Podcasts about Atlassian

Australian enterprise software company

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Best podcasts about Atlassian

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Latest podcast episodes about Atlassian

Roads Taken
Time Traveler: Keshav Puttaswamy on appreciating both change and stability

Roads Taken

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 31:46


Guest Keshav Puttaswamy was excited to be able to dabble in the full liberal arts curriculum of college and found an interest in computer science. When he had the opportunity to intern at Microsoft in a rather new role of product manager he took it despite not knowing what it would entail. He ended up learning a lot about not only computer science but also how the business worked and had fun doing it. But it felt didn't feel like a mainstream route for either a computer scientist or a business person so he thought about other roles in each field. Ultimately he decided to take the offer to work at Microsoft, but he figured it would be for only two years and then he'd get into something more “normal” in the business world.Those two years turned into twenty when it became clear that his skill set was well suited for product management and seeing how the variety of projects he got to work on was vast. But the desire to change came again when he thought about providing his children the opportunity to live abroad, as he had been afforded by his parents.//In this episode, find out from Keshav how feeling years to be long or short is sometimes related to the pace of change and sometimes to how right things feel…on Roads Taken with Leslie Jennings Rowley. About This Episode's GuestKeshav Puttaswamy is a near lifer at Microsoft. He spent the first 20 years there in product management leadership roles and currently leads the collaboration and workplace experiences there, helping to deliver transformational digital experiences for Microsoft employees that serve as a blueprint for customers' own digital transformation journeys. During his family's two years in Sydney he led the server and enterprise-focused data center products for Atlassian before boomeranging back to Seattle. In addition to the travel, Keshav also enjoys cricket, cooking, and cocktails. (307) Executive Producer/Host: Leslie Jennings RowleyMusic: Brian Burrows Find more episodes at https://roadstakenshow.com Email the show at RoadsTakenShow@gmail.com 

Best Speech
Season 3 Story Compilation Part 1

Best Speech

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 49:38


This episode is compiled of all the stories told by guests in the first half of Season 3 of the Best Speech Podcast.Geomyra Pollard is a  life and business coach (geomyra.com). Follow her at @iamlivingwellrounded.Joshua Becker is a speaker, author and blogger at Becoming Minimalist. He is also the co-founder of The Hope Effect, which supports orphans by moving them into families. His most recent book Things that Matter: Overcoming Distraction to Pursue a More Meaningful Life just came out in April 2022.Koula Callahan can be found on Instagram at @koulacal, and her charity of choice is the Joshua Thomas Foundation, which provides prosthetic limbs to children.Jodie Cook is a writer, competitive power lifter and entrepreneur found at JodieCook.com. She's written and co-written five books, including Business Book Awards 2021 Sales & Marketing Book of the Year, Instagram Rules.Josh Shipp (@joshshipp ) is a speaker and an author. You can watch his main keynote speech and hear his very moving, personal history. You can book Josh or one his great youth speakers at TopYouthSpeakers.com where they book about 1,000 speeches a year for students and educators.Charli Marie Prangley is a YouTuber with over 200,000 subscribers, the design lead for ConvertKit, and a public speaker. You can find her great content at CharliMarie.com.Chris Norton (@chrisanorton16) is an inspirational public speaker and the founder of the Chris Norton Foundation. He co-wrote a memoir with his wife titled The Seven Longest Yards and there's a film about his life on Netflix and other major platforms called 7 Yards: The Chris Norton Story.Ashley Faus (@ashleyfaus) is a "marketer, writer and speaker by day" and a "singer, actor and fitness fiend by night."  She currently the Director Integrated Product Marketing at Atlassian. David Lemus is an independent design strategist with engineering roots working with organizations to empower teams to be customer obsessed and have a culture of iterative learning. His work can be found at LemusAnd.co.Laura Belgray  (@talkingshrimpnyc) is the super successful author and copywriter behind Talking Shrimp where she offers tons of free and paid tools for improving your writing.Steve Kamb (@stevekamb) is the founder and leader of Nerd Fitness, community and coaching for regular people to get healthy and strong. Mike Pacchione (@mpacc) coaches groups and individuals on improving their public speaking. You can hire him or join his email list to receive free public speaking tips at BestSpeech.co.

Built for Change
Reimagining the Future of Work

Built for Change

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 25:35 Very Popular


Even before the pandemic, many organizations struggled to foster strong and innovative working connections among their employees. And now – with technological, organizational and societal changes piling up – the pressure is on business leaders to listen to their employees and explore entirely new ways of working. In this episode, we'll speak with Dominic Price, Work Futurist at Atlassian; Christie Smith, Global Lead, Talent and Organization/Human Potential at Accenture; and Sean Hinton, Founder and C.E.O. of SkyHive Technologies. 

The Remarkable Project
052: Using Customer Support & Community as your Remarkable with Sarah Hatter

The Remarkable Project

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 60:32


In this episode of The Remarkable Project Jay speaks with customer care and support  expert, Sarah Hatter, about why the best communities give members a voice, how listening, caring and acting are key to driving repeat business, and the reason replicating the CX of a brand you admire may well miss the mark for your organisation.Sarah Hatter is the founder of CoSupport, a customer experience coaching and consulting firm founded in 2011. She wrote ‘The Customer Support Handbook' back in 2014, and has since travelled the world training CX teams for startups and legacy brands like Disney, Dropbox, and Atlassian.CoSupport's mission is to bring excellence in customer care and support to every startup, software company, and web dev team in the world. So far, they've reached over 300 of those companies and are still going strong. Sarah leads the team in helping businesses become more efficient, have a better understanding of their metrics, and wow customers with every engagement.She also produces ElevateCX, an event series focused on growing the next generation of customer experience leaders. Through ElevateCX, Sarah has built up an engaged community of over 1,800 CX professionals, and produced over 30 ElevateCX events in 14 cities and three countries around the globe so far.Three Remarkable TakeawaysWhy the best communities, those that thrive long term, are the ones that have great engagement because they give the people involved a voice.How to turn real warmth, authentic outreach and proactive problem resolution for our customers into special outcomes, online and off.The reason you can't just replicate the customer experience of your favourite brand and expect it'll work in the same way for your business.Connect with SarahFind her on LinkedinLearn more about CoSupport and ElevateCX via their website

BlueCollar.CEO
The “Grind Season” Is Coming With Michelle Van Beek

BlueCollar.CEO

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 39:35


BlueCollar.CEO –Michelle Van Beek is a business coach and the COO of ServiceRocket Group, a trusted software partner to thousands of enterprises, including Atlassian, Workplace, and Digital.ai. She was also a part of Service Hero Academy before transitioning to her current role. In her coaching, Michelle impacts businesses positively and fulfills her passion for helping people on a larger scale. She offers online and on-site training for contractors to help improve their operations and grow their business.In this episode, Ryan and Michelle discuss the shoulder season, aka GRIND season that all companies will face.  Regardless of the speciality, there is seasonality because there is always a peak season. Michelle shares the how seasons affect your home service business, preparing for peak periods, and how to keep clients coming all year round in this episode. 

Adaptavist Live - The Adaptavist Atlassian Ecosystem Podcast
Ep. 147 - The 90's Are Alive on WAVST

Adaptavist Live - The Adaptavist Atlassian Ecosystem Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 28:02


*Cues up the Friends theme song*   Brenda and Ryan go a bit overboard with the 90's jokes in this episode, covering all the Atlassian product news they could find, as well as reporting on some big updates to ScriptRunner.

Traction
Building Connection in a Distributed World with Anu Bharadwaj, Atlassian

Traction

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 22:15


On this episode, host Lloyed Lobo of Boast.AI welcomes Anu Bharadwaj, Chief Operating Officer at Atlassian.   Anu believes building connection and engagement in a distributed world is Atlassian's best strategy for growth and retention.   Too many companies are wasting resources on navigating return-to-office strategies instead of investing in employees and improving their ways of working.   Anu shares the playbook for building meaningful connections across a distributed workforce.   Specifically, Anu covers:   1:46 - The powerful lesson that Anu learned after being hospitalized unexpectedly.  4:36 - What are the key factors to building strong connections. 6:53 - The difference between remote work and distributed work. 9:43 - How to create shared experiences in a distributed work environment instead of wasting resources on return-to-office strategies. 16:05 - How to leverage communication to drive engagement. 20:34 - The results of Atlassian's Team Anywhere initiative to build stronger bonds in a distributed world.   Learn more at https://tractionconf.io   Connect with Anu Bharadwaj: https://www.linkedin.com/in/anutthara/   Learn more about Atlassian at https://www.atlassian.com/   This episode is brought to you by: Extend your company's hiring budget with VanHack's pool of 400,000 remote engineers at a lower cost than local hires. Join companies like Dapper Labs, 1Password, Brex, and Dooly who hired great engineers with VanHack. Mention “Traction Remote” when you sign up today to get 10% off your first hire at https://VanHack.com.   Each year the U.S. and Canadian governments provide more than $20 billion in R&D tax credits and innovation incentives to fund businesses. But the application process is cumbersome, prone to costly audits, and receiving the money can take as long as 16 months. Boast automates this process, enabling companies to get more money faster without the paperwork and audit risk. We don't get paid until you do! Find out if you qualify today at https://Boast.AI.   Launch Academy is one of the top global tech hubs for international entrepreneurs and a designated organization for Canada's Startup Visa. Since 2012, Launch has worked with more than 6,000 entrepreneurs from over 100 countries, of which 300 have grown their startups to seed and Series A stage and raised over $2 billion in funding. To learn more about Launch's programs or the Canadian Startup Visa, visit https://LaunchAcademy.ca    Content Allies helps B2B companies build revenue-generating podcasts. We recommend them to any B2B company that is looking to launch or streamline its podcast production. Learn more at https://contentallies.com  

Startup for Startup - Global ⚡ by monday.com
Why have we decided to build a startup within monday.com?

Startup for Startup - Global ⚡ by monday.com

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 47:58


Why have we decided to build a startup within monday.com? What makes a founder that closed their company want to start a new one within an existing company? And how does the integration between the two companies work?  How many of the big companies you know have started within other companies? Gmail started within Google, Atlassian has companies with a different brand like confluence, and most other examples related to companies acquired by more prominent brands and kept their autonomy.  In this episode, Darya Wertheim spoke with Roy Mann, monday.com Co-CEO and Co-Founder, and Noam Ackerman, who leads ‘monday canvas', about how we built a new startup within monday. Roy and Noam shared the experience of starting a new, separate startup - one that is led by its own founder doesn't use any of monday's resources and hires slowly - like any other startup in its first stages. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Not Just Pixels
012 - Strategy, Designing for B2B, and Scrum Methodology with Charlie Weston of Atlassian

Not Just Pixels

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 32:54


Today, I'm talking to Charlie Weston.-Charlie is currently the Senior Product Designer on the Migrations team at Atlassian. He leads a team focused on improving small-medium businesses and enterprise customers' experiences while migrating between server, data center, and cloud environments at Atlassian. If you did not understand a single word I just said, don't worry at all. Before Atlassian, he worked at a variety of enterprise companies specifically on the business-to-business, or B2B, vertical.-Going back in time, one of the reasons I wanted to chat with Charlie was because of his strategist background. And in our conversation, you'll hear how his unique background shaped him into the designer he is today along with many other topics such as design culture at Atlassian, scrum methodology, and agile principles. So, without further ado, here's my conversation with Charlie Weston.===Highlights⭐ What is strategy?⭐ How to get started in strategy as a designer⭐ What's it like working on B2B products⭐ Design culture at Atlassian⭐ Scrum & agile development===Links

SBS French - SBS en français
Le journal de l'Économie en Australie 01/09/2022

SBS French - SBS en français

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 6:05


L'homme d'affaires australien Scott Farquar, co-fondateur et co-PDG de la société mondiale de logiciels Atlassian voudrait que le gouvernement augmente le taux d'immigration.

REACH - A Podcast for Executive Assistants
How to Telescope Your Value and Build Good PR Across the Organization as an Executive Assistant

REACH - A Podcast for Executive Assistants

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 48:49


If you're a regular REACH listener, you know we've spent a lot of time discussing how to gain buy-in from your executive, but what about everyone else you need information from and work with day-in and day-out? People like your executive's direct reports, or Finance, or other C-Suite members. Kristine Valenzuela, Executive Assistant at Atlassian, has graciously offered to tackle this topic and share her tips for how to telescope your value beyond just your executive and essentially that boils down to creating good PR for yourself. So, if you need advice on how to position yourself or tweak your leadership brand to be perceived differently (and respected!) in your organization in order to get the information you need to do your job effectively, this episode is for you. 

PurePerformance
Persona Driven Engineering – The magic of knowing your end users with Barbara Ogris

PurePerformance

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 37:01


How do you a design a feature if you don't know for whom it is for? How do you define SLOs (Service Level Objectives) if you don't know what your users expect from you? How do you design performance tests and workloads if you don't know which user behavior to simulate?In this episode we have Barbara Ogris, Sr Product Experience Designer at Dynatrace, who walks us through the concept of target personas that she helped establish within Dynatrace. It changes product and observability discussions from “as a user I want …” towards “as Archie I have this need …”. Listen in and learn about design thinking, using empathy maps to define your target persona and how this can be applied to many aspects in software engineering.Barbara on Linkedinhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/barbara-ogris-6a0b6011b/Dynatrace Blog: Terminology matters: how to enhance user experience by aligning names with expectationshttps://www.dynatrace.com/news/blog/terminology-matters-how-to-enhance-user-experience-by-aligning-names-with-expectations/Atlassian persona template: https://www.atlassian.com/software/confluence/templates/personaMIRO persona template: https://miro.com/aq/ps/templates/personas/?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_c[…]aIQobChMI6J7Juqql-QIVCOJ3Ch3jtwWwEAAYASAAEgLxT_D_BwE&loc=9062705Adobe XD: how to define a persona: https://xd.adobe.com/ideas/process/user-research/putting-personas-to-work-in-ux-design/

Value Investing FM
235. Consultorio Bursátil - Agosto 2022

Value Investing FM

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 51:03


Consultorio bursátil de junio de 2022 en el que Adrián Godás y Paco Lodeiro respondemos a las preguntas de los oyentes. Las consultas de este mes van sobre la especialización a la hora de valorar empresas, invertir en compounders, free float, políticas verdes, Lundin Mining, Meta, Atlassian, Horizonte Minerals, invertir en MPCs, Cake Box, Angold y Spyrosoft,

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
2084: RevOps CEO Chat with Andy Byrne of Clari

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 23:07


Most CEOs have difficulty answering the most critical question in business: "Are we going to meet, beat, or miss on revenue?" Why? After more than $1 Trillion spent on ERP, CRM, Business Intelligence, spreadsheets, and collaboration software, there is no enterprise approach to revenue. As a result, there is no way for "Revenue-critical" people, processes, and systems to work together. Andy Byrne, CEO, and Co-Founder of Clari joins me on Tech Talks Daily to discuss how RevOps is a rapidly emerging concept in the UK. We talk about the importance of business unification and the end of siloed operations. Andy also shares how he put a deck on LinkedIn detailing his recommendations for how companies can not just thrive during the downturn but thrive and how it went viral. I also learned how Clari is helping companies including Zoom, Equinix, Atlassian, and Okta forecast revenue growth, manage operations efficiently, and how they have achieved a valuation of $2.6 billion.

Rosenfeld Review Podcast
ADHD: A DesignOps Superpower

Rosenfeld Review Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 30:44


Lou sits down with Atlassian's Design Enablement Coordinator, Jess Norris, to discuss her talk on ADHD that she'll be presenting at this year's Design Ops Summit. After being diagnosed with ADHD a little over a year ago, Jessica went on a journey to discover the secret superpowers that lie within everyone with a neurodivergent brain. She now urges managers to use these perspectives that team members may bring to the table to enhance their design ops work.

Shine: a podcast by Star
Why product delivery excellence starts with united global teams

Shine: a podcast by Star

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 39:56


Break down barriers, build a shared culture and deliver excellent products with globally distributed teams. Explore how on this product delivery and management-focused Shine Podcast episode.

High Tech Freedom
Take Ownership of the Partner Relationship by Steve Cross

High Tech Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 32:19


Check out our webinar: How Top Sales Pros Create Passive Income & Achieve Financial Freedom With Hands-Off Real Estate Investing https://hightechfreedom.com/webinar/   Subscribe to our newsletter for sales and real estate investing tips by going to www.hightechfreedom.com   Host Contact Information - Chris Freeman LinkedIn - http://linkedin.com/in/chrisfreeman Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/chris.freeman.9461   Steve Cross has 40+ years experience in tech sales; hardware, software, peripherals. Started out selling keypunch machines!! In those days we still rode dinosaurs to the office. As National Sales Manager and later VP Global Sales drove packaged Mac software in the retail channel when that was a "thing": SoftPC, RAM Doubler, Virtual PC. As VP Sales, launched the global market for webcams in 1995-1998.Finished up career at Atlassian - managed Americas Channel. Now a billion dollar channel (est). 10 years in the Atlassian ecosystem. Retired from full time work in 2018. Currently retained to consult/advise on channel issues and general business in the Atlassian ecosystem for one software company, one Solution Partner, and one Private Equity firm. You can connect with Steve through linkedin: linkedin.com/in/channelsalesstevecross

Getting There
Ep. #4, The April 2022 Atlassian Outage

Getting There

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 34:46


In episode 4 of Getting There, Nora Jones and Niall Murphy discuss the Atlassian outage of April 2022. This talk explores Atlassian's 20-year history, key takeaways from this 14-day outage, surprising findings from the incident report, and critical discussion of Atlassian's response.

Heavybit Podcast Network: Master Feed
Ep. #4, The April 2022 Atlassian Outage

Heavybit Podcast Network: Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 34:46


In episode 4 of Getting There, Nora Jones and Niall Murphy discuss the Atlassian outage of April 2022. This talk explores Atlassian's 20-year history, key takeaways from this 14-day outage, surprising findings from the incident report, and critical discussion of Atlassian's response.

Design MBA
When to Quit - Tanner Christensen (Founder @ Shape)

Design MBA

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 55:14


Tanner Christensen is a curious, multi-disciplinary design leader who is dedicated to helping designers and businesses find the best in each other. He's the founder at Shape.co and previously worked as Head or Design at Gem dot com. Before Gem, Tanner designed software for autonomous vehicles at Lyft, led design of the Atlassian mobile platform, and designed for 2.85 billion people at Facebook. He's a published author, prolific writer, indie app developer, angel investor, podcaster, and more. INTERVIEW VIDEO:https://youtu.be/1HPwcA0O4IYARE YOU LOOKING TO LEVEL UP YOUR INTERVIEWING SKILLS AS A DESIGNER?Check out Shape - https://shape.co/CONNECT WITH TANNER CHRISTENSENTwitter - https://twitter.com/tannercLinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/tannerchristensen/Website - https://tannerchristensen.com/CONNECT WITH MELinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/jayneil Twitter - https://twitter.com/jayneildalal 

Cloud Posse DevOps
Cloud Posse DevOps "Office Hours" (2022-08-17)

Cloud Posse DevOps "Office Hours" Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 53:51


Cloud Posse holds public "Office Hours" every Wednesday at 11:30am PST to answer questions on all things related to DevOps, Terraform, Kubernetes, CICD. Basically, it's like an interactive "Lunch & Learn" session where we get together for about an hour and talk shop. These are totally free and just an opportunity to ask us (or our community of experts) any questions you may have. You can register here: https://cloudposse.com/office-hoursJoin the conversation: https://slack.cloudposse.com/Find out how we can help your company:https://cloudposse.com/quizhttps://cloudposse.com/accelerate/Learn more about Cloud Posse:https://cloudposse.comhttps://github.com/cloudpossehttps://sweetops.com/https://newsletter.cloudposse.comhttps://podcast.cloudposse.com/[00:00:00] Intro[00:01:17] Tons of New Cloud Posse Modulesterraform-aws-ecr-public https://github.com/cloudposse/terraform-aws-ecr-publicTerraform-aws-lakeformationhttps://github.com/cloudposse/terraform-aws-lakeformationTerraform-aws-gluehttps://github.com/cloudposse/terraform-aws-glueTerraform-aws-athenahttps://github.com/cloudposse/terraform-aws-athenaTerraform-aws-kinesis-streamhttps://github.com/cloudposse/terraform-aws-kinesis-stream[00:04:48] GitHub Pages now Builds using GitHub Actions by defaulthttps://github.blog/changelog/2022-08-10-github-pages-builds-with-github-actions-ga/[00:05:17] After eleven-year wait, Atlassian customers promised custom domains in 2023https://www.theregister.com/2022/08/12/atlassian_cloud_6999_2023/[00:06:18] Terradozer - destroy using the state only - no *.tf files needed (via weekly.tf)https://github.com/jckuester/terradozer[00:07:08] Cf2tf - optimistically convert cloudformation templates to terraform (via weekly.tf)https://github.com/DontShaveTheYak/cf2tf[00:11:47] I recently heard there are cheaper alternatives to AWS Support provided by their third party partners. I'm unclear on which partners offer this but does anyone here use an alternative to AWS Support? If so, who do you pay and is it just as "good"? [00:17:40] KMS Design Decision[00:27:38] Cognito Design Decision[00:31:08] Hiring Devops Engineers questions[00:52:43] Outro#officehours,#cloudposse,#sweetops,#devops,#sre,#terraform,#kubernetes,#awsSupport the show

The Internship Show
Alternative Pathways into Tech: Atlassian's Bootcamp Initiative

The Internship Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 19:35


On this episode of The Internship Show, we speak with Helen Bobbitt and Andy Gala from Atlassian. Helen is a Lead, Strategic Programs for Talent Acquisition, while Andy is a Software Engineer. We discuss Atlassian's Bootcamp hiring initiatives and hear about Andy's experience transitioning from a Bootcamp to a tech company.

B2B Growth
The 4 Pillars of Thought Leadership Your SME's Must Have

B2B Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 49:27 Transcription Available


In this replay episode, Dan Sanchez talks to Ashley Faus about her entire thought leadership process as the Content Strategy Lead at Atlassian .

Adaptavist Live - The Adaptavist Atlassian Ecosystem Podcast

Updates from all across the Atlassian ecosystem and news from Adaptavist.

Revenue Builders
The Busiest Man in Venture Capital with Neeraj Agrawal

Revenue Builders

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 73:26


In this episode of the Revenue Builders podcast, Neeraj Agrawal, General Partner at Battery Ventures, joins our hosts John Kaplan and John McMahon to discuss the nitty gritty of doing business in today's markets. Neeraj sits on more than a dozen boards and has invested in several companies that have gone on to stage IPOs. As a serial investor with a long list of companies in his portfolio, Neeraj knows a thing or two about helping startups turn an idea into a full-fledged company. Tune in to hear actionable tips on leadership, growth, and revenue from the man himself, including how he chooses the companies he works with as an investor. Additional Resources:Donate to Hack Diversity: https://www.hackdiversity.com/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/neerajagrawal2000/5 Traits of Successful Leaders: https://forc.mx/3BrMkHhListen to More Revenue Builders: https://forc.mx/3bfW5OdHIGHLIGHTS4 key dimensions that determine the success of companies Timing is more predictive of success than market sizeGreat product and sales processes are crucial for sustainable growthLessons learned from successful and failed investments Technical founders aren't necessarily the best CEOs The bull market is on its way out, what about it?Your company reputation is everythingHow Neeraj chooses the companies that he works withGUEST BIONeeraj joined Battery in 2000 and invests in SaaS and internet companies across all stages. He has invested in several companies that have gone on to stage IPOs, including Bazaarvoice (NASDAQ: BV); Coupa (NASDAQ: COUP); Guidewire Software (NYSE: GWRE); Marketo (NASDAQ: MKTO, acquired by Vista Equity Partners); Nutanix (NASDAQ: NTNX); Omniture (NASDAQ: OMTR, acquired by Adobe); RealPage (NASDAQ: RP); and Wayfair (NYSE: W).He also invested in several companies that have experienced M&A events, such as A Place for Mom (acquired by Warburg Pincus); AppDynamics (acquired by Cisco); Brightree (acquired by ResMed); Chef (acquired by Progress); Glassdoor (acquired by Recruit Holdings); Internet Brands (acquired by Hellman & Friedman); Kustomer (acquired by Meta); OpsGenie (acquired by Atlassian); Stella Connect (acquired by Medallia, Inc.); and VSS Monitoring (acquired by Danaher). Neeraj also played a key role in several other Battery investments including Groupon (NASDAQ: GRPN); ITA Software (acquired by Google); and Sabre (NASDAQ: SABR).Neeraj is currently on the boards of Braze (NASDAQ: BRZE), Compt, Catchpoint, Dataiku, Level AI, LogRocket, Pendo, Reify Health, Repeat, Scopely, Shortcut (formerly Clubhouse), Sprinklr (NYSE: CXM), Tealium, Wunderkind (formerly BounceX), Workato and Yesware. He is a board observer for InVision and Mattermost. Neeraj has also made seed investments in companies including 8fig, Dooly, PayStand, Proton, Reibus International and UserGems since 2020.QUOTESNeeraj on the challenge of timing your investment: "The challenge often is if you invest too early, you've got a good idea but you run out of money before the inflection point happens. And if you invest too late, somebody else captures the market. Having a sense of the timing is really important and like most things in life, luck has a lot to do with it."Neeraj on why both product and sales are crucial for success: "Ultimately, great companies are built on great products and great sales. You can kind of fake it for a while now on the sales side, but the longer you wait to put in the fundamentals, the harder it is to do later." Neeraj on how he chooses the companies that he backs: "Life's too short. If this isn't a person that I want to back from beginning to exit, they don't have the right coachability and skill to read my mind, it's probably time to move on and look at other investments."Check out John McMahon's book here: https://www.amazon.com/Qualified-Sales-Leader-Proven-Lessons/dp/0578895064

How I Work
Atlassian's Dom Price wants you to up your communication game by designing a “working agreement”

How I Work

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 41:44


Have you heard praise showered on the concept of being a “lifelong learner”? You might've missed it in school, but our kids' generation are reminded everyday that learning should continue far beyond the classroom. And if you didn't hear it in school or in parent-teacher conferences, you've surely heard it at work by now. But what does it actually mean, and how do you become a lifelong learner yourself?  Enter Dom Price, Atlassian's Work Futurist and a celebrated keynote speaker. Given his title, it makes sense that Dom spends a lot of time thinking about the future of work, but he's certainly not keeping it to himself!  Dom discusses how the future of work might look, but cruciually, he's just as passionate about sparking broader conversations on the future, so that we can all design it together. He covers everything from updating our methods of communication, to designing a working world that can truly support its workers' physical and mental health.   Connect with Dom on Twitter or Linkedin *** My new book Time Wise is out now. You can grab a copy here.   Connect with me on the socials: Linkedin Twitter Instagram    If you're looking for more tips to improve the way you work, I write a fortnightly newsletter that contains three cool things I have discovered that help me work better, which range from interesting research findings through to gadgets I am loving. You can sign up for that at http://howiwork.co Visit https://www.amantha.com/podcast for full show notes from all episodes. Get in touch at amantha@inventium.com.au   CREDITS Produced by Inventium Host: Amantha Imber Production Support from Deadset Studios Episode Producer: Liam Riordan Sound Engineer: Martin Imber

Doppelgänger Tech Talk

Wurden in der Krise bessere Firmen gebaut? Strategiewechsel auf Dividendenaktien sinnvoll? Neuste Meme Aktien. Eine Menge Earnings. Manche gut wie Atlassian, Monday und Lemonade. Andere weniger gut, wie Palantir, Upstart oder Fortinet. Wie viel hat die Bewegung von Softbank pro Stunde verloren? Philipp Glöckler (https://twitter.com/gloeckler) und Philipp Klöckner (https://twitter.com/pip_net) sprechen heute über: (00:06:00) Next big thing wird in der Krise gebaut? (00:19:30) als relativ frischer Anleger auf Verlustzen sitzend (00:28:30) bed bath and beyond (00:32:00) Atlassian (00:37:30) Palantir (00:54:50) Upstart (01:08:00) Monday.com (01:14:00) clover health (01:15:00) Lemonade (01:23:00) Softbank (01:27:45) Beide Robotaxi Lizenz Shownotes: Is Palantir Buying Revenue? https://www.newcomer.co/p/is-palantir-buying-revenue How steep can we make 4% look...? https://twitter.com/pip_net/status/1556614555131940865 SoftBank Lost $39 Billion in 6 Months https://wolfstreet.com/2022/08/08/softbank-lost-39-billion-in-6-months-wiping-out-all-of-the-bubble-gains-of-the-vision-funds-since-2017/ Doppelgänger & Friends auf Twitch 02 mit Kein Spekulant, Christian W. Röhl & Holger Zschäpitz https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=itcKIi3Bu-0 **Doppelgänger Tech Talk Podcast** Doppelgänger & Friends auf Twitch https://www.twitch.tv/doppelgaengerio Sheet https://doppelgaenger.io/sheet/ Earnings & Event Kalender https://www.doppelgaenger.io/kalender/ Disclaimer https://www.doppelgaenger.io/disclaimer/ Passionfroot Storefront https://www.passionfroot.xyz/storefront/doppelgaenger Post Production by Jan Wagener https://twitter.com/JanAusDemOff

The Product Podcast
How to Crack the Product Manager Execution Interview by Instacart Sr PM

The Product Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 32:26


If you have a Product Management interview in your future, you certainly won't want to miss this episode. Murali Kamalesha, an Instacart Senior PM, will be sharing the do's and don'ts of the PM Execution interview and will go through a real-life walkthrough so you can know exactly what interviewers want to see. Get the FREE Product Book and check out our curated list of free Product Management resources here.This episode is brought to you by Amplitude.Amplitude is the pioneer in digital optimization software, helping product leaders answer the strategic question: "How do our digital products drive our business?" More than 1,400 customers, including Atlassian, Instacart, NBCUniversal, Shopify, and Under Armour rely on Amplitude. The Amplitude Digital Optimization System makes critical data accessible and actionable so teams can unlock insights, build winning products faster, and turn products into revenue. Amplitude is the best-in-class product analytics solution, ranked #1 in G2's 2022 Winter Report.Get started today at amplitude.com.

Earnings Season
Atlassian Corporation Plc, Q4 2022 Earnings Call, Aug 04, 2022

Earnings Season

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 48:59


Atlassian Corporation Plc, Q4 2022 Earnings Call, Aug 04, 2022

TWiT Bits (Video HI)
SN Clip: Atlassian's "Confluence" Under Attack

TWiT Bits (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 10:36


On Security Now, Steve Gibson and Leo Laporte discuss an urgent vulnerability created by an add-on to Atlassian's Confluence corporate workgroup server. For more, check out Security Now: https://twit.tv/sn/882 Hosts: Leo Laporte and Steve Gibson You can find more about TWiT and subscribe to our podcasts at https://podcasts.twit.tv/

TWiT Bits (Video HD)
SN Clip: Atlassian's "Confluence" Under Attack

TWiT Bits (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 10:36


On Security Now, Steve Gibson and Leo Laporte discuss an urgent vulnerability created by an add-on to Atlassian's Confluence corporate workgroup server. For more, check out Security Now: https://twit.tv/sn/882 Hosts: Leo Laporte and Steve Gibson You can find more about TWiT and subscribe to our podcasts at https://podcasts.twit.tv/

TWiT Bits (MP3)
SN Clip: Atlassian's "Confluence" Under Attack

TWiT Bits (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 10:33


On Security Now, Steve Gibson and Leo Laporte discuss an urgent vulnerability created by an add-on to Atlassian's Confluence corporate workgroup server. For more, check out Security Now: https://twit.tv/sn/882 Hosts: Leo Laporte and Steve Gibson You can find more about TWiT and subscribe to our podcasts at https://podcasts.twit.tv/

The Product Podcast
Generalizing Your PM Skills by Google Product Leader

The Product Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 25:50


There are many skills you need in order for your product career to take off, but it's always important to keep your basic ones sharp even when learning new ones. Come learn about generalizing your Product Management skills in this episode with Google Product Leader Manosai Eerabathini. Get the FREE Product Book and check out our curated list of free Product Management resources here.This episode is brought to you by Amplitude.Amplitude is the pioneer in digital optimization software, helping product leaders answer the strategic question: "How do our digital products drive our business?" More than 1,400 customers, including Atlassian, Instacart, NBCUniversal, Shopify, and Under Armour rely on Amplitude. The Amplitude Digital Optimization System makes critical data accessible and actionable so teams can unlock insights, build winning products faster, and turn products into revenue. Amplitude is the best-in-class product analytics solution, ranked #1 in G2's 2022 Winter Report.Get started today at amplitude.com.

Security Now (MP3)
SN 882: Rowhammer's Nine Lives - TLS-Anvil, Chrome cookies stick around, Atlassian Confluence under attack

Security Now (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 133:24 Very Popular


Picture of the Week. Atlassian's "Confluence" under attack. LS-Anvil. Google delays Chrome's cookie phase-out again. Attacker responding to loss of Office Macros. SpinRite. Closing The Loop. RIP: Nichelle Nichols. "The Dropout" on Hulu and "WeCrashed" on AppleTV+. Winamp releases new version after four years in development. Rowhammer's Nine Lives. We invite you to read our show notes at https://www.grc.com/sn/SN-882-Notes.pdf Hosts: Steve Gibson and Leo Laporte Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/security-now. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit You can submit a question to Security Now! at the GRC Feedback Page. For 16kbps versions, transcripts, and notes (including fixes), visit Steve's site: grc.com, also the home of the best disk maintenance and recovery utility ever written Spinrite 6. Sponsors: tanium.com/twit itpro.tv/securitynow use code: SN30 grammarly.com/securitynow

Security Now (Video HD)
SN 882: Rowhammer's Nine Lives - TLS-Anvil, Chrome cookies stick around, Atlassian Confluence under attack

Security Now (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 133:24 Very Popular


Picture of the Week. Atlassian's "Confluence" under attack. LS-Anvil. Google delays Chrome's cookie phase-out again. Attacker responding to loss of Office Macros. SpinRite. Closing The Loop. RIP: Nichelle Nichols. "The Dropout" on Hulu and "WeCrashed" on AppleTV+. Winamp releases new version after four years in development. Rowhammer's Nine Lives. We invite you to read our show notes at https://www.grc.com/sn/SN-882-Notes.pdf Hosts: Steve Gibson and Leo Laporte Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/security-now. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit You can submit a question to Security Now! at the GRC Feedback Page. For 16kbps versions, transcripts, and notes (including fixes), visit Steve's site: grc.com, also the home of the best disk maintenance and recovery utility ever written Spinrite 6. Sponsors: tanium.com/twit itpro.tv/securitynow use code: SN30 grammarly.com/securitynow

In The Know with Axonify
Finding a Career Path in L&D w/ Tracie Cantu (Atlassian)

In The Know with Axonify

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 27:06


What do L&D professionals actually do?It can be hard for L&D pros to explain their jobs to people outside the profession. Sometimes they're teachers. Sometimes they're media designers. And sometimes they're the people who make employees finish those boring compliance courses. In reality, L&D is a dynamic profession with lots of opportunity for people with different interests and skills. Do you know your options for building a career in L&D? Does your company have the right L&D roles in place to properly enable your business? Tracie Cantu, Senior Manager - Talent Operations at Atlassian, joins JD Dillon to discuss L&D careers. They share their L&D origin stories and explore some less familiar L&D jobs that play critical roles in modern learning and enablement functions.  Watch the full video of this episode on the Axonify YouTube channel.Follow JD on LinkedIn to catch his daily BIG LIST of Cool L&D jobs.Pre-order JD's new book - The Modern Learning Ecosystem - via Amazon or ATD.In The Know is brought to you by Axonify, the mobile-first training and communication solution that helps make sure your frontline workforce is ready for anything. To learn more about Axonify's digital learning experience and check out success stories from companies like O'Reilly Auto Parts, Longo's, Briscoe Group, Citizen's Bank, MOL Group and Etihad Airways, visit axonify.com.

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
Security Now 882: Rowhammer's Nine Lives

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 133:24


Picture of the Week. Atlassian's "Confluence" under attack. LS-Anvil. Google delays Chrome's cookie phase-out again. Attacker responding to loss of Office Macros. SpinRite. Closing The Loop. RIP: Nichelle Nichols. "The Dropout" on Hulu and "WeCrashed" on AppleTV+. Winamp releases new version after four years in development. Rowhammer's Nine Lives. We invite you to read our show notes at https://www.grc.com/sn/SN-882-Notes.pdf Hosts: Steve Gibson and Leo Laporte Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/security-now. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit You can submit a question to Security Now! at the GRC Feedback Page. For 16kbps versions, transcripts, and notes (including fixes), visit Steve's site: grc.com, also the home of the best disk maintenance and recovery utility ever written Spinrite 6. Sponsors: tanium.com/twit itpro.tv/securitynow use code: SN30 grammarly.com/securitynow

Radio Leo (Audio)
Security Now 882: Rowhammer's Nine Lives

Radio Leo (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 133:24


Picture of the Week. Atlassian's "Confluence" under attack. LS-Anvil. Google delays Chrome's cookie phase-out again. Attacker responding to loss of Office Macros. SpinRite. Closing The Loop. RIP: Nichelle Nichols. "The Dropout" on Hulu and "WeCrashed" on AppleTV+. Winamp releases new version after four years in development. Rowhammer's Nine Lives. We invite you to read our show notes at https://www.grc.com/sn/SN-882-Notes.pdf Hosts: Steve Gibson and Leo Laporte Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/security-now. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit You can submit a question to Security Now! at the GRC Feedback Page. For 16kbps versions, transcripts, and notes (including fixes), visit Steve's site: grc.com, also the home of the best disk maintenance and recovery utility ever written Spinrite 6. Sponsors: tanium.com/twit itpro.tv/securitynow use code: SN30 grammarly.com/securitynow

Security Now (Video HI)
SN 882: Rowhammer's Nine Lives - TLS-Anvil, Chrome cookies stick around, Atlassian Confluence under attack

Security Now (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 133:24


Picture of the Week. Atlassian's "Confluence" under attack. LS-Anvil. Google delays Chrome's cookie phase-out again. Attacker responding to loss of Office Macros. SpinRite. Closing The Loop. RIP: Nichelle Nichols. "The Dropout" on Hulu and "WeCrashed" on AppleTV+. Winamp releases new version after four years in development. Rowhammer's Nine Lives. We invite you to read our show notes at https://www.grc.com/sn/SN-882-Notes.pdf Hosts: Steve Gibson and Leo Laporte Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/security-now. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit You can submit a question to Security Now! at the GRC Feedback Page. For 16kbps versions, transcripts, and notes (including fixes), visit Steve's site: grc.com, also the home of the best disk maintenance and recovery utility ever written Spinrite 6. Sponsors: tanium.com/twit itpro.tv/securitynow use code: SN30 grammarly.com/securitynow

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
Security Now 882: Rowhammer's Nine Lives

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 133:24


Picture of the Week. Atlassian's "Confluence" under attack. LS-Anvil. Google delays Chrome's cookie phase-out again. Attacker responding to loss of Office Macros. SpinRite. Closing The Loop. RIP: Nichelle Nichols. "The Dropout" on Hulu and "WeCrashed" on AppleTV+. Winamp releases new version after four years in development. Rowhammer's Nine Lives. We invite you to read our show notes at https://www.grc.com/sn/SN-882-Notes.pdf Hosts: Steve Gibson and Leo Laporte Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/security-now. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit You can submit a question to Security Now! at the GRC Feedback Page. For 16kbps versions, transcripts, and notes (including fixes), visit Steve's site: grc.com, also the home of the best disk maintenance and recovery utility ever written Spinrite 6. Sponsors: tanium.com/twit itpro.tv/securitynow use code: SN30 grammarly.com/securitynow

Security Now (Video LO)
SN 882: Rowhammer's Nine Lives - TLS-Anvil, Chrome cookies stick around, Atlassian Confluence under attack

Security Now (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 133:24


Picture of the Week. Atlassian's "Confluence" under attack. LS-Anvil. Google delays Chrome's cookie phase-out again. Attacker responding to loss of Office Macros. SpinRite. Closing The Loop. RIP: Nichelle Nichols. "The Dropout" on Hulu and "WeCrashed" on AppleTV+. Winamp releases new version after four years in development. Rowhammer's Nine Lives. We invite you to read our show notes at https://www.grc.com/sn/SN-882-Notes.pdf Hosts: Steve Gibson and Leo Laporte Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/security-now. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit You can submit a question to Security Now! at the GRC Feedback Page. For 16kbps versions, transcripts, and notes (including fixes), visit Steve's site: grc.com, also the home of the best disk maintenance and recovery utility ever written Spinrite 6. Sponsors: tanium.com/twit itpro.tv/securitynow use code: SN30 grammarly.com/securitynow

The Product Podcast
Building Robot Experiences That People Love by Amazon Sr PM

The Product Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 22:04


In today's world, technology can do fascinating things. Amazon Senior PM, Katrin Beauchaud, is joining the show today to talk about robotics and how to build user-friendly robotic experiences that delight the consumer in their everyday life. If you want to be part of the innovation of the future, this episode will fully prepare you to start creating worthwhile robotic experiences for your users. Get the FREE Product Book and check out our curated list of free Product Management resources here.This episode is brought to you by Amplitude.Amplitude is the pioneer in digital optimization software, helping product leaders answer the strategic question: "How do our digital products drive our business?" More than 1,400 customers, including Atlassian, Instacart, NBCUniversal, Shopify, and Under Armour rely on Amplitude. The Amplitude Digital Optimization System makes critical data accessible and actionable so teams can unlock insights, build winning products faster, and turn products into revenue. Amplitude is the best-in-class product analytics solution, ranked #1 in G2's 2022 Winter Report.Get started today at amplitude.com.

What The Flux
Atlassian co-founder's bid rejected | TikTok gets musical | Amazon says goodbye

What The Flux

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 5:58


Atlassian co-founder Scott Farquhar has made a major bid to acquire renewables generator Genex Power.. but they want a larger premium   TikTok has applied to trademark TikTok Music, which could see TikTok start to dabble in more than just short-form video   Amazon is bidding farewell to Amazon Drive - which joins a long list of other failed projects. Thanks to Natasha Gillezeau, Product Manager at Flux for co-hosting today! --- Build the financial wellbeing of your team at work with Flux at Work: https://bit.ly/fluxatwork Download the free app (App Store): http://bit.ly/FluxAppStore Download the free app (Google Play): http://bit.ly/FluxappGooglePlay Daily newsletter: https://bit.ly/fluxnewsletter Instagram: http://bit.ly/fluxinsta TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@flux.finance --- The content in this podcast reflects the views and opinions of the hosts, and is intended for personal and not commercial use. We do not represent or endorse the accuracy or reliability of any opinion, statement or other information provided or distributed in these episodes.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

PC Perspective Podcast
Podcast #687 - AMD Discounts, Arc A750 Showcase, Gigabyte Z690 Aorus Master, and MORE

PC Perspective Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 73:13 Very Popular


Josh took himself out to a ballgame, so we podcasted without him. But that doesn't mean you won't see some OG PCPer faces, if you listen to at least the 24-ish minute mark. Heck, you might as well watch to 26 min, as well. Maybe even to the end.Enjoy the Z690 build series, GPU sales, gaming updates and security sadness!Timestamps:00:00 Intro00:52 Where's Josh?02:01 Game On AMD sale05:38 New Radeon Software07:49 Micron's new 232-layer NAND10:14 CORSAIR Vengeance RGB DDR514:47 Tiny Core i7 system18:24 Razer Blade Advanced22:23 Mandatory Intel Arc news (with familiar faces)26:27 Podcast Sponsor TextExpander27:47 KotOR NoMORE30:15 GTA6 non-update31:30 CosmicStrand UEFI insecurity36:38 Atlassian vulnerabilities37:49 Browser 0-day39:55 Kent explores the Gigabyte Z690 Aorus Master1:02:43 Picks of the Week1:11:54 OutroLink to the Intel Intel Arc A750 Limited Edition Graphics Card Showcase used in the podcast: https://youtu.be/fsij4LgXmZw★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

The Product Podcast
Building Sound Product Strategy by Netflix Sr Product Manager

The Product Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 32:02


Before you start building a product, you need to create a well-grounded strategy. You need to think about how you will drive adoption, how the product fits with your company's vision, and how you will define success. Today our guest Ameya Joshi, a Netflix Senior PM, will be going over how to construct a strategy that best suits you, your product, and your business.Get the FREE Product Book and check out our curated list of free Product Management resources here.This episode is brought to you by Amplitude.Amplitude is the pioneer in digital optimization software, helping product leaders answer the strategic question: "How do our digital products drive our business?" More than 1,400 customers, including Atlassian, Instacart, NBCUniversal, Shopify, and Under Armour rely on Amplitude. The Amplitude Digital Optimization System makes critical data accessible and actionable so teams can unlock insights, build winning products faster, and turn products into revenue. Amplitude is the best-in-class product analytics solution, ranked #1 in G2's 2022 Winter Report.Get started today at amplitude.com.

Personal Podcaster
S2-Ep4: The Marketer's Guide w/ Samuel Cheong

Personal Podcaster

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 42:49


The benefits of podcasting takes many forms! From thought leadership, to learning from guests, to upping your network. Join Angela as she chats with Samuel on his new journey in the podcasting sphere and what he has already gained! Topics include: how podcasting humanizes brands how podcasting is an intimate experience and what a good podcasting host brings to the studio You can connect with Samuel on LinkedIn and by listening to The Marketer's Guide. Other resources mentioned: Mason Cosby & The Marketing Ladder Joseph Lewin & The Strategic Marketer Ashley Faus, Director of Integrated Product Marketing at Atlassian

Screaming in the Cloud
Remote Work and Finding Your Voice with Jeff Smith

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 40:42


About JeffJeff Smith has been in the technology industry for over 20 years, oscillating between management and individual contributor. Jeff currently serves as the Director of Production Operations for Basis Technologies (formerly Centro), an advertising software company headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. Before that he served as the Manager of Site Reliability Engineering at Grubhub.Jeff is passionate about DevOps transformations in organizations large and small, with a particular interest in the psychological aspects of problems in companies. He lives in Chicago with his wife Stephanie and their two kids Ella and Xander.Jeff is also the author of Operations Anti-Patterns, DevOps Solutions with Manning publishing. (https://www.manning.com/books/operations-anti-patterns-devops-solutions) Links Referenced: Basis Technologies: https://basis.net/ Operations Anti-Patterns: https://attainabledevops.com/book Personal Site: https://attainabledevops.com LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jeffery-smith-devops/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/DarkAndNerdy Medium: https://medium.com/@jefferysmith duckbillgroup.com: https://duckbillgroup.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Fortinet. Fortinet's partnership with AWS is a better-together combination that ensures your workloads on AWS are protected by best-in-class security solutions powered by comprehensive threat intelligence and more than 20 years of cybersecurity experience. Integrations with key AWS services simplify security management, ensure full visibility across environments, and provide broad protection across your workloads and applications. Visit them at AWS re:Inforce to see the latest trends in cybersecurity on July 25-26 at the Boston Convention Center. Just go over to the Fortinet booth and tell them Corey Quinn sent you and watch for the flinch. My thanks again to my friends at Fortinet.Corey: Let's face it, on-call firefighting at 2am is stressful! So there's good news and there's bad news. The bad news is that you probably can't prevent incidents from happening, but the good news is that incident.io makes incidents less stressful and a lot more valuable. incident.io is a Slack-native incident management platform that allows you to automate incident processes, focus on fixing the issues and learn from incident insights to improve site reliability and fix your vulnerabilities. Try incident.io, recover faster and sleep more.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. One of the fun things about doing this show for long enough is that you eventually get to catch up with people and follow up on previous conversations that you've had. Many years ago—which sounds like I'm being sarcastic, but is increasingly actually true—Jeff Smith was on the show talking about a book that was about to release. Well, time has passed and things have changed. And Jeff Smith is back once again. He's the Director of Product Operations at Basis Technologies, and the author of DevOps Anti-Patterns? Or what was the actual title of the book it was—Jeff: Operations Anti-Patterns.Corey: I got hung up in the anti-patterns part because it's amazing. I love the title.Jeff: Yeah, Operations Anti-Patterns, DevOps Solutions.Corey: Got you. Usually in my experience, alway been operations anti-patterns, and here I am to make them worse, probably by doing something like using DNS as a database or some godforsaken thing. But you were talking about the book aspirationally a few years ago, and now it's published and it has been sent out to the world. And it went well enough that they translated it to Japanese, I believe, and it has seen significant uptick. What was your experience of it? How did it go?Jeff: You know, it was a great experience. This is definitely the first book that I've written. And the Manning process was extremely smooth. You know, they sort of hold your hand through the entire process. But even after launch, just getting feedback from readers and hearing how it resonated with folks was extremely powerful.I was surprised to find out that they turned it into an audiobook as well. So, everyone reaches out and says, “Did you read the audiobook? I was going to buy it, but I wasn't sure.” I was like, “No, unfortunately, I don't read it.” But you know, still cool to have it out there.Corey: My theory has been for a while now that no one wants to actually write a book; they want to have written a book. Now that you're on the other side, how accurate is that? Are you in a position of, “Wow, sure glad that's done?” Or are you, “That was fun. Let's do it again because I like being sad all the time.” I mean, you do work Kubernetes for God's sake. I mean, there's a bit of masochism inherent to all of us in this space.Jeff: Yeah. Kubernetes makes me cry a little bit more than the writing process. But it's one of the things when you look back on it, you're like, “Wow, that was fun,” but not in the heat of the moment, right? So, I totally agree with the sentiment that people want to have written a book but not actually gone through the process. And that's evident by the fact that how many people try to start a book on their own without a publisher behind them, and they end up writing it for 15 years. The process is pretty grueling. The feedback is intense at first, but you start to get into a groove and you—I could see, you know, in a little while wanting to write another book. So, I can see the appeal.Corey: And the last time you were on the show, I didn't really bother to go in a particular topical direction because, what's the point? It didn't really seem like it was a top-of-mind issue to really bring up because what's it matter; it's a small percentage of the workforce. Now I feel like talking about remote work is suddenly taking on a bit of a different sheen than it was before the dark times arrived. Where do you land on the broad spectrum of opinions around the idea of remote work, given that you have specialized in anti-patterns, and well, as sarcastic as I am, I tend to look at almost every place I've ever worked is expressing different anti-patterns from time to time. So, where do you land on the topic?Jeff: So, it's funny, I started as a staunch office supporter, right? I like being in the office. I like collaborating in person; I thought we were way more productive. Since the pandemic, all of us are forced into remote work, I've hired almost half of my team now as remote. And I am somewhat of a convert, but I'm not on the bandwagon of remote work is just as good or is better as in person work.I've firmly landed in the camp of remote work is good. It's got its shortcomings, but it's worth the trade off. And I think acknowledging what those trade-offs are important to keeping the team afloat. We just recently had a conversation with the team where we were discussing, like, you know, there's definitely been a drop in productivity over the past six months to a year. And in that conversation, a lot of the things that came up were things that are different remote that were better in person, right, Slack etiquette—which is something, you know, I could talk a little bit about as well—but, you know, Slack etiquette in terms of getting feedback quickly, just the sort of camaraderie and the lack of building that camaraderie with new team members as they come on board and not having those rituals to replace the in-person rituals. But through all that, oddly enough, no one suggested going back into the office. [laugh].Corey: For some strange reason, yeah. I need to be careful what I say here, I want to disclaim the position that I'm in. There is a power imbalance and nothing I say is going to be able to necessarily address that because I own the company and if my team members are listening to this, they're going to read a lot into what I say that I might not necessarily intend. But The Duckbill Group, since its founding, has been a fully distributed company. My business partner lives in a different state than I do so there's never been the crappy version of remote, which is, well, we're all going to be in the same city, except for Theodore. Theodore is going to be timezones away and then wonder why he doesn't get to participate in some of the conversations where the real decisions get made.Like that's crappy. I don't like that striated approach to things. We don't have many people who are co-located in any real sense, nor have we for the majority of the company's life. But there are times when I am able to work on a project in a room with one of my colleagues, and things go a lot more smoothly. As much as we want to pretend that video is the same, it quite simply isn't.It is a somewhat poor substitute for the very high bandwidth of a face-to-face interaction. And yes, I understand this is also a somewhat neurotypical perspective, let's be clear with that as well, and it's not for everyone. But I think that for the base case, a lot of the remote work advocates are not being fully, I guess, honest with themselves about some of the shortcomings remote has. That is where I've mostly landed on this. Does that generally land with where you are?Jeff: Yeah, that's exactly where I'm at. I completely agree. And when we take work out of the equation, I think the shortcomings lay themselves bare, right? Like I was having a conversation with a friend and we were like, well, if you had a major breakup, right, I would never be like, “Oh, man. Grab a beer and hop on Zoom,” right? [laugh]. “Let's talk it out.”No, you're like, hey, let's get in person and let's talk, right? We can do all of that conversation over Zoom, but the magic of being in person and having that personal connection, you know, can't be replaced. So, you know, if it's not going to work, commiserating over beers, right? I can't imagine it's going to work, diagramming some complex workflows and trying to come to an answer or a solution on that. So again, not to say that, you know, remote work is not valuable, it's just different.And I think organizations are really going to have to figure out, like, okay, if I want to entice people back into the office, what are the things that I need to do to make this realistic? We've opened the floodgates on remote hiring, right, so now it's like, okay, everyone's janky office setup needs to get fixed, right? So, I can't have a scenario where it's like, “Oh, just point your laptop at the whiteboard, right?” [laugh]. Like that can't exist, we have to have office spaces that are first-class citizens for our remote counterparts as well.Corey: Right because otherwise, the alternative is, “Great, I expect you to take the home that you pay for and turn it into an area fit for office use. Of course, we're not going to compensate you for that, despite the fact that, let's be realistic, rent is often larger than the AWS bill.” Which I know, gasp, I'm as shocked as anyone affected by that, but it's true. “But oh, you want to work from home? Great. That just means you can work more hours.”I am not of the school of thought where I consider time in the office to be an indicator of anything meaningful. I care if the work gets done and at small-scale, this works. Let me also be clear, we're an 11-person company. A lot of what I'm talking about simply will not scale to companies that are orders of magnitude larger than this. And from where I sit, that's okay. It doesn't need to.Jeff: Right. And I think a lot of the things that you talk about will scale, right? Because in most scenarios, you're not scaling it organizationally so much as you are with a handful of teams, right? Because when I think about all the different teams I interact with, I never really interact with the organization as a whole, I interact with my little neighborhood in the organization. So, it is definitely something that scales.But again, when it comes to companies, like, enticing people back into the office, now that I'm talking about working from home five days a week, I've invested in my home setup. I've got the monitor I want, I've got the chair that I want, I've got the mouse and keyboard that I want. So, you're going to bring me back to the office so I can have some standard Dell keyboard and mouse with some janky, you know—maybe—21-inch monitor or something like that, right? Like, you really have to decide, like, okay, we're going to make the office a destination, we're going to make it where people want to go there where it's not just even about the collaboration aspect, but people can still work and be effective.And on top of that, I think how we look at what the office delivers is going to change, right? Because now when I go to the office now, I do very little work. It's connections, right? It's like, you know, “Oh, I haven't seen you in forever. Let's catch up.” And a lot of that stuff is valuable. You know, there's these hallway conversations that exist that just weren't happening previously because how do I accidentally bump into you on Slack? [laugh]. Right, it has to be much more it of a—Corey: Right. It takes some contrivance to wind up making that happen. I remember back in the days of working in offices, I remember here in San Francisco where we had unlimited sick time and unlimited PTO, I would often fake a sick day, but just stay home and get work done. Because I knew if I was in the office, I'd be constantly subjected to drive-bys the entire time of just drive-by requests, people stopping by to ask, “Oh, can you just help me with this one thing,” that completely derails my train of thought. Then at the end of the day, they'd tell me, “You seem distractible and you didn't get a lot of work done.”It's, “Well, no kidding. Of course not. Are you surprised?” And one of the nice things about starting your own company—because there are a lot of downsides, let me be very clear—one of the nice things is you get to decide how you want to work. And that was a study in, first, amazement, and then frustration.It was, “All right, I just landed a big customer. I'm off to the races and going to take this seriously for a good six to twelve months. Great sky's the limit, I'm going to do up my home office.” And then you see how little money it takes to have a nice chair, a good standing desk, a monitor that makes sense and you remember fighting tooth-and-nail for nothing that even approached this quality at companies and they acted like it was going to cost them 20-grand. And here, it's two grand at most, when I decorated this place the first time.And it was… “What the hell?” Like, it feels like the scales fall away from your eyes, and you start seeing things that you didn't realize were a thing. Now I worry that five years in, there's no way in the world I'm ever fit to be an employee again, so this is probably the last job I'll ever have. Just because I've basically made myself completely unemployable across six different axes.Jeff: [laugh]. And I think one of the things when it comes to, like, furniture, keyboard, stuff like that, I feel like part of it was just, like, this sort of enforced conformity, right, that the office provided us the ability to do. We can make sure everyone's got the same monitor, the same keyboard that way, when it breaks, we can replace it easily. In a lot of organizations that I've been in, you know, that sort of like, you know, even if it was the same amount or ordering a custom keyboard was a big exception process, right? Like, “Oh, we've got to do a whole thing.” And it's just like, “Well, it doesn't have to be that complicated.”And like you said, it doesn't cost much to allow someone to get the tools that they want and prefer and they're going to be more productive with. But to your point really quickly about work in the office, until the pandemic, I personally didn't recognize how difficult it actually was to get work done in the office. I don't think I appreciated it. And now that I'm remote, I'm like, wow, it is so much easier for me to close this door, put my headphones on, mute Slack and go heads down. You know, the only drive-by I've got is my wife wondering if I want to go for a walk, and that's usually a text message that I can ignore and come back to later.Corey: The thing that just continues to be strange for me and breaks in some of the weirdest ways has just been the growing awareness of how much of office life is unnecessary and ridiculous. When you're in the office every day, you have to find a way to make it work and be productive and you have this passive-aggressive story of this open office, it's for collaboration purposes. Yeah, I can definitively say that is not true. I had a boss who once told me that there was such benefits to working in an open plan office that if magically it were less expensive to give people individual offices, he would spare the extra expense for open plan. That was the day I learned he would lie to me while looking me in the eye. Because of course you wouldn't.And it's for collaboration. Yeah, it means two loud people—often me—are collaborating and everyone else wears noise-canceling headphones trying desperately to get work done, coming in early, hours before everyone else to get things done before people show up and distracted me. What the hell kind of day-to-day work environment is that?Jeff: What's interesting about that, though, is those same distractions are the things that get cited as being missed from the perspective of the person doing the distracting. So, everyone universally hates that sort of drive-by distractions, but everyone sort of universally misses the ability to say like, “Hey, can I just pull on your ear for a second and get your feedback on this?” Or, “Can we just walk through this really quickly?” That's the thing that people miss, and I don't think that they ever connect it to the idea that if you're not the interruptee, you're the interruptor, [laugh] and what that might do to someone else's productivity. So, you would think something like Slack would help with that, but in reality, what ends up happening is if you don't have proper Slack etiquette, there's a lot of signals that go out that get misconstrued, misinterpreted, internalized, and then it ends up impacting morale.Corey: And that's the most painful part of a lot of that too. Is that yeah, I want to go ahead and spend some time doing some nonsense—as one does; imagine that—and I know that if I'm going to go into an office or meet up with my colleagues, okay, that afternoon or that day, yeah, I'm planning that I'm probably not going to get a whole lot of deep coding done. Okay, great. But when that becomes 40 hours a week, well, that's a challenge. I feel like being full remote doesn't work out, but also being in the office 40 hours a week also feels a little sadistic, more than almost anything else.I don't know what the future looks like and I am privileged enough that I don't have to because we have been full remote the entire time. But what we don't spend on office space we spend on plane tickets back and forth so people can have meetings. In the before times, we were very good about that. Now it's, we're hesitant to do it just because it's we don't want people traveling before the feel that it's safe to do so. We've also learned, for example, when dealing with our clients, that we can get an awful lot done without being on site with them and be extraordinarily effective.It was always weird have traveled to some faraway city to meet with the client, and then you're on a Zoom call from their office with the rest of the team. It's… I could have done this from my living room.Jeff: Yeah. I find those sorts of hybrid meetings are often worse than if we were all just remote, right? It's just so much easier because now it's like, all right, three of us are going to crowd around one person's laptop, and then all of the things that we want to do to take advantage of being in person are excluding the people that are remote, so you got to do this careful dance. The way we've been sort of tackling it so far—and we're still experimenting—is we're not requiring anyone to come back into the office, but some people find it useful to go to the office as a change of scenery, to sort of, like break things up from their typical routine, and they like the break and the change. But it's something that they do sort of ad hoc.So, we've got a small group that meets, like, every Thursday, just as a day to sort of go into the office and switch things up. I think the idea of saying everyone has to come into the office two or three days a week is probably broken when there's no purpose behind it. So, my wife technically should go into the office twice a week, but her entire team is in Europe. [laugh]. So, what point does that make other than I am a body in a chair? So, I think companies are going to have to get flexible with this sort of hybrid environment.But then it makes you wonder, like, is it worth the office space and how many people are actually taking advantage of it when it's not mandated? We find that our office time centers around some event, right? And that event might be someone in town that's typically remote. That might be a particular project that we're working on where we want to get ideas and collaborate and have a workshop. But the idea of just, like, you know, we're going to systematically require people to be in the office x many days, I don't see that in our future.Corey: No, and I hope you're right. But it also feels like a lot of folks are also doing some weird things around the idea of remote such as, “Oh, we're full remote but we're going to pay you based upon where you happen to be sitting geographically.” And we find that the way that we've done this—and again, I'm not saying there's a right answer for everyone—but we wind up paying what the value of the work is for us. In many cases, that means that we would be hard-pressed to hire someone in the Bay Area, for example. On the other hand, it means that when we hire people who are in places with relatively low cost of living, they feel like they've just hit the lottery, on some level.And yeah, some of them, I guess it does sort of cause a weird imbalance if you're a large Amazon-scale company where you want to start not disrupting local economies. We're not hiring that many people, I promise. So, there's this idea of figuring out how that works out. And then where does the headquarters live? And well, what state laws do we wind up following on what we're doing? Just seems odd.Jeff: Yeah. So, you know, one thing I wanted to comment on that you'd mentioned earlier, too, was the weird things that people are doing, and organizations are doing with this, sort of, remote work thing, especially the geographic base pay. And you know, a lot of it is, how can we manipulate the situation to better us in a way that sounds good on paper, right? So, it sounds perfectly reasonable. Like, oh, you live in New York, I'm going to pay you in New York rates, right?But, like, you live in Des Moines, so I'm going to pay you Des Moines rates. And on the surface, when you just go you're like, oh, yeah, that makes sense, but then you think about it, you're like, “Wait, why does that matter?” Right? And then, like, how do I, as a manager, you know, level that across my employees, right? It's like, “Oh, so and so is getting paid 30 grand less. Oh, but they live in a cheaper area, right?” I don't know what your personal situation is, and how much that actually resonates or matters.Corey: Does the value that they provide to your company materially change based upon where they happen to be sitting that week?Jeff: Right, exactly. But it's a good story that you can tell, it sounds fair at first examination. But then when you start to scratch the surface, you're like, “Wait a second, this is BS.” So, that's one thing.Corey: It's like tipping on some level. If you can't afford the tip, you can't afford to eat out. Same story here. If you can't afford to compensate people the value that they're worth, you can't afford to employ people. And figure that out before you wind up disappointing people and possibly becoming today's Twitter main character.Jeff: Right. And then the state law thing is interesting. You know, when you see states like California adopting laws similar to, like, GDPR. And it's like, do you have to start planning for the most stringent possibility across every hire just to be safe and to avoid having to have this sort of patchwork of rules and policies based on where someone lives? You might say like, “Okay, Delaware has the most stringent employer law, so we're going to apply Delaware's laws across the board.” So, it'll be interesting to see how that sort of plays out in the long run. Luckily, that's not a problem I have to solve, but it'll be interesting to see how it shakes out.Corey: It is something we had to solve. We have an HR consultancy that helps out with a lot of these things, but the short answer is that we make sure that we obey with local laws, but the way that we operate is as if everyone were a San Francisco employee because that is—so far—the locale that, one, I live here, but also of every jurisdiction we've looked at in the United States, it tends to have the most advantageous to the employee restrictions and requirements. Like one thing we do is kind of ridiculous—and we have to do for me and one other person, but almost no one else, but we do it for everyone—is we have to provide stipends every month for electricity, for cellphone usage, for internet. They have to be broken out for each one of those categories, so we do 20 bucks a month for each of those. It adds up to 100 bucks, as I recall, and we call it good. And employees say, “Okay. Do we just send you receipts? Please don't.”I don't want to look at your cell phone bill. It's not my business. I don't want to know. We're doing this to comply with the law. I mean, if it were up to me, it would be this is ridiculous. Can we just give everyone $100 a month raise and call it good? Nope. The forms must be obeyed. So, all right.We do the same thing with PTO accrual. If you've acquired time off and you leave the company, we pay it out. Not every state requires that. But paying for cell phone access and internet access as well, is something Amazon is currently facing a class action about because they didn't do that for a number of their California employees. And even talking to Amazonians, like, “Well, they did, but you had to jump through a bunch of hoops.”We have the apparatus administratively to handle that in a way that employees don't. Why on earth would we make them do it unless we didn't want to pay them? Oh, I think I figured out this sneaky, sneaky plan. I'm not here to build a business by exploiting people. If that's the only way to succeed, and the business doesn't deserve to exist. That's my hot take of the day on that topic.Jeff: No, I totally agree. And what's interesting is these insidious costs that sneak up that employees tend to discount, like, one thing I always talk about with my team is all that time you're thinking about a problem at work, right, like when you're in the shower, when you're at dinner, when you're talking it over with your spouse, right? That's work. That's work. And it's work that you're doing on your time.But we don't account for it that way because we're not typing; we're not writing code. But, like, think about how much more effective as people, as employees, we would be if we had time dedicated to just sit and think, right? If I could just sit and think about a problem without needing to type but just critically think about it. But then it's like, well, what does that look like in the office, right? If I'm just sitting there in my chair like this, it doesn't look like I'm doing anything.But that's so important to be able to, like, break down and digest some of the complex problems that we're dealing with. And we just sort of write it off, right? So, I'm like, you know, you got to think about how that bleeds into your personal time and take that into account. So yeah, maybe you leave three hours early today, but I guarantee you, you're going to spend three hours throughout the week thinking about work. It's the same thing with these cellphone costs that you're talking about, right? “Oh, I've got a cell phone anyways; I've got internet anyways.” But still, that's something that you're contributing to the business that they're not on the hook for, so it seems fair that you get compensated for that.Corey: I just think about that stuff all the time from that perspective, and now that I you know, own the place, it's one of those which pocket of mine does it come out of? But I hold myself to a far higher standard about that stuff than I do the staff, where it's, for example, I could theoretically justify paying my internet bill here because we have business-class internet and an insane WiFi system because of all of the ridiculous video production I do. Now. It's like, like, if anyone else on the team was doing this, yes, I will insist we pay it, but for me, it just it feels a little close to the edge. So, it's one of those areas where I'm very conservative around things like that.The thing that also continues to just vex me, on some level, is this idea that time in a seat is somehow considered work. I'll never forget one of the last jobs I had before I started this place. My boss walked past me and saw that I was on Reddit. And, “Is that really the best use of your time right now?” May I use the bathroom when I'm done with this, sir?Yeah, of course it is. It sounds ridiculous, but one of the most valuable things I can do for The Duckbill Group now is go on the internet and start shit posting on Twitter, which sounds ridiculous, but it's also true. There's a brand awareness story there, on some level. And that's just wild to me. It's weird, we start treating people like adults, they start behaving that way. And if you start micromanaging them, they live up or down to the expectations you tend to hold. I'm a big believer in if I have to micromanage someone, I should just do the job myself.Jeff: Yeah. The Reddit story makes me think of, like, how few organizations have systematic ways of getting vital information. So, the first thing I think about is, like, security and security vulnerabilities, right? So, how does Basis Technologies, as an organization, know about these things? Right now, it's like, well, my team knows because we're plugged into Reddit and Twitter, right, but if we were gone Basis, right, may not necessarily get that information.So, that's something we're trying to correct, but it just sort of highlights the importance of freedom for these employees, right? Because yeah, I'm on Reddit, but I'm on /r/sysadmin. I'm on /r/AWS, right, I'm on /r/Atlassian. Now I'm finding out about this zero-day vulnerability and it's like, “Oh, guys, we got to act. I just heard about this thing.” And people are like, “Oh, where did this come from?” And it's like it came from my network, right? And my network—Corey: Mm-hm.Jeff: Is on Twitter, LinkedIn, Reddit. So, the idea that someone browsing the internet on any site, really, is somehow not a productive use of their time, you better be ready to itemize exactly what that means and what that looks like. “Oh, you can do this on Reddit but you can't do that on Reddit.”Corey: I have no boss now, I have no oversight, but somehow I still show up with a work ethic and get things done.Jeff: Right. [laugh].Corey: Wow, I guess I didn't need someone over my shoulder the whole time. Who knew?Jeff: Right. That's all that matters, right? And if you do it in 30 hours or 40 hours, that doesn't really matter to me, you know? You want to do it at night because you're more productive there, right, like, let's figure out a way to make that happen. And remote work is actually empowering us ways to really retain people that wasn't possible before I had an employee that was like, you know, I really want to travel. I'm like, “Dude, go to Europe. Work from Europe. Just do it. Work from Europe,” right? We've got senior leaders on the C-suite that are doing it. One of the chief—Corey: I'm told they have the internet, even there. Imagine that?Jeff: Yeah. [laugh]. So, our chief program officer, she was in Greece for four weeks. And it worked. It worked great. They had a process. You know, she would spent one week on and then one week off on vacation. But you know, she was able to have this incredible, long experience, and still deliver. And it's like, you know, we can use that as a model to say, like—Corey: And somehow the work got done. Wow, she must be amazing. No, that's the baseline expectation that people can be self-managing in that respect.Jeff: Right.Corey: They aren't toddlers.Jeff: So, if she can do that, I'm sure you can figure out how to code in China or wherever you want to visit. So, it's a great way to stay ahead of some of these companies that have a bit more lethargic policies around that stuff, where it's like, you know, all right, I'm not getting that insane salary, but guess what, I'm going to spend three weeks in New Zealand hanging out and not using any time off or anything like that, and you know, being able to enjoy life. I wish this pandemic had happened pre-kids because—Corey: Yeah. [laugh].Jeff: —you know, we would really take advantage of this.Corey: You and me both. It would have very different experience.Jeff: Yeah. [laugh]. Absolutely, right? But with kids in school, and all that stuff, we've been tethered down. But man, I you know, I want to encourage the young people or the single people on my team to just, like, hey, really, really embrace this time and take advantage of it.Corey: I come bearing ill tidings. Developers are responsible for more than ever these days. Not just the code that they write, but also the containers and the cloud infrastructure that their apps run on. Because serverless means it's still somebody's problem. And a big part of that responsibility is app security from code to cloud. And that's where our friend Snyk comes in. Snyk is a frictionless security platform that meets developers where they are - Finding and fixing vulnerabilities right from the CLI, IDEs, Repos, and Pipelines. Snyk integrates seamlessly with AWS offerings like code pipeline, EKS, ECR, and more! As well as things you're actually likely to be using. Deploy on AWS, secure with Snyk. Learn more at Snyk.co/scream That's S-N-Y-K.co/screamCorey: One last topic I want to get into before we call it an episode is, I admit, I read an awful lot of books, it's a guilty pleasure. And it's easy to fall into the trap, especially when you know the author, of assuming that snapshot of their state of mind at a very fixed point in time is somehow who they are, like a fly frozen in amber, and it's never true. So, my question for you is, quite simply, what have you learned since your book came out?Jeff: Oh, man, great question. So, when I was writing the book, I was really nervous about if my audience was as big as I thought it was, the people that I was targeting with the book.Corey: Okay, that keeps me up at night, too. I have no argument there.Jeff: Yeah. You know what I mean?Corey: Please, continue.Jeff: I'm surrounded, you know, by—Corey: Is anyone actually listening to this? Yeah.Jeff: Right. [laugh]. So, after the book got finished and it got published, I would get tons of feedback from people that so thoroughly enjoyed the book, they would say things like, you know, “It feels like you were in our office like a fly on the wall.” And that was exciting, one, because I felt like these were experiences that sort of resonated, but, two, it sort of proved this thesis that sometimes you don't have to do something revolutionary to be a positive contribution to other people, right? So, like, when I lay out the tips and things that I do in the book, it's nothing earth-shattering that I expect Google to adopt. Like, oh, my God, this is the most unique view ever.But being able to talk to an audience in a way that resonates with them, that connects with them, that shows that I understand their problem and have been there, it was really humbling and enlightening to just see that there are people out there that they're not on the bleeding edge, but they just need someone to talk to them in a language that they understand and resonate with. So, I think the biggest thing that I learned was this idea that your voice is important, your voice matters, and how you tell your story may be the difference between someone understanding a concept and someone not understanding a concept. So, there's always an audience for you out there as you're writing, whether it be your blog post, the videos that you produce, the podcasts that you make, somewhere there's someone that needs to hear what you have to say, and the unique way that you can say it. So, that was extremely powerful.Corey: Part of the challenge that I found is when I start talking to other people, back in the before times, trying to push them into conference talks and these days, write blog posts, the biggest objection I get sometimes is, “Well, I don't have anything worth saying.” That is provably not true. One of my favorite parts about writing Last Week in AWS is as I troll the internet looking for topics about AWS that I find interesting, I keep coming across people who are very involved in one area or another of this ecosystem and have stories they want to tell. And I love, “Hey, would you like to write a guest post for Last Week in AWS?” It's always invite only and every single one of them has been paid because people die of exposure and I'm not about that exploitation lifestyle.A couple have said, “Oh, I can't accept payment for a variety of reasons.” Great. Pick a charity that you would like it to go to instead because we do not accept volunteer work, we are a for-profit entity. That is the way it works here. And that has been just one of the absolute favorite parts about what I do just because you get to sort of discover new voices.And what I find really neat is that for a lot of these folks, this is their start to writing and telling the story, but they don't stop there, they start telling their story in other areas, too. It leads to interesting career opportunities for them, it leads to interesting exposure that they wouldn't have necessarily had—again, not that they're getting paid in exposure, but the fact that they are able to be exposed to different methodologies, different ways of thinking—I love that. It's one of my favorite parts about doing what I do. And it seems to scale a hell of a lot better than me sitting down with someone for two hours to help them build a CFP that they wind up not getting accepted or whatnot.Jeff: Right. It's a great opportunity that you provide folks, too, because of, like, an instant audience, I think that's one of the things that has made Medium so successful as, like, a blogging platform is, you know, everyone wants to go out and build their own WordPress site and launch it, but then it like, you write your blog post and it's crickets. So, the ability for you to, you know, use your platform to also expose those voices is great and extremely powerful. But you're right, once they do it, it lights a fire in a way that is admirable to watch. I have a person that I'm mentoring and that was my biggest piece of advice I can give. It was like, you know, write. Just write.It's the one thing that you can do without anyone else. And you can reinforce your own knowledge of a thing. If you just say, you know, I'm going to teach this thing that I just learned, just the writing process helps you solidify, like, okay, I know this stuff. I'm demonstrating that I know it and then four years from now, when you're applying for a job, someone's like, “Oh, I found your blog post and I see that you actually do know how to set up a Kubernetes cluster,” or whatever. It's just extremely great and it—Corey: It's always fun. You're googling for how to do something and you find something you wrote five years ago.Jeff: Right, yeah. [laugh]. And it's like code where you're like, “Oh, man, I would do that so much differently now.”Corey: Since we last spoke, one of the things I've been doing is I have been on the hook to write between a one to two-thousand-word blog post every week, and I've done that like clockwork, for about a year-and-a-half now. And I was no slouch at storytelling before I started doing that. I've given a few hundred conference talks in the before times. And I do obviously long Twitter threads in the past and I write reports a lot. But forcing me to go through that process every week and then sit with an editor and go ahead and get it improved, has made me a far better writer, it's made me a better storyteller, I am far better at articulating my point of view.It is absolutely just unlocking a host of benefits that I would have thought I was, oh, I passed all this. I'm already good at these things. And I was, but I'm better now. I think that writing is one of those things that people need to do a lot more of.Jeff: Absolutely. And it's funny that you mentioned that because I just recently, back in April, started to do the same thing I said, I'm going to write a blog post every week, right? I'm going to get three or four in the can, so that if life comes up and I miss a beat, right, I'm not actually missing the production schedule, so I have a steady—and you're right. Even after writing a book, I'm still learning stuff through the writing process, articulating my point of view.It's just something that carries over, and it carries over into the workforce, too. Like, if you've ever read a bad piece of documentation, right, that comes from—Corey: No.Jeff: Right? [laugh]. That comes from an inability to write. Like, you know, you end up asking these questions like who's the audience for this? What is ‘it' in this sentence? [laugh].Corey: Part of it too, is that people writing these things are so close to the problem themselves that the fact that, “Well, I'm not an expert in this.” That's why you should write about it. Talk about your experience. You're afraid everyone's going to say, “Oh, you're a fool. You didn't understand how this works.”Yeah, my lived experiences instead—and admittedly, I have the winds of privilege of my back on this—but it's also yeah, I didn't understand that either. It turns out that you're never the only person who has trouble with a concept. And by calling it out, you're normalizing it and doing a tremendous service for others in your shoes.Jeff: Especially when you're not an expert because I wrote some documentation about the SSL process and it didn't occur to me that these people don't use the AWS command line, right? Like, you know, in our organization, we sort of mask that from them through a bunch of in-house automation. Now we're starting to expose it to them and simple things like oh, you need to preface the AWS command with a profile name. So, then when we're going through the setup, we're like, “Oh. What if they already have an existing profile, right?” Like, we don't want to clobber that.SSo, it just changed the way you write the documentation. But like, that's not something that initially came to mind for me. It wasn't until someone went through the docs, and they're like, “Uh, this is blowing up in a weird way.” And I was like, “Oh, right. You know, like, I need to also teach you about profile management.”Corey: Also, everyone has a slightly different workflow for the way they interact with AWS accounts, and their shell prompts, and the way they set up local dev environments.Jeff: Yeah, absolutely. So, not being an expert on a thing is key because you're coming to it with virgin eyes, right, and you're able to look at it from a fresh perspective.Corey: So, much documentation out there is always coming from the perspective of someone who is intimately familiar with the problem space. Some of the more interesting episodes that I have, from a challenge perspective, are people who are deep technologists in a particular area and they love they fallen in love with the thing that they are building. Great. Can you explain it to the rest of us mere mortals so that we can actually we can share your excitement on this? And it's very hard to get them to come down to a level where it's coherent to folks who haven't spent years thinking deeply about that particular problem space.Jeff: Man, the number one culprit for that is, like, the AWS blogs where they have, like, a how-to article. You follow that thing and you're like, “None of this is working.” [laugh]. Right? And then you realize, oh, they made an assumption that I knew this, but I didn't right?So, it's like, you know, I didn't realize this was supposed to be, like, a handwritten JSON document just jammed into the value field. Because I didn't know that, I'm not pulling those values out as JSON. I'm expecting that just to be, like, a straight string value. And that has happened more and more times on the AWS blog than I can count. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yeah, very often. And then there's other problems, too. “Oh, yeah. Set up your IAM permissions properly.” That's left as an exercise for the reader. And then you wonder why everything's full of stars. Okay.Jeff: Right. Yep, exactly, exactly.Corey: Ugh. It's so great to catch up with you and see what you've been working on. If people want to learn more, where's the best place to find you?Jeff: So, the best place is probably my website, attainabledevops.com. That's a place where you can find me on all the other places. I don't really update that site much, but you can find me on LinkedIn, Twitter, from that jumping off point, links to the book are there if anyone's interested in that. Perfect stocking stuffers. Mom would love it, grandma would love it, so definitely, definitely buy multiple copies of that.Corey: Yeah, it's going to be one of my two-year-old's learning to read books, it'd be great.Jeff: Yeah, it's perfect. You know, you just throw it in the crib and walk away, right? They're asleep at no time. Like I said, I've also been taking to, you know, blogging on Medium, so you can catch me there, the links will be there on Attainable DevOps as well.Corey: Excellent. And that link will of course, be in the show notes. Thank you so much for being so generous with your time. I really do appreciate it. And it's great to talk to you again.Jeff: It was great to catch up.Corey: Really was. Jeff Smith, Director of Product Operations at Basis Technologies. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice or smash the like and subscribe buttons on the YouTubes, whereas if you've hated this podcast, do the exact same thing—five-star review, smash the buttons—but also leave an angry, incoherent comment that you're then going to have edited and every week you're going to come back and write another incoherent comment that you get edited. And in the fullness of time, you'll get much better at writing angry, incoherent comments.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Product Podcast
What I Wish I Knew When Pivoting to Product by fmr Zendesk Sr PM

The Product Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 37:30


Are you thinking about a career in product? Or do you just want to know more about the industry and what it's really like to build ground-breaking digital products? Check out this episode to hear from former Zendesk Senior PM, Ashima Sharma, on all the things that she wish she knew before starting her career in product so you can prepare yourself and find out if you should make the PM transition.Get the FREE Product Book and check out our curated list of free Product Management resources here.This episode is brought to you by Amplitude.Amplitude is the pioneer in digital optimization software, helping product leaders answer the strategic question: "How do our digital products drive our business?" More than 1,400 customers, including Atlassian, Instacart, NBCUniversal, Shopify, and Under Armour rely on Amplitude. The Amplitude Digital Optimization System makes critical data accessible and actionable so teams can unlock insights, build winning products faster, and turn products into revenue. Amplitude is the best-in-class product analytics solution, ranked #1 in G2's 2022 Winter Report.Get started today at amplitude.com.

People Business w/ O'Brien McMahon
Developing the Team w/ Ryan McCrea

People Business w/ O'Brien McMahon

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 59:16


Ryan McCrea is passionate about helping others own their career. He is currently the Head of Career Development at Atlassian, leading development and mobility programs for a growing global technology company with more than 7,000 employees. Prior to Atlassian, Ryan was Vice President and Manager of Talent Development at Commerce Bank where he built their corporate-wide professional development program from scratch. Mentioned in this Episode:Grit by Angela DuckworthThe Medici Effect by Frans JohanssonDare to Lead Hub with Brené BrownTime Codes:(2:49) - How does one become a Learning & Development Leader?(4:16) - What drew you to this aspect within HR?(4:59) - How have you developed your knowledge base?(6:38) - Where does a company start to develop its internal training?(10:10) - How do you get buy-in from organizational leaders?(12:13) - What skills have you developed to have an impact in your role?(14:06) - What do you see as the staples of being a good marketer?(17:28) - How do you structure learning environments?(21:26) - What are you seeing when it comes to attention spans in employees?(24:56) - Do you consider yourself a niche expert or a jack-of-all-trades?(31:41) - Do you have an example of using the Agile framework for building programs?(36:42) - What is a Scrum Master?(37:53) - Is part of Agile breaking the entire process down into micro-steps?(39:27) - How do you build recovery into your processes?(41:52) - What's the right way to roll out a Pilot?(45:28) - How do you test and demonstrate ROI?(48:54) - Where do you see leadership changing?(56:53) - What is the purpose of business?(58:13) - Where can people connect with you?

Motley Fool Money
Microsoft's Deal Under Investigation

Motley Fool Money

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 24:12 Very Popular


The UK's regulatory authority on competition has officially opened an investigation into Microsoft's deal to buy Activision Blizzard. (0:21) Bill Mann discusses: - Why Wall Street is shrugging off the news - What to expect when the decision is announced by September 1st - Amazon's deal to take a small stake in GrubHub - The prospect for more companies (e.g., Salesforce, Atlassian) to take stakes in smaller software companies (11:51) Deidre Woollard talks with Jacob Goldstein about his recent interview with Redfin CEO Glenn Kelman, the 3% commission model, and more. Got a question about stocks? Call the Motley Fool Money Hotline at 703-254-1445. Stocks mentioned: MSFT, ATVI, UBSFY, AMZN, JET, CRM, TEAM, RDFN, ZG Host: Chris Hill Guests: Bill Mann, Deidre Woollard, Jacob Goldstein Producer: Ricky Mulvey Engineers: Dan Boyd, Rick Engdahl