Podcast appearances and mentions of dan kennedy

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Latest podcast episodes about dan kennedy

The Marketing Secrets Show
Geometric Funnel Growth... The Real Secret To Scale

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 12:46


If you want to stop playing checkers and start playing chess, listen to today's episode. Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com Magnetic Marketing ---Transcript--- Good morning everybody. Welcome back to the Marketing Secrets Podcast. Today I want to talk about something interesting, about when you have a success and you have a win, how to take that and roll it on to geometrically grow everything else you did inside your business. So I hope you guys are awesome today. It's been snowing here in Boise, and then today it's been raining so it's all slushy, and I've had fun driving kids to school this morning. This is one of my favorite things, is to drive them and have a chance to talk to them. It makes me sad because my twins are about to get their licenses and then I'll probably not get to drive them anymore. But until they do, I'm enjoying it and it's just really fun. Just dropped off Aiden, my little man, at school and have a few minutes while I'm heading back to the office. And I was thinking about something that I thought would be helpful for all of you guys, because I don't see this happen enough. In fact, I noticed with a lot of us entrepreneurs, we do something that works really good and then we move on to the next thing as opposed to being like, "Hey, that worked really good. We should do more of that, or we should focus on that, or we should go deeper on that." A good example just happened recently. As you guys know, I bought Dan Kennedy's company and then we relaunched it last month. The relaunch went really, really well. And the way we launched it is we took ... it was a concept that Dan Kennedy and Bill Glazer did back 15, 18, I don't know how many years ago, when Bill first bought the company. The company's basically a newsletter company, it had the Magnetic Marketing newsletter. And so when Bill bought it, he was like, "I want to grow this" so he created something that he called the MIFGE. I talked about it on the podcast before, stands for Most Incredible Free Gift Ever. And they launched it and that's how the newsletter grew originally. And then they sold the company to private equity firms, who as a rule are not very good at actually marketing the way that we all market. And they ran the business to the ground over the next decade. So I had a chance to buy it out of that. And the first thing I did is, well, what worked in the past? Oh, the MIFGE, we should remake the MIFGE. So we built the MIFGE, we launched it, and from the MIFGE we added over 4000 new paying members into the newsletter. So I want to do the math on that for you, because it makes this really interesting. And obviously people are going to cancel, but let's just say they don't. So we added 4000 people at $97 a month. That's $400,000 a month, times 12 months in a year, that's an extra 4.8 million dollar-a-year business we launched in a weekend by creating a really good MIFGE offer. That's awesome. And again, like I said, there's going to be a churn and things are going to drop, we're also going to start buying ads to it. The funnel converted extremely well. I think I talked about that, if not... Hopefully you signed up through the funnel and you got the first January's newsletter because I break down the funnel. But we're averaging 200 and something dollars for every free trial. So I can spend $200 to get a free trial and still be profitable, which is insane. And now it's making that business where we can start growing it and scaling it, and I think by summertime I could have 10,000 members in there, pay $97 a month which is a million dollar-a-month business on info product, a newsletter. It's insane. And so for me, I am the worst at keeping secrets, that's why all my books are called DotCom Secrets, Expert Secrets, Traffic Secrets, because I just tell everyone my secrets. And on the podcast I shared this, in the first issue of the newsletter I'm sharing it. I'm not good at keeping secrets. But it's interesting because I'll share that with most people and like, "oh that's so cool, that's awesome." And then they don't do anything with it. I have somebody who I love and respect who I shared it with, probably one of the first people I shared it with, and I thought they were going to grab it and take it. And then I saw their next offer run out and they could have done the model that I did with the offer they did. It would've fit. It would've been a simple tweak to make it match that, and then they didn't. And they launched something and they didn't follow the model and I was like, "man, if somebody told me that they had a funnel that was averaging 200 and ... $230, it might have been ... Anyway, insane EPC, average cart value. It isn't my market, it's something similar. I would look at that, I would've funnel hacked it and I would've called an audible before I launched my funnel and made tweaks and changes based on it. But they didn't, they just said, "oh wow, that's amazing, that's so cool." And then they went on. And I'm sure a lot of you guys heard me talk about it and you're like, "oh, that's so cool" and then you went on. The way to leverage this stuff, to leverage my wins, to leverage your wins, to leverage what's working in the market is to not do that. So for example, we launched the MIFGE offer, it killed it. We had an urgency and scarcity where it closed down for two weeks or something like that. I think it just went back live a day or two ago. If you go to noBSletter.com, you can see the funnel. But after we shut it down, the first question was "man, that works really good. We should create a MIFGE for ClickFunnels." That was the first thing. "It worked here, let's do it again." Where most people are like "That worked awesome", and then they move on to the next thing and they forget about the success. So we sat down and said, "how would we make a MIFGE for ClickFunnels? What would that look like? How do we make it so the offers are irresistible, so it gets people to stick longer? So it gets our average cart value up front higher?" Right now, for me to get a ClickFunnels trial, just so you guys know, in paid media, for my paid ads, it costs me $300. Between 250 and $300, depending on a lot of things, to get somebody to sign up for free ClickFunnels trial. Which is fine because our lifetime value of a customer is really, really high so we can do it. But it's a float. It takes me three to four months. And honestly longer than that, because you have churn and breakage and all that kind of stuff. It takes a good almost a year to break even from me buying to get someone to sign up for a ClickFunnels trial, which is fine. But if I could tweak my front end funnel so that I was making 250, $300 for every trial we signed up, now I break even immediately and now guess what? I can out-scale everybody once again. And so I'm like, "how do I do that?" Well, we need a ClickFunnels MIFGE offer. And so that's what we did. We spent three hours, in a room, "how do we make a ClickFunnels most incredible free gift ever?" That's what MIFGE stands for. Most Incredible Free Gift Ever. And we structured it, we sat down and we mapped it out, and we're like, "now we have this, what's the hook? What's the story? Why are we doing this? What's the offer? What do we send them in the mail so we can get the physical address? How do we build community? How do we build culture? How do we weave all that stuff into an incredible offer?" And when it was done, we literally mapped it out. And I sat there and I was like, "oh my gosh, this will change ClickFunnels forever." And it's so simple. It's nothing complicated. All of us make good offers. We sell something. But looking at it through the lens of the most incredible free gift ever, and then looking at the funnel we built for the Dan Kennedy company and how high the average cart value and how high the EPCs were, how high everything was. It's like, okay, let's take this model and let's replicate it over here. And so for you guys, I just want you to understand when I share something, I'm excited and I'm ... it's not like, "oh cool, Russell. That's awesome." It should be like, "okay, how do I implement this in my business?" That'd be the first question I'd be asking myself instantly, is how do I take this and do it, because it's awesome? I want to put that out there, because I see a lot of people who don't do those kind of things. Like when we launched the Traffic Secrets book funnel, it was the highest converting book funnel I'd done to date. It was awesome. And so instead of being like, "man, that's awesome. The Traffic Secrets book funnel's great." I said, "okay, what did we learn on this? What was the layout? The style, design, the tweak… like what did we do different in this one than the other ones?" We took those things and we moved them and we took all those best practices, all things we figured out. And we did them on the other book funnels. We went backwards in time. Now all the book funnels match the model and they're all converting high. And right now we're in the process of re-tweaking with the book funnels to try to increase the cart value. And we're trying things and tweaking things and testing things. As soon as we get it to work, then guess what we're going to do instantly? Take those changes and roll them across all the book funnels. So I want you guys to understand that's how you double down on these things, how you get consistently better. Geometrically better, not just incrementally. A lot of people have incremental wins. They add this thing, they get a little better, add this thing, they get a little bit better. Whereas I'm looking at geometry, how do we geometrically grow what we're doing? Because I don't want to go from $150 million to $170 million. That's not inspiring or exciting or anything. I want to go from $150 million to $300 million. How do you do that? You don't do it by playing checkers. You do it by playing chess. Geometrically thinking differently, strategically. When you have a win, you got to compound that win upon the other win as opposed to just "oh, we had a win. Cool." And the moving on to the next thing. Everything needs to compound and increase and get better and get better. But to do that, it takes you becoming passionate about this. I've talked about this a lot over the years. You got to become more passionate about the marketing of your thing than you do about the thing. All of us have the thing that we're selling, that we're in love with, the reason why we got in this business. But if you really love that thing, whatever your product, your service, your message is. If you really love that, you have to become obsessed with the selling of that thing. One of the biggest mistakes I see influencers and people do is that they love their thing. They're having success and they want to go hire a funnel builder. They want to outsource it to somebody else. They want to ... "who do I hire to become a marketing team? Who can I outsource this to?" And it's like, "ah, you're missing it. That's the best part, to figure out how to get your thing into people's hands." If you become obsessed with that part of it, that's how you really grow and scale and dramatically grow your companies. So for all you guys who are listening, I wanted to look at that lens of number one, when I'm dropping gold, when I'm dropping like, "this funnel's killing it." Funnel hack it, look at it. And then look at your old funnels. "How do I weave this model in?" That's number one. Number two, same thing for yourself. When you have a win, don't just be like "cool. That was awesome." Go back and roll that win across everything else so you can geometrically grow everything you're doing. And number three, become obsessed with this game. Again, the ones who are winning at the highest level are the ones who obsess. They keep going into this and keep figuring things out and they have so much fun with it. And then they layer it on and they do the next thing and the next thing, and that's when you can really have fun and enjoy this. So I hope that helps. I hope that gets your mind thinking a little bit differently. If it does, and you enjoyed this, then please let me know. All right. Thanks you guys for listening, I appreciate you. Thanks for listening to this podcast. And by the way, if you haven't heard yet, with the launch of Danny Kennedy's company, we launched the Magnetic Marketing Podcast, which is basically, I found tons of old Danny Kennedy presentations from the last 20 years or so. Him speaking at info summits, him on the gold and the diamond CDs and all these things that were lost in the archives. I started going through them. I'm like, "these are amazing. I don't know how to sell these. 'Here's a CD interview of Dan talking for an hour about wealth creation or whatever'." It's amazing, but it's not a product, really. I was like, "what do I do with these things?" And so I decided to give them to you guys for free. And so we created a podcast called the Magnetic Marketing Podcast. And if you go to MagneticMarketingPodcast.com, you can subscribe to it there. And then you get hardcore raw Dan Kennedy interviews and audios once a week, which are ... they're really, really good. So I recommend doing that and diving into Danny. I love him. He's a little ornery, but man, he's brilliant. So anyway, there you go. There's an old Magnetic Marketing Podcast that the old company had ran, which was a bunch of people talking about Dan, which I did not love. And so if you search in the podcast search engine, you might find the old one. If you go to MagneticMarketingPodcast.com, that's the right one. And you'll know because there's a cool picture of Dan Kennedy in black and white, and looks amazing. He looks like the tough guy that he is. So anyway, that said, thanks, you guys so much for listening. Hope you enjoyed this podcast, hope you enjoy Dan's podcast as well, and I will talk to you soon.

Behind The Smiles: With Dr. Gina Dorfman
Own Your Freedom with Dr. David Phelps

Behind The Smiles: With Dr. Gina Dorfman

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 50:58


It's a shocking truth that so many dentists can't afford to retire at 62 and maintain their lifestyle. But this does not have to be the case! Today we are joined by David Phelps, a Dentist and Real Estate Investor who has figured out how to own his freedom and even wrote a book about it! In this episode, David opens up about the struggles his family faced that motivated him to sell his dental practice and build a passive income. We discuss some of the reasons why so many dentists struggle to retire and how we can go about avoiding this pitfall. We talk about the mistakes dentists commonly make from abdicating the management of their investments and investing in speculative things that aren't sustainable.David explains how he came to write the book Own Your Freedom with Dan Kennedy and some of the principles covered in it. Tuning in you'll hear how to determine what your ‘freedom number' is, how to achieve it by owning assets, not financial products, and the importance of not just investing in assets but also investing in relationships. To hear David's valuable advice to investors and business owners in light of the volatile times that we're living in and to discover how you too can own your freedom, tune in today!

Breakfast With Champions
Episode 690 with Kim Walsh Phillips - Strategies To Dominate Your Market

Breakfast With Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 28:07


Thank you for joining us on Breakfast With Champions! Today we hear from Kim Walsh Phillips, Kim Walsh Phillips is the founder of Powerful Professionals, a business coaching and education company. She went from 32 clients to over 11,000 in less than a year and was recently named #475 in the Inc 5000 and is an MBA-free self-made millionaire. Named “a must to read by those in business” by Forbes Magazine, she is the bestselling author of multiple books including "The Ultimate Guide to Instagram for Business" and "The No B.S. Guide To Direct Response Social Media Marketing." She's the behind-the-scenes secret weapon of some of the biggest names in business including Kevin O'Leary from Shark Tank, Dan Kennedy, Profit First Author Mike Michalowicz, Harley-Davidson, Hilton Hotels and High Point University and has spoken on stages beside some of the world's leading thought leaders including Tony Robbins, Grant Cardone, Barbara Corcoran and Gary Vaynerchuk. She resides just outside of Atlanta, GA with her very tall husband and glitter obsessed girls and is fueled by faith, love, laughter and lots, and lots (and lots) of coffee.

The Alexander Lorenzo Podcast
Netvrk Explained: Talking Metaverse With Dan Kennedy

The Alexander Lorenzo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 25:19


#014 Meet Dan. With a different approach to the podcast this week we have a crypto related interview Alex did for YouTube. The CEO of Netvrk joined us to talk everything metaverse and Netvrk. Dan goes into details about his company, what he sees in the metaverse space going forward, and much more. 

The Marketing Secrets Show
Money Mindset Secrets…

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 37:50


Did you know this may be holding you back from success in your business? Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com Magnetic Marketing ---Transcript--- Russell Brunson: What's up everybody? This is Russell Brunson. Welcome back to Marketing Secrets podcast. One of the questions I get asked a lot about, and I don't spend a lot of time talking about it, is actually money and mindset around money, and how that works, and things that can help you to make more money, things that hold you back from making money. They have nothing to do with your skill set, it just has everything to do with the conversations, the beliefs, the things inside of your mind. This interview with Josh Forti, it was really fun and hopefully you enjoy it. Hopefully it'll help you if you do have money blocks, to help you get unstuck. If you don't think you have money blocks, you probably do. And this hopefully, interview, will make you very aware of those things, and help you to find those things and knock them out in your life. That said, we'll keep the theme song, and when we come back, listen in on this interview with me and Josh Forti. What's up everybody? Welcome back The Marketing Secrets podcast. I'm here today again with Josh Forti, and we're having so much fun today. We just recorded one episode and now we're going deep into episode number two, which we're going to be talking about mindset as it relates to things that are very specific to you guys as entrepreneurs. I'll Josh talk more about this as he's going to be queuing up the question, but hope you guys enjoy this episode as well. Josh Forti: All right, man. First off, we got to talk about your shirt. I feel like there's got to be a story behind this. Guys, for those of you that are listening on audio, let me just explain real quick. It is a skull and crossbones, but it's not just a skull and crossbones. It's got bunny ears on the skull. It's got little waves off to the side. What does it say on the sleeve? Russell: It says, "Psycho bunny." Josh: Psycho bunny. Russell: This is actually a really cool brand called Psycho Bunny, and I bought a couple of their things. I'm like, "This is a cool brand." And then I was shopping with Bart Miller in Vegas, and they have a Psycho Bunny shop. I went in there- Josh: Oh dang! Russell: And they had shirts and jackets and suit jackets that have the Psycho Bunny inside. It's just a fun, cool brand, and I really like it. Psycho Bunny. Josh: Okay. There's no grand, huge story behind how you got it. You just liked it. Russell: I should buy the company because it'd be really cool. Anyway, nope. Nothing. Josh: Guys, when you're a funnel hacker and when you decide to take over the world and create empires, you can randomly decide on a podcast that you're just going to ... "I should buy the company." That's not a normal thing that most people get to say, but it's super dope. Russell: This could be a fun episode in the future because as we acquired two big companies last year and I'm learning about this and having more fun with it, there are some cool ... For most of us, we look at a company, like, "There's no way I could buy that company," but then like Tai Lopez who just bought RadioShack and he bought Pier 1 Imports and all these companies… Josh: Dress Barn. Yeah. Russell: Now, I bought a couple companies and I'm like, oh, my gosh, there's actually a really cool strategy where it doesn't technically cost you any money if you do it correctly. We bought Dan Kennedy's company for a steal. We've launched the first thing. Now we made our money back. And now moving forward, everything I do with Dan Kennedy's company is pure, unadulterated profit to the bottom line. And that's exciting because ... All of a sudden it's like, you can actually buy companies when you understand the core principles of what we do. Anyway, that's a topic for another day, but it's kind of a fun one. Josh: So much fun stuff. Topic for another day. We'll do many episodes. Now is not the time. We're going to dive into what I think goes really well with our last episode. Last episode we talked about goal setting and setting things up, and that last bit of it was around identity and beliefs and values and rules and things like that. I want to talk about mindset here, and specifically the mindset ... There's a couple core key areas, because what's interesting is a lot of times we think mindset is we have to train our minds to think a certain way, or we have to overcome false beliefs about bad things. Like, "I'll never be successful" or "I'll never be this." But it goes both ways, because often times we can have fear of success. We can have fear that, oh, my gosh, what happens if I actually achieve that goal? There's so many different things around that, that we could dive into, but I want to kick off with this one specifically around mindset around money. I do want to talk about not just money, failure, doing the impossible, things like that, but I want to start with money because I feel like money is one of these things that we all have some form of weird relationship with it. Very few people grew up in a home where their parents and everybody around them had a healthy relationship with money, because most people ... I would say 90 plus percent of the people that I've met do not have a healthy relationship with money. They don't understand it. They don't understand what it represents, how it works, any of the things with it. For you, I want you to take us back because one of things, and I've kind of told you this at the beginning, a lot of people in the ClickFunnels world, like Russell. I was talking to Brad Gibb the other day. Shout out to Brad. He's awesome. He's like, "Russell has come and he's taken these handcuffs off of us, to where now we just can print money." It's ridiculous. It's kind of a cheat code. When we talk about it to all of our friends, we go around and we're like, "Yeah, we just kind of make money on the Internet." They're like, "How do you do that?" We're like, "We don't know. We just do what Russell says and it just works." Russell: It's a magic trick! Josh: It just shows up. It's amazing. We've kind of unshackled the making of money, if we follow what it is, but keeping money. But our thoughts around money, our beliefs around money, how we perceive and value money, how we think money is going to change us. All of these different other things around money, those things are now new problems that a lot of us are running into, or have not yet applied the things that you've told us to do because of those beliefs. I think both of those are true. I've seen so many people ... I made not a ton, ton of money, but certainly 10 times more money than I'd ever made in my life when I first got started, and blew it all because of my poor, very unhealthy, almost toxic relationship with money. Take us back, what are the money shifts or the beliefs around money, specifically in mindset, that you had to go through. I'm just going to kind of leave that open ended and see where you take it. Russell: The first thing I think that would be useful for everyone is for everyone to actually, honestly sit down and look at their relationship with money and understand it ... It's funny because if you would ask Russell 15 years ago Russell if this was actually a real thing, I'd be like, "No, this is stupid. Just make money. It's easy." But I had a friend who I worked with, man, probably 12, 13 years ago on a project and he was someone who is super charismatic, super dynamic, super talented person. When he was younger, he used his talents and his gifts and he made a whole bunch of money really, really fast. Crazy, crazy money. Money that doesn't make any sense. When he got that money, he started doing stupid things with it. He got into drugs and alcohol and all the problems that are associated with when you make too much money too fast as a kid, and almost destroyed his life. He almost died. He almost lost his family and his marriage. All these things happened. He lost all the money, which was probably a blessing. And then he refixed his life. And then he got back to the spot where he's like, "I want to make money again." I watched him for probably 10 years of his life, where he would do all the right things, he would get close to making a bunch of money and then he would literally subconsciously destroy everything he had built, and it kept happening. At first I was so confused by it. I'm like, "You were so close. How do you keep messing this up? I don't understand it." Then he told me a story. He didn't know this subconsciously but we had a conversation one night where he told me a story. I was like, "Oh, my gosh. Subconsciously, you are linking the destruction of your family, your health and all these things to making money, because that's what happened the very first time. Now every time you get close to it, your whole subconscious mind is like, no, and starts making you do stupid things to destroy yourself from actually having success." I've seen ... Now, it's been a decade of me watching this. And as much as I love this person, I keep seeing him. He's so talented, so many gifts, and keeps not having any success because of this thing that happened in his youth. His is an extreme example, but this is happening to all of us. You think about when you were growing up, what are the things that your parents said about money? What are the things that you heard at church about money? What are the things you heard in different spots? There are so many things that have been ingrained in our head that we don't even know consciously. And also, we start having success in whatever. We start making money or we start getting close to making money, and all these warning signals are popping off in your head, like, don't get money because of this because you'll become a bad person and you're going to fall away from God. You're going to be doing this. You're going to be the bad person. You look at TV. Myron Golden is the first one that ever pointed this out to me. You look at every movie, every superhero movie, for the most part, the bad guy is the rich billionaire who is this horrible person. This is ingrained in our heads that money is going to make us evil. Those things are real, and even if you don't think that they're affecting you, they probably are. Josh: And then you don't consciously believe it. Subconsciously they control you. Russell: Yeah, it's affecting you. I've seen this in my own journey. When I first started making money, I thought everyone was going to be excited. I was like, "This is so cool." I was so excited to teach everybody else. I started making money. I start teaching people and try to show my friends and my family and what happened. The response I got was not what I thought it was going to be. It was not like, "This is amazing-" Josh: At all. Russell: "Let's try it." Instead it was weird, especially for my wife. My wife struggled with it even more so than me because I've had success in parts of my life in the past where ... In wrestling, I was a state champ, I was an all-American. I hit these different things, but there was this weird side of success you aren't expecting where the people around you who you think are going to be celebrating with you, they don't. In fact, I remember my mom when I bought my dream house ... My house is ... You've been to my house. Josh: Your house is insane. It's so awesome. Russell: It's like the coolest thing in the world. When I was growing up, I wanted an insane house. I remember I was finally at a spot where I could buy this house. In the reality, I didn't pay it off immediately. I could've just paid cash for it. I didn't. But within two years I think I paid it off, which was a big deal for me. But I remember when I was buying my house, I remember a comment my mom said. She was like, "You don't want to buy a house like this because then you're going to be one of those rich people up on the hill." I was like, "What does that mean, mom?" She was like, "They're the ones that are always looking down at everybody else." I'm like, "What?" All of a sudden I was scared to tell my mom about my success because my mom viewed the rich people as this thing over here. And then other people. It was this weird thing where all of a sudden it makes you want to shrink down, it makes you want to hide because you're like, "I don't want people judging me because of this thing." For all of you guys, for all of us, there's these things that may happen, where comments are made, when people we love and respect were to all of a sudden to ... The side of success that you think is going to happen doesn't. Especially in money. I think money is a big one because it's such a thing. Josh: Yeah. I also think that because of the stories that we're told by everybody else, like you're saying, subconsciously it's ingrained in our society, what money is and how it works, nobody understands it. Taylor Welch ... You know Taylor, right? Taylor Welch? Russell: Yep. Josh: He's the one ... He and I have become ... I don't want to say good friends, but certainly friends over the past little bit. He was actually the very first person I ever interviewed on my podcast. Russell: Very cool. Josh: He got me into money. He was like, "Study money. Because once you understand how it works, it'll completely change your perspective of it." I always joke around with my mom. I'm like, "Money's not real. It's all fake." In America specifically, the U.S. dollar is not real. It's all fake and it's all made up. She always pushes back. She's like, "It's not fake because I can guy groceries with it." I'm like, "That right there, that shows that I have a different relationship ..." And side note, I freaking love my mom. My mom and I have an amazing relationship. But my mom and I have a completely different fundamental relationship with money. That was a very interesting learning lesson for me. When you change your relationship with money, when you change how it works, when you understand it differently and when you change your relationship with it, it also becomes not hard to get or keep, because now you're not needy of it. Your relationship changes with it. I always think about ... Take it back to dating. I'm not even going to say the book because I don't want people to go ... It's not a great book, but I was reading a clip out of this book one time and the guy in it goes, "Money and ..." Let's say, relationship. Money and girls are kind of the same thing. Those are not the words he used, but money and girls are the same way. If you're desperate and needy of it, you'll never have it. But if you don't care, it'll come abundantly. That was a very interesting shift for me as well. Anyway, I didn't mean to interrupt you but that was very interesting. Russell: It's key. As I studied Tony Robbins, the biggest thing I learned ... One of the biggest things. I shouldn't say the biggest, but is just becoming aware of things. I think the first step for of any us is being aware of how this is actually affecting you. For a lot of us, at whatever level you're at, the reason you're not at the next level is because there's some belief around it that's keeping you from there. It's interesting, I remember when I had the goal, when I hit a million dollars in a year, I didn't hit it three years in a row. Every year I was within $50,000. Like, $75,000. How am I not hitting this? It was like, I had these weird beliefs around that thing. As soon as I broke it, I was like, this is easy. Going from million to 10 million was next. Getting to two, three, five, eight million was easy, but then 10 million was this gap where I was stuck. It's beliefs. What's easy? What's hard? A couple things ... Again, this is one of those topics. I've never taught this before so I don't have the, here's the Russell three step framework. Things have happened in my life that I became aware of this for myself. One of them was, I had a coach ... I've had her a couple times throughout my life. She's awesome. One of my favorite coaches of all time. Her name is Tara Williams. Tara ... It was interesting because I always thought ... Again, especially people who are religious, there's always this belief of is money going to make me evil? You hear these things on the side. I definitely had this subconscious fear around that. If I get too much money, I'm going to forget God. I'm going to forget my family. All these things couple happen. Because they do. They happen to so many people. We see it. I had that fear behind it. I remember, especially when I bought my house, I was like, I bought this house and it's crazy. Anyway, Tara was at our house, actually, doing a coaching session with my wife and I. It was an interesting thing. But she said a couple things in that meeting that had a big impact on me. One of the things was ... She asked my wife this specifically. "Do you think this is bad that he bought this house?" My wife is like, "Yeah." She has so much guilt associated with it, because she's like ... It was interesting because Tara brought back, "Because you guys have money, talk about things you've done. Last year you gave a million dollars to OUR. Last year you did this. Last year you did this. How many people have you helped? How many entrepreneurs have you empowered? How many jobs have you created?" We started going through this whole thing, and it was like, all these things you're doing has been creating wealth for you. You have this wealth. You can just give it away and you guys do give a lot away, but is it bad for you now to enjoy some of it, to buy a house? Still she was like, "I don't know. Is it bad or not?" She's like, "Now you have this house, what have you guys done with this house?" I was like, "We have our kids here and we have our family here. We bring people here. We're able to serve people at a different level because we have these things." All of a sudden it was like, oh, my gosh, this isn't a bad thing. I remember hearing Richard Branson, somebody asked him ... Who was it? It was another one of those moments for me that opened my mind. But someone asked Branson, "Do you feel guilty that you're not down at the soup kitchen helping feed these people?" Branson's response was so powerful. He said, "The people of the soup kitchen who are feeding people, that's amazing. We're so grateful for them. They're giving their time and their effort. It's powerful. I'm not going to go to the soup kitchen and feed people soup, but I can give the soup kitchen $50,000, and that's going to feed 10,000 people. It's different service but it's still service, and this is able to help even more people." I started thinking about that. Man, these tools that we create, like wealth and the things that we have can be so much more impactful if we use it correctly. It's not a bad thing. It's just understanding these are tools that we have. Anyway ... Josh: It's interesting you say that and phrase it that way because that was one of the things, actually, Brad Gibb, he's a very good friend of mine as well, and we talk a lot. And he's taught me probably more about money as far as investing how it works and how to use it and things like that, probably more than anybody else. Very, very smart. One of the things that he said is money is not all the same. He's like, "You can have a million dollars over here and a million dollars over here and one of them be used for good and to multiply and to be productive, and one of them be used just to indulge and be gluttonous and to be greedy. Is money good or bad? It's not good, it's not bad. It is. It is a tool for exchange. How you go and use it will determine whether or not it's good or bad for you in your own life." When he put it that way, I was like, if I have my money and I'm investing and I'm multiplying it and it's creating freedom and then I'm using that to be able to go out and give back, all of a sudden money is now good. It makes me be able to do my job better. But if I'm just going and I make a million dollars and I go to Vegas and I put 100 grand on black, cool. Maybe once in your lifetime. But that is not a good thing anymore. Now it's taking away from your gift. It can either be an amplifier or it can be something that takes away. That was a really, really big shift for me. It was like, how am I using it? Russell: It's powerful. Again, it just comes down to there's so many subconscious things that are weird about it. Next thing I want to talk about for entrepreneurs too ... And this is a trap with money that I got caught into for almost 15 years. When I stared my business, I remember I started making some money. I figured out what my wife and I needed to live. I think at the time it was $8,000 a month that was giving us the most amazing lifestyle ever. We set it up where our paycheck was eight grand a month and that's what was coming from the company. And everything else in the company I kept reinvesting back into the company. For a while that's important. That's where we're going to grow, where we're going to expand it. I look at my business for the next decade at least, maybe longer, I never pulled anything else out. It only kept getting reinvested, reinvested. And eventually ... Some of you guys heard my story. 10, 12 years ago we had this big crash where everything got shut down and we lost everything. And the thing that sucked is when it all was said and done, I had nothing. We never pulled money out. We never invested. We never did anything. It was all being reinvested back into the business. I got my guarantee, we had our certainty, eight grand a month coming in consistently every single time, but then nothing happened. I remember when we launched after that happened and everything crashed and we were rebuilding back up, during that time we had no money so everything is being reinvested back into the business because we had no business at that point. We started figuring this out. That's where I met Todd. We launched Click Funnels. When we launched Click Funnels, I instantly went back to my same pattern. Like, cool, all the money goes back into Click Funnels. That's how we're going to do this thing. Todd was like, "Dude, just so you understand, I did not build this thing to just have a good paycheck and let this thing keep growing. This is not worth it for me unless we pull money out." I remember I was like ... I had so much fear and I was like, "No. We can't do this." This is one of Todd and I's first and probably only real things where he was just like, "It's not worth it to me unless this is producing money that's being put over here for my family, for my church, for my faith, all the things I want to be doing." Again, we fought back and forth for a couple of months. The very first time we had some profit. I was like, "What do I do with this profit? Put it back in the business." Todd was like, "No, we need to pull it out of the business," and we fought back and forth. Finally, we figured out a way to make us both happy where we figured ... At the time, we need three months of money in reserve. Worst case scenario, that's there. But then after that's over, all of the money, 100% of the money needs to be pulled out and given to the owners. Otherwise we're going to be like you were, Russell, 15 years in and you've got nothing to show for it. All the stress, all the effort, all the energy, and nothing to show for it. That's how we set things up. I remember it was so scary for me. In fact, when we started pulling out and distributing out the profits every single month, I kept mine in there for two years. I didn't touch a penny of it because I'm like ... It's in my separate account. It's over there. What was crazy, though, is that all of a sudden this thing that I was doing started actually producing wealth for me, which took the stress down. I started seeing this thing happening, and all of a sudden it started giving me options where I had no options ahead of time. I think for a lot of entrepreneurs it's like, we have this thing ... It's funny because I see even big people like Gary Vee talk about this, like, "I don't care about money. I dump all my money back in. I'm just building this brand." I'm like, I thought that was the thing for a while too, but it's not. If the business is not producing wealth for the owners, what's the point of it? Eventually you got a job and that's it. It needs to be doing something or else it's not serving you, and therefore, it's not a gift. Josh: Was that the thing, though, helping you overcome that? Was it just doing it? Is that what helped you overcome it? Russell: Yeah, Todd forced me. If it wasn't for Todd, I would still be pulling out eight grand a month and that would be where I would be living. 100%. Todd forced me to do it and it stressed me out. I was so scared. For two years I didn't touch the money and all of a sudden it was like, oh, my gosh, there's this money here. Now I have the ability to ... This thing I had created, this value I was trying to put into the world was paying us back, and now we could ... Now we had all sorts of options. Especially when you're really pushing and you're working hard and you're grinding on something, if aren't seeing some tangible value back from it, it's not serving you. It's just taking from you. Again, this was my personal money, one of my personal issues I struggled with. This may or may not be that, but I would say for all of you guys, looking at this as you are creating a business and creating wealth, you need to be pulling things out. What you do with it is up to you. Like you talked about, use it for good, evil. You can give it to charity. You can do whatever. But if the business is just paying for itself, the business will continue to eat up all your money. It will. You leave money it, it's going to continue to eat it up and it'll disappear as fast as it can possibly happen. But if you start pulling it out and it's over here and it's different, man, it becomes more efficient. It becomes more effective. Everything becomes better because of that. Josh: It's funny, because my thing ... I had that same struggle except I wasn't even paying myself. I was literally just, what are my bills for the month, the bare minimum, and then that was it. And then I met my now wife and I started thinking about finances and she wanted stuff. I was like, but also the business. It was kind of like this thing. Katie came along and was like, "Josh ..." The very first ... She didn't give me a lot of tactical things. It was very mindset-focused. I remember one of the biggest tactical things that she gave me out of the very few that she did, she was like, "You need to pay yourself a paycheck, and that paycheck needs to not only be enough to cover all of your expenses, but it needs to in excess." When I started to put away multiple thousand dollars a month into savings or into being able to invest outside of the company, it changed my whole entire perspective. Weirdly enough, magically, the business made more money. It was like, made it every month. It was like, we're entrepreneurs. We figure out problems. Our brain programs for it. And then I started looking at it as myself as an expense. I was like, I'm a line item on the books. Just like I pay a contractor, that's me. All of a sudden, the business made enough money to cover that. But before that, it didn't. It was crazy. Russell: It's interesting because when you start seeing the results ... I've talked about this before. If you look at my Disc profile, there's the D-I-S-C, and then there's your values. My number one value is ROI. If I can't see the ROI of a situation, it makes it harder for me to do it. I was in business for a decade and a half and the ROI I was getting was good. I was like, "I'm helping people and having success, and it's fun to see the success stories." That was the ROI I was getting, and it was good. It kept me going. But man, I look at the last seven years of Click Funnel, it was like the pressure and the stress and all of the type of things. If it wasn't for the ROI, it took this pressure, but here's the ROI of it, I wouldn't have been able to do it. As soon as I started seeing the ROI and the ROI gets bigger and bigger and bigger, all of a sudden it's like, this becomes fun again and you get excited. How do I make the ROI ... For me, it's all about the ROI, the return on investment, any situation is the key. If you don't have the ROI, it gets hard. It's hard to be creative. It's hard to come up with the next idea, the next thing, and the stress and the pressure that comes. What's the return on investment for the effort you're putting into it? But if you see the ROI and you start amplifying it, then it becomes a more fun game. That's where you start growing from a million to a 10 to 100 and beyond because it's like, I see this game. I'm playing it. I'm getting the return on investment. But I never saw that before because the only return on investment I was getting was this one thing, and those things they feel good, but it's hard to keep score with the feel goods. You got to have a scoreboard to see, like, oh, my gosh, I'm winning. Can I win even more? What's it going to look like? And now it gives you options and opportunities… Josh: You mean you're telling me that all the stress and pressure isn't worth $8,000 a month? Russell: You know, I could get ... I was like ... Nowadays with all of the inflation, I can work at McDonald's for eight grand a month, I think. It's crazy. Josh: Man. Russell: But back then- Josh: That's crazy. Russell: That was the ... Anyway, it's crazy. Josh: You can buy Bitcoin and keep up with inflation. Bitcoin, the savior of money. One more. I kind of want to dive ... I wasn't going to make this a money episode, because that's kind of where it's been. When did you make the shift ... One of the big problems with entrepreneurs, talking maybe a little bit more established entrepreneur, is once they're making money ... I was talking with Brad about this and he was talking about in the inner circle. He was in there ... Or in Category Kings, right? The guy's like, "What's the main problem that you solve?" Brad was like, "So interesting. We thought we could answer that question." Then he asked us it and we try to do it, and it was like, dang, what is the main problem that we solve? What he said is one of the things that they came down to was entrepreneurs know that if they have money, it should be doing more. But they don't know what to do with it. This is something that you probably are an amplified example of this, because you're really, really good at making money. You don't even need to think about what your money should be doing because you can just go make more of it. Once again, that because you've unshackled us. It's like, "All right, want a new car? Go build a funnel. You want a palace? Go build a funnel. Want to take a vacation? Launch a funnel. Just do a funnel and you print money." For you, when did that shift happen for you when you actually started paying attention to, I can't just leave my money in an account right now? I can't just buy cars and houses because those don't make me ... You have houses, you've got the cars, you've got everything you've ever wanted and you still have money left over, so when did you make that shift of, my money needs to be doing more, and how did you solve that problem? Russell: Interesting. This is one that's been more recently solved for me, actually, which is fascinating. For a long I was just hoarding it. Just hoarding it, keeping it here. Then Brad and Ryan ... You have to invest it. I'm like, "I don't want to do that." They forced me to do ... I give them a bunch of money every year and they do whatever they do with it, and that's awesome. I'm like, "Okay, cool. Something is happening." But then the money kept adding up. I remember one day I was like, "I'm in a weird spot where I could buy almost anything I want. What do I want? I'm going to go and spend some money." I remember going to eBay and I was like, "I'm going to buy anything I want." I was searching for stuff, and I spent four hours on eBay when all of a sudden I spent three grand. I was like, "That's it. I got everything I wanted." I was like, "Oh, crap, now what do I do with it?" It was interesting, because for me, it was like ... Again, this is something ... It's been a recent development. I can't remember if it was this podcast or the one I talked about it, I was like, I didn't know what to do with this. Yeah, I could invest in real estate, but that wasn't inspiring to me. I have money in crypto, but that's not inspiring. What's the things that's going to inspire me to want to do more? Again, it's ROI for me. What's going to give me the ROI of now I got to create more money so I can do this thing? So I have a lot of things. Again, we give money to charity. All those things are good and they get me excited. But I was like, what would be the thing that, for me, would amplify? When we bought Dan Kennedy's company, it was the first time I felt it. I bought his thing. We reorganized it, cleaned it up, and I was like, "Oh, my gosh, I'm able to take these things that were so precious to me and I can bring them back to the world, and I can monetize them. I can actually make money off of this thing." I got really excited. I told you I started buying old books. I started investing in Napoleon Hill books and Charles Haanel and Orison Swett Marden and Samuel Smiles and all these people, the founding fathers of personal development and business and all these kinds of things. I've literally spent a small fortune ... I've spent a lot of money in the last couple months on these old, old books, because now it's like, I'm not investing in real estate that's over here. I'm investing in these things I don't care about. Now it's like I'm investing in something that I can take and that I can turn this into more money, and I can turn it into help. I can serve my entrepreneurs. I can do more things with it. For me, that's what's been stimulating for me. That was the investment of ... It was like, I can dump it back into things, but it was like something that's meaningful to me. For some people, crypto is meaningful. For some people it's NFT. Finding the thing that's not just like, I'm investing to invest, but what's the thing that you're passionate about it where it becomes more than just ... For me, that's what I'm geeking out on. You know this, next door I'm building a 20,000 square foot library to house all these books, to build an event center, to build all these kind of things because this is what I feel like my life's mission is. I'm curating all these ideas and I'm bringing them back to people in the simple new form to help these ideas and these concepts live on. For me, that's double fulfilling because it'll make me money, but it's also something that can serve the people I've been called to serve as well. Again, buying Kennedy's company, I'm serving these people, but I'm also making money, which gives me the ability to serve more people. It's kind of fun. Josh: What was the shift, though? For a while you didn't do that, right? Russell: For a while I just sat there. I didn't know what it was. Josh: Who or what got you to the point where you're like, "Okay, I've got to go figure this out"? Yes, this is what you ended up doing with it, but I think a lot of people, there's got to be that thing that's like, "This is when I realized I got to figure out ..." Or some people just let it sit their whole life, I guess. You know what I'm saying? Russell: I heard stories about ... I don't know how true ... But like Scottie Pippen or Mike Tyson, he made half a billion dollars and he's broke. I was like, I don't want to be that dude who made a half a billion dollars and is broke right now. I need to figure out ... I always joke with Brad and Ryan when we were writing their webinar page initially, I was like ... On 30 Rock, there's that scene where Liz Lemon is talking to Alec Baldwin and he's like, "I need that thing that rich people do where they turn money into more money." He's like, "Investing?" He's like, "Yeah. I want to do that." For me, it was like, I've got money here. I need to figure out how to turn money into more money, that's not just me doing the whole thing. How do we amplify what we're doing? How do we have that exponential growth? That was kind of the thing that got me into it. Again, initially it was doing the things that weren't exciting. I'd invested money in real estate and I hated that, so I had Brad and Ryan, I invested money with them. That was cool. It was passive. It wasn't passionate. I was trying to figure out what's the thing that I'm going to be passionate about, where now it becomes part of a game. Now I can see the ROI on this thing. I invested $40,000 this weekend on old books, how do I turn that into $400,000 or four million or 40 million? Can I do that? Now begins ... Now it's fun. Some people, real estate is that game. I got friends who own 100 houses, or 200 houses, and that's the game that they love. I look at Tai Lopez and he's buying these businesses. That's the game that he loves. What's the game you're going to love, the investing game you're going to love? There's a million ways to invest, but when you find one that you love, then it becomes ... Now it becomes a fun part of the game. I think it's understanding first off you need to do it, otherwise you're going to ... You mentioned this ... I can't remember if it was before we started recording, but people who have won Two Comma Club and they got nothing, or Two Comma Club X and they're broke. Entrepreneurs are good at generating money, but there's this other part that you got to learn how to invest it correctly. Otherwise, you're going to pull a Tyson or a Pippen and be broke in a couple of years from now. Yeah, I got 3 Two Comma Club awards on the wall, but I'm trying to figure out how to feed my family this weekend, and that's now where you want to be… Josh: That's so crazy that's a reality for people. It really, really is. I think that's one of the things that I am very, very thankful to have learned relatively early on, is ... Russell: They're two different skill sets. Making money- Josh: They are. Russell: And keeping money are not the same thing. Josh: Yeah. Russell: They are completely different skill sets. In fact, typically, the people who are good at making money are the worst at managing it. Josh: Keeping it. Russell: It's like yin and yang. Understanding that if you're good at making it, you find people around you, like Brad and Ryan, I was like, "Here's money. Do that thing you do because I don't want to mess it up." Josh: Yeah. Russell: In fact, it's funny, before I invested money with Brad and Ryan, I invested it in two different deals. I was like, "This is the greatest thing in the world." Both of them, literally both of them turned out to Ponzi schemes. I got to write off multiple of millions of dollars last year because I gave money to ideas that were so good that me as the entrepreneur was like, "This is genius. This is the greatest thing in the world." Ponzi scheme. I got sold on the thing. It's funny, one of my friends just sold his business for eight figures and he messages me. He was like, "All right. I want to ask your opinion. Where should I put this money?" I was like, "Dude, do not ask me. If I think it's a good idea, it's going to be a Ponzi scheme. Find someone who, that's their life, is that, like Brad and Ryan. Go give your money to them," or find something like I'm doing now with the books and stuff, where it's like now. This is something that fits into my skill set. I think it was ... What's the old dude who invests all the money? Warren Buffett, that said only invest in things you understand. It's like, I understand how to turn old information into money. I'm investing in information and intellectual property because I can turn that into more money, and so that becomes something I can invest in, because I understand the game. I don't understand- Josh: So interesting. Russell: This, but I do understand this, therefore, I will invest in the thing I understand because I can turn this into more money. Josh: That makes sense. Side note on Warren Buffett, you know 80% of his wealth or something like that came off of nine trades? Russell: Really? Josh: Nine investments that he made, it produced 80% of his wealth or something like that. Isn't that insane? Russell: That is fascinating. Josh: That's why when ... I read the quote from him, it was in the context of this quote. It was like, Warren Buffett is like, everyone thinks they have to make a bunch of good decisions. He was like, "I try to make three good decisions a year." I was like, "Oh, my gosh. What the heck?" And then I found out that 80% of his wealth came from ... It was eight or nine trades or something, or investments, and I was like, "All right. I guess that makes sense, then, if you only need to make ..." Anyway, last question, rapid fire question on money. Is there anything that you could do, if you could go back and change something about what you've done or your handling with money, is there anything that you would change, and if so, what's the biggest thing that would be? Russell: Good question. I think I would've started ... Number one, I would've started pulling money out of my business faster. Number two, I would've had a plan for what I would do with that money. I wish I would've said, "I'm going to pull out ... After three months of thing, pull out all the profit, I'm going to put 25% in real estate, 25% in crypto, 25% in something else, and just have that happening in the background, I'd be a much wealthier man today." It took me a long, long time before I did that. Todd forced me to start putting money into crypto, which was one of the greatest gifts ever for me. Brad and Ryan are now forcing me to put money over here. It's like taking that and putting it in spots where again, it's not going to be 100%. I'm going to fall for two Ponzi schemes a year probably, but if I can get one of them to win and three of them to fail, or whatever that is, that's the big thing. I always thought that I will start pulling money out when blah. When I hit Two Comma Club, when I hit a million. The problem is that win never comes. You got to structure from day number one. When money comes in, boom. Profits come out. This happens here. I pay myself first. From the money I pay myself, 10% is going to go for me to go do stupid things, 25% is going to go into real estate or Bitcoin or stocks or whatever. And dividing that stuff up so it's happening at a small level, because when that happens, I wasted a decade and a half before any kind of investments happening. Can you imagine if I had 15 years of the stuff I was doing, turning into something? I missed out on so much of that, that I wish I would've done. Josh: You just got to make sure that you have a small percentage there, which is dedicated to losing bets and Bitcoin to Josh. If you have that, then we're good. For the rest of your life, you're going to be losing bets, so that's how that's going to work. Guys, I hope you enjoyed this episode with money. I'll let you sign it off, but this was awesome. We get to hear Russell Brunson talk about money, which is something that, you make a ton of it, but you don't really talk about it, which is awesome. Thanks for sharing a little bit more. Russell: Thank you. I apologize I don't have a framework for this yet, but this gets me thinking, man, if I could figure out something for entrepreneurs, this is the next thing to do, so then I'll talk more about it as I figure things out. But it's fascinating. I remember I bought a Dan Kennedy course on wealth creation, and it was fascinating because I'd heard Dan talk about building businesses and all that sort of stuff, but it was the first time he ever talked about wealth. Again, same thing. Fascinating. I'm like, oh, my gosh. I never thought about that side of the coin because most entrepreneurs don't talk about it, or don't think about it. I think it's important for us to think and talk and do more with it because again, 15 years of never investing anything, man, it would've been nice. I'd be in a different spot right now than I am today, for sure. Thank you, Josh, for hanging out and talking about money. Hopefully you guys enjoyed this episode. If you did, let us know if you want more about money and wealth and these kind of things. Let us know and we'll go deeper on topics. Just take a screen shot of this on your phone, post it, and tag me and write your #1 question you want to hear, and maybe we'll talk about it on the next podcast. Thanks again. Thank you, Josh, and I will see you guys soon.

Breakfast With Champions
Episode 635 with Kim Walsh Phillips - Fast Pass To Success

Breakfast With Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 32:17


Thank you for joining us on Breakfast With Champions! Today we hear from Kim Walsh Phillips, Kim Walsh Phillips is the founder of Powerful Professionals, a business coaching and education company. She went from 32 clients to over 11,000 in less than a year and was recently named #475 in the Inc 5000 and is an MBA-free self-made millionaire. Named “a must to read by those in business” by Forbes Magazine, she is the bestselling author of multiple books including "The Ultimate Guide to Instagram for Business" and "The No B.S. Guide To Direct Response Social Media Marketing." She's the behind-the-scenes secret weapon of some of the biggest names in business including Kevin O'Leary from Shark Tank, Dan Kennedy, Profit First Author Mike Michalowicz, Harley-Davidson, Hilton Hotels and High Point University and has spoken on stages beside some of the world's leading thought leaders including Tony Robbins, Grant Cardone, Barbara Corcoran and Gary Vaynerchuk. She resides just outside of Atlanta, GA with her very tall husband and glitter obsessed girls and is fueled by faith, love, laughter and lots, and lots (and lots) of coffee.

Breakfast With Champions
Episode 595 with Kim Walsh Phillips - How To Make 2022 The Best Year Ever

Breakfast With Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 32:02


Thank you for joining us on Breakfast With Champions! Today we hear from Kim Walsh Phillips, Kim Walsh Phillips is the founder of Powerful Professionals, a business coaching and education company. She went from 32 clients to over 11,000 in less than a year and was recently named #475 in the Inc 5000 and is an MBA-free self-made millionaire. Named “a must to read by those in business” by Forbes Magazine, she is the bestselling author of multiple books including "The Ultimate Guide to Instagram for Business" and "The No B.S. Guide To Direct Response Social Media Marketing." She's the behind-the-scenes secret weapon of some of the biggest names in business including Kevin O'Leary from Shark Tank, Dan Kennedy, Profit First Author Mike Michalowicz, Harley-Davidson, Hilton Hotels and High Point University and has spoken on stages beside some of the world's leading thought leaders including Tony Robbins, Grant Cardone, Barbara Corcoran and Gary Vaynerchuk. She resides just outside of Atlanta, GA with her very tall husband and glitter obsessed girls and is fueled by faith, love, laughter and lots, and lots (and lots) of coffee.

The Leadership Stack Podcast
Ep 324: Fail-Safe Growth Hacks for Creative Entrepreneurs

The Leadership Stack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 18:20


Sean: And talking about growth, all these books that you were able to read through, how did you know what books you want to read next? And how, what other methods of growth do you have, aside from books? Did you have mentors? Did you pursue them? Do you listen to podcasts? Do you watch YouTube videos? What channels do you watch? Can you share some of that with us? Chris: I would always go to the bookstore. Yeah. We don't really have bookstores anymore, but these bookstores are known, go to the business department and grab a stack of books. And just go, you know, you buy a book for $9. I buy five books, go home and read them. And you started seeing like patterns of like the same people showing up over and over again, know, this guy is writing a book and this guy has a newsletter. So I get a newsletter, Dan Kennedy is one of the guys' newsletter. Just you'd see names popping up over and over again, like people who are really out there doing it or somebody who has a lot of books.  You know, some of the leadership guys like John Maxwell, right? That guy has a lot of books, you don't have to read them all, but you know, you could read a few of his books to learn ideas about leadership.  Michael Gerber. I've actually read all his books. He really wrote the same book over and over again. It's really the same concept, but they're really solid. But I think that is, initially that was something I really did. And then it was things like seminars and conferences you can go to. And there are different ones, you know, like say someone like Tony Robbins has sort of the self-help. How do you get motivated to attend conferences? Well, I'm pretty motivated, so I didn't really need that, but any kind of business-related stuff, I would look at who's a great business leader? Who's going to speak in it? Who's going to be there? And so I would go to things like that. At some point. I actually, it's funny, my business got audited by the IRS. This is a funny story and it was fine, but they wanted, they need to look at your finances. And so my accountant said, "you know, I do your taxes or your finances. You're fine. You're not, there's nothing to worry about, but you don't know anything about accounting. So we're going to go to this meeting and don't say anything because everything's fine. So you talking can only make things worse," right? He's like, so just go to a meeting and don't talk. Let me talk. I said, "Okay, great." So I sat there and they talked about finance and I had no idea what they're talking about. I was like, I don't know anything about accounting. And so after that, I started taking accounting classes and I took about, I don't know, like three or four years' worth of accounting classes. I really became like this a really beautiful funny accounting person. Yeah, I actually, it's funny because one of my accounting teachers who I see kept in touch with these, she goes, "oh, you know, they have a program at Harvard business school, you should really look into doing it." And I was like, "I don't know if I have the time." But I just learned all about the accounting side of things. And that was a gap. So I knew marketing. I had learned management and I knew I wasn't very good at it. I learned all sorts of things, but it was like I didn't know anything about finance. So about 10 years ago, I learned as much about small business finances as I could have. And I didn't do it all at once.  I took a class in the summer. I took one in the fall. I took basically, you know, four classes a year for like three years. So I took basically all the classes you would need to have a degree in accounting. Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/leadershipstack Join our community and ask questions here: from.sean.si/discord Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/leadershipstack

Breakfast With Champions
Episode 560 with Kim Walsh Phillips - How To Become The Taylor Swift of Your Industry

Breakfast With Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 31:46


Thank you for joining us on Breakfast With Champions! Today we hear from Kim Walsh Phillips, Kim Walsh Phillips is the founder of Powerful Professionals, a business coaching and education company. She went from 32 clients to over 11,000 in less than a year and was recently named #475 in the Inc 5000 and is an MBA-free self-made millionaire. Named “a must to read by those in business” by Forbes Magazine, she is the bestselling author of multiple books including "The Ultimate Guide to Instagram for Business" and "The No B.S. Guide To Direct Response Social Media Marketing." She's the behind-the-scenes secret weapon of some of the biggest names in business including Kevin O'Leary from Shark Tank, Dan Kennedy, Profit First Author Mike Michalowicz, Harley-Davidson, Hilton Hotels and High Point University and has spoken on stages beside some of the world's leading thought leaders including Tony Robbins, Grant Cardone, Barbara Corcoran and Gary Vaynerchuk. She resides just outside of Atlanta, GA with her very tall husband and glitter obsessed girls and is fueled by faith, love, laughter and lots, and lots (and lots) of coffee.

Breakfast With Champions
Episode 527 with Kim Walsh Phillips - Successful Business with Personal Life Balance

Breakfast With Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 33:34


Thank you for joining us on Breakfast With Champions! Today we hear from Kim Walsh Phillips, Kim Walsh Phillips is the founder of Powerful Professionals, a business coaching and education company. She went from 32 clients to over 11,000 in less than a year and was recently named #475 in the Inc 5000 and is an MBA-free self-made millionaire. Named “a must to read by those in business” by Forbes Magazine, she is the bestselling author of multiple books including "The Ultimate Guide to Instagram for Business" and "The No B.S. Guide To Direct Response Social Media Marketing." She's the behind-the-scenes secret weapon of some of the biggest names in business including Kevin O'Leary from Shark Tank, Dan Kennedy, Profit First Author Mike Michalowicz, Harley-Davidson, Hilton Hotels and High Point University and has spoken on stages beside some of the world's leading thought leaders including Tony Robbins, Grant Cardone, Barbara Corcoran and Gary Vaynerchuk. She resides just outside of Atlanta, GA with her very tall husband and glitter obsessed girls and is fueled by faith, love, laughter and lots, and lots (and lots) of coffee.

The Maximum Lawyer Podcast
Hard Earned Dollars vs. Easy Money w/ Jim Hacking and Tyson Mutrux

The Maximum Lawyer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 26:21


In today's episode, Jim and Tyson chat with one another about Dan Kennedy's concept, the difference between hard-earned dollars and easy money.  They dive into the journey of what hard-earned dollars versus easy money looks like. If you've been grinding away, this episode talks about leveraging for better results and how to make things better.  1:50 concept of easy money4:07 contingency fees7:00 hard work10:13 where did all the workers go13:57 psychological barriers17:32 leveraging21:09 is the guilt warrantedJim's Hack: Check out Dan Kennedy's Magnetic Marketing Podcast.Tyson's Tip: Check out the next-generation paper tablet, the reMarkable 2. It replaces your notebooks and printed documents with a tablet that feels like paper.Watch the podcast here.Join the Guild: www.maxlawguild.comMaxLawCon 2022 Early Bird Tickets are Live: www.maxlawcon2022.com

2000 Books for Ambitious Entrepreneurs - Author Interviews and Book Summaries
326[Productivity] 1 Key to Discipline your Mind | No BS Time Management for Entrepreneurs - Dan Kennedy

2000 Books for Ambitious Entrepreneurs - Author Interviews and Book Summaries

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 1:23


Double Your Work Output in 60 mins: https://focusblocks.io 7 Day FREE Trial to “The Entrepreneur's Book Club”: https://2000books.com Get my Coaching & Mentorship on scaling your Online Business: https://www.2000books.com/grow  

Alpha Hippie Podcast
AH260: Perry Marshall

Alpha Hippie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 55:45


Perry Marshall is one of the most expensive business strategists in the world. He is endorsed in FORBES and INC Magazine and has worked with clients such as FanDuel, InfusionSoft, and LoanBuilder.He founded the $10 million Evolution 2.0 Prize, with judges from Harvard, Oxford and MIT. Launched at the Royal Society in London, it's the world's largest science research award. He is a published scientist.NASA's Jet Propulsion Labs uses his 80/20 Curve as a productivity tool. His reinvention of the Pareto Principle is published in Harvard Business Review.His Google book laid the foundations for the $100 billion Pay Per Click industry, and Ultimate Guide to Google Ads is the world's best selling book on internet advertising.Marketing maverick Dan Kennedy says, “If you don't know who Perry Marshall is — unforgivable. Perry's an honest man in a field rife with charlatans.”He's consulted in over 300 industries. He has a degree in Electrical Engineering and lives in Chicago.Connect with Perry:Email | perry@perrymarshall.comWebsiteFREE ResourcesFREE QUIZ: Discover Why You're Stuck!Connect with Angelo & Alpha Hippie:Apply to work with Alpha HippieWebsiteInstagramFacebookFree Facebook Group

The Marketing Secrets Show
RANT: You Attract Who You Are, Not Who You Want

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 14:00


In a rare Russell rant, find out what made him upset today, and how you can protect yourself from annoying customers. Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com Magnetic Marketing ---Transcript--- What's up everybody? Today, I want to welcome you to the marketing secrets rant. That's right today, we are going on a rant. All right. I don't rant often. I'm a pretty positive guy, but I'm not going to lie. I am slightly annoyed this morning and it's because people. Like I kill myself to try to serve people. I try my best. I make ears of offers. I stay up all night. I work hard. I create good things. I spend millions of dollars acquiring companies, so I can give it to people in a simplified format and change their lives. And I risk insane amounts to try to give people my entire everything for almost nothing. Like it is ridiculous when you look at it. Just like, and, and this is coming in the middle of us launching the whole Dan Kennedy relaunch, the new offer, the new newsletter, all that kind of stuff. And so the context of it is, and yes I'm going to make money in the long term, because if you look at my dis profile, my value and number one value is ROI. So if I can't see the ROI of something, I don't do it. So yes, there's a huge, positive ROI. And I get it. I'm going to make a bunch of money, the deal when all said and done. But I want people to understand like the investment up front for me to be able to give people access to information. Right? First off, I had to buy Dan Kennedy's company for multiple, multiple, multiple millions of dollars front. So there's that. Then I had to go through all this stuff, and then negotiating and working, and then writing the newsletter, writing the offer and creating this offer, and hiring copywriters and designers and like the upfront cost in me being able to give people access to the most incredible free gift ever is insane. Like, yeah, multiple, multiple, multiple millions of dollars, plus time effort, stress, headache, to be able to give people this offer. Where we're literally giving people $20,000 of bonuses for free, when they subscribe to this newsletter, right? And so for me, it's like, man, if people realize what it's taken me to be able to give this thing to people as a gift, it'd be awesome, right? Like they'd say man Russ, I can't believe how much money you invested, so that I could have access to this really cool thing. And that's literally $97 a month after the trial, and you get a whole 30 day trial. You get a full newsletter for free and you get $20,000 in products and bonuses and all stuff, that Russ let us spend multiple millions of dollars on you to get it all for free, just for like test driving this newsletter. And I get it. It's the offer, so it's exciting. But what blows my mind is, and again, I'm speaking to the choir, I'm preaching to the choir, right? Most everyone is cool and understanding, but there's a small percentage of people who literally hate success so much that they put up all these barriers to make them not be successful. And it blows my mind, and it's all just this little mindset thing. It's like a little tweak in their brains that keep them from having success. And it's a pattern that's happening throughout their lives. And so typically I kind of like shelter myself for most of the feedback that's not positive, or that people have. Because just our community's so big now that if I looked at every complaint, every frustration of everything, like it would drown me and I would not want to produce. So I have gatekeepers in almost everywhere to make sure that I'm focusing on positive things, and they're taking care of any of the clean up stuff that we need to do. And that's true to any business. But I think right now it's because we're in this launch, it's like, I know how much I've invested, how much I'm killing myself. To hopefully a year or two, get a positive ROI on my investment, and then continue to serve people. But it's just funny because it's in the middle launch, I'm in the Facebook groups, I'm in the things like, I'm more aware of all this stuff. And so while I see the positive, I also the few negatives that pop up like blaringly in my face. And it's just like, wake in the morning, open my Facebook. And the first thing I see are the people who are the negative ones. Like they somehow magically Facebook lets their posts.... The first thing I see my feed every morning. And so anyway, so I wanted to talk about this. This is my rant that hopefully will serve for each of you hopefully in one way or the other. So if you rewind back to pre Russell Brunson, as you know him now. Back when we were doing events before Funnel Hockey Live, and things that where they were smaller. We would do these events in our office that had anywhere from 10 people at the low end, to 30 to 40 people in, in the big end. And we do these workshops. People come to Boise, we do these little mini events and we'd take them around the office, and we'd train them. And it was really fun. But what was always fascinating to me is within about five minutes of me having them in the room, and starting to talk and asking some questions, introducing people. I could tell within five minutes with almost 100% accuracy, if someone would be successful or not. It's fascinating. In fact, I would take, literally do my initial introductions. I'd talk a little bit, ask some Q and A, and then give them their first assignment they'd be working on. I would sit down and I'd like write the names like these are the three people will be hyper successful. These 80% got kind of a shot, and these 20% or whatever like there's no way, like I should just refund their money and send them home. Because there's no way in infinity years, they will have any success in any of this. And I would know within five minutes it was crazy. And it had 100% do with like mindset and attitude. It was crazy. And then we'd track people over the next year, five years, 10 years. And we'd see it. And sure enough, like with almost 100% accuracy, it was true. And there were some, there were some people who changed. And there were the people who shifted from like blaming the world to all of a sudden taking personal accountability. And like when a mistake would come up, they would no longer freak out. And they would just whatever. People that invest themselves, people who were grateful for the investment, people who didn't complain about the investments. It was crazy to me. And there's a principle I learned from Myron Golden. Myron says, you don't attract who you want, you attract who you are. Okay. Write that one down. Like you don't attract who you want, you attract who you are. So if you look at like the way you interact with the businesses you do business with. Like if you come on here and you listen to my podcast, and you take notes and you study and you apply and you do those kind of things. What's fascinating is that because that's the type of person that you are, you're going to track that kind of person. So if you have a podcast you're going to track the kind of people who go and they do that thing. But if you come in and you sign up for a continuity program, for example. And maybe this is just the example I saw this morning, so it's top of my mind from an annoyance standpoint. But this person signed up. They wanted the $20,000 in free gifts, which I get it's the offer, but they wanted to make sure that we didn't ship in the newsletter, because I think they lived in different countries. So instead of the $97 a month, it was going to cost them $140 a month to get the newsletter to their country, and they didn't want that. They just wanted the free gifts, and they wanted refund as quick as possible. They wanted to cancel the blah, blah, blah. And instead of just going to the help desk and canceling, they had to go to Facebook and post it and tell everybody why they were canceling. And the reason and the purposes, and why it wasn't worth it. They just wanted the bonuses, and that's why they were there. And they weren't for it. I'm like, oh my gosh, like that person I guarantee you, I would bet a million dollars. That person will never break the seven figure mark in the business ever. Probably not the six figure mark and probably not anything. Because guess what? The kind of person, they are, the kind of consumer, the kind of buyer they are. They're going to attract people who are like them. They're going to attract people, come in for the free offer and then cancel as quick as possible. They're going to attract people who go to the free luncheon to hear the seminar pitch, but then they'll never buy. Because that's who they are. Like if you're the kind of person who's going to come and get a free lunch, and then not pay for the thing later, like that's going to be the kind of person you attract. Because subconsciously you're going to create the offer and create the structure, and the way you pitch it. And your belief level, all those things are going to be synced with how you would've reacted to the offer. And if you're the kind of person who reacts, where it's, you come in and you cancel and you come in, you take, and you never give. If that's the kind of person you are, guess what, that's the kind of person you're going to attract. Because subconsciously everything you do from how you pitch the product to the service, to create the offer to the funnel, all the things are going to be synced because we don't attract who we want. We attract who we are. And so I'm telling you this as a warning because I know I'm preaching to the choir. I know that the people who are listening to the podcast are the best of the best, right? You are the people who are the doers, the implementers, the people who are listening and actually doing something with this stuff. But I want you to understand that look at your interactions. If you're the kind of person who buys a product, and then complains and then refunds and posts the Facebook group about why you're not happy and all the kind of stuff, like that's the kind of customers you are going to attract. I promise you that. But if you're the kind of person who buys to something invest and says, okay, look, this isn't on the product owner to entertain me and to wow me. But it's my job to dig through the stuff and to find the one gold nugget. That's not going to be worth the $97 this month. That's going to be worth 100,000 dollars. Like that's the kind of person you're going to attract. I look at the newsletter, for example. I know you guys don't know behind the scenes of it all, but you know, we acquired Dan Kennedy's companies had a newsletter. That's been running since 1992. And for years Dan ran it, and it was amazing. And then this private equity company bought Dan's company and the last decade, the newsletters kind of... It hasn't been amazing. So as I've taken it over, like January 1st is the brand new, like issue number one, and I'm fired up and I'm excited. And I was like, I want to make sure this is amazing. So I look at what was my role? My role is in each newsletter is to curate the best stuff. So if you don't know the offer, basically you get two newsletters a month. You get the no BS newsletter from Dan, like the very beginning of the month and the middle month you get the behind the scenes letter newsletter from me. So with Dan's thing, like when I renegotiate his contract, I was like, Hey, I want each issue to focus on a topic that I have curated of all the Dan stuff, 40 years of stuff. Like, what do I think are the most important principles and topics he taught? So for example, January 1st, the thing he's talking is opportunity versus improvement. This is how we structure our offers. If you've read the Expert Secrets book, you know I've talked about this. It's one of the most valuable, most powerful, most important things you could possibly do. So like, Dan I want you to go and talk about this again. So Dan went, and based on like me curating all the things I teach him in January, what's the most valuable thing I can give him it's opportunity versus improvement. So I had Dan going write a special, new updated thing about that specifically and I put it in the newsletter. And I took that and I took my 20 years of info now, and I curated Dan's stuff with me taking the best of what I've learned. And when I learned from Dan, how I applied it, the examples of cases, all kind of stuff. And I put it in this newsletter. So now you get this newsletter and it's like, not, not me going through, and obviously we're giving a $20,000 bonus for people to join the thing. But $20,000 bonus, now you got to weed through all this stuff and find the principles, figure out applying. I went through and did all the work for you. I've spent and probably a week of my time, which if you look at how I bill my hourly rates, I mean, that's four or $500,000 worth of, if you were to hire me to do this. Went through all the Dan stuff, found the things, pulled out the best stuff, wrote my context around Dan's article. Put Dan's article in there and everything, and now it's there. And those who signed up, get that for free in January. And worst case, you're a lifelong member you got to pay $97 to get that. But it's like, I spent a week of my life curating and figuring out the best stuff, simplified, organized, put into a spot where it's like, this is the thing you should be focusing on today. And then two weeks later, they get the next thing, which is me showing behind the scenes of arguably the membership funnel that has got the highest average car value that I've ever seen. That's going to give me the ability to outspend every other membership site on the planet, because we figured out the car value. So me showing behind the scenes, like here's page one, here's page two, here's page three here's page four. Here's what we did. Here's why we did it. And that comes as well, like for free. Like that's the first two issues you get for free when you signed up, it's insane. But there's people are like, oh, look, I don't want to, I don't want to pay the $150 because I got to pay shipping because it's coming further for me. Like, okay, I'm sorry that you're going to pay extra $50. Like, and instead of just quietly canceling, let's go and make a big deal out of that on Facebook in the Facebook group because you're an idiot. Like that's the reality of it. That person will never be successful. There's no chance on this planet, that person will have success in their business because guess what? They're going to attract who they are, not who they want. And they're going to attract a bunch of people like them who get the offer, who complain, who go and post about it on Facebook, who do all these things. As opposed to like either number one, being grateful, like oh my gosh. Like a hundred bucks, I'm getting all of this hand delivered to me twice a month. Like that's insane. Or hey, maybe it's not for me. And I understand that maybe it's not for you, I get it. But then just go quietly, going and canceling and then get back to what you're doing. Like, anyway, it just blows my mind. So I just want to rant a little bit, again I know I'm preaching the choir. But you attract who you are, not who you want. So become the kind of customer you want to be, become the kind of buyer you want to be. In my 20 plus years of doing this, I've only refunded something once. And then the person actually give me the refund instead of complaining or posting form. I thought, you know what, who cares? And I didn't worry about it, but I don't ask for refunds. I don't ship things back. It's not on the product owner, it's on my job to say, look, the person who put the time and effort into them. I'm going to get it, and I got to find the nugget. I got to dig to this. I got to find it. And if I don't find it, it's on me, not on them. I take personal responsibility for everything. So guess what happens, as a majority I attract people who take personal responsibility. Because I want to attract who I am, and so I try to become the kind of person I want to serve. And so for you, it's the same kind of thing I want you to think through. Anyway, Nora's got a Christmas concert day. I got to go. Hope you guys are awesome, and I'll talk to you soon. All right, bye everybody.

Breakfast With Champions
Episode 507 with Kim Walsh Phillips - Fog On Your Path

Breakfast With Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 30:35


Thank you for joining us on Breakfast With Champions! Today we hear from Kim Walsh Phillips, Kim Walsh Phillips is the founder of Powerful Professionals, a business coaching and education company. She went from 32 clients to over 11,000 in less than a year and was recently named #475 in the Inc 5000 and is an MBA-free self-made millionaire. Named “a must to read by those in business” by Forbes Magazine, she is the bestselling author of multiple books including "The Ultimate Guide to Instagram for Business" and "The No B.S. Guide To Direct Response Social Media Marketing." She's the behind-the-scenes secret weapon of some of the biggest names in business including Kevin O'Leary from Shark Tank, Dan Kennedy, Profit First Author Mike Michalowicz, Harley-Davidson, Hilton Hotels and High Point University and has spoken on stages beside some of the world's leading thought leaders including Tony Robbins, Grant Cardone, Barbara Corcoran and Gary Vaynerchuk. She resides just outside of Atlanta, GA with her very tall husband and glitter obsessed girls and is fueled by faith, love, laughter and lots, and lots (and lots) of coffee.

Dan Kennedy's Magnetic Marketing Podcast
Dan Kennedy Selling From Stage!!!

Dan Kennedy's Magnetic Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 56:48


This is the actual lost recordings of Dan Kennedy doing his pitch at the old Peter Lowe events!!! MagneticMarketing.com NoBSLetter.com

UnderDog
From Navy Aviation to LinkedIn & Marketing Queen, Tracy Enos Shares Her Unique Journey of Determination to Rise to the Top with Millions in Revenue

UnderDog

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 44:21


Tracy Enos is one of the world's top LinkedIn Experts and a single Mom of 4. She has helped thousands of business owners generate new business, become the authority in their industry, and stay front of mind with their clients. She has shared the stage with marketing geniuses, Dan Kennedy, Ryan Levesque, Dave VanHoose, Dustin Mathews, Rich Schefren, and Danny Fingeroth (Marvel Comics).Throughout the conversation, Tracy shared:- Her experience as the only female in the Navy- The ups and downs of her marketing agency- How all the challenges lead her to become the world's top LinkedIn ExpertFollow what Tracy's up to here:LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tracyenos/Website: https://tracyenos.com/Email: localhoopla@gmail.comKeep up with the latest Underdog Episodes here:Apple iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/underdog/id1534385651Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/6FbSDu0aNtuxAEiderUAfBWebsite: https://theunderdogshow.com/

Storytelling Secrets
Scale Your Offers In 2022 As Industry Authority | Tuan Luu

Storytelling Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 37:30


Today I brought in Tuan Luu from PredictableScaling.comI wanted to find out what were his secrets to scaling multiple companies to 7 figures…Using their email list…and a secret (inexpensive) retargeting strategy.I made sure to pull out a bunch of nuggets for you.Here's a little of what we spoke about on the podcast.**How to get on more discovery calls with QUALIFIED leads. Tuan reveals a little known strategy to only target people who know your wizardry…for less than $2 a day.**The number one best way to stand out as an authority in 2022…without being a crazed content berserker.**What to say in your post FB-ad email sequence to get more booked calls. If you're a fan of Dan Kennedy…you'll love Tuan's spin on how to land properly prepared prospects in your calendar._______________________________Tuan's (Free) Special Offer

MicroFamous
You Can't Fix This With More Instagram Selfies: The Biggest Challenge Facing Coaches & Consultants Right Now

MicroFamous

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 17:04


As lead gen costs continue to go up, and social media algorithms are optimized for rapid rising, negative emotional responses, it gets more and more difficult to put any kind of a direct response call-to-action in front of people on social media. That goes for whether you pay to play or not. I'll give you an example. Let's rewind to February 2020, the MicroFamous book just launched, got great feedback and reviews. So my idea was to run the free+shipping offer to build the email list, and I built a whole 90-day email nurture system to follow up and convert those book buyers into true believers in the MicroFamous message. But the ads just were ridiculously expensive, despite us doing all the latest, greatest, micro-testing techniques. Then I found out why. The guy helping me with ads checked with his network around May of 2020 and heard that it was starting to cost $40-50 in ads to get one conversion on a $7 free+shipping book offer. What that told me is that the people doing it are spending a warchest to build their email list. They probably have a complex set of backend follow up and a mix of offers to try to recapture all that ad spend and hopefully make a profit. And who knows if it's working or how long they're waiting to actually profit. Just because people are doing things doesn't mean it's working or that it's sustainable. So I pulled back that offer. My observation is that over the long run, lead gen costs will continue going up, regardless of short-term issues like iOS14 or variations in the market or by niche. The more the big companies start shifting ad budgets away from TV and radio into social media, it just drives up everyone's cost. This shouldn't be a surprise to anyone. I've talked to some Facebook ad agency folks over the last year, and they're proud of getting their clients leads at $5-10. When they first start running ads, opt-ins can be $15, $20 or more. Now, you might say, what about the folks who are running ads and selling programs and courses in the millions? The Russell Brunsons, Russ Rufinos, Amy Porterfields, etc. I have no doubt that the top 1-5% of info-marketers are still making money. Whether that's with free+shipping funnels. Or running ads to webinars with a whole series of upsells and cross-sells and complicated, trigger-driven email campaigns. Or maybe they're running ads to call-funnels and hard-selling with a phone team. I'm sure it all still works to a degree. But to make the math work now, in an environment of $5-10 lead costs, the game has changed. Your backend has to be fine tuned. It reminds me of a story one of my mentors, Frank Klesitz, told on this podcast in the episode on puffery and copywriting. The story goes that he was at a Dan Kennedy event years ago, and one of the guest speakers was a top info-marketer. And to show his autoresponder campaign in all of its glory, he took a 6-foot tall roll of paper with his entire campaign sketched out. When the paper was rolled out, it ran across the width of the entire stage and needed several people just to hold it up. On seeing that, Frank decided that was not where he wanted to compete. So is the biggest challenge facing us just an issue of optimizing ads? In other words, if we just became better info-marketers, does that solve the problem? I don't think so. Let's say the top 5% of info-marketers can still scale up using social media ads and a complex backend of funnels and triggers and upsells and cross-sells. Do you WANT to put in the work to reach the top 5% of info-marketers? Do you have the rare set of skills and mentality and engineering ability to get there? Do you have the internal values that drive you to extract maximum value from someone regardless of whether it's in their best interest? I don't know that I do. I certainly don't have the values piece. I also don't have the passion to reverse engineer ads on social media...every day... looking for that slight...

The Marketing Secrets Show
Whatever Happened To...?

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 14:20


Ever witness someone succeed big time at something and then they can't repeat that success? Why is that? Russell examines the ingredients of success and why some people have staying power and others fizzle out. Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com Magnetic Marketing ---Transcript--- What's up everybody. This is Russell Brunson. Welcome back to the Marketing Secrets Podcast. Today, I just dropped off my kids and it's snowing outside. How great is that? All right. I'm driving home in the snow and I wanted... Something in my head that I don't know exactly the answer to, but I wanted to bring it up because in any career, anything you're doing, there's always... I don't know. There's people that last a long time and there's people who have success and then they don't last a long time. And specifically I was this morning reading, for those of you guys who are UFC fans, this last weekend was a crazy PPV card. I was never into UFC until COVID hit and then I started watching it and now I'm obsessed. And I can't miss a fight, which is kind of funny. Because I don't watch sports. I don't watch football. I don't watch basketball. I don't even watch wrestling, wrestling on a TV though. Actually, if it was, I would watch it. So I'm not going to lie. But UFC, I got into it and I love it. And last weekend, Amanda Nunes, who's literally supposed to be undefeatable, got defeated, which was crazy and bunch of other things. But one fight specifically was this guy named Cody... I don't know how to pronounce his last name. Garbrandt or something like that. Anyway, doesn't matter. So Cody basically in 2007 became UFC champ. Just an amazing, beat the champ, dethroned him and it was this huge deal. And then he's lost the last seven fights in a row. I think he won one, but lost basically seven fights in a row. And ever since he was the champ, hasn't been able to get it back again, which is interesting. And you see other people like that in the UFC where they go and they win a championship and then they never win again. One week you're the best in the world and then you never win another fight again. Or you win very few. And they got other people, someone like Usman who wins it and then wins another one, another one and he's won 10 matches, 10 title offenses in a row. And for those who don't follow UFC, this doesn't make any sense to you, but just conceptually, what makes it so that one person can become a champion, the best in the world and then never win again? Versus someone else who becomes a champion, the best in the world and then defends their title 10 times or 20 times, whatever it ends up being. I try thinking about that in business because it's kind of similar. I've been doing this now, I think I'm in my 20th year, which is crazy. So I've been playing this game for a while. And last night I was hiring a copywriter for a really cool project I'm working on. So I was going back in time trying to find offers in the path that had been successful. So, Russell, the core funnel hacker in my head, I've got like, okay, I remember 12 years ago, 18 years ago, three years ago all the people similar offers in the past. And so I go and I find them and I have to go to a site called the Wayback Machine because most of these offers are dead now. But I go to the Wayback Machine, type in the old URL and boom, it pulls up the old offer, which is really cool. So I was looking, I was trying to remember all the old offers that were similar to this new one that we're creating that's going to launch probably in January or February. And I was going in there finding them all and I found this one that I remember when it launched. It was like the offer and I remember the person who launched, I'm not going to say their name because this person pulled a Cody Garbrandt. I'm saying his name wrong. Anyway, a Cody where they had the offer. They created this offer. They were out of the gate. They were a newer marketer and for some reason, this offer just crushed it. It was the right message, right timing, right everything. And I remember being so jealous because this offer did, I don't know, probably $10 million in sales over the period of a couple months. And it was a $37 offer with some upsells and down sales. But again, for whatever reason, it was perfect message to market match. It was the right message for the market at the time and it just crushed it. Okay. And I started thinking about those guys. I'm like, whatever happened to the people who launched that offer? They were young cool dudes. People loved them and they had the offer better than any offer I'd ever had at that time. And I was just so jealous, but I haven't seen them since and it makes me wonder what happened? And I remember I've seen them launch other offers. I remember because they contacted me. I remember because the time I was trying to broker their leads to a call center and then they kind of screwed me. And so I remember after that, watching them do another offer, another offer, but none of their other offers hit. That one hit and they did a bunch of other ones, none of them ever hit. And I look back now and again, they're gone. And I can tell you in the almost 20 years I've been doing this, I've seen so many people come into the scene, have a good offer, launch it, make a ton of money and then we never see them again. And there's other people who have been doing this now like me for two decades, or Dan Kennedy for four decades, or Tony Robbins or people who have longevity that have been doing this way longer and are still doing this. And it makes me think about that. What makes somebody go and become the UFC champ of the world, have the best offer in the world and then never have another win again, versus the person who's titled defense 10 times who's had 10, 20, 30 winning offers? What's the big difference? And so I don't know if I know all the answers or the exact answer, but I want to propose what I think is the biggest reason in our world that somebody wins long term because I think anybody could create a really good offer. You get the right hook, story, offer, get the right message, get the right timing, get the right all the things. It's not hard to get an offer that's going to crush. Well, I'm not going to say it's not hard. It's hard, takes a lot of work, but if you get it right, I've seen people who make more money in one offer than the average person will make in 10 lifetimes. So if you get it right, the amount of money you can make really quickly is huge. But then longevity, again, most people... I've been doing this now for so long, I can tell you the people that were around when I got started are few and far between. If I mentioned most of those names, for the most part you wouldn't no any of them. You might know one or two of them, but for the most part, the people who were the legends, who were the biggest names in the world, their longevity has not lasted. And so I wonder what causes that? And I want to propose, I think the biggest thing is to create an offer it's hook, story, offer. You get the right sales letter, you get the right offer, you get the right message, the right ads, all kind of stuff. It hits, it blows up. But the people who have been around for more than an offer, people who have had 10 title defenses, 10 good offers, 20 good offers, whatever and they're still around, it's not so much just the offer. The offer's part of it. The key is the relationship. It's the community. It's what happens after the offer. I look at these dudes who had this offer back 10 years ago that crushed it, they outdid every offer I had ever dreamed of. They launched it. They sold a bunch, but then I was on their list and what happened with their list? They emailed other people's offers. They sold other things. And eventually I lost interest in them and they went away. They were so focused on monetizing the list and making money from the data, whatever you want to call it, selling thing after thing, after thing that eventually I stopped opening their emails. I stopped reading because it wasn't... I came in because they had this offer. It was exciting. It was interesting. It was new and then they didn't keep talking about it. They stopped talking about it. They shifted to the next thing, the next thing. This person's offer, the next one. They created a new offer. And then they kept shifting. Where I want to propose the reason why I've been doing this for so long and I would say that I was on the same path as these guys, probably the first decade of my business. First decade I was launching offer, after offer, after offer and there's nothing wrong with launching a lot of offers. In fact, you need to. In fact, most of you will do better by launching more offers. But the difference is the offers have to stack. If you come into the Russell Brunson world, you can ask anyone, "What does Russell teach? What do does he do?" There's one word that's coming to your mind. What is that? It's funnels. Okay, Russell comes in, you're going to learn funnels. But then inside of funnels, I have a whole bunch of offers that stack upon that new opportunity. The new opportunity I bring people in is a funnel. But then I have offers that stack upon that. Does that make sense? So we have funnel scripts, but it's how to write the copy for your funnel. We've got traffic secrets. How to get traffic to your funnel. We got expert secrets is how to tell your story inside your funnel. Every single offer I've created all comes back down to the same thing. It's all stacking on the same opportunity. So that way I don't have to resell my audience each time. My audience is already sold on the core principle thing I'm talking about. And everything I'm doing day in and day out, week in and week out, month in and month out, year in and year out is stacking on the opportunity. So what happens is the culture, the brand, the people get deeper and deeper, deeper as opposed to here's an offer, made a bunch of money. Now we shift to a new offer and then a new offer because eventually one of your offers isn't going to work. And I had tons of offers that we sold, but they haven't worked as an offer. To go buy ads and drive traffic and things like that, but they do work to my list because my list loves me. My list is looking for other ways to do funnels better. That's the new opportunity people came in into my world for. So when I'm stacking and I'm adding new opportunities on top of that, that is the key. And so it's all about the community. It's all about the relationship. It's all about not giving your audience schizophrenia by changing things over and over and over again. But instead going deeper and doubling down and really believing what you're believing. I think that these guys who I saw this offer from a decade ago, if they would've doubled that... Even today, the offer I was looking at, this offer would convert today, but they stopped promoting that. They start promoting all the concepts around that and they went to the next thing, next thing, they went all over the place. I see that happening in our world, all these people who were experts at their thing, and now we've got Bitcoin and then NFTs and stuff. And now they're shifting to the next thing, the next thing and not there's anything wrong with that. There's probably going to be a day, I guarantee in the near future or not near future in the future where I'm going to sell an NFT. But there's not going to be an NFT on some random magic monkey that's dancing around because it's not doubling down on the new opportunities someone came in with. They came into my world, they're entrepreneurs. And so if and when I was to do an NFT or something like that is going to be doubling down on the core message. It's going to be somehow amplifying the things I'm already talking about. It's not going to be this whole new thing where people are now shifting focus and moving over to different spot. All those kind of things. Does that make sense? So anyway, for you guys, just to think about that. And if you haven't read the Expert Secrets book, the Expert Secrets book is where I talk about new opportunity. And it's interesting because Dan Kennedy did a whole course called Opportunity Concepts about this, which is so good and I'm actually working on two projects right now. One is the January newsletter for NO BS Newsletter. If you haven't subscribed yet go to NOBSletter.com. But at NOBS newsletter, January, this is all about new opportunity. I had Dan write a bunch of stuff. I wrote a bunch of stuff going deep on this concept of a new opportunity. We got to create a new opportunity. What is your new opportunity? So there's kind of that piece of it. But so, and then I'm also working on another book project with Dan about new opportunity. Because it's the key. You don't give somebody improvement or repair as a front end. The front end's got to be this here's this new opportunity. This is the new opportunity that's going to shift everything for you. That's how you lead the conversation. Bring somebody in and in Expert Secrets talk about being the opportunity switch. You've taken them from their old opportunity to new opportunity. That's the initial switch and after they come in, then we do what we call an opportunity stack, which is now they moved with you into this new opportunity. Now you're stacking things on top of that. So for me, the new opportunity is funnels. Now we're stacking on funnel scripts. We're stacking on fill your funnel. We're stacking all these different things to double down, triple down, quadruple down on the new opportunity. So hope that makes sense. That's the power we're talking about. That's the core key thing that you got to understand to be able to be around a long time, because anyone could have one hit wonder. You can have an offer. You can win a championship, but if you want to be able to be around for the long term, it comes down to one opportunity switch. Every company should have one and only one opportunity to switch. I'm a big believer in after you've switched someone into your opportunity then you stack opportunities on top of that. The people who are losing are people who are going opportunity switch, opportunity switch, opportunity switch, keep switching people over and over and over again and gives your audience literal schizophrenia. We got to focus on one opportunity to switch and then opportunity stacking after that. So hope that helps. For those who understand it, I hope that was a nugget that kind of gets you thinking differently. If you don't, if that doesn't make sense to you and you want to go a little deeper on this, make sure you understand it, go read the Expert Secrets. Get the new updated hardbound version and go read the section on new opportunity and hopefully that'll help you. And or get on the NOBS newsletter ASAP and get the January issue because I go deep into there as well. All right. Thanks you guys. Appreciate you all and we'll talk soon.

Brian J. Pombo Live
Brunson, Kennedy and Customer Experience

Brian J. Pombo Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 7:44


Thoughts on customer experience from a recent interview Brian saw between Russell Brunson and Dan Kennedy. Transcription Brunson, Kennedy and customer experience. Hi I’m Brian Pombo, welcome back to Brian J. Pombo Live. Yesterday we were talking about the VIP treatment, and how Disneyland has been able to do that for years with their club […] The post Brunson, Kennedy and Customer Experience

The Marketing Secrets Show
Geeking Out on Story with Josh Forti, Part 2

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 37:28


In this second installment of this special interview, Russell and Josh go super deep on ‘the master story' and the attractive character…and what happens when you have tons of followers and NO ONE buys! Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com Magnetic Marketing ---Transcript--- Russell Brunson: What's up, everybody? This is Russell Brunson. Welcome back to the Marketing Secrets Podcast. So, today's episode is probably from most of my conversations with Josh, might have been one of my favorites. It was really, really fun. We started talking about expert secrets and storytelling and how they work, and attractive character profiles, which one you should be using, and how they work, and can you change them? And then also he started going into his concept of the master story, which is something I talk about in Perfect Webinar, but he goes really, really deep in it. And anyway, we geeked out. This was a really fun episode. I hope you enjoy it. With that said, let me cue up the theme song. When we get back, you'll have a chance to listen to this exciting conversation with me and Josh talking about story and attractive character, and a bunch of other really cool things. JoshForti: I got to ask this. Are you not on Twitter? Like I see you on Twitter a lot, and I see you posting stuff on Twitter. But is it not you that's engaging on Twitter? Russell: No, I don't know how to tweet. Josh: You don't know how to tweet? Russell, I tweeted you a lot. Or not a lot, but I tweeted you quite a bit. Russell: Oh, hey. Josh: And then sometimes you like my tweets. Dang it. Russell: I do like all your tweets. They're awesome. Josh: Yeah. Oh, man. Russell: I personally, I enjoy Instagram, probably my favorite. And then Facebook's probably number two. But that's the two social platforms I spend my personal time on the most. So, if it's from either of those two platforms, it's usually me. If it's other places... Josh: Do you have it like broken up? Like are you like, "Instagram, I do this type of content and stuff on. And Facebook, I do this type of content on." Or is it kind of like a mixture of both? Or... Russell: Um. Josh: For you personally. I know your team posts stuff, but... Russell: The only place I really post/do stuff typically is Instagram, like stories. That's where I kind of, like me personally, do stuff. And then Facebook and my personal page, probably once, every once in a while, I drop stuff there. And everything else, that's my team. Josh: Yeah, that's rare though, not often. Russell: Yeah. Josh: You're not like me who's like, "What? It's been 48 hours without some form of controversy? What can I say? Oh my God." All right. Well, actually, I kind of want to talk about that though. Not so much controversy, but creating content specifically around storytelling, because I think this is probably one of the biggest... Let me give backstory, a little context around this. I came into the world completely backwards of what most people do, right? So I was the guy that came into the world, and most people have no following and no followers, and they can't get leads to happen. Right? And they don't get anybody to show up to their webinar. And then they're super depressed because nobody showed up and nobody bought. I had the exact opposite problem. I had everybody show up and nobody bought. And let me tell you, that's way more depressing. You know why? Because when everybody shows up and nobody buys, you're like, "Crap. Now I really am screwed because I have no idea what's going on." Right? Russell: It was me, and not the… whatever, yeah. Josh: Right. It's not because nobody's hearing it. It's because I actually suck. And I remember the first time I ever did a webinar, we actually... I don't know if you remember this or not. I actually sent you a Snapchat. This is right when you first got Snapchat. This is way, way back in the day. I've told this story before. And I went and I was like, "Russell, what's up, man? I'm trying to build this webinar. How much would you charge me to build out a webinar for me or whatever?" Right? And you sent me a little video, a Snapchat video back. You're in the Jeep, and you were like, "Man, I don't really do that. I don't really do that anymore." So I like snapped you back, and then you snapped me back, and you're like, "It'd probably be like $250,000 or something like that. But I don't really do that." I'm like, "Man, I really wish I would've hired you for 250 grand." But anyway, so I go and we do this huge webinar, and everyone told us... We were like, "We're going to have all these people sign up." And everyone's like, "No. No, you're not. Nobody gets people to their webinar that easy. You maybe have a hundred registrants." We had 2000 people register, and we had a thousand people... We maxed out the room with a thousand people on live. At the pitch, there was like 982 people in the room. I go through, I do my pitch. No one buys, not a single person. And then we hung up, and like an hour goes by, and one person had bought. And most miserable, depressing... Russell: That's the worst because then you're like, "Crap. I thought there was no sound or something. Maybe they didn't hear me." Josh: Right, right, right. But I sat there and it was a bad webinar. We had like dozens, probably hundreds of emails and comments of like, "Can I have my money back for a free webinar? This totally sucks. Worst experience ever." It was awful, right? And what was interesting is that really scarred me for a while, from doing presentations and from doing anything where I pitched live. And so I basically went and I just did sales from that point on. I did lots of presentations. I did lots of content. But I did not actually go and pitch because really, it was like PTSD almost. Right? It was like, "I don't want to go back there." And what was interesting is I went and I would do sales, and I got good at sales, but sales is hard, man. Sales is just a different game. It's just like pushing and pushing and pushing and pushing. Right? And then my brother died, and out of just sheer not knowing what to do, I just started sharing my story because at that point you're like, "What do you do? My whole life is messed up at this point. I'm so confused." And so I just start sharing what I was going through, and I start sharing things of like the emotions and what I'm learning and what I'm going through. And I remember people just started buying, and it was like the weirdest thing, because I wasn't selling anything. Right? But I would go through and I'd be like, "I'm super grateful and thankful to have an audience right now because I'm able to go through and have a business that allows me to go and like be mobile and go to my brother's funeral or whatever." And then people started buying my programs. And I was like, "What in the world?" And then I would share other things, and then people would start buying. And I'm like, "I'm not actually selling these things. I'm just talking about my life." And what was interesting is I went back eventually later that year, and I went back to all these different people, and I was like, "Why did you buy this product?" And they're like, "Well, because you told such and such a story." Oh, that's interesting. So then I went over here and I was like, "Why did you buy that product?" And they're like, "Well, you guys told such and such story." And it was a completely different story. And it was like they were buying because they would hear a story, and they would associate that story with a product that I was selling, and they would go buy it. And so I had all these different products and all these different stories, and I was like, "Okay, well, I got to figure out what's the one story that I want people to figure out?" Right? So I could sell the one product. And so that's what I've really been focused on recently. But that lesson taught me that storytelling was everything, because I had heard that from you a million times. Right? Russell: Yeah. You didn't believe it. Josh: Story, story, story, story. Right? And I'm like, "I'm telling stories, Russell. What more do you want me to do?" But I wasn't. I was telling facts and I was going out there and trying to sound smart. And when I just let go of it all and was like, "This is the story, like the real, the raw, the genuine. I'm not trying to sell you anything. This is legitimately what's going on in my life." I made more money and more sales than I had before. And so I would love for you to talk about... Like I know in Expert Seekers you go through like storytelling and all the different, the core four stories, and the change of false beliefs. But what's the key? And maybe that's it, like going back through that. And that's fine. But like what's the key to telling a good story? Because I think not only do people... And there's a follow-up question to this, which I'm not going to tell you what it is yet. But what are the elements that make a good story? What actually makes a story work? And how do you tell one effectively? Russell: Yeah. First off, it's fascinating because I went through a very similar journey when I got in this world too. I remember going to my very first event. I saw people selling from stage, and seeing the numbers and doing the math, I was just like, "This is crazy. There's no way this actually works." And then I remember getting invited to speak at a seminar, and it was different because webinars are painful, but man, standing on stage and doing a pitch, and then it bombing was even worse. Because it's just like all these people, nobody moved, and it was just like... In fact, I remember I was like, "I'll never, after the first one, I'll never do this again." That was the worst experience ever. And that's when I joined the Dan Kennedy world, and they had this public speaking course. It was like 40 CDs. I remember the pack was like this thick of CDs. And I bought it because I was like, "I want to figure this thing out." I started listening to him. And I don't remember the course at all, other than this feeling of just like it's not teaching. Teaching is not what gets people to buy when you're on stage. It's telling these stories that connect with people. And it shifted my mindset, and so it shifted to the point where I went and tried again. And the next time I tried, I tried to weed these things in, and I got like six sales, a thousand bucks apiece. And I was like, "Oh, okay." Like I got the reward of like this actually worked. And then I was like, "Okay, do it again and do it again." And then you start getting obsessed with it. And then for me, most of my education for the next five years... Because there wasn't a lot of people that had courses on public speaking or things like that. There were a couple, but there wasn't a lot. I just went... And from a timeline, it was before the big 2000 whatever, the big crash in 2008 or whatever. And so there were events happening every single weekend. So I'd go to an event every weekend, and I would sit there and I would just watch the people speak. And I would watch what they were doing and then see how people would buy at the end. And people, the ones that had the big table rushes and stuff, I was like, "Okay, what did they just do? What'd they do to me? How did they do it? What did they say?" And I was like trying to dissect what they were doing. And then I would model that for my presentations. I'd be like, "Oh, I like how they did that part, how they told the story or how they got emotional." Sort of like just studying. McCall Jones calls it charisma hacking. I didn't know that's what it was at the time. But I was just watching how they did stuff and how it made me feel. And it wasn't just like selling from stage. I started watching religion people as well. Like some of the best presenters in the world are preachers and pastors and things like that. And I was watching just people speak and how they got me to feel and move, and how they told stories in a way that was exciting. And then so that's like this study I started going on. Then I met Michael Hague. I started learning about story structure. I was like, "This isn't just made up. There's actual structures and there's things in place. And this guy's way easier," because now I'm not just guessing. There's actually a pathway. Anyway, so that's kind of my history with it too, but it's fascinating. But I think that if I was to break it down into something for people to understand that's not complex but simple... Because you can go to the Expert Secrets book and it can get really complex. But the simplest form is that if somebody's coming to you, it's because they're looking for something different, right? They want change. They want more. There's some result. And I always think about this like on a mountain because Dan Kennedy used to talk about this. He's like, "You need to become the guru on the mountain. And people are going to come to the base of the mountain, and the closer they get to you up the mountain, the more they're going to pay." Right? So, the base of the mountain, they're paying a hundred bucks a month for a newsletter. And then they want to get closer, they pay 500 bucks a month, then a thousand bucks a month. And for whatever, for 50 grand, they can sit at your feet and talk to you." And he used to always talk about that guru on the mountain thing. And back when I was first studying this, the way people sold was different. It was much more like that. It was more of a status play like, "This is how successful and why you should come up here. And if you want to be like me, you got to come to me, pay me more money." And I never really resonated with that, partially because I'm awkward and I always felt awkward like positioning myself. So I never liked that, and so I started learning about story structure. It was cool because I realized that the positioning of you on the mountain, it's essential, right? But it's not like you sell from the top of the mountain, yelling down to the people. It's like people see you on the top of the mountain, and they're down here like, "I want to be up there." You're like, "Cool." And then it's you coming down off the mountain, running down to where they're at, and being like, "Okay, I know exactly where you're at. Let me tell you my story, because I was in your same spot at one time." Right? And that's the power. So, if you look at the way I do my presentations, I usually drop like one slide or one thing like, "Hey, this is the thing you want." Right? Like, "Cool, I've made whatever." Like I'll do my quick posturing just so they know that I've been to the top of the mountain they're trying to get to. But then I don't stay there. But again, if you watch the old-time speakers from the nineties and early 2000s, they would spend the 90-minute presentation talking about them on top of the mountain the whole time. And I just hate it. So I drop real quick, so you know that I know I've been where we're trying to get to, but I got to come back very, very quickly. And the story I'm telling you is the story, my story, of them. Right? I have to put myself in their spot. Like where was I when I went through the same thing? Because all of us, if you got to the top of the mountain, somewhere you had to start hiking. And you went through that journey to be the guru on the top. Right? And so it's like coming back and remembering where are they at or where were you at, telling your story. And if you tell it the way that they connect, they're like, "Oh my gosh, they are me. I was Russell. Russell went through this. He understands." And there's empathy. Then they trust you. Then they want to go on that journey with you. That's like when you came out and you started telling your story, it wasn't you posturing a position of how great you were. But it's like, "Hey, I've done this thing you're trying to figure out. But let me tell you my story and how I'm struggling, how I'm still struggling, the struggles I went through, and the pain and the fear." And all of sudden they're like, "Oh, I feel that too. I feel the pain. I feel the fear. I understand those things. This person understands me. I can trust them to take me on this journey because he's not going to be the person who's just positioning how great they are. It's someone who I have empathy with. They understand me." And that's the key. Because if they feel like you understand them, then they're going to go on that journey with you. And you do that by telling the story, like your version of their story. Because they're living it right now, and you've lived it the past. You've got to tell that in a way where they connect and now they're going to want to go on that journey with you. And that's kind of the key to it all. Josh: That's super, super interesting. Yeah. Because when I think about story structure, because I've like tried to simplify things down in my own head... Because it's always interesting, because I'll watch everything that you do, and so it's funny whenever I do presentations, people are like, "You're a mini Russell." I'm like, "Well, that makes sense actually. Right?" Like I've watched all this stuff, right? So, but for me, man, going through Expert Secrets, I don't know, it was probably the third or fourth or maybe even fifth time through before I finally actually was like, "Oh yeah, you actually do know what you're talking about." Because every step of the way I'd be like, "But my story doesn't fit in. That doesn't work." Or like, "Mine doesn't have that." Or like, "It's not that systematic." Or, "Russell, it's too much of a science. There's more of an art to it." And then I'd read about it and I'd be like, "This is so scientific." And then I'd watch you do it and I'm like, "That's so artistic." And I'm like, "But they're the same." Right? And so I would try to figure out ways to simplify it down to a way I can understand it. And then once I would understand it, I would plug it into yours, and then it would work. Right? And so for me, it was always like, okay, there's four parts. It's, "How did I get here?" Right? That's backstory. Like, "How did I get to right here right now?" That's like that. And then it's, "Where am I going?" Right? So, the goal, the desire. And then it's, "How am I going to get there?" New vehicle, new opportunity, right? And then it's, "What's it going to look like?" The vision, like what's it going to look like in the process of all that, so we can paint this thing and we get people emotionally attached? And so for me, in my brain... And they don't always happen in that sequential order. Like sometimes you start with the desire, and then you go back, but it has to have all four of those parts. And then I would take that and I would go, and then I would apply it to the Expert Secrets, and then it would start working. Right? I was like, "Oh my gosh, that's what Russell's doing here and here and here." And then you actually have this whole framework out about it, right? And I think one of the things for me is I always go... Because we've done book clubs on Expert Secrets. I teach stories in marketing. I teach stories in personal development. Like stories and storytelling is a big part of what I do now, especially over the last six months and moving forward. One of the questions that continues to come up is... Well, there's two parts. Let me start with the first one. "Hey, Russell, that's all great, but I'm not a leader. I'm not the attractive character that's the leader." Right? "I'm not the person that figured it out and am living my customer's journey." And there's actually a lot more of those people than I thought. I thought most people were leaders because that's what I was when I first got started. So my question is, do you tell this story a different way? Or how is the story different, how is it positioned differently, if you are not the leader? Because I know you're not in your story. You're the reluctant hero, right? And so I tell people, I'm like, "Before you start figuring out your story, you got to figure out what attractive character you're going to be." Right? And we go through the four inside of Expert Secrets. It's like there's the leader, there's the adventurer, there's the reporter, and then there's the reluctant hero. And what's interesting is early on in my journey, I was the hero. Right? I was the one, I was like, "Guys..." I was literally this broke kid, freaking living in a $500-a-month apartment with duct tape windows. And now I'm not, right? And Instagram was the thing, and social media, and here we go. Right? But as I evolved, then the podcast came. And without even realizing it, I became the reporter. Right? And so how does, based on your attractive character, how does that change the story or how you tell it? Russell: Yeah. And it's funny because mine's transformed, not only just throughout time, but in different situations as well. Right? Like sometimes I'm the attractive... You know, when I got started, say when I was an interviewer, so I interviewed people. So I was a reporter for a long time. But then I transitioned to like a reluctant hero. But there's other times, like if I'm on Hockey Live, I'm not the reluctant hero, right? At that time I've got to be the hero. Like I'm coming in and I'm setting authority because I've got a whole group of alphas in the room. And if I don't come there as like the head alpha, they will run me over. If you're like in a situation with Tony Adib, like if I'm that situation, I'm transitioning more back to reporter because I'm leveraging Tony's expertise and things like that. And so I'm going back as a reporter. Same thing with Dan Kennedy right now. You look at... It's fascinating. Like we just bought Dan Kennedy's company, right? We just launched the first Dan Kennedy new offer. By the way, if you're listening, go to NoBSLetter.com and go sign up. But yeah, like... Josh: By the way, make sure you go through my link. Russell: Yeah. But look at like how I've... It's /JoshForti, yeah. Josh: Yeah. Russell: But if you look at like how I'm positioning this offer, it's not me coming as like Russell's the alpha. Right? I'm coming back here as like, "This is my mentor. Boom. And I had this chance to acquire, but I'm going to go through 40 years of his stuff, and I'm bringing it back to you." And I'm pulling these things out, and this is what I learned from Dan and what I learned from Dan here." Right? And it's me coming back in a reporter role with my mentor, and that's how I'm introducing the world to him. So, it shifts, right? It shifts based on the story and the situation. Like what are you using it for? Right? Like I could've come in and be like... Because there's different posturing. Like I could've come in and been the hero and like, "I bought Dan's company. We bringing it back from the dead. Da, da, da." Like put it on me. But that story, first off, didn't feel good. But second off, it's not the story that needs to get people to move. The stories to get people to move is me giving homage to this guy who's changed my life, and now I'm going to be having the chance to bring these things back to you. Like me becoming the reporter back in that phase, in that business and that side, is a more powerful story to use. Right? And so it's all coming down to figuring out what's going to be the best story, right, in this situation and where you're at, and thinking through that. Because right now you're in a reporter role, but other times I still see you, you shift back over where you're running different things. So it's just trying to figure out what's... Again, these are all tools. I was talking to the Two Comma Club X members this week. And part of the group's doing challenges, part are doing webinars, part are doing different things. And they're like, "Which one should I do? Which one's the best?" I'm like, "No, it's not which one's best. These are tools. Like this is a hammer, this is a saw, and different jobs and different tools." And so it's like if I'm coming in here, I want a hammer, but over here I want a saw, and here I want a hammer and a saw, because I'm going to do this thing. Right? And same thing with stories, understanding that. Like your attractive character can shift. Mine's shifted more throughout time, but also situationally it shifts where it's like, okay, this is the role I need to be here, and it's okay to shift back to reporter. I've seen people, in fact... Well, can I drop names? Yeah. Who cares? So like Grant Cardone's a good example. I love Grant. Grant is like the leader, right? And at 10X, after we set all these sales records, Grant was going to shift to the interviewer and he was going to interview me. And it would've been a really fascinating thing for him to pick my brain and ask. And we sat down and we got in the thing, and he sat there for a second, and all of a sudden he was like, he didn't want to. He thought like shifting to the interviewer was a decrease in status. And he literally stopped before he started and said, "Actually I don't want to interview you. I'm going to have somebody else do it." And he got off the little thing, had somebody else come in, and that person interviewed me. And I was like, "Ah, dang it." It would've been so powerful for him. Josh: Come on, Grant. Russell: It would been so powerful for him, for his positioning, for people to connect with him better, if he would've come off like, "I'm Grant Cardone." You know, trade, come down for a second, and done the reporter, and been excited. Because he genuinely was excited. He, backstage, was freaking out. He was like, "I've never seen what you just did. That was amazing." Like it was this cool thing. And it humanized him for a minute. And he could have had that moment where he did it, and he didn't. Whereas me right now with Kennedy, I'm paying all homage to Dan. He's amazing. And it, first off, makes the offer better, makes the story better, but it also makes me more... People connect because now it's like they're the same thing. Like, "Oh my gosh. I have mentors. I can be excited about what they're learning." I don't have to posture all the time where I'm the only person. You know what I mean? Josh: Yeah. Well, it's super interesting that you say that because studying influencers has been something that I've kind of geeked out about. And one of the things you talk about in there, in Expert Secrets or whatever, is the attractive character has flaws. Right? And when the attractive character owns those flaws, it actually makes their supporters love them more. And what's interesting is that I've looked at people like Trump, and we're not trying to get political here in any way, shape or form, but one of the big criticisms of Trump, even from his own people, and I being one of those, is he never admits when he's wrong. He never will step down and even give the idea that somebody else could be right. And because of that, that actually hurts him a lot more in the long run than in the short, than it gains him in the short term. Right? And so it's that same concept. And then I look at someone like a Dave Portnoy, right? And do you follow Dave at all? Dave Portnoy? Okay. So he's the founder of Barstool Sports, and he's the one that did the Barstool Fund and everything like that or whatever. Here's a dude who, I mean, his fan base is not as large as Trump's, but as far as like fans and fans, people love Portnoy. Right? Like, I mean, there's his fans. But he makes fun of himself constantly, right? And he's constantly coming back and being like, "Yeah, I messed up." All of his bets are public because he owns like a gambling or a sports betting company. So you go to his Twitter and it's nothing but all of his wins and then all of his losses. Right? And so you can see both, and people just love it. And anytime people are trying to bash up on him, all of his supporters come and they're like, "Yeah, we know he's an idiot. Right? But he's an amazing idiot. Yeah." Right? And so it's like when you show that other side, people connect to you even better. And it's such a fascinating concept because it's opposite of what our brains think. You know what I mean? Russell: A hundred percent. It's counterintuitive. Like we want to always posture position, thinking that's the... It's just like the guru on the mountain we talked about, right? Like in the eighties, nineties, every expert wanted to be the person, the infallible expert up here at the top. But man, that's not what gets people to connect. It's the coming down and like, "Dude, I struggle too. I remember the pain. I remember the pressure, the fear, the scare, like all those things." And that's what connects people. People crave connection now. Maybe there was a time in history where people just wanted the other thing. But nowadays it's not that way. People connect with vulnerability. But it's hard, it's scary, because it's like... In fact, Natalie Hodson, I think she quoted Brene Brown, but she's the one that told me this. She's like, "When you're vulnerable, you feel small, but people looking at it, it feels makes you feel big to them." So it's a weird thing where you're like, "I feel horrible," but it makes them look at you and like, "Oh my gosh, this person's willing to say things I'm thinking in my head and I don't dare to talk about because of my own fear and anxiety and status, and all those kind of things." And it gives them that thing, and that's what gets people to connect with you. It's really fascinating. Josh: Yeah, for sure. For sure. Okay. Last piece on this, which will take up the rest of the time for sure, is the number one question that I get hands down when it comes to stories... I'm sure you've heard this a million times, but in the odd case that you haven't, Russell, your people want to know this. Okay? The number one question is: How do I know which story to tell? Russell: Ooh, that's good. Josh: Right? It's the hardest thing because people are like... And it's always hilarious because I'll sit down and I'll be like, "Well, what story are you trying to tell?" And they're like, "I don't know." And I'm like, "Well, here's your life story." And I will tell them because I'm like their coach and I've been around them for six weeks or whatever it is. And I'll go, "Here's your story. Boom, boom, boom." And I'll summarize their entire life in 30 seconds. And they're like, "How did you do that?" And I'm like, "Because it..." Well, anyway, I want to know the answer to their question. How do you know what story to tell? Because everybody has these. We're so close, right? And for me, I'm about to turn 28, right? My 28th birthday, we'll do a big birthday bash. Russ is coming on. It's going to be great. We're going to want to do podcasts. It's going to be so cool. Right? But it's like I've got 28 years worth of experiences. How do I know what to tell? Russell: Yeah. It's fascinating. When I wrote the first version of the Expert Secrets, I didn't know that was the question people had. I didn't even know how to answer. It never crossed my mind. And anyway, I wrote the second version of the Expert Secrets and I'd seen it, so I'd updated it. But no one ever commented. And it wasn't until... Actually, you came to it. You came to the most recent FHAT event I did, right? The expert one? Yes, okay. Josh: Yeah, not the e-com one, but yeah. Russell: Yeah. So the first time I shared that publicly was at that event, and I remember it was fascinating because Steven Larson is probably one of the people that have studied me the most. And he raised his hand like, "Oh my gosh." He's like, "I finally understand what story I'm supposed to tell." And that was coming from Steven who like... And I was like, "Interesting." So, this is the problem I think that... And I always tell people, "Tell your backstory. Tell the origin story." So they're like, "Okay. I was born in Provo, Utah, March 8th, 1980. It was a cold night." And they, they go back to there, right? Because they think that's the story, because I tell them, "Tell your origin story." And it wasn't until at that event... Again, I think, I'm pretty sure in the second version, the hardbound version of DotCom Secrets, it's in there. But it was that event where I really said, "The story you're telling is not like your origin story. It's your origin story of how you came upon or created or figured out your framework. It's your interaction with the framework you're sharing." That's the key, right? So, when I'm talking about the perfect webinar, for example, the origin story I'm telling is not my origin story. It's my origin story discovering this framework. So, for example, I went to Armand Morin's event and I saw people speaking on stage. I did the math, and then I spoke on stage, and I looked like an idiot. And I went back home, and then I bought Dan Kennedy's course. I realized it was wrong, and then I went through the thing. And so it's that story, it's how I learned or I earned this framework. Like how did I come up with... What was the things I went through to discover this gem that I'm bringing now from the top of the mountain down to them, saying like, "This is the thing I found out, and this is the story about how I found it. Let me share it with you." And be like, "Ooh, I want that gem. I want that gold nugget." And then they come with you on the journey to go and get that with you. So, that's the most simple way I've figured out how to explain it. I'm curious on your side, because you've explained versions of this as well, would you add to that or change it? Or what are kind of your thoughts on it? Josh: Well, so let me start by telling you the biggest struggle that I had. Like I'm talking for over a year of reading Expert Secrets, I struggled with one specific thing that I could not figure out, and it was the question that I wanted to ask you for the longest time. And then like right before we got an interview, I figured it out. I was like, "Oh my gosh." But it was I didn't understand the difference between the backstory and secret number one. And what I meant mean by that is like, to me, I'm like, "First you discover funnels, and then you teach them the framework for funnels. It's the same thing." But then you would say they're different. And I'm like, "How?" Right? Like I don't understand the difference between those two things. Now, at first I didn't understand it at all. And then kind of my first epiphany or my first breakthrough was, "Oh, wait, wait, wait, wait. First the backstory introduces the thing. And then secret number one has the framework for the thing." Right? And so then that was kind of my first realization of like, "Okay, these are separate. It's one, it's the thing. And then the framework for the thing." But then I would look at your webinar and I would go, "Russell, Russell, what's your framework? Like what's the framework to build a funnel?" I'm like, "It's hook, story, offer." That's what I thought, right? I'm like, "In order to build a good funnel, it's hook, story, offer." And then I was like, "Well, maybe that's not the framework. Maybe it's add all the upsells and break the beliefs, and then go through." And I was like... But no matter what it was, it was never... Like the framework for building a successful funnel was never to go and model somebody else's funnel, and then build all the up. I'm like, that's a thing, but that's not the parts of a funnel. Right? And so I got confused because I thought the framework that I was supposed to teach in secret number one was the parts of the thing, not the framework for how to build the thing. Right? And so I think one of the biggest 'aha' moments for me is like each part of the webinar that you're doing is its own separate section, and they build off of one another, but they're also each standalone. Right? And so I thought that the backstory or that the story that I told in the backstory was the story through the entire webinar, and it's not. Right? And so whenever I would hear you say, "Well, tell the backstory about how you learned it and how you earned it," I thought it was like that was the story for the webinar, and then I had to go through and tell each thing. And then I realized that there's a separate story for each thing. Right? There was a separate story for the backstory. And by the time you're done with the backstory... And I think it was you that said it. I go back and forth. I really like how Dan Henry explained some of the things specifically when selling courses, because that was the other problem, was you were selling a software and I was like, "Well, what happens if I'm not selling a software? Oh, crap. Where does it fit in?" Right? But I think it was you that said by the time you're done with the backstory, there's a percentage of your people that are ready to buy. And I'm like, "Whoa. That's the story that I've got to figure out." And so for me, I was like, "What is the story that I have to tell, that if I were not allowed to tell secret one, secret two or secret three, people just took me at my word that what I said was the solution to their problem? What's that story that I have to tell that people would go and buy?" And I became obsessed with that, and that's what I call a master story. Because I'm like, to me... And that's why I was telling you where I was geeking out about it. I'm like, to me, once I figure out that, and I've gone through and taught all these students how to teach stories, if I focus all of my time on the three secrets, we never get anywhere. Like literally. It's ridiculous. We'll spend so much time, and then they'll do the presentation and it won't work. But if I spend 80% of my time on just the backstory and we get that right, they basically figure out the other three secrets like that. And I spend 20% of my time in the other three secrets. Russell: That's fascinating. Josh: Yeah. Russell: Because I spend both of my time doing the three secrets, because that's where people get stuck on my side. But man, the way you frame that's really cool, because I always think about... There's different markets I go after, right? So if I'm going after like a beginner market, my first thing is telling the potato gun story, because it's like, "I had a potato gun, we had an upsell, da, da, da." And for beginner, like... Josh: Which 100%, by the way, 100% of what I've done... The last like six, three months I've been doing sales calls like crazy. Whenever I mention the master story, I go, "Hey guys, do you know Russell?" They're like, "What's the master story?" I'm like, "Do you know who Russell Brunson is?" They're like, "Yeah." I'm like, "Do you know the potato gun story?" 100% of the people say yes, every single time. There's not been a single person... I'm like, "That's his master story when it comes to funnels." Anyway. Russell: That's always interests me because I have a different master story if I'm going over like a more advanced audience, which is the master story of no VCs. Right? So it's like, "We're competing against InfusionSoft and all these things. They had a hundred million dollars in funding. We didn't have any money. We were broke. And so we put this thing together. Da, da, da." And they're like, "Now we get customers for free, and then they buy software." And that master story is what sells it to more of like the corporate, like the business owners who think through the world of like investing. So, that's story that I lead... If I talk about potato guns with them, they're lost, right? So again, it's like, people are like, "But I only have a story." It's like, "No, you have different stories. What are the stories that fit the audience?" Dan Kennedy 101, message to market match. Like how do you connect these things? Right? It's like here's the market I'm talking to. In fact, I think you know this. We bought Doodly.com and we bought like Brad Callen's whole company. And these people, I didn't realize at the time, I thought they were internet marketers using software to make sales videos. But no, they were actually course creators who don't know anything about marketing. And so I went and did my webinar pitch to these people and it bombed, and it was like the worst thing ever. And I was like, "What?" And it was like, "Oh my gosh. I didn't understand the market." And so I had to change. So we rewrote it, changed the story, changed the thing to match the market we're going after. And now it's converted really well. But it was like, it's just understanding that in every situation, like figuring out, "Okay, who am I actually speaking to? So there's the market. And what's the message, the story I think I have that's going to match that to then bring them into our world?" Because I'm selling the same product, no matter what, but there's different stories that's going to hit different markets as you go through. You'll probably hear me quote a lot more Dan Kennedy in your future, as I'm going through all his courses again right now, and having the time of my life with it. So... Josh: Yeah. Well, it's just interesting, just going back to that one concept of like the first core story, the master story, the backstory of it all. I think one of the big problems that I know I ran into this is, once again, I thought the whole webinar was designed to teach and educate. Like that's when I would introduce and teach it, the whole entire process. But it's not. Like secret one, secret two, secret three are designed to educate on the thing that you introduce in the backstory. Right? And for me, with the people I work with on a pretty consistent basis, it's like they don't understand that either. And so when I go in and I'm like, "No, no, no, no, no. Forget about teaching them about it. You have to teach them what it is, why it's so important." And I always go back to that story when you were like no one was buying it and then you're like, "Do you understand what I went through then?" I'm like, "That! That's what you're trying to create." It's like forget the framework for it. Forget how it works. Forget why it worked for them. Forget the external objections for a second or whatever. Like what do you have to do that, if you didn't get to do anything like that, how would you convince somebody that this is the most greatest, amazing thing, and then be like, "And just take my word for it that it's going to work for you." Like, what's that story that you would tell? And for me, once I identified that was what it was, and I started working on my students with that, all the rest of the webinars and find new challenges and everything became easy. Whether it was Catherine Jones when we worked with her, whether it was Brad Gibbon, casual tactics, like all of them, it was like, once we figured out that, then all the rest of the things fell into place. Russell: Yeah. It's fascinating because the reason why I bombed when I first started versus why I started studying dance stuff, is that realization of just like, "They haven't bought into the fact that they want to funnel yet or that they want weight loss or whatever the thing is." Like your only goal during the webinar or the challenge or whatever is to convince them that this is the vehicle that's going to be the most likely successful to get up on that mountain and get the result that they've been looking for. Because they've been looking for the result for a long time, right? I think Katlyn said the average woman goes on eight diets a year. Right? So it's like, now that they're like, "Oh my gosh, I'm going to lose weight." It's not like this, "Oh my gosh, I'm going to make money. Oh my gosh, I'm going to..." Like, they already want the result. They tried three or four other things. You're trying to convince them that your presentation or your challenge or whatever is to convince them that of all the different potential opportunities, that your new opportunity is the one that's most likely to get them success. And if they buy into that, then you can take them on the journey. But you start teaching around the gate. You're trying to take them on this journey, and they're like, "Wait, but there's like 10 other options. I don't think you're the right... I don't even know if you're the right option. I have no idea." So your job and your role is 100% only there to convince them that this is the most likely thing that's going to give them the success they're looking for. And yeah, then you won. Then you can bring them into world. Now you can serve them. Now you can change their life. But until you've sold them on the fact that your vehicle is the one that is most likely to give success, you can't serve them. You can't change their life. You can't do anything. And so that's what we got to become really good at is that transition. So, anyway, so fun. Josh: All right. Well, that'll wrap up the story episode there. I think that was really, really good. I think we got a lot accomplished. Russell: We should go, another time, or next time you're a voice, we should do like a half-day live with everybody on like the master story. That'd be fascinating to go deeper just on that, without the context of having to have all the rest of the webinar things. I'd love to geek out with you deeper on that. So, there's the thought. If you guys want more of that, you got to let me and Josh know, and maybe next time we're around some UFC fight or some fake YouTube boxing fight, we'll plan something fun like that. Because that'd be really cool to go deep on that. Josh: That fake YouTube boxer fight, that's 5 and 0, right? Oh, man. All right. Russell: All right. Thanks, you guys, for listening. If you enjoyed this, please let us know. Tag us on social. Tweet us out. Instagram us. YouTube... I don't know. All the different places. Josh: Don't tweet us. Russell won't tweet at you. He'll just fake like your tweets. Instagram? Instagram. Russell: Tweet at Josh, and then I'll share it. Josh: Yeah. Russell: My team will share it. Anyhow, let us know. We're enjoying doing these, and hopefully you guys love them as well. And the last way, if you want to help grow this podcast, please just tell other people about it. And yeah, that's all I got. Thanks, everyone. Thanks, Josh.

Breakfast With Champions
Episode 462 with Kim Walsh Phillips - The Secret To Closing a Sale

Breakfast With Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 30:58


Thank you for joining us on Breakfast With Champions! Today we hear from Kim Walsh Phillips, Kim Walsh Phillips is the founder of Powerful Professionals, a business coaching and education company. She went from 32 clients to over 11,000 in less than a year and was recently named #475 in the Inc 5000 and is an MBA-free self-made millionaire. Named “a must to read by those in business” by Forbes Magazine, she is the bestselling author of multiple books including "The Ultimate Guide to Instagram for Business" and "The No B.S. Guide To Direct Response Social Media Marketing." She's the behind-the-scenes secret weapon of some of the biggest names in business including Kevin O'Leary from Shark Tank, Dan Kennedy, Profit First Author Mike Michalowicz, Harley-Davidson, Hilton Hotels and High Point University and has spoken on stages beside some of the world's leading thought leaders including Tony Robbins, Grant Cardone, Barbara Corcoran and Gary Vaynerchuk. She resides just outside of Atlanta, GA with her very tall husband and glitter obsessed girls and is fueled by faith, love, laughter and lots, and lots (and lots) of coffee.

ClickFunnels Radio
How to Get the "Most Incredible Free Gift Ever" - Dave Woodward - CFR #603

ClickFunnels Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 25:05


Dave's getting the word out about an amazing new offer curated by none other than Russell Brunson himself. Russell has recently announced the acquisition of Magnetic Marketing, the company previously owned by marketing legend and mentor Dan Kennedy. Together Russell and his team have wasted no time in using Magnetic Marketing to create the "Most Incredible Free Gift Ever" (a.k.a. the MIFGE)! Not sure who Dan Kennedy is? Want to know what the MIFGE includes? No worries, just listen in to find out. Dave, Russell and other top entrepreneurs have a lot to say about Dan's legacy. Chances are his evergreen principles have already had an impact on your business without you even realizing. Head to nobsletter.com now to take advantage of the MIFGE! Join our Messenger Tribe! https://m.me/clickfunnels?ref=cfpodcast-join-CF-tribe

The Marketing Secrets Show
Forti, Funnels, and Football: A World View, Part 1

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 28:42


Russell and special guest Josh Forti dive deep into funnels,  storytelling, and building your own reality. Find out how to break free of what's expected, how to create your own rules, build your own world, and be OK with being different. Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com Magnetic Marketing ---Transcript--- Russell Brunson: What's up, everybody? This is Russell Brunson. Welcome back to The Marketing Secrets podcast. Today, I've got two things for you. Number one, I got kind of a cold so if I sound a little funny, that's why. Number two, is you guys loved our last three podcast episodes with Josh Forti, so we thought we should do it again. Today, we jumped on a call and we recorded three more episodes for you, and they've been a lot of fun. The first episode was all about just kind of... It was an interesting conversation, and I think it took us a while to get exactly to the point. But by the end, the end of of it wrapped with some really cool thoughts and ideas and I think some clarifications that'll help you guys a lot. But it was all about I'm in this world of funnels, and how has that affected my world perspective, my world view and, everything else happening around me? And how does that work for you with the thing that you're most passionate and most obsessed with? And so I think you guys will enjoy this conversation. With that said, I'll queue up the theme song. When we come back, you have a chance to listen in on a conversation with me and Josh Forti. What's up, everybody? It's Russell Brunson. Welcome back to The Marketing Secrets podcast. A little while ago, Josh Forti and I did a couple episodes. We've done this three times now technically. This is the fourth, but we did an episode a little while ago, just to see how you guys liked it. And the feedback was amazing. I got tons of good feedback. I think you did as well, right? You saw everyone. Josh Forti: I got tons. I sent you some of them. We convinced somebody to start a podcast over it. Russell: Because of the... Yes. Josh: Because of the podcast. Russell: ... podcast. We are having little podcast babies now because of what happened last time we hung out, and I'm pumped. We're jumping back in. We got three episodes of recording today. I know the title of the topics, but that's about it. I don't know where we're going, the direction, but I'm pumped and excited and just grateful for you, man, doing these. I really enjoyed it last time. I left afterwards pumped and on fire and had a ton of energy, so I'm excited for this. Josh: Heck yeah. That's awesome. Well, are you sick? Russell: Yes. I have a little stuffy nose, so I apologize in advance if I sound... My voice sounds deeper though, so I sound more masculine which is kind of cool. But yeah, definitely got a little bit of a cold. Josh: Oh, man. As long as it's not COVID. Russell: Oh, yeah. No, I did that. We're good. The antibodies are flowing through my body, so I'm pretty good there. Josh: Heck yeah. Russell: Well, what's the plan today? What are we talking about for this episode? Love to get kind of- Josh: Are we doing intros or are we just jumping in? Russell: This is the intro. I'll do intros. Josh: This is it, we're in. We're rocking and rolling. Russell: We're live. Let's go. Josh: All right, all right. Let's dive in. Dude, interestingly enough, as I went back and I started going... By the way, I actually listened to all three of our episodes, even though we did them. I actually went back and listen, because I'm that geeky nerd. I was talking to one of my friends. We were sending VOXs back and forth to each other and he's like, "I just listed to my vox back to you." And I'm like, "I'm glad I'm not the only one that does that." And he's like, "Oh, no, you are the only one. I just did that one time." I'm like, "Crap. Dang it." I go back through it. I listen to VOXs and I listen to podcasts. I'm trying to figure out how I could've made them better. But what's interesting is I wanted to take this one a little bit of a different route today, to kind of kick things off. Because normally, I'd say there's two types of podcasts. There's educational podcasts, which is you're talking on a very specific topic, and you're trying to educate people on that. And then there's entertainment podcasts. Entertainment is much more... Maybe it could be educational still, but it's not designed to educate you on one specific thing, and then break all the beliefs around that thing. And then do the whole perfect webinar thing on a podcast episode. Whatever. But rather, just kind have an open conversation. And I want to open this one up, talking specifically about funnels. And not funnels and how you build them, but I want to know is funnels a worldview for you? And what I mean by that is right now, I'm really, really big into storytelling. That's kind of my thing that I'm geeking out about, is how to tell amazing stories. And I call it the master story. That's the core thing that I'm trying to figure out right now, is the master story for me is what's the one story I got to get people to believe? After they believe that story, they'll do whatever I want them to do. It's the big domino statement of stories. But as I've done that, I've kind of gone out and everything in my life now revolves around stories. I'm like, "Oh, story there, story there. Oh, that's the story? Oh, that's the story." And my whole life now is just everything is stories. Obviously, I'm a huge fan of Expert Secrets and Dotcom Secrets, and you wrote those books and everything like that. You talk about kind of building this world and this identity, and bringing everybody in. And so I'm curious for you, where do funnels play into your life besides just marketing? Is this a worldview? Is this a lens upon which you view the world? Russell: Everything. Yes, for sure it is. It's interesting. I still remember back when I first got in this game, and I was learning marketing, and then I started studying Dan Kennedy's stuff and started... And I remember starting after I got that, some of the initial inputs of this world. What's the Matrix? The red pill or the blue pill. I took the pill and all of a sudden I was like, "Oh, my gosh, I see the world differently." And for me, it was fascinating. I started loving, I became obsessed. In fact, you can ask my wife this. We first got married, we listened to the radio and commercials would come on and she'd want to change. I'm like, "No, no, no. What are they doing? Did they do a good job did, they do a bad job, and how could they have done it better?" I started geeking out on that and I started watching more infomercials. I started watching as you go down the highway and you see the billboards. "Okay. That billboard, did it make me do anything, did it not? Was there a call to action, was there not? If there was, what did... " I'd get my phone out and I call the number and like, "What happened? What was the sales pitch?" And I started seeing behind the curtain of what was happening, and I became obsessed seeing that. And I remember, this is probably a little bit prior to this, but after I started seeing things I started realizing how things made me feel. I remember in high school, I was the wrestler, as you know. and I was into my health and fitness. I didn't understand it back then, but I do remember Bill Phillips had a magazine called Muscle Media. This is probably way before your time. But it was the first muscle building magazine that wasn't... All the other ones were these dudes who were just steroided out. And Muscle Media was the dudes and the ladies in it was who you want to look like. That guys looks amazing. And he had a supplement company called EAS he launched, and so I got into supplements and got into Bill Phillips. I got into his world, where I was reading his magazine articles and buying his supplementsm and it was cool. But I remember I wanted to buy some... I can't remember what the new supplement was. And there was a GNC close to my house.And so I remember jumping my bike, riding down to GNC, being so excited to buy a supplement. And I walked through the door, and as soon as I walked through the door of the GNC, the person came out and was like, "Hey, how can I help you?" And I'm like, “uh…”, and kind of freaked out. I was like, "Oh, I'm just looking." And I got all nervous and then I kind of wandered away, and then it felt like the person was kind of following me and everything. And I remember I came there cause I wanted to buy something, but I felt so uncomfortable, excuse me, that eventually I just snuck out and I left. And I was like, "I didn't get the thing." Because I felt so uncomfortable in the process that even though I came there with my money in hand, ready to buy something, I didn't because I didn't like the process. And I noticed, I don't know if you ever go into a GNC. As soon as you walk in, they always come and they pounce on you. And even to this day when I walk into GNC, it's one of my favorite stores. But I know the initial anxiety of the person pouncing on me asking if I can help them, or what I'm looking for. I'm like, "I don't know what I'm looking for. I want to literally read the back of every label of every bottle here. I'll come to you if I need help, but don't come and pounce on me." And I started realizing that and I started thinking, "If this was my story, how would I have wanted to be approached?" And I started thinking the script. And I started thinking if I came in the door and the person says something like, "Hey, welcome to GNC today. I'm over here. If you need anything, let me know." And it was more of a deflect, I would've felt more comfortable. I would've walked around, then I would've felt comfortable coming back the person. And I just started thinking through that. Anyway, that was before I learned marketing. I remember feeling that way, and as I started studying marketing I was like, "Oh, my gosh. I now know why I felt that way. The script was wrong and the process was wrong." And I started thinking through things more like that. And I'm sure it was annoying for my family. We'd go to a restaurant and I would notice how did the server do things, and what did they say? And it started opening up for me. In fact, my junior year in high school during the summer, I got a serving job and I was serving tables. And I remember, because I would split test different things to see what would give me more tips. If I said this to a person versus this. And I remember in fact, this is a 17 year old kid who's stuck on himself. I'd roll my sleeves. "If my sleeves are rolled up and they see more of my arms, would it be higher?" And literally would split test this thing to try to figure out how to increase them. And it's just weird. That was when I was young, and definitely it's messed me up nowadays, because it's hard for me when I see every ad, everything. I want to go deep into things, and I do sometimes but sometimes it takes me long rabbit holes. I don't know if that answers the question or not. Josh: Okay. Well, I want to kind of dive further down deeper into that, because I want to expand beyond just marketing as well. Because I think any of us as marketers when we have the light bulb turn on, you take the red pill or whatever it is. I remember for me, I had that first experience with money. I grew up in a very small, small, small town. The two towns collectively combined had 750 people in them, and one bank and a gas station. Very, very small world. And then I started learning about money, and I'll never forget the day that it clicked for me. I was actually out in... I had already moved to Nebraska, and I started to realize how money flowed. And I got done reading this book, and I remember I picked up the phone and I called one of my friends who had been teaching me about money. I'm like, "Dude, I get it now. I get everywhere around. I can't not see how money is flowing and where it works." I'm like this, and now I have all these questions about it. And so I totally understand when your lights come on, you start seeing the whole world through that, for that specific thing. But I want to know what about other areas of your life, and how funnels and your viewpoint of funnels has affected that. And what I'm trying to get at and understand, is you talk a lot about in Expert Secrets, we're building this identity, we're building this community, we're building this movement, this calling. And what's interesting for me I've noticed, is that when I first got into this space, I was so new that the preconceived notions of what people should do or should not do did not affect me. Because I didn't know anything. I was like, "I know I'm an idiot." people were like, "You're doing that wrong?" I'm like, "Probably." And there was no ego in the way of it. But then as I grew, I thought there were certain ways that I had to think, or there were certain things that I had to do. And then if I broke free from the mold that everybody else was doing, then somehow that was wrong. And I struggled with that. Thankfully for me, I didn't stay in there. But what helped me get out of it, is I gave myself permission and I literally was like, "I'm doing my own world over here. Everybody else, they can have whatever it is that they want. They can make more money than me, that's fine. I'm building this own little thing." And when I envisioned myself stepping into this world, then I was allowed to make my own rules. And so the rules had to follow everything else, but people would be like, "Josh, it's super weird that you think about everything in marketing." And I'm like, "But that's my world." And so everything about my life, from what I buy, to where I live, to who I hung out with, was all shaped around that. And for a while, that was weird. And whenever I would go to my friends it was like, "You're weird." And I struggled with that. But then once I gave myself kind of permission to be like, "Well, that's just literally how I think. That's my world, and it's okay to be different." That really freed me. And so I'm curious. How has funnels shaped your world outside of only marketing? And what would you tell somebody? Would you tell someone it's okay to like view the world through whatever their new opportunity is, in all aspects of life? Does that make sense? Russell: I think so. It's interesting, because I know you're trying to get outside of marketing, but it's fascinating because in my vision of the world, like everything is marketing. Josh: That's what I'm saying though. That's what I'm saying. Russell: When I meant my wife- Josh: How has that affected relationships? When you are dealing with a problem in your family, do like go like, "What's the funnel for this?" Does that make sense? Russell: How do we craft the story, the pitch, the thing. But it's true, because I think about when I met my wife. When I met her, there were multiple people who... She was the prospect and multiple people all competing for her attention. It was like, "Okay. I've got to create a better offer. I'm not the best looking guy, so I got to... What are the tools I have to increase the value of what I have to be more attractive to her?" And things like that. With my kids right now, it's tough because my kids have got so many distractions and there's things that are way cooler than dad. I'm always trying to think through that lens of, "Okay." Josh: Wait, there's people cooler and Russell Brunson? What? Russell: You could never be a prophet in your hometown, they say. You're never cool to your own kids. But it's tough though, because I'm competing against all of... For my kids, the rappers that are in their ears, and they're listening to all these people who... That part of the world. And they got their friends and they got these... There's so many things we're competing against. It's like, "Okay. Well, how do I take them on this journey to be able to help?" And you talked about universe building, which is true. In fact, I'm working on a project with Dan Kennedy right now, and it's all about that concept of universe building, and things like that. And you look at the big companies that have done it successfully, that's what they did. Walt Disney built this universe. In fact, I've listened to the interviewed me and Dan did on Funnel Hacking Live, and he talked about Walt Disney and Hefner were basically the same business. He's like, "One had bunnies and one had had rabbits or whatever. Or one had mice, one had bunnies." But it's the same business, right? They both had a universe that people came into. And I think about that. We're doing the same thing. You create a universe for your customers. That's a lot of what the Expert Secrets and everything is about, creating this customer universe. But it's true in your office with your team, it's true with your family, it's true with your relationships. You're kind of trying to craft this environment that makes people first off want to be there and to be part of it, and then to persuade people to hopefully get the things you're looking for. All of us are in a persuasion business, even we don't want to admit it. And people are like, "I don't persuade people. I don't manipulate people." But you are. What do you want to eat for dinner tonight? You got to persuade the other person. What movie do you want to go to? Are we going to go out tonight, or are we going to sit home on the couch? You're always in this thing of persuasion. And if you look at any kind of sales environment, is the number one. The biggest, one of the most important things when you're trying to sell somebody something, is the, the environment. The universe that you put them in. It's the reason why if I do a pitch on a virtual event, where somebody is at their own home, in their own environment, and I'm giving them a glimpse in my environment. I can convert and I can sell people. But I do the exact same presentation at Funnel Hacking Live in a room where I control the environment, they're in my universe. My sales were 5-6X, even though it's the exact same presentation, exact same everything because I'm controlling the environment. And so my home, same thing. How do I control this environment, my home? And how do I structure things? And how do we set the same things? You think about in the ClickFunnels ecosystem, we've got these awards. We got the Two Comma Club awards, Two Comma Club X. We have things like that. How do we create these things for people to strive towards inside of our families? Colette and I did that a couple years ago. We were trying to figure out what's our family goals. Do we have a goal? What does that look like? What's something that we can collectively all work towards together? And in the Mormon church, one of the biggest goals is you want to get married in the temple. But to get married in the temple, you have to be living worthily. There's all these things to do. And so as a family, we set a goal. How do you explain it? If my kids get married in the temple, their younger siblings won't be able to go, because they're not old enough to be able to go into the temple to actually witness the marriage. The goal we set as a family, we set a goal of when Nora... Because Nora is the youngest. When Nora gets married, the goal is we'd love her to get married in the temple, and we want all of our family to be there. Which means all of our family has lived in a way where we're worthy to be there together as the family. That became our family goal, and it's this thing we're all shooting towards. And it's fun, because now when I'm having family conversations with my kids, it's like, "Hey, you shouldn't be doing that." It's like, "Hey, these are things that are keeping us away from our family goal." We want to do this thing in 10 years from now, 15 years ago, Nora... But the way you're living, you're not going to be able to do that. And it's less of me trying to tell them what to do, as much as this is the goal we collectively set as a family. This is what we're trying to get to. Same thing in Marketing, we're trying to get the Two Comma Club award, cool. You can go listen to forty other gurus if you want, but this is the path. This is the process. We can get you there, but if you're distracted... It's just kind of a similar thing where, you set the things inside the universe, the goals, the steps. And hopefully, everyone... Not that they will or that they want to. Maybe my kids decide they hate the universe and they want to break out of it, and that can happen, too. People don't think funnels are cool, because they don't like me. I talk too fast or I'm annoying or whatever, and they enter different a different universe, but that's okay. Josh: Yeah. And I think entering a different universe, I think maybe what I'm trying to get at is I grew up, once again, super small town. Super small world, and I just figured there was a way the world worked. Singular. That's how it worked. And as I've grown up, I was striving to figure that out. I'm like, "What's the way the world works?" And I get out there and I'm like, "Oh, my gosh. There's five million different ways the world works." And depending upon whose world old that you're in. And so I was watching the football game last night. We had it on. It was the Steelers and the Vikings. I don't know. By the way, I know you don't watch football, but I'm going to make a prediction on here for all my football fans out there. Patriots are going to the Super Bowl versus Tom Brady. It's going to be Tom Brady and the Bucks versus Bill Belichick and the Patriots in the Super Bowl. Anyway, we're watching it last night and they have this documentary that's coming out. Do you know who John Madden is? Russell: Yeah. Just from the video game. Josh: Yeah. They have this whole thing on Madden and his whole life. And it's coming out, this documentary, and they do little clips, and there's all these different little people talking about it. And they're like, "This dude, you couldn't be around him and not love football. Because he just exuded football in every aspect of his life. At the dinner table, around his family, around his friends, at the... Football, football, football, football." And it got me thinking, because I'm preparing for this interview last night. And I'm like, "That guy's whole life was football. That's how it came about. He couldn't imagine a reality where football didn't exist. "Yet there's somebody else out. There's millions, billions of people out in this world who they never heard of or think about or want anything to do with football." And so here's a guy where his whole life revolves around football. All of his analogies, all of his stories, all of his strategies, everything was football all. And then I was like, "Oh, I wonder if that's what it's like living with Russell." Everything is funnels. And it's like funnels, funnels, funnels, funnels, funnels. I feel like sometimes as entrepreneurs, I know I struggled with this for a while, and I struggled with this a lot more when I didn't know what I wanted to do with my life. When I was still trying to figure out my voice and kind of everything like that. But I'm like, "I just can't be the X guy, because that would be weird. That's not how reality works. That's not how life works. You don't just get to just focus on all of this." But I feel like it is. And I feel like you don't necessarily have to be a single thing guy, but I feel like you can. In the sense of... And that's why I'm trying to get at with you, is I feel like you've gone into this world and you've found the thing that works. And you've said, "Hey, listen, basically, in life you have to know where it is that you're going and how it is that you're going to get there." That's essentially in life, and that's kind of my core premise of everything. I'm like, "I don't care how you live in life." But I'm like, "If you don't know where you're going and how you're going to get there, your life is going to suck. You're not going to have a very fulfilled life." And so I feel like for you, you've figured out, "Okay. Wherever I want to get, this is the vehicle I'm going to use." And you've built an entire reality and universe around that. Yeah? Russell: Yeah, for sure. And it's interesting though, too, because I actually was on a call last night with Stu McLaren at their prediction college here, and he was asking my predictions for the future. And it's interesting because yes, funnels is the thing. It's my lens. And that's what people come to me. It's the lens they come through. But what I think is fascinating, and I see this with... In fact, I told Stu, I'm like, "There's an evolution. People were experts for a while and then they became influencers." And I think the next phase, it won't stick. People will still call themselves influencers, because it sounds cool and they feel the significance of that. But I think the next phase is people are going to become curators more so. Which is someone comes to me for funnels, but it's interesting because my last inner circle meeting, people pay 50 grand to be in the room. There's 100 people in this room and they're here because they want to learn funnels from Russell. We're talking about funnels and then we open for Q&A. And guess how many funnel questions came through? Zero. The questions were, "Russell, I came to you for funnels, but I trust you. I like you." And they didn't say this, but this is what happened, is they wanted to figure out how I curate. They wanted me to curate other thoughts for them. "I trust you in this, therefore what do you think about religion?" And they want me to take all my years of curation of all the ideas like, "This is what I believe." Or they're like, "How is your family successful?" And so they asked me these other questions. And I was telling Stu last night. I'm like, "Stu, you're the membership guy. People come from your memberships. But after they come in, that's what brings them into the door, but then they're coming because they want your curation of other ideas." Dan Usher. I think Dan on our team. It was fascinating, because his favorite band is Rufus or something like that. I don't really know the band that well. But he's obsessed with them and their music, and so he follows them, he loves them and everything. And he just bought his first house out here in Boise, so he needed to get art on the wall. He's like, "Well, I love Rufus. I trust them. They've curated their favorite art." He went and bought everything that Rufus ever said they like for art and put it on his wall. He's like, "Cool. Because I trust them, therefore I want this." And then he bought the furniture that they have in their house, because he trusts their opinion on this and other things. And so I think it's with Madden, I'm sure the football is what brings people in. And they come in there, they sit at the table for that. But then if they like him and they connect with him, then they want to know, "What else do you know?” I want to go down these other rabbit holes with you, because I trust you and I trust your opinion. I trust because you've already kind of done that." I think for me, that's probably more so, is they come in from one thing, but then if they connect with you then they want to dive deep on all the other pieces, the things that you find fascinating. Josh: Yeah. It's almost like they need the in to step into your universe, and then you get to build the rest of the universe out for them simply because you've built trust in that one area. Russell: Yeah. And what's fascinating. If you rewind back in my history 15 years ago, it was tough because when I was trying to create my universe, I didn't know that's what it was called. But it was funny. If you look at the landscape in our industry back then, it was interesting. Jeff Walker was the launch guy, Frank Kern was the mass control guy, Filsaime was the butterfly marketing person. Everyone had a thing where they were the best. Brad Fallon was SEO, and then you had Perry Marshall was PPC, and everyone had their thing. And I came in, I was good at all of this. I'm like, "I'm the guy who do everything." And I'd go to events like, "Cool, what do you do?" I'm like, "What do you need? I'm good at copywriting, and I can do all the things." And people are like, "Oh, okay." But then they'd go and they'd sign up for Jeff for launch. And I'm like, "I can do launch. I've done tons of launches." Or they'd go to whoever for copywriting, John Carlton for copywriting. I'm like, "God, I've done all these things." But there wasn't a thing. It wasn't until I specialize in. "Okay. Funnels is the thing." And it was a narrow focus where people could attach a thing in their head like, "Oh, Russell is the guy who does funnels." And they do that. But they come into the... That's the doorway that brings them into my world. But inside the funnel world, what is there? You can launch a funnel. There's copywriting, there's traffic driving, there's all these other things. But I had to bring them in through a channel they could connect with, they could label me with. You know what I mean? But after they're in my universe, there's all sorts of stuff I can do with him. Josh: I feel like that right there was the core of what I was trying to get after. I think a lot of people struggle with or are afraid to claim their thing, because they're like, "I can't just claim it." Funnels. Russell could claim funnels because that was a thing, but was it a thing before Russell? Was there a funnel... You are the one that came in and nobody came to you and was like, "Russell, you're the funnel guy. Go." You were the one that had to decide that. You were the one that had to come in and be like… Russell: And it's fascinating, because I was the only one back then talking about it. There was a bunch of people. In fact, I remember Todd and I started building ClickFunnels. And I remember about that time it was T&C, so it was the T&C before we launched ClickFunnels. And we got T&C, we were sitting in the audience, and Todd and I are mapping things out, and we're talking back and forth. And the entire T&C, that event was about funnels. And so Ryan was on stage, Perry was on stage talking about funnels they developed. "This is the funnel framework for all funnels." They sold the $18,000 funnel coaching program and half the room signed up, and all this stuff. And I was like, "Oh, my gosh. That's what we're trying to go, but they just took it from us." And then it was crazy. After that T&C, then everyone was talking about funnels. And it was funny, because the next week everyone became a funnel consultant. All of a sudden, 2,000 little funnel consultants were running around the internet talking about funnels. And I remember Mike Filsaime had done something showing behind the scenes of one of his funnels, and I remember somebody else got mad. I'm like, "We're the funnel person. You shouldn't be talking about this us." And I remember Mike and him were fighting back and forth. I was kind of watching this and I was like, "We have this software coming out called ClickFunnels. And I have this book I'm writing that's almost done called Dotcom Secrets, which is all about funnels." And so I was stepping in this thing where there was a whole bunch of noise around this topic, and I could have been like, "Who am I? I'm not qualified." Whatever. But instead I was like, "You know what? This is what I'm obsessed with. And I'm just going to do my thing, and I don't care about everybody else." And so I just did my thing and came out there, and there were people who... I can't tell the actual stories, but there were people who were upset. "You shouldn't be talking about this, Russel. This is so and so's thing." And then at TNC the next year, there was some weird comments from stage made about stuff. Because in fact, somebody said from stage, "Because of what we talked about last year at T&C, Russell created ClickFunnels because of us." And they gave them credit for this thing. And it was just this craziness. But man, we were the only ones who took it and that were consistent, consistent, consistent, consistent. I'm seven, almost eight years into the consistency, which is how you define the path. That's how you get the... You look at Jeff Walker, who's been talking about product launches for 20 years. Therefore, he's the product launch guy. People try to come dethrone him, but he's been consistently talking about the same thing for so long that you can't. And so the biggest thing is picking the platform, and then you just triple down on it and you keep doing it, and doing it, and doing it. And eventually, you will rise the Victor. But most people don't have the longterm, the patients to keep just drilling in for long enough to make it stick. Josh: Yeah. And I think that a lot of times, at least in my experience, and it could be different for other people. But a lot of times, it's because you're just not confident enough in it. The only thing that's going to be the difference of whether or not it's going to stick or not, is whether or not you're confident enough to follow through. That's not necessarily true for every single product universally. Sometimes the market doesn't fit, and sometimes there really is... If you tried to launch a competitor to iPhone right now, you're probably not going to make it. But generally speaking, especially in our world with funnels and experts and a lot of online influencer marketing and things of that nature. It's basically whoever sticks at it the longest and then creates the clearest, simplest stories, the clearest, simplest frameworks, and the easiest way for people to be able to get results with it, are the ones that are actually going to make it and follow through. Russell: Yeah. That's the game, and it's so much fun. Josh: All right. Well, I'm ready to move onto topic number two here. We're about at time. Russell: All right. Josh: You ready to rock and roll? Russell: We'll wrap it up. Thank you guys for listening. If you enjoyed this, let us know. Otherwise, we'll never do this again, so if you loved it, tag me and Josh on Facebook, Instagram, wherever you guys do stuff. If you tweet, I probably won't see it there, but tweet it up and let us know, and we'll come back and do some more of this stuff.

Edge of NFT Podcast
Metaverse Panel Feat. Ed Mason Of Frogland And Daniel Kennedy Of NetVRk (Recorded From Miami Crypto Experience)

Edge of NFT Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 61:52


In this bonus episode recorded live from the Miami Crypto Experience convention Eathan, co-host of Edge of NFT, explores the Metaverse with two folks who are building their own pieces of it. Edward Mason is the founder and CEO of Frogland. He recently presented NFTs, Metaverse and Frogland to the United Nations. He is a pioneer in emerging technologies. He has partnered with Nvidia, building XR products and prototypes for companies like Samsung and Mattel. Dan Kennedy is the CEO of NetVRk, whose token can be used to buy assets within the virtual reality world (Assets can include buildings, vehicles, houses, land, advertising and more). Dan has a background in real estate and finance, and is captivated by cryptocurrency and the intersection of DeFi, NFTs, and the Metaverse, which he is currently building.

Dan Kennedy's Magnetic Marketing Podcast

Do business on YOUR terms. Most businesses don't do this. Big mistake. Dan Kennedy opens up Pandora's Box and lets loose the idea of ‘earned entitlement'... and your duty and responsibility to operate this way in your business.

The Marketing Secrets Show
Curation Secrets

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 15:51


A new way to look at your role as an expert or an influencer. Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com Magnetic Marketing ---Transcript--- What's up everybody? Good morning. This is Russell Brunson, and I want to welcome you back to the Marketing Secrets podcast. Today we're going to talk about curation secrets. All right. I just dropped my kids off at school and I've been thinking about this for the last, man, couple months. I keep thinking about doing a podcast about it, and then I struggle, I can never remember the word curate. I always forget that word so every time I try to do it, I'm like, "Oh, what's that word? What's the word? It starts with a C." Anyway, but I remembered this morning, so you're getting a podcast. I hope you're okay with that. So I want to talk about curation, that word curate, because I think that the future... People always ask me like, "What's the future? What's going to be the big thing in '20..." What year we in? 2021. So what's 2022, "What's the big thing? And what's the future?" And it's interesting because I honestly believe the future for all people like us, for businesses, for brands, for influencers, for whatever you want to call yourself, is really understanding and mastering curation and from a lot different angles and directions. I come back and I look at what I've done over the last 20 years of my business, right? People always ask, "What are you? Are you an author, an entrepreneur or a speaker or whatever?" I'm like, "When all is said and done, if I really look at it, if I'm completely honest with myself, I'm a curator." That's what I do. I curate ideas, right? I go and I find the best ideas in the world and I curate them together and then I give them to my audience. Like you think about Dotcom Secrets, Experts Secrets, Traffic Secrets. What are those books? Those books are me spending 20 years of my life curating ideas, right? I go and I've read hundreds of, maybe even thousands of these kind of books, and courses and podcasts and audience, and I go and I take these principles and these things, and I test them and I try them and I try to figure out what's going to work. And from all of the stuff, all of the learning, the ideas, the everything, I take all these things and I curate them into a way that I can engage my audience, right? And so for me the curation initially all happens through my books. So here's Dotcom Secrets, it's my curation of everything I've learned and experimented and tested on sales funnels. And essentially, look, you notice for the most part... There are definitely things in all my books that are my thoughts, but for the most part, it's like, I took a framework of other people's thoughts, ideas, and I tested, tried all sorts of stuff. And from the curation, from the testing those things, out popped my frameworks. In fact, I was talking to this guy that goes to church with me yesterday about this. And he asked he's like, "How do you develop your frameworks?" And at first I didn't know how to answer. And I was like, "Well, it's kind of like I try to take the best from everybody, right? And it's kind of like grabbing sand and I throw it in this big sifter, right? And I'm sifting it out and I'm taking everybody's principles and I'm sifting it and all the sand's falling out and what's left behind is the truth, the principles, the core philosophies or ideas that are actual truth." "And from there is where I build out these frameworks." And I think for all of us, it's kind of similar, right? We're going out there, we're studying, we're learning, we're testing, we're trying, we're figuring things out, whatever business, whatever market, whatever thing you're doing, and then from that, your frameworks kind of appear, right? They rise from the top after you're sifting and sorting through all the things that are being put out there and you're taking it back to your audience and you share like, "Here's the things that are working, here's what I figured out." And so you're curating ideas. And so it's interesting because I started thinking about that and I was actually talking to Dan Usher on my team and Dan... Sorry, I'm turning left here, make sure I don't get hit by a car live on my podcast. All right we're good. Anyway, so Dan, I was talking about that. I was like, "I had this big realization that my role, I'm a curator, I curate ideas, right?" And then Dan kind of help take it to the next level. He talked about his favorite artist is Rufus, right? And so Rufus is, I think that's not the full name of the band. I'm probably messing it up. But anyway, for those who know this artist, that's a band or an artist, whatever, right? And Dan loves this person. Follows them, listens to all his things. He's one of his thousand true fans, right? Buys all the CDs, merch, everything. But what's interesting he says that Rufus, this band, they go and they curate things. So it's like, "This is our favorite art, this is our favorite things, this is our favorite..." And so Dan just recently moved from Canada to Boise, bought his very first house or he is renting his first house, and when he is like, "I have this house now I got to buy furniture, I got to buy paintings or pictures and all this stuff," He didn't go and try to figure out, "Well, what's my taste, what's my style?" He said, "Okay, I trust Rufus. Rufus is my favorite band, but I also trust their style, I trust their design." And he went and he found stuff that these guys had already curated, like here's the best pictures, here's the best furniture, here's all these things. And he just bought what these guys recommended. They had curated, he trusted this person, this band, this person that he trusted as a curator, right? Because he's got the best music, he's got the best taste, got the best everything. And he just took that and went and pimped out his entire apartment with Rufus stuff, right? Not just the Rufus's things, but things that they had said, "These are our favorite items," right? And basically, that person curated things together. And I started thinking about this, in our world, when you start your own company or you start your own brand, right? People come in for a thing, people come into my world because they want to build funnels. But then they get to know me, they build a personality... they build a connection with me as a person, they start seeing all these other things that I do, right? And it's interesting because the questions I get most of the time nowadays, even in my inner circle, people paying 50 grand a year to be in this inner circle, and I open up for Q&A's and like, "What questions you got?" The questions are rarely ever about marketing. They're about all these other areas of my life, right? They're like, "How do you do these things with your family? How are you able to keep balance with your family and your business and your religion, all these kind of things." I have a lot of people ask me about my religion, "I want to understand your faith more." I have a lot of people ask me about my supplements, right? Like, "How are you still in good shape? What supplements do you take? How do you eat? What's your eating protocols," right? "What's your morning routine?" People started asking me all these other things. They came to me for funnel building, right, but then they trust my opinion. And now they're asking me what I think about all these other things. And so, obviously I haven't at this point done that but if I were to go curate a book on my supplement routines or curate a product on my eating or my religion or my personal development beliefs or all these different things because they came in and they're connected with me just like Dan is connected to these artists because he loves their music, but because he trusts them, likes, knows and trusts them, he's looking at the curation of all the things that they offer and they talk about and he's diving into all those things. And I really think that's the future for all of us who are artists, who are influencers, who are creators, experts, whatever you want to call yourself, is people are going to come in for your core expertise but then they're leaning on you to curate concepts and principles and ideas in all aspects of their life. And so this kind of leads me to honestly what I feel is the next phase of my own personal mission. I haven't talked a ton about this publicly yet, because it's still happening. A couple places I've talked about so you may or may not have heard of this, but one of the big projects I'm doing right now is I'm actually building next door to the ClickFunnels HQ office, a library, a 20,000 square foot library. And people are like, "Why are you building a library. That makes no sense this, you're going to give people library cards?" I'm like, "No, no, no, I'm building this library curated with the books and the things that mean the most to me." And I've had this weird feeling where I keep getting drawn to these people who have died, who have written amazing books in the personal development, in the advertising space. And so in fact, recently I went out and I spent multiple seven figures acquiring Napoleon Hill, a huge Napoleon Hill estate, with a whole bunch of first edition copies of a whole bunch of stuff he's done. Over 250 pages of stuff that he, from his typewriter he hand-typed and then wrote his notes on and it never got published, a bunch of books that he wrote that never got published. All these things I bought and I've collected them now, and old magazines and all these things from Napoleon Hill, but also Dale Carnegie. And also Orison Swett, who's the guy who started Success Magazine as well as his mentor and other... And I've been going down this rabbit hole, literally traveling the world, acquiring these old things. I've spent insane amounts of money in the last 45 days on eBay, acquiring all these books and things. And I'm getting all of the best, the best, all of these.... the best personal development books, the old advertisers, the old business people and I'm collecting all their stuff, so I can start going through them and studying them and then curating them and putting them back together and something I can then give back to my audience saying, "Okay, I was able to go deep for the last two years on all of these, the personal development from the early 1800s till now and go through all the thoughts, all the philosophies, all of the things. And from these, I've tested in my own life, in lives of people that I've had a chance to work close with. These are the things that rose to the top," right? Right now I'm going through the process of taking all of the sand, right? Literally I would say conservatively, I've bought a thousand books in the last, man, 60 days from people who have passed on in the personal development space and I'm taking this, this is the sand, right, and I'm going to be going through all of this material and sifting it out and sorting it and letting the sand kind of fall out and seeing what are the nuggets that are left behind, the things that are universal principles that are true today, tomorrow and forever, that I can then take and turn into frameworks so I can then give back to you guys. In fact heard Rich Schefren say this one time, he said, "My job, my role, is to think for a lot of other people." I feel like I'm the same way. You could have gone and read the 300, 400 different marketing books, gone through 10, 15 years of testing and trial, signed up for the masterminds of courses, listened to all the podcasts, all the things I did over the last 20 years, you can go do that and go figure it out or you can trust me. If you trust me, trust me to curate together and say, "Boom, here's DotCom Secrets, here's Expert Secrets, here's Traffic Secrets, here's the core things you need to know." Right? And for me, it's the same thing anyway, you can go and spend multiple seven figures on eBay, buying every old book on these topics and go through them and study them and test them and try them. Or you can come back to me as a curator and say," Look, I trust you, Russell." And I can say, "Cool, of all the stuff I went through after sifting and sorting, these are the things that rose to the top. Here's the frameworks I developed. Let me give these back to you now." Right now, I'm doing the thing with Dan Kennedy's company. I bought Dan Kennedy's company. I got 40 years of intellectual property. I literally have hard drives with insane amounts of stuff on it. I'm going through there right now, and I'm sifting and I'm sorting and I'm curating and bringing the best stuff out, so I can come back to you guys and be like, "Boom, here's the stuff." And for me so far it's been so exciting. I'm having the time in my life doing it, but that's my role is I'm a curator. And eventually I'll curate stuff on my health beliefs. I'll curate stuff on my religious beliefs. I'll curate things, all these things so that when you're coming to and you connect with me as an influencer or an expert, or whatever you want to call me, that you'll come for one thing. But then if you like the way that I live my life, if you like the things I'm doing, you'll probably look for other things like, "Well, what else does he have? What else does he recommend? What are the things that have given him the biggest impact? I want those things as well" Because that's what I'm realizing in my life is that that's my role. I'm a curator, but I wanted also for you guys to realize that you're probably a curator as well. You probably never looked at it that way, but you're curating ideas, concepts, principles, and you're sharing them with your audience, right? And the better you become at this, the more talented you are at taking these ideas and simplifying them for your audience. Think about this, I read all these books, spent all this time in masterminds, and from there I wrote the DotCom Secrets book, which simplified all these principles, right? And then from there, we created software that simplified it even a step further. Our role is to take these principles and simplify them and simplify them and simplify them, and whoever can make them the most simple will be the person in the market who makes the most money. So your job is to curate ideas, simplify them, if you can turn them into software, because that's one of the best ways to make money off anything, but it's that curation process. And then giving them back and like, "Boom, here's the most simple version of all this stuff. I did all the work for you. I've curated, I've simplified it. And I'm giving it back to you in a format that you can actually take and apply. And you're going to get a thousand years worth of thought and effort and work. And you can get it all in this book or this course, or this software," whatever it is, however you curate your stuff and bring it back to the market. So I hope that that helps you guys to kind of look at your business and what you do and your role a little bit differently. I know for me it has, it's got me really excited when I'm like, "Okay, this is my role, I'm a curator, I'm getting paid to think for a lot of people. Therefore, I need to put in the time and the energy, the effort to go and find these things to put them together." And someday, just so you guys know, this library I'm building's going to be amazing, because you'll walk in and the library's sectioned off based on things I'm passionate about, right? So there's definitely going to a religion section. And then in there under glass, like bolted glass, fireproof glass, will be all the first editions of some of the most amazing religious books that I've had a chance to purchase in the last year or so. And then you go to the personal development section, there'll be like, "Here's all of the personal development books I've acquired." The first edition printings under glass. Then behind it will be all the physical versions of all of the books, but they'll be... Yeah, then same thing in business and advertising, same thing in all the areas of my life I'm passionate about. I'm again acquiring all the first edition copies of these different books to put them under a glass, and then also just tons of copies of all the other ones. And so when someone comes in there and they're like, "I want to go deep with Russell." It's like, "Cool, here's the section library where we talk about this." You can go, you can find the actual things you can study and you can learn them or here's Russel's curated version of... Here's the book or the course or the thing that gives you the simplified version of it. So anyway, I'm excited, I'm geeking out. Hope you are as well. Hopefully that, by me recording this episode, I can remember the word curate, because I always forget that word, but that is the role that we are doing. And the better you get at this, again, people will come in because they want to listen to your music, but then they're going to buy things based on your style of furniture and pictures on the wall or, in the example of Dan and his favorite artist, Rufus. Or with me, they come in for marketing advice but then hopefully here in the near future, they get personal development advice, health advice, health advice, and other things I am passionate about at the geek-out level that I think most people aren't able to. So anyway, it's exciting. I'm going to curate something today for you. I hope you do as well. Thanks for everything guys. And we'll talk to you soon.

The Profitable Photographer
132: David Hilton- How To Build A Highly Successful Photography Business

The Profitable Photographer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 64:56


I'm joined this week by marketing master, David Hilton. He knows the power of branding.It begins with how you position yourself to the customer. And from there, it's all about the journey that you take them on. David's extensive business experience makes this an interview you won't want to miss.David is experienced in building businesses, guiding owners to higher profits and greater freedom. He is the author of two books on entrepreneurship: SPARK, Taking Your Business from Struggle to Significance, and The Ultimate Success Secret with co-author Dan Kennedy.As president of Hilton Photography, a business that he recently, successfully sold, he grew and managed multiple locations and recruited, hired, and trained over 500 people. He developed this company to operate profitably without his day-to-day involvement.He holds a Photographic Craftsman degree from PPA, a Doctorate Degree in Business, an MBA, a BS in Photography, and a Master's degree in EducationTune in and let's get down to business!You won't want to miss:What inspired him to major in business.Why you need to find your style.How many hours a day David spends on marketing.How to have a business and not work full-time.The details on the business he began as a child.Connect with DavidWebsite http://portraitstudiosuccess.com/Email dhilton@StrategicVisionOnline.comFacebook David HiltonLInkedInhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/davidahilton/

Real Estate Investing With Jay Conner, The Private Money Authority
Robert Bluhm, The Asset Protection Attorney with Jay Conner, the Private Money Authority

Real Estate Investing With Jay Conner, The Private Money Authority

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 2:22


Robert Bluhm is one of the nation's leading asset protection attorneys. During his 30 years as an attorney, Bob has been a trial lawyer and has represented Fortune 500 companies as well as smaller, privately-held businesses. As a speaker, Bob has shared the stage with notable political figures, such as Presidents Trump, Clinton and Bush, Margaret Thatcher, Mikhail Gorbachev, Benjamin Netanyahu, and financial figures, such as Jim Cramer, Dan Kennedy, Jay Abraham, Suze Orman, and Robert Kiyosaki. He is the author of several articles on asset protection and is a contributor to "The Asset Protection Handbook." Bob specializes in protecting real estate investors from lawsuits, lowering their taxes, and reducing the risk of an IRS audit. He and his team work with both U.S. investors and international investors purchasing U.S. real estate. Bob and his team have helped many thousands of people all over the world grow their wealth more quickly and securely. For more valuable information click on this link and watch the complete episode: https://youtu.be/Uu-v8dmuWyQ - “Protect Your Real Estate Assets Now! with Robert Bluhm and Jay Conner, The Private Money Authority” Real Estate Cashflow Conference: https://www.jayconner.com/learnrealestate/ Free Webinar: http://bit.ly/jaymoneypodcast Jay Conner is a proven real estate investment leader. Without using his own money or credit, Jay maximizes creative methods to buy and sell properties with profits averaging $64,000 per deal. What is Real Estate Investing? Live Cashflow Conference https://youtu.be/QyeBbDOF4wo The Conner Marketing Group Inc.P.O. Box 1276, Morehead City, NC USA 28557 P 252-808-2927F 252-240-2504 Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZfl6O7pRhyX5R-rRuSnK6w https://www.youtube.com/c/RealEstateInvestingWithJayConner RSS Feed http://realestateinvestingdeals.mypodcastworld.com/rss2.xml Google Play https://play.google.com/music/listen#/ps/Ihrzsai7jo7awj2e7nhhwfsv47y iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/real-estate-investing-minus-bank-flipping-houses-foreclosure/id1377723034 Watch on ROKU: Roku https://my.roku.com/add/realestateinvestingRoku https://my.roku.com/add/realestateinvesting Watch on Amazon Prime: https://www.amazon.com/How-Locate-Real-Estate-Deals/dp/B07M9WNZR6/ref=sr_1_3

Dan Kennedy's Magnetic Marketing Podcast
Two Marketing Legends In One Room

Dan Kennedy's Magnetic Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 70:55


In a rare meeting of the minds, legendary marketer Dan Kennedy interviews marketing giant Jay Abraham. In this high-level episode, you'll discover the power of pre-eminence and how to authentically connect with your audience. Jay also reveals the #1 critical mistake most entrepreneurs and business owners make when it comes to marketing and sales.

Startup Marketing
Videos and Social Media

Startup Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 40:34


Learn how to use videos on social media to grow your small business. Learn how videos can help you reach your target audience. Professional videographer tips. This week's guest is Matt Peet. Matt Peet is a Videographer turned Marketer. He got his start shooting weddings 10 years ago where he learned how to shoot and edit video fast. He then took that to the entrepreneur space and has been the videographer at large 4000 person events and small 30 person masterminds in places like Puerto Rico. Some of his clients include John Lee Dumas, Disney, Podcast Movement, Woodhouse Day Spa, and more. He has shot at events with speakers like Dan Kennedy from Magnetic Marketing, Pat Flynn, Tony Robbins, and Mark Cuban. Key Takeaways: How video helps boost your reach How video helps you engage with your target audience How to make adding video to your content easier How to find creative video content ideas What you need to film good videos Connect with Matt: https://mattpeet.com (Website) https://www.facebook.com/matthew.peet (Facebook) https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/matt-peet-marketing-podcast/id1553536313 (Podcast) Music: Tuesday by Sascha Ende, Music.io

Dan Kennedy's Magnetic Marketing Podcast
Welcome To Dan Kennedy's Magnetic Marketing Podcast!

Dan Kennedy's Magnetic Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 28:53


Welcome to the first episode of Dan Kennedy's Magnetic Marketing Podcast! Enjoy this interview between Dan and Russell Brunson where they discuss evergreen marketing principles.

The Marketing Secrets Show
ROR - It's Not Who You Know, It's Who Knows You (2 of 3)

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 22:55


In part 2 of this special 3 part series, you get to hear more of Russell's presentation at the ROR (Return on Relationships) Symposium! In this half, Russell explains how you should provide value to people before you ask them for anything. Enjoy the second half of this keynote presentation, and don't forget to check out RORUniversity.com to learn more! Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com ---Transcript--- Russell Brunson: Hey, what's up everybody? This is Russell. Welcome back to the Marketing Seekers Podcast. I hope you enjoyed the last episode for my keynote presentation at Christopher Vos' ROR Symposium. So far, in the episode number one, I had a chance to talk us through some of the history and the background of how we started building our business and I'm excited this next episode's going to be the second half of my keynote presentation. I hope you enjoy. And then afterwards, the third episode, we're actually going to, I opened up some Q & A and we had a really good time doing some of that as well. That'll be the third episode, so this episode would be the last half of my keynote presentation. I hope you enjoy it. Again, if you want to go deeper with Christopher Vos, make sure you go to roruniversity.com and get on his list, read his stuff, listen to what he is doing because he is helping a lot of people to build businesses by using relationships and really understanding how to do the stuff we talk about. I talked about Dream 100 in the Traffic Secrets book. This is what he's talking at a much deeper, much more powerful level. With that said, I'm going to cue up the theme song and when we come back, you'll have a chance to listen to second half of my keynote from the ROR Symposium. Okay. Now, I'll tell a side story because it popped in my head right now and that's what I do, right? About the time, it was after Joe Vitale promoted me, I had a list with certain sites and then I got a phone call from a guy named Tellman Knudson. Anybody here know who Tellman is? Tellman used to be big at our space. He shifted it over to more hypnosis, personal development space. But Tellman messaged me on the phone. He was like, "Hey, Russell, I had this idea. I'm building or I'm interviewing all these people and," I can't remember, "I'm going to interview you for an hour about a topic and then I'm going to put it behind the squeeze page and then everyone's going to promote the squeeze page. People are going to join my list, they'll get your interview and all the other interviews." And I was like, Uh, okay, I think that's the worst idea ever." He's like, "What do you mean?" I'm like, "I'm not going to email my list to your squeeze page so they can opt in and join your list to get my free interview. I'll just give them my free interview. Why would I do that? It does it make any logical sense." He's like, "Well, everyone's going to promote it and that way, everybody, everybody's lists, people from other lists will see you as well and it's going to be the huge thing for you." I was like, "Dude, that's the stupidest idea ever. No. No." I told him no, flat out, I was like, "This is never going to work, but good luck in your future," and I hung up, right? I was nice because on my DISC profile, I'm a high S, so I can't be mean to people. So I was like, "Okay, well, sorry." Anyway, so that happens and then fast forward three months later, all of a sudden, in one day, I get emails from everybody, Joe Vitale, the Nitro Marketing guys, all the people who are the biggest of the time, emails from everybody and I open up and it's like, "There's this guy named Tellman Knutson, the interview is on his ListBuilder and you should go check it out." And I clicked on it and went to, it was called listcrusade.com, it was his site, I went to listcrusade.com and sure enough, there's an opt-in to get all these interviews and I opted in and there's all these people's interviews. I was like, "What? How do you pull it off? You got the biggest names in the world to go and do this." And I was just perplexed, like how? I'm like, "This is the dumbest idea ever. I should have done it. If it worked, this is crazy. So I found his number, I messaged him, "Okay, tell me, I'm so confused. Can I ask you a question?" So he jumped on a call with me and I was like, "Okay. I just saw yesterday 50 people all promoted your squeeze page." He's like, "Yeah, I've added 120,000, 130,000 people to my list and the last 48 hours." And I was like, "How did you do that?" And it was so fascinating. He said, "You know what, Russell? I called 49 people and I got 49 nos in a row. First one said no, no, no, no, no. You said no. Someone said, everyone said no." And he's like, "But guess what? The 50th person," he said it was Kevin and Matt from Nitro. He said, "I called Kevin and Matt and for some reason, they said yes. And after they said yes, I was like, "Cool, do you know else would be a good fit?" And then Kevin and Matt were like, "Oh, yeah, you should get so and so and so," and then they emailed the Nitro like, "Hey, you should meet so and so and so and so," they jumped over there. Those people said yes as well." And he's like, "The next 37 people in the row all said yes." Oh, he even had Jay Abraham on the list. Anyway, he said, "The next 37 people all said yes and here we are." And I was like, "Oh, my gosh, how many of us, including me, would've stopped at the first no or the second or the third? But as soon as he got one cool kid to think he was cool, he was in. Okay? So you start thinking about this, actually, this is probably more for the women. This is embarrassing, I'm going to say this. How many you guys ever seen the movie Never Been Kissed? Drew Barrymore. Okay. Macaulay, can you act this out while I explain? Just kidding. Okay. Here's the story from Never Been Kissed. Drew Barrymore, in the movie, she's never been kissed, she graduates high school and now she's a columnist at a newspaper. She's a big columnist and her brother was the cool kid. He was the jock and the coolest kid and he graduated now he's this loser because he's graduated from high school. Anyway, she's in her day job as a columnist and they're like, "We want article from what are the high school kids doing so we need you to go undercover back to high school and find out about the cool parties and all the cool stuff." So Josie, drew Barrymore's, character goes back to high school and within five seconds, she slides back into the nerd group which they're doing chess club and all these kind of things and she's writing articles about chess club and her editor's like, "No, we don't want these articles. I want the cool kids, the drugs and all this stuff, what's happening. We want the underground dirt, that's the article we're looking for." So she tries to get in and she's like, no one will, the cool kids club will not let her in. So she's home and she's frustrated and then her brother's there and her brother's played by David Arquette and so David Arquette is jealous. He's like, "I want to go back to high school, I was the coolest kid in high school." And, and Josie's like, "There's no way, you don't understand, it's harder, it's not the same thing. If you went back to school, you wouldn't be cool." And it gives the idea for him. He's like, "No, I'm going back to school." So he somehow, and Tammy says it isn't on Netflix, I'm sure it's on Netflix. Anyway, this is your homework. Everyone go watch it. So Drew Barrymore or David Arquette's character goes back and gets in high high school somehow and she sees him in the hallway, she's like, "You can't do this. It's not going to be like, you're not going to be cool like you were before." He's like, "Watch this." So he goes into the lunch room, this is the greatest scene of all film. He's in the lunch room, he's standing up on the table and he's got this huge bucket of cole slaw and he's trying to eat the entire thing, shove it in his mouth and the whole high school's cheering him on like, "Oh," and he's eating the stuff he slams the thing down. He's like, "Oh," and that fast, he's the coolest kid in high school, everybody loves him and he's the man. And then, the next day, he's like, "Okay, I'm going to show you, Josie. I'm going to make you cool." So he goes with Josie, his sister and one of the cool kids sees him and he's like, "Oh, why are you hanging out with her?" And he's like," "Her? She's the coolest girl. She actually broke up with me, she's so cool." All this stuff. And he starts talking about how cool she is and all of a sudden, everyone's like, "Oh," and then all of a sudden the cool kids are like, "Oh, she's cool." And all of a sudden, boom, she gets sucked in. And then one cool kid thinks she's cool, the next, the next and eventually, that fast, she's cool. Okay? That was a very long story to tell you that the secret is, as soon as one kid thinks you're cool, as soon as one cool kid thinks you're cool, you're in. So Tellman Knudson, same thing. He was going back here. No, no, no, no, and he got one cool kid, Kevin and Matt from Nitro who thought he was cool and then opened up everything else. So if you guys are on this ROR thing again, a couple things that I was hoping to get through to you guys, number one is, we're shooting for the stars, that'd be amazing, but don't start there because it's going to be really hard to get in. Build your thing. Find people who are around you who are doing the same, in the same business, same industry and start building from there and start growing. As you do that, it's going to start opening more doors for you. Someone's going to introduce you to somebody else, someone else is going to introduce you and you start building this network of people and you start doing it collectively. If you do it collectively, all, what's the saying? High tide rises all boats. So it starts getting bigger and bigger and bigger and eventually, it gets easier to open the next door and the next door. And eventually, what happens is, I had this group of people, Mike Filsaime and Gary Ambrose, Brad Callen and Brad Fallon, all these people, all my friends at the time, Frank Kern, all of us who are this level and eventually, at that point, we're at the level of all these other people. But guess what? There's always a next level. And there was this guy that, oh, I looked up at this guy, crazy. He's a giant, he's got big old teeth. Anyone guess who it is? It's Tony Robbins. And Tony's the next level up here. And Tony's up there and we're all down here. And one day, somehow, one of my cool kid friends got into Tony. I don't know how or who it was or anything, but somehow, one of them got into Tony. He had a meeting with Tony and blew Tony's mind and then my friend, I actually I know, it was Mike Koenigs. Mike Koenigs got into Tony somehow, blew his mind and then, so one cool guy, cool with Tony. And then Mike Koenigs introduced him to me like, "Hey, you should meet Russell." He's so and so, and suddenly Tony, I get a, and this is the craziest experience ever, Saturday morning with my kids getting ready and the phone rings, I pick it up and it's Tony Robbins' assistant. "Hey, Tony Robbins wants to see if you can meet him today?" I'm like, "Okay, who is this?" I thought it was my friends messing with me and they're like, "No, my name's Jay Garrity, I'm Tony Robbins assistant. He's in Salt Lake City, he wants to meet with you." I'm like, "I live in Boise." They're like, "Yeah, well, he knows who you are and he meet with you. Can you get to Salt Lake?" And I'm like, "Well, it's a five hour drive. I can jump in my car." He's like, "Oh, we're flying out in three hours." He's like, "How about next week? Can you meet Tony in Toronto? He's your UPW, you can show up, go to the event, walk on fire and then he'll have a private meeting with you." I was like, "What's your name again? Is this a real person?" I'm like, "Heck yes, I'll be in Toronto next week." So the next week, I'm flying to Toronto. Again, I've never been to a Tony Robbins event so I show up with my backpack, my computer, I'm going to sit back and take notes like the internet nerd that I am. And I walk in and people are jumping and screaming and we're sitting there dancing and rubbing people shoulders and I'm so confused what's even happening. And then, we walk on fire and the first time I met Tony actually was the fire walk. He had me in a VIP section, so imagine there's 2000 people in the event and then right next to the stage, he has these two VIP sections and I actually stood next to Chuck Liddell. I didn't know who Chuck Liddell was at the time, I'm like, "That guy looks scary," big old mustache and big old muscles and I was like, but he was there. Anyway, I saw him when he went to UFC and I'm like, "That was my partner at UPW, I know everything was messed up in his life. This is so weird." Anyway. He's probably offended I had no idea who actually was. Anyway, we're in this little group so we could have a chance, to go back, the first time I met Tony is, after everyone leaves the fire walk, we walked through the front thing and they opened the curtain and Tony's standing there and he was like, "Russell, I heard so much about you," he gives me this huge hug and then we walk with him and I did the fire walk with Tony and that's my first impression. But check it out, it wasn't because I emailed Tony and tried to get to know him. I probably emailed him a lot and it never made it to the gatekeepers. But it was because one cool kid got in there and told him I was cool. And after that, it was open. Doors were open. So this is in, in my mind, this is the stuff I want you guys thinking through. Sometimes, with Dream 100, we're going to turn the relationship, we're going to give a list and we're going to send it to mailboxes and that's going to be how we grow our company. There's a place and a time for that, but that's not how it really works. It's this organic thing where it's building actual relationships, getting to know people, finding out about them and their families and how can I serve them and back here, when we're all at this level, it's like me trying to help them like, "Oh, I tried this in my business and it worked. You should try that." We're having these back and forth and it builds these relationships. And then, together, we all collectively rise up to the next level and the next level and the next level to eventually, we are the top level and that's when it gets more and more fun. So that's what I was hoping to really share with you guys, especially because I think, for some of you guys, as I'm sure for many, you look at someone who, like me, who's been doing this now for 20 years, oh, it's easy for us. Anyone will take this call. Yeah, but it's 20 years I've been playing this game. 20 years I've been putting the coins in the deposit box over and over and over and over and over again. When I found out who Dan Kennedy was, I'm like, "Okay, I want to get to know that person, but I don't know how to get there and it was like, well, there's two ways I can get into Dan Kennedy's world. I can work my way in or I can buy my way in. I'm like, working my way could take a decade or two, so I'm going to buy my way in. So I was like, "Okay, I've joined the mastermind group, I'm getting in there." And then I didn't go. I have people, oh, people that joined my mastermind group this last time around, amazing group, but there's different, everyone's got a different mindset and I have people coming in initially and they're like, "Russell, this is so cool. Can I make a testimony with my video? Hey, can I get a picture?" And they were trying to take, take, take, take, I'm like, "Ah." When I went to Dan Kennedy's group, guess what I didn't do? I didn't take from Dan. First off, because I'm scared of him. Number two, I was like, all right, I'm going to serve these guys because I want Dan to know who my name is. I don't want me to message Dan, I want people telling Dan who I am. If I can do that, that's the secret. So I'm in Bill Grazer's group, I'm serving the group, I'm trying to help as much as possible. I'm helping these offline people in this group to launch online businesses. I'm helping them get funnels. I'm helping them do the launch, I'm doing coordination. All this stuff to serve Bill Grazer's group. And Bill's like, "Oh, my gosh, Russell's really helpful." And he tells Dan, "Dude, this guy in our group, he loves you, he loves everything, he's helping our group." And I always wanted to speak at Dan's event, but I'm like, I'm not going to ask him because I don't want to do it, but I'm just going to keep serving and eventually, he's going to have to, because I do so much stuff for so many people, they're going to want to put me on stage. So I get in that group and I'm serving like crazy. In fact, after, I think it was three years in, I wanted to, anyway, I had to fly to Baltimore three times a year and it's not just flying to Baltimore, Bill was in Baltimore. You'd fly to Baltimore and then you'd drive in a taxi for an hour to get to the hotel that Bill would have it at, and after three years I was like, "I can't do this anymore." So literally, I messaged Bill, I'm like, "Hey, I'm not going to re-up this next year because I just can't keep coming to Baltimore." And he literally was like, "This is the deal, Russell, you have to be in the room so you're not going to have to pay anymore, but you're still coming." I was like, "Okay." And for the next three years, I didn't pay but I kept showing up because I provided so much value, he's like, "You have to be in this room because you're facilitating all these things." And then he had me on stage, had me on stage again and then eventually, I remember the last event I spoke at, I spoke on stage four times. I was on stage longer than Dan Kennedy was. Do you think Dan Kennedy knew my name? Yes, he did. He was like, "There's this internet nerd who keeps showing up and helping everybody, he's never asked for anything. We should get to know him," and that's how I built a relationship with Dan and then with Bill and with all these kind of things. And now, fast forward a couple years later, the opportunity to buy Dan's company's there and I'm like, what if he hates me? Because he's not going to approve ... And I literally, I faxed him because you can't email Dan, he has no email, you have to fax him. So I had to open an eFax account, write it on a piece of paper, send it, it's this whole thing. So I faxed him, I was like, "Hey, there's an opportunity to buy your company, but I just want to make sure that you don't hate me or I'm not ... We're going to be working together so I want to make sure this is going to be a good fit." And he faxes me back, he was like, "Dude, every time I've heard about you, it's you on stage talking about how good I am, you always praise my name, all these kind of things. Of course, I would love to work with you," because he knew who I was. I had been trying to serve him for all this time and I'd never asked him for something so because of that, he said yes. And now we're have this partnership and we're 30 days away from watching the new magnetic marketing and you guys are going to die when you see this, it's the most exciting thing ever, but it all came off of that, building these relationships over the long term. If you guys haven't, on YouTube, there's a video, if you type in "Russell Brunson Tony Robbins Dream 100," there's a video documenting my Dream 100 process with Tony, which was over a decade and a half to do this thing, the very first time he actually promoted me. But it wasn't me coming in like, "Tony promote, Tony, promote." If I would've done that, I would've had one meeting with Tony and that would've been the last. It was a decade of me just, every meeting with Tony, "How can I help? How can I help?" People from this company would call like, "Hey, can you consult us on this thing?" I'm like, "Yes." "How much does it cost?" I'm like, "For Tony, it's free." "I'm sure your time's valuable, we're willing to pay you." "No, tell Tony, your money's no good with Russell," because I wanted the relationship. And fast forward now, I'm going to get emotional. Oh. This isn't a story that we've publicly told, but you guys know Funnel Hacking Live, Dave had his cancer, if you know the real story, it's literally the worst kind of cancer you have, they give them like a 6% survival rate past eight months, 10 months, something like that. So we were so scared and after Funnel Hacking Live, after Tony off stage, went backstage with him and Tony was like, "How can I serve? What else, what can I do for you guys?" And Todd had the impression, "Hey Tony, this is our friend and partner Dave. He's dying. Is there anything you can do?" And Tony says, "Yes, these are the people. Call this person, call this person. In fact, I'll connect you. Here's the people." Two weeks later, Dave's flying to Dallas, he's with this doctor who does things the opposite of what every other cancer doctor does, Dave spends two weeks down there with him. I won't get too deep into the details, but discovers there's a root canal that causes the tumor, pulls his tooth out, throws the oxygen in there, oxygens his body, does a bunch of things. Two days later, Dave goes back for his MRI where they're supposed to tell him how long he's got left so he can plan with his family. They do an MRI, the doctor looks inside and says, "There's not a bit of cancer inside you. What did you do the last two weeks?" And because of my relationship with Tony, I had access to this guy who saved Dave's life. And Dave's going to be here for the next 20, 30 years because I was willing to put in, for a decade and a half, this relationship with Tony and Tony had a relationship with these other guys and man ... So is it worth it? Yes. Is it worth financially? Yes. Is it worth it from so many more things? Yes. It is. So I'm forever grateful that I didn't ask Tony to promote my thing on day one. I'm forever grateful that I didn't try to figure out what I could take. I'm forever grateful that when they asked for help, I just gave it because I love Tony and because that opened all these doors where, yeah, so whew, not planning going there, but that's the power of this stuff. So when Christopher's talking about this, I'm sure he is told his story. He had a very similar situation where, because of the relationship, his life was saved. So you never know, it's coming into these things not looking for something, but coming in as a servant. And as you have that servant feeling and you're going into it, it's amazing what doors open and you never know what door you're going to need or when you're going to need it or what the thing is or what the, you know what I mean? It's crazy. Whew. I don't know how I wrap that up or how to- Don Mamone: Do you need a minute? Do you need a minute? I mean, I'm going to step in and just say, take a drip of water. That's probably one of the most amazing stories and I have to say that you, unknowingly maybe, and the reason you needed to tell that story was because we had an ongoing over-under bet on how long it takes a speaker to cry on Christopher's stage because so many people have come up and told stories from the depths of their heart and soul. So, hey, I want to thank you for joining those of us that have joined Christopher's stage in which you have an over-under on telling an emotional story, so thanks for that, Russell. Russell: No worries. You set a environment where it was there. Anyway. Yeah, I hope that this was helpful for you guys. Again, I was like, I could go and give you guys the foundation and step one and step two and step three, stuff we talked about here, but I was like, I don't want to do that. I want to be real as possible because it's real in so many aspects of your life. And now's the time, wherever you are, is to start planting those seeds and starting looking at who can you serve, who can you serve and the more you do that, the more doors open and the more things. And it's okay eventually because I think sometimes, people are scared to ask and I would tease Christopher about this. He's been building a relationship with me for now, I don't even know, three or four years and we used to have a joke inside of the office, "What's he going to ask?" Somebody's going to ask something. "I don't know. Maybe he's just going to keep serving and serving and never ask." And then when he finally is like, "Hey, I'm doing this thing, would you be willing?" "Finally, thank you for asking." Because we know, there's always, all of us, when I was dating my wife, I was asking her on a date and she knows my intentions. If I already came date number one, "Hey, can we get a picture just in case if we get married, we'll have the ... " Whatever. If I'd done these weird things along the way, it wouldn't have worked, but like everyone knows, we're in business, we're in things like that, we know what the goal is, but we're trying to feel people out to see if they're genuine or not. It's interesting. I heard Adam Sandler talk about it one time and he was like, "I don't have very many friends." He said the reason why is because, he's like, "Earlier in my career, as I started having more success, everyone wanted be my friend. I realized really quickly they didn't want to be my friend, they wanted something from me." And the higher tier you get, you'll find out that happens. For me, I don't have a whole bunch of friends because I don't know who my friends are a lot of times. It's interesting because there was a time in my life where I thought everyone who was coming was my friend and I started giving people jobs and some of you have heard the story, I built a huge company of over a hundred people and I thought they were my friends and were here because of the mission, because of the vision. And when we had a hiccup and things kind of crashed, they all went away. And it was interesting because thought that they were coming for that. I can't remember exactly where I was trying to go with this train of thought, but ... Oh, yeah. At the higher levels, just Understand that their guards are up because they've been burned in the past and it's like, who's true friends? And if you show up as a true friend where you're giving, you're serving, they know you want to do something with them eventually anyway, that's in the back of their mind, but they're testing, is this person the person who's coming because they're trying to get something from me or someone who genuinely wants to be a friend or genuinely wants to help, genuinely wants to do something? So it's just consistently showing up for a long time and maybe it's not as fast to turning on a Facebook ad, but for the long term stability, what you're trying to do, it's the best thing. Anyway, I hope that helps. I hope that gave somebody something today.

Making Media Now
Journalist Dan Kennedy: Seeing The World From a Local Angle

Making Media Now

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 43:07


It's episode number 51 of Making Media Now and host Michael Azevedo is talking with journalist Dan Kennedy. Dan is a professor at Northeastern University's School of Journalism and writes a weekly column on media and politics for the GBH News website. From 1991 through 2005  he worked at The Boston Phoenix, mostly as the alt-weekly's media columnist. Dan has also contributed articles to a number of other publications, including The Washington Post, The Boston Globe and Nieman Lab. From 2007-2011 he  wrote a weekly online column for The Guardian. His book on a new breed of wealthy newspaper owners, “The Return of the Moguls: How Jeff Bezos and John Henry Are Remaking Newspapers for the Twenty-First Century,” was published in 2018. “The Return of the Moguls” has been critically praised by the academic publication Journalism, the trade magazine Editor & Publisher, The Boston Globe and other publications. And from 1998 to just this year he was regular panelist on “Beat the Press,” a weekly roundtable program on media issues broadcast on GBH-TV. Most recently, Dan entered the world of podcasting with "What Works," a podcast about the future of local news. Dan's collaborator in that effort is former Boston Globe editor Ellen Clegg. Making Media Now is sponsored by Filmmakers Collaborative, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting media makers from across the creative spectrum. From providing fiscal sponsorship to presenting an array of informative and educational programs, FC supports creatives at every step in their journey.   About the host: www.mrazvo.com and https://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-azevedo/   Sound Engineer: A.J. Kierstead 

The Marketing Secrets Show
What's Your Return On Relationship...? (1 of 3)

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 29:42


On this special 3 part series, you get to hear Russell's presentation at the ROR (Return on Relationships) Symposium! Russell discusses the importance of what he calls the “Dream 100”, and how it helps create relationships that support both his business and his personal life. Check out RORUniversity.com to learn more! Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com ---Transcript--- Russell Brunson: Hey. What's going on, everybody? This is Russell Brunson. Want to welcome you back to The Marking Secrets podcast. I got something special for you guys over the next three episodes. I'm actually on vacation right now, Thanksgiving vacation. My wife and my kids and I are all in Kauai, Hawaii. You might hear them giggling in the background depending on how well this microphone picks up noise. And so, I didn't have a chance to record a podcast for the next couple episodes, but before I left on vacation, I actually had a chance to be part of a really cool summit that my friend, Christopher Voss put on called The ROR Symposium. And he had me as one of his keynote speakers, and he had me talk about just my history, my journey, using relationships, and joint ventures, and things like that. The Dream 100, as I call it, to build my business and everything we've done over the last almost 20 years now. And so, it was a really special presentation. It was one that I came to with notes, but not PowerPoint slides and things like that. It was more, I just wanted to kind of share from my heart. And if you know Christopher Voss you know he's a very emotional person and he brings that emotion. And apparently, I found out afterwards, all the speakers end up crying. In fact, I did as well during my presentation. So, there's something really special in the middle that you'll find out about. But anyway, I hope you really enjoy these. They're going to help you to learn how to build joint ventures, how to find your Dream 100, how to build better relationships with people, and how to turn that into more business and help you to get your mission out there to change more people's lives. If you don't know who Christopher Voss is, I recommend following him. He told me that the best site to send you guys to... I said, "Where should I send people to listen who want to go deeper with you and learn more about relationships and how to build businesses using them?" And he said theroruniversity.com would be the best place for you guys to go. So, if you want to go deeper with Chris, go to roruniversity.com, check out what he's got there. And with that said, I'm going to cue the theme song. When we come back, you have a chance to hear the first part of my keynote presentation. As I was kind of thinking through this, I was like, "Man, there's 30-something speakers coming. Everyone's talking about different ways to do this ROR, return on relationship game. And everyone's got different ideas and things, and it got me to back, man, almost 19, 20 years ago now. And so I... If you guys are cool with it, I just want to do some story time and tell you guys my story and some of the things along the journey that I tried, that I... failures, the successes, specifically inside of this relationship, and joint venture partners, and things like that. And hopefully, it'll give you guys some comfort. Because everyone starting different points and sometimes you look at someone like me like, "Oh, well, Russell knows Tony Robbins, and Dan Kennedy," and da, da, da. But there was a day, 18, 19, 20 years ago where I was a little kid scared out of my mind awkwardly trying to message people pre-Facebook. So, I'm sending emails and trying to... and it was scary, and hard, and so hopefully, it'll give you some faith in wherever you are in your journey. Just like, "Okay, this is right. It's going to be good." It's going to be for some of us, especially the introverts like me, this is going to be something that kind of stretches you and feels uncomfortable sometimes, but then it can become something you really love and enjoy and gives you the ability to change the world at a level you never thought was possible. So, that's kind of my game plan. Then after that, we can open for some Q&A and... or whatever we want to do. Or we can celebrate, have a party, or we can sing Christopher's song and let him have a nap. Hey, whatever we want to do, it'll be fun. So, looking back, it's funny, because when I got started in this business, I was still in college. So, I had just met my beautiful wife, Colette, who I think we're celebrating our... I think it's our 20th anniversary this summer, which is crazy. So, she's stuck around my chaos for this long and she's... Gosh, she's the best. But we had just gotten married and I was trying to figure out how to support her. I was wrestling and I didn't want to quit wrestling, so I'm like, "How do I wrestle and do all these things at once?" And so, I did what most people do and I went to Google and typed in how to make money. Right? Which, who here has done that at one point in your career? And you go on this rabbit trail, right? Of like, "Whoa, there's a lot of things to do." And everyone's got a different thing, and you start joining email newsletters. You know what those are at first and you start getting these emails from all these people, and then for me, it was like I was reading blogs and then I was joining... They didn't have Facebook groups back then. They had forums. So, I was joining the Warrior forum and How-To Court forum, and then... Anyway, there's like 20 or 30 different forums. So, all day long I'm reading forums of people, and I'm getting emails, and I'm learning all these things. And it was interesting because I was learning all the different pieces, right? Some people would talk about SEO and that's what they geeked out on. So, I started reading all the SEO articles, and I started learning how to do SEO and backlinking. So, I was like, "Oh, this is how you make money." And then someone else was like, "SEO's stupid. This is how we make money," and they had a whole different strategy. And then someone else had a different strategy, and soon I was just looking at all these shiny objects and I was like, "I don't know which one I'm supposed to do." How many of you guys ever felt that before? There's like 8,000 things. Like, "Russell said funnel. Someone else said this." Like, "Ah." And so, I was in that as well, and so I was just like... I got in this perpetual learning phase, right? Where I was learning and studying, and learning and studying. Then I started watching what was happening. Right? And I was on all these different email lists, but then it seemed like it was coordinated. Once every couple months, all of a sudden I would get an email from 30 or 40 people who somehow I had got on their email lists and all of them would be talking about the same product at the exact same time. Right? And all of a sudden you're like, "Oh, my gosh. Everyone's talking about this thing." Right? And I think the first ones I saw there was an old e-book called Google Cash. And it's how people are making money on Google doing Google ads. It was Chris Carpenter's offer, and he had gotten a whole bunch of affiliates. I don't know how at the time, but he had a whole bunch of affiliates all promote at the same time, so my inbox... And I'm at college opening my inbox and there's like 40 emails from people all talking about this book. I'm like, "This is the thing everyone's talking about. It's got to be the secret." I was so excited. And I went and paid this $67 for an e-book, which no one knew what e-books were back then and we were all confused. Literally, I remember messaging the support team and I was... like two weeks later. I'm like, "When's the book going to show up?" And they're like, "It's digital." I'm like, "I don't know what that means." They're like, "It means you download it." And again, 20 years ago, that was like... that was weird. That wasn't a thing that nowadays we all get it. But back then... And so I download this book, and I'm trying to read it, and I was just like, "I paid $67 for a PDF. My wife's going to kill me when she finds out." But I'm reading it and I'm getting all excited like t's next big thing, and all of a sudden, there's this next promotion and everybody's talking about this next thing. I'm getting all these... like 20, 30 emails. And I was like, "It's got to be this," so I jumped over there, and it's started me on this rabbit trail. And I just remember being confused, and overwhelmed, and all the things a lot of us go through. Right? And about that time... This was probably the very first ever high-ticket... Not even high-ticket, like $1,00 product. There was this guy, and I didn't know who he was at the time, but again, all of a sudden the emails start flying in my inbox. Right? And they're all for this guy. They say this guy is the godfather of internet marketing and he's retiring. And because of that, he's giving away his entire empire, everything he's built. And he called it the farewell package. Like, "This is my farewell from the internet. I'm done. I'm out. I've made millions of dollars, now I'm leaving." And his name was Mark Joyner. And I didn't know who Mark was at the time, but I started reading the emails and the stuff, and I was just like, "This is the greatest thing in the world." Right? So, I remember going to the sales page, reading through it ready to try to buy it for 20, or 30 bucks, or whatever, and the price went was $1,000. And I was like, "Oh, I do not have $1,000. I've never had $1,000." My wife was working, supporting at the time, and she was making, I believe $9.50 an hour. So, I mean, it would take her, man, over 100 hours. No, because you got taxes. Probably 200 hours of her working, so that's a lot of time to pay for this $1,000 course. I remember looking at it and I was like, "Oh, I don't have any money. I'm a broke wrestler." I had just gotten married, therefore, now I'm living off my wife who's making $9.50 an hour as a receptionist where she was working at. And I was like, "There's no way I can do it." And so, I remember not being able to buy it, not being able to buy it, but I kept seeing the emails, and the promotions, and the urgency, and the scarcity, and it eventually got to the point where it was about to sell out. Probably five or six weeks into this whole thing and about to sell out. And they were closing down the cart. And I remember the night before... This is... Again, for those of you who are newer before there were webinars, there were things called teleseminars where you would pick up the phone, and you would call, and you'd just listen to people talk. And so, I called this teleseminar, and on the teleseminar these guys are talking about the Mark Joyner Farewell Package. And it was just... It was going to be gone the next day and you had to get it. And I remember listening to it and being sick to my stomach and laying in bed that night, and I was like, "I have to do it. This is my thing," and being so stressed out. And finally, the next morning I was still laying in bed. My wife woke up and I was like, "Colette, I know I bought a lot of stupid things that I haven't done anything with any of it yet, but I think this is the one. I think this is the thing." I remember asking her. I was like, "Can I buy it?" And she said something like... In fact, I talked about it. I wrote it in the Traffic Secrets book, this story, but she's like, "Well, do you think this is the one for you?" I was like, "I think this is the one." She's like, "Okay, then here's our credit card." And we only had like a $500 credit limit I had to call up my bank like, "Can you double our limit to 1,000?" This is how like green we were back then. And we did it, and I bought the course, and I remember I got the course and there was like 15 CDs, all these interviews. And so, I started listening to the CDs, and what was crazy, as Mark was talking, he kept talking over and over and over again, about two concepts. The first one was the power of your own list. He kept talking about, "You have to have your own email list, and this is how it works, and if you have an email list of 10,000 people, you send an email out to your offer, you can sell a whole bunch of your things." And I started realize, I'm like, "Oh, my gosh. This is literally what's been happening to me. I'm on all these people's email lists. They have a big email list and send an email, and if I buy a $1,000 course, they must have made 500 bucks." And I started putting the pieces together. It's like, "Oh, my gosh. This is how it works." And some of you guys... I'm not going to tell the whole story, but some of you guys have heard my story. After listening to two or three of these CDs I was like, "I need an email list." And I went down that whole journey where I got called a spammer and... Anyway, so that's... Insert that story there. I'm not going to tell that story because it's outside the context of this event. But I started trying to send email and it didn't work. And I was just like, "This thing Mark is teaching me, I need to have an email list, but everyone's got one, except for me. I don't have a list. It's not fair." And I kept listening to Mark's course, and as he got deeper and deeper in the course, he started talking about this thing called joint ventures. And he was like, "Every time you start a new company or launch a new product, the first thing we do before you buy ads or anything is we go and we have these different partners who all already have email lists." He's like, "Go with people who already have email lists, and then some of them will promote and send traffic to my thing, and that's how you make money." And I was like... I was just seeing... You know there's those curtain in front of your face, and the curtain's lifted? I saw the Wizard of Oz. I'm like, "This is how it works. You have to have an email list. If you don't have an email list, you find other people with email lists, and they promote your offer, and then the people buy your product, and then you have an email list." And I was like... It all started making sense in my head. I was like, "Okay." And then I did what I'm sure all of you guys did, especially if you've read Traffic Secrets book... And I didn't know what this was called at the time. I didn't have words for it, but it was basically my first Dream 100. I was like, "Okay. Who's got an email list?" Like, "Mark said people have email lists. We need to find people with email lists," and so that was kind of the next question. And so, I started making my first Dream 100 list. And it was funny because I had this farewell package I bought from Mark Joyner and he had all the people he interviewed. So I said, "Well, this is my Dream 100, all the people Mark interviewed." And so, I don't remember most of the names. I do remember Joe Vitale though. He was one of the names. And some of you guys know Joe Vitale. If you go to mrfire.com, he's written like 400 books. He's awesome. I wrote Joe Vitale down. I started writing other people's names down. And so, I remember I'm building this Dream 100 list and I was like, "Okay, this is easy. I'm just going to email them all, and then they're going to promote my thing, and I'm going to be rich. This seems really awesome." Right? And I'm sure some of you guys have thought of that before. Hopefully, it's not just me. So, I start emailing Joe Vitale, and I can't remember all the other names. Joe's the one that stuck out in my head. I remember emailing them all and then just waiting like, "Okay, they're going to respond back to me, and then this is going to be this big thing, and I'm going to make a bunch of money." And I think I had my first or second product at the time, so it was like I had a product for them to sell and everything. Sent all the emails out and it was crickets. Not one person wrote back to me. And I was like, "Huh." I was like, "Okay, either this Mark Joyner's full of crap or I need to send another email." So, being a relentless person, I send another email to all them like, "Hey, Joe Vitale. Did you not get my email? Because I've got this new product and if you promote it, we can split the money 50/50. It's going to be awesome." Right? Like he's for sure... Like, "I'll even give you 60% commission." Maybe I'll blow his mind. Right? So, I tell him this thing, crickets. Nobody responds back to me. And I remember just being like... I was like, "This internet thing doesn't work." So, I remember being frustrated and just not knowing what to do, not believing this JV thing actually worked. Assuming that it's impossible to build an email list and I was stuck in that rut for a while. Probably, I don't know how many, four or five months of this rut of just like, "It didn't work. I tried." And have you guys done that where you try something somebody told you and then you're like, "Oh"? It reminds me of... Well, never mind. I'm not going to tell that story, but it reminds me of just so many of us do that where we're trying to follow a guru. We try the thing and it doesn't work, and we're like, "Oh, it didn't work." It's like, maybe we just didn't execute it quite correctly. So, fast forward a little while later there was this internet marketing event. It was Armand Morin. It was called the Big Seminar back then. And it was the seminar in the industry. Kind of like Funnel Hacking Live is nowadays. It was the seminar. And so, I remember saving up some money and we flew out to... And I had made a little bit of money online at this point. Not a lot. I was making, I don't know, maybe 1,000 bucks a month or something. So, I had a little bit of money just so I didn't have to yell... borrow more money from Colette's credit card to go and go to this event. So, I fly out to this event. It's in Atlanta. I go to the seminar and I remember thinking, "All the speakers on stage, I'm going to get all... That's going to be my next affiliates or my next people I'm going to be partners with." And so, we're seeing all the speakers and they seem bigger than life. They're on stage, and they're talking, and I was just like, "If any of these guys promoted my product, I'd be rich." That's the thing going through my head. Right? And so, I'm seeing them, writing all their names down. I'm like, "I'm going to become partners with them and become friends with them. I'm going to go meet them face-to-face. Maybe that's the secret. If I meet them face-to-face then it'll be easy." Unfortunately, I'm insanely introverted, and shy, and scared. So, I'm at the event, I see the person walking by. I remember seeing Stephen Pierce. He was the guy at the time. He walked past and I was just like... He walked right past me, and he walked past, and I'm like, "Ah, I blew it. Stupid, Russell. Stupid, Russell. You didn't even talk to him." And I'm sitting there in the hallway and all of a sudden Armand... Actually, I was in the bathroom and Armand walked next to me in the urinal next to me. I'm like, "Armand's right here. What do I do? Do I say something? I can't say in the bathroom. It's so awkward." And he looks over and he is like, "Hey, man. How's it going?" I'm like, "Good." And he is like, "All right," and then walks away and walks out of the bathroom. I'm like, "Ah, I blew it again. I blew it again." You know? And I'm too scared to talk to any of the speakers, but I'm like... For me, I'm like, "This is the key. This is the key to my freedom is these speakers," and I didn't dare do it. I wimped out every single person. I didn't talk to a single one of them. And then at nights, all the attendees would go to the bar. Now, I'm not a drinker. I've never drank in my life. Most people don't believe me, but I've literally never drank in my entire life. So, I'd go to these bars and I was like, "I don't want people to think I'm drinking," because like I have a thing like that where I want to avoid the appearance of evil at all costs. Right? So, I remember I'd go to the bar and I was like, "Ah, how do I..." And literally, the bartender was like, "You want something to drink?" I was like, "Can you give me milk?" He was like, "Seriously?" I'm like, "I don't know. Can you?" I was like "Because if it's going to be a Sprite, people going to think it's some fizzy drink." I don't know. I don't even know what drinks are. Like, "It's going to be fizzy something." So, I'm like, "If you give me milk they're going to know that it's not alcohol." Right? So, he's like, "All right." So, the guy gives me a milk. I'm holding this milk at the bar walking around and everyone's like... All these people start coming to me, which is really cool, and they're like, "Are you drinking milk?" I was like, "Yeah." They're like, "Why are drinking milk?" I'm like, "Oh, well, I'm Mormon, so I don't drink." They all kind of laugh at me, but it opened dialogue when they came to me. And this is... Okay, side note. Interesting for the introvert. Who are the introverts in the room? If you're introvert, I learned something really cool. Nicholas Bailey actually told me this. He dresses weird because he's introverted and he's too scared to go talk to people. He's like, "If I do something weird," he's like, "people come to me and like, 'Oh, nice shirt. Nice glasses. Nice,'" blah, blah, blah, blah. And so, that's what happens. I had this weird thing, and then people came to me. They're like, "Why are you drinking milk in a bar?" And then it started a conversation, and then when I'm in a conversation I can do it. It's the walking up to. Like, "How am I going to go and..." You know what I mean? So scary for me. And so, people started talking to me. We started becoming friends and get to know people, and I'm talking in this group, and it was interesting because everyone I was talking to, they all had businesses just like me, but they weren't the guy on stage with a list of 100,000 people and all this kind of stuff They were here and they had a list of like 500 people. Or I got a list of 1,200 people. They were all kind of at this level. About the same level I was at. I was like, "Oh, my gosh," and we started talking, getting to know each other. And back then it was before Skype or before... It was pre-Skype. It was pre... What do we use nowadays? Slack or Instant Messenger. Whatever. We used to use Yahoo Messenger, or IRQ, or AOL, and so it always like, "What messenger are you on? Here's my AOL chat," or, "Here's my IRQ." Or ICQ Sorry. ICQ. Or, "Here's my..." And so, they give them to you, and so that was how we get to know people. So, I put it out, write it down, and then I remember the people. I remember Mike Phillip's name was on Yahoo Messenger. His name was signanddrive.com. And I remember Brad Callen. I remember Brad Fallon. And so, I started meeting all these people at the bar while I'm drinking my milk, and getting to know them, and I'm writing down all their little handles. And then we get home and away from the event, and so I start putting those things in and I start messaging them. I feel way more comfortable talking through text, through Yahoo Messenger. I was like, "Hey, great meeting you at the event," blah, blah, blah. "This is a picture of me so you remember who I was." Right? And the person would write back, "Oh, yeah. It was really cool. You were the guy with the milk, right?" I'm like, "Yeah." And we'd start this dialogue. And then I was like, "Okay..." Not even thinking that these guys would be big partners someday, but I kind of started getting to know these people. And we were all kind of the same level. And this is the key. Okay? I'm trying to tell stories with hopefully principles you guys can pick from it. So, all these people were at the same level. And I remember because at the same time I was messaging Joe, Vitale, and messaging all the speakers in the event, and none of them are responding to me. It's just like crickets. No one's responding back. I'm talking to these guys. And I remember I was creating an offer and these guys had become my friends. And I was like, "Hey, can you check this out? Do you think this is good? Is the offer good?" And they started messaging back, and all of a sudden they started becoming involved in my business, right? They had a vested interest because they were kind of like, "Oh, I would do this," or, "I'd try this over here. And all of a sudden they started sharing ideas back and forth and it was really cool. And then they would share with me what they were doing back and forth, and it was really, really cool. And I had vested interest in their projects because I was like, "Oh, you should try this, or, "Oh, I did this. You should try this." We built this little group of people. And I don't even know. It was probably four, five, six people maybe that we kind of did this thing. And I remember because about this time is when my very first software product ever came out, and I don't talk much about this product. It was a product called ZIP Brander, and I was so proud of it. And I remember I sent it to Mike Filsaime. I was like, "Hey, here's my first software. Check it out." He was like, "Dude, that's so cool. Do you want me to promote it to my list?" And I was like, "Wait, he just asked me." Like never it happened. I was just like, "I've been asking all these people at this level up here, all the people I'm looking up to, the gurus, the big famous people. No one, crickets, and all of a sudden my friend's, like, 'I'll promote it to my list.'" And I was like, "Dude, you serious?" He's like, "Yeah." I'm like, "Okay." And so I give him the link. He sends an email to his list, and I can't remember. I paid him like 50, 60, 70. I don't know. I was like, "You can have all the money. I just want... I need a list. I know the goal. The goal to get a list. I'll give you 100% commission." Right? And so, he promoted and I think he sold... I don't know, he sold five or six copies of my thing, but then I got the money, and then I gave most of it to him. But then what happened is I got five or six customers, but a bunch of people... I had a pop-up on the site. A bunch of people filled out the pop-up, and I got like 300 or 400 people on my email list. And I was like, "This is awesome." And then I knew Mike had a product, and I was like, "Hey, man." I was like, "Dude, I love..." He had a product called Carbon Copy Marketing back then or something. It was a two-disc DVD set. And this is before DVD, so he literally would go and he would print a DVD and ship it out to you from his house. This is how... 20 years ago. Remember, this is before things like that. And so, he said, "Yeah." So, I emailed my list of like 300 people from him the 400 or 500 people I built, so maybe a thousand from my list. I sent the email and I sold like five or six of his DVDs. And he is like, "Thanks, man." And we did our first little cross-promotion, and me and Mike became friends. And then Mike told me. Then Mike's like, "Dude, you know who you should do? I met this guy named Gary Ambrose. You should meet Gary because Gary has got a list too, and he promoted the same DVDs you just promoted and it was awesome. You should get to know him." So, he introduced me to Gary. Me and Gary met up, and I was like, "Oh." And Gary and I started sharing ideas, and then eventually he promoted my things, I promoted his, and then Gary's like, "Oh, dude, you should meet so and so." And I was like, "Oh, you should meet..." And all of a sudden we started this little four or five people start introducing more and more people, and soon I've got 20 or 30 friends all on Yahoo Messenger and AOL that we're talking back and forth and getting to know each other. Right? And what's interesting is that we all kind of helped promoting each other. Our list went from 400 or 500 people to 1,000 to 1,500, to 1,000 to 2,500, and they kept growing and growing. And I was looking at this little group of people all working together. It was like a groundswell where our businesses all started gradually rising together. What do they say? A rising tide raises all ships, right? That's what started happening. And we started getting bigger and bigger. I'm like, "Oh, my gosh. This is so cool." And then we started doing more things and this is, man, a two or three-year period of time while I was in college, we were going back and doing these things. And it was just... It was really, really cool. Right? And I remember one day Mike had this idea, Mike Filsaime had this idea for a product called Butterfly Marketing. Some of you guys may have heard of it, but it was the first time he had the idea. And he's like, "Hey, man, check out the sales letter." He had this huge sales letter. And on the sales letter, he had these testimonials from all the people. All the people you'd want, right? I was like, "How'd you get all those guys' testimonials?" He's like, "Oh, I didn't. I just put their pictures in just as the placeholders as a dream of someday I'm wanting to get these people's testimonials." I was like, "Oh, that'd be so cool to get to know them." And then he's like, "Well, I met so and so. I know so and so who does know that person," and all of a sudden this network started happening, right? Anyway, Mike went and started messaging and eventually got to the person, one of the people, and they gave him a thing, and all of a sudden he got a bigger promotion from a bigger person. And what happened is, is we started doing this. Again, the people I looked up to were way up here and they wouldn't respond to me and things like that. And this group down here became friends. We all started growing together, and eventually what started happening is as we got bigger and bigger and bigger, we got closer to these people. I remember probably, man, two years, maybe three years into this business I had an idea. And I was creating this whole project. It was a membership site. It was called The Lost Files, and it was based on old public domain books, which I could talk about for six years. But it's this geeky, nerdy thing that you can make money with. And so I got excited, I'm creating this thing, and I was like, "Joe Vitale, he's written like 500 books." I'm like, "Oh, Joe would be my dream person." I know Joe had talked about public domain in the past. Joe had actually published a couple books from the public domain. And I was like, "He'd be my dream partner." But I was like, "He's ignored like 40 emails from me. There's no way he's going to respond to me now." Right? But I was like, "Oh, I got to do something." So, I remember I messaged him again this time and I was like, "Hey, Joe. Sorry to bug you. I have this new site." I explained what my site, thelostfiles.com. Like, "This is what is, how it works," and everything. And then the next day I get email back from Joe, and I was too scared to even open it. I'm like, "This is crazy." And Joe messaged me back. He's like, "Hey, Russell, so good to meet you." He's like, "I've been seeing your name everywhere. All these different people keep promoting your stuff. They keep popping up in my inbox. The Lost Files sounds awesome." The way he made the connection, he didn't... I don't think he... He didn't connect that it was me who was annoying him for like 40 emails prior. He just didn't connect it. Or maybe he just ignored it, or he forgave me, or whatever, but he message back and said, "Yes." And I was like, "Joe Vitale said yes." And I was freaking out. And so he goes and he does this... We had this promotion where we had a teleseminar together. He promoted his list. And then at the teleseminar he promoted The Lost Files, and we signed up like 300 members off his list at like 40 bucks a month, which for a college kid, is insane. And it was this one deal, and then Joe was like, "Oh, by the way, have you ever met so and so, and so and so?" and starts opening these doors again. Now, because I've gotten closer and closer, I got one person in and all of sudden it opened up this whole network of people. And that was my journey for the first three or four years. And so I wanted to kind of lead with that because again, I think so many of you guys are like me where you see the people. I meet people all the time. "Russell, you say to build a Dream 100 list, I've got to dream one, and it's just you." And I'm like, "Not a good strategy." I literally said Dream 100 for a very important reason because it shouldn't be me. I do maybe one promotion a year and usually, it's for Tony Robbins. And so, for me to say yes, it's going to be like... We got to date for a decade before it's going to happen, so if you're banking on that it's going to be a long, long time for something to happen, right? I was like, "Instead, go and do things with people at your own tier, your own level where they're looking for things, and looking for cross-promotions, and things will start happening. And then what happened is you start rising to the top, and all of a sudden people like me are going to start seeing you. You show up my news feed. I start seeing emails." All of a sudden it's like now there's this relationship, right? It's funny. There's... This is a funny story. So, one of my buddies, I met him probably... It's probably been 12 years ago now. Some of you guys know him. He's Chad Wallner. He's a chiropractor. I talk about him in the Dot Com Secrets book. But he moved into our area, and so we go to church. We were going to the same church, and so he shows up and he sees me. And he was seeing me online. He knew I was and stuff. He came to me and he's like, "Russell." He's like, "Dude, this is so... I can't believe you're in my ward. I've seen you before," blah, blah, blah, all this stuff. And he's like, "We actually have a mutual friend together." And I was like, "We do?" He's like, "Yeah." So, he's trying to build a connection so we can connect and stuff. And it was interesting because he said, "We got this mutual friend." And then he told me the name. He's like, "Here's the guy's name." And I was like, "Don't know who he is." He was like, "Oh, weird." He's like, "He talks about you all the time as if you guys were best friends." I was like, "I don't know who that is. I'm so sorry." And years later, Chad and I had this discussion about this and it was funny because he was like, "Man, I..." The realization is it's not who you know, it's who knows you. Right? I knew who Joe Vitale was. I knew who these people... I knew Tony Robbins. So, I wanted them, but it's not that I know them. I need them to know me. Right? So, it's how do you get them to know you? Well, it's by doing cool stuff in the market that they're playing in. Showing up. Will they see you in news feeds, see you in emails, see you in stuff? Where all of a sudden they keep seeing these things and then they see you. They got to know who you are. Right? When you approach them like, "Hey, my name is so and so," if they don't know who you are, it's going to be really hard to build a relationship. If they're like, "Hey, this is so and so," it's easy. For example, I was trying to do a negotiation with someone the other day. I wish I could tell you all the details. I can't though. Anyway, really big company. You'd be aware of who they are. And so, I tried to get a meeting with the founder of it, and we get on a Zoom call like this, and the very first thing he says, he's like, "Man, Russell," he's like, "I see you like 12 times a day. You are everywhere in my news feed. I get emails from you. You must be the best internet marketer on the planet." And I was like, "This is going to be the easiest negotiation in my entire life because he knows exactly who I am." Right? As opposed to me coming to him and trying to explain who I was. Right? And so it's like, as you're doing stuff actively in the marketplace, people will start seeing that and become aware of you. Right? And that's how you start rising to the top. I get people all the time that message me like, "Hey, can I speak at Funnel Hacking Live?" I'm like, "I don't know who you are." Like, "I'm the best speaker. Here's my speaker," blah, blah, blah. I'm like, "I don't know who you are." Right? But check this out. McCall Jones, who I think is on here, or she was on here earlier, right? McCall, she showed up on Funnel Hacking Live. Then she does this thing, and then she starts publishing, and she starts doing everything, and I start seeing her everywhere. I see her energy and her excitement. I see how she's developing things. She's like using things she learned from me, but developing her own things, which was really cool. Because I'm like, "Oh, my gosh. She's a good student and she's doing things." And this whole thing starts happening, and I see her in my feed. I see her all the time. And my friends start talking about her, and then Monica, who's on this as well. Monica messaged me. There's McCall right there. Yeah. What's up? And Monica messaged me, "You know McCall? You got to..." And so, her friends are calling me and telling me to listen and stuff. And soon, I'm watching everything she's doing. And I'm like, "Oh, my gosh, I'm impressed." I start podcasts. How many... Once or twice I talked about you on the podcast before we even met officially. I'm like, "This girl McCall keeps showing up. She's doing these cool things." And on Funnel Hacking Live, I'm like, "Who should speak on Funnel Hacking Live?" I'm like, "There's this girl who's never spoken on stage before. Right? She's never... Doesn't like, 'Here's my speaker reel. I've got a perfect presentation.'" But I'm seeing that. I was like, "She'd be like the perfect person to come on stage and, and speak." And so anyway... Hey, McCall. What's up? McCall Jones: Thank you. Wow, that's so nice. I'm just hyping you up, over here reacting to all of your stuff, so hey. Funnel Hacking Live. Woo hoo! Russell: All right. But conceptually, you guys, it make sense. If you want to get into, they call it the good old boys club. Like, "How do I get in the good old boys club?" It's the way you get into it is you have to infiltrate it. And it starts finding people at your own level and start playing the game, start moving forward, start making noise, start doing stuff, and then people are going to start seeing you and start becoming aware of you.

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner
How to Adopt Disney's Magical Customer Experience in Your Business

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 24:57


MAGICAL CUSTOMER EXPERIENCEDoes creating a magical customer experience sound like a bunch of marketing pie in the sky? Well, today's guest is a Disney management alum, and he says that you don't need a roller coaster or nightly fireworks to create a magical customer experience. So stay tuned and let's find out how. What You'll Discover About the Magical Customer Experience (highlights & transcript):https://businessconfidentialradio.com/?p=126307&preview=true# (HIGHLIGHTSCLICK HERE FOR AUDIO TRANSCRIPT) * Unpacking the magical customer experience [01:26] * How to adopt the magical customer experience for your business [04:25] * How small gifts create a magical customer experience and increase revenue [07:28] * How to get ideas for making your own magical customer experience [08:28] * How Disney's Law of Unlimited Abundance fits into the magical customer experience [12:05] * How to keep new hires from ruining the magic [15:10] * Salvaging the magical customer experience when things go wrong [17:17] * 2 ways businesses diminish the magical customer experience [20:07] * And MUCH more.  ♥ Share this episode with someone you think will benefit from it. ♥ ♥ Leave a review at https://lovethepodcast.com/BusinessConfidential (Lovethepodcast.com/BusinessConfidential )♥ Guest: Vance MorrisVance spent 10 years working for the mouse at Walt Disney World in Orlando Florida. He started his career at Disney on the Opening Team of the Yacht & Beach Club Resorts, and progressed through the management ranks as a Night Club Manager at Pleasure Island, Service Trainer aboard the Empress Lily, and on the revitalization team of the Contemporary Resort in the mid-90's. It was at the Contemporary that Vance got his crowning achievement, Designing, Opening and Operating Chef Mickey's, Disney's flagship Character Dining Experience. After leaving Disney, (yes people do leave) he utilized his skills to rescue or improve many of America's companies and government agencies. His clients included Legal Seafoods, Tyson, NASA, Rain Forest Café, Compass Group, The Executive Office of the President of the United States, The Smithsonian and the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. Tiring of corporate life, Vance opened his own Bricks & Mortar Business in 2007. After meteoric growth of his service business, other entrepreneurs began to seek him out for advice and counsel. This spawned his next business, http://www.deliverservicenow.com/ (Deliver Service Now!), consulting and coaching other companies on how to create and implement Disney style service and then apply Direct Response Marketing to profit from it. Vance Morris has shared the stage with many of the premier marketers and service professional in the world; Dan Kennedy, Joe Polish, Bob Brown, Lou Ferrigno, Dean Jackson, Charles Henning, Lee Cockerell, and Meg Crofton. 2015-2019 Longest Reigning Marketer of the Year, GKIC & Dan Kennedy Award Winner Related Resources:Contact Vance and connect with him on http://www.linkedin.com/in/vancemorris (LinkedIn), https://www.facebook.com/DeliverServiceNow (Facebook), and https://twitter.com/DlvrProfitsNow (Twitter.) Join, Rate and Review:Rating and reviewing the show helps us grow our audience and allows us to bring you more of the rich information you need to succeed from our high powered guests. Leave a review at https://lovethepodcast.com/BusinessConfidential (Lovethepodcast.com/BusinessConfidential) Joining the Business Confidential Now family is easy and lets you have instant access to the latest tactics, strategies and tips to make your business more successful. Follow on your favorite podcast app http://bit.ly/bcnlisten (here) as well as on https://twitter.com/businessconfid (Twitter), https://facebook.com/businessconfidentialnow (Facebook), https://www.youtube.com/c/HannaHaslKelchner (YouTube),...

Breakfast With Champions
Episode 392 with Kim Walsh Phillips - Increasing Your Impact

Breakfast With Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 32:23


Thank you for joining us on Breakfast With Champions! Today we hear from Kim Walsh Phillips, Kim Walsh Phillips is the founder of Powerful Professionals, a business coaching and education company. She went from 32 clients to over 11,000 in less than a year and was recently named #475 in the Inc 5000 and is an MBA-free self-made millionaire. Named “a must to read by those in business” by Forbes Magazine, she is the bestselling author of multiple books including "The Ultimate Guide to Instagram for Business" and "The No B.S. Guide To Direct Response Social Media Marketing." She's the behind-the-scenes secret weapon of some of the biggest names in business including Kevin O'Leary from Shark Tank, Dan Kennedy, Profit First Author Mike Michalowicz, Harley-Davidson, Hilton Hotels and High Point University and has spoken on stages beside some of the world's leading thought leaders including Tony Robbins, Grant Cardone, Barbara Corcoran and Gary Vaynerchuk. She resides just outside of Atlanta, GA with her very tall husband and glitter obsessed girls and is fueled by faith, love, laughter and lots, and lots (and lots) of coffee.

The Marketing Secrets Show
Rapid-Fire Q&A With My FunnelHackers!

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 29:37


See if your question got answered live! Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com ---Transcript--- Russell Brunson: What's up everyone. This is Russell. Welcome back to the Marketing Secrets Podcast. I'm back with Josh today. And do I tell them what today's episode is, this is a really fun one? Josh Forti: Yeah. Today guys, we're doing rapid fire. We went to the community. We asked a bunch of different questions and by the way, we have like so many more to go over. So like, hey, just keep coming in, which is awesome. But it's a rapid fire Q and A with Russell to kind of bring out a side of Russell that maybe, maybe we don't get to see as much by asking just a bunch of rapid fire questions. Russell: There's some cool questions there. I think you guys going to enjoy. I think there's something for everybody. So listen, take notes. And next time we ask you for some questions, make sure you submit them maybe you'll get answered live. Josh: And called out. We called out some people. Russell: It's true. Maybe you got called out. You should pay attention. Anyway, thanks Josh. This was a fun episode, with that said, let's queue up the theme song and we'll get right back with some Q and As. Josh: All right. So this one I want to do a little bit different, kind of phase three here as we go through this is I went and ask community bunch of different questions and there's so many different ones. I've got screenshots on screenshots on screenshots of, on Facebook, on Instagram and kind of things like that. And so I thought it would be cool to go through and do a rapid fire style where we hit you with a bunch of different questions. And there's a lot of similarities, like underlying actual questions at what it is. But a lot of it is people they want to understand your thought process. They want to understand how you run certain things or how you do certain things or whatever. And so what I thought would be cool is I have enough questions to where we could literally do one a minute for the next couple hours. So take as much time as you want or need to go through this. But I think if we just went through and did like a rapid fire of like, all right, start here and then go through and do this, I think that'd be super beneficial. And I think it'd be a unique creative thing that we could try and see how people like it, sound good? Russell: That'd be fun. Let's do it. Josh: All right. So the first question is, and I think this kind of... It's interesting, I think this ties into both of our previous topics that we covered and talked about, whether it be podcasting and finding your voice there or funnels and figuring that all out is like... The question got asked probably three or four different times, some variation of like, what do you do when you don't know what you want to do yet, like when you haven't found that voice? And you're like, because I think... For me, it's interesting. I actually found my voice before I found my product, right? And I think a lot of people figure out what they are going to sell before they find their voice. And so for me it was a little bit easier because I had all these followers before I was ever selling anything and I was super broke and then I found dotcom secrets and it was like, "Oh my gosh, this is amazing." I literally went from making like $25,000 a year to like $250,000 a year and like one year. It was amazing because I just added it too. But a lot of people, they really struggle with like, "Okay, cool, I get all these things conceptually. I know I need a funnel and I know I need a value ad. I know I need a community and a following and raving fans. And I get all the things, but I don't know mine yet. I don't know the thing. And so when you're doing that, like what's the thing that you do or what advice would you give people to fix that problem of, or what things should they be focused on when they haven't found their voice yet? Russell: I'd say there's two directions on this, and both of them are correct. It's just depends on who you are. Number one, if you are a visionary, if you do the DISC profile, and you're a high I, you want to be the person that's there; the biggest key is not to wait. If I would've waited four click funnels and funnels, I never would've got here. I just started creating stuff that was bad like potato guns, zip brander, or forum fortunes. All these things that didn't work or I made very little money. No one's ever heard of, but I did 150 funnels before I was ever like, "I'm the funnel guy. I'm going to fun... I go on teach..." I started getting into funnels and then we built funnel software, but it was man 14 years and 150 funnels before I figure that out. But if I wouldn't have been in motion, I never would've found that. So if you are a creator and you know that's your calling, just start moving forward and find out what you're passionate about. If I was starting today, I would be into bio hacking, I'd be into nutrition. I'd be into those are the things I'm really geeking out about now in my life. So I'd be running that direction. I don't know what the opportunity's going to be, but I'm going to do something or I'm going to nothing… And then eventually I feel like God, as we start moving in a direction, like conscious I'm moving this direction, trying to figure this out; He will give us little ideas. He'll give us impressions and ideas. And He's trying to see like, "If I give Russell's idea, is he going to be good steward to this idea or not? And if I take it and I implement it, He's like, oh, he's a good steward of little thing, let me give him some more. Let me give him some more." And then 14 years later, He is like, "Okay, now I know he's worthy of this. Let me give him the big idea." But He's checking it. And if you get the idea, you're like, "Oh, I'm scared. I get fearful, whatever." And you don't do it, He's not going to give you the next one. He's like, "Oh, he's not a good steward of ideas." And He gives idea to somebody else. It's why, how many times you are like, "I had an idea for that, but so, and so did this." Because you weren't a good steward of the idea when it showed up. So that's the one thing it's like moving forward. The second thing is that some of you guys, you're not the visionary person and that's okay. There's 450 people who work at ClickFunnels who aren't the visionary person. And if it wasn't for all of them, I'd be screwed. There are people that are my number twos that are my psychics that are helping me support it and they can buy into my vision. In fact, I remember Leon who designs all my slides for me. He's one of the most amazing people in the world. And he was out here in Boise one day and he's a quiet guy, just more reserved and he's got to leave for the airport. And he pulled me aside, he said, "I want to talk to you real quick." And I was like, "Yeah, what's going on?" And he said, he's like, "I've decided that my mission in life is to help you to get your word out to the world." I got chills and I was like, "Oh my gosh. Thank you." It was such a cool thing. And I was like... And I got it. He's got this skillset. He's not going to be on stage doing the things and doing podcasts and stuff, man, without him, I couldn't do what I'm doing. So being a supporting role is huge. So find a vision you do believe in. If you're like... I think Dave Asprey in the bio... and the bulletproof movement is the thing, go get a job from them, go work for them, go work for free, whatever. It's like, go figure out how you can be close to that person and help bolster. It's like, I'm hoping that everyone believes in something. Figure out something you believe in, you're passionate about and go be a supporter of that. Your vision is not to be something you created. It's just something you're supporting and you're helping to move forward. And so that'd be my two advice, depending on which side you fall on. If you're not sure, just start running. Josh: Love it. Russell: See what happens. Josh: Love it. That's awesome. And I think that's really, really cool. My current assistant, I've cycled through a couple of assistants now and I finally have one and she's amazing. And she's just like, "I came into your company thinking that this is what you needed." And I was like, "Yeah, because that's what I told you I needed. But I had no idea what I needed." And she's like, "What you actually needed is this." And I'm like- Russell: "I need you to tell me what I need." Josh: ... right. I was like, "Are you going to leave me now?" She's like, "No, I believe in you. And I believe in your vision. I know what you're trying to accomplish. You didn't realize this is what you needed but I believe in you." And I'm like, "Huh, that is a relief." If you can find that person, that's lucky. Next thing kind of goes along with this another rapid fire one is, as you're going through and you are figuring out all these different things and testing through your things, how do you make it to where you're not confusing your audience and to where they don't feel you're just a mess, that's everything is everywhere? You're trying all these different things. You're throwing things at the wall. Is that just something that people are just going to leave and just be upset just because, or is that like, is there ways to minimize that and communicate to your community that you don't know what you're doing, but that this is the vision. This is what we're going. I'm just trying a bunch of different things. Is there a way to do that well? Russell: Yeah. I think a couple things, number one is understanding that until you really dial that in, it's going to be hard to get a huge following anyway. Like the other day I was searching my name with someone else's name that I did a deal with 20 years ago and it pulled up the Google results and there was like, "Oh, I was so embarrassed." Anyway, it was bad. But guess what? Those people are all gone now. They left. They're are not even aware what happened. They don't know who I am. Most people are like, "Russell I've been following you since the beginning. Ever since you guys launched Funnel Hacking Live." I was like, "Oh, I was in business 15 years before the first Funnel Hacking Live." "I followed you all the way back from Micro Continuity." I was like, "That was a long time ago, I was in business nine years before Micro Continuity." Most people... Just understanding the people are going to be... When you figure out the thing, it's going to be a whole new group of people. And so it's not stressing too much about that, but at the same time, it's like, it's helping people understand like, I'm experimenting. I call it marketing experiments or like I used to call mine dotcom secrets labs before I wrote the book and anything it's like, I'm practicing these principles. So I would like study SEO and talk about like, "Oh." And I'd sell SEO courses for other people because I'm learning from this person to understand SEO. I'm over here and I'm in a laboratory testing these things out. This is what I'm actually doing. And there's a lot of value in that because you're becoming in proxy the person and sometimes you can cut through stuff that's working and not working, you can get direct access to people that they can. So just helping them understand like, my end goal is I want to be... Again, if I was going to bio hacking world right now, my end goal is I want to be healthier. So for example, this is my live mushroom GTS root beer. It's literally my favorite thing. I get twice a day. It's from Whole Foods. It's got Reishi, Chaga, and Turkey Tail. The actual fruiting bodies of the mushrooms in here blended into this root beer. It tastes like root beer my grandma used to make, I love it. I'm obsessed with it. So I could be like, "This thing's amazing. I'm excited about it. And this is why, and this is why I did the study and this is why I'm doing it." I could probably sell a crap ton of these right now. And then I could find out something else like Anthony DiClementi, he's got this thing. And I'm like, "I can be excited. I'm testing it. I bought his newsletter. I bought his membership site." And so it's just like you as the, I'm like a reporter, who's testing these things out in the beginning until you figure out what your thing is and you can really dial it. Maybe I become the mushroom dude who sells mushroom root beer. I don't know, but anyway. Josh: Please stick with funnels. We need you in that lane more. Is it good? All right. Cool. Next question we got here is, do you ever struggle with scarcity and being in scarcity mode even after you've made... Had all the success and as much money as you you've made, do you still struggle with being in scarcity mode or have you evolved past that? Russell: I don't struggle with scarcity. I have a lot of my own issues for sure. And it's funny because every time someone launches the next click funnels killer, it annoys me. But then I'm like, "You know what? First off they're not going to... I'm willing to outwork all of them and so I'm not worried that way." Number two, competition drives me, which is really, really good. And number three, actually, Annie Grace messaged me this a little while ago. She was talking about her business and all these people who were competing and she felt they were leading her people astray. And I was like, "I get that." And I said, "The thing that's most comforting to me is actually a Bible scripture where Jesus Christ said, my sheep will hear my voice and they'll follow me." That's not direct translation, but basically that's just like, my sheep will hear my voice. And I believe that's something that was true for him. But I think it's true for all of us. It's a universal principle. And so what I understand is like, I'm going to go out there. I'm going to be Russell. The best Russell I can be. And a lot of people are not going to follow me. They're going to understand that person better or whatever. Like some other product better, but my sheep are going to hear my voice and they're going to follow me. I'm going to attract the right people and they're going to come to Funnel Hacking Live, and they're going to use my platform. They're going to be exciting. And those are the people I've been called to serve. I am not called to serve the people who are going to go and go somewhere else. Or they don't resonate my message or with me or whatever. And I got to be okay with that because my sheep will hear my voice. And that's my belief that helps me to not be scared of scarcity, because I don't want those people anyway. I want my sheep to follow me and I'm going to help them. I'm going to serve them. Because that's what I've been called to serve. Josh: That's awesome. That's super cool. All right, next one here is actually from Parker Woodward, shout out Parker. Russell: Yeah, Parker. Josh: He says, "How do you know what positions to put members of your team in so they personally thrive?" Russell: Man, I cannot tell you, just you know Parker, this is a constant thing. So if you read the book Good To Great, one thing he talks about is like finding the right people and then putting them on the right seats on the bus. And those are two different activities. And sometimes you nail it. You're like, "Got the right person. They're on the right seat on the bus. And it's awesome." So many times in my company, I find someone who's amazing and we put them in a thing and it's like, "Oh, they don't fit there." And you move around four or five times like, "This person sucks at their job. They're horrible." And it's not actually true. It's horrible. The problem is you have the right person in the wrong seat on the bus. You get them the right seat and then they thrive. And so it's understanding that and really defining it of like, "What are the seats initially?" Because I think that's... You had this with your system. I don't really know what the seat is. I just know I need help. And I'm drowning, what that is, right? Josh: Yeah. Russell: You or someone around you understands like, this is where I'm hurting, this is what I'm struggling and they can define the seat, then it's easy to find the right person, or you find somebody like knows the right person. And then having them like working with them, being okay like, "We may have to try a couple seats so we figure out, I know you're the right cultural fit. I know you're the right person, the right work ethic." But I don't know what the skillset is yet. Maybe they don't know yet either. And as soon as you're able to figure out what their unique ability is, then you put in the right spot and then they can thrive. And so it's a two step process. Josh: Interesting. All right. This one's from Braden. He says, "What are the biggest beliefs fundamentally that you had to shift early on in your life or career that you believe are required to get to $100 million and beyond?" Russell: It's funny you think it's like belief that some marketing principles. So I found out every tier, so me to get to a million dollars, I was trying to get a million dollars in the calendar year. It took me three years in row. I missed it by like 20 grand, three years in a row, I couldn't do it. And it was totally like a mental block. I didn't believe that I could do it for some reason. And after I did the first time it was like, "Oh." Then it was easy. And then 10 million was my next mental block. I missed it first year, second year we got, and then... So it's there's these mental blocks where I don't know if it's we don't believe in ourselves. We don't believe in, that we're worth. I don't know if it's, we don't believe worthy of it or we have the abilities of it, whatever. But the first thing is you got to believe in yourself. And that just comes with a lot of you doing things. Again, it comes back... We talked about earlier, like God gives you an idea. You're going to be a good steward of this idea. And the more often you take an idea and you run with it. Even if you fail, the more times you do that, the more you start trusting yourself. And that's a big part of it. Right now I can walk into a room where there's like, things are on fire and there's pure chaos, I have no idea what I'm going to go into it. I walk in knowing that the right idea's going to show up and I need it because I've done it so many times over and over and over and over and over again. I just know that it's going to happen. And I have belief in myself. That's the first thing. I honestly believe that the second thing, this comes back to the spiritual side of things, is that there's a purpose behind it. I struggled growing ClickFunnels because I thought that it was for Russell and Todd and our friends to make money. I thought that's what the business was, for probably the first three or four years. And it wasn't until I hired this coach who helped me see the connection between things. And she's just... Because I was always like, there's business and there's spiritual things. And God doesn't care right with my business because whatever. And she helped me bridge the gap. Like, "Do you see what's actually happening because this business..." She see people's lives are changed. All these kind of things. And she was the first person who said, "This is literally a calling that God gave you to do this." And as soon as I heard that and I felt it and I believed it, it changed everything for me. I was like, "This isn't just something Russell does as a hobby on the side to keep me busy till I die, this is what I was made for." I was made to do this, to inspire entrepreneurs, to change the world because each entrepreneur can do that. And when I heard that and I believed it, then it changed everything. It gave me permission like, "Okay, well then it's all my donkey Kong. I'm going to publish. I'm going to create, I'm going to write books. I'm going to do software. I'm going to do things." Because it wasn't just like money for money's sake. It was because this is the mission. This is the calling. I need to do it. And so it changed everything for me. So I think for you guys, that'd be the next thing is like, you got to be connected. Is this actually what God wants me doing? And if you believe that, you believe it's not just some side hobby, man it gives you the feel you need to grow row because now it's bigger than just you making money. Making money is so uninspiring. Changing the world because you were called to, at least, for me changed everything. Josh: That's super, super interesting. And so obviously, I've worked with Katie Richardson and tremendous mindset shifting things in there. And one of the things that I've learned just about mindset, what you said there is your brain, by default just runs. And so it will run with whatever program... Like 90% of your life is basically autopilot. You don't even realize that you're making the decision that you're making. So it's like, whatever program is there, that's how your life operates. And how you change that is not by changing this or all these different things, it's by literally reprogramming is changing belief. And so if you could actually just shift the belief, that's actually shifting the program. And so I think, for me, when I first got started in entrepreneurship, it was how do I hustle my way to success? It was freaking. I was at Gary Vaynerchuk working 18 hours a day. Let's go. And so I was like, "That's what I'm going to do." And it was like, Katie came in and was like, "Cool. That's the belief that you have and it's only going to get you so far." And then once you can replace that belief, that it's like, "Oh, you don't have to do that anymore, this is the way to do it." It was a real identity crisis. It was like, "But wait, no, I'm a hustler. I'm up to 4:00 in the morning, every single morning. You can't take that away from me." But then once the belief shifted, then it was like, "Oh, everything else in life shifted." It was like, "Okay, cool. Now I operate this way." And so that's super, super interesting that you say that because I feel like- Russell: If you look at like what I believe my only role is inside of ClickFunnels literally is for me to stand on stage, to write books, do podcasts, everything so I can get our customers to believe this will work for them. That's it. I know it works for them. But if I get them the tool and they don't believe this is going to work for them, it will not work for them. I get them to believe this works. I'm the head belief, cheerleader. That's all I'm actually doing is trying to take my... Whoever has the most certainty, any circumstance, any situation always wins. So when I come into something, I've got to come with more certainty than them and I've got to prove them I believe it can work and it can work for them. And if I can get them to believe it, then it'll happen. But that's the hardest thing is just the mental thing inside people's head. As soon as they believe it, you see it, because it's like, "Oh, they're struggling, struggling." And all of a sudden something happens, and I believe it'll work for them and holy cow, next thing they know they're Two Comma Club. It's weird. Because it makes sense. You're like, "No, it's just a process." Like, "No, it's a process, but your belief is your fuel and how you attack this thing one way or the other, 100% depends on if you believe is going to work." If I believe that if I write a book, a million people are going to buy it, I can go write a book. If I'm like, "I don't think anyone's going to buy it. What if they don't like it? What if..." I'll spend 25 years writing this book, it's never going to get done. The belief is everything. Josh: ... yeah. Garrett White talks about that with Warrior Way. He's like, "We tell people this isn't the only way, this is A way." And I was talking with my students the other day, I was like, "Hey guys, how many different ways are there to grow your business?" And they're like, "I don't know, thousands of them." I'm like, "Sweet, what's the way you grow their business?" And they're like, "Funnels." Like without even thinking about it. And it was like, "See what Russell did there." He convinced me… Russell: And that took me seven years of preaching consistently to get the market and get people to believe that. But it wasn't that… yeah. It's interesting. Josh: All right. The next question here, and this comes up... I mean this probably came up probably more than anything outside of funnels was how do you manage the relationship with your family and the balance between work and family? Because this is something I think a lot of people struggle with. I didn't even realize that this was a thing until I got married and then I got married and I was like, "Oh, I'm experiencing a little bit of this." And I'm like, I can't imagine like then kids and then being around. So how do you balance your work and your family and overwhelm and burn out and like... I mean there's limited amounts and it seems you can do everything Russell, like cause you're everything over there. So how do you balance that with your family and the work life balance of that? Russell: That's a great question. I get asked that a lot, which is interesting. I think a lot of people... Well I think the big problem is most people who are doing what I do, they have... The area of life they're the entrepreneur, they're killing it, and then the rest of their life's a wreck. Or they just don't talk about the rest of life. No one knows. And so anyway, a couple things is number one, Charfen had us do like a time study before. You ever heard of that before? Josh: Yeah. They were the worst. I hate them so much. Russell: So annoying. Yeah I did it for like three minutes, I was like, "I want to die." But you basically sit down and you start every 15 minutes, you're like, write down what you're doing during the day and really quick you realize, "Oh I'm only actually working two hours a day." And I think the average employee, I think is in two hours and eight hour days is actual productive work, the rest is… Josh: Yeah, something like that. It's super low. Russell: So the first thing is just by default, this is comes from me being a wrestler, right? As a wrestler, we have two hour practice. We got the limited time and I wanted to be the best. So I had to cram as much actual stuff in those small windows as humanly possible. And you know when you're an entrepreneur, you're going on a trip and it's like, "My plane leaves at 2:00, but I got an hour and a half to work." In the hour and a half, you'll get more done than an entire day typically. And so I trick my mind that all the time. So if you look at like a typical eight hour day, like I'm coming in from usually from 9:30, till 5:00, it's like my window that I'm here at the office. When I'm here, I'm super present. But what I do in that window of time is what most people do in a week. Because I don't... People always ask me, "Hey Russell, can I take you to lunch?" I'm like, "You have the luxury of lunch. I've not eaten lunch in, I don't know, decade and a half, I'm working. I quit Uber eats. I keep working. It shows up, I'm eating it. And I keep going." I don't waste time for that crap. I'm in the zone and I'm working and I'm not doodling and texting in a million different things. When I'm doing something, I'm doing the thing. I was up this morning from 5:30, till 7:00, I was writing copy for the new offer. And like, that's what I did by myself. Cranked it out. Seven o'clock, boom, I hear Nora talking, hear the kids getting up. And then I break my presence at the thing and I leave and from 7:00 to like 8:30 ish, I'm a dad. And so I take high school kids in school. I come back and I pick up Nora and I play with her a little bit. And then I get her fed and then Collette's getting her dressed and stuff and I go wake up Aiden and then me and Aiden are hanging out. We're talking about the day. And then Collette takes Ellie to school. Aiden's there. I get in the shower. I get dressed. And by nine o'clock I'm ready to go. And I jump in my car. I come here and then boom, I'm in Russell, like I'm entrepreneur mode and from 9:30 ish till 5;00 I'm here. I'm cranking. My days blocked out. I know everything I got to do during the day. I got a to-do list. I got schedule. Everything's blocked out. I knew from 9:00 to 10:30, me and you were here and I'm present. I'm not looking at 1000... We're here doing the thing, it's going to be done. And then at 10:30, I know exactly what I'm doing. As soon as we're done, I'm not sitting around for 30 minutes, like what should I do next. I know what's going to be happening and I'm going, I'm doing the thing. And so my days are like that. So boom, boom, boom, by the time I get to the end of the day, it's like, "Oh, I got a lot of done today. This is amazing." And then I go home. And when I walk through the door from my car in the garage to the door, I send... Before I walk to the door I stop. And I'm like, "Okay, I got to literally stop for a second." I'm like, I'm getting dad mode. I'm getting husband mode. And I get done and I walk through the door and I'm now a dad and husband. I'm not an entrepreneur. And I go, literally go to every one of my kids in the house. My love language is physical touch. I go give each a hug. I go give my wife a hug. And then I'm there. And from that time I'm dad till 9:00 and then from 9:00 to 11:00 I'm husband and 11 o'clock I'm in bed waiting for the next day. And so it's just, I'm really good at chunking time. And I'm not perfect. Some days I'll get depressed or I'll get tired or burned out or whatever, and I don't hit it. But for the most part, I would say I'm pretty consistent in getting a lot of stuff done in the windows that I got. Josh: That's super, super interesting. Being present and being present at work, being present at home, that balance that once again, something Katie talked about a lot is just like, be fully present with where you are and then set boundaries. Having those clear for that Russell: You ask my wife too, I'm not perfect at it, but I try to let things bleed from thing to thing. I try that when I walk through the garage door at night that I'm done with work and I'm home and then, you know what I mean? Josh: Yeah. Russell: And I think that's what most people don't do is like, it all just mushes together where they're doing everything. So everything becomes done inefficiently. I was listening to Dan Kennedy actually yesterday. He's like, "Would you hire a doctor who is going to do surgery on you, and while he's doing surgery, he's watching YouTube video and he's eating something on the side?" He's like, "No, you want presence if you're going to hire someone." Same thing, if you want to build a funnel, you need your designer and everyone who's doing this to have laser focus. You don't want them doing these other things because you need their full attention and presence. Josh: That's awesome. This one's from Paul Vanblum He says, and I'm going to paraphrase this here because... But how do you modify your behavior? Which is, like maybe you've got this thing that you... I don't know, scroll Facebook too much and you just can't seem to quit. I'm sure that's not a problem for you, but how do you go through it actually change or modify behavior? Because it sounds like a lot of your life is routine. Is that true? You figure out the process that works and then you go until it needs to change. And then it's just you pick the next process. So how do you go through and modify behavior that you want to be able to change? Russell: That's a big section of the new book that's coming out someday in the future. So this is a reality is that the shorter versions if we're running close on time is understanding that we do things that meet our needs. And so we had to figure out, how are our needs being met? Talked about this at Funnel Hacking Live a little bit with Tony Robbins, Six Human Needs, right? Like if any... I wish I could geek out on this for like two hours. Maybe this would be the first topic for next time we do this. Josh: Yeah. I was going to say maybe we do that. Russell: That'd be fun. But there's six human needs and there's four needs of the body. And anytime three of the four needs of the body are met, it creates a physical addiction inside you. So if you're scrolling Facebook all day long, it's because it's meeting a need. Like you're getting certainty from it. You're getting significance from it. And you're probably getting love and connection from it. So three of your four needs are being met... And variety, all four of your needs are being met by scrolling Facebook. So it's creating a physical addiction. So for you to break that physical addiction, it's not going to be easy unless you replace it with another physical addiction that you enjoy more. So it's like I have to replacing that. I can't just just willpower it out and got this thing out and be gone. It's like, I'm trying to get my needs met somewhere. And so they're getting met there, I'm good. So I need to get met somewhere else to replace it. It's a lot of people get their needs met by eating. And so they keep eating, eating, and they want to lose weight and they can't lose weight because all their needs are met there. And so until they replace those needs somewhere else, they're going to keep defaulting to that. Again, we can geek on that for a long time, but that's the core root of it. Is it fulfills your need until you get those needs met somewhere else you're going to keep falling back to it over and over and over again. Josh: All right. Last two, super rapid fire questions. Number one. What is the top, the number one or... I'll give you top three, because number one's impossible. Top three books outside of your own that someone must read? Outside of your own because duh obviously is DotcomSecrets, Expert Secrets, and Traffic Secrets. Thinking bio... Russell: Oh, depends on which area of your life looking at. I just bought... I spent a... not a small, a pretty big fortune buying the Napoleon Hill thing. So I'm in the middle of this Napoleon Hill like Deep Dive. Can I give you my three best Napoleon Hill books because that's all I got right now. Josh: There you go. All right, modify the question, three best Napoleon Hill books? Russell: Everything else seems like a distraction. So for me Outwitting the Devil is the best thing he's ever written. It is insanely good and very, very practical. Think and Grow Rich, I've been revisiting and like, oh, it's so good. And then the Laws of Success is not a book. It's a book series, which I now own. Oh my gosh. I don't know if I've even told you this yet. I think I showed you a quick picture, but- Josh: You showed me a video, yeah. Russell: ... The Laws of Success was published in 1928. I have his version that he wrote in 1925 before he sent it to the editors or publishers, first edition signed that he printed at a schoolhouse here in my possession. It's insane. Josh: I can't wait to visit your library bro. Oh my gosh. It's crazy. Russell: But those are the three. I would start with Outwitting the Devil because I'll make you fall in love with Napoleon Hill, then go Think and Grow Rich. And if you love that, then go into Laws of Success' it's like a longer form version of stuff, but it's... Ah, he's my favorite right now. Josh: All right, last question for you. And we all know the answer to this, but I thought it was a great last question to end on just to make sure in business, in marketing, in success for all of success, what's the number one skillset that someone must learn? Russell: Oh, persuasion. Josh: Persuasion. Russell: It's learning how to tell a story in a way that gets people to move. Because everything else, like I can outsource all the rest of it. But like I said, we're talking about creating the offer for the Magnetic Marketing. It's the story, the persuasion, the thing that's going to get people to move. And that... Because that weaves into your funnel, weaves into your email, like weaves into how you get your team to move. How you get your community. All the stuff comes down to that skillset of learning how to persuade people. Josh: Awesome. Well, Russell, I think that wraps it up. We'll see what the audience says. But that is a fun run. Russell: That was really fun, man. I appreciate that. This has been a good day. I woke up this morning working, have a ton of energy. This has been a lot of fun energy. I appreciate you appreciate it. And if you guys like these episodes like this, let us know and we'll do it again. This was kind of a test drive to see if you enjoyed it. Josh: Yeah, you got to let us know guys. Russell: And I had a lot of fun. So hopefully you did too. Josh: Was this was super fun. Yeah, man, for sure. It was good chatting with you and everybody go buy Russell stuff and ClickFunnels and all the things because it'll make you tons and tons of money and that's it. That's just the end of it. Russell: That's the real reason we did this… I wanted you to pitch the stuff so I didn't have to awkwardly tell people to buy it. Thank you so much. Josh: Okay. Everybody go buy stuff right now. It is amazing. That's my pitch. The first thing you're going to get is you're going to get a change of belief. The second thing you're going to get is you're going to get, I don't know what it is, a step by step process of the marketing bible. The third thing you're going to get is increase the status because Russell will like you. Boom there's my pitch. Russell: Boom. What more do you want in life? Come on now. Josh: Yeah, you can't imagine. All right, Russell. Thank you so much, man. I appreciate your time and we'll talk to you soon. Russell: Awesome. Thank you too.

The Marketing Secrets Show
The MOST Important Part of the Funnel (I Guarantee it's NOT What You Think!)

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 31:22


What is the future of funnels...? With meta-verse coming, what should we be focused on now!? Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com ---Transcript--- Russell Brunson: What's up everybody? This is Russell Brunson. I'm back with my co-host Josh Forti. How you doing, man? Josh Forti: I'm doing awesome, man. How are you? Russell: Doing so good. We just recorded a new episode for you guys. This one's all about funnels and I think it went in a different direction you thought it was going to go, didn't it? Josh: Yeah, it did, a little bit. It was super good. Russell: …because the question was like, "What is the next funnel? What's the thing?" And it wasn't a funnel thing, it was something different. So, I think this is an episode you guys can enjoy. Josh: It's tough. Russell: It's been so exciting for me, I literally woke up at 5:00 AM every morning this week because I'm geeking out on the thing that you're going to learn about. And hopefully, it'll help you guys with all your funnels, no matter if you're running a webinar funnel, or a book funnel, or a challenge funnel, or whatever, doesn't really matter. This principle, you can overlay on top of all of them and it'll make them all better. So, that said, should we queue up the theme song? Josh: Let's do it. Russell: Let's go. Josh: Now we got to move into.. I want to move into funnels, dude. This is a topic that continued to come up. So kind of a back story. When we're preparing for this episode, guys like, Russell hit me up and was like, "Do you want to do a podcast together?" And I was like, "Yeah, what do you want to do it on?" He's like, "I don't know, find something." And I'm like, "oh, all right." And so- Russell: "You tell me." Josh: I do what I all always do and I go to the community and I'm like, if the community tells me... I loved Poland's presentation at Funnel Hacking Live it's like, "Ask, go ask your community. What did they tell you?" And so, that's what we did. I went to my Facebook group and I went on my Instagram and luckily, I have a pretty engaged following that will give us lots of feedback back. And this theme that kept coming up was funnels. And obviously, this is your world. But it was interesting because I've been talking with several different higher level people that are like, "How are all the funnels, they made tens of millions of dollars or whatever?" And it's like, "This funnel's not really working anymore. This funnel's kind of working here. This type of funnel is working." And so there's like, I feel like we're in this phase of funnels are almost evolving, where it used to be that you could run an ad to a webinar and sell a 9.97 product, and make a million bucks, and high profit margins, and you can make it work. But I was talking to Dan Henry the other day and he's like, "Dude, I can't even make that work anymore." And he's like, "And I'm brilliant at ads." And like Sam Ovens, I was talking to him the other day- Russell: Dan Henry, "I know everything." I love Dan. Josh: And Sam Ovens was like, "Man, we're probably going to shut down our front-end $2,000 program and we're going to transition up and evolve the way we do funnels." And so, funnels are the thing, obviously. They're going to be around forever, they've been around forever, you popularized them. But I want to go and take this into two parts and see where this goes. But number one, what is the foundation of funnels? What are the things that like... it doesn't matter how it's executed, the funnel itself, this is the thing that works. Because I think a lot of people get confused that... Whenever I talk to a lot of my students that are building funnels, they're like, "Should I do this type or this?" And I'm like, "The core essence of funnels doesn't change," so what are the core essence of funnels? And then two, what is the future of what that looks like rolled out with technology? Because I mean, I know it's not here yet and one of the things we'll talk about, but- Russell: Metaverse. Josh: We got Metaverse. And my wife was like, "Oh my gosh, ask Russell. If I want to be able to walk into Metaverse and Russell's going to be right there being like, "'Hey, do you want to buy my funnel cake,' click this button and you go into a portal. Instead of another page, you enter a new world that is Russell's world, that'd be so cool." But let's start with the foundation of funnels. When someone is building a funnel, when they're looking at it, what are the core pieces that they're actually looking at? Take us back to the foundation of that because I think a lot of people miss that or forget. Russell: Yeah. So, I'll take you back in history back in time so back to my beginning. Think what example I have sitting here on my desk that I can show you. So, the core, the thing you have to understand why funnels are essential, and why they'll always be here, comes back to my favorite Dan Kennedy quote of all time which is, "Whoever can spend the most money to acquire customer wins." This is the foundation but... Everything else you have understand- Josh: Like 7,000 speakers at Funnel Hacking Live all said that. Russell: Yeah, because it's the thing. In fact, you'll see, if you look at the... And maybe we'll get into this. My next move, what's happening next year for me? I'm looking at this, all ties into that as well. Why did I buy Dan Kennedy's company? Why am I doing these things? And I'll show you it's literally to solve that exact same question. So, when I got started 20 years ago, people didn't have offers yet they just had a product. So, you would be... Just say a book, like, "Okay, here's my book," and I would just sell a product, and that was what I was selling. And it worked for a long time and then guess what? Everyone else is like, "Oh, dude's making money with this product, I can make a product," they make the same product. Now you got 10 people selling a product that's similar. And so, then it's harder to compete because now you're no longer a unique thing, you are a commodity. And anytime you're a commodity, the person with the lowest price always wins. So, as soon as everyone's doing it, you got to drop at the bottom and then you lose your margin and then life sucks because if you don't profit what's the point of what we're doing? So, there's the first phase. So, then the next phase is like, "Okay, well I got a product, everyone's got the same product but how do I turn this from a product into an offer?" That was the first evolution. It's like, "Hey, when you buy my book, you also get my book, but you're also going to get my video course, my audio course, and then my checklist and my..." And all of a sudden you make something truly unique again where it's like, not just a product, but this is my offer that's specific, unique to me, that nobody else has. So that was the next evolution. And we got really good then in making offers that were sexy. It's like, "Oh yeah, everyone's selling this, but mine, if you get mine, you also da da, da, da, these other things." Right? And that's where this whole offer development started happening. In my mind, probably 15 years ago is when this became the thing that we all focused on. And whoever had the best offer was going to win because ads didn't ship that much. It was just like you're competing so now you're competing with six different people or 10 different people. So because that, Google ads AdWords cost went up, because there's 20 people bidding on the same keyword versus just you, initially. Now you're coming in, you make a better offer. Then you get the lion share people buy from you because your offer is the best. That was kind the next phase. And then of course the market evolves. Everyone gets smart. Everyone starts making good offers. Now it's like, maybe they're unique offers, but they're all good offers. Now it's like the market's getting fragmented up again. And so this is where the evolution now of funnels started happening where... And it was before. We didn't have one click up-sales back in the day. But the first thing was like: you buy my potato gun DVD, fill in your credit card, you buy it. The next page, you're like, "Do you want the potato gun kit? Cool. Get your credit card back out and fill it out again." And they'd fill out all the credit card again. Josh: Dang. Russell: But even with that, there's no one-click up-sales, man, like 15, 20, 30% people would buy the second thing. And all of a sudden, I'm selling a potato gun DVD, but I'm making 200 bucks on the back of the kit and nobody else selling potato gun DVDs was doing. I could outspend them all. So even though costs me more per click, I was able to get all the clicks because I made way more money than anybody else. So I was able to dominate the market. And that was kind of the next phase. And what's interesting is that depending on the market you're in, depends on where this is. For example, I'm in a fun phase where I wanted some side projects. So I'm launching a couple supplement companies. The first supplement company launched is called Zooma Juice. It's a green drink company. And some of you guys know, I actually worked with Drew Canole and his team back in the day on Organifi, and helped them launch that when it first came out seven years ago, and helped him build an actual funnel. And what's interesting is because of that... The green drink market is sophisticated. I went and funnel hacked, probably, 30 green drink offers before we built Zooma Juice. And all of them have pretty advanced funnels. Everyone's doing the best practices pretty well. Second company that we are starting, I acquired a bone broth company. And so I took... Got bone broth company and went funnel hacked every bone broth offer. And that market's new. Nobody had a funnel, not one. They have an offer, they have a product, that's it. And I'm like, "I'm walking into virgin funnel territory." We'll be the biggest bone broth company on the planet in like 30 days? Because there's nobody who understands any of what we're talking about. We'll outspend everybody 10 to 1 because we understand the funnel structure. So depending on what market you're in, some markets haven't even evolved to the funnels yet. Some have, that's exciting. If they have, it's like, "Cool. We got... We can funnel hack. We get good ideas of what's working." If it hasn't like, "Man, you can bring all the stuff we know into these markets and just dominate and destroy them all." It was funny, as we were buying, I was funnel hacking the bone broth offers, I was like, "There's literally not single upsell, order form bump, email sequence. Like nothing." I was just like, "This is like, oh, embarrassing. Almost too easy." That was next phase though. And then to your point, initially it was like... In fact, I remember 10 pre-click funnels. Almost every funnel was the same. It was a video sales letter order button order form upsell one, upsell two, down-sell, down-sell. Thank you, basically. That was what a funnel was. In fact, if you look at, before we launched ClickFunnels, the first T and C event, Ryan Dice and Perry, and they had this whole team event talk about, "Here's the funnel." And they had a funnel and there's only one. And it was just like, "This is the five steps of every funnel." And it fits. It was like trip wire. They had these five steps like trip wire, profit maximizer, and they five or six... They had a name for each page. And it was like, "This is the funnel." And in reality, that was the funnel. There weren't funnels. It was like, "This is a funnel. This is kind of the one." And at the time when I was writing The Dot Com Seekers book and we had been playing with different ones, but there wasn't a lot of this thing out there. Was just kind of like, for the most part, there was a funnel. After ClickFunnels came out and it gave people the ability to create things fast and start innovating, creating ideas, that. And then I was like writing all my ideas in the book and people are doing stuff. It started evolving quickly. Last seven years have evolved where now there's been like a million different funnel things come out, from webinar funnels, auto webinar funnels, high funnels, low ticket funnels, trip wires, SLOs VSLs, challenges, paid challenges, free challenges, challenges to a webinar challenges to high tickets, a webinar to high ticket. There's a billion variations that come from that which probably gets people overwhelming. And so this os what I want to tell them because, this kind of comes back to your first questions, what is it? The reality is, it's going to be shocking for most of you guys, what funnel type you use doesn't really matter. They all work. The thing that matters is the offer. You still have to make the sexiest offer. That's still the most important. We acquired Dan Kennedy's company and we're doing this merger. And like I've spent I podcast episode this morning driving to the office. I've been up every single morning at 5:00 AM because I'm so excited. Because we have a fun, we picked a funnel on structure, we have all of products. I spend a week every morning at 5:00 AM, from 5:00 till like 7:30, when my kids are getting up, in there writing the page for the copy and the offer, and then tweaking and tweaking. That's the thing. The sexiness of the offer that gets people in is the key. So I can get them in, I can use this to get them in a webinar, in a challenge, in a free plus shipping. It doesn't matter. It's like the offer is the thing that puts people in a momentum. And the thing that I'm selling, I could sell it in the webinar. I could sell it in the challenge. I like there's I could sell in all the different funnels. It would fit in all of them. I'm picking the one that I'm using because I think it's going to go... For like the launch campaign, it the one that'll probably get sells the fastest, but it'll work in all of them. And So it's understanding that, it's still coming to the core fundamentals. The funnel structure is the sales process. All of them will work. You just got to figure out better way to sell. Like that's the harder thing that people are missing. Josh: All right. So let's talk... I want to dive into that offer. When you say specifically here... Because I think, and this is just from coaching with a lot of people, the questions that I get asked when I talk about this type of stuff. You talk about the offers, the sexy thing, but how does the offer affect getting somebody to opt in? How does the offer affect my ad? How does the offer affect the training? I don't show my offer until the end after the whole thing. So how does that affect every other step of the funnel? Russell: Okay, great question. So if I can see one here. Right, sorry. I had all the examples here a second ago. Oh, well. I'll just tell you the story. So when Dan Kennedy started his newsletter, in the Dan Kennedy company, the newsletter's the foundation of everything. And we could do a whole podcast episode just on psychology of the original GKIC, when Bill Glazer was running it with Dan. But the newsletter- Josh: Sounds like a sexy topic. Russell: Yeah. It'd be really fun, actually. I love... In fact, it's funny because I spent so much time with Bill Glazer geeking out about. I knew their business really well. And when that they sold it the very first time people bought it and didn't understand the business. And I saw within weeks of them destroying the foundation, I was like, "You guys literally don't know what you bought. You should have asked some questions before you wrote a check that big anyway." But the core is the newsletter. And so I had a chance to go back in the archives. I literally... they gave me, "Here's Google drive. Everything's ever been created." So I'm like, "This is... It's insane." for nerdy Russell, everything Dan's ever said is in this drive. And most of it, no one's ever seen before, so I'm freaking out. But the newsletter started back in like 1995 ish. I was like 15 years old when it started and it was just a newsletter. That's all it was right. It's like a product. That's how they sold it. And from '95 till I think I was probably 23, 24. So, 2004, 2005 ish was when Bill Glazer bought out the company from Dan and kind of ran it, and then they launched it. Instead of a newsletter, they launched it as an offer. And the offer at the time... I still remember the day it happened because I got like 400 emails from my Yanik Silver and all the different gurus at the time. They all started emailing about this Dan Kennedy offer. And it was called the most incredible free gift ever. And in fact, internally in the company called the MIFGE offer, M-I-F-G-E, the most incredible free gift ever. And what it was, it was like, "Hey, when you sign up for magnetic marketing net letter, what you're going to get is you're going to get..." I think it's like, "$639.93 for the money making material from Dan Kennedy himself." So it was like, "We'll give you all this cool stuff when you sign up for the newsletter." And it was the bribe. It's kind of like, if you guys remember back in the day, sports illustrator. It's really hard to sell sports illustrated issues. So what they would do is they would have TV commercials were like, "Here's sports illustrator, 12 issues year about the best sports. When you sign up today, we're going to give you..." And then they had their version of the most incredible free gift offer. It was this huge football clock and the sports illustrator swimsuit issue. That was the MIFGE offer for sports illustrator. And so Dan had their... They had their MIFGE offer, and they went from having five or 600 subscribers at that time to... Bill built it up to over, I don't know, 10, 15, 20. I don't know how big it got it as peak, but 10,000 plus members. And it was because they took a newsletter and they made it an offer. And that's how they launched initially. And so the MIFGE is how they did it. Now, fast forward to Russell gets access to all this stuff. I'm like, "This is amazing." So I'm trying to sit... I sat down Monday morning. No, sorry. It was last Saturday. Saturday. I wanted to write... I didn't want to do all the pages in the offer. So I have some of my team do the upsells and down-sells. I was like, "The landing page, this is mine." I want to write because I want to make sure I get the offer right and everything. Because this is... everything hinges on this. The landing page is broken, nothing works. And so I went and I funnel hacked. I every newsletter, sales letter, I could find throughout time. I just went deep in my archives, way back machine. People I knew who publishing newsletters, looked at every variation of theirs for the last 10 years. I totally geeked out like Russell does. Funnel hacking. I want to understand how people are structuring their newsletter offers. Gore's got a ton of them. So I'm looking at tons of them and everyone I looked at, I come back to like the Dan Kennedy one I'm like this offers just not sexy. More like $630 of money making information sounded cool in 2003. But today, it's like every opt-in, people are giving a thousand dollars worth of free crap. It wasn't that sexy- Josh: Right. Inflation, baby. Oh my word. Russell: Yeah. And then I'm like, "Now my funnel nerds are going to go and they're going to sign for this newsletter, and they're going to get this newsletter from Dan. He's talking about direct mail and faxing. And they're going to be confused and they're going to cancel." I have this weird opportunity. I was like, "This is just not the right thing." And I was like, "How do I make this sexy excited? How do I get myself excited to email about it?" And then Dan's email. I got to get affiliates on board and other people. How do I make this sexy so that I can create the noise? So that when there's an ad, there's a good enough hook in the ad that people are going to click? Because if the ads like, "Old marketing, grumpy marketing genius is going to give you 300 or $639 money making material for free when you join this newsletter," no one's going to click on that. The hook sucks now. It was good in 2003, horrible in 2021. And so I'm like sitting there and I spent three hours just going to yourself. And I was like, no matter how I tried, the offer just didn't feel right. And I explain to other knight, I was like, "I know I wouldn't click and I know I wouldn't buy it. And I don't want to even email my list tell them about it because it's not that exciting. How do I structure this in a way that's going to be really exciting?" And so that the problem. This is where I got stuck at. Right. And then, after about three hours of it is when I had the light bulb, I was like, "Oh my gosh." So all of the current Dan Kennedy customers, they love Dan. They're obsessed with them. And actually, this is a fascinating step. You'll appreciate this. Have you read a thousand true fans? Josh: Yeah. I love that book. Russell: It was crazy. So Dan's company was sold initially like 10 years ago, from Bill Glazer sold it. In the last 10 years, they haven't bought a single ad. So that's the attrition of the company, that's been happening. And I'm acquiring it like, "Oh, let's buy some ads." But what's crazy is 10 years since they bought the last ad, there are almost, to a T, it's like 990 something active paid subscribers still on a newsletter a decade later, without any ads at all. A thousand true fans. Is that crazy? Josh: That's insane. Russell: Really? Josh: And you're one of those true fans because you bought the whole company. Russell: Yeah. I thought that was a fascinating side note. So anyway, that's crazy. Like Dan's people love Dan. They love him talking. If they want Dan, but they need funnels. And I'm like, I don't want to come and be the guy who acquires the company and just starts emailing his own offer. I need them to.. I need to indoctrinate them to want it. So it's like, they're going to read Dan's newsletter and how do I bridge that to ClickFunnels? And I'm like, my funnel nerds are going to read his newsletter and be like, "I don't understand. This isn't..." They need it. They don't know they want it yet. If I can indoctrinate them for a while, they'll be like, "Oh my gosh, I get this," but it's going to take a while for them to really respect it enough that they'll get it. I was the same way. First time I heard Kennedy, I was like, "This guy's old, boring, and doesn't relate to what I'm talking about." And after I went deep in, I was like, "Oh my gosh, everything he says is literal. He's handing gold nuggets out." And I was just like, I didn't notice them. Now I'm like, "Oh my gosh." And so I was like, "I need this bridge." And some people know, when I first joined the Kennedy world, we actually launched my first print newsletter right afterwards. It was called The Dot Com Seekers Journal. It morphed from The Dot Com Seekers Journal to eventually call it, The Dot Com Seekers Labs. And then it became a Funnel Report and then it became Funnel University. So I actually ran a print newsletter for 14 years. We shut it down two years ago, but 14 years I ran a print newsletter. Josh: Yeah. I remember when you shut it down actually. Russell: Yeah. And I loved it, but I just, anyway... There's reasons like the person who was publishing it, she had a baby and she retired and all these things. I was just like, "Ah. I'm, I'm focusing ClickFunnels. Don't even worry about this right now." So we shut it down. But I loved that part of it. And I was like, what if I create an offer where the concept, the story, the hook of this whole entire thing is like, "Russell bought Dan company and they're coming together to give you two things like the best foundational direct response in the world. Plus the best in the marketing, the cutting edge, the new things are happening. So you can have both sides. So you understand the foundation you need to be able to survive Facebook slapping you and all these things happening and media shifting and changing. But you also have like what's working today so you can capitalize on things in real time." What if we took those two worlds together? The baby. And so instead of just being like, "You're signing for the new, from the Dan Kennedy newsletter," what if it was like, "Dan Kennedy, Russell Brunson?" Two different newsletters. You get two newsletters for the price of one. I was like, "That's the offer. That's the hook. That's what gets affiliates excited, to get ads excited, everything gets excited around this offer." And then, every mornings at 5:00 in this morning, or 5:00 AM every morning this week, I woke up and I'm writing copy for this page of like, "Okay, here's the hook. They're coming in. And there's Dan and there's Russell." How these things are coming together. And the story behind that, how it worked and then the offer instead of just like, "Here's $697 worth of free stuff," it's like, "you get two newsletters. You get the best direct response, best of Russell, every two weeks." So you get one in the mail and then 14 days later, you get the next one. And you're getting both of these. You get the old and the new but you only pay one price. You get both for the price of one. And then you get all Dan's bonus, all Russell's bonuses. Now becomes this like insane offer where, now, it's like, "I'm excited to mail my list." We bought Dan's company, you get all my best stuff in this to get, and it's this combination. And then affiliates will be excited. It just... And maybe the hook bombs, I don't know. But it gave me the energy, just like, "Okay, now, this is exciting and sexy." And so I can turn that into webinar where it's just like, "Dan Kennedy and Russell Brunson coming together to literally blah, blah, blah, blah, whatever." Like, "Opt in here to find our webinar," and people would opt in because the story, the hook is exciting or I can do a challenge like, "The seven day challenge. Me and Dan are going to go through how to destroy your business and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah." And in the end, I'm selling a newsletter or it could be a VSL telling the story with a newsletter or could be... all of them work. The book is the secrets of story. Josh: Well, what it sounds like... Correct me if I'm wrong here, but it sounds like you just created this story about the offer. And now that you know what the offer is, and there's a reason that that came together and like, "That's what it is," now, you understand the story behind that. I'm trying to think of it like an analogy. For example, Disney world. That offer is so good. You're literally going into a different world that pretty much sells itself once you put it out there. And so once you have the story, once you have that idea around what the offer does and how it's unique and how it's it's own unique thing, then you can just take that and then it fills the rest of the funnel. Because everybody wants that thing because now the offer itself is so good. And I think one of the problems that I had, man, for so long is, I was trying to convince people that they wanted my thing be... Or convince people that they had this problem, and then that they wanted this thing, and then I would make them an offer on it. And they wouldn't get to... they wouldn't even know about the offer, or what the offer did, or like anything about it, until like forced or like right before the offer. And they'd be like, "And then I've got this offer? Boo." And because of that, there was no story around it. There's no congruency with it. And so then it was like, "Oh, I didn't even know. That's what I was here for." And then I would like try to sell them something and it wouldn't sell. And I feel like that's the problem that got solved right there, is like first you created the offer and the story around the offer and you made it sexy. And then that made everything else on the funnel super, super easy, because you were just pointing them back to that. Russell: Everything, the funnel plus all the ads. Because now the ads are fun. "Why Dan Kennedy came out of retirement? Dan Kennedy almost died. What's he doing today?" All a sudden, all these hooks that tie into that. "Why did Dan Kennedy partner with the owner ClickFunnels? Why did... Is it true that ClickFunnels was built off the back of all Dan Kennedy principles?" There's so many stories I can tell now that are hooks. That'll grab his people in or my people in or... And then the landing page. And then... It creates everything. And the people that the best in the world of this, and they also make the most money, is Agora. The good Gora publishing. They're selling newsletters. That's all they sell. Right. But every single time they have these insane stories like Porter Stan's got... I think maybe not still, but for like a decade and a half, the highest of all the Agora divisions. I think he'll do like 1.5 or 2 billion dollars a year. Like these are big divisions. Porter's letter one. And, the story was like, "The railroad across America." And it was talking about like, "The original railroad, how it happened and all the people made money along the way. And this is the next railroad that's being built. It's the digital highway and all this stuff." And that offer was selling a newsletter. But it's the story behind it that became this thing that built a billion dollar company. And they're good. They're so good at figuring out the story, those kind of things. And I think sometimes we're like, "Hey, I've created a course in the passed. You should create a course too. I made money. It's going to be awesome." And then like, "You should buy my course creating software or whatever." Like, "That's not the thing." We're so bad at telling stories. We brag about our result. We tell them making the same result and that's it. It's like, no, that's not the key. It's the story. It's the entry. It's the... We want to be entertained. We want to be courted. We want to be... that's the game we're playing in marketing. And so when you figure that out... The offer is actually sexy. And then why is that sexy? The sexiness is not just, "You get a bunch of crap." The sexiness is the story about like how this was created. Josh: Literally what it does that. Russell: That's the fascinating part. Josh: Yeah. Yeah. Catherine Jones. One of her favorite things is, "When your stories become their stories, then your solutions become their solutions." and that's literally what this is. If you can tell them a story where they like it and they're like, "Oh my gosh, this is amazing," then, go and do it. So for example, Harry Potter world. The story, it... My wife freaking loves Harry Potter world. I mean, that was her thing. When we went down to Funnel Hacking Live, it was like, we were going to take a half a day just to go to Harry Potter world. So we showed up and then it was like, "Hey." Miles is like, "Dude, the buss is leaving for Harry Potter world." There wasn't much convincing that has to be done. The story is, "Oh my gosh, Harry Potter world's amazing. It's Harry Potter. I want it" She wanted that thing because of the story that was leading up to it. There was no, "What's Harry Potter world? Is it any good? What's this?" It's like, "No, it's Harry Potter world." And you're like, "Oh, okay. Yeah, I want it." That's like the story with that. So that's super, super interesting. So where do you see the future of funnels going? Because obviously there's a lot of changes coming with ClickFunnels and ClickFunnels 2.0, which, oh my gosh, I'm so excited. Gusting. Gusting hits me up. Probably... Dude, he probably hits me up once a week and is like, "Hey, guess what? ClickFunnel 2.0 is awesome. And you don't have it." And I'm like, "I heard you. Stop." Russell: He actually built out the magnetic marketing funnel hub right now for me, which is cool. Josh: So, yeah. So anyway, but what's the next evolution? And we don't have really have too much to talk about metaverse and where that goes. But we're entering this new world. I mean, the world is changing very, very, very rapidly. COVID is one of those things that we thought the internet was a big deal, and internet marketing was a big deal, pre-COVID, and then we watch zoom blow up by like 3000% or something like that. And they ruin zoom for us. But anyway, so where are things going that people should be paying attention to and going actually studying and understanding about the future of funnels? Because one of the things that I've been really, really focused on and we're kind of getting dialed in, is community funnels, Specifically, I think for me, one of the things that I've noticed is that it's very, very... It's getting increasingly harder to sell things unless you have a community that's tied with it. And so like for me, one of the things we're focusing on is how do we build funnels inside of our community where our community actually becomes part of the funnel? Which is kind of a cool concept. What do you see as those future things of where funnels are headed, where the big opportunities are going to be? What's the next add to webinar to a 9 97 course? You know what I'm saying? What's the future? Where we're heading? Russell: I hate to make it sound simple, but if I come back to the fundamentals we talked about the beginning of this call. Like Dan Kennedy, whoever can spend the most money to acquire customer wins. So you look at it through that lens. Went from a product, to an offer, to a funnel. And now with the funnel, I have more ways to make money. And then, from there, the next evolution was like from funnel to value ladder. Right now, it's like, I have a break even funnel and move people up a value ladder and that's how I may lose money or break even on my book funnel, but then my webinar funnel's going to make money or vice versa. Right? Josh: Right. Russell: That was the next phase. And I think, for me, where I'm playing because I'm trying to play for the next 10 years. How do I win this game? We're doing well. I want to.. How do I get a point where, Shopify, or Salesforce is like, "I want to write you a check for 20 billion because you're such annoyance." The way I'm going to do that, for me, is... and it comes back to why did I acquire Magnet Marketing? Why did I buy Brad Callin's company? Why am I doing this? Because I'm not looking at breakeven funnels anymore. Breakeven funnels, awesome. I'm going one chair back or I'm building breakeven businesses. So magnetic marketing, the only gold magnetic is to break even. The entire company, the value ladder, the coaching, the everything. So every penny made side of magnetic marketing be dumped back into ads, want 100% of the profits dump back into ads. So this company's blowing up. And I get now all these things dumped into my value ladder for ClickFunnels. Like that's it. Voomly doing 40 million a year? Why do we acquire that company? Tons of lead flow. Now, right now there's... it was 10 million dollars a year net profit. All that money now is being dumped directly into lead flow as a breakeven business, to acquire customers for ClickFunnel. So I think it's going deeper. It's looking past... from product to offer, to funnel, to value ladder, to how do I buy or acquire or create something where the only goal of this entire business is just get customers for free that can put into here. And I thing, for me, that's the next level is just like that thought. Josh: You just blew my mind, dude. Holy cow. You're creating an ecosystem, but in a very specific way. It's interesting, as you just told that out, just, "First, it was this. Then, it was this." The thing before it didn't change. That's still part of it. Russell: It's both the same. Yeah. Josh: Right. But it's kind of that next evolution, that next piece of where that comes out. That's fascinating. I think a lot of people need to just really rewind that, go listen to that clip again and let your brain sit on that. Russell: That's how I'm playing the game. Yes. Hopefully I'm four step ahead everyone else, but I'm all for showing that with you guys. And so I just... Again, for everyone to start thinking that, because it's going to get harder. It's going to get more expensive. It's going to get more... We've seen that this year. Ad costs have gone up. It's not going to get cheap. It's not going to bounce back down and be cheaper. It's going to keep doing that. The people who only had a product back in the day are out of business. People only had an offer back in day, they're out of business. People don't have a funnel are out of a business. People don't have a value ladder out of a business. So it's just thinking ahead of that. Metaverse or whatever next step is, doesn't really matter. It's the principle still is the same for me. For 20 years, whoever can spend the most money to acquire customer wins. Josh: Wins. Russell: How do I do that in a way that serves the customers, brings them in and then... I'll end on this, because it back to what you said. And I did a podcast on this. It's in the facts I got from Dan Kennedy. After the company sold last time, he was super mad at the company that had jacked up his brand and his legacy and stuff. And so like he sent this 25 page facts, like all the things to do to fix it. And there's one paragraph where he said, "There's difference between why customers come in and why they stay." He said, "People think they're the same things." He's like, "No, no, they're different." Why they come in is because they see the hook of like, "Ooh, the scene." They come in from that. They stay for something different. And you have to understand that. So like I had my inner circle meeting, right. Everyone paid 50 grand to be in the room. We had a hundred entrepreneurs in the room and I told them. I said like, "Well, you guys all because you want to learn funnels from Russell." But I'm like, "The reason why you came is not why you were going to stay here. The reason I get sick year, after year, after year is because of the community." That's it. That's why I sat in Dan Kennedy rooms for six years of my life is because the community built and I wanted to be around these people. I came for Dan stuck for the community. And I think that you start understanding that, that's how you get these people to come in on a front end, but they stay and they buy over and over and they stay on continuity. They stick because it's like.. They come in from a hook, but they stay for the something different. And so really understanding that and then weaving everything you're doing like you're doing now with the community funnels, which is perfect. Josh: That's amazing. That's amazing. All right. Well I think that's a good ending point for that topic. Russell: There's episode number two of our hangout today, which was amazing.

The Next 100 Days Podcast
#300 Kevin Appleby & Graham Arrowsmith – Review

The Next 100 Days Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 47:23


A Review of the Last 6 Years with Kevin Appleby & Graham Arrowsmith After 6 years of podcasting, Graham and Kevin decided to review what they'd achieved in this milestone 300th episode. Prior to the podcast in our way, we agreed to discuss 3 things that have been good for us and 3 things that have not been so good during that time. And not just for the podcast, but for our businesses too. Kevin pays homage to Internet Business Mastery Without both Kevin and I listening to the Internet Business Mastery podcast, we would not have even met, let alone start a podcast. The presenters of this popular show, have both been guests on The Next 100 Days. Here are the links to their shows with us. Jeremy Frandsen - #100 Lifestyle Design Jason Van Orden - #223 Thought Leadership Kevin Blames Internet Business Mastery for Making it Sound Too Easy! Kevin was in determined mood. On his list of didn't go so well, they were at the top of his negative list too! http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Kevin-Internet-Business-Mastery-Podcast.mp4 Kevin relented! Jeremy and Jason brought us together. Kevin also got to know another previous two-time guest - Russell Thackeray too. Additionally, for Kevin, he is also forging a business relationship with Dan Wells in their Grow CFO business. Strengths of The Next 100 Days Podcast Another review point Kevin makes is that our consistency in producing episodes helps us attract guests. Many of our guests introduce themselves to us through the APPLICATION form on this website! Graham pointed out that many of our guests are ex-corporate, probably running their own businesses and like to have fun. They don't take themselves too seriously! http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Strengths-of-The-Next-100-Days-Podcast.mp4 But is The Next 100 Days Podcast TOO GENERAL? Kevin pointed out that we have been a generalist podcast. In this way, has it been both success and failure. Success in that we have brought so many very interesting guests, covering a wide arc of topics. But could we have done better, by being highly focused on one or two markets? We are not niche. If we provide a service for everyone, you are providing a show for no-one. Kevin made the point that his Grow CFO shows grown quickly because it is focused on a small audience. It is relevant to them. Graham made the point that in the next 100 days, in a business context, topics could be virtually anything. It's Difficult to Scale a Podcast http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Kevin-Diffcult-to-Scale-a-Podcast.mp4 The lesson to be learned is be clear about WHY you want to do it and to WHOM will you provide the service to. Accurate Thinking Graham made the case that when the podcast was being first thought of, both Kevin and Graham were probably not displaying Accurate Thinking. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Graham-Accurate-Thinking.mp4 In Renegade Millionaire, Dan Kennedy uses accurate as in "knowing facts you may not want to know". For Graham, delegation has been a negative. Recently, we used a photo without permission and that cost Kevin and Graham. Graham cited a legal agreement that he probably ought not to have entered, and with better accurate thinking he would have avoided. So, with both staffing issues and contracts, accurate thinking - delving into the facts you mat not want to know, a better outcome would have been possible. Fail Fast, Fail Forward Kevin mentions how he has achieved results through people. Especially with his involvement with GrowCFO. Dan Wells and Kevin brought complementary skills. Then they needed mentoring. After that they transformed their website with a person focused on their website. Graham notes he needs to refresh his website, so he wants to get his website updated. Kevin said Finely Fettled's website is purely being used as a lead generation tool. It is.

Vanderpump Robs
Season 3: Tears Over Miami / A Stand Against Stassi / Miami Vices (with Dan Kennedy)

Vanderpump Robs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 43:54


We're back from a mid-season break and we've got so much to catch up on. Today we're joined by the great Dan Kennedy from KPODD! It's Vanderpump Rules reexamined! Support PinkJeans on Patreon Follow MacKenzie Follow Robs --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/robsrobs/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/robsrobs/support

Real Estate Investing With Jay Conner, The Private Money Authority
Protect Your Real Estate Assets Now! with Robert Bluhm and Jay Conner, The Private Money Authority

Real Estate Investing With Jay Conner, The Private Money Authority

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 21:49


Robert Bluhm is here today together with Jay Conner to share information on how you can protect yourself from lawsuits, how to lower your taxes, and most importantly how to reduce the risks of an IRS audit. Bob Bluhm is one of the nation's leading asset protection attorneys. During his 30 years as an attorney, Bob has been a trial lawyer and has represented Fortune 500 companies as well as smaller, privately-held businesses. As a speaker, Bob has shared the stage with notable political figures, such as Presidents Trump, Clinton and Bush, Margaret Thatcher, Mikhail Gorbachev, Benjamin Netanyahu, and financial figures, such as Jim Cramer, Dan Kennedy, Jay Abraham, Suze Orman, and Robert Kiyosaki. He is the author of several articles on asset protection and is a contributor to "The Asset Protection Handbook." Bob specializes in protecting real estate investors from lawsuits, lowering their taxes, and reducing the risk of an IRS audit. He and his team work with both U.S. investors and international investors purchasing U.S. real estate. Bob and his team have helped many thousands of people all over the world grow their wealth more quickly and securely. Timestamps: 0:01 - Get Ready To Be Plugged Into The Money 1:14 - Jay’s New Book: “Where To Get The Money Now”- https://www.JayConner.com/Book 3:24 - Today’s guest: Robert Bluhm 6:32 - Who is Robert Bluhm? 8:21 - How many years have been helping people protect their assets? 8:41 - What is Asset Protection? 9:15 - Strategies in protecting your assets 10:31 - What is the best type of entity for asset protection? 12:25 - How complicated is the process of determining what kind of entity is right for you? 13:11 - Different states have different law 13:48 - Connect with Robert Bluhm - https://www.AssetDefenseTeam.com 15:15 - Know the rules, follow the rules and you will be okay 17:09 - Case studies/ stories that prove you need asset protection 20:53 - Own Nothing but Control Everything 22:05 - Personal Property Trust 23:46 - Bob Bluhm’s best advice on asset protection 24:52 - Bob Bluhm’s parting comment: “We will protect your assets to the greatest extent possible” 26:13 - Connect with Robert Bluhm - https://www.AssetDefenseTeam.com Real Estate Cashflow Conference: https://www.jayconner.com/learnrealestate/ Free Webinar: http://bit.ly/jaymoneypodcast Jay Conner is a proven real estate investment leader. Without using his own money or credit, Jay maximizes creative methods to buy and sell properties with profits averaging $64,000 per deal. What is Real Estate Investing? Live Cashflow Conference https://youtu.be/QyeBbDOF4wo The Conner Marketing Group Inc.P.O. Box 1276, Morehead City, NC USA 28557 P 252-808-2927F 252-240-2504 Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZfl6O7pRhyX5R-rRuSnK6w https://www.youtube.com/c/RealEstateInvestingWithJayConner RSS Feed http://realestateinvestingdeals.mypodcastworld.com/rss2.xml Google Play https://play.google.com/music/listen#/ps/Ihrzsai7jo7awj2e7nhhwfsv47y iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/real-estate-investing-minus-bank-flipping-houses-foreclosure/id1377723034 Watch on ROKU: Roku https://my.roku.com/add/realestateinvestingRoku https://my.roku.com/add/realestateinvesting Watch on Amazon Prime: https://www.amazon.com/How-Locate-Real-Estate-Deals/dp/B07M9WNZR6/ref=sr_1_3

The Marketing Secrets Show
Marketing Secrets From An Auctioneer

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 13:18


Cool things I witnessed at a recent fundraiser for my boys' wrestling. Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com ---Transcript--- What's up everybody. This is Russell. I just jumped in the Tesla. I'm going to drive into the office and I got something cool I want to share with you. We had a chance to go to a wrestling auction this week and some of the salesmanship and marketing principles that I saw were amazing. And so I want to talk through them and how you can apply them to your business. Hey, everybody. Welcome back. I hope you guys are excited. I've had a good week this week. I'm working on some fun projects with the mushifying of Dan Kennedy's company with ClickFunnels and a new offers coming out and a bunch of stuff. And so I wake up every morning at five this week and I've been excited and got a lot of work done. It's been good. You know the feeling like when you're excited about something, how much easier it is to wake up and do the thing? It's been a while since I felt that way. In fact, I was last night, I was thinking like, when was the last time I was this excited about working on something in the business. And if I'm honest with myself, it was when the traffic secret book launch, which is man almost like two years ago now, is that right? A year and a half ago. Anyway. So anyway, it just feels good to be doing something fun. So hopefully all you guys have got something fun you're working on, because it just makes everything else better anyway. Okay. So as you guys know, I'm a wrestler. My ears are all cauliflowered up and my kids, some of them like wrestling, some hate wrestling, but I've got one stronghold who loves wrestling. And so, which is great. And so we went to the wrestling banquet this year where they were raising money for the wrestling team. And so we were there ready to support and help donate money so that the team can get the stuff we need to be a good team. And I also help coach. So I'm one of the coaches too. But anyway, we go to the wrestling banquet and in the past they used to do a spaghetti feed. They have spaghetti, everyone come, the wrestlers serve the people and they'd have like a silent auction. And I think they said the best year ever was like $6,000 raised. I think the average year is like four or 5,000. So that's kind of the context of where we're starting at. So this time around they met one of the coaches, the coach's wife or someone met these guys who do auctions. They were an auction company and would basically go up there and instead of just like having silent auction where people bid on stuff, that's like an auctioneer up top. And he's like doing the, yeah, can I get five? Can I get five? All that kind of stuff like they do, right. And so it was weird because it was in a bar so they didn't invite kids. It just the parents. So first we kind of like, this is weird. Like I don't know how it's going to work. Like they still had silent auction and we bid on some things, whatever. And then we had dinner and then after dinner they had the auctioneers get up and start the process. And this is where the marketing gold started happening. And as a marketing nerd that I am, I was just like freaking out like watching the process and how they did it and how they were able to get the room excited about giving up money and spoiler alert when it was all said and done, they raised almost $40,000 for wrestling. So yeah like, yeah, a lot. And that's not counting we gave extra donations on top. That's just like the rest of the people, right. Which was really, really cool. And so a couple of things, the first thing they did, the auctioneers got up there. The first thing they do is they had to build a rapport with the audience. Because by default you're like, oh, these guys are going to sell me something. And so there's no rapport. So they get up there and they start telling their stories, who they are and how they're a family business and how they get into this. And they just kind of told these stories and jokes really quickly to try to build rapport as quick as they could. Right. So that was the first thing. Second thing is they had to train everybody how to buy. And this was really fascinating. What they did initially is like, we're going to get this auctions process starting. We're going to teach you guys how it works. And they held up $500 cash and we're going to start with $500 cash. And the way that you can win this $500 cash is if you buy a $20 thing, like you bis $20 or you pay $20 and you get a chance to win this $500. Right? So who would pay $20 for a chance to win 500 and all the money goes to wrestling. So it's going to be good, right? So start doing this and I don't know how many people did it, but most of the audience put in there $20 to win this thing. And they had a lot of energy and it was fun, it was exciting. And the end of it, they drew somebody and someone won the $500. They got $500 and the person like gave the $500 back just put it toward wrestling. And so from that one little exercise, they raised $1,500 for wrestling, right? The $500 came back and then the $20 bills like a thousand dollars worth of $20 orders that went through really quickly. And so they made $1,500. But that first thing, it was interesting because you're paying $20 for a chance to win 500. So it's like a no brainer. Like I'll just try it. But what they were really doing, if you look at the strategies, they were teaching people how to bid, right. For somebody like me who had never been in an auction before, I didn't know how to hold the paddle and how it worked and all those kind of things and so this gave us the ability to learn at a very low risk thing, with the worst case, you lose 20 bucks, right? Best case you win 500. So it's like a really risk reward thing was, was very, very, very, very easy to say yes to. And it's interesting because training the audience is so important in everything you're doing. In fact, I remember I learned this originally from Bill Glazer at their super conferences day number one, they would do a charity offer where he had this whole swipe file book. He's like, hey, you pay a hundred dollars to charity. You get the book and everyone ran back and they closed like most of the room. In fact, I remember running back and had a hundred dollar bill and give a hundred dollar bill getting this book. And it was like the first time I had seen that happen. I didn't understand it until my next mastermind meeting when Bill Glazer got up and explained his strategy. He said day number one, my biggest goal in the event is to train the audience how to buy. Because I don't want them trying to figure out how to buy when I'm doing my high ticket, $25,000 sale, right. I want them to know how to buy on something that's low risk, that's not scary. And so he's like day number and I always do a charity thing because number one, it builds rapport because you're helping people. Number two, you're actually helping people, which is awesome. And number three, though, it trains the audience on how to buy. And so they learn how to stand up. They learn where to go. They learn how to go and where the forms are at. They go through the whole process once and then when you ask them to buy two days later, they already know how to do it. They're not confused. Right? And so you're training the audience how to buy. So again, the auctioneers did that. They trained us how to buy something that was super low risk. We do it at our front hockey live events, Bill Glazer did it at their events where we're training people how to stand up, go to the back of the room, give money on something that's very low risk. Right? And so that's how we've done events, but how could you do it during your webinars? How could you do it during... There's so many things that you could leverage that idea, like how to train the audience how to buy something small before you're asking them for the big purchase. So that's the first thing. Next thing they go out there and they start auctioning off these different packages. And I wish I would've had a pad of paper and notes the night that it happened I was just like freaking out about everything. But I kind of just remember the core things that stuck out. So next thing is it wasn't just one dude on stage doing the auction, right. That's how I would've thought it was going to be. But the auctioneer had like four or five people in the audience walking around. So people in the audience were doing a couple things. Number one is they were making noise. So it felt like even though there wasn't a lot of people bidding, it felt like there was because you could hear hear the people out in the audience talking and there are seeds out the audience talking and creating energy and creating momentum and social proof that people were bidding. And so they were walking around and as they were doing that, they started figuring like who are the people that want this offer. Right? And so the people in the audience would see and like, okay, this person bid 50, this person bid a hundred, this person 150. They started looking at the people who were bidding. So then it starts isolating from the entire audience. Like here's the five or six people that are bidding. And as you get closer and closer, the people in the audience walking around the auctioneers is partners or whatever you call them, they start identifying, okay, these are the three people that want this. And so then they hone in on those people. And as the auctions happening, they're like, he's the 250, do you want to do 3, 3, 3? And then like, they're kind of like helping push and like urge them to bid up. And so person bids up. Next person goes back. And so now it's the auctioneers are standing side by side with the two or three whales in the audience who were going to buy and using that as a way to up the bid, like get it moving higher, higher, higher, higher at the point where these things that probably would've sold for 50 bucks at a silent auction were selling for 15 or $2,000 because of the way the process worked. And it was really, really fascinating. And so I started seeing that. And so how could you replicate that? You could replicate in a lot of ways, right? Like in an event you could replicate that when it's creating social proof. Like you think about when you get a table rush, if you don't get a table rush it's hard, because nobody moves, right. But get people to stand up and run to the back of the room, as soon as a couple people run back and people see that, it creates social proof. Like I remember during my funnel hockey live presentation when I was speaking a lot on stages and doing the whole process like that, I remember I would usually the very first time I dropped the price, it's weird because usually like one or two people would get up. And at first I would just like, I was like, oh, like feeling all awkward. Like, oh man, like only two people got up. I don't want to say things. I kept going through the rest of my pitch and going through things and over to the pitch, more people would go, more people would go. And I remember this one time I was doing the pitch and I got up and I got to the point where I showed the price and the two or three people that jumped up, and I don't remember why, but some reason it startled me. I was like, oh wow. And I could have stopped. And I said, whoa, I'm like those people right there, they get it. They've already started moving. And I pointed to the people that were walking towards the back of the room, like jogging towards the back of the room to buy and everyone else stopped and looked back and they saw like 30 people running and all of a sudden they're like, oh my gosh, this is legit. I don't want to be in the back of the line. All of sudden next person popped up. Next one popped. And all of a sudden, like it was this like sprint to the back and it created this table rush. And it's kind of the similar process as like, it's like, if you get one or two people who are in, who are going to buy, right, they're starting to walk to the back of the room. Don't just like be secret about it, like call that like, oh my gosh, like I haven't got the pitch in. Look, these guys are already in the back room buying. Dude, you don't know the prices yet, you're already in. And they're like, yeah, I'm already in like, oh my gosh, like they get it. If you guys get this, you know this is the way like, just like you have my permission to stand up and go right now. Right. And we create this thing and they start moving. It was just really cool to be able to see these marketing and sales principles that we use in different places used here inside of this auction to raise money for wrestling. And so I started thinking, one of my first mentors, I've had a lot of really good mentors in life. One of them was Jay Abraham. What Jay Abraham taught me really well was to look at things happening in other industries and how do you model them for yours? And so really like my goal with this was to kind of share with you guys a couple just quick examples from the auction, but hopefully open up your eyes so you start seeing all the sales and marketing happening around you, right? You look at ClickFunnels, we launched our dream car contests. People are like, how'd you come up with that? I'm like, because I looked over at this other industry, the network marketing industry, and they give away cars to people and get people to go crazy to build up their companies. I was like, we're going to take that concept from this industry and move it over, right. From the auction industry, like I saw what they did over here. Next time we do our fundraiser at Funnel Hacking Live, I'm going to do things differently because what I learned over here, right? So it's looking at other industries beside your own, looking like what they are doing, how are they marketing? How are they doing sales? How can you replicate that and pull that into your business? And I hope that's the principle I kind of got to today is just understanding that like there's amazing marketing sales happening so many places. There's businesses, industries that have proven stuff, right? This auction industry, these guys have been doing this for a decade. They have whole family does this. They test it. They tweak it. I'm sure that they've done a thousand auctions a year. They test all these things and how to say it and when to say it and all the different subtleties, how do you say that word of how to make it work? And so you can come look at that and see the process and just be, it's like sitting there at school learning how to increase your sales online. So keep your eyes open, watch other industries, see what they're doing, click on every ad you see because you have no idea what rabbit holes it's going to take you down, what you're going to learn, what you're going to discover for your own business as well. And I hope that helps. One other side tangent. I did this recently. I had my wife's phone. I thought it was mine. I grabbed it, opened up Facebook. And I was like, this is not my Facebook because she follows different ads, different people. So the ads she's targeted with are completely different than mine. And I was like fascinated. I started clicking on her ads, started taking me on this magical wonderland of offers and products and funnels I'd never seen before all because I look from a different lens. So same thing. Look at, you know, go to Facebook, create a fake profile and like things that are the opposite of what you normally look and start seeing when ads show up and what things you can learn from different industries. And it gets really powerful. So hope it helps. Thanks so much for everything. And I'll talk to you guys all again soon. Bye everybody.

MicroFamous
Should You Offer Paid Podcast Content? What Coaches & Consultants Need to Know Right Now About Paid Subscriptions

MicroFamous

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 14:35


With Apple releasinghttps://podcasters.apple.com/878-subscriptions ( paid and freemium podcast subscriptions), there's a lot of talk in the podcast world about this new option for monetizing podcasts. So this is a perfect opportunity to cover an idea I've talked about behind the scenes but isn't in the MicroFamous book (at least, not this current version). There's a big difference between a product that helps you build demand for you, versus a product that harvests demand that already exists. Let's give a couple examples. Dan Kennedy tells a story of him taking his personal swipe file and offering it to his email list and making a quick 6 figures, then offering it out through affiliates and making another quick 6 figures. What gets left out of that story is all the years he spent investing in that email list.  Sending out high-value content. Making promises and then keeping them. Building trust over time. Then he can release a product that capitalizes on the demand and trust that already exists. If no one knew who Dan Kennedy was, no one cares about his swipe file and he doesn't make multiple 6 figures off that product. Let's look at another example, the rise ofhttps://substack.com/ ( Substack) and alternative journalism. Take someone likehttps://greenwald.substack.com/ ( Glenn Greenwald), now an independent journalist, but in the past someone who contributed to big name outlets like the Guardian and the Washington Post, where he won a Pulitzer Prize, then went out to found the Intercept. Now he publishes on Substack, a platform for paid newsletters. Estimates are that he has 20k-40k subscribers each paying at least $5 a month, which puts his yearly earnings around 2 million.  With podcasting opening up the option for paid subscriptions, we're going to see some similar success stories in that space. Here's my opinion: Paid subscriptions capitalize on existing demand. They don't carry the heavy lifting of creating new demand. So should an expert - like a coach, consultant or business book author - jump into the world of paid subscriptions? It depends on whether you have an existing audience or not. What we forget about folks like Glenn Greenwald is that they spent years writing for big name publications, going on TV, writing books or speaking.  They spent years, maybe even decades building their influence, creating trust, gaining notoriety, attracting attention, getting their content in front of thousands, maybe even millions. So unless you have already done that, remember that the economics of paid subscriptions may not be in your favor. In my point of view, paid subscriptions are like harvesting a crop you've been growing all season. But it doesn't plant new seeds. So the success stories we're about to hear in paid subscriptions will probably be those who already had an audience. They are “harvesting” from the crop of fame, influence and demand they built over years. Demand is how much of YOU people want.  When there's more demand for you than supply, you can harvest that demand in different ways. You can launch a book or an online membership. You can raise your speaking fees or your coaching fees. You can launch certifications or group coaching where your involvement is minimal Why? Because there's more demand for you than supply. What if you don't have that level of demand yet? What if you're still in the phase of attracting an audience and becoming MicroFamous in your space? Then my advice is that you're just in a different season. It's your time to plant, not harvest. And this is important because a detour into paid subscriptions has consequences. When you release a harvesting type product without a high level of demand, you'll put a ton of effort into something that only a small portion of your audience signs up for. Which means you aren't...

The Marketing Secrets Show
Secret Dan Kennedy Fax Reveals A Nugget Of Gold

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 12:00


Reasons for entry vs reasons to stay. Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com ---Transcript--- What's up everybody, this is Russell Brunson. Welcome back to the Marketing Secrets podcast. Today I want to share with you guys a little... It's 20 words, maybe 30 words, inside of a secret fax I got from Dan Kennedy. While he has only recently acquired his company and so I've been going through the archives, and there's this fax he sent to the old owners and I'm not allowed to share the whole thing because literally on the front page it says... Let me see what says, it says, "Confidential. Prepared for internal use only." Anyway. But there's this one little paragraph that is so cool and probably going to change some of your guys' lives forever. I don't want you to miss it. We're going to keep things on, come back, I'm going to tell you what it is. I'm going to explain it. And hopefully this is a little marketing secret you guys can use. Okay. Inside of this fax, so this is actually a fax. Bill Glazer, who's my first mentor in this world. Anyway, so Bill Glazer owned Magnetic Marketing. When I was with Bill, on my sixth year of his mastermind group is when he sold it to this PE firm. The PE firm destroyed the company, ran it to the ground and then Adam Witty bought it from them. Adam Witty got this fax from Dan. It was basically, "This is what is wrong with the business. This is how they killed it. Here's how to fix it. Here's what it was supposed to be. Here's the..." It's almost Dan's business plan for business, which is really cool. And so then Adam ran it for three years and then we bought it from Adam. I think there's so much like gold in here. I wish I could do a whole event just on, "Oh, here's a fax that Dan sent showing how to fix his own business from the PE firms who ran it into the ground." Oh, there's so many cool things. But okay, I can't give you it all because I'll get in trouble, but there's a nugget. I'm going to go on a limb for you guys because this nugget is so cool. And I want you just to understand it and to be able to use it. And it's interesting because I saw it last week at our over Inner Circle meetings and I saw the practical application of this again. Okay, you guys ready for this? Get out a pad of paper and a pencil if you want to go deep. In this section he titles the sections, "Reasons for entry versus reasons to stay." And then underneath that it says, "The acquisition versus attachment." We're talking about reasons for entries, how do you get people into your company, into your community, into your world, so that's acquisition. Versus reasons to stay, and that's attachment. So how do you get somebody into your community and then what gets them to actually stay in your community? Those are two different things. And then the next sentence says, "Not the same, not even close." Because a lot of times people think, "Oh yeah, you acquire a customer. They stay because they want to and keep buying your stuff." It's like, no, no, no, no. Acquisition and attachment are two different things. Then what Dan said here is the last sentence I'm going to read to you from the fax. He said, "What brings them in the door initially is almost never what keeps them inside over time." Let me say it one more time. "What brings them in the door initially is almost never what keeps them inside over time." And so for example, most of you guys who are listening to this, you came in based on some front end something, some kind of acquisition. It could have been a lot of things. It might have been one of my free books. It could have been, you heard me on someone's podcast. It could have been, you saw me in an event or you saw a YouTube video. Or there's something that got you and peaked your interest and it acquired you, got you into my world. Acquired you as a customer. Now, if you look... In fact, so the very first time I got this is when we first launched my Inner Circle, as my high ticket at the time was 25 grand that we signed up, I don't know, a dozen or so people. And it was interesting because people came to me, they joined the Inner Circle because they wanted to get closer to me. They all told me like, "Yeah, I joined because I wanted to learn from you." But then it was interesting because I watched these people and they stayed year, after year, after year. In fact, we renamed our Inner Circle, we call it Inner Circle For Life because it's like, we want people to come in to stay there for life. They're not allowed to leave after they come in. They can obviously, but that's concepts of Inner Circle For Life. And so they come in, they stay year, after year, after year. And what's interesting is I noticed that, again, they came because they want to get to know me, but then they stayed for something different. They stayed for the community. They stayed for the other people. They stayed for the group, they stayed for the... They didn't stay for me. If it was just Russell and it was me coming and speaking at them once a year, twice a year for the meetings, they wouldn't have stayed long-term. They stayed because of the community. And so what brings them in the door initially is almost never what keeps them inside over time. And it was interesting because we relaunched the Inner Circle, I talked about this in the last couple of podcast episodes. But what was interesting is initially, especially in the... We had two levels now, the Category Kings. And most of the Category Kings, all but two I think, or maybe three, had been in my Inner Circle before. And so they knew what was happening. But for the Inner Circle For Life program, there was almost 100 people who were brand new. Again, there are some people that had been there before, but for the most part they're all new people. And they came, they joined because they wanted to be in Russell Brunson's Inner Circle. They came because they wanted to get to know me. They came because they wanted learn funnels from Russell. So they came in, but then we facilitated this group and the whole goal of me facilitating the group was not for Russell to be on stage talking, the goal was to get them in this room. It's the room where it happens, the room where the magic happens. The room where these conversations are happening at a higher level. And I told them, initially I was like, "If you guys come here to learn from me, you can learn from me. Go read my books, all the stuff's in there. You don't need to pay me this amount of money to learn from me." I'm like, "Well, the power in this room is not me. It's like I said, I'm going to stand on stage and my goal is to stimulate conversation, and then to send it back to you guys in these rooms to have these conversations amongst each other." That's the whole thing. Even though that we acquire them, the reason for entry, what brought them in the door initially was because they wanted to be in Russell's Inner Circle and be around Russell. But the reasons they stay is to create attachment, and it's what keeps them inside over time is the relationships, the people, the community. And it's just fascinating. If you look at that from... Zooming out, you start looking at that, it's like, "Oh my gosh, this is the power." So many times we think that all the weight is on our own shoulders to run these businesses long-term, especially information businesses, but they're not. It's the community. And so if you're not building a community, if you're not doing things correctly, then that becomes the problem. Then it's always on you, always on you. It's just this hard thing. Why do people keep coming to Funnel Hacking Live? The first time they come to Funnel Hacking Live because they want to learn what's the funnel. If you look at the copy on the page, usually the headline I replicate from theme to theme to theme, is always something tied to, "You want to funnel away, but you don't know which funnel it's going to be. Come to Funnel Hacking Live, I want to show you which funnel that is." That's the acquisition, it gets people and it's like, "I keep hearing Russell talk about funnels. I just don't know which funnel's for me." So they come for that feel, what funnel it is when they come in the room and they have a feeling. They get to know other people, they become part of a community. They feel the energy. All those intangibles is why they come back. Why people come year, after year, after year. It's why most every other events happening in my industry is getting smaller and smaller and smaller every year, and ours gets bigger and bigger and bigger. Because we acquire people. We bring them in the door initially with the thing that they want. And then we create attachment inside the community with the thing that's going to keep them over time. Coming here hearing Russell talk about the next new funnel is not going to keep them over time, that's boring. Eventually they're going to leave. But if you build the reasons for them to stay strong enough, they'll stay and they'll keep coming over and over and over again. The first time I ever saw this in action was interesting. The very first time I went to Dan Kennedy's seminar, and I had been studying him, been learning about him. And for me it was like going to see the guru on the mountain. I was so excited to go and journey that direction and to meet him and to see him and all that kind of stuff. And I remember the time I saw him, he had just gotten in a... Dan, if you know anything about him, he has horses and he races horses and stuff, and he got injured or something. I remember they told us, he's like... At first they thought he wasn't going to come. And he did come, but he's in a wheelchair. And I remember when he came out, they wheeled him out and it was just silence in the room. And no one said a word. And everyone stood up and he came in and I was just like, "This is the coolest thing in the world." And I remember that feeling of him getting wheeled in here and everyone standing and like, the guru has showed up. I was so excited and that's why I came. And then I remember what he said that was interesting is, he asked the audience, he's like, "Who here has been following me for more than a year?" Everyone's hand goes up. "And more than five years? More than 10? More than 15? More than 20? More than 25? More than 30, more than 30?" And he went all the way back 30 or 40 years, I can't remember what it was. And there were still two dozen people standing with their hands raised of this entire room, who've been following him for 30 or 40 years. And I remember he said, he kind laughed and he's like, "You guys, I haven't had anything new to say since the seventies," or something like that. And he's like, "So why do you keep coming back?" And that's when he started talking about the reasons why they stay. The attractive character, the stories, the people, the community. These are the reasons why people stay. And so if you're just building a company on acquisition where you're bringing people in, the problem with that is you have this company that burns and churns where you're always... And I had, my very first supplement company was a burn and churn. People would come in, we had a really good funnel based on media. We'd spend $120 and make 180 back, and it was a good business. We were able to crank things through. But the supplement didn't get people to stick. They didn't keep coming back and reordering and building all these kind of things, they didn't stay. And so it was always this burn and churn business, and we turned off ads, the business stopped. And that was the issue and the problem behind it. And so that's true for a lot of people's businesses. If you're in a transactional business, all you're doing is acquisition. And if you're in acquisition, profitably you're okay. But if you want to scale your company and grow it, where each person goes from being worth, whatever, 180 bucks to four or 5,000, it's this mindset shift to, "Hey, we acquire them one way and then we create attachment, a reason for them to stay. Something that keeps them inside over time, a different way." And so hopefully this gets the thoughts in your head spinning, especially if you've got a retention problem, especially if you're losing people. Especially if you know customers by once from you and you never hear them again. This is the reason, you're good at the entry but you're not good at the reasons for them to stay. And so you, together as your team or whoever's you're working with, think through that. Ask some questions, "Why do people stay with us? What's the reasons? Have we built a culture?" If you need to go deeper on that, go back to Expert Secrets. I have three or four chapters talking about building mass movements and what gets people to stay over time, like identity and all the things. Anyway, there's a bunch of stuff that you can learn from there. But there you go, you guys. So Dan Kennedy, he's brilliant. There's a fax. I think that's, what, 30 words I gave you, but hopefully it's a needle mover. All right, that's it. You guys, appreciate you. Thanks for listening. Don't forget, the reason for entry is different than the reason they stay. And then as Dan said, "They're not the same, they're not even close." Hope it helps you guys. Thanks so much for everything, and I will talk to you soon.

The Marketing Secrets Show
Inner Circle For Life

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 9:43


What I'm doing day #1 to help launch or relaunch each of their businesses. Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com ---Transcript--- What's up everybody. This is Russell Brunson. Welcome back to the Marketing Secrets podcast. I have just finished day number three of the Category King's Mastermind, and now I'm driving to day number one of the Inner Circle. And I just want to drop some thoughts on you of what's been happening the last couple days, my insights about some of the stuff I'll be sharing today, and a whole bunch of other cool stuff. We'll be right back. All right. So, the last three days have been insane. I think I told you guys in the last episode, we launched a new Mastermind level called the Category Kings. It's $150,000 to join, and we got 15 people to sign up in a day and a half or something, which surprised me, but it was amazing. In fact, okay, hold on for all you guys, it's been really interesting, three or four people who are in that group right now, right, "First thing Russell told us when we joined the mastermind group was to email our lists and sell a mastermind group" and one person's like "I did it and sold 20 people and made my money back the first night at Inner Circle, the very first time." And then somebody else like, "Same thing, same thing," like three or four people. So, there's one piece of advice. If you're like, "I need to make more money," and you've gotten a list, send them an email and back, Yo, I'm launching a mastermind you want in?" And I think for most of you guys, you'll be surprised what happens. So, anyway, throwing that out there is a quick win that I think all of you guys could do. It's actually really interesting. Today I'm going to be talking to the group about improvement offers versus new opportunities. If you've read the Expert Secrets book, I geeked out on there for five chapters about it, but new opportunities are what you want to sell because it attracts people who have desire and t's really good. You don't want to sell improvement offers, typically, because improvement offers only attract people who have ambition, right? People who want to improve and the people who, the bucket of people who want to improve is very, very small. Now for you guys who are entrepreneurs, who are listening to this podcast, interesting enough, you're probably one of the few people who, the small percentage of the world who actually does want to improve. And in everyone's list, there's, the majority is people who have desires and there's a small group of people who want improvement. And typically those are the people at the very, very, very, very, very, very back of your value ladder, right? It's your highest ticket people. It's the people who have ambition, right? Those are the people and they're few and far between, but they're there. And so, what's interesting, if you look at, we announced this to our list and most people were probably like, "$150,000 for a meeting? No!" But the ambitious people were like, "Yes, I want to improve." Boom. And they didn't think about it. It wasn't a hard sell. It was an easy thing. And my guess is that, on most people's lists, there's a small certain people who are looking for improvement and a high end mastermind or thing like that, is what fulfills an improvement offer, right? It's, they're going to become better smarter. Anytime you have an ER, it's an improvement offer, which is horrible for a friend and offer, but it works for high ticket. So anyway, another thing to think out there. Anyway. So I was going to talk about today, which is really fun. So I'm in a really interesting phase of the business right now where, as you guys know, we're about to launch ClickFunnels 2.0, we just bought Magnetic Marketing. So we're about to relaunch Dan Kennedy's company. We also bought Brad Callen's company, which was called Bryxen. We've renamed it Voomly because that's the core kind of product and the product line. And it's interesting because, I'm in this phase right now, where I am either launching or relaunching my core business and two other businesses. And so this mastermind has been fun for me because I'm rethinking through everything, rethinking through the problem we solve, rethinking through what our new opportunity is. Our new opportunity, by the way, has shifted over the years. And it's like, what's the new opportunity today? And then what is the… and that's in ClickFunnels, but what's the new opportunity in Magnetic Marketing? What's new opportunity in Voomly? So as I'm teaching the stuff, it's fun for me because I'm literally in the middle of redoing these things for all the businesses I have. And so it's given me this really unique, fun experience where I'm teaching the process I'm going through in my head. And so today, for the mastermind, I have my list of 13 things that I'm currently doing and thinking through and trying to figure out for these businesses, that I'm sharing with them, as I'm going down the same rabbit hole that, they are right, because they're coming to me. To be in this group you have to have at least one or two call my club, and so they've all got a good business, but it's like, okay, I've got this business. How do I scale it? Well, usually scaling is about reinvention, right? What got you here is not going to get you you there. And it's true. The skill sets, the ideas, the thoughts that get you from zero to a million dollars are one thing. But the thoughts from a million to 10 and 10 to a 100 and a 100 to a billion are different. And so I'm going to be sharing some of my thoughts, as I'm trying to go from, whatever, 200 something a year to a billion and how do we do it? What are we thinking through? And it's ah, anyways, interesting and it's fascinating and exciting. And so, I want you guys who are listening today to look at it through this lens, right? Pretend you're consulting yourself. I thought that as I was preparing my presentation today. I was like, okay, if I was consulting myself, I've got these group people, I'm consulting them, but I'm them, right? I'm them, just maybe in a different step or different part of the journey, but how would I consult myself? What would I do? What would I say? And I started going through these things. And especially if you've read my books before, you have the playbooks of what I do and what I teach, it doesn't shift, right? It's like, "Oh there's this idea I forgot about. There's a new secret book. The fourth secret, you know, like the foundation and the foundation, the fundamentals are the same, the principles are the same, but for us it's re-going back and re-looking at them and not forgetting them. In fact, it was interesting. I was telling the story yesterday to the Category Kings that Funnel Hacking Live Orlando. So that's 2018, I believe, was the first time we launched the Two Comma Club X coaching program and it killed it. First time I ever had an eight figure day and it was insane. Right? The next year we launched Funnel Hacking Live again. Boom, same thing, eight figure day. And I was like, this is amazing! And then I did, what all smart entrepreneurs do, is the next year, I was like, "Hey, we have something that's perfect that's worked flawlessly two years in a row. Let's change everything." And so I literally changed the name of the program, the fulfillment, like how we delivered, like all the things because I thought, I had a better way to do it. There was this ER there, which means I unknowingly, unconsciously shifted it from a new opportunity to an improvement offer. And last year's Funnel Hacking Live 2020, the offer bombed we we sold like, I mean, it was good compared to what most people would think. It wasn't like we blinked, but you know, from going from two years in a row, where we do over eight figures in a day to the next year, only doing a couple a million and you've tied your cost to the event, all the stuff into this, it was a big bomb. It was a big failure for us. And while I was on stage doing the presentation, I could feel, I was like, oh no, this is an improvement offer. I forgot my own core foundational teachings, Expert Secrets 101. Ah, I've messed it up and I forgot it. even though I know this stuff, I teach this stuff, I've written about it. So it's coming back the fundamentals like, Russell! And so we, this last year, restructured it and went back to what worked before, put it back into new opportunity, launched it and boom, eight figure day. And so just, yeah, these are the things to think through, is how would you consult yourself? What would you step back? What would you do? And so I'm excited to deliver this presentation today, but hopefully gives you guys who aren't here just some ideas and some things to start looking through and how to consult yourself. Like Hormozi, a lot of you guys know Alex who joined the inner circle with the goal of making 20 grand a month and then ended up doing over a hundred million dollars in three years, which is amazing. One thing he told me, he's like, "Most people read a lot of books". He's like, "I read one book a lot of times." And for him, he said it was Expert Secrets. He read it and when it got to the end, he flipped it over, started over and read it again. When he got the end, he flipped over and started again. And it's the fundamentals, right? It's Vince Lombardi coming to his football team that are the best in the world. And first day of practice is starting saying, "Gentlemen, this is the football." And that's where these things begin. So anyway, I am almost to the event. In fact, I see a bunch of Inner Circle people walking. I'm going to wave out the window at them, "What's up guys?" Anyway, the Inner Circle who walked by, they just freaked out. Ah, so exciting! All right. I got to go because I'm about to park and get over to the meeting. I appreciate you guys. Hope you're doing well. And someday I hope you can be in the Inner Circle with me so we can hang out and talk about these things together. Until, then keep listening to the podcasts but keep dropping bread crumbs and ideas and thoughts and hints and things to help get you further along on your journey. Thanks so much for listening. We'll talk to you soon, bye everybody.

The Marketing Secrets Show
A Sneak Peek from Within the Category King's Mastermind

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 19:49


One of my biggest "ah-ha's" and "takeaways" from day 1 of our highest level mastermind. Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com ---Transcript--- What's up everybody, this is Russell Brunson. Welcome back to the Marketing Seekers podcast. I'm in a good mood today. I'm in a really good mood today. I hope you are as well. We relaunched my Inner Circle. We opened a new level called the Category Kings. We had a chance to meet with him yesterday, and actually I'm driving to downtown Boise, because I'm going to be hanging out with that group again for the next two days and then my Inner Circle for the next two days after that. And so this is like a week of hanging out with my favorite people in the world, and so I'm excited. I've got some long car rides back and forth this week, so you'll probably get some episodes of me talking about what we're talking about, what's happening. And I'm doing this for a couple reasons, number one is I want you to learn from some lessons and the key takeaways that I'm getting from these events. And number two, hopefully it will inspire you to want to set as a goal someday to be in my Inner Circle, and eventually to send up with the Category Kings and things like that. So there you go with that said I'm going to cue the theme song, when we come back I'm going to share with you guys some of the cool aha I had from our meeting yesterday. All right everybody. So yeah I'm driving downtown Boise here, about to go hang out with my Category Kings, which is a small group mastermind I have with some of the Category Kings here inside of the Click Funnels universe, which is fun. When I decided, as some of you guys know I've run my Inner Circle mastermind program for seven or eight years, and then two years ago, about six months before the COVID lockdowns I decided I needed a break. And so I paused Inner Circle. I shut it down, whatever you want to call it, and decided to take a two year hiatus, actually I didn't know how long it was going to be at the time. So decided to take a hiatus and maybe it was going to be forever. But over the last two years, I missed it. For me there're different ways to learn, like you can learn from a book, you can learn from a course, you can learn from a seminar, and for me I've done all those things. I'm a voracious reader. I go through everybody's courses. I love going to seminars, but eventually for me it gets harder and harder to like mine the gold out right? Because you just are more aware of things. And I've been doing this game now for almost 20 years. And so I've been to more seminars than most of you guys probably even knew existed in our industry. So for me it gets harder and harder to find like that gold nugget. And I was in, I remember my very first mastermind group I ever joined was Dan Kennedy and Bill Glazier's, which some you guys heard we recently acquired their company, which is such a cool thing. But in those groups it was interesting because it wasn't like I was learning, it wasn't like here's course curriculum. It was like the mastermind group, we get together, we all get share and talk, and ideas. And like that's where I started getting these nuggets of things that were just like, oh wow, I can apply that. Oh I can apply that. It was a different type of learning I never experienced before, but I fell in love with it. And I was in Bill's mastermind group for six years. And then when he retired and sold his company I wanted to go see if I could find another mastermind group to join. And I ended up joining all of them. Like all the ones I could find in my world in similar markets, I would join them all. And I never got the same experience. I didn't know why. And that was about the time I decided to launch my Inner Circle. And I think the reason why most of the masterminds I tried to join was like you join them, and there were a whole bunch of internet marketers in the group. And so everyone, I don't know, it was just, it never felt awesome. But what was cool about the Inner Circle I launched it, because we have ClickFunnels we didn't just have internet marketers who are using the platform, we had people in every market you can dream of. We have 100 and something 1000 active members now. And again, there's people that are chiropractors, dentists, doctors, people in curing cancer, wellness, health filled, people in marriage, family, counseling, relationships, dating, every market you can dream of are using ClickFunnels. And so when we opened the Inner Circle, it was crazy, because it wasn't just like, oh a whole bunch of internet marketers joined to talk about internet marketing stuff. It was like the best people in each industry joined it. And it was so cool, because now in this mastermind I was learning like what's working now in the relationship market? What's working over here in the supplement market? What's working here, because we had such a such wide variety of people. And man for me it lit up. And if you've read, specifically the Expert Secrets book, the Expert Secrets book was written in the middle of when the Inner Circle was at its peak. When people like Brandon and Calum Poland and Alex Hormozi and I could list all, the most of the names you guys know in the ClickFunnels community today were in the Inner Circle during that time. And it was fun, because I was writing that book, I would like test ideas and then I would test it on my business, have some success, I'd share it with the entire Inner Circle and within hours it was being tested in 40 different industries. And we got feedback and course correction, and tweaks back and forth and back and forth. And really the Expert Secrets book was born from that testing process inside the Inner Circle. It was so cool. Anyway, I digress. So for me after two years of having it closed down I reopened it, specifically because I missed learning. Like I've been in a weird spot where we've been growing, we've been acquiring companies, we're doing things, but I don't feel like I've been personally growing and you know growth is a big value for me. That's why I have so many books that I study so much, is I'm looking for ways to grow all the time. And so I reopened it with the excitement to start regrowing again with a small group of really cool people. So the Category Kings have 15 people in it. Each of them spend $150,000 a year to be part of it. And then the Inner Circle is $50,000 a year, and there's a 100 people in that one. And so those are the two groups, the Category Kings one was funny, I thought that was going to, I was like there's no way people are going to spend that much money. That one sold out in two days and Inner Circle, man we ended up from Funnel Hacking Live, we only presented it to people at Two Comma Club. We had a special luncheon. And from that I think we had 60 or 70 people join during the luncheon. And so anyway, so there's some context to what it is, why it is, why it's exciting, why I'm so passionate about it. So with the Category Kings, to kick off kind of this new group some of you guys have read the book Play Bigger, which teaches you how to become a category king. And I thought, how cool, and it's funny, because half of our, the Category King group are actually women. So as of yesterday I'm calling it the Category King and Queens, because there's as many Queens in the group as there are Kings. But anyway I digress, I thought it'd be really cool to have one of the authors of that book come and actually present. And so Dave Peterson came and he presented on how to like design your category. And it was interesting, because I've read the book multiple times, I've referred it to, I think he told me I was probably the top refer of his book, because I told everybody about it. And so it was interesting, because as we were preparing for this I had it in my head what he was going to do. He was going to use the principles in the book. We're going to map it out. We're going to category design. Like I thought, I really thought that was the direction we were going to go. It was interesting, because he told me, he's like, you know everything I've learned about category design for the most part happened after I wrote the book, we wrote the book based on these principles and he's like, we've been coaching for the last decade now. And he's actually now doing it in a company again. And he's like you know most of what I've learned about category design, I have learned since the book. And so there's a lot of things that are different. And so anyway, we had a four hour workshop with him and what was fascinating to me was we didn't cover most of the things in the book. In fact the first hour was all spent on something that seemed so simple. I'm almost nervous to tell you guys this, because you'd be like, oh that's so simple Russell. But me and 15 other people in this room of arguably Category Kings in their industries, none of us were able to really answer it. And that's what I want to share with you guys today. So the question and it's interesting, because like the way that I, the lens that I view the world at typically for me is like, okay I'm going to go find, who's my dream customer? And then I'm going to create an offer for them. That's like for me, like ground zero, that's where I begin this process. And then if you've read Extra Secrets, you know it's like, hey do we make an improvement offer? Or a new opportunity? Create a new opportunity. There's this whole thing around like down that rabbit hole. And that's where I begin. That's where I kind of start running with. And I always knew that when we're creating offers and creating products, and services and things like that, where like our goal to solve a problem. But what was interesting is that Dave asked us, he's like, what is the problem that you solve? And he showed a bunch of the big companies you're aware of. Like the billion dollar brands and most of them have like a really simple, less than 10 word statement on the problem that they solve for the market. Like for example the wetsuit guy, I don't know who it was, but like his problem he's trying to solve is I want to swim in cold water longer, but that was it. I want to swim in cold water longer, eight words right. And like, what is a wetsuit? Oh it helps people swim in cold water longer. What was the problem you try to solve? Boom this is a solution and billion dollar brand. And every company had something like that. And then he was interesting, he said that he would go to, or he was talking about some of his friends that have big companies. And he said that he started doing this exercise with them, when he'd get in the car with them, and he'd be like, Hey how's it going? How's business? Real quickly, what do you think the problem is you guys as a company solve? His friend would tell him the answer and he'd write it down, and next time they hung out three or four days later he'd be talking, he's like, wait real quick, what was the question? What is the main problem you solve again? And the guy would be like, oh, he'd tell him again, and then he'd do it again, he'd do it five or six times over the next month and a half or so. And eventually the guy came back and said, you know the seventh or eighth time he asked him, he's like, dude you got to quit asking me this. Like you keep asking and I keep telling you the problem we solve. And then Dave came back and said, actually what's interesting is I've been writing them down. He's like every single time I've asked you that question, you've given me a different answer. And the guy was like, oh my gosh. And he started looking at him and he was disagreeing with himself, not knowing it. But if you look at like, he's like I solve this problem, I solve this problem. And I solve this problem. And they kept changing around. And he said a lot of times he'll do consulting with people and they're in category design, and he'll ask everybody in the executive team, what is the problem you solve? And everybody's answers different. And then he'll ask the employees and everyone's answers different. And he's like, this is the foundation. Business is all about solving a core problem for an industry. Like what is the core problem? And what's interesting he said that if you figure out the problem correctly, he said, the category will take care of itself. Like you don't have to go and figure out the category and design, all kind of stuff. He's like it all relies on this one thing, is what is the problem you solve? And it was interesting, because as he said that, instant I'm like oh sweet I can answer this. And then I was like, wait a minute. I could answer this seven years ago when ClickFunnels first came out. That was the problem we were solving seven years ago? It was that entrepreneurs couldn't code. And so we had to make this easy drag and drop builder, oh sorry this is the solution. The problem is that entrepreneurs aren't coders, that's the problem right? And so we built ClickFunnels, because someone like me who's an entrepreneur who needs funnels, I can't code. And so it was like this simple thing. And so that was the problem we solved. Now fast forward seven years later, that's not the market problem anymore. There's a million ways that entrepreneurs can code something. There's a million Wix's and WYSIWYG editors, and WordPress and Shopify, and Etsy and Amazon, like there's a million ways to do it. So, that's no longer the core problem. Although, that's the problem that we solved initially. And so it got me thinking, what is the problem we solve today? Like the problems change in a market and an industry over time. In fact, I asked someone, I was like, does the core problem stay the same forever? And he's like, no, no. He's like there's a core problem, and you got to figure out and identify that, because that'll define the category and everything else. But he's like markets shift, markets change. And he showed this graph of the CRM industry over the last 50 years or 60 years, initially he was it was business cards. And then it was some dude figured out you could take a business card and type it into a data processor. Now you had a digital business card, and then the next wave was like... Sorry, we can come back to the problem. So the first problem is like I needed contacts. So business cards became the thing. That was the problem. And then next thing I have all these business cards, I don't know how to manage them or track them. And so someone made a program where you could type it in. It's like, oh I have a digital version, I can look at it. And if my book of business cards burns up I don't lose my business. So problem solution, and then a little while later it's like, okay this is tough I hate typing in these things. And so the next wave of that industry was card scanners, where you take a business card, you scan it and boom it's in your computer now, you've got it there. And that solved the next set of problems in the industry. And then later it was I don't just want a business card. I want a business card, but to be able to take notes. And if I talk to somebody and things like that, and it was like the first version of CRM, and he showed, was it Seabolt and showed how they became the Category Kings and they dominated. But then eventually it was like well, first Seabolt was really hard to install and all these kind of things. And that's when Mark Benioff came out with Salesforce, which was not software, it was hard and confusing and you had to have people come install it and set up. It was just web based software. And he was the very first to do SAS based software. And so like that became the next thing. And he kept showing them the industry shifting, because the problem shifts over time. And it was interesting, because in your market if you're not shifting your problem over time, someone else is going to solve the problem and that's when you lose the category. That's when the person passes you, which is so fascinating. And so the question came down to, what is the problem you solve? And so that's the thing I want to identify for you guys. And the problem that us entrepreneurs have is like, oh we solve a ton of problems. We do this and this and this, and this and this, and this and this, this and that is the wrong answer. You don't solve a whole bunch of problems. You've got to solve one problem for the category. And by doing that, by creating that, by understanding and identifying and framing that problem from there the category is built. And then we got deeper and talked about POV statements and things like that, it got deeper from there. But that was the core foundation, that again, if I was teaching, I'd be like step one find a problem, step two, what is the offer? And then like you know, and I'd go directly into that, but it's like, no, no, we got to step back to the foundation, which is really what is the problem that you're solving for the industry? When you figure that out the category will take care of itself, which was so fascinating. And again, he said, try to keep your problem statement to under 10 words. And that's hard to do. I spent 45 minutes talking about, 15 minutes work shopping it, and then I spent the next four hours like noodling on it, like try to figure this out, like what in the world, especially as I know some of you guys know we're launching ClickFunnels 2.0 soon, so like with this whole new launch, this new thing, what is the problem we're trying to solve? How do I identify? How do I structure? How do I make it so simple that it keeps us as the Category King? So anyway I hope that's helpful. Obviously there was a lot of stuff yesterday that was really, really cool, but that was the one that was like the biggest insight. It was funny, because we came back from the first workshop, I raised my hand initially, I was like, all right I don't know if it's just me, but that was really, really hard. And I looked around at everybody else, every other Category King and Queen in the room looked back and said, oh, then Kevin's like, we're so grateful it was hard for you Russ, that was really, really hard for us and we thought we were the only ones. I'm like, no, I'm going to be vulnerable here too. That was really hard. And then it was fun, because it opened the dialogue with us all trying to figure it out and work with each other. And Annie Grace, a lot of you guys know her, she spoke at Funnel Hacking Live two years ago, she actually wrote out mine and my POV statement and all these things for me, it was like I think this is what yours is. And like, anyway it was magical. So anyway that was the first half day of Category Kings and Queens. And so I'm heading into the event room now, I'm getting close actually. And I'm excited because I was up till two o'clock last night working on my presentation, because I'm going to, based off of what we learned yesterday with the problem I'm going to take that as the foundation point and then show everybody over the last seven years how ClickFunnels has built to the place it is. We've got over half a billion dollars in sales, well over that now, we built the category, we've done these things. So I'm going to kind of show the next phases for me to the group. I'll probably spend two or three hours going deep into that, which I'm so excited for. And this is like Russell raw, like if you guys see me live, I'm Russell polished where I'm, I've got slides, I've got things. Russell raw you get me and a black marker and that's about it. So I'm excited for these guys they're going to, for those who haven't been with Russell raw this will be my first hardcore doodle session with them going through the principles of how we build ClickFunnels into the category king it is. Things I've learned along the way, the pros, the cons, the ups the downs, and yeah stuff I don't get to talk about typically. So, that's the cool thing about these groups, if you look at our coaching programs we have all the base level stuff. And then if you come in one funnel way and courses and all that kind of stuff, but when you decide to ascend up and get into coaching with us, the first is our Two Comma Club X coaching program. The goal of that is to get somebody from where they are today to Two Comma Club. After you get done with Two Comma Club and you've made a million dollars inside of a funnel, that's when you get invited into the Inner Circle and then from there into category Kings. But it's interesting because the reason why we break it up like that, we used to always have it all together and everyone would be dumped in one coaching program. And it was tough because, or one mastermind group, but it was tough, because there're different conversations that happen at different levels. Like the conversations I'm having with people that spend $150,000 to be in a group, they have to make a minimum of five million a year, and have had to sold over 10 million. They had to have won at Two Comma Club X award. The conversations they have in that room are different than the conversation that happen in a room with people who just passed the million dollar mark. And they're different than the conversation I've going to have with somebody who is in a startup mode trying to get into Two Comma Club. So it's just fun, because again these are things I don't get to talk about, or share ever. And so the place it gets to happen is here inside Category King. So for you guys who are looking to say, okay this is the path, I'm going to hit Two Comma Club X. And then from there Inner Circle, then Category Kings, just know we do record these things and there's a private members there. So when you get to Category King some day, come in here and watch Dave Peterson's talk on Category Kings and watch my presentations from the next day. And you'll have a chance to kind of see where I went from there. So with that said, thanks for listening. This is a long episode because I got a long ride. Hopefully you guys enjoyed it. I miss doing stuff like this, I'm going to try to... We have some fun updates to the podcast coming that I'm doing a few things more long form, I'm going to have someone come and interview me on some topics, because I think those make fun episodes and yeah it's going to be anyway... I'm going to be spending more time with you guys here, is my plan and my goal. So with that said, thanks so much for everything and we'll talk to you guys all again soon.

The Marketing Secrets Show
I Bought Dan Kennedy's Company!! Here is the Plan Over the Next 12 Months!!!

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 13:52


Recently I acquired my mentor's company, and we're working over the next 12 months turning it around. If you want to know what we're doing and why, listen to this episode. Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com ---Transcript--- Hey, what's up everybody? This is Russell Brunson. Welcome back to the Marketing Secrets podcast. I hope you guys have an amazing day. I had a really fun, interesting week working with Dan Kennedy's company, Magnetic Marketing, and a whole bunch of other cool things. Some of you guys may or may not have heard, but we acquired his company recently. And with that, we got 40 years of intellectual property. And so this episode, we'll talk about what we're doing with it all, what it's going to look like, why I'm so excited, and a whole bunch of other cool stuff. All right. So number one, how cool is this? I keep pinching myself. When I first got in this game, my first mentors, my first internet mentor really was Mark Joyner, which helped get me to a certain level. And then I started looking for more stuff and that's when I bumped into Dan Kennedy and Bill Glazer, and I started going to their mastermind groups and their events. And man, it really was like the next evolution for me is just really understanding these core principles and things that have been working since the beginning. I always kind of tease these guys are teaching how to use fax machines and the Pony Express to deliver marketing messages, because a lot of it was like direct mail bootcamps and stuff like that, all kind of older school stuff. And at first it didn't make sense to me how this stuff worked until really I started realizing through Dan that these things that we all think we are, like we think we're internet marketers, he's like, "No, no, no." He's like, "The internet is a channel. It's a media channel." And a lot of us, we think Facebook, Instagram, YouTube is media channels, but for Dan's rule, it's like the internet's one channel. There's direct mail, there's TV, there's radio, and internet is a channel. And nowadays obviously it is I think the best and the coolest channel, but the principles and the philosophies and the psychology and the persuasion and all the things that are working today on the internet are things that were pioneered and developed through direct mail, through TV, through radio. And so, so much of Dan's stuff, he's had a chance to work with everybody for the last 40 years. I say 40, not four, the last 40 years has been just kind of all around these things. And it's just like ... Anyway, so I digress. Again, when I was getting into this, I started learning those things and all the sudden I was like, oh my gosh, the things I'm learning that they did in their fax marketing or their direct mail, I can use on the internet, I can use on the Facebook ads, I can use, and for me really, it was what changed my business. And honestly, for most of you guys, your businesses, as well. A lot of you guys probably don't even know that the core foundations that ClickFunnels were built on were the principles that I learned from Dan Kennedy and that we just turned it into software and turned it something that everybody could do. So that's why it's so exciting. And we recently acquired the company, which is a huge honor for me because I have this unique opportunity and chance now to take my mentor's stuff and to continue it on and bring it into the future. And I'm excited. So this week, on Monday, Tuesday, this week, we had the existing Magnetic Marketing team, the people that are still there, the company flew out here to Boise, and we spent two days kind of figuring out what's the plans, what's the future? How do we get this thing back to the point where there's 10,000 active members on membership and there's all these things that are happening? And so as they showed up, we also had a chance to look at like, okay, what did we actually acquire here? What's all the intellectual property? And it's insane. There's 40 years of stuff. And some is not relevant, and so we're sifting through those, but most of it is some of the best stuff ever. And it's cool, because as we were building out funnels and looking at these courses that they've been selling for $2,500 or $3,000 or $5,000, and it's just like, they're not selling a lot of them. I'm like, ugh, it's because they just need to be packaged differently. But I also think that the pricing is different nowadays than it was 15, 20 years ago, even. And so what's going to be cool is we're taking, you know, Dan's written, I don't know, 20, 30 books, we're taking each book and we're figuring out what courses sync with it, what content fits in this process. And we're building out new funnels, like book funnels that take people through all the products and the courses and the events that Dan did related to each book. Every book he wrote, he wrote a book and then they'd do an event teaching it and then they would do workshops and they'd do all these things. And so every book has got like an archive of stuff that nobody's ever seen before, which is insane. And I'm going through the archives. I'm like, oh my gosh, I thought I owned everything Dan ever had, and I had never seen this, never seen this, never heard of this. And so it's just so exciting. We're having a chance to come pull things out and plug them in and all these things. But as excited and as nerdy as I am in this process, the thing I wanted to share with you guys is that the things that you are learning, the principles you are learning, the things that you've been, especially going deep with me and you've been reading DotCom Secrets, Expert Secrets, Traffic Secrets, literally all we're doing is using that playbook. I'm coming in to this company where I learned a lot of these principles with, but the company's been sold twice since Dan and Bill ran it. So they've fallen away from a lot of the core principles that made them great initially. And so what we're doing literally is like, hey, what's the value ladder? Okay, what is the front end offer? Okay, here's the funnel, what do we need? What's the free plus shipping? What's the order form bump? What's upsell one, upsell two? What's downsell? You know, like walking through and then, okay after someone buys this, where's the next step we take them? What's the next tier on the value ladder? How do we move them up one tier? And then okay, from there, what content do we need, what pieces, and we're kind of just literally just taking the same blueprint that you guys have been learning forever. I laid the blueprint out for you guys, like this is the blueprint. It doesn't deviate. It doesn't change. It's the same for every business. I don't care if you're selling info, products, or coaching, or physical products, or dental, you know, cleaning people's teeth, or if you are doing chiropractic adjustments. It doesn't matter. It's all the same. The framework's the same. It's like a house. The framework's the same. You have a bathroom. You have a kitchen. It doesn't matter if you're making a $30,000 house or a $30 million house, the framework's the same. And so we're just bringing up the same frameworks you guys have been learning and studying and then taking all of the pieces, the content, the copy, the assets and everything, and just plugging it into that framework. So I wanted to share that with all you guys, because I know that, and I'm probably one of the causes of this because I get so excited and I want to launch a thousand funnels because I know the profits, I know how they work. I can just do it over and over again. And so we roll out a lot of things. But if you actually look at this strategy, me coming into this new company and having 40 years of intellectual property and a million courses and products and all this stuff, the strategy is the same. It's the same thing. And so if I was you guys and you're still not sure what to do, start there, start with the DotCom Secrets book, read the book and say, okay, what's the value ladder? What's funnel number one? What's offers inside of funnel number one? And coming back to the basics. I get people, it's crazy, on Instagram, I don't know if you guys ever click over to the other tab, which is messages that don't go in the inbox. I look at that probably once a week or so, just to see if I'm missing any conversations with people who I need to be having conversations with. And I look over there just to make sure I'm not missing anything. And as crazy as it is, I will tell you that each week there are probably anywhere from 20 to 50 people that message like, "Oh your stuff's so good. Where do I start?" Or, "I love your stuff. I can't figure how to get started. What should I do?" Like oh my gosh, you guys, this is simple. Read book number one. That's why I wrote the first book, so you'd have the foundation. Go read DotCom Secrets. The same thing that we're doing now, after we acquired this huge company, it's like okay, apply principles. It reminds me of Vince Lombardi. They said the first year of every football season, he'd walk out to his team. We're the best in the world, you know? And he'd hold the football and be like, "Gentlemen, this is a football." And he's just showing them, here's the foundation, here's the beginning. Here's the start of this. And I think that's what sometimes we forget, is we're trying to figure out the secret ninja, Facebook advertising hack, and the this and the that. And it's like, no, no, no, come back to the fundamentals, come back to the foundation. Gentlemen, this is a funnel. Right? Okay. Which funnel is it? Value ladder, boom, boom, boom, boom. And then you're just plugging the pieces into the model that's been proven to work over and over and over again for decades. And like I said, initially, it's the stuff I learned from Dan and learned from Bill, and such an honor to have a chance to come back. In fact, it's funny, because I was like, I'm going back to the advertising archives. We're pulling all the old sales letters back from when Dan and Bill ran the company. It's like, okay, this is what we need to see, because this is when it was done correctly. You know, everything in the last decade, since some of the other people who bought the company, they messed up the model. They didn't understand the model. They bought it, not understanding it. And they jacked the whole thing up. We're coming back, thinking back to the foundations, back to the fundamentals. What worked before? How does this work? Plug in the system. And so I'm excited. You guys will see the first iteration of what we're doing. We'll be launching probably the first week in January or maybe the last week in December. Not quite positive, but around there. And then over the next 12 months, you'll see the process. You'll see it happening in real time. You'll see, oh, there's the front end of the value. Oh, he's moving us up a step. Oh, from there we're moving to the high ticket. Oh, from there there's a continuity. You'll be able to see it rolled out in real time over the next 12 months, which will be really, really fun. So I'm pumped. I'm excited. Hope you guys, are as well, to see behind the scenes of the process. But that's what we did this week. So if you guys, if you are at the beginning of your business, I would stop what you're doing. Go reread DotCom Secrets, and then do what we just did. Do two day planning meetings. Okay, what's our value ladder? What's the funnel? What are the offers inside the funnels? What's the first funnel we're going to launch? And then just focus on that. Because we built out a whole value ladder. This is the thing that a lot of people make mistakes. They build a value ladder and they're like, okay, I've got to build all these things. And then they spend the next six years building all the things. No. You build a value ladder so you know where you're going. But then you just build the first thing. Like for us, it's okay, now we know where we're going between now and the next three months. The only thing that matters is this funnel, that's it. Nothing else matters. And blinders on. Let's go. And that's what we're focusing on for the next, well, it shouldn't take three months because we're ClickFunnels. Come on now. But the next 30 days, the next 60 days, is picking the one and focusing on it and not trying to build out the coaching program, the high ticket, and all these things in between, it's like, no, just focus on the one. The value ladder is there so we know where we're going, but we begin from our funnel and launch it and then we start the process from there. So anyway, I hope that helps. Again, if you're just beginning, go read the DotCom Secrets book, take two days with your business partner, your family, your friends, whoever you're working with, and map that out. If you've got a business that you just acquired and you're trying to figure it out, do that. If you are struggling in business and you're like, it's all chaos and nothing's working, and you're frustrated, take two days and do this. It's key. So hope that helps you guys. Anyway, we're getting close to Halloween. I've got my Inner Circle. Some of you guys know we relaunched Inner Circle at Funnel Hacking Live. We actually relaunched three different tiers. First is the Inner Circle for life, which is $50,000 a year. And we have, I think like 70 or 80 people signed up for that, which is crazy, but I'm excited to be able to bring back the Inner Circle. It's been closed for two years. And then we opened a second tier of Inner Circle called the Category Kings. And we started the pricing there at $150,000 a year. And there's only 14 spots. I was like, oh, it's going to take us a while to fill that up. We sold those 14 spots in two days and we have a waiting list of probably 30 people who are waiting to be able to send me $150,000 for that, which is insane. I didn't think that was going to happen. So note to self, I should have launched two Category King groups. Anyway, not this year, I'm too tired. And then we have a third tier called the Atlas Group, which is going to be, I know we have people on the waiting list. We haven't actually opened that one yet, and it's going to be really fun as well. So anyway, I'm excited because next week, all next week we've got five days of meetings with the first two tiers of Inner Circle and it's going to be a lot of fun. So anyway, I'm sure I'll probably box you, or not box you, probably do podcast episodes somewhere during that window next week and share some of the insights and the ideas and things that are happening there. And if you want to be in the Inner Circle someday, I always tell people this is where you're ascending to, get in my Inner Circle. That's where I have a chance to work really close in very small groups with you guys. So that is a goal. Nowadays you have to be a Two Comma Club winner to qualify for it. So set that as a goal. Get your Two Comma Club and then get in the Inner Circle with us, coming out, because there's a lot of fun stuff happening. All right, thanks everybody. Appreciate you all for listening, and excited to show off what we're going to be doing behind the scenes with Magnetic Marketing, Dan Kennedy's company, over the next 12 months. Thanks everybody, and we'll talk soon.