast.com/support (www.fambizpodcast.com/support) Work With Russ If what I have spoken about in the show resonates and you want to discuss how I can help you and your family business drop me an email: russ@familybusinesspartnership.com or head over to https://my.captivate.fm/www.familybusinesspartnership.com (www.familybusinesspartnership.com) Sign up to the Newsletter You can get podcasts, videos and blogs delivered directly to your... Support this podcast

Mark Narrations - The Wafflecast Reddit Stories
r/AITA They Kicked Me Out Of The Family Business And Now Family Are Begging For Me Back

Mark Narrations - The Wafflecast Reddit Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 19:53


r/AITA Reddit Stories in today's aita stories, When the family business was passed to another family member, they decided to re-structure the business and fired me. After this OP finds a new job and the family business starts to go down hill. The family begs for OP to return but what we will he do?Go through the FULL Reddit Playlists:

Proprietors of Pittsburgh Podcast
Never Be Afraid to Pivot | Sarah Kaminski, Owner of Best Ever Granola

Proprietors of Pittsburgh Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 37:21


If you have any questions or if you'd like to chat, you can reach me at my contact info below. The purpose of this podcast is to share ideas, inspire action, and build a stronger small business community here in Pittsburgh. So please say hello, tell me what you think, and let me know how I'm doing. It means a ton!YOU CAN REACH ME AT:Website: https://www.proprietorsofpittsburgh.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/proprietorsofpittsburghpodcastFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/proprietorsofpittsburghpodcastLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/darinvilanoPhone: 412-336-8247YOU CAN REACH SARAH KAMINSKI AT:Website: https://www.bestevergranola.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/bestevergranolaFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/bestevergranolapgh

Boston's Best
069 - Where Family and Food Come Together ​​With New England Country Mart

Boston's Best

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 48:29


We all know that food creates experiences. Whether you're cooking your favorite Holiday dishes, prepping for tailgating parties, or doing some last-minute meal prepping for office Holiday parties, food is an essential part of creating long-lasting memories. Because of this, my guests this week offer quality, local products you genuinely can't find anywhere else. This week, I'm talking with Jeff and Elyssa Kotzen, Co-Founders of New England Country Mart. New England Country Mart is a local fresh produce and grocery home delivery service focusing on sourcing the most local, sustainable, and nutrient-dense foods you can find across New England. Jeff and Elyssa believe that food should provide sustenance and pleasure and bring families and communities closer together. In this episode, Jeff shares how New England Country Mart first started when his great-grandfather started a produce business in Boston. Jeff shares how the company has developed over time to become a family-owned and operated wholesale produce business. Elyssa also shares how they source their local produce and the importance of connecting with and supporting local businesses. Topics Discussed: Unique ways to partner with and support local businesses The process behind pairing different tasting notes with wines and foods Early successes (and challenges) behind starting NECM The power of social media & connecting online (especially during Covid-19) Balancing both the Wholesale and Retail side business Connect with New England Country Mart: Website: https://newenglandcountrymart.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/newenglandcountrymart Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newenglandcountrymart/ Instagram (Jeff): https://www.instagram.com/jeffkotzen/ Instagram (Elyssa): https://www.instagram.com/epkotzen/ Relevant Articles: Edible Boston: Preserving the Family Business - https://www.edibleboston.com/blog/2021/1/3/preserving-the-family-business-new-england-country-mart Contact New England Country Mart: Address: Chelsea, MA Call: 617-812-5250 Email: info@newenglandcountrymart.com Connect with Mark Condon: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BostonsBestPodcast Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bostonsbest_podcast/ About Boston's Best: “Highlighting successful businesses in and around Boston, MA.” Go behind the scenes with financial planner Mark Condon as he asks industry-leading experts to talk about their businesses throughout the state of Massachusetts. Through each episode, Mark finds what sets these different businesses apart from their competition and how they rose above the inevitable challenges they faced along the way to their ultimate success.

Go For Launch — Rocket Fuel for Entrepreneurs
GFL 157: The Right Framework to Grow and Scale a Family Business

Go For Launch — Rocket Fuel for Entrepreneurs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 35:18


Jonathan Goldhill is a business coach and personal strategist who specializes in guiding next-generation leaders of family businesses to scale up their business as they take control over the leadership and ownership of the family business. Jonathan left New York for California at age 20 after his family's large, privately-held men's apparel manufacturing company—started by his great-grandfather—sold to a conglomerate in its third generation of family ownership. Within 10 years, Jonathan had established himself as the go-to expert for entrepreneurs looking to find their freedom. Today, Jonathan brings 30 years of experience advising, coaching, consulting, training, and guiding entrepreneurial and family businesses to grow their revenues, profits and people's leadership. Learn more at The Goldhill Group and get a copy of his book, Disruptive Successor. Links:  (book) (company)  (podcast)  

Black to Business
71: Building A Family Business And Legacy Planning w/ Nike Anani

Black to Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 51:54


Name: Nike Anani Current Title: Founder at Nike Anani Consulting    About Nike: Nike Anani is an entrepreneur, Speaker, and Consultant. She was rated as a top-100 Family Business Consultant globally. She helps her clients bridge the gap between the senior and younger generations. As a result, they communicate, collaborate, and collectively gain clarity, to increase profit and productivity in their family businesses. With over a decade of family business expertise in Nigeria, Nike helps owners lead their family organizations to long-term impact and legacy. Her inside experience as a second-generation family business owner birthed a passion to help other families in building legacy enterprises that would outlive them. Nike is an accountant (ex-Deloitte UK) and a top-rated family business expert, with a Family Business and Wealth advisor qualification from Family Firm Institute. She is the co-founder of African Family Firms, a pan-African association of family businesses, and the host of "The Connected Generation" podcast - a top-10 Family Business podcast globally. Nike's clients choose to engage her, not only because of her extensive professional training but also because of her practical experience as both a business founder and a NextGen. This allows her to uniquely empathize with both generations and act as a connector. Nike is a champion for diversity and celebrates the uniqueness in every individual, family, and business.   DURING THIS EPISODE WE DISCUSSED: The state of Black family-owned businesses Why creating a legacy plan for your business is important Knowing when to start estate planning Tips for setting boundaries with family in business How to involve and groom your children or the future owners/decision-makers of your business early How to build a business that will outlast you The importance of bridging the gaps between generations in business Are you a business owner looking to get more clients and exposure? Does your business provide professional services that would be beneficial for a business owner starting their business? If so, submit your business to be listed in our directory, The Connect!  You may submit your business at:  https://blacktobusiness.com/theconnect/   For complete show notes and resources mentioned for this episode go to: blacktobusiness.com/71    Thank you so much for listening! Please support us by simply rating and reviewing our podcast!

The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast
Old Agency Flexes with a Focus on New

The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 32:30


Jamie Michelson is President and CEO of SMZ Advertising, a Detroit-based agency that started in 1929, producing and distributing jeweler artwork ad kits. These ad packages, delivered as a monthly subscription service, provided graphics to promote and showcase jewelry and were used in catalogs and newspaper advertisements.  Early advertising, Jamie says, “was much more informational” than today. As advertising evolved, information had to be packaged with some entertainment and hooks to get people's attention. The agency adapted and grew through that transitional period. Today, at 92 years old, the still independent, family-owned full-service agency focuses on communications, planning and strategy, research, design, advertising heavily, retail, events, mobile, social, and “moving our clients' businesses forward.” Jamie says, “All that history doesn't mean we know everything. It teaches you to question everything.” He then describes his agency as “a team of around 40 people” . . . with “new ideas, new media, new ways of communicating” – “quietly making noise with purpose” – to keep the focus on the client. Initially, Jamie wanted no part of his family's business. A few internships changed his mind. Today two of his sisters run groups of accounts in the agency. Jamie's third sister, the fourth sibling, went to law school and serves as a federal judge.  In this interview, Jamie discusses in depth the mindsets, tools, attitudes, and strategies SMZ has used to survive so many years and how an agency changes as it is passed down through the generations. Jamie says the first generation, the founders, the creators, tend to stay involved. The second generation had to wrest control from the founders. The transition from second to third generation has been much smoother. The long-term plan is to keep the agency going as a legacy business. Jamie says the agency business can be all-consuming. He has found it important to take time from day-to-day client servicing “to think about the future, the visioning, the structure, the governance, all that.” A second tip he offers is that companies need to codify and write down their values. Driving out to his employees' homes to deliver packages of information made Jamie aware of some of his employees' beastly commutes. He says his intention going forward is to be flexible . . . in a number of ways. That flexibility has probably contributed greatly to his agency's “long life.” Jamie can be reached on his agency's website at: smz.com, where visitors can find the agency's blog, and Jamie's Generation Excellence podcast, which explores generational family businesses. SMZ Advertising is also on all of the social platforms. Transcript Follows: ROB: Welcome to the Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast. I'm your host, Rob Kischuk, and I am joined today by Jamie Michelson. He is the President and CEO of SMZ Advertising based in Troy, Michigan. Welcome to the podcast, Jamie. JAMIE: Thank you for having me, Rob. I'm really looking forward to our conversation. ROB: It's exciting to have you here. Why don't you start us off with an introduction to SMZ? Tell us about the firm and any key metrics, any key focuses, key verticals. Go for it.  JAMIE: People like to talk about the elevator pitch; our agency is located on the first floor of the building, so it's more of a “walk in the door” pitch. I guess I would start with very few things survive 92 years, let alone biologically or in business. It's something to remember, something to know. At SMZ Advertising, we're proud of that length of time of operation. I'm proud of our long-term and enduring relationships with our clients. But it's kind of like all that history doesn't mean we know everything. It teaches you to question everything. We say we remain an independent, family-owned, creatively driven, full-service – and we like to go, “accent on the full” – agency doing work in communications, planning and strategy, research, design, advertising (heavily), retail, events, mobile, social, and more. We're a team of around 40 people, moving our clients' businesses and then ours forward. New ideas, new media, new ways of communicating. Our theme for our agency, if you will, our own headline, is what we call “quietly making noise with purpose.” There's a tension between quiet and noise. Really, it's about the spotlight shining on our clients and being humble about ourselves and very focused on them. ROB: How does that propagate out to a client campaign? Does that echo into their campaigns, where there's a “speak softly and carry a big stick” mentality in that as well? Or do they get to be a little bit more boisterous? JAMIE: There's all these books out there about filtering through the noise, avoid the noise, ignore the noise. Yet we are trying to make appropriate levels of noise, and strategic noise. I feel that our approach to it – and this goes back to roots – I'm part of a third generation of a family business where there's a strong belief in likeability. You do business with brands you like and people you like. And it's not namby-pamby likeability; it's not love or “lovemarks,” but it's just that someone likes you and they might buy what you're selling. So, we want people to really like the work we're doing and the brand and the business. Especially with so much choice and so much competition. ROB: We don't normally jump so quicky to the origin story here, but 92 years is a little bit of something. We are talking about quite a long time ago. We are talking about a Great Depression era business. What is the background here? Was it always something we would call an ad agency, or was it even something different in that regard? JAMIE: It's a great question. It's a pretty neat story. Clearly, the world doesn't look like it did in 1929. We're faster and global and colorful and we know a lot more. But the origin was a gentleman who was my grandfather and a partner. When you talk to newer agencies, oftentimes it's a partnership. A couple people have a dream, a vision. One's a business guy, one's an artist or creative. Their early work was what we would today call ad kits. It was the artwork for jewelers. Jewelry stores, jewelry retailers around North America. There was no digital way to distribute that. There wasn't even FedEx to deliver it. It wasn't even Slicks, for those who go back to those in the early print/design ways. It was packages that were sent with art that became print, catalogue, even newspaper, and that got them into some jewelers as retailers and the roots of a retail agency. This is a Detroit-based company. It was actually, weirdly, software as a service. It was subscription as a service. These people were buying this package each month so they could promote and showcase jewelry. And along came layaway and credit and these innovations in retail and business that they were a part of, and then moving that into outdoor and radio and the whole explosion of media. ROB: Wow. Thinking about that, how are you distributing what goes into outdoor advertising on potentially a distributed basis? It's more about a package and a solution than it is about hours and the hour trap. JAMIE: They talked about getting that package out, because it was very calendar-driven, time-driven. Sleeping around the agency on cots and stuff to make the deadlines. Again, what's old is new. But the idea that in the earlier roots of advertising, stuff was much more informational, and then you started to get into the beginning of having to package that information with some entertainment, some other hooks to get people to pay attention to it. It was really an agency that followed that journey. I think what it says is – as you talk about COVID years and difficult times the agency's gone through, there's certainly some level of resilience in the company that starts in 1929, hits the Great Depression, the stock market crash, world wars, other follow-on wars – there were pandemics, even, in that 90-some years. You don't assume, “We're going to make it because we've been there,” but there's something woven into – with brands, we talk about DNA a lot. I think because we're from Detroit and it's Motown and whatever, we talk about soul. There's something in the soul of this agency and its people. It's hard to describe and find, but it makes us proud of what we did and charging forward. ROB: When in your upbringing did you become distinctly aware of the business and what it was? I don't know if you knew it as something your grandfather was involved in, or your dad. When did you start to figure out what it was? JAMIE: Agency people, we have this role of you do business with who you do business with. If you have a product, you have a service, you support that. Whether they did some work for Pepsi-Cola bottlers or a potato chip company or a restaurant brand, you're using those clients' products. One of the cornerstone accounts of the agency in my childhood years was Big Boy Restaurants in what would've been their heyday. There were a lot of Sunday night family dinners at the Big Boy, even to the point of my father and his partner, who are the second generation, owning a Big Boy restaurant. I'd get to be back in the kitchen as a high schooler and experience it close-hand. But with that, I was not running into this business. I grew up around it at the kitchen table and that dinner table at restaurants. “Okay, my grandfather did it, my father did it.” When you're a teenager, typical is rebellion. You're going to do the other thing. I wasn't disinterested, because I understood – I went and studied finance; I was going to be an investment banker, the whole Wall Street thing. I'm still passionate about business. But I didn't really want things to do with this business until I experienced it firsthand with some internships and through college years and different parts of the business. Back to that soul thing. It's definitely in my blood. It's just absorption. [laughs] So I worked since college at basically three different agencies, independent agencies for the most part. Never client side. A little bit, one weird little thing. But my whole career. That's what I know, and I'm still fired up about it. ROB: Did you have siblings that also looked to get involved, did get involved, chose to actually rebel? What is that dynamic? JAMIE: I have three sisters, so we have four children in the third generation. Two of my sisters are involved in the business, run groups of accounts, and have been very involved with the agency and each had their own path or track into it. And then my third sister, the fourth sibling, went to law school and to a law firm and is a federal judge. That's what's fun. We refer to her as the black sheep. ROB: [laughs] The woman who is a federal judge. JAMIE: [laughs] Exactly. ROB: That sketchy business, right? JAMIE: Yeah. She's good counsel to the agency because she's sure learned to ask probing and challenging questions. ROB: I think there's probably an interesting season here. It's interesting that you chose to spend some time getting experience in other businesses. Clearly, the agency had to change. The whole firm went in and out of the golden age of advertising, the kind of Mad Men. How has the firm navigated these shifts of adding services, keeping a sense of identity – that balance of not getting overwhelmed with the shiny and becoming a social media influencer agency exclusively, but also not being mired in – you're not just broadcasting car dealerships, either. JAMIE: I think about that all the time, the path. They talk about sins of omission/commission, those things you didn't do or you passed on those things you did do. We talk a lot about those decisions we made or moves we made where you do them and then you go, “We should've done this sooner” versus “Why did we do this at all?” The things that we've done were good moves for the most part. Not a lot of giant blowout mistakes, disasters. I remember stringing phone line to plug into a computer to go through modem sounds, to be on AOL, to have earliest of site stuff. Our URL is SMZ.com, so to have a three-letter URL says you were in it early. But not necessarily going on all things digital. A lot of it has been your clients take you, smoothly or kicking and screaming, into some of these new spaces and areas, or you do it the same way with them. I think we've been open-minded all the time to experiment and try. It's always changing, like you said, and there's going to be that next new thing. Don't get so enamored with the shiny, but don't get to the “This is how we do it” or “It was better then” or “God, I wish it would slow down and not change.” I refer to myself – you gave my formal title, CEO/President or whatever. I talk about being Chief Agitator. I've got to keep the place and myself shaken up a little bit so that we don't rest and settle. ROB: Was SMZ a longer name at one point? JAMIE: The original company was Simons Michelson Company, SM Co. Simons Michelson Zieve for the gentleman, son-in-law of one of the founders, my father's partner, second gen. And then that got shortened to SMZ, I think for the poor person who had to answer the phone at the front desk all the time, saying that over and over and over again. [laughs] ROB: What did that transition of you coming into the business – you had some experience from other places; I guess your dad was in charge. What did that transition of generations look like? JAMIE: The transition from the first generation – and I'm a big student and have a podcast I do called Generation Excellence where I'm focused on other generational businesses and the follow-ons, G2, G3, G4. Not just because HBO does Succession and it's super dramatic, but it's a fertile area. The first generation, they're the founders, the creators. Those two guys worked, and that's what they did. They didn't really retire. They kept involved. The second gen had to wrest control from them a little bit. You're talking about guys now in their seventies, eighties, whatever it was. The transition from second gen to this third generation was much smoother. I give my father, Jim Michelson, incredible credit because it is a very hard thing to be in that command chair, be the president, running an agency, and then give away both authority and responsibility and not backtrack. Not jump back in, try to fix stuff if you don't like how it is. You're giving up control and letting others go make those mistakes you talked about, make those new moves. He did that and really set a model for me that I have memorized. As we figure out whatever's next after me – because that's the plan, the infinite game, keep this going as a legacy business – to be able to do that that same way. ROB: I interned once upon a time at Chick-fil-A corporate. I was there under the Truett Cathy regime. Truett was there for forever, and then his son Dan comes in, and the window for Dan was much shorter. They've transitioned off to the third generation now. It seemed much faster. He seemed very happy to transition it sooner than maybe he did. I don't know if you've looked at what they did and what they're thinking. JAMIE: It's a multiparty thing. And then you've got the people who work for the agency, and they're watching how this goes. You have the clients. It adds a layer on top of any other business when you add this family dynamic to it. We do have now as a company a formal written policy that next generation family members need to have some successful work experience outside the business, because it is really nice to be able to do what you do not just as a son/daughter of someone who created a business, but on your own merits. Make your own way. ROB: It's funny you bring up Succession. I didn't think about it as you talked about having these four siblings – JAMIE: It is much less dramatic within our walls and halls. ROB: But also interesting because you have three siblings. Presumably at least some of you have kids. We're on video; I can see a picture behind you of a couple of fresh faces. JAMIE: Yeah, a couple of young adult daughters working out there in the business world in both geography of where they want to be, areas they want to be in – my one daughter works out in Portland, Oregon. She's been five years at Nike. She's an engineer. She's very much involved in sourcing, manufacturing product at scale. So different than what a more boutique agency does where everything is bespoke and one-offs and ideas that you can't touch. For a lot of businesses, a lot of our clients are marketing the invisible. My other daughter is a business consultant, so more in our space at one of the consulting firms as she finishes business school this year. They're making their way. Again, grew up around it at the dinner table, and they know some things. It's really helpful to have that perspective of what they're going through. Use of social media, use of digital tools, how they communicate, remote work – every bit of those things as a mini focus group, really. ROB: Do you even have maybe some nieces or nephews that are also in that leadership pool for the next generation? JAMIE: Yeah, what they call the “cousins' consortium” in family business land. The next oldest would be my nephew, who's 20. He's in film school. Very talented creative. I think looking to go more out West and be involved in the movie business. It's still a bit of a journey for him to even join us. So, we have some things to figure out in our transitioning future, which is one of the things that excites me about the coming years of the business part of the business. ROB: Yeah, absolutely. You've done some transition, you'll see some transition. When you think about your history with SMZ, what are some things you think about as lessons you might tell on to the next generation about maybe what you'd do differently or what they should think about? JAMIE: We meet probably not regularly – you know that old expression, work on the business/in the business. The agency business can be all-consuming. Your list of things to do can be so filled with serving your clients, and you have to work to take that time to think about the future, the visioning, the structure, the governance, all that. We try to take some time to do that. In a recent meeting, I had a quote up on the screen from Tallulah Bankhead, an old Hollywood actress. She said, “If I had to live my life again, I'd make the same mistakes, only sooner.” The definite advice I'd give or the thing I've learned is, businesses that are longstanding like ours and legacy, when they started out, there wasn't all this content and advice for startups and podcasts and videos. They were just running a business through the Depression and then going on. The agency definitely had values, and they are woven into the place. It took us a long time. It was really only recently that we codified those values in writing, where they're on the wall, where they're on a sheet, where you share them with everybody at the agency and use that more as how we operate, how we hire, how we put that in front of our clients. That's not a new idea, that businesses are based on their values, and that as good marketers, you don't just pick the same six buzzword values that every business has. But to do that work, to have them be really true to who you are – you mentioned Chick-fil-A. They're a business that I think their values and their approach – and somewhat controversial sometimes – are so much a part of how they operate and who they are. ROB: Is there anything in particular that's happened – you could argue that for some portion of the firm, the values were intrinsic. A lot of firms starting from scratch, the values may be absent. You've seen this need to move the values from intrinsic to explicit. What do you think may have changed in your time there and your time in business – is that a necessity now? Has something changed? Or is it just a better way that we understand now to make them more explicit? JAMIE: Many of us in business have had the good fortune to go to seminars, webinars, conferences. You go to those and there's a moment, something hot for a moment, you come back, you bring it up all charged up, and then it fades off.  But I did, a few years ago, attend – Family Business has a conference called Transitions. They do it once or twice a year. You're immersed for a few days with other – these are not all marketing firms. These are just businesses that have that test of time thing to them. The title of their thing was “Values-Based Businesses Are Valuable Businesses.” Example after example was brought up of how these different businesses had used what was true to the values that they were all about to help them not just operate, but grow – whether it was Bigelow Tea, down to the detail of the person whose name is on the teabag inside the box that packaged your product. Kind of like some of the car manufacturers where there's someone who signs the engine, or one of the parts inside, or the steelworkers sign the last beam highest up. Just to be much more explicit about it. ROB: Sure. JAMIE: You see people react well to it and be involved in that process. ROB: Yeah, that involvement in the process is so key for ownership, for carrying forward. Earlier, you talked about remote distributed work. How has that played into SMZ at this point? How do you think it plays into SMZ moving forward? October 2021, some folks are never going back to the office. Some people are already back in the office full-time. How are you thinking about that dynamic right now? JAMIE: It's certainly front, middle, back of mind a lot of the time. I'll start with our feeling that our physical office we've always felt is a competitive advantage. It's a great box. It's colorful, it's alive, it's well-designed, it's functional. We like being there. We like working with clients being there. Great. At the same time, we've had some creative people who have worked remotely for 15, 20, 30 years and interacting with people at the agency. We've had others who have had all kinds of different flexible schedules and been accommodating that and learning from that. So at least for us, it wasn't a full 180 or whatever, like maybe for many other businesses. We're so open right now to the idea of how this is going to work, listening to our people, and using it to hire and fill new positions – which we're able to do. It's hard, but hybrid – my next car will probably be a hybrid. We talk about hybrid a lot in other categories and stuff that mashes together. One of the things that was eye-opening to me was one day I took some packages and delivered them, driveway deliveries, to almost the entire employee list. My wife helped map it out on a map thing. A few of the people I got to, that commute for them, the most outlying spots, the time that they get back if they can have a few of those days where they're not having to come into the office and can work from home – that's life-changing. So, we're going to embrace it. We went back mid-July to three days in, two days remote, everybody in on Wednesdays, and we had to revert back a little bit to an all-optional in the office mode. So, there's always somebody in each day, but it's small groups. ROB: It seems like the most important thing is to have an intentionality about it. Some of that's going to be aligned to the culture and the place where you are. It seems to me that somebody around Detroit can work virtual for anyone, but they've chosen to be there. I think there's an extent to which if you're in digital marketing, if you're in Detroit, you've chosen to be there. JAMIE: Correct. ROB: So, giving people more reasons to be there and to enjoy why they're there is meaningful and life-giving. JAMIE: I'm glad you brought up Detroit. We're a proud Detroit-based business. That's our roots, physically in the city for 50-some years in operation. A bunch of clients that are Detroit downtown-based, or the whole city. We love our region. Nationally or internationally, it gets some press reviews that aren't fair and accurate. It's a great place to live and work. So, there's that spirit that people have here about our hometown, and we want to have people from here work here and be connected to here. At the same time, this place is still a community that makes a lot of stuff. Manufactures and builds. Those operations, you can't do that from your kitchen table. You've got to go to those buildings and warehouses. It's still 30% of people that have this luxury of remote or this tech work, and everybody else has to go to the hospital, go to the school, go to the manufacturing facility, go to the supermarket, do those jobs. That's going on around us. We're part of that. We'll figure it out. The biggest part for me is – we're having this meeting right now. It's virtual. If it were physically in the conference room with a couple clients and you were in there with them, Rob, I might just walk by – our place is a lot of an aquarium. It's got a lot of glass boxes. [laughs] You can see in most everywhere. Pretty transparent. You see these meetings going on and you can stick your head in and say hi, and you can see clients and you can see people. That's the biggest miss for me, those little, quick – you just don't know those things are going on. Not to disrupt them or interrupt them, but just to wave. Just to see that that meeting's going on. It's actually uplifting. You see those meetings going on and go, “They don't need me in there. They're doing great in there.” [laughs]  ROB: It's meaningful for you, it's meaningful for them. It's meaningful for the client. I don't know if there's going to be a client situation – JAMIE: Clients love getting away and going to the agency. We've got a dog running around or somebody's dog running around. It's just a different environment. ROB: It's going to be hard for them to get on a plane to go to an agency. At some scale, yes, but mostly no.  JAMIE: It's taking a while. It's really productions or major things that our people are getting on a plane or those people where, again, you have to be somewhere, versus it would be nice to be there. ROB: Jamie, when you think about what's coming up next for SMZ and for the marketing landscape that you're in the middle of, what are you excited about? What's next? JAMIE: We talk about that history and we use that number 92. What got us driven a little bit more a year and a half ago was we embraced a program called EOS, if you're familiar with it. Entrepreneurial Operating System. We used that. That 100-year milestone is a pretty neat concept/sound. What are we going to smell like, look like, feel like when we get there? I'm really excited about being this smart, steady, scrappy, creative – still creative; I think ideas still matter – growing agency, celebrating that in the right way. Not just “We made it” and it's a moment, but that whole year should be something, and that should be a stepping stone to what's next. So that excites me. I mentioned before, mapping out, going to visit people who work for the agency. That's what we do for clients. We ask them that question all the time. “Where are you trying to go? What are you trying to be? How do we get there?” We don't always do it as well for ourselves as marketing firms. So doing that work and doing that visioning. And when you do that and you have goals and you write it down and say how you're going to get there, you tend to not only get there, you tend to get there faster and even a little better. The other thing that excites me is I was really caught up or hung up with the trend – and it was real, and we faced it. Clients were in-housing a lot of stuff. This whole great reshuffle of everything that's going on from where ships are to where chips are to where people are is upsetting that, too, for in-house operations. I think it's going to yield opportunity for, as your podcast is for, marketing leadership and marketing firms of all shapes and sizes. They're like, “I can't get the people to do this,” so now they've got to go back to outsourcing and finding folks to help. We'll certainly going to be there and do that. I hope I'm right on that. ROB: That's definitely a tricky wave. Sometimes it's even very client-specific. I'm usually in Atlanta, and to an extent, the fabled Coca-Cola company is perpetually on one end of the pendulum or the other on in-house, out-of-house. Certainly, macro trends also impact that. JAMIE: Yeah, there's that whole thing of get closer to the data. I get that. But when you said growing up around agencies, or my sense of it, that concept of being – we talk about being partnerships or even beyond a partnership with clients, stakeholders and very involved, but still objective outsiders at the same time. That combination can be powerful for client operations. We think we age well with the client relationships. We learn more and we get better. ROB: Jamie, you mentioned a little bit earlier on the digital real estate, but when people want to find you and find SMZ, where should they go to find you? JAMIE: It starts with smz.com, which is our website. That also houses our blog and the podcast I do called Generation Excellence, which is for those who are really interested in that very niche-y space of generational family businesses. And then SMZ Advertising is on all of the social platforms, sharing stories of our people, our clients, our work, a little thought leadership, little bit of our fun and things that we do to stay connected, which is a big effort right now inside of work and outside of work. I guess that would probably be about it. I welcome anyone who wants to reach out to me via the email address on the site, or call me. I'm open to talk about this business. I'm very fortunate to steward a unique and special place, and I want to put my energies against it being successful, but I love helping others. ROB: Definitely. Congratulations on being 92 going on 100 as a firm. That is exciting. JAMIE: For those who can't see me, the firm's 92. I'm a little bit younger than that. ROB: [laughs] Yeah. We'll see what a 100-year-old SMZ looks like. We'll look forward to that. Jamie, I wish you and the team the best. Thank you for coming on the podcast. JAMIE: I thank you for having me on this. I like that you blend the individual story and the business story, because they are intertwined and interconnected. ROB: In this kind of firm, absolutely. They're inseparable. JAMIE: Yep. Thanks, Rob. ROB: Thanks, Jamie. Be well. Thank you for listening. The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast is presented by Converge. Converge helps digital marketing agencies and brands automate their reporting so they can be more profitable, accurate, and responsive. To learn more about how Converge can automate your marketing reporting, email info@convergehq.com, or visit us on the web at convergehq.com.

Conscious Millionaire  J V Crum III ~ Business Coaching Now 6 Days a Week
2228: Best of Ricci Victorio: Family Business Succession Planning

Conscious Millionaire J V Crum III ~ Business Coaching Now 6 Days a Week

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 31:52


Welcome to the Conscious Millionaire Show for entrepreneurs,  who want to create an abundant future for themselves and humanity. Heard by millions in 190 countries.  Do you want to put more money in the bank, create a powerful impact, and enjoy a purposeful life? This is the podcast for you! Join host, JV Crum III, as he goes inside the minds of Millionaire Entrepreneurs and World-Class Business Experts. Today's featured episode... Ricci Victorio: Family Business Succession Planning Ricci Victorio is a Succession and Leadership Coach, certified by the International Succession Planning Association and International Coaching Federation. She has coached and facilitated multiple generation family business owners, their families and management teams through difficult ownership and leadership transitions since 1994. Now, working with her daughter, they develop tailored approaches for families and business teams to have discussions about difficult topics, where each individual has a voice and can contribute to build a common vision for the future. In fulfilling this commitment, she has become recognized as an innovator in untangling the knots that can unravel family harmony, team morale and business success. Like this Podcast? Get every episode delivered to you free!  Subscribe in iTunes Download Your Free Money-Making Gift Now... "Born to Make Millions" Hypnotic Audio - Click Here Now! Please help spread the word. Subscribing and leaving a review helps others find our podcast. Thanks so much! Inc Magazine "Top 13 Business Podcasts." Conscious Millionaire Network has over 3,000 episodes and millions of listeners in 190 countries. Join us as a regular listener to get money-making secrets on how you can grow your business and profits faster! 

Level Up - From Agent to Entrepreneur
Working With Family: The Fulton Sisters On Growing An Established Family Business To New Heights

Level Up - From Agent to Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 29:16


Going into an established family business certainly has its perks, but it also has its fair share of challenges. However, if we get really intentional about how we run a family business, there's no reason why we can't go from strength to strength.    What are the kinds of conversations we need to have, before taking up a position in a family-owned company? How can we ensure we're fostering a healthy culture on our teams that encourages top agents outside of our families to join?   In this episode, Carly, Katelyn and Paige Fulton of The Fulton Sisters Team share how they not only joined the business their grandfather started, but grew it to astronomical heights.    "For any family going into business together, I suggest doing personality tests so you can accept and respect the different ways everyone handles conflict." -Katelyn Fulton     Three Things You'll Learn In This Episode     What we need to know about succession plans When is it necessary to start thinking about a succession plan in a family-owned business, and what should it look like?    How to make a family business our own How can younger generations within a family-owned company begin to bring their own values into the organization?    How to safeguard our relationships with relatives in a family business Is there a way to avoid letting workplace disagreements impact our family dynamics? More importantly, is it possible to avoid conflict in the first place?    Guest Bio-    Carly Fulton is a Third-Generation Broker at Century 21 Percy Fulton. One of the leaders of The Fulton Sisters Team, Carly previously spent years in the corporate world before deciding to make the jump into real estate. Today, she's passionate about growing her team alongside her sisters, and in addition to running the team's office operations, she can be found servicing clients and helping other agents make their dreams a reality.    Katelyn Fulton is a Third-Generation Broker at Century 21 Percy Fulton. Along with her sisters, Katelyn leads The Fulton Sisters Team. She is also a Manager and Recruiter at C21 Percy Fulton. Before going into business with her sisters, Katelyn spent a number of years in the healthcare space as a sonographer.    Paige Fulton is a Third-Generation Broker at Century 21 Percy Fulton. Paige runs The Fulton Sisters Team, alongside her sisters. Prior to joining her sisters in the family business established by her grandfather in the 1970s, Paige had a successful career in Human Resources.    To find out more about The Fulton Sisters Team, go to: https://www.thefultonsisters.com/  https://www.instagram.com/fultonsisters/?hl=en https://www.instagram.com/c21percyfulton/?hl=en

Stories in Our Roots with Heather Murphy
Andrea Watson | Three Generations Evolving with the Family Business

Stories in Our Roots with Heather Murphy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 25:12


#53.  In this episode Andrea shares:The challenge her grandfather faced within the first weeks, and years, of purchasing a home heating businessThe moments the business almost didn't stay in the familyHow her son's school project led her to ask deeper questions about the history of her familyAbout Andrea:Andrea currently lives in Mercer Island, Washington—about a mile from the house she grew up in—with her husband, and youngest son (two older sons are in college out of state). She is the author of Twentieth Century Boys: How One Family Business Survived and Thrived, which published on October 26, 2021. The book is a narrative non-fiction which covers over 100 years and spans four generations. It's about a family business and how it was passed down through the generations given the cultural and economic trends and hardships that required the company to change in order to survive.Connect with Andrea:Website          andreawatson.net      Facebook        @andreaclarkwatsonInstagram       @nanwat93 LinkedIn         Andrea Watson  Episode Sponsor: Episode sponsored by Heather Murphy's personalized coaching service, Resilience in Your Roots. Get a free workbook, "Release Limiting Beliefs by Understanding Your Family History " to help identify your beliefs, where they come from, and how to choose your beliefs moving forward.

Be The Girl Podcast
Episode 44 - A passion for skincare & an incredible family business journey with entrepreneur Mary Gouganovski from Mary Grace

Be The Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 40:24


Today it is my absolute pleasure to welcome Mary Gouganovski, creator and curator of Mary Grace, a beautiful brand with a focus on Home Fragrance, Beauty, Skincare, Gifts and ever-growing collections. Mary has been working in the family business since she was 8 years old and has guided the business through to the amazing brand that we see today. We are chatting all about Mary's incredible business journey, the ups and downs, how her passion for skincare started and the reality and reward of running a business. With a wealth of knowledge, experience and a strong and super inspiring entrepreneurial energy this episode will motivate you and provide some really valuable advice and real talk (no sugar coating) which is what we love here on #bethegirl! Let's get into the conversation.... Follow Be The Girl Podcast, The Daily Pretty and your host, Hayley Payne on Instagram. Explore our digital magazine and visit our online store at thedailypretty.com and sign up to our newsletter for 10% off! Find out more about Mary Grace Connect with Mary Grace on Instagram and Facebook

Grit & Growth
Profile of Purpose: Flowers in the River

Grit & Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 9:07


Meet Ankit Agarwal, Founder of Phool, a flower recycling business based in Kanpur, India. By collecting waste flowers from temples and converting them into eco-friendly products, the company is making an impact on both the women they employ who live near the sacred yet polluted Ganges River and the river itself. Ankit's entrepreneurial journey began with a question from a friend who was visiting the Ganges: “If this river is so sacred, why is it so polluted? And why don't you do something about it?” Ankit did just that.“Every year, we, Indians, put in about eight million tons of waste flowers in the waters. All the pesticides that are used to grow these flowers mixes with the river water, making it highly toxic. That is the leading cause of diarrhea, hepatitis and severe cholera across India and Bangladesh, where the water flows. Finally, I decided to form a company where we can collect waste flowers and do some products.”Ankit believes real change will not happen in this generation...but he is hopeful. ”It will happen in the next generation, when the kids of the women that we're able to employ start going to school: their next generation will be liberated from scavenging.” Listen to Ankit's mini profile to learn how a great business idea can change lives for generations.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Up Next In Commerce
Linens That Last: Penny Murphy, President of Pioneer Linens, Discusses How Company Pivots Have Led to More than a Century of Success

Up Next In Commerce

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 30:03


So much from the past is long gone — corded phones, the food pyramid, writing checks at the grocery store. But on the flip side, there are things from years gone by that have come back — mom jeans anyone? And then, there are the things that last the test of time. Traditions, styles, and yes, even businesses. Pioneer Linens is one of those companies that has stood strong for more than 100 years and sure, it has gone through its fair share of changes and pivots over the years, but as President, Penny Murphy, told me on this episode of Up Next in Commerce, the commitment to serving its customers has remained through it all. And today, Pioneer Linens is succeeding by giving customers the best experience not just in-store, but online as well. In fact, Pioneer moved into the ecommerce world way back in the 1990s, and Penny led the charge. We got into that story and dug into the company's long history, the lessons Penny and her daughters have carried into running the business today, and where this century-old company is headed next. Enjoy this episode!Main Takeaways:A Lasting Legacy: Although a company may pivot or change throughout its history, what customers remember most is the experience they had and the people within the company they interacted with. No matter where your business is headed, the most important thing to remember is to create the best customer experience possible and connect with customers as much as you can.Lessons From The Past: Even if you don't have a 100-year company history to rely on, you can always look to the past for trends and ideas that are likely to come back around. There is a saying that history repeats itself — and it's true. So be a student of history and prepare yourself with knowledge of what has happened before so you can be ready for the future.Instant Gratification: Although it is sometimes risky to carry a lot of inventory, it's equally risky to not have enough of what customers want readily available. When customers shop, they are often looking to solve a problem right now, and if you can't meet their needs, you will lose out on a sale today, and also the possibility of future sales from that same customer.For an in-depth look at this episode, check out the full transcript below. Quotes have been edited for clarity and length.---Up Next in Commerce is brought to you by Salesforce Commerce Cloud. Respond quickly to changing customer needs with flexible Ecommerce connected to marketing, sales, and service. Deliver intelligent commerce experiences your customers can trust, across every channel. Together, we're ready for what's next in commerce. Learn more at salesforce.com/commerce---For a full transcript of this interview, click here.

Epic Conquerors podcast
5 Elephants in the Room - Part 3

Epic Conquerors podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 22:51


Dr Judy Bauer presents the powerful conclusion of this series. We embrace our calling to be Spiritual Entrepreneurs in The Father's Family Business. Visit http://www.epicwin4u.com for links and show notes and join in on the conversation @EpicConqerors on Facebook. If you enjoy our bi-weekly podcasts and videocasts then simply buy us a coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/KingJesus

Dudes Behind the Foods with Tim Chantarangsu and David So
Yelp Can't Be Trusted, Did Our Bad Review Ruin a Family Business?

Dudes Behind the Foods with Tim Chantarangsu and David So

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 64:16


In the first episode of Dudes Behind the Foods, your hosts Tim Chantarangsu and David So, share hilarious and horrendous food stories, Including a Bacon Festival gone wrong and an angry old Korean man. David shares his ups and downs of gaining weight from the show and Tim details how his dad's face may have been the downfall of his family's restaurant.  Follow Tim on Insta: @timchantarangsu Follow David on Insta: @davidsocomedy To watch Dudes Behind the Foods podcast videos on YouTube: www.youtube.com/timothy Don't forget to subscribe to the podcast for free wherever you're listening or by using this link: https://bit.ly/DudesBehindtheFoodsPodcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

On Boards Podcast
30. Family businesses: the most successful, long-lasting and impactful businesses in the world

On Boards Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 46:26


Rob and Josh are each co-founders of BanyanGlobal Family Business Advisors which advises family owners on business, finance, ownership, philanthropy, and a wide range of other issues.  They are each leaders in the field of family-owned business.  They recently co-authored the Harvard Business School publication: “Family Business Handbook: How to Build and Sustain a Successful, Enduring Enterprise.” Thanks for listening! We love our listeners! Drop us a line or give us guest suggestions here. Links Why the 21st Century Will Belong To Family Businesses Build a Family Business that Lasts Order the HBR Family Business Handbook Quotes   Family Business Myths/Facts   Myth: Family businesses don't really matter.   Fact: “About 90% of all businesses in the United States are family owned and they account for about 50% of all employment.”   Myth: Family businesses don't last, after three generations, they're doomed to fail.   Fact: “Family businesses last longer on average than other forms of ownership. Some of the longest lasting and most successful businesses in the world are family businesses. Why don't Americans know that?”   Joe: Josh, why do you think that the myth that family businesses are less successful, that they never get beyond the third generation, why does that persist?   Josh: It's a great scare tactic, I think you keep hearing it is because people want to tell you, "You're doomed to fail and therefore you need my help to be able to overcome it."   Myth: Family businesses are rife with conflicts - family members are fighting and suing each other and just can't possibly get along   Fact:  “Most family businesses struggle not from having too much conflict, but from too little conflict, because it's really hard to raise some of these issues about fairness and compensation and all the things that come in as being part of a family business.”   Rob: It's strange, but the celebrity or the business celebrities, when I went to business school, Jack Welch, and he was making a brand for himself. Now, it's Bill Gates or Mark Zuckerberg at Facebook or Elon Musk at Tesla. They seek the publicity. I would say most all of the family business that we know the owners, they shy away from publicity. They don't want to be the face of their family business. They actually know the downside that can come with that. Josh: Most family businesses are private companies and the word "private" is there for a reason, that they don't want to be public. They see advantages in being below the radar. I was visiting a family business recently in a state out west and I drive up to the headquarters and I was like, "That can't be it. We must have the address wrong. That can't possibly be the headquarters of a billion dollar company." And of course, it was. “One of the amazing things about family businesses is that they can break the rules in a way and practice business in a way that is fundamentally different than other companies.”   “Family business owners can, if they choose, own it for their whole lifetime and maybe set it up for their next generation. It's the difference between maybe renting an apartment or even being in an Airbnb overnight - you're day trading versus owning a home that you're hoping to bequeath to your children.”   Unlike other companies,  family businesses actually talk about longevity. How often do you hear companies outside of the world of family businesses talking about how many generations do you last? Do we put like a second or third generation as if that's just a low number, but then you have to multiply it by 20 or 30 years and you realize that a third-generation family business has probably been around for a hundred years. Josh:  People say: "Oh, most family businesses don't make it for a hundred years and therefore they're doomed to fail." I'm like, "No, no, most businesses last for under a year, maybe five years." Joe: Their success is actually used as a way of talking about their failure when it's not really a failure at all.   What we find in family businesses is that core decisions are really made at the owner level in family businesses, not like publicly-traded companies. If you don't like what's going on at GM, you sell GM and you're out and it wasn't really hard to sell. With a family business you're in. So, you're going to work really hard to make the owner decisions the right decisions.   The rights that come with that ownership are profound, the ability to influence the company in ways that are positive and negative are fundamental and learning how to effectively step into that role as owners is essence of the work that we do and the essence of the book that we set out to write.   If you're working in a family business or if you're on the board of a family business and you don't understand the owner strategy, like what trade-offs they're making, you're going to be very surprised by the decisions that are coming your way.   Leadership Transition If you've been in this position of leading a family business for decades, maybe your entire adult life, you're not just going to quit that and play golf. In most cases, you need some place to land, some place to go to…. to give that up, it's super scary.  It's psychologically very challenging for some people.   Joe: One of the things we talked about earlier … for the person that's been running the family business it is not just a job. It is his or her identity because they're really living their job. I think that provides a perspective of why it's so hard to let go.   Rob: That's a great point.  It is their narrative and maybe it's been their narrative since they were five years old, is that they wanted to be the controlling owner or CEO of their family business, and their narrative probably never got to that final few chapters about how they're going to relinquish control over time.   Some do it, and some do it with such aplomb, it's really quite amazing. We're trying to learn from those people about what it is that gets them to the other side of that transition.   Getting to the next generation, the hardest thing often is the current generation! It's like letting go of the reins and really talking. We have some clients who it's fairly easy for, but they're the exception.     “One of the hardest things to get right in a family business is family employment. One of the things that causes the most conflict in a family businesses is who gets a job, who gets paid how much, who gets promoted, who gets the CEO spot. And it's really hard to navigate those issues.”   “Once your (family) business gets to a certain size, the value you get from the right independent directors is almost always going to be worth the time and investment that you make into them.”     Big Ideas/Thoughts   The kinds of things that family businesses are able to do in terms of investing in their employees, investing in their communities that they believe and see paying off in their company, they would never be able to do them if they had to focus on quarterly earnings.   It's so interesting, when CFOs come into family businesses from public companies or from private equity, they have to be retrained, just retrained about what the priorities of the family owners are.     Managing Expectations Another one of the things that people say about family businesses is that families grow faster than businesses, so therefore a family business is doomed to fail because at some point the size of the family will outstrip the ability of the business to support it. That's where expectations come into play because that's a choice.  Should family members actually expect to live off the business or do you expect them to find other ways and treat the dividends they get as a nice bonus to buy something, to buy a new car, or maybe if it's a great year, to get a new house, but not to treat it as sort of like the foundation of the family living on.   The Wall Street Journal is a great example of expectation driving decisions. The family (that owned the WSJ) lived off of a very profitable business, a growing family over time. And then as the digital age came in and disrupted newspapers, it was no longer as profitable anymore. And so the family was in a position where they either had to drastically cut their lifestyle or drastically cut the reinvestment in the business, putting them almost in a no-win position that Rupert Murdoch took advantage of and made an offer that they really felt like they didn't have a choice, but to accept.   Dividend policy and debt are two of the things that families have to grapple with, and that often leads to their demise.   Regarding debt: You go to business school, and they'd say, "Oh, look at all of the great benefits of leverage. You can get a much higher return on equity. Interest payments are tax deductible." So,  you come out of business school saying, "Lever up, baby." and there are also these LBOs going on.   You go into the world of family business, and it's so, so different. Many of our large clients effectively have zero debt. And in fact, we had one client, it was in the agricultural business, and they had zero debt and they had two full years of operating expenses on their balance sheet. And we're like, "This is not what we learned at business school."       Family Business Goals   From an ownership perspective, there are three main things you might want. You could want to grow the value of the business - let's go from a million to ten million to a billion and so on. You might want to do that just because you want to be richer, or maybe you want to influence the world and you see your business as a platform to do that.   The second thing you might want as an owner is liquidity, and here we mean taking money out of the business. So, you might want to do that because you want to lead a nice lifestyle, or you want to give it away to charity. Or you want to have something that is yours and not belonging to your entire family.   And the third thing you might want is control, and control is sort of like you have it until you give it up. So, if you take on an equity partner, you are giving up some level of control. If you take on outside debt, you're giving up control because now someone else is in the room with you and has some influence over your decisions.   The most common path to building a successful family business is the mixture of growth and control. If you look at the largest family businesses in the world, most of them have been built in exactly the same way, which is that they make a dollar, and they reinvest 99 cents. They give themselves enough money to pay the bills and they put 99 cents right back into the business. They do that over and over and over again until they've built something very significant.   The growth and control is at the expense of liquidity.     Owners Room/Importance of Owner Decisions In family businesses on top of the boardroom sits the “owner room” and here there are very few decisions, but this is about the longevity of the firm.  What's being traded in this room isn't the competency that's traded in a management room or the wisdom in a boardroom. It's actually power and influence. It's the power that if 51% of the voting shareholders do it this way, that's where it's going to go. But it's also the influence that if you stick it to your sister and she goes to her dad, oh, it may come back to haunt you somewhere else.   So what part of what we say is the owner room needs to have both the vote, the 51% we talked about, but really important to have the voice. Sometimes it's okay to be out voted if you had a voice in the matter and people have taken seriously what you have to say.

Trap Talk With MJ Podcast
#115 JACE & JOSH HADISH OF GEN Z REPTILES | BALL PYTHON BREEDERS | FAMILY BUSINESS | TRAP TALK

Trap Talk With MJ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 115:54


#BALLPYTHONS #FAMILYBUSINESS #COOLESTREPTILEPODCASTINTHEWORLD JOIN TRAP PATREON FAM: https://bit.ly/311x4gxSUBSCRIBE: https://bit.ly/39kZBkZSUPPORT USARK: https://usark.org/memberships/TRAP TALK HERP MERCH HERE: https://bit.ly/3mvC4EB Follow Me On Instagram: Trap Talk Podcast https://bit.ly/2WLXL7w MJExoticsCartal https://bit.ly/3hthAZuUnfiltered Reptiles Podcast https://bit.ly/3eSqAFMSubscribe to Unfiltered Reptiles Podcast: https://bit.ly/2WM11jsListen On Apple:Trap Talk With MJ https://bit.ly/2CVW9Bd Unfiltered Reptiles Podcast https://bit.ly/3jySnhV Listen On Spotify:Trap Talk With MJ https://bit.ly/2WMcKOO Unfiltered Reptiles Podcast https://bit.ly/2ZQ2JCbBROUGHT TO YOU BY:www.coldbloodedcafe.comwww.simcontainer.comTRAP TALK PODCAST WEAR: mjexoticscartal@gmail.comALL COLLAB INQUIRIES PLEASE EMAIL: thesnaketrapsessions@gmail.com WELCOME TO THE SNAKE TRAP SESSIONS HOME OF THE TRAP TALK WITH MJ PODCAST. THIS ISN'T YOUR TYPICAL REPTILE PODCAST. THERE WILL BE SMOKING, DRINKING, CUSSING & MAD DISCUSSION ON ANYTHING REPTILE RELATED. WE'LL ALSO HAVE DISCUSSION OF EVERYDAY LIFE WITH THE OCCASION GIVE AWAY HERE AND THERE. I APPRECIATE ALL THE LOVE AND SUPPORT & LOOKING FORWARD TO BRINGING SOME REAL ONES TO THE TABLE.

Pro Fan's Sports Podcast
Gordie Gronkowski "Talent beats hard work" & family business

Pro Fan's Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 45:27


Pro Fan's Sports Podcast (Where The Fan's Of The Pro's Go) Hosted by John Altidor, Barry Ebua and Vladimir Albin Junior.Please join us weekly, to hear us discuss the latest in sports. Follow Us On Social Media Facebook.com/profanssports Twitter.com/profanssports Instagram.com/profans_sports Merchandise: www.redbubble.com/people/profanssports --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/profanssports/support

Camano Voice
Nick Sanders: From joining a Family Business to Co-owning one!

Camano Voice

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 47:30


Links to Things Mentioned in this Episode: Orchards Nursery ( https://www.orchardsnursery.com/ ) Twin City Foods ( http://twincityfoods.com/ ) Country Store (Previously Skagit Farm Supply / https://www.countrystore.net/ ) Mi Cocina ( https://www.taqueriamicocinawa.com/order )

Epic Conquerors podcast
5 Elephants in the Room - part 1

Epic Conquerors podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 23:34


In this exciting mini-series Dr Judy addresses 5 myths (aka elephants in the room) concerning our role in the Father's Family Business. Discover how YOU are the answer to Jesus prayer! Visit http://www.epicwin4u.com for links and show notes and join in on the conversation @EpicConqerors on Facebook. If you enjoy our bi-weekly podcasts and videocasts then simply buy us a coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/KingJesus

Live and Lead for Impact with Kirsten E. Ross
226 The Work of One Preparing for Conversations & Choices in Your Family Business

Live and Lead for Impact with Kirsten E. Ross

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 26:57


226 The Work of One Preparing for Conversations & Choices in Your Family Business I Help Build Your High Performing Team and Make Your Bigger Bolder Impact Get What You Need from Your Team – Even if they're family Important first step – family businesses can struggle with feelings of obligation or entitlement between the Now Gen and Next Gen Often assumptions are what drive the path of the Next Gen into the business. I've seen it so many times.  A Next Gen feeling the weight of responsibility to run the business, generate profits that will support the employees, family members and Now Gen through retirement. Often, underneath is a lack of confidence and an uncertainty about desire. Most often family members fear and worry about what might be a difficult conversation. They have assumptions about how the conversation will go and the reactions of close family members.   It is especially difficult to have the tenacity required to initiate what might be a tough conversation if we aren't clear about what we're asking for. When I begin working with a client who has not engaged in self-discovery there is usually knowledge about what they don't want  - Often – I don't want what is – but no clear idea about what they do want. And….they usually have not identified the key reasons WHY they don't want the current circumstance. Is it fear, lack of confidence, staying silent rather than speaking up, how they are being treated currently…… The list goes on. Ideally, each family member will take time to clarify what he or she desires from the business.  If they current circumstance is not what is desired learn why – all of this will help drive the conversation and path. EXAMPLE – 2nd Gen – 30's – Lacked Confidence – felt she didn't want to be a leader or couldn't be good at it. Not interested in running the family business No Creative Exploration – She saw only 2 paths – run the business – exit the business Self Exploration =Loved CFO work.  Did not want to run the business – Was a good leader – just needed to build her skills –  End result – CFO – hire a President – Build Leadership Skills   The Take Away Lessons from this example:   First Explore Why You don't Want to go Down the Current Path   Lack confidence Lack knowledge or experience Feel unheard Feel powerless Feel lack of life balance Building resentments Things feel unfair Unrealistic Expectations – you or others.   Create a Clear Path – to a new possibility – Identify in Detail Future Desires Strengths Passions How Do You Want to Spend Your Time? Where Do You Want to Live? What Do You Want? What Do You Need? Get Creative Now that You're Clear About What You Want – How Can You Get There Time to Get Creative Creative Exploration Explore New Paths  Consider Alternate Options Identify New Possibilities What If………. Could it Be…………  

Graining In
#125: Zack Adams | Fox Farm Brewery

Graining In

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 95:39


Our hot-n-ready studio gets christened in style — with owner/brewer at Fox Farm Brewery, Zack Adams!In trademark fashion, the conversation (endearingly?) is all over the place. Zack gets into his  *extremely* accomplished career as a home brewer (2012 @SamuelAdamsBeer LongShot winner?!?)); his brewery's commitment to nailing as many styles as possible; lager logistics // spoils of spontaneous fermentation; and the beauty of brewing with what you can find in your state.It's starting to seem that people that live at their brewery are the nicest brewers of all — put that hypothesis to the test with the episode in full, NOW available damn near everywhere!. . . . . . . . . . . . Music: “Mountain Climb” by Jake Hill

ConnectCalgary
Family Business

ConnectCalgary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 23:52


If you are a Christian, you are in "the family business." Mother-daughter team Kathy and Stephanie Morales share what that means and how it plays out in their lives in this week's wonderful message!

Proprietors of Pittsburgh Podcast
Set Yourself Apart From the Competition | John Graf, Owner of the Priory Hospitality Group

Proprietors of Pittsburgh Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 35:09


If you have any questions or if you'd like to chat, you can reach me at my contact info below. The purpose of this podcast is to share ideas, inspire action, and build a stronger small business community here in Pittsburgh. So please say hello, tell me what you think, and let me know how I'm doing. It means a ton!YOU CAN REACH ME AT:Website: https://www.proprietorsofpittsburgh.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/proprietorsofpittsburghpodcastFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/proprietorsofpittsburghpodcastLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/darinvilanoPhone: 412-336-8247YOU CAN REACH JOHN GRAF AT:Website: https://www.thepriory.comWebsite: https://www.mansionsonfifth.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/theprioryhotelInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/mansionsonfifthFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/prioryhotelFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/MansionsonFifth

Earth Eats: Real Food, Green Living
A second-generation baker takes the family business to the next level

Earth Eats: Real Food, Green Living

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 30:00


When Brittany Kiel took over the family bakery, she wanted to make changes to reflect her own passions. Honoring tradition is also important to her, so she's striking a delicate balance.

Conversations
David Stratton's reel life

Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 50:28


The critic on what he has learned from watching 25,000 films, and that time he peed on Federico Fellini

Behrend Talks: A Penn State Podcast
Supporting Family Business, with Dr. Christopher Harben and Doug Neckers

Behrend Talks: A Penn State Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 31:03


Dr. Ralph Ford, chancellor of Penn State Behrend, discusses the new Center for Family Business with Dr. Christopher Harben, Toudy Chair of Entrepreneurship and Family Business, and Doug Neckers, president and CEO of Maplevale Farms. Originally recorded October 26, 2021. For a captioned version, visit behrend.psu.edu/behrendtalks.

Grit & Growth
Profile of Purpose: One Stitch at a Time

Grit & Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 9:36


Meet Linda Ampah, founder of KAD Manufacturing and a fashion brand called Cadling Fashions based in Ghana. Linda's entrepreneurial journey has had all the typical hurdles plus the extra challenges of being a female business owner in Africa. That's why providing job opportunities for women is central to her mission.Linda has always loved the sound of sewing machines. Now she gets to hear them all the time in her factories where she manufactures school uniforms and makes garments for U.S. brands like Anthropologie and Brooklyn Industries. “In Ghana, in the marketplaces there are women and girls who sleep on the streets. We went out asking them whether they'll be interested to come and train? And the response we got was just amazing. We invited them over and then we started training them. Now the challenge though was that because they didn't have a place to stay, they get raped. We decided we'll add housing to it. And usually after a year, they are able to rent their own place then they move from the hostel.”Listen to Linda's mini-profile to learn how employing women in need can have a ripple effect on an entire community.Resources:Pieces of the Portrait: An Autobiography by Linda AmpahSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Gravity
90. Building White Castle: What It Takes to Run a Family Business with Lisa Ingram

Gravity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 53:42


Lisa Ingram is the President and CEO of White Castle, the iconic Columbus-based burger chain founded 100 years ago, and now, with 377 locations across 13 states. She's been at the company for over two decades, although her tenure was split to allow her the opportunity to experience work elsewhere – a fascinating hiring concept applied to all interested family members. Lisa's great grandfather, Billy Ingram, co-founded White Castle over a century ago and the brand is still going strong. In 2014, Time magazine named the White Castle slider as the most influential burger of all time. They pride themselves on being a family business. But, just because you're part of the family doesn't mean this is the right job for you. We talk about how they knit family into the fabric of the company, and when the two are separated for the good of all involved. As part of that process, Lisa spent time working for a variety of companies outside of the famous burger chain, and remains heavily involved in the local community to this day, holding a seat on multiple local advisory boards among other things.  Our conversation starts with her upbringing, experiencing the divorce of her parents and digging into what drew her toward cheerleading from a young age (as well as how being a cheerleader is more similar to being a CEO than you might think). Then, we get into the pros and cons of working with family. We also touch on how to juggle multiple priorities and responsibilities while honing in on what's important and, ultimately, what will make you happy.  What Brett asks: [02:10] Let's start at the very beginning. Tell us about your childhood. [06:05] How did your parents' divorce shape you? [11:10] Why did cheerleading stick as a childhood hobby? [13:40] How much of being an introvert is down to nurture vs. nature for you? [22:40] How have you found working with family? [34:10] How long have you been in your current role? [40:15] Will you put together a succession plan for the generation after you? [42:00] What's the biggest challenge with juggling motherhood, your involvement in the community, and work? [46:50] How do you manage self-care through exercise?  [50:00] Any final thoughts? To learn more about intentional living, and for the complete show notes, visit: https://gravityproject.com/ (gravityproject.com) Resources: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lisa-ingram-a6195a4/ (Lisa on LinkedIn) https://twitter.com/wclisaingram (Lisa on Twitter) https://www.whitecastle.com (White Castle) Gravity is a production of http://crate.media (Crate Media).

Live and Lead for Impact with Kirsten E. Ross
EP 224 Are Your Truths Assumptions or Facts in Your Family Business? 

Live and Lead for Impact with Kirsten E. Ross

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 12:03


EP 224 Are Your Truths Assumptions or Facts in Your Family Business?  Families in Business have a shared history unlike co-workers in a non-family business.    The connection to the business  What Do You Assume to Be True about the Business Now?   Who Does the Work of the Business?  Who Makes Decisions for the Business?  Who Owns the Business?  Who Benefits Financially from the Business?  How Do You Know?  Have these Truths Been Discussed, Decided & Documented   OR - Are They Assumed?  Challenging Your ”Truths”  Are These Truths the Only Possibility?  Have Options Been Discussed & Explored?   What Do You Assume to Be True about the Business FUTURE?  Who Does the Work of the Business?  Who Makes Decisions for the Business  Who Owns the Business  Who Benefits Financially?  How Do You Know?  Have these Truths Been Discussed, Decided & Documented   OR - Are They Assumed?  Challenging Your ”Truths”  Are These Truths the Only Possibility?  Have Options Been Discussed & Explored?    MyImpactAcademy.com/join 

Pax Britannica
02.29 - The O'Neill Family Business

Pax Britannica

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 29:45


Owen Roe O'Neill returns to Ireland to fight for God, Fatherland, and King. Well, maybe not that last one... Check out the podcast website Check out Pax Britannica Merch! Facebook | Twitter | Patreon | Donate For this episode, I found the following publications particularly useful: Jane Ohlmeyer, Micheál Ó Siochrú, Ireland, 1641: Contexts and Reactions John Cunningham, ‘Politics, 1641-1660', Cambridge History of Ireland David Edwards, ‘Political Change and Social Transformation, 1603-1641', Cambridge History of Ireland John Jeremiah Cronin and Padraig Lenihan, ‘Wars of Religion, 1641-1691', Cambridge History of Ireland Joseph Cope, ‘The Irish Rising', in Michael J. Braddick. The Oxford Handbook of the English Revolution Micheál Ó Siochrú, Atrocity, Codes of Conduct and the Irish in the British Civil Wars 1641-1653 Micheál Ó Siochrú, The Centre Cannot Hold: Ireland 1643-1649 Micheál Ó Siochrú, God's Executioner: Oliver Cromwell and the Conquest of Ireland Demetri D. Debe, The fifth earl of Clanricarde and the founding of the Confederate Catholic government, 1641-3, Irish Historical Studies Philip McClory, Assessing the religious, political and personal motivations of Owen Roe O'Neill in returning to and campaigning in Ireland, 1642-49 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Proprietors of Pittsburgh Podcast
Do What Is Authentic to You | Natalie Gentile, M.D., Co-Founder of Direct Care Physicians of Pittsburgh

Proprietors of Pittsburgh Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 36:16


As Natalie Gentile, M.D. was planning to move back to Pittsburgh with her family, she began searching for a way to practice medicine that fit her desire for a patient-focused approach. The type of comprehensive and wellness-centered care that she was interested in seemed to be disappearing from modern clinical medicine. Through conversations she had with her mentor, she discovered the direct primary care (DPC) practice model. By cutting out insurance companies and third parties from influencing medical decisions, this alternative format for primary care medicine meant that Dr. Natalie could focus her time and energy on lifestyle guidance and preventative measures to help her patients get well.In 2019, shortly after returning home to Pittsburgh, Dr. Natalie opened her own DPC practice - Gentile Family Direct Primary Care. Building a business from scratch would prove challenging as physicians do not learn any of these skills in medical school. Nevertheless, as she dug into all of the details of starting a new company, Dr. Natalie quickly discovered a love for entrepreneurship that she didn't know she had. As a board-certified family medicine and lifestyle medicine physician, Dr. Natalie is free to run her practice in a way that allows her to spend as much time as needed with her patients while keeping their overall health and well-being front and center. If you have any questions or if you'd like to chat, you can reach me at my contact info below. The purpose of this podcast is to share ideas, inspire action, and build a stronger small business community here in Pittsburgh. So please say hello, tell me what you think, and let me know how I'm doing. It means a ton!YOU CAN REACH ME AT:Website: https://www.proprietorsofpittsburgh.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/proprietorsofpittsburghpodcastFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/proprietorsofpittsburghpodcastLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/darinvilanoPhone: 412-336-8247YOU CAN REACH DR. NATALIE GENTILE AT:Website: https://www.directcarepgh.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/directcarepghFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/DirectCarePghLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/natalie-gentile-md-5982b081

“What It’s Really Like to be an Entrepreneur”
Parkinson's Leads to CBD with Sonny's Wellness

“What It’s Really Like to be an Entrepreneur”

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 21:55


Moving across the country to Oregon from New York was the necessary step for this week's guest. Tom Oliva was eager to gain access into the CBD market. For Oliva, it all started with his grandfather “Sonny,” which is where Sonny's Wellness got its name. Sonny struggled with Parkinson's disease for years.In this episode, you will learn tips for moving your business to a new location, the basics and benefits of CBD,  how to get your products on the shelves at stores, and much more.Episode #158 - "What It's Really Like to Be an Entrepreneur" has been rebranded  to "That Entrepreneur Show" https://www.VincentALanci.com/.Each week, the founder of a company or brand shares what worked for them, what they needed to improve on, and all of their learning lessons along the way.The show is stopping in Oregon to sit down with Sonny's Wellness C0-Founder, Tom Oliva. Head to https://sonnyswellness.com/ and use SONNYS30 at checkout for a discount on your order.The last two years for Tom's grandfather were especially difficult for his mental and physical health. Tom spent countless days and nights trying to help comfort Sonny, and after consulting a friend in the Biotech industry, Tom learned about Cannabidiol (CBD). After a few phone calls and a lot of research, he learned that the oil from the cannabis plant might be the key to finding relief for Sonny. Tom immediately purchased CBD for his grandfather and noticed improvements within hours. Sonny's muscles and joints had reduced inflammation and pain, and his appetite and mood swings were in check. Most importantly, the CBD helped Sonny sleep through the night for the first time in months. CBD made Sonny's life significantly more comfortable before his passing, and Tom hopes to help others find how CBD can change their lives as well.After experiencing first-hand the difference CBD can make in people's lives, he set out to create a reliable and safe brand of products that people can come to know and trust. In 2019, when CBD was finally legalized across the U.S., he knew that it was time to make his move. He created Sonny's Wellness, which is founded on the principles of integrity, compassion, and transparency. Website: https://sonnyswellness.com/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tom-oliva-b1709775/Host Name: Vincent A. LanciEmail: PodcastsByLanci@Gmail.comYouTube: youtube.com/channel/UCy0dil34Q5ILEuHgLVmfhXQInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/thatentrepreneurshowFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/ThatEntrepreneurShowTwitter: twitter.com/PodcastsByLanciLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/thatentrepreneurshowDigital Editing Inquiries: Email PodcastsByLanci@Gmail.comHappy | https://soundcloud.com/morning-kulishow/happy-backgUplifting Energy by Mixaund | https://www.free-stock-music.com/mixaund-uplifting-energy.htmlAdventure by MusicbyAden | https://soundcloud.com/musicbyadenCreative Commons Attribution-Share

The Rules to the Game
[The] FOUNDATION - 5 Steps to Build Your Family Business Credit!

The Rules to the Game

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 106:00


*ALL TOPICS DISCUSSED ARE FOR INFORMATIONAL AND EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND NOT TO BE CONSIDERED OR CONSTRUED AS LEGAL OR TRADING ADVICE*   Welcome to the FOUNDATION!   [The] FOUNDATION - 5 Steps to Build Your Family Business Credit!   This May Be A Very Controversial Show...   "Sot, what happened to the show from last week?l" We Are Living In Crazy Times, May Be Best To Listen Live...       Some Ideas are based in 'reality". Most Ideas are Simply Dynamite With Very Short Fuses. Most Do Not Understand That It Takes Specific knowledge In Order To Do Everything And Anything. ...   Once You Have "Gone Private" It Is All About What You KNOW. Think About That For A Minute.   The System Is Set Up To Allow Us To BARELY Get By? Let's Talk About Banks, Trust, The Monetary System and What YOU Can Do About It!   As Always, Make Sure To Call In With Any Questions!   Join Host Sot El as we Discuss this and other Topics.   As We Lay the FOUNDATION...

Made in America with Ari Santiago
A Successful Transition From the Restaurant Industry to A Family Business with Ed Planeta, Acme Wire Products Co., Inc.

Made in America with Ari Santiago

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 43:12


Joining us this week on the Made in America podcast is Ed Planeta, VP of Sales and Owner of Acme Wire Products Co., Inc.! Ed talks to Ari about the importance of figuring out what you are good at, making business videos to engage with customers, and how to differentiate yourself in the marketplace. He details what his transition was like from the restaurant industry to their family business and how well they work together. Ed also shares what Acme Wire Products sees from a workforce perspective and how quickly they get qualified people in the doors to start working. He expresses how they are always making sure the people they employ and the customers they serve are a good fit! Ed Planeta, VP of Sales and Owner, Acme Wire Products Acme Wire Products's Website: https://acmewire.com/ Acme Wire Products's Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AcmeWireProductsCoInc Acme Wire Products's YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjOQVTi9h99xNRm9x66Qt8g Acme Wire Products's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/acme-wire-products-co.-inc./ Ed's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ed-planeta-16b9327/ Ari Santiago, CEO, CompassMSP Company Website: https://www.gettingyouconnected.com/ Company Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/itdtech/ Company LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/it-direct-llc Company YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/itdirect151 Ari's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/asantiago104/ Podcast produced by Miceli Productions: https://miceliproductions.com/

Innovation Talks
Enabling the Next Generation to Innovate Family Businesses

Innovation Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 34:49


Dr. Nadine Kammerlander is a Professor of Business at WHU – Otto Beisheim School of Management, one of the leading business schools in the world. She was previously a Consultant at Mckinsey & Company and Assistant Professor at the Center of Family Business at the University of St. Gallen, Switzerland. She has a master's degree in Physics from the Technical University of Munich and a Ph.D. in management from the Otto-Friedrich-University of Bamberg. Nadine is the Associate Editor of the Family Business Review and has received international recognition for her research. Nadine joins me today to discuss enabling the next generation to innovate family businesses. She reveals why family businesses experience different innovation dilemmas from corporations and the emotional hurdles in play. Nadine shares where family firms find funding for new ventures and innovation and discloses why perspectives have changed significantly in the last few years. She explains why not giving up control restricts the adoption of new technologies and why family businesses tend to introduce sustainable practices naturally. Nadine also shares why it is vital to enable digitization by bringing training to family firms. “What is important now is that we continue to teach family businesses and to bring knowledge into the family business.” - Dr. Nadine Kammerlander This week on Innovation Talks: Why the hurdles of radical innovation differ between corporates and family-run businesses How the majority of worldwide firms are family businesses or have family influence The specific hurdles for family manager owners Where family-run companies can find funding for innovation and new start-ups Why there has been a rapid change in outlook and perspective over the past two years Why family business managers will need to give up control to adopt new technologies such as AI applications Why next gens are less likely to continue the succession trend and what this means for family companies What Nadine is working on now Resources Mentioned: Book: Innovator's Dilemma: When New Technologies Cause Great Firms to Fail by Clayton Christensen Harvard Business review: Family Firms Are More Innovative Than Other Companies Connect with Dr. Nadine Kammerlander: WHU – Otto Beisheim School of Management WHU on LinkedIn Nadine Kammerlander on LinkedIn This Podcast is brought to you by Sopheon Thanks for tuning into this week's episode of Innovation Talks. If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe and leave a review wherever you get your podcasts. Apple Podcasts | TuneIn | GooglePlay | Stitcher | Spotify | iHeart Be sure to connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn, and share your favorite episodes on social media to help us reach more listeners, like you. For additional information around new product development or corporate innovation, sign up for Sopheon's newsletter where we share news and industry best practices monthly! The fastest way to do this is to go to sopheon.com and click here.

Roads Taken
Gratitude, Attitude, & Courage: Kate Andrews Kelly on finding joy by developing it in others

Roads Taken

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 33:20


Guest Kate Kelly had grown up thinking about herself as an athlete. But she also was someone who sought out joy in all aspects of her life. She liked being around kids, so figured she would be an educator. But something whispered to her that educating kids wasn't all about being in the classroom. She started working in admissions and coaching at an independent school in Massachusetts but wished she could make a longer relationship with the students.Working in residential life, she was on the academic calendar, so her summers were free and she reached out to some summer camps. She first landed at Camp Danbee, where she was in charge of 250 girls, ages six to 12. Undaunted, she realized this was what she was looking for: the intersection of experiential learning and community building and relationships. She was in love.At the same time, her co-worker and Dartmouth classmate Briarly Kessler kept hounding her to meet Cole Kelly, a friend who lived in Georgia but just seemed perfect for Kate. Like the immediate sense of “this is it” when she got to camp, connecting with Cole had the same certainty. He brought the perfect combination of fun and care for the same things that Kate loved. Shortly after meeting, summer camp came up and Cole, who was just finishing his MBA and looking for something to go run, was all in. Along the couple's nearly twenty year camp journey, they've developed and refined the values that make everything work, in both their personal life and camp life.In this episode, find out from Kate how operationalizing your values can lead to optimized joy…on ROADS TAKEN...with Leslie Jennings Rowley. About This Episode's GuestFor almost twenty years, Kate Kelly, with husband Cole, has run Camp Weequahic, a three- or six-week sleep-away camp for girls and boys located in northeastern Pennsylvania. When not on site each summer, the couple lives with their three boys in Athens, Georgia. Executive Producer/Host: Leslie Jennings RowleyMusic: Brian Burrows Find more episodes at https://roadstakenshow.comEmail the show at RoadsTakenShow@gmail.com  

Graining In
#123: Matt Richardson | Tilted Barn Brewery (REPOSTED)

Graining In

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 94:34


Taking a much needed breather to put the finishing touches on the *new* Portland studio, preparing for a Murder's Row of upcoming guests, and to be completely honest, do a lot of lawn work (not sexy, but valid nonetheless). In the stead of the normal fresh-fresh, we're revisiting an extremely enjoyable conversation that occurred back in February with farmer, father, brewer, and notably, Exeter's chief Seinfeldophile -- Matt Richardson of Tilted Barn. This is one we internally reference to this date as the archetype of how we strive to have these conversations go. Enjoy it, whether you missed it the first time or simply revisit it as much we we do................... ........................ ................Music: "Mountain Climb" by Jake Hill

Kermode and Mayo's Film Review
Denis Villeneuve, Dune, The French Dispatch, The Harder They Fall and The Boss Baby 2: Family Business

Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 139:41


Simon and Mark's guest is Denis Villeneuve, who talks about his film Dune, based on Frank Herbert's 1965 science fiction novel and starring Timothée Chalamet, Rebecca Ferguson and Zendaya. Plus we have reviews of The Boss Baby 2: Family Business, in which the grown Templeton brothers have become and drifted away from each other; The Harder They Fall, Jeymes Samuel's Western starring Regina King; Wes Anderson's The French Dispatch, set in an outpost of an American newspaper in a fictional twentieth century French city, starring Léa Seydoux, Timothée Chalamet and Christoph Waltz; Dear Evan Hansen, the film adaptation of the Tony and Grammy Award-winning musical about Evan Hansen, a high school senior with Social Anxiety disorder and his journey of self-discovery and acceptance following the suicide of a fellow classmate; Bigfoot Hunters, in which a clickbait journalist is sent to the Appalachian foothills to cover a Bigfoot Convention and discovers there's more to this listicle than meets the eye; The Bacchus Lady, which deals with the issue of elderly prostitution in South Korea and Lucky Chan-sil, about a film producer who finds herself unemployed with the sudden death of her long-time collaborated director. Mark and Simon also talk you through the best and worst films on subscription-free TV next week, and recommend a home entertainment purchase in DVD of the Week. Send us your sub 20 second instant reaction to any film attached to an email to mayo@bbc.co.uk for our feature ‘Lobby Correspondents'. . Download our podcast from the Baby Sea Clowns app. We welcome your contributions: Email: mayo@bbc.co.uk Twitter: @wittertainment

Becoming Your Best | The Principles of Highly Successful Leaders

We know that successful leaders lead with a vision, and there is no better example of it than our guest for today's show, Crystal Maggelet. When FJ Management had to change and restructure back in 2010, after seeking Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in 2008, Crystal knew she had to find a way to tie different businesses together. She and the company's executives decided that FJM's new mission would be building value to last. They added three elements for its vision to this powerful mission: mutual respect, integrity, and excellence. They figured that if they managed to instill this vision among their employees, they would succeed -- and they weren't wrong.  In this hallmark episode, our number 300 together, we brought a special guest, an outstanding leader, accomplished professional, wife, and mother, Crystal Maggelet. She is the President and CEO of FJ Management, a diversified family business that includes wholly-owned subsidiaries like Maverik, a 350 c-store chain, and Big West Oil, a petroleum refinery. FJM also has a minority stake in Pilot Flying J. Crystal is the Founder of Crystal Inn Hotel & Suites and the recipient of the 2018 E & Y Entrepreneur of the Year for Family Business award.  We had an inspiring conversation about Crystal's unique approach to leadership, inspiring colleagues and associates, and problem-solving. We talk about how important it was for FJM to create a culture that supports its mission and vision and Crystal's most important professional and personal lessons learned along the way. We also discuss nurturing a culture where speaking up, sharing ideas, and pointing out errors are standard practices, adequately rewarded and encouraged.  Tune in to Episode 300 of Becoming Your Best to learn more about Crystal's next-level leadership.  Some Questions I Ask: You're now involved with petroleum lodging, banking, and healthcare. How do you create a culture across these companies that are so unique? (4:13) What are some of the vital professional lessons learned that have helped you succeed in your business? (6:55) What would you say to a new employee about what it means to be a great team member at FJM? (10:26) How do you inspire your employees to be excellent, to get amazing results? (14:19) In This Episode, You Will Learn: The coolest store on the planet. How Maverik vision came about (6:46) Honesty before anything. One of Crystal's first lessons in the professional realm (8:28) The best way to encourage team members to speak up, share their ideas and suggestions (12:01) The importance of being surrounded by the right people. How Crystal balances her professional and personal life (18:53) Resources: JF Management website Connect with Crystal: LinkedIn Becoming Your Best Resources: Becoming Your Best Website Becoming Your Best University Website Becoming Your Best Library See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Grit & Growth
Masterclass on Communicating with Confidence

Grit & Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 23:33


Welcome to Grit & Growth's masterclass on communicating with confidence, featuring Matt Abrahams, Stanford Graduate School of Business lecturer in strategic communications. Whether pitching to investors, reporting to your board, or motivating employees, Abrahams has tips and tricks for managing anxiety and making an impact with both what you say and how you say it.Abrahams knows a thing or two about communicating. Whether he's teaching MBAs at Stanford GSB or hosting his podcast “Think Fast, Talk Smart,” he advises entrepreneurs on the value of “Speaking Up Without Freaking Out” — which is also the title of his best-selling book.Abrahams believes confidence and mindset can be developed to alleviate anxiety and improve almost any pitch or meeting. He's also on a personal mission to stop entrepreneurs from beginning their presentations with “Hi, my name is _______, and today we're going to talk about_________.”“That is boring. It's silly because you're showing a slide that has your name and your topic on it. I like to joke that every good pitch should start like a James Bond movie. No, not with sex and violence, but with action, get people participating and focused … and that's what will help people get interested in what you're saying.”Top Seven Masterclass Takeaways Some anxiety is a good thing. It can give you energy and focus. Abrahams suggests using cognitive reframing to use your excitement about your business and vision to manage your fear of pitching.Use nonverbal cues to convey confidence … even if you're not feeling it. Gesture more slowly, make direct eye contact, take deep breaths to slow your speech rate down. These nonverbal cues will make people think you're confident, which will actually make you feel more confident.Record yourself and watch it. Rather than judge and evaluate based upon your own internal dialogue, try to see what others will see in the pitch or presentation.Mindfulness can help you manage anxiety. Give yourself permission to be nervous — it's only human. And forgive yourself if you're nervous or make a mistake. That's human, too.Create a compelling hook. Make sure it grabs people's attention and is relevant. Abrahams explains, “If you do something different, you automatically stand out. You've got my attention just because you did something different.”Learn to tell your story fast and slow. Have a two-minute, 10-minute, and 30-minute version to deliver depending upon the situation.Consider cultural differences and pay attention to social status. Low context and high context cultures require different approaches. And hierarchy and social status should impact how you communicate.Listen to Abrahams' insights, advice, and strategies for how entrepreneurs can communicate with greater confidence and learn how you can improve your next pitch, board meeting, or presentation.Please take a few moments and provide us with your feedback on Grit & Growth. We would love to hear what you're interested in learning about and how we can make the content we create relevant to your growth journey. ResourcesPodcast SurveyThink Fast Talk Smart podcastNo Freaking Speaking See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Trend Report
The Transition of A Family Business with Evan Lagueruela

The Trend Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 42:23


The furniture industry is filled with family businesses. But what happens when one of our amazing colleagues passes? Evan Lagueruela and I are talking about the transition of his family business, Trinity Furniture.Evan and I met at Spring Breakout. I was fascinated by the story of his family business and asked if he'd be willing to come on the podcast. Instead he recommended that his dad join me. We had a wonderful discovery call but before we could actually sit down and record for the show, Mr. Lagueruela passed away from cancer. Rather than let their story go untold, Evan took to the mic to share his family's story and let us know how Trinity Furniture is evolving with the changes. Listen as Evan shares the direction of the company, how they're making waves in the renewables space, and what they're doing to combat their image as traditional furniture makers. I know I say it often, but this truly was a powerful conversation that you won't want to miss.  In this episode: [02:20] Welcome to the show, Evan![04:40] He shares his background and his role with Trinity Furniture today.[05:34] He talks about when he came back to the family business.[07:22] Listen as Evan shares a story about his father's journey from Cuba to the United States.[10:57] He discusses how his father got into the furniture business.[12:36] With $1000 they started Trinity Furniture in 1984.[14:08] Evan speaks about the first piece of furniture they made.[17:19] He shares what he believes was the pivotal moment his father had that boosted Trinity Furniture to where they are today.[19:45] He talks about the Facelift product and the success they've had with this renewable product.[23:42] Listen as Evan discusses the steps that led to him taking over the family business.[27:50] He shares where the company is going in the future.[30:00] He speaks about the legacy collection that they are still producing.[31:47] He talks about the vision he has for Trinity in the next 5 to 10 years.[34:30] Trinity Furniture leads by example and remains made in America with all American parts.[35:30] He gives us a glimpse into the new product development Trinity is working on.[38:50] “There is so much to be said about the power of small businesses.”[40:41] Thank you for being on the show! Links & Resources: INDEAL UniversityConnect with Evan:Trinity FurnitureLinkedIn | Facebook | InstagramEvan's EmailLinkedInConnect with Sid:www.sidmeadows.comEmbark CCT on FacebookSid on LinkedInSid on InstagramSid on YouTubeSid on Clubhouse - @sidmeadowsThe Trend Report is proudly sponsored by INDEAL U. Partners in progress in the commercial interiors industry. To learn more about INDEAL U, please visit their website athttps://www.indeal.org/The Trend Report introduction music is provided by Werq by Kevin MacLeod Link:https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4616-werq License:http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/