Podcasts about Down syndrome

Genetic disorder, "trisomy 21"

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Latest podcast episodes about Down syndrome

The Green Zone
Non-Profit Spotlight: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation & GiGi's Playhouse (Ep. 61)

The Green Zone

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 26:16


This episode of The Green Zone podcast kicks off a special series to raise awareness of several non-profits that support special populations and their families. They hope that once you've heard these stories, you may choose to recognize the work being done with your time and your dollars. In this episode, Jeff and Lauren learn about and discuss: The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Interview with Courtney Egan The mission of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, the world's leader in the search for a cure for CF Important facts about Cystic Fibrosis and how it affects individuals and families The personal story of Courtney and her daughter, who has Cystic Fibrosis How we can help support their mission, particularly in Green Financial Group's home base of Houston, Texas  Support the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation  How To Donate: https://www.cff.org/give-monthly  Website: www.cff.org Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CFFTXGulfCoast  Instagram: @cff_texasgulfcoast or @cf_foundation  Twitter: @CFF_Houston or @CF_Foundation  Upcoming Events in the Houston area: November 15, 2022: Houston Great Strides at the Houston Zoo  Gigi's Playhouse (Sugarland, Texas Location) Interview with Ammie Blahuta The mission of GiGi's Playhouse, a network of Down Syndrome Achievement Centers that provides support for people with Down syndrome and their families. Important facts about Down Syndrome and its impact on people's lives The personal story of Ammie and her daughter, Sadie, who has Down Syndrome How we can help support their mission, particularly in Green Financial Group's home base of Houston, Texas  Support GiGi's Playhouse How To Donate: Visit their website and click DONATE in the menu Website: https://gigisplayhouse.org/sugarland/ Facebook: GiGi's Playhouse Sugarland Instagram: @gigisplayhousesugarland Upcoming Events in the Houston area: April 29, 2023: Fun Run March 10, 2023: Fashion Show March 21, 2023: World Down Syndrome Day   Connect With Green Financial Group: jeff@greenfinancialgrp.com (713) 244-3030 Schedule A Call With Jeff or Lauren Green Financial Group LinkedIn: Jeff Green LinkedIn: Lauren Smith  Note: Raymond James is not affiliated with and does not endorse the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation or GiGi's Playhouse. 

Lehto's Law
No New Trial for Walmart in Suit by Fired Worker w/Down Syndrome

Lehto's Law

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 11:30


The judgment is $300,000 and an appeal appears likely. www.patreon.com/stevelehto

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
Primary school ordered to pay €12,000 compensation to girl with Down Syndrome

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 6:06


Josepha Madigan, Minister for Special Education and Inclusion, responds to the discrimination of a young girl with Down Syndrome.

Arroe Collins
Cara Brindisi From NBC's The Voice

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 9:32


Cara works as a board-certified music therapist for those in hospice care for people with Alzheimer's as well as individuals living with cerebral palsy and Down Syndrome. Cara was inspired to pursue music therapy after seeing the power music had with her own grandfather, who had Alzheimer's. His memory of lyrics and song combined with her grandmother's emotion in that moment was enough to prove to her that music can truly help people. During college, Cara met a guy and by their late 20's, they were engaged. Soon after buying a home and just before the wedding, everything fell apart and they went their separate ways. However, she created a new plan for her life that was propelled by selling her home, taking her dog, Lula, on a cross-country road trip, writing songs, and finding a new sense of independence.

The LowDOWN: A Down Syndrome Podcast
My Lips are Sealed: Selective Mutism in Down Syndrome

The LowDOWN: A Down Syndrome Podcast

Play Episode Play 58 sec Highlight Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 64:07


On Season 6, Episode 10 of The LowDOWN: A Down Syndrome Podcast, Dr. Rosalind Catchpole gives us the lowdown on Down syndrome and selective mutism. Support the showThe LowDOWN: A Down Syndrome Podcast is produced by the Down Syndrome Resource Foundation. Learn more and support the podcast at DSRF.org.Follow @DSRFCanada on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.Leave us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts.

This Rockin' Life | Inspiration | Healthy Lifestyle | Entertainment | Motivation | Life Coach

My guest today is an award-winning feature film writer and director, David Hughens. With scripts that have won numerous awards at film festivals around the world, David gives us an inside look into his newest film, Made with Love, the first ever crowdfunded feature film to star an actor with Down Syndrome.   In this episode, David shares the powerful message and heart warming purpose behind this uplifting and encouraging film, and the endearing story behind how he and the lead actor Jay Carr began their journey together. Along with members in the audience, we highlight the many misconceptions that surround the Down Syndrome community, and bring awareness to these incredible individuals.    We discuss how crowdfunding is changing the filmmaking industry, and what we can do to continue to help support Christian and conservative voices. In these chaotic times, it is crucial that we stand together and support one another, to spread inspiration and positivity, to conquer the forces of depression and darkness.  In this episode: [00:30] Shemane introduces today's guest, David Hughens, welcomes the live audience, and shares about how her and David first became friends [3:34] David shares about his filmmaking journey, how God lead him to creating powerful uplifting movies, and a heartwarming story about the inspiration and lead actor Jay Carr [8:03] The mission to raise awareness for the Down Syndrome community, what we can do to support the film and how you can connect with David, and inspiring statistics and incredible stories about Down Syndrome [13:58] The process of creating a film, where you can watch more from David and Jay, how crowdfunding is changing the filmmaking industry, the importance of more positive and uplifting entertainment, and a sneak peek at an upcoming project with Shemane and David  [22:32] The intricate process of film production, and a surprise guest for the next episode, Brandt Fricker [27:22] Where you can learn more about Shemane's superfood nutrition   Resources:   Help support the film: madewithlovethemovie.com   Made With Love Social Media: Instagram: @madewithlovethemovie Facebook: Made With Love  YouTube: @madewithlovethemovie TikTok: @madewithlovethemovie   Connect with Shemane:  For more information about Shemane & Ted's superfood nutrition: wildlywell21@gmail.com Get Wildly Well at shemanenugent.rocks Toxic Mold Help Check out Shemane's book:  "4 Minutes to Happy" Shemane Social Media: Facebook: @shemane.nugent Instagram: @shemanenugent Youtube: /shemane Truth Social/shemane Listen On: Rumble Libsyn Apple Podcast Podbean

The Lucky Few
186. Dental Anxiety & Down Syndrome (ft. Dr. Samantha Healy)

The Lucky Few

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 47:39


If you've been with us since the beginning then you might remember why this podcast started.. Micha was looking for more information on the best toothbrush for her son with Down syndrome. She and Heather quickly realized there was no information out there about dentistry and DS.. and especially no podcasts about it. So they called Mercedes and started this one.. vowing to have a dentist on as a guest! And today (nearly 200 episodes later..) we are SO excited to share an interview with Samantha Healy, a pediatric dentist and mother to a child with Down syndrome. She's taking us through every moment of her son's surprising birth story + giving us all the info we need to keep up with our children's oral hygiene! We're getting specific about tooth brushes, tooth paste, floss, and more. Samantha also shares her top tips for easing dental anxiety and why you should think twice before sharing a spoon with your baby! Get ready to take some notes! -- SHOW NOTES Find a pediatric dentist here! Check out aapd.org for all the dental info you need! LET'S CHAT Email hello@theluckyfewpodcast.com with your questions and Good News for future episodes. HELP US SHIFT THE NARRATIVE Interested in partnering with The Lucky Few Podcast as a sponsor? Email hello@theluckyfewpodcast.com for more information! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/theluckyfewpod/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theluckyfewpod/support

Elevate Your Advocacy Through the IEP Podcast
E82: Tier 2 Support: MTSS/RTI/SST with Sabrina Axt

Elevate Your Advocacy Through the IEP Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 32:25


Multitiered Systems of Support (but called MANY other similar names) is a system outside of the special education system that provides targeted support to children.  But why are we talking about it on an IEP podcast??? Because... 1) You may be a parent trying to get your child an IEP but are getting pushed towards the MTSS system first (this can be good or bad!) 2) You may be seeing a need your child has that isn't covered by their IEP currently...and they may want to provide support for THIS need through MTSS process first. Shownotes Facebook Group Connect with Special Education Attorney Sabrina Axt: https://www.axtlegal.com/   Prizes: -ALL submissions will receive an exclusive “Accommodations 101 Guide”   -10 winners of IEP 101 Parent Workbook (make your 30-day advocacy plan!) $19 value -5 winners of the December Decoding IEP Data Workshop ($27 value) -Grand prize winner of The Ultimate Parent IEP Prep Course ($249 value) How to Enter the Giveaway: Rate and Review the Podcast in your preferred player & take a screenshot to submit! Make sure you are on the email list by CLICKING THIS LINK TO SIGN UP CLINK THIS LINK to fill out your submission form! Name Email Picture of podcast review What topics would you love to see on the podcast Any guests you know that would be helpful to have on the podcast? You have until Thanksgiving to fill out your form to be entered into the drawings!

All Inclusive
Zack Gottsagen - Conquering Hollywood

All Inclusive

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 21:32


Zack Gottsagen is an American actor who made his debut in the film The Peanut Butter Falcon. He is the first person with Down Syndrome to be a presenter at the Academy Awards. Zack was discovered at a summer camp for people with and without disabilities and has appeared in several projects since Peanut Butter Falcon, including God Save the Queens. He is continuing to pursue a career in acting. Join us for the latest episode of All About Change as Zack discusses his experiences on set during the production of Peanut Butter Falcon, working with big Hollywood stars like Dakota Johnson & Shia LaBeouf, growing up with a disability, dealing with bullies, and more. Zack is proving day after day that when given opportunities, people with disabilities can and should tell their own stories in the film industry. Please find a transcription of this episode: https://allaboutchangepodcast.com/podcast-episode/zack-gottsagen-conquering-hollywood/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

I'M THE VILLAIN
141. The Pivot Episode: Grieving the Alternate Paths You Life Could Have Taken

I'M THE VILLAIN

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 54:09


There's a lot of episodes we've had about major life pivots: Andy Reinhold (Episode 78) talked about how he started in consulting, quit his job to follow his passion and work in gaming, and then went back to consulting to support his baby. Sara Alepin (Episode 123) wanted to be a teacher, but after a student stomped on her foot and left her permanently unable to walk more than a few hours a day without pain, she pivoted to being a wedding photographer, podcaster, and running a businesses community. Ayana Major Bey (Episode 134) wanted to be an actor in plays and then a global pandemic hit. Aaron Matis' story is a bit of a meld between Sara and Ayana's stories: he dreamed of being an actor, and at 26, he was cast in a show on Nickolodeon. He had succeeded in almost everything on his 5-year plan: "I was peaking in every measurable way." Then, one fateful day, he was walking down a hill with a cooler and fell and tore his meniscus. This one fall changed the course of his life forever. 3 surgeries later, and his doctors say he will likely never run again. He moved back home to Scranton from LA and is starting on his next 5-year plan: one that doesn't involve acting. He tells us about the sheer amount of self-hatred that came after his surgery, and how it was so difficult to accept help from those supporting him: "I so much hated myself that I started to resent people that loved me because I thought there must be something wrong with them." He thinks of his former self as a completely different person, and in therapy, he has managed to go through the process of grieving that former self and that former vision he had of what his life was going to look like. But he also talks about the process of rediscovering joy and trying to find happiness in simply being around the people he loves, and not worrying so much about what physical activity they may be doing. He talks about being able to empathize in a new way with his sister, who has a rare condition that causes debilitating bouts of pain, and has found a community in online groups for people who suffer from chronic pain. "I'm not the happiest that I have ever been...but I am getting there." Links: PALS Programs, a camp for kids with Down Syndrome that Aaron has worked with and loves: https://www.palsprograms.org/ Deondre's new show, 3Disc Changer, a podcast where three friends take a deep dive into an iconic album each episode: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/3-disc-changer/id1644161173 Music is The Beauty of Maths by Meydän. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/im-the-villain/support

The Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine Podcast
Wasn't AT Still an M.D. too - Dr. Miriam Mills, M.D.

The Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 82:13


She does Buddhist meditation, dance, is an actress, a theatrical director, a 40 year advocate for children and an M.D. who is as Osteopathic as they come! She has done extensive osteopathic pediatric research throughout her career and for this we thank her. She holds a special place for children with Down Syndrome and has learned many a lesson from them. Following a motor vehicle accident in 1988 she received cranial osteopathic treatments. The physician who treated her told her she should learn these osteopathic treatments for her patients. She sat in on medical school OMT classes for two years and since then has been treating her pediatic patients with great success. Enjoy my conversation with a wise soul, a Pediatrician and an incredible M.D. like A.T. Still who is an osteopath at heart. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/benjamin--greene/message

Gettin' Down with Down Syndrome
Episode #59 Setting up a special needs trust

Gettin' Down with Down Syndrome

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 26:20


Do you know what a special needs trust is or why it is so important to have one?  In this episode I talk with Josh from Hope Trust.  He gives us all the answers to why you need this, when to set this up, and how Hope Trust can help you!  Are you ready to get down!

Best of Today
A tale of brotherly love

Best of Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 8:39


They were just five words, separated by four tiny full stops and four spaces: “brother. do. you. love. me.” It was a text from Reuben Coe who has Down Syndrome, alone in his room because of lockdown - at a care home in Dorset. When the message arrived on the phone of his brother, Manni knew he had to leave his home in Andalusia in Spain and rescue Reuben. Today's Martha Kearney speaks to the two brothers Photo: Manni and Reuben Coe. Credit: Eddy Pearce

The Optimizing Mother's podcast
Ep 10: The Moment It's Real with Goldie Plotkin

The Optimizing Mother's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 37:35


Meet Mrs. Goldie Plotkin. A Shlucha to Markham, Ontario, lecturer, preschool director and co-director of Tamim Academy Toronto, and mother of eight children, ka"h, Mrs. Plotkin shares her experience of mothering her son with special needs, Zalmy OBM. From the moment she heard the words, "your son has Down Syndrome", until she unfortunately had her last moments with him just a few hours before his fifteenth birthday, Mrs. Plotkin worked to remain positive and connected throughout it all. Whether it was dealing with unforeseen instances just as she was about to head out the door to school with her children, or Zalmy's delays and unique challenges, Mrs. Plotkin saw the silver linings in the, sometimes, grey clouds. Get inspired as Mrs. Plotkin shares what got her through some tough times and what she still lives with today. 

Down Syndrome Center of Western Pennsylvania Podcast
#144 - Global Down Syndrome Foundation

Down Syndrome Center of Western Pennsylvania Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 22:55


Michelle Sie Whitten from the Global Down Syndrome Foundation joined the podcast today as part of our "Meet the Nationals" series.   For more information on Global Down Syndrome Foundation https://www.globaldownsyndrome.org Prenatal & Newborn Pamphlet: https://www.globaldownsyndrome.org/prenatal-testing-pamphlet/ GLOBAL Adult Healthcare Guideline: https://www.globaldownsyndrome.org/medical-care-guidelines-for-adults/ If you have a podcast topic you would like us to address, please send an e-mail to DownSyndromeCenter@chp.edu.  If you would like to partner with the Down Syndrome Center and the work that we do, including this podcast, please go to https://givetochildrens.org/downsyndromecenter. Thank you to “Caring for Kids” The Carrie Martin Fund for its support of the Down Syndrome Center Podcast. 

The LowDOWN: A Down Syndrome Podcast
Baby Talk: Down Syndrome Infant Development

The LowDOWN: A Down Syndrome Podcast

Play Episode Play 54 sec Highlight Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 38:15


On Season 6, Episode 9 of The LowDOWN: A Down Syndrome Podcast, infant development specialist Bergen Rosebush gives us the lowdown on Down syndrome infant development.Support the showThe LowDOWN: A Down Syndrome Podcast is produced by the Down Syndrome Resource Foundation. Learn more and support the podcast at DSRF.org.Follow @DSRFCanada on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.Leave us a rat...

Greener Grass
Having a Child with Down Syndrome with Joanne Goughan

Greener Grass

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 49:52


She and her husband already had a full family when they had a surprise in their 40's. Charly was born with Down Syndrome and Joanne talks about finding out at the hospital, how caring for her is different and how it's not and how Charly inspires her.   Resources: National Down Syndrome Society National Down Syndrome Conference Ruby's Rainbow Gigi's Playhouse   Check out our website: greenergrasspodcast.com Get the Greener Grass Newsletter HERE Part of the Digitent Podcast Network   Find us at: IG: @grandrevecreative Twitter: @grass_podcast Email:  kerry@grandrevecreative.com The Expecting Aerialist PodcastSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Lucky Few
185. What if my child with Down syndrome can't?

The Lucky Few

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 48:05


We had SO much fun celebrating Down Syndrome Awareness Month in October. We featured many wonderful self-advocates who are shifting the DS narrative in big ways. And we're so excited for all of them. But if you're a parent of a child with DS who felt a little lost, sad, and maybe even lied to this past month.. then this episode is for you. We're chatting about what happens when your child with Down syndrome doesn't achieve all the things our society celebrates. Are they still worthy? Where does our value come from if not accomplishments? Our kids have been the greatest invitation to see the worth in others (and ourselves) apart from achievements.. and today we're talking about why. We're also chatting about how to share content about our children in honorable ways and how to receive content about other people's children without comparing. Plus we're exploring the “dark side to positive representation” that causes us to only celebrate people with DS who act the most like people without DS. WOW! So much to unpack here, friends. It's a good one. SHOW NOTES Read Heather's blog: What If My Child With Down Syndrome Can't? Read “DOWNism: When You're not Even Good Enough for Your Own Community, or…The Dark Side of Positive Representation” Read “My Mistake, My Bad” LET'S CHAT Email hello@theluckyfewpodcast.com with your questions and Good News for future episodes. HELP US SHIFT THE NARRATIVE Interested in partnering with The Lucky Few Podcast as a sponsor? Email hello@theluckyfewpodcast.com for more information! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/theluckyfewpod/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theluckyfewpod/support

Beyond 6 Seconds
Down Syndrome advocacy, competitive swimming, modeling and more – with Mary Borman

Beyond 6 Seconds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 14:06


October is Down Syndrome Awareness Month, and I'm excited to host my first podcast guest who is talking about Down syndrome! Mary Borman is an ambassador for Down syndrome and 2018 Self-Advocate of the Year for the National Down Syndrome Society. We recorded this episode a few weeks ago, while Mary was preparing to compete at the Down Syndrome World Swimming Championships in Portugal this month. We talk about several of Mary's accomplishments, which include: Swimming competitively and winning medals at the Special Olympics National Games and Down Syndrome World Swimming Championships Modeling in Northwest Arkansas Fashion Week Lobbying for disability rights and legislation Speaking to organizations across the U.S. about Down syndrome Learn more about Mary and her work at MaryBorman.com and follow her on Instagram and TikTok. Watch the video of this interview on YouTube! Subscribe to the FREE Beyond 6 Seconds newsletter for early access to new episodes! Support this podcast at BuyMeACoffee.com/Beyond6Seconds and get a shout-out on a future episode! Read the episode transcript. *Disclaimer: The views, guidance, opinions, and thoughts expressed in Beyond 6 Seconds episodes are solely mine and/or those of my guests, and do not necessarily represent those of my employer or other organizations.*

Gettin' Down with Down Syndrome
Episode 58 Improving Speech from Home

Gettin' Down with Down Syndrome

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 27:06


Are you having a hard time finding a speech therapist? Are you tired of driving to yet another appointment?  In this episode hear how Lenora Edwards from Better Speech can make speech therapy easier all from the comfort of your own home!  Are you ready to get down!

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 70 – Unstoppable advocate with Autism with Miyah Sundermeyer

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 65:26


This is one of those episodes I love to experience because I get to discuss a topic about which I know little. Miyah Sundermeyer was diagnosed as a person who happens to be autistic. She received her diagnosis at age 11. As with many of us who happen to be persons with disabilities, the immediate reaction of medical experts and others was that Miyah could not grow up to accomplish anything. Well, she is currently working on her PHD. You will hear about her life as a person on the autistic spectrum among other things about the spectrum.   Miyah works for George State helping to raise awareness concerning autism. By any standards, she is successful, growing and she is making a difference.   About the Guest: Miyah Sundermeyer is a Minnesota native and spent the first 21 years prior to moving to Atlanta in 2003.   In 2010, she earned her associate's degree in psychology from Georgia Perimeter College before transferring her credits top Georgia State University in where she earned  her bachelor's in psychology.   She was hired at Georgia State at the Center for Leadership in Disability where she has helped gather information on autism resources across GA as well as many other roles.  All the while, working to raise Autism Awareness and Acceptance through her podcast “Hello World with Miyah and public speaking.    About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Welcome to another episode of unstoppable mindset. Glad to have you wherever you are. And I want to introduce you to Miyah Sundermeyer , who is our guest this week. Miyah has all sorts of interesting things that we get to discuss. She does a lot addressing the concept of autism. And we're going to find out why as well as other things. And she has asked me some questions about September 11 2001. And I'm curious to learn about her interest in that as well. So we'll get there. Anyway. Miyah, welcome to unstoppable mindset. How are you?   Miyah Sundermeyer  01:55 And the words of my hero and network Dr. Temple Grandin? It's really great to be here.   Michael Hingson  02:02 I have I have heard her and we're glad to have you here. Tell me a little bit about maybe your early life, your childhood and some of that stuff. Let's start. Let's start at the beginning, as Lewis Carroll would say, oh, yeah,   Miyah Sundermeyer  02:14 now you're making me think of the sound of music. Let's go.   Michael Hingson  02:19 There you go. So we'll start with dough.   Miyah Sundermeyer  02:24 And so anyway, I don't want to dry dive off topic too much. But anyway, Mr. Hingson. So my early childhood, I was born, when I was born, as it was my understanding that I was first of all stuck in the womb, and then they got me out. I had swallowed a great deal of placenta. And so there caused some a neck that caused anoxia that caused the brain damage. And so my mom and I looked at each other they when they looked at the doctor, and he spanked the fluid out of me. And so I nearly died at childbirth. But the doctors saved my life. And then what? Well, and then I started to develop according to my late aunt, I mean, she died in 2019. I lived with her for a while and she and I had a mother and daughter relationship. But that was in my 20s. At that was in most of my 20s. But when she would come and meet with my parents, and she'd meet with me, she said that other people in the room would try to talk to me, and they thought that I was deaf. So and then as I began to develop into a toddler, my mom noticed that I was staring into space. I wasn't interested in toys. And she also noticed that I would script waiting, I would copy lines from movies and TV shows and commercials. And she specifically remembers the Burger King commercial, where I said, where the old lady says, Where's the beef?   Michael Hingson  03:53 Where's the beef? Yeah.   Miyah Sundermeyer  03:55 And so my mom caught that caught me, say, where's the beef? And I do recall she said that, I think should they were outside grilling outside of a house that we were renting at the time. And I just ran upstairs and I blurted it out and my mom thought it was funny. I went where's the beef. And so that was the sign right there. And then my mom had started to wonder as to whether or not I was somewhere on the autism spectrum. But keep in mind, this was back in the 80s. And back then autism was looked at very differently. And this was even before that movie Rain Man, which by the way, is not my favorite film.   Michael Hingson  04:36 Understand. So he did a good job of acting, but I understand what you're saying.   Miyah Sundermeyer  04:41 Yeah, well, I just didn't like the idea that they were putting autism into a box. Yeah. And, you know, they just, it was just one person on the spectrum. And I mean, he was, I mean, Raymond wasn't a real character, but it's my understanding that he was based on another individual and spectrum who was known as a savant. And the thing is, the thing is there's studies suggesting that there's only 1% of the autistic population, that even suggests that you would have the Savant type syndrome. So,   Michael Hingson  05:14 anyway, so go ahead and continue. So you, you really weren't like Rain Man, which is understandable.   Miyah Sundermeyer  05:23 No, no, it's my understanding. According to my parents, I was two years old. I just thought it was a normal kid back when I was two. But, you know, I just, I just, I got in trouble a lot with with some of our babysitters, because I was just so hyper. And nobody understood that. At the same time, my mom took me to a series of doctors. And I didn't even think there was anything wrong with me. I thought that it was a normal routine. And I thought that every child went through that. I remember also going to a special preschool, and the special preschool, they had IQ testing. And they had me play with special blocks. But at the same time, when they would observe me one on one, I'd want to play with the blocks, but then the specialists but I was grabbed my fingers and stopped me from putting the blocks together. And I hated that. I just, I didn't know why.   Michael Hingson  06:26 Why, why was that, that they stopped you from putting the blocks together?   Miyah Sundermeyer  06:29 Well, they were using a special, I think they were trying to run tests on me think they were doing IQ type tests and things like that. And so I could, so I didn't understand that what they were doing was they were running some tests on me to test my IQ. And they were also trying to figure out why it was Piper at the same time. They couldn't figure out what was wrong with the autistic traits. Even though back then my mom tried talking to the doctors about actually our family doctors, you know what, I think my daughter might have autism. And they laughed at her because because autism back in the 80s was looked at like Rain Man, and was also looked at, as if everyone on the spectrum was just very, very proud. Even though, even though it was coming out that Dr. Temple Grandin, I mean, she, I mean, by the 80s, she was already beginning to share her story in meetings and conferences across America, and eventually the part of the world. So there's just nobody was making a connection.   Michael Hingson  07:37 So when did they finally decide that that autism was a part of your life?   Miyah Sundermeyer  07:43 That wasn't until I was 11, I was first diagnosed with ADHD, and I was placed on medication before that. And then I was continuing to go to the doctors, but they didn't officially diagnosed me as an autistic, or a person on the spectrum until I was 11 years old. And back then they preferred it to me as PDD NOS or which was pervasive developmental delays, hyphen, none other specified. That helps, yeah, and back then they referred to me as a woman with high functioning autism are a female with high functioning autism, which is rare. So and then I was placed into special education for the rest of my, the rest of my high school from sixth grade all the way up to 12th grade. And, you know, that's just that was a big mess. Let me tell you how so well, first of all, it started with I hated studying, I hated sitting still and doing homework, I wanted to goof off all the time. And I think which is normal for any kid. Every day, every night, my mom would struggle to get me to sit down and do my homework. And I would sit and have a fit because I hated the studying. And then on top of all that I I would fail at my grades. I mean, I would fail at my exams, because I wasn't wasn't studious. But then they put me in a special education. And I had, we had all the IQ tests, and they just basically told my mom don't waste any time with her. She'll never amount to anything. So   Michael Hingson  09:23 I mentioned before we started recording that you could go hear one of my speeches, which talks in great detail about September 11 than the fact is that part of that speech, discusses that went and was discovered that I was blinded about four months, the doctor said that my parents should put me in a home because no blind child could ever grow up and amount to anything. So we're not alone in that, are we?   Miyah Sundermeyer  09:50 No, we're not. And it's just amazing what these teach these doctors and these special education teachers. I don't know where they get these ideas from I don't know where or they get this idea that just because everyone's disabled, it doesn't mean they're going to fit into a box according to the DSM manuals.   Michael Hingson  10:08 Well, the, the fact is that no matter what they choose to believe or not, they are still reflections of society. And unfortunately, people with disabilities are still not really included, understood, or really educated about in a lot of the professions is slowly getting better. But even back in the 80s, much less back in the 1950s, when I was born and grew up, it still was, and to a large degree, today still is a problem. So we we deal with it. So tell me a little bit about the autism spectrum. I don't know a lot about that. And I don't know how many of our listeners do Can you give us a little bit of an insight as to what it is, where you fit on it and how that whole process works.   Miyah Sundermeyer  10:59 So the autism spectrum is very, very broad. If you have people on the spectrum, like myself, who can articulate we can dress ourselves, we can hold down jobs, we can go to college, we can get married. And I mean, me, I'm in a relationship right now. And you know, I have my own place. And I've got a bachelor's degree and getting ready to go back at some point and get my doctorate, I'm planning on developmental psychology. But you also have other people on the spectrum that can talk. But they have other challenges. I mean, I don't like to say, the functioning label, we don't like to say that we don't say, high functioning, low functioning, if people on the Hill, you know, we're a little more moderate, and they can talk. But socially and emotionally, their brain doesn't develop as quickly. I mean, I had some challenges on my own, and that my brain didn't start developing until I was much older. And for them, some of them actually develop the social skills of a child or social skills of a child or up to the level of a teenager. And yes, they can dress themselves, but they have very poor social skills. And then they have other challenges, like some of them have underlying conditions. Some of them have cerebral palsy, but it doesn't mean like, they're not limited from everything, they just have to work around their, their challenges or their disabilities. And some of them have to have coaching and mentoring. And, you know, they can, I mean, they can do it, but some of them need more, more coaching and mentoring. I mean, I still needed coaching and mentoring like everybody else. And then you have other people on the spectrum, the more the severe end, they can't articulate it all. And they refer to them as nonverbal. Or some other self advocates refer to them as people who don't use formal language. I mean, they can talk but they use hollow phrases, meaning that they say one word phrases, like, like, they'll like, they'll say something like, oh, or Oh, are the, they'll just quote a line from a TV show. And then there are other people on the spectrum that just cannot articulate at all, they cannot use the one word phrases, and then some of them, they just, they can't dress themselves, they can't be themselves. Some of those people ended up in group homes and those situations, I mean, it's not that they're fully broken, it's just that they can't take care of themselves. But for them, they would have to use a communicative device or use some sort of a sign language and that they have to have the extra help. But actually, what actually what they have a brain, actually, they're very, very intelligent. But they have you have to unlock that brain. And you have to teach them how to type because they have, they have thoughts like everyone else. And then you have people on the spectrum that have severe sensory input, meaning that they can't sit stay on certain sounds and they can't stand certain colors or they can't stand certain smells. Some of them have the cannot control their bodies, they cannot control their body movements. And then some of them they just, they just they cannot they cannot use the toilet by themselves. So it really ranges and   Michael Hingson  14:34 several years ago, I delivered a speech somewhere and I don't recall exactly was I think it was some sort of association of nurses and there was also someone else who spoke who was on the autism spectrum. And she said at the beginning in describing herself, that she tended to react to loud sounds and about 10 minutes into the speech. For some reason the microphone own started giving feedback. Something was too loud or whatever. And she reacted to that was a pretty for me graphic illustration and helped me understand part of of the whole process. But she she said up front that she tended to react to loud sounds and it was just the way it was.   Miyah Sundermeyer  15:21 Yeah. So by the way was this woman was this woman Dr. Temple Grandin say No, it wasn't   Michael Hingson  15:27 Temple Grandin, I have heard her speak also. But this wasn't Temple Grandin. This was with somebody else, and I can't remember who it was.   Miyah Sundermeyer  15:37 So why No, there was a Donna Williams from Australia, she had severe sensory disorders for temple said she could not stand up, she could not stand looking at fluorescent light bulbs. Actually, there's some people on the spectrum that have was it visual inputs, that I can't remember how it temporally phrased it. But according to one of her book, I think it was the way I see it, I read it in thinking in pictures that you walk under some of the fluorescent bulbs. And according to the way the brain processes information, the lights will flicker like a strobe light. So people on the spectrum that cannot stand that. And there are people on the spectrum that cannot even handle LED lights. And for I'm not one of those people. For me. I don't like micro microphone input either. I just I hate it. And then it's funny, you mentioned temple and we're talking about sensory input, she was doing an interview and she kept imitating the sound of, of a microphone input. And it hurt my ears every time she did it. Like I thought to myself temple stop doing that.   Michael Hingson  16:53 So this person, as I said, reacted when the squealing of the feedback happened. And it took her about a minute or a minute and a half to recover and be able to continue. They dealt with the issue of feedback. And the rest of the speech was fine. But it it makes sense that different people react in different ways. And that's, of course, what the whole idea of innocence, the spectrum is about. It's very difficult to sit there and say, people fit in one box and that you are somewhere on the spectrum. And somebody else might be at the same place on the spectrum as you but it doesn't mean that they necessarily react the same way you do.   Miyah Sundermeyer  17:37 Yeah, there's also speculation out there. That's why it's called. That's why you have neurodivergent because there's a saying that no two snowflakes are alike, right. And there's also another saying out there that goes up. Just because you meet one autistic, that means that you meet one autistic. And I mean, Dr. Temple and I have very, very different types of disabilities. For her, she cannot stand the feeling of stretchy clothes. And I agree with that on her. But you cannot walk in front of her while she is giving a talk. And actually I blogged for future horizons. And I've had a chance to go to some of her talks there put on by future horizons. I kept getting up to use the bathroom. And this was just before the pandemic. And you know, I kept walking and then temple called me out in front of everyone. She goes, you really don't need to be texting. Because I was sitting there tweeting about the event. And I thought I'm talking to you talking to me. And she goes, No, you walked out of here twice. And then she also said don't worry, you'll thank me later. And then she brought up one of her own life memories of a of a POS that slammed down a container of deodorant and I said you always do and she goes, Do you need to sit back? And I'm sorry? She said, Do you need to go sit in the back? And I just kept on talking. I just she just kept on talking and what were you doing anyway? And then I explained to her, Well, why don't you just explain to her what I was doing? Why it was nice. I'm not texting, I'm tweeting. I'm promoting your event and I told her what I do. And she goes, Well, what did you say? So in the first place, and then me I said temple temple I was waiting for you to get done talking. So but yeah, I've had her on my podcast a couple times. And I mean, I've known her since 2014. And I've presented alongside her before so   Michael Hingson  19:36 we were at the same event but we didn't get actually to meet. She spoke over lunch and I was near the back of the room just coincidentally so we never did really get a chance to but I was hoping to have an opportunity to do that. But she had to leave right away so we didn't get to do it, unfortunately.   Miyah Sundermeyer  19:53 Well, she's very, very nice and I think you too would hit it off. I'd love to meet her. I She would be a great guest on your show.   Michael Hingson  20:02 Well, we'd love to explore that. And if you can help us make contact, we'd love to have her on. I mean, she's a person who is extremely well known. Would would love to meet her in person. And I don't even I can probably go back and research. Where was that? I heard her. Very fascinating speaker. Needless to say,   Miyah Sundermeyer  20:23 yeah. She's so funny, too. I mean, she just ranted. It's like she's randomly funny, too.   Michael Hingson  20:30 Yeah. Well, and and that's okay. People are as they are. So you describing the whole idea of autism? And I realize they're not related. But how does autism and the way people function and behave different? Or how does it compare with, say, people with Down syndrome?   Miyah Sundermeyer  20:52 Well, for a person with Down syndrome, I don't really know much about it. I don't know much about what Down Syndrome does. But for Down syndrome, it is genetic, and that I believe that autism is genetic, too. But for Down syndrome, you have the extra chromosome, as far as I know. But I also understand that people who are downs, also have other medical conditions that are underlying, and it's my understanding that people who have Down Syndrome don't live very long as their lifespans are shorter. And I suspect as they get older, they deal with issues such as specific types of Alzheimer's disease. And so I think most of the people who are Down's and then they've died in their 30s.   Michael Hingson  21:48 I wonder about the the the intelligence level or the intelligence differences, because I know that clearly, people with autism, as you pointed out, can be extremely intelligent, it isn't really a lack of intelligence in any way. I don't know enough about Down syndrome either. To understand that,   Miyah Sundermeyer  22:05 well, there are, but there, there are advocacy group movements right now for people who are downs. In fact, there's a whole movement in the college setting called inclusive post secondary education, that allows people with Down's people who are downs that the DSM manual would refer to as an intellectual disability. And you know, for an autistic, I prefer it as I have a developmental disability, yes. But for a person with Down syndrome, they're considered to have intellectual disabilities, but they have specific curriculums now with Inclusive post secondary education. And they, they let the individuals take special class, regular college classes and be with their peers. And right at the moment, they're trying to go from just the individuals audit, auditing classes to taking college courses. But they're also trying to get them out into the world and get them into internships, where they get to do things that their normal peers do. And they're also doing other types of programs for people on the spectrum. In college settings, too. They're trying to come up with a special accommodations, because there's a large number of people on the spectrum right now that have been struggling with college because of accommodation issues, or executive functioning issues. And myself included, because I'm getting ready to I'm getting ready to go back to take some Postback classes this fall, and I'm looking for accommodations because I want I want some internships and I want to get into research and I want to build up some skill sets in that area and learn how to talk with my professors.   Michael Hingson  23:53 Well, Han, you are clearly an intelligent individual who knows what they need to have in the way of accommodations. And clearly, as we understand all being from the community of persons with disabilities, reasonable accommodations are appropriate. So is autism considered an intellectual disability in any way?   Miyah Sundermeyer  24:16 No, not that I know of. I mean, usually, you usually if you had an intellectual disability, there would probably be a dual diagnosis, you probably have someone on the spectrum, but they would also have a diagnosis if they had fetal alcohol syndrome combined with autism. Or they would have Down syndrome, which would be the intellectual disabilities and then autism, which would be the developmental disabilities. So it just really depends on how the child develops in the womb.   Michael Hingson  24:47 So you, I think, have talked a little bit about the concept of raising awareness of autism and being autistic as opposed to acceptance. Tell me about If you would,   Miyah Sundermeyer  25:01 well, actually, I believe in standing right in the middle, I believe in except in raising autism awareness and acceptance, because I think that they're both important. And I do not believe that raising awareness through organizations like Autism Speaks, and OT, and it was at the Autism Society of America, I do not believe that. That's the best way to educate people. I just think that, that way to raise awareness and acceptance are just way too big. I just think that that awareness should be more at the community level. I mean, it starts in our homeowners associations, it starts in our town halls, and it starts in our schools. It starts with our parents. And it can start by having little townhall meetings or little meetings through your homeowners association. And it starts with community building and connecting with each other. That's where the awareness starts. And then you have the acceptance part, again, at the community level, where you have families and you have individuals and you have you have employers that work in the community, that that that could also teach with Teach the individual social skills and soft skills and work skills and get these individuals employed. Because right now, what we have is just way too big. And right now there's a lot of misunderstanding about autism. And because of that we have individuals out there that are 90% either unemployed or underemployed.   Michael Hingson  26:43 That's true across all disabilities to a very large degree. I know for many years, we who happen to be blind have felt that the unemployment rate among unplayable blind people is in the 70% Roughly range. And it isn't because we can't work. It's because people think we can't work. And I suspect that it's the same for you.   Miyah Sundermeyer  27:03 Yeah, because a lot of people think that we don't, because we're autistic, they think that we don't understand something.   Michael Hingson  27:11 Yeah. And that's not necessarily true at all. Well, I'm curious about something if I, if I might, and that is that we have heard over the past several years, parents talk about not vaccinating their children because they might become autistic or that autism is caused by vaccinations and so on. And that there's been a great increase in spike in autism because of vaccinations and so on. Where do you fit into that?   Miyah Sundermeyer  27:41 So, again, I was already I already started to share showing symptoms of autism when I was developing as an infant. Because again, when I was young, my family thought that I was deaf, when it was really part of the autism, because I was probably as a baby, I was hyper, probably very hyper focused on some color, or hyper focused on something in the room as my eyesight was developing. And so I probably wasn't even paying attention to my late aunt Lois. So there's that. But as far as the vaccination goes, I do not think that that's autism at all. I think that that there's some sort of a disorder that mimics autism, but it's not autism, like look at lions disease. And I'm not saying that there's lions disease in the vaccinations, but lions disease mimics autism, I think that they could also be some sort of an allergic reaction that causes damage to the brain and somehow mimics autism, but I don't think that's autism. Or maybe they were already autistic. But perhaps there was a Mercury, there was something in the vaccinations that caused some sort of allergic reaction. And that probably aggravated I mean, I don't know, I haven't done the research. Yeah. Just off the top of my head. So I don't know. Well, the   Michael Hingson  29:06 other thing that comes to mind is that maybe the vaccinations don't have anything to do with it at all. It isn't now we are doing a much better job of diagnosing autism, and that in fact, that is caused a lot of the increase in the number of people who are diagnosed with having autism.   Miyah Sundermeyer  29:27 Yeah, that's another really good speculation. I think that one's pretty good, too. It's just that I know that Dr. Andrew, was it. Andrew Wakefield is the one that claims to have caught the that had discovered that there was mercury in the vaccinations. But his theory since since got ruled out, and I believe he was caught with plagiarism. I'm not sure. It's not good. Yeah. So I mean, his theory was ruled out. The thing is, they're people that are still believing his theories and they're still fighting back. Wow,   Michael Hingson  30:05 it's too bad that, that there tends to be a lot of that. And unfortunately, we also try to find things to blame one thing or another on when we plain just don't know enough to really understand we don't have all the answers yet. That's what science is about. And that's why it's also an evolving process. Yeah.   Miyah Sundermeyer  30:27 And science is a slow process, you know, you know, it's funny, you know, there's, you look at the media, and they're, they put all this information out there, like green tea makes you healthier. And you know, then you look, and then you look at back at those short articles, or green tea makes you sleep better. And then you click on the, on the online articles to your local paper. And then you find out that, that there's that there are other research papers that were much different than what the media have put it out there to be said,   Michael Hingson  31:06 yeah, there are a lot of misconceptions that are put out by people all over the place who don't really understand. And unfortunately, a lot of it comes from the media. But we live in a society today where basically everything gets dumped into the world, for people to see. And there are always people who believe it. And so the result is that a lot of things get spread that maybe it would be better to wait and see. Exactly. We hear about climate change today. And there are a huge number of people who just don't believe it, or it's the natural scheme of things, and there's nothing we can do about it. But a lot of people who just plain don't believe in the idea of climate change. There's way too much evidence that says that it really is something that maybe we do have some control over and that greenhouse gas emissions should be addressed. And we should deal with some of those things.   Miyah Sundermeyer  32:06 Yeah. And then there's situations where you have wildfires. I know that I understand that people can still be conservative and be careful. But I heard that isn't out there in California, there's some areas that get dry. And sometimes you have these brush fires and these forest fires that are caused by heat lightning, because the ground is so dry in California, is that true? Oh, it's   Michael Hingson  32:29 absolutely true. There are there any number of things that cause the wildfires out here, there are also in reality, a number of them that are caused by power lines that touch something and ignite a spark. And we're not doing enough fast enough to upgrade the infrastructure. But yeah, there is what he lightning can do. It is very dry. And so it's not magic to imagine that some of the fires can be created by the some of these things. And that's probably been true all along. But now, we want to find other ways to blame things rather than looking at the issues and how do we address them? Yeah, exact autism and autism is the same thing. Is it caused by something we do? I don't know that I've seen evidence of that. Is blindness caused by something we do? Well, some some people who have become blind, certainly became blind because of medical issues. Premature babies were given oxygen, pure oxygen environments and their retinas tended to malformed. And it took a while for medical science to recognize that too much oxygen might not be a good thing after all. So it's, again an evolutionary process.   Miyah Sundermeyer  33:51 Yeah, well, you know, we were, you know, I'm a big Little House on the Prairie fan. And for years, Laura's sister Laura Ingalls Wilder sister, Mary Ingalls. And I'm not just talking about the TV show, ladies and gentlemen, talking about the real historical figure Mary eagles are so first they thought she had gotten she ended up becoming blind, because she had scarlet fever. But then they discovered later on that there was some other disease in their eyes, and it just caused her eyesight to dim and then she lost it completely. And she was blind the rest of her life. Yeah. So and then there was Helen Keller, I think she saw at one point and then she became what was it blind, deaf and mute?   Michael Hingson  34:36 Correct? Yeah. But clearly had a lot of intelligence and learn to function in the world in which she lived and and hopefully helped a lot of other people grow. How to many people quote Helen Keller, but they don't really go back and intellectually understand that because of of who she was and what she did. Those quotes are meaningful and ought to be taken to heart. And it doesn't mean that we're less capable. It means that we do things in a different way. Have you ever heard? Have you ever heard people use the term differently abled?   Miyah Sundermeyer  35:17 No, I haven't. But that would make sense. But I've used the term human detour system because I was tired of the word disabled. So I decided to call it the human detour system, by learning how to focus on your abilities, and really building on those strengths and working around the things that you can never do, which, which are your disabilities, because that way you don't let the you don't let your disability steal your life and let that ruin your joy. So   Michael Hingson  35:46 well. And the reason I asked the question is, I personally don't value the concept of, quote, differently abled and have quotation because I don't think that we're differently abled, we may do things in a different way. But hey, there are lots of sighted people who do things differently because they're left handed does that make them differently abled, it only means that there may use some alternatives to what most people do. And the same if you're blind or have any other kind of disability. And I agree with you, I don't like the term disability. But I think that the community overall has tried to address that by saying you don't call people disabled people. You call them persons with disabilities. Now, for my part, I believe society in general, every single person on this planet has a disability. And people have heard me say this on the podcast. But I believe that sighted people have the disability that they're like dependent. And Thomas Edison invented the electric light bulb, to allow people to mostly cover up and ignore their disability of being like dependent until the time that there's a power failure. And then they have to run through the flashlights and the candles, but it doesn't change the fact that they have a disability.   Miyah Sundermeyer  36:58 No, it doesn't. I mean, sure, it doesn't change the fact I mean, just because I live on my own, I take the bus everywhere, it doesn't change the fact that I have a disability, you're right, I have my moments where things get too overwhelming. And I just for an autistic, sometimes things get to be too overwhelming. Like there are people there are people on the spectrum today that are scared to disclose the fact that they're autistic, because there are people that are scared to accept us. And there are people on the spectrum that like to do something called masking, which is a form of trying to blend in so people don't bully us. People don't judge us like other people on the spectrum that will love. They won't fit, they won't to stamp meaning they won't rock back and forth. They won't fidget when they're out in society. And so each day, they will go out and try to pretend to be normal, and just basically blend in like a chameleon. And then by the time they get home, they are mentally and physically exhausted. And over time that burnout builds up. Yes. So and   Michael Hingson  38:08 I think there are a lot of people with various disabilities who probably somewhat work the same way. Or they just plain resent the disability. And it oftentimes takes a long time, if at all that people recognize it's nothing wrong with being different. There's nothing wrong with having this so called disability. And I agree with you, I wish there were a better term. But it is the term that we have. And society is great at changing definitions. I mean, look at diversity. We should be included in diversity, but we're not because that is anyone with a disability. The conversation tends not to include us they talk about race and gender and sexual orientation. Disabilities generally aren't included.   Miyah Sundermeyer  38:56 Yeah, yeah. And it's just like, people don't understand that, you know, they, they think that we're whining. And we're not, we're saying, Hey, we're disabilities are part of diversity, too.   Michael Hingson  39:09 Yeah. And so it's important that people start to recognize that it's okay. Now, I and I mentioned speeches that I given that we have on the podcast, if you listen to the second show, on our podcast, you will hear me deliver a speech that I love to call moving from diversity to inclusion, because I won't accept that you can be partially inclusive, either you are inclusive, or you're not. And if you're inclusive, then you need to, and you must include disabilities otherwise you're not inclusive.   Miyah Sundermeyer  39:42 Yeah, exactly. So when did you start your podcast   Michael Hingson  39:46 started at last September, actually. So we've done 38 shows so far, we were given a we actually made Editor's Choice for podcasts magazine in February of 2022 total Surprise, but excited by that. That's awesome. So yes, it's kind of exciting. You mentioned September 11. What is your interest in what did you bring up the concept of September 11?   Miyah Sundermeyer  40:12 Well, I just want to I read that you're a survivor? Oh, yeah, you're the first person I have talked to that has actually been in those buildings. I mean, actually, I take that back. I have friends, I have friends up in the DC area. And they didn't see the Pentagon get blown up. But they said that they were on their way to work. And everything shut down. And because the the Metro in DC was shut down, they spent three hours walking home. Well, I wanted to talk to you about your experiences, because you're the first person I have met, that that was actually in those attacks and 911 what you know, is a part of my life, just like it's a part of everyone's life.   Michael Hingson  40:59 And how did you how did you react to September 11? What What was it like for you?   Miyah Sundermeyer  41:04 So 911 For me, it was very interesting. And I remember I was I was staying at a hospital with a friend and she was a teenager, it was a teenage pregnancy. And she was a girl I grew up with. And so I was in the hospital supporting her and her mom with a new baby. And the baby, the baby's father was there. And I remember getting up the next morning, and I was planning on moving to the same area that my friend and her boyfriend and her mom were and they were going to help they were going to start helping me the next day as well as the kids settled in with that new baby. But anyway, I went downstairs, I had breakfast, and I was waiting for the gift shop to open when a few nurses came in. And they started talking about somebody trying to take over America. And I said what's going on? And one of the nurses kind of brushed me off she went, then she walked away. And I said, Did I just hear you say that someone's trying to take over America. And I heard well, then the Pentagon just got bombs. And at first I blew it off. And I walked out of the cafeteria and I went over to the gift shop which was not open. And I looked and there was a waiting area by the the emergency room. And I walked over, I walked over there and I saw smoke on TV and I said what's going on? And someone said, Bob, and then I heard there was a plane that slammed into the World Trade Centers. And so I sat there trying to take in the same and I was watching as a both of the Twin Towers were on fire. It was just a very unrealistic situation. And, of course, I was so zoned out by it, that I completely. I completely missed the south tower collapse. And I thought I thought what's going on, I just thought there was a lot of smoke. And then someone said that the cell tower has collapsed. That's why you're seeing all the smoke. And then all of a sudden I saw one tower Tandy standing, that was the North Tower. And I first thought, well, at least there's one tower left. And then I was able to go to the gift shop and buy and buy that present for my friend and go back upstairs. But they were just turning on the radio. And I just hopped back in the elevator and I thought, yeah, I think the SEC, yeah, I think the North Tower was going to fall. So I went upstairs, told my friend turn on the TV. And as I was, as I was turning on the TV, there, you know, there was this, there was the North Tower falling. And I remember just I remember being very, I remember feeling very sick after that. I mean, I almost threw up when I saw the second one fall   Michael Hingson  43:56 so much less, much less the Pentagon, but of course I will I don't know actually did they? Did they show much on the news about the Pentagon? Because when I heard about it, I spoke I had been speaking with my wife after both towers fell. So of course the Pentagon was a different thing. But I don't know how much they actually showed us the Pentagon on the news.   Miyah Sundermeyer  44:18 Oh, they went back and forth. But I just remember seeing more of the footage of the World Trade Centers than I remember everybody in the hospital. I mean, they were trying to get my friend out of the hospital that everybody. Everybody was focused on the attacks, even when everybody was at the hospital working.   Michael Hingson  44:39 Yeah, everyone, of course, got focused on this because it's something that we had never experienced before. Yeah. And it became a, needless to say, a very intense thing. And I agree with most people, you'll always remember where you were on September 11. I was in the eighth grade. Read when President Kennedy was shot, it's the same sort of thing, because I remember that I was in my whole class was taking a test in our Constitution and government class in the eighth grade. And Mr. Brown was reading me the questions quietly while everyone else was taking the written tests. And of course, my job was to answer them. And my seventh grade teacher, Mr. Ren Zullo, came in and just quietly spoke to Mr. Brown. And I heard it that President Kennedy was just shot, turn the TV on. And of course, it wasn't long than before he died, the flags went to half staff, and everyone was sent home. So when there are major events like that, yeah, we do remember where we are. And then the issue is, how do we deal with them? And that's what ultimately is, is what we have to discuss regularly and think about is, how do we deal with events like this when they occur?   Miyah Sundermeyer  46:04 Yeah. So me when I saw the World Trade Centers fall, it was very hard for me, you know, when they fell, because it was hard for me to even imagine that there were people in there when they fell. And so I thought, I thought too, that maybe everybody had gotten out, but they did.   Michael Hingson  46:20 Yeah, they didn't. The people. And by the way, mostly that was the people who were above the impact points of the airplanes. I think about 90%, as I heard about it from a police officer, 90% of the people we lost were above where the planes hit. So there were very few people, relatively speaking, who were below who didn't make it out. But it doesn't matter. There were still people who didn't. And we should remember and honor those people always.   Miyah Sundermeyer  46:49 Yeah, I remember seeing video footage on the news, if they were family members that were in denial, this isn't there. They were showing pictures of their loved ones. This is my husband is missing. And you know, just seeing just seeing the reaction of them. You know, you know, that whole grief process? Can you find my loved ones, please? Can you find my loved ones?   Michael Hingson  47:13 So one of my stories of September 11, is that two weeks later? Was it two weeks? I think it was I was in the city meeting with someone. And my wife called and said that she had just gotten a call from someone who was looking for me. And the way the phone call went was that when my wife answered, the guy asked if this was the hingson residence, and of course, she said yes. And he said, Well, I'm I'm trying to find Michael Hinkson. Is this where he lives? And she said, Yes. And he was very uncomfortable. And he said, Well, is Is he okay? And she said, Well, yes. Why are you asking? It turns out that he worked for 9x, which is, of course, now part of Verizon. And he had been on the pile, which it was back then that is the the, the remains of the towers, they were looking for bodies and looking for people and so on. And he found a plaque with my name on it. He took it home, he polished it up. And then he started trying to find me on any of the lists. wasn't on any of the the list of people who'd passed at least as far as they knew, as far as he knew. Anyway, somehow he eventually tracked us down. And so while I was in the city, I did meet him and he gave me the plaque and so on, and we got a chance to meet and visit. But I can almost well I can understand people saying, well, would you help me find my loved one because at the at least at the beginning, and for some time, it wasn't necessarily very clear who totally survived and didn't survive. Really? Did   Miyah Sundermeyer  49:13 they ever find anybody alive under the rubble, not after   Michael Hingson  49:17 the first day or two. But there were a couple of people who were, for example, in the stairwell of one of the towers, who, if you will rode the stairwell down, there was I think, a police officer. And there was a woman that I believe a day or two days later, they were digging through and eventually I think she yelled and they were able to pull her out. So there were a couple. So it's one of those kinds of events where you just never know. And that's why people do a lot of searching after events like this because you don't know who might be surviving and who might not be surviving.   Miyah Sundermeyer  49:59 Yeah, So you were mentioning that 911 wasn't as just walking down the stairs, trying to get out wasn't as scary for you?   Michael Hingson  50:07 Well, for me, and again, this is something we've talked about, but I'll, I'll I'll answer your question. I spent a lot of time, once I was working in the World Trade Center, exploring it, I was the Mid Atlantic region sales manager for a computer company. So it was my job to run an office to run our facility in New York. And my position was to do that I needed to make sure that I knew everything I could about where things were around the World Trade Center, how to get from place to place, what were the emergency evacuation procedures, what were the fire safety procedures, and so on. And I spent a lot of time over weeks learning that which really created a mindset for me, that told me that I knew what to do in an emergency. And so as a result, when it happened, that mindset kicked in. We're actually now working on a book to talk about that. Because what I've realized as a public speaker who's been traveling and speaking about September 11, now for 20 plus years, what I've not done is begun to teach people, how they can learn to not let fear as I call it, blind them, but rather use fear as a powerful tool to help and control their fears. So it's something that we're working toward. And I think that that is that same fear is the same sort of thing that all of us as persons with disabilities face from so many people who are just afraid, or why don't want to end up like them. In one sense, I think at some level, they realize disabilities is an equal opportunity, contributor to people's lives, and they could become a person with a disability in some way. I know. And, and the problem is that, so if you do, do you have the strength? Or will you find that you have the strength to learn to do things in a different way? And that's what people are so uncomfortable about?   Miyah Sundermeyer  52:17 Yeah, now had I had I been in the towers that day, I probably would, if I wasn't, that wasn't super high up, like at the top, like, looking out, I think, if I would have seen the scene, the South Tower on fire, I wouldn't, you know, I would have seen the explosion, I would have been gone, I would have ran down those stairs, and I would have gotten out of there.   Michael Hingson  52:38 Sure. Running wouldn't necessarily have worked because the stairs were pretty crowded. And in fact, when people started to panic on the stairs, we worked to, to try to keep them quiet, or at least to calm them down. To recognize that we all were in this together, we're all going to work to get out together. And a number of us had those kinds of things that we had to work on during the trip down. For me when the plane hit, we were 18 floors below where the plane hit and tower one. So I was on the 78th floor, but no one near me physically in the building at all, no one on our side of the building knew what happened. Because the plane hit on the other side of the building 18 floors above us. So if I had known an aircraft hit the building, I think I can say it wouldn't have made a difference, because I still knew that we had to use the skills and knowledge that we had to get out. But I love information. There were a couple of times that people could have told us. One was when firefighters were coming up. And then when we got down to the bottom, we met someone from the FBI and in both cases, they didn't want to talk about what happened and I can understand that they don't know me they don't know what would throw somebody into panic. But again, my situation would be different than yours. And you you might even just because of autism be more prone to panic or not. I don't know. But you know that's Well that's   Miyah Sundermeyer  54:08 no for me it would have been fight or flight. Yeah, so But So how long did it take you to get down the stairs was I read? How long did it take you to get down the stairs with your coworker?   Michael Hingson  54:20 Well from the time the plane hit until we got outside it was an hour.   Miyah Sundermeyer  54:25 So it took you an hour to get down. Wow. Yep, I know. So read that. The the sprinkler systems were going off down the stairwells as well.   Michael Hingson  54:36 They're probably later on there were the sprinkler systems were on at the bottom when we got got there. But when we were going down the stairs the sprinklers weren't on where we were. And I don't know I assume that there were sprinklers in the stairs. But this I don't know whether there were but the sprinkler systems at the bottom of the stairwell were on there. He formed a barrier between the exit to the stairwell and the lobby of the World Trade Center towers. And you can imagine why that was they wanted to make sure that if fire broke out in the lobby, it wouldn't get into the stairwell. Or if it did get into the stairwell in the air currents took it down, that the fire wouldn't get out into the lobby. So there was a goodly amount of water that was falling from the sprinklers.   Miyah Sundermeyer  55:26 Yeah. And then, you know, sounds like you got out, Nick time to?   Michael Hingson  55:30 Well, I got out from tower one at 945. So we had a little bit of time to get away. But at the same time, we ended up very close to tower to when it collapsed. So we were about 100 yards away. So we ended up having to face it.   Miyah Sundermeyer  55:47 You had to face all that, from what I read you the face all the dust, what do you do to cover your faces?   Michael Hingson  55:52 Nothing for a little while, but then somebody was passing out some masks later on. And we got some.   Miyah Sundermeyer  55:57 Yep. And how long did it take before you got out of that area out of Ground Zero?   Michael Hingson  56:03 Probably by the time we really got up to Canal Street, or in that area, which was a little bit away from ground zero. It was about 1115 or 1130. I think by the time we got there, and then then later we got further up north. Yeah. Well, you know, the thing is that we all react differently to different situations. But we tend to have a lot more power to be able to deal with things, if we truly try to know. And my point is, I wasn't going to rely on people who had signs or red signs. I needed to know what to do. And I will always take input, but I needed to know what to do. And that created a much more firm conviction in my mind that there wasn't a need to be afraid. And I did use a lot of input from both guide dog Roselle at the time, and from the comments of other people that gave me more information going down the stairs. And I think that's something that no matter who we are, those are the kinds of things that we need to do.   Miyah Sundermeyer  57:16 Yeah. Well, I'm glad you got out of there safely. I mean, what, like I said, I'm really glad that you didn't end up caught up in the towers fell.   Michael Hingson  57:25 Yeah, me. Me too. Well, I'm glad that you are, are doing well. And you're going off to get your PhD, huh? Yeah, well,   Miyah Sundermeyer  57:33 right now I'm going I mean, I was planning on going to school back during 911. I just didn't know how I was going to do undergrad back at 19. I had just advocated to get out of special ed. And I was not going to do another transition program. Because I didn't like how the special education teachers were telling me that I needed to do this directions, all because of the DSM and telling me that everything at every dream I wanted was unrealistic. And so they kept shooting it down. And so they tried to put me under a conservatorship or they tried to get my parents to and my parents didn't agree with that. So they told me I could pretty much call the shots. And so at the end of that school year 2001, I just said, Hey, I'm getting out of here, I'm going to find a way to go to college. So but I, I mean, I tend to to go back a few times and take some learning support classes, after doing what they call is the compass exam, which is it's an interest exam for you that you can take a two year school, versus the, the AC T or the SCT, which they steered me away from. And so I went, I went that route instead ay ay, ay, I did the two year education first over a five years, from 23 to 28. And then I transferred my credits over to Georgia State. And I went off and on, off and on. And then I reached I finally got my Bachelor's in 2020. And luckily, I was able to graduate outside on my football field due to COVID, which was a big dream of mine. But   Michael Hingson  59:15 it's good for you.   Miyah Sundermeyer  59:17 But now I'm getting ready to take some Postback classes. And I want to I need to be talking to advisors, anybody I can because I'm fascinated and I have a background that just most of my classes seem to seem to geared towards developmental type psychology and psychology is my baby. So that's what I want to get my doctorate in, is developmental psychology and I want to go into research and I'd also like to teach so   Michael Hingson  59:44 I, and I don't say this lightly, but I'll bet you'll be good at it. You're clearly very articulate, you know what you want to do, and that's as good as it gets.   Miyah Sundermeyer  59:53 Yep, yep. But, but along the way, I mean, because I didn't have along the way at my undergrad. I didn't have mathematical background, I didn't really have much of an academic background because I was in Special Ed and I hated studying. So when I moved to Atlanta from Minnesota at the age of 20, at the age of 21, my aunt told me that, okay, do you want to flip burgers the rest of your life? Or do you want to go back to school? So about so nearly 20 years ago, I moved down here and started learning how to do math. So math is one of my favorite subjects. Nobody understands why. Well, I spent a lot of time getting exposed to it. That's why   Michael Hingson  1:00:34 it doesn't matter. It is. And that's, that's the big issue. But yeah, you do have an explanation for it. So that's pretty cool. Well, Maya, we have been talking for now a little bit over an hour. So I am going to suggest that what we ought to do is to keep in touch. And when you have more adventures about your education talked about, we should get you to come back on the podcast again.   Miyah Sundermeyer  1:00:55 Yep, I will come back and talk about my education, especially as I talked about my progress for that. And then I really need to have temple back on the show. However, I really like to see her in person again, I miss seeing temple. So   Michael Hingson  1:01:11 well, if you talk with her, see if she would love to chat and explore coming on unstoppable mindset. All right, well, thank   Miyah Sundermeyer  1:01:18 you much. Well, I   Michael Hingson  1:01:19 appreciate it. And if people want to reach out to you, is there a way that they can contact you and you have a website or anything or whatever?   Miyah Sundermeyer  1:01:27 Yeah. Well, so I'm a podcast host myself that said that. Yeah. And I'm currently on a podcast tour. And you are number four on the tour. So I've HelloWorld with Miyah, and that's helloworldwithMiyah. podbean.com. That's Hello, world with Miyah dot pod bean.com.   Michael Hingson  1:01:45 Hello, world with miyah dot pod bean.com. Okay,   Miyah Sundermeyer  1:01:50 yeah. And I have two applications. I am calling for proposals. I'm always looking for guests to be on the show. And I am also on a podcast tour right now. So if you know anyone that has any slots that are open, I would love to be on your show. So   Michael Hingson  1:02:07 great. Well, we can introduce you to people and make some of that happen.   Miyah Sundermeyer  1:02:11 All right. Well, thank you so much.   Michael Hingson  1:02:13 Well, thank you. And I appreciate everyone who is listening to this today. Miyah is certainly one of those people that I want to grow up to be like, I can just say that.   Miyah Sundermeyer  1:02:27 But whoever for two years, I have a young face, but I'm about 40 now.   Michael Hingson  1:02:31 There you go. Well, I want to thank you again. And thank you all for listening. If you'd like to reach out to me, we'd love to hear your thoughts about the episode. You can email me at Michaelhi M I C H A E L H I  at accessibe A C C E S S I B E .com. You can also go to our podcast page, which is www dot Michael hingson .com slash podcast Michael Hingson is M I C H A E L H I N G S O N. And if you go to Michael hingson.com/podcast. Or if you're listening to this at some other location, please give us a five star rating. We appreciate the ratings. And I hope that you'll give us a five star one for this episode. So again, thank you all for listening. Wherever you are in Miyah, thank you for listening. Are you all you listen to thank you for being here.   Miyah Sundermeyer  1:03:21 All right, thank you much.   Michael Hingson  1:03:22 Thank you.   Michael Hingson  1:03:28 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

This Organized Life
Ep 307: Partner Spotlight with Angela O'Brien

This Organized Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 50:46 Transcription Available Very Popular


Hi Friends, Joining me today is Angela O'Brien, founder of Your Space Reclaimed in Dallas, TX. Angela is one of our incredible SBO Partners and I invited her on the show to talk about motherhood, organizing and all things Enneagram! I specifically asked Angela to visit our show in October as we recognize Down Syndrome Awareness Month. As a mom of 2 grown-ish kids, Angela shares her story of finding out her daughter was born with Down Syndrome and what she wants people to know about the Down Syndrome community. During our conversation we talked about: Life transitions, knowing when to pull back and when to lean in. Her personal discovery into the Enneagram and how it led her to becoming a certified Enneagram coach and finding her passion as a professional organizer at the age of 51. The importance of teaching independence, providing support and building confidence for all kids, especially those with Intellectual Disabilities. How she gives back and supports the Down Syndrome community in Dallas  We also talked about her struggles as an Enneagram 9 (The Peacemaker) and what strategies she has put in place to help her live an organized life. Make sure to check out the links below for everything we talked about including Angela's fav organizing products, book recommendations and special promos for our TOL listeners. If you know someone who could benefit from this episode, please take a moment to share it with your friends. And finally, if you are a Professional Organizer, or thinking about becoming a Professional Organizer, we would love to talk with you about our Group and Individual Offerings. Click HERE to learn more! XOXO- Laurie P.S. If you are curious about finding your enneagram type, here's a link to a free assessment: https://www.truity.com/test/enneagram-personality-test ***(note: online assessments have a high rate of inaccuracy. Assessments can prove helpful in giving insight, but we believe that the best way to determine your Enneagram type is through self-discovery and learning about each of the 9 types. Learn more) LINKS MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE CONNECT WITH ANGELA WEBSITE | INSTAGRAM | FACEBOOK ANGELA'S FAVORITE PRODUCTS: Lazy Susans | Deep Acrylic Bins with Wheels ANGELA'S BOOK RECOMMENDATIONS: You are a Badass | The Gift of an Ordinary Day

Talk Nerdy to Me
Sigma Comics Here Comes Calico issue 6 Kickstarter has launched

Talk Nerdy to Me

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 29:08


Here Comes Calico from Sigma Comics has been firing on all cylinders! Great story - yup, who doesn't love seeing someone stand up to animal abusers? Good artwork - the visual aesthetic fits the story line and adds a little extra oomph to the overall experience. Compelling characters - there are enough interesting and relatable characters in the first five issues to launch endless spinoff stories. These aren't your run of the mill characters either. There is a gang of little people and one of the most feared crime bosses has Down Syndrome. This series does not shy away from using characters that fall outside the spectrum of normal comic book tropes. The hero of the story is not against using extreme violence to extract justice for animals that are being abused. Blood, gore, and brutal reality are presented in the story in such a way that it doesn't feel forced. The violence in the story actually fits the narrative and helps define the main character, Calico. I like to describe this series as if The Boys and the SPCA had an illegitimate love child and named it Calico. Issue 6 of 8 is launched on Kickstarter yesterday (October 26) and is already halfway to being funded. Please consider backing this project and help bring issue 6 to completion. There are lots of great support tiers and awesome perks. This is an independent title, so if you can't find it at your local comic book store your best bet is to support this Kickstarter and get all of the first 6 issues. You won't be disappointed. Support Here Comes Calico #6 on Kickstarter http://kck.st/3f2EkUx SUBSCRIBE to watch more videos like this one! LET'S CONNECT! -- Zia Comics website -- Zia Comics TikTok -- Zia Comics Facebook -- Zia Comics Twitter -- Zia Comics Instagram LISTEN TO OUR PODCAST! - iTunes #ziacomics #lascruces #newmexico #lascrucesnm #lascrucesnewmexico #sigmacomics #hhgerman #calico #herecomescalico

The LowDOWN: A Down Syndrome Podcast
New Sensations: Down Syndrome and Sensory Processing

The LowDOWN: A Down Syndrome Podcast

Play Episode Play 59 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 73:09


On Season 6, Episode 8 of The LowDOWN: A Down Syndrome Podcast, Hina Mahmood gives us the lowdown on Down syndrome and sensory processing. Support the showThe LowDOWN: A Down Syndrome Podcast is produced by the Down Syndrome Resource Foundation. Learn more and support the podcast at DSRF.org.Follow @DSRFCanada on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.Leave us a rat...

Sleep Apnea Stories
82 - Jeff, Kattia & Nate Krouse - Down Syndrome and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Sleep Apnea Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 33:15


Emma is joined by Jeff and Kattia Krouse, parents to Nathan, a child with Down Syndrome and Sleep Apnea. Together they discuss: * Nathan's Down Syndrome coming as a surprise to Jeff and Kattia. * Going for a sleep study and receiving a diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea and beginning CPAP therapy. * Difficulties finding a well-fitting CPAP mask for a non-verbal child. * A tonsillectomy that didn't resolve Nathan's sleep apnea. * Advice for other families with kids navigating sleep apnea diagnosis and treatment with Down Syndrome. This episode is sponsored by: Airway Management https://tapintosleep.com/ BetterHelp https://www.betterhelp.com/emma for 10% off your first month of online therapy Vivos Therapeutics https://vivos.com/patients/ Follow the podcast on Instagram: @sleepapneastories Email Emma at sleepapneastories@gmail.com www.sleepapneastories.com Disclaimer: this episode of the podcast includes people with sleep apnea discussing their own experiences of medical procedures and devices. This is for information purposes only and you should consult with your own medical professionals before you start or stop any medication or treatment.

Back2Basics: Reconnecting to the essence of YOU
E177- Mark and John Cronin- Spreading Happiness by showing what's possible

Back2Basics: Reconnecting to the essence of YOU

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 32:05


Visit: www.johnscrazysocks.com  Mark X. Cronin is the co-founder, along with his son John, of John's Crazy Socks, a social enterprise with a mission to spread happiness. His leadership has demonstrated that pursuing social goals – demonstrating what people with differing abilities can achieve and giving back – makes for good business. Mark advocates for the rights of differently abled people. His advocacy work has seen Mark testify before Congress twice, speak at the UN and make numerous trips to Capitol Hill. Mark is a sought-after speaker having spoken at events across the U.S., Canada and Mexico.  Mark is part of the U.S. State Department's Speakers' Bureau and the CEO Commission for Disability Employment. Mark served as the Chief Operating officer of multiple health care management and technology firms, founded a software company, organized political campaigns and worked as a Congressional aide. Mark began his career as a schoolteacher and has taught in graduate schools as well. Mark has an undergraduate degree from Holy Cross and a Masters of Public Policy from the Kennedy School at Harvard University. He has been named an EY Entrepreneur of the Year and is a Board member for the Long Island Chapter of the Entrepreneurs Organization. 

Forty Drinks
Turning 40 and Overcoming Disordered Eating and Exercise to Find Joyful Movement and Food Freedom

Forty Drinks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 45:31 Transcription Available


Kim Hagle was a stay at home mom to three young kids when she started working out with a personal trainer. She loved how she felt - and looked - and eventually got certified as a trainer herself. But her hobby-turned-career turned into an unhealthy obsession with size and weight. Kim's journey to self acceptance began with the baby she had at 40: a beautiful boy with Down Syndrome who taught her to just be herself. At the age of 42, she overcame disordered eating and exercise habits, and obsessing over her weight and found joyful movement, body acceptance and food freedom. Guest Bio Kim Hagle is Certified Personal Trainer, Registered Holistic Nutritionist, Body Image Coach and founder of Radiant Vitality Wellness. Kim hosts The Joyful Movement Show podcast, where she inspires women to disconnect movement from weight loss and re-engage with movement as a form of self care. Through movement and mindset coaching, she helps women heal their relationship with food and exercise while disconnecting their worth from their weight, so they can feel healthy, happy and confident in the body they have. A New Hobby Leads to an Unhealthy ObsessionAt 35, Kim Hagle had left her nursing career to be a stay at home mom to her three kids. While she valued being at home with the kids and they could afford for her to be home, Kim had always valued her career. So she found herself struggling  with her identity. She felt a lot of “not enough-ness” and she thought it was because she wasn't happy with her body and she had to lose weight.   While she had a long history of dieting, she had never been athletic and had never worked out. A friend turned her on to a personal trainer who would come to the house while the baby was napping. As she worked out, she started feeling stronger and more capable, and the hobby turned into an obsession. She started running and winning road races and fitness became as much her identity as stay-at-home-mom. She eventually got certified as a personal trainer and decided to turn it into her career - but it pretty quickly turned into an unhealthy obsession.  Kim said she was always a “straight size,” meaning she could always walk into any store and find something that fit. But she thinks most women are conditioned to think that if we just lost weight, we'd feel better. And, at the beginning, she did get a lot of validation and praise for how she looked. But that came with anxiety around “what if I gain the weight back?” In about a year, Kim lost about 50 pounds and dropped from a size 12 to a size 2, but maintaining that required a lot of work. She had to watch what she ate very closely. She had to exercise for multiple hours each day, every day. Through it all, she wondered if there was some accolade or accomplishment that would finally make her feel good enough, but she never found it.  And, when her youngest child was four, she and her husband decided to end their marriage, which caused her to be more obsessive about her heating and working out - not so much as a quest to be thin, but as a mode of stress relief. She found she ran a lot during that time.  A Second Chance at LoveA few months after her divorce, Kim met a man she thought would be a summer fling but who she soon realized was the real deal. They dated long distance for a while and got married when she was 39.  Her husband didn't have any children of his own and as their relationship developed, Kim realized how important it was to him to become a dad. In their discussions about having children, Kim told him that, because of her age, there was a high likelihood that their child would have chromosomal abnormalities. Her then-boyfriend's response was "No big deal. Like If that happens it's what's meant to be, it'll be great. We'll rock it."  At that moment, Kim had a vision of a little blonde boy with down syndrome running towards them. And now they are parents to a little five year old blonde boy with down...

The Lucky Few
184. Busting Myths About Down Syndrome - ft. Madison Tevlin

The Lucky Few

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 31:56


Madison Tevlin is a young woman with Down syndrome who enjoys listening to music, hanging out with her friends, and hosting her own talk show (she's basically living OUR dream). In her mini interview series titled “Who do you think I am?” Madison connects with people from diverse backgrounds to get to the heart of who they really are. When she's not on camera, she's busting myths about Down syndrome on her Instagram page! Today, Madison is sharing all about her advocacy work, her future goals, and why she says that having Down syndrome is the least interesting thing about her. Tune in and enjoy! --- SHOW NOTES Keep up with Madison! IG: @madisontevlin Tik Tok: @madisontevlin Watch “Who do you think I am?” Celebrate Down Syndrome month in style! We are excited to have a brand new shop just in time for DS Awareness Month. For the month of October ONLY we are offering 21% off EVERYTHING because we love you. Use code “DSawareness” for your discount. Tap HERE to shop. LET'S CHAT Email hello@theluckyfewpodcast.com with your questions and Good News for future episodes. HELP US SHIFT THE NARRATIVE Interested in partnering with The Lucky Few Podcast as a sponsor? Email hello@theluckyfewpodcast.com for more information! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/theluckyfewpod/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theluckyfewpod/support

Telepractice Today
Dr. Amanda Blackwell Discusses Finding Her Passion In Guatemala

Telepractice Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 31:04


After serving for a year as a volunteer speech language pathologist at an orphanage in Guatemala in 2013, Amanda Blackwell has been living and working full-time in the country for over 7 years. Amanda completed a clinical doctorate in speech language pathology and started the official professional association for local Guatemalan speech therapists (SomosTLgt), which has grown to more than 300 members over the past year. In January 2020, she began working toward a Doctor of Education degree at Murray State University with the goal of opening a university for allied health professions in Guatemala to improve the quality of services across the country. She currently directs the speech therapy departments at FUNDAL (for individuals with deafblindness and multiple disabilities) and the Guatemalan Association of Down Syndrome in Guatemala City, teaches a course about teletherapy through UOC in Barcelona, Spain, provides teletherapy services for public school students in the United States, runs an autism education social project for Spanish speakers called LUNA (@lunautismo), and is part of the ASHA-PAHO ad hoc committee for Ecuador. She was a clinical supervisor of graduate students at the University of California San Marcos doing teletherapy in the Summer of 2020 and she is an adjunct research fellow working with five doctoral students in the SLPD program at Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions in Provo, Utah. She is a life-long learner herself and also loves providing dynamic training on various topics to school districts and SLPs around the world. 

Gettin' Down with Down Syndrome
Episode 57 The history and types of down syndrome

Gettin' Down with Down Syndrome

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 16:54


It's down syndrome awareness month, so let's talk about the history, the name , and the types of down syndrome. Are you ready to get down!

Pebbles of Light
029 The Joy of Sam || Natalie Hobbs

Pebbles of Light

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 40:44


Natalie Hobbs shares her story of learning that her new baby, Sam, had been diagnosed with Down Syndrome. She talks about how she personally worked through the diagnosis and what it would mean for their family and their new son as well as the joy and happiness that Sam has brought to their family.  THIS EPISODE'S PEBBLE: The pebble for this week is to check out one of the following organizations to learn a bit more about Down Syndrome. National Down Syndrome Society - https://ndss.org/aboutNational Down Syndrome Congress - https://www.ndsccenter.org/Down Syndrom Diagnosis Network - https://www.dsdiagnosisnetwork.org/ Jack's Basket - https://www.jacksbasket.org/ Down Syndrome Association of Minnesota - https://dsamn.org/Zion's Army - https://www.zionsarmy.netZoe's Toolbox - https://www.zoes-toolbox.com/who-we-areRESOURCESAffiliate Disclaimer - As an Amazon Associate and member of other affiliate programs, we may earn advertising or referral fees from qualifying purchases. Thank you for supporting Pebbles of Light!Follow Anne:Website: https://annemaxson.com/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pebblesoflight  Instagram: @PebblesOfLightSupport Pebbles of Light by visiting our sponsors:This is an affiliate link for Betterhelp Counseling Services. I receive a commission when people use this link. Go to https://www.betterhelp.com/pebbles for 10% off your first month of convenient, affordable, and accessible counseling services.Shine Cosmetics: https://www.shinecosmetics.com/?afmc=AnneM10   (**Always get 10% off with code AnneM10)See Good Days Shop: https://see-good-days.myteespring.co/  (**Always get 10% off with code AnneM10 at checkout.)Wholist - Wellness Comes Full Circle: https://whol.me/PebblesofLight

Down Syndrome Center of Western Pennsylvania Podcast
#143 - Depression, Anxiety, and OCD in Down syndrome

Down Syndrome Center of Western Pennsylvania Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 30:11


Dr. Anna Esbensen, psychologist with the Thomas Center for Down Syndrome at Cincinnati Children's Hospital, joined the podcast to answer a listener question about psychological issues that are seen in Down syndrome.   Thomas Center for Down Syndrome https://www.cincinnatichildrens.org/service/t/down-syndrome/services Association of University Centers on Disabilities https://www.aucd.org/directory/directory.cfm?program=UCEDD The National Association for the Dually Diagnosed (NADD) http://thenadd.org Mental Wellness in Adults with Down Syndrome (currently out of print) https://www.amazon.com/Mental-Wellness-Adults-Down-Syndrome/dp/1890627658/ref=sr_1_3?crid=2ANS38WEA9XWV&keywords=mental+health+down+syndrome&qid=1662478738&sprefix=%2Caps%2C61&sr=8-3 If you have a question that you would like us to address on the podcast, please send an e-mail to DownSyndromeCenter@chp.edu. If you would like to partner with us at the Down Syndrome Center, including this podcast, please visit https://givetochildrens.org/downsyndromecenter. Thank you to “Caring for Kids” The Carrie Martin Fund for its support of the Down Syndrome Center Podcast.   

Thriving Family Podcast
Episode 34: A letter from Holland & raising kids with disabilities

Thriving Family Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 56:22


B+T interview author Suzanne Lezotte. An excerpted chapter from her book about her son Owen who has Down Syndrome, was awarded an Honorable Mention in the Writer's Digest 91st Essay Competition, and she is currently working on a documentary short about his success in swimming. Read more Suzanne below. Click here for the free letter from Suzanne and for exciting updates, including her book and documentary! The letter was inspired by Welcome to Holland, a poem written by Emily Perl Kingsley describing what it was like to raise a child with a disability. https://thinkcollege.net/ IG: @suzannelezotte FB: https://www.facebook.com/suzannelezotte LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/suzannelezotte/ See free giveaway details below! JOIN OUR MEMBERSHIP Join us LIVE on Thursdays at 11:30am PT on IG: https://www.instagram.com/thrivingfamilypodcast/?hl=en Connect on FB: https://m.facebook.com/thrivingfamilypodcast/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiqp1YF3rI909vsKko0G0zw LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/65412085/ CONTEST! If you subscribe & leave a review of this podcast, you'll be entered to win a NOW Tone Therapy System by Solu (valued at $179 USD). No purchase or payment is necessary to enter, see the Terms and Conditions page of our site for more about the contest. NOW Tone Therapy System by Solu exclusive discount for our community: https://www.calmparent.net/now-tone-therapy-system-by-solu-yoga-for-your-mind. More about Suzanne: Growing up in Michigan with nine siblings, Suzanne always had dreams to move to a big city, where she could define herself, not just always be labeled “one of the Lezotte kids.” She chose LA over NY for the weather, and moved as soon as she graduated from college with a double major in English and Communications. Her first job was a receptionist at “Animation Magazine,” with a goal to write stories and eventually run a magazine. She landed a job in the sales department of “Entertainment Weekly,” then “Fortune Magazine.” Eventually she did run a magazine, an entertainment trade called “International Cinematographer Magazine.” She pivoted to Director of Public Relations at Panavision when she was six months pregnant with her first child Owen, who was born with Down Syndrome. During her tenure at Panavision, she had two more children, and concentrated on finding the right inclusive setting for her son. Her original grassroots group of moms with children who have Down syndrome became a springboard into multiple support groups and non-profit organizations. After a brief stint with Bexel and Sim International as Director of Marketing, she ditched the corporate life and began consulting for Sony Electronics so she had time to finish her book. An excerpted chapter from her book was a recent Honorable Mention in the Writer's Digest 91st Essay Competition and she is currently working on a documentary short about her son's success in swimming. She resides in Westlake Village with her husband and three children. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/calm-parent/message

The LowDOWN: A Down Syndrome Podcast
Coming to Terms: Down Syndrome and Grief

The LowDOWN: A Down Syndrome Podcast

Play Episode Play 54 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 61:17 Transcription Available


On Season 6, Episode 7 of The LowDOWN: A Down Syndrome Podcast, Samantha French gives us the lowdown on Down syndrome and grief.Support the showThe LowDOWN: A Down Syndrome Podcast is produced by the Down Syndrome Resource Foundation. Learn more and support the podcast at DSRF.org.Follow @DSRFCanada on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.Leave us a rat...

The Lucky Few
183. Following the Lead of Self-Advocates (ft. Matthew Schwab)

The Lucky Few

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 42:19


Matthew Schwab is a 25 year old man with Down syndrome who is absolutely slaying it at life. There's no better way to describe him! Since we last chatted with him in 2020, Matthew has moved into an apartment with his brother and started his own podcast! He's officially entered the world of “adulting” where there's no one around to remind you to do your chores! Today we're chatting about the highs and lows of living away from home, the future of Matthew's relationship (and why the law makes it SO difficult for couples with DS to get married), and what we think of the phrase “nothing about us without us.” Friends, you're going to love this episode! And if you want more behind the scenes of Matthew's life, you can check out Matthew Schwab Speaks The Podcast: Thriving with Down Syndrome on anchor and spotify! --- SHOW NOTES Listen to.. Matthew Schwab Speaks The Podcast: Thriving With Down Syndrome Matthew's other podcast, Tales of Arcadia: Unlocking the Universe's Secrets Our previous episode with Matthew Schwab.. #66. Public Speaking & Self-Advocacy Keep up with Matthew! Instagram Facebook. Visit matthewschwabspeaks.com to book Matthew for your next speaking opportunity! Watch Matthew's TedX Talk: How I Know Including People With Down Syndrome Is A Good Thing --- Celebrate Down Syndrome month in style! We are excited to have a brand new shop just in time for DS Awareness Month. For the month of October ONLY we are offering 21% off EVERYTHING because we love you. Use code “DSawareness” for your discount. https://www.theluckyfew.co/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/theluckyfewpod/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theluckyfewpod/support

The Jefferson Exchange
Eugene author writes YA novel about Down Syndrome family

The Jefferson Exchange

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 33:28


Melissa Hart's book about a young girl and her brother who has Down Syndrome is called Daisy Woodworm Changes the World.

Elevate Your Advocacy Through the IEP Podcast
E76: Paraprofessionals/Aides/Paraeducators/Para's

Elevate Your Advocacy Through the IEP Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 20:28


**FREE LEVERAGING PARENT ROLE IN IEP WEBINAR THIS WEEK!** CLICK HERE TO REGISTER! Episode 76: Paraprofessionals/Aides/Paraeducators/Paras   Does your child receive support from a paraprofessional but you aren't quite sure what a paraprofessional is or does? If you have questions about paraprofessionals, this episode is for you!   We are diving into who paraprofessionals are, what they do, how they fit into IEPs, and why good paraprofessionals are so beneficial to students with IEPs. Shownotes: theieplab.com/episode76   Decoding IEP Data Workshop: theieplab.com/data Facebook group: https://urlgeni.us/facebook/IEPlab

ABCs of Disability Planning
RODS Heroes - Helping orphaned children with Down Syndrome come home to loving families

ABCs of Disability Planning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 41:59


Around the world, children with Down syndrome are routinely abandoned and institutionalized for life. This widespread problem seems overwhelming, but there is hope. RODS Heroes wholeheartedly believe that when you become actively engaged in good work, whether that be adopting a child or helping create opportunities for others to adopt, you will witness miracles. People will help you, partnerships will be forged, and all of the necessary components of your plan will fall into place. But you have to be willing to take a leap of faith. RODS Heroes is a nonprofit committed to finding a loving home for all orphaned children with Down syndrome. Through the efforts of our many RODS Heroes and the amazing families who are answering the call to adopt, miracles are transpiring right before our eyes. Brady and Andrea Murray are the founders of RODS Heroes, and Brady serves as its President. Their journey with the Down syndrome community began in 2007 when their son was born with Down syndrome. The Murrays quickly realized that what they thought would be one of their family's greatest challenges would actually be one of their greatest blessings. Reece's Rainbow - https://reecesrainbow.org/ Connect to learn more: Website: https://rods.org/ Facebook: @rodsheroes Instagram: @rodsheroes Email: hero@rods.org See the Miracle Podcast: https://anchor.fm/seethemiracle As an Amazon Associate, I earn commissions from qualifying purchases. For more information about True North Disability Planning: Web: https://truenorthdisabilityplanning.com/ Podcast (ABCs of Disability Planning) - https://anchor.fm/abcs-disability-planning Waypoints - https://waypoints.substack.com/ Facebook: @TrueNorthDisabilityPlanning Twitter: @NeedsNavigator Resource store (free downloads too) - https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/True-North-Disability-Planning --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/abcs-disability-planning/message

Gettin' Down with Down Syndrome
Episode 56 Tribe Inclusive

Gettin' Down with Down Syndrome

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 17:49


Are you looking for some fun LIVE on-line classes and meet new friends.  Check out this episode where Mariana Shank talks all about tribe inclusive and the programs they offer.  For more information check them out at tribe inclusive.com

Wake Up and Dream!
Episode 30: Advocating for Your Child's Invisible Disabilities: An Interview with Criss Madrigal

Wake Up and Dream!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 27:31


Quote:  “You cannot connect the dots looking forward.  You can only connect them by looking back, so you have to trust that the dots will somehow will connect in the future.”    What an amazing discussion we had today with Criss Madrigal, mother of 3, a coach, and has a huge heart for moms with what she calls “invisible disabilities.”  Criss shared her favorite quote by Steve Jobs,  “You cannot connect the dots looking forward.  You can only connect them by looking back, so you have to trust that the dots will somehow will connect in the future.”   For her this quote helped to explain things that had happened in her life, and specifically in parenthood.  Cris has twin daughters that have “22Q Deletion Syndrome” which is known as one of the most common syndromes that nobody has heard of, because it follows the characteristics of Down Syndrome, yet because it manifests itself in so many ways, it is very difficult to diagnose.   Criss and her husband have gone “all in” in providing various therapies for their daughter, and all the “dots” connected when they stepped out in faith, yet not knowing where the tens of thousands of dollars would come from to pay for these therapies.  But, the money has alway come in, somehow!  Because of the unique and “invisible disabilities of her daughters, she has always been an advocate in partnering with the girls' teachers, and has created this Questionnaire template to help teachers know more about them, how they learn best, strengths, weaknesses, etc. and she wants to make this template available to YOU, our listeners!   You can connect with Criss in her FREE facebook community that is absolutely INCREDIBLE!   Also, grab her Meet My Child School Blueprint here!    Do you know of someone that could use this template? Share our podcast on your social media platforms, or send it to a friend that may need this encouragement!  And, be sure to reach out and connect with us on Instagram @wakeupanddreampodcast    Or feel free to connect with us individually as well:   Sara Carlisi: @saracarlisi1  sara@saracarlisi.com saracarlisi.com/wakeup   Kelly Armstrong:  @kellyarmstrongofficial  kelly@fullyembraceyourlife.com   Lisa Taylor:  @lisa.kay.taylor lisatay.lbri@gmail.com www.linktree.com/lisa.kay.taylor www.lbri.com/lisatay

The LowDOWN: A Down Syndrome Podcast
Let's Get to Work: Down Syndrome Employment

The LowDOWN: A Down Syndrome Podcast

Play Episode Play 42 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 32:52


On Season 6, Episode 6 of The LowDOWN: A Down Syndrome Podcast, Jason Konowalchuk and Aja Masters give us the lowdown on finding a job as a person with Down syndrome.Support the showThe LowDOWN: A Down Syndrome Podcast is produced by the Down Syndrome Resource Foundation. Learn more and support the podcast at DSRF.org.Follow @DSRFCanada on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.Leave us a rat...

Unbabbled
Ali Allawala and Farzeen Ali: The Karachi Down Syndrome Program | Season 5. Episode 2

Unbabbled

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 48:30 Transcription Available


In this episode we sit down with Ali Allawala and Farzeen Ali to discuss their innovative and inspiring work to support families and individuals with Down Syndrome. Ali and Farzeen are Co-founders and current directors of The Karachi Down Syndrome Program (KDSP). KDSP is a non-profit organization in Karachi Pakistan, launched in March 2014 by a group of concerned parents and passionate individuals who realized a need for a platform for those with Down syndrome due to limited support and resources available locally. KDSP's mission is to advocate the value, acceptance and inclusion of people with Down syndrome living in Karachi and aims to provide them with the opportunity to lead independent and fulfilling lives. KDSP embarks on a journey with families and those with Down Syndrome to ensure they feel empowered, included and equal members of society.  Ali and Farzeen discuss their personal journey with the diagnosis of their daughter, what led them to found The Karachi Down Syndrome Program, and ways KDSP is serving the community in Karachi Pakistan. Their story of navigating an unexpected diagnosis and figuring out step by step what life can look like for their daughter is one many families will be able to relate to.   Links: The Karachi Down Syndrome Program  The Parish School The Carruth Center This episode is generously sponsored by The Carruth Center in Houston, Texas. The Carruth Center provides children therapeutic services to advance their communication skills, independence and emotional well-being. They offer individual speech, occupational, physical, music and play therapy sessions. They also offer group classes for young children with language delays as well as groups for school-aged children who would benefit from Social Thinking methodologies. If you would like to find out more visit  www.carruthcenter.org. The Carruth Center is proud of their relationship with the Karachi Down Syndrome Program. We hope you enjoy listening to Ali and Farzeen Allawala. Support the show

Joni and Friends Radio
Bearing the Image of God

Joni and Friends Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 4:00


Every human life has great value and worth, including the lives of people with disabilities! They bear the image of God in special and unique ways, and they are precious to him. ----Joni's 73rd birthday is coming up and you can join her in celebrating God's faithfulness!Celebrate with Joni Looking for more encouragement?  Follow Joni on Facebook and subscribe to her daily devotional. Listen to all of Joni's 4-minute and 1-minute programs at  joniradio.org!Joni and Friends envisions a world where every person with a disability finds hope, dignity, and their place in the body of Christ. Get involved at joniandfriends.org or on TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, and YouTube.

Magnifying Motherhood
Down Syndrome Awareness Month-Mandy Cabarrus

Magnifying Motherhood

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 50:56


In this episode I interview Mandy Cabarrus who has three daughters, one of which was diagnosed at birth with Down Syndrome. We discuss her experience with her daughter and how she has learned to parent each of her children according to their needs. We talk about the emotional rollercoaster of raising a child with special needs. It is a beautifully honest episode and inspires us to love all of those with special needs and treat them no differently than we would another human being. Link to Holland Poem: Welcome to Holland Poem (A Poem About Autism) (dailytimepoems.com)

Down Syndrome Center of Western Pennsylvania Podcast
#142 - Exciting Upcoming Events with DSA Pittsburgh!

Down Syndrome Center of Western Pennsylvania Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 25:24


To celebrate Down Syndrome Awareness Month, representatives from the Down Syndrome Association of Pittsburgh (DSAP) joined the podcast today to reflect on their experiences as parents as well as highlight the ongoing work of DSAP.  The highlight event of the year is the Buddy Walk which is coming up on October 23, 2022 at Schenley Plaza on the University of Pittsburgh campus.   Helpful websites related to the podcast discussion today: DSAP: https://www.dsapgh.org/ or call/text us 4125659936 Pittsburgh Buddy Walk: https://www.ds-stride.org/pghbuddywalk First Call Program: https://www.dsapgh.org/first-call or call/text us 4125524972 FB: https://www.facebook.com/dsapgh IG: https://www.instagram.com/dsapgh LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/down-syndrome-association-of-pittsburgh Twitter: https://twitter.com/dsapittsburgh Shannons blog: https://www.thislifewegot.com If you would like to suggest a topic for us to cover on the podcast, please send an e-mail to DownSyndromeCenter@chp.edu. If you would like to partner with the Down Syndrome Center, including this podcast, please visit https://givetochildrens.org/downsyndromecenter. Thank you to “Caring for Kids” The Carrie Martin Fund for its support of the Down Syndrome Center Podcast.   

IronWomen podcast
The Women of Kona - Episode 5 - A Sweaty Day at the Press Conference

IronWomen podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 28:57


It's day 5 in Kona and things are heating up! Today we bring you interviews from the pro-press conference. We hear from Sarah True, Daniela Ryf, and get a question from the first person with Down Syndrome to finish an Ironman - Chris Nikic. Finally, Sara and Ellen chat with Vanessa Foerster and Lauren Vallee, age group competitors and the founders of the company With > Against. Follow With > Against on Instagram @withisgreaterthanagainst Enter the Feisty Kona Giveaway at https://www.feistytriathlon.com/link-in-bio *** Support the Podcast *** Coeur Sports: Use the code KONAHOT10 for $10 off at http://coeursports.com/ (coeursports.com) TRIHARD: Use the code FEISTYKONA for 20% off at http://trihard.co/ (trihard.co) That's It.: Use the code KONA25 for 25% off your order at http://thatsitfruit.com/ (thatsitfruit.com) Register for the Outspoken Summit at http://outspokensummit.com/ (outspokensummit.com) Audio by:  Beach by MusicbyAden & Jurgance | https://soundcloud.com/musicbyaden (https://soundcloud.com/musicbyaden) https://soundcloud.com/jurgance (https://soundcloud.com/jurgance) Music promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.com/ (https://www.free-stock-music.com) Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-ND 4.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/ (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/) Beach by MBB | https://soundcloud.com/mbbofficial (https://soundcloud.com/mbbofficial) Music promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.com/ (https://www.free-stock-music.com) Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en_US (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en_US) This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Podsights - https://podsights.com/privacy Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

The Birth Hour
728| Unexpected Down Syndrome Diagnosis at Birth - Kelle Hampton Rebroadcast

The Birth Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 41:54 Very Popular


In honor of Down Syndrome Awareness Month we are sharing Kelle Hampton's story that was originally published in 2017. Links This episode is sponsored by Kindred Bravely. Use code BIRTHHOUR for 20% off at kindredbravely.com Know Your Options Online Childbirth Course - Use Code 100OFF for $100 off Beyond the First Latch Course Support The Birth Hour via Patreon!

The Action Catalyst
Going "Crazy", with John and Mark X. Cronin (Family, Business, Down Syndrome, Advocacy, Apparel, Fashion)

The Action Catalyst

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 22:25


John and Mark X. Cronin, entrepreneurs, advocates for Down Syndrome, and co-founders of the largest sock store on the planet, https://johnscrazysocks.com/ (John's Crazy Socks), explain the 5 essential pillars of business, the joys and the challenges of working as a father and son team, a small problem they ran into with opening a food truck, making friends with Washington elite, and the importance of uplifting differently-abled employees. Mentioned in this episode: This episode is brought to you by Southwestern Legacy Insurance Group. This episode is brought to you by Southwestern Legacy Insurance Group. https://the-action-catalyst.captivate.fm/southwesternlegacy (Southwestern Legacy Insurance Group)

Babes and Babies
EP 237: Zoe's Story with Karmel Garcia: Down Syndrome Awareness Month

Babes and Babies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 79:09


Karmel Garcia is on this episode sharing the story of her 3 year old, Zoe, who was born with Down Syndrome. She takes us from the beginning with a prenatal diagnosis, the birth and through her first three years of life. Karmel started to see a need for families to have therapuetic tools to work with their kids at home and has started Zoe's Tool Box. https://www.instagram.com/karmelita16/?hl=en https://www.instagram.com/zoes_toolbox/?hl=en Non Profit https://www.zoes-toolbox.com/ Every baby born with Down syndrome will have their own unique experiences and abilities. Some will have many medical procedures in their first year, and some will be born never spending a day in the hospital.  For any diagnosis the first year is the hardest to navigate, and we are here to be a box of sunshine to those families. Books to check out: You Are Enough Different - A Great Thing to Be What's Inside you, Is Inside Me Too Hannah's Down Syndrome Powers 47 Strings Connect with Liz https://www.instagram.com/esandoz/?hl=en https://miraculousmamas.com/