Podcasts about mit technology review

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Best podcasts about mit technology review

Latest podcast episodes about mit technology review

Impact Real Estate Investing
Cultural Commentary.

Impact Real Estate Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 44:53


Allison Arieff was lucky enough to help launch Dwell magazine, first as founding senior editor and then editor in chief. During her tenure, the Design and Architecture magazine won the National Magazine Award for General Excellence, and by that point, it had already become a ubiquitous read for an emergent design community, rekindling a design lifestyle boom for the 21st century. Since then, Allison has continued to build a storied and prominent career as a writer, author and thought leader. Prefab, her first book, explores the history and innovative potential of prefabricated housing well before prefab became a thing. Today, Allison is back where she started as the editorial director of another print magazine, MIT Technology Review. If you'd like to join me in my quest to rethink real estate, there are two simple things you can do. Share this podcast and go to RethinkRealEstateForGood.co, where you can subscribe to be the first to hear about my podcasts, blog posts and other goodies.

Casual Space
178: 20+ Years of Science from the International Space Station and more with science communicator Erin Winick Anthony!

Casual Space

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 49:23


Erin grew up in Florida watching shuttles launch and shake the windows of her house on reentry. She has always had a passion for making things, leading to her degree in mechanical engineering. Erin works at NASA's Johnson Space Center as a science communication specialist for the International Space Station at NASA's Johnson Space Center. She shares the amazing stories of research on the space station with the world through writing and social media. Today on the Casual Space Podcast, Erin shares with Beth specific examples of space station spinoffs that have benefited humanity (20+ years of science has been conducted aboard the space station) and the impact it's made for all of us back on Earth- all captured in the new book, The ISS Benefits for Humanity 2022.  AND, Beth congratulates Erin on a very prestigious, and much- deserved award for her work as a space communicator.  “Its a joy to be able to now work in the space industry as a senior science communications specialist telling the stories of International Space Station Research.”- Erin W. Anthony From the book (You're going to want to read this book) The ISS Benefits for Humanity 2022 book; It's DIGITAL, and it's FREE to download!!!!!  https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/news/benefits-2022-book The International Space Station is a modern marvel. Only 400 kilometers (250 miles) above our heads, it streaks spectacularly across the sky at 28,200 kilometers (17,500 miles) per hour, orbiting the Earth every 90 minutes. The station carries an impressive array of research facilities supporting hundreds of experiments at any given time across every major science discipline. It can host up to eight visiting vehicles and accommodate 11 crew—all while providing an amazing view featuring 16 sunrises and sunsets per day. But what is so special about an orbiting lab? What makes scientists willing to tackle the significant challenges of planning and scheduling research, designing and building hardware, and committing extraordinary time and effort to complete experiments? It's all about location. An orbiting laboratory provides researchers with the unique features of low-Earth orbit (LEO): long-duration microgravity, exposure to space, and a unique perspective on our planet. These attributes enable scientists to conduct innovative experiments that cannot be done anywhere else… Check out the latest NASA Explorers video series Erin worked on, along with friend of the show and writer Rachel Barry here; https://youtu.be/-pJcbKr7iA4 And find Erin on Twitter at: @ISS_Research More about Erin:  Erin works at NASA's Johnson Space Center as a science communication specialist for the International Space Station. She shares the amazing stories of research on the space station with the world through writing and social media.She has spearheaded strategies for sharing station science on Twitter and Instagram, including the creation of an Instagram AR filter viewed more than 10 million times, creation of some the agency's first (and most successful) Instagram Reels, and growing the @ISS_Research Twitter audience by more than 250K, to over 1 million. Erin serves as managing editor for all station science feature stories, and as well as a series producer for digital series, NASA Explorers: Microgravity (more than 11 million views) and contributor to episodes of the NASA's Curious Universe podcast.She previously worked as the space reporter for the MIT Technology Review where she launched and managed its space newsletter, The Airlock. She also covered automation as the Associate Editor of the Future of Work for the publication and helmed the its largest daily tech newsletter, The Download and Instagram strategy.Erin founded and served as CEO of Sci Chic, a company that designs and produces 3D printed jewelry inspired by science and engineering, and creates outreach programs based on the jewelry, for more than 5 years.Erin aims to show the creativity in science and engineering, and encourage everyone to appreciate and explore the STEM fields. She has written for an array of publications such as Sci Show, The Economist, Engineering.com, Lateral Magazine, Beanz, IEEE Potentials, and The New York Times, and is a course author for LinkedIn Learning (Lynda.com). She has a personal combined social media following of more than 60,000 to which she shares science in engaging new ways. You may have seen her on The Weather Channel, CBS Mission Unstoppable, or Marvel's The Unstoppable Wasp.Erin graduated with her BS in Mechanical Engineering from University of Florida in Dec. 2016. After graduating she worked as a freelance science writer and interned in London with the science and technology section of The Economist. She had four engineering internships at Bracken Engineering, Solar Turbines, John Deere, and at Keysight Technologies working on mechanical design and technical writing projects. In her free time, Erin enjoys 3D printing, sewing, hiking, STEM outreach, creating science communication content for her personal social media channels, science fashion, puzzles, dominoes, and photography.

What is California?
Episode 32: Allison Arieff

What is California?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 47:46


Allison Arieff is the editorial director of print for MIT Technology Review. I feel like all of America looks at infrastructure kind of the way a negligent homeowner looks at their house. “Yeah, the roof's kinda leaky, but we'll give it another year.” Invariably what happens is you've waited too long, your whole house floods, your insurance premiums go up, and it costs you three times as much to fix your roof–because you waited. Writ large, that, to me, is how we deal with infrastructure. We just wait and wait, people fight over it, it gets more and more expensive, something happens, and then it's an emergency, and the labor costs are more expensive. And people rush, and they make mistakes. There's no regard for it. There's no respect for how important it is. Notes and references from this episode: @allisonarieff - Allison Arieff on TwitterMIT Technology Review - home page SPUR - home page “Allison Arieff: Riverfront Q&A” - by Stu VanAirsdale, Sactown MagazineAdam Neumann's latest big idea? To become America's biggest landlord - by Lauren Aratani, The Guardian“The future of urban housing is energy-efficient refrigerators,” by Patrick Sisson, MIT Technology Review“Los Angeles Enjoys Its New Bridge a Little Too Much,” by Shawn Hubler and Soumya Karlamangla, NY Times “What Happened to the Great Urban Design Projects?”, by Allison Arieff, NY TimesThis Bridge Will Not be Gray, by Dave Eggers and Tucker Nichols“The Magic of Empty Streets,” by Allison Arieff, NY Times“Cars Are Death Machines. Self-Driving Tech Won't Change That,” by Allison Arieff, NY TimesJoan Brown retrospective - SFMOMA===== Produced, hosted and edited by Stu VanAirsdaleTheme music: Sounds SupremeTwitter: @WhatCaliforniaSubstack newsletter: whatiscalifornia.substack.comSupport What is California? on Patreon: patreon.com/whatiscalifornia  Email: hello@whatiscalifornia.comPlease subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. And if you liked What is California?, please rate and review What is California? on Apple Podcasts! It helps new listeners find the show.

That's Cool News | A weekly breakdown of positive Science & Tech news.
124. Hearing Mars Meteoroid Impacts, 3D Printing Swarm Drones, 3D Printing Wooden Objects

That's Cool News | A weekly breakdown of positive Science & Tech news.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 23:13


Show Notes: InSight hears meteoroid impacts on Mars | EarthSky (01:15) Since 2018, NASA's InSight lander has been busy studying the interior of Mars detecting  over 1,300 marsquakes NASA announced on September 19, 2022, that, for the first time, InSight has heard the impacts of four meteoroids as they crashed into the Martian surface. Detected the vibrations from the impacts in 2020 and 2021. The impacts produced small marsquakes, up to a magnitude of 2.0.  This is the first time that InSight – or any Mars lander or rover – has ever detected the seismic waves from a meteoroid impact. The four impacts occurred between 53 and 180 miles from InSight's location in Elysium Planitia.  Elysium Planitia, a flat-smooth plain just north of the equator making it a great location to study the Martian interior.  NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter took images of the impact sites from orbit.  Appeared as dark spots in the orbiter's black-and-white Context Camera.  The seismic waves generated by the impacts can give scientists clues about both the impacting rocks and the Martian subsurface. Additionally, scientists can use impact craters to determine the age of the surface. More craters = Older the surface is By using both InSight's data and orbital images of the impact craters, researchers can determine the meteoroid's trajectory and size of its shock wave (seismic wave).  7,000-year-old structure near Prague is older than Stonehenge, Egyptian pyramids | Live Science (05:27) Archaeologists digging near Prague have discovered the remains of a Stone Age structure that's older than Stonehenge and even the Egyptian pyramids: an enigmatic complex known as a roundel.  7,000 years ago during the late Neolithic, or New Stone Age Viewed from above, roundels consist of one or more wide, circular ditches with several gaps that functioned as entrances.  "Roundels are the oldest evidence of architecture in the whole of Europe," according to Jaroslav Řídký, a spokesperson for the Institute of Archaeology of the Czech Academy of Sciences (IAP). Radio Prague International reported, the excavated roundel is large — about 180 feet (55 meters) in diameter, or about as long as the Leaning Tower of Pisa is tall Clear that this was part of the Stroked Pottery culture, which flourished between 4900 B.C. and 4400 B.C.  Located in the Bohemian region of the Czech Republic Many farming villages found near the intersection of contemporary Poland, eastern Germany and the northern Czech Republic  Carbon-dating organic remains from this roundel excavation could help the team pinpoint the date of the structure's construction and possibly link it with a Neolithic settlement discovered nearby. Watch this team of drones 3D-print a tower | MIT Technology Review (09:03) A mini-swarm's worth of drones have been trained to work together to 3D-print some simple towers. Could, one day, help with challenging projects such as post-disaster construction or even repairs on buildings that are too high to access safely. The process has multiple drones work together to build from a single blueprint, with one essentially checking the others' work as it goes. Inspired by the way bees or wasps construct large nests To demonstrate the drones' capabilities, the researchers got them to use foam and a special lightweight form of cement to build structures with heights ranging from 0.18 meters to 2.05 meters.  The technique is limited for now because drones struggle to carry heavy loads, need regular charging, and still require human supervision. The researchers are hoping to alleviate some of these issues by automating the charging of drones during projects World's largest geothermal lagoon planned for Canada | New Atlas (14:12) A project, called geoLagon, is underway in Canada for a magnificent new open air lagoon in Canada that will be kept at balmy temperatures year round through a “huge Thermos” heating system underneath.  Designed to be the largest of its type in the world Modeled on the famous geothermal lagoons of Iceland, the geoLagon is designed as an open-air attraction for visitors to relax and soak up the surroundings. To be built in Charlevoix, Quebec,  span some 12,000 square meters (130,000 sq ft)  warmed to a pleasant 39 °C (102 °F) all year It will be heated through an energy ecosystem consisting of geothermal, biomass, photovoltaics and solar heating systems, along with a thermal reservoir beneath the lagoon's base to store heat. Clusters of chalets will surround the lagoon once the project is completed, capturing solar energy with photovoltaic cladding to help run the heat pumps for the water. CEO Louis Massicotte says that further optimizations and technologies like sewer heat recovery could see the geoLagon village even become an energy provider, but is positive that the project will at the very least be able to sustain itself without drawing power from the grid. The project is planned in three stages, beginning with the construction of 150 solar-powered cottages, followed by the lagoon as the second stage and then the remaining 150 chalets thereafter. Expected to get underway in March and should take around 18 months. Israeli researchers managed to produce 3D printer ink to make wooden objects | Interesting Engineering (18:29) This Wood Ink is made from a mixture of wood flour and plant extracts. Doron Kam, a Ph.D. student working on the project, and colleagues developed this technology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The technology converts organic "wood derivatives" into a paste that is then used as ink by a 3D printer.  The scientists have so far used 3D printing to construct saddle, dome, and helix-shaped models out of their wood-infused ink. They think it might be used to make more sophisticated self-assembling products like furniture. What is the plan for this material, according to Doron Kam: “We are trying to make a material that won't last forever, that's what plastic is for. We are not looking for that … Three or four years of use, and then you can grind it down and print it again. This is sustainability in our product, this is our principle.” 

That's Cool News | A weekly breakdown of positive Science & Tech news.
122. Better Concussion Detection, Restoring Memories With Prosthesis, AI and Epilepsy

That's Cool News | A weekly breakdown of positive Science & Tech news.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 32:43


Shows Notes: Neck-worn "bandage" sensors could better warn of concussions | New Atlas (01:09) One of the dangerous things about sports-related concussions is the fact that athletes may not realize they have one.A new sensor could let them (or their coaches) know. It would go on their neck, not their head. Helmet-integrated sensors, which have been developed, detect the type of impacts associated with concussions; such devices aren't necessarily 100-percent reliable.  Because a lot of concussions are associated with their head rapidly moving whiplash-style to one side, researchers at Michigan State University developed a thin-film adhesive-patch sensor that could detect the telltale neck movements. Size of a small bandage prototype device is only about 0.1 mm thick Piezoelectric material that produces an electrical charge when stretched or compressed. Once the material is charged due to the movement of the material, the data is sent to a computer, which will analyze it to determine if a concussion-grade impact occurred. While executing tests with this prototype, they found it performed as well as the helmet-integrated accelerometers at detecting concussion causing impacts, BUT they found the neck-bandage wouldn't produce false readings. The researchers are looking into ways of streamlining the design of the patch, such as equipping it with a transmitter that would wirelessly relay data to a nearby computer or mobile device.   Cancer trial amazingly results in 100% remission in every patient | Brighter Side News (07:41) Immunotherapy harnesses the body's own immune system as an ally against cancer. The  Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center was investigating — for the first time ever — if immunotherapy alone could beat rectal cancer that had not spread to other tissues Sascha Roth, a 6-month participant in the clinical trial, found out, “a team of doctors examined my tests … And since they couldn't find any signs of cancer, Dr. Cercek said there was no reason to make me endure radiation therapy.” These same remarkable results would be repeated for all 14 people — and counting — in the MSK clinical trial for rectal cancer with a particular mutation. The rectal cancer disappeared after immunotherapy — without the need for the standard treatments of radiation, surgery, or chemotherapy  the cancer has not returned in any of the patients Dr. Cercek talks on this rewarding experience:“It's incredibly rewarding … to get these happy tears and happy emails from the patients in this study who finish treatment and realize, ‘Oh my God, I get to keep all my normal body functions that I feared I might lose to radiation or surgery.' ” The research team went out to figure out precisely which patients benefit most from immunotherapy, so they can receive it right away. Patients who have tumors with a specific genetic makeup known as mismatch repair-deficient (MMRd) or microsatellite instability (MSI). Between 5% and 10% of all rectal cancer patients are thought to have MMRd tumors. 45,000 Americans are diagnosed a year with rectal cancer. Dr. Diaz talks on the mutation and treatment:“An MMRd tumor develops a defect in its ability to repair certain types of mutations that occur in cells. When those mutations accumulate in the tumor, they stimulate the immune system, which attacks the mutation-ridden cancer cells.” An immunotherapy agent called a checkpoint inhibitor releases the brakes on an immune cell, freeing it to recognize and attack cancer cells. The patients were given the checkpoint inhibitor dostarlimab (Jemperli) intravenously every three weeks, for six months. Another amazing thing is removing the toxicity of chemotherapy, which Dr. Cercek mentions:“The most exciting part of this is that every single one of our patients has only needed immunotherapy. We haven't radiated anybody, and we haven't put anybody through surgery … They have preserved normal bowel function, bladder function, sexual function, fertility. Women have their uterus and ovaries. It's remarkable.” A memory prosthesis could restore memory in people with damaged brains | MIT Technology Review (15:09) A unique form of brain stimulation appears to boost people's ability to remember new information—by mimicking the way our brains create memories.  Given the term: memory prosthesis It involves inserting an electrode deep into the brain, and it seems to work in people with memory disorders.Copies what happens in the hippocampus Effective in people who had poor memory to begin with The researchers, at University of Southern California, think future devices like this one could  help people with memory loss due to brain injuries or as a result of aging or degenerative diseases like Alzheimer's. The hippocampus that it is mimicking helps us form short-term memories but also appears to direct memories to other regions for long-term storage. The researchers' overall idea is to use brain electrodes to understand the electrical patterns of activity that occur when memories are encoded.Then use those same electrodes to fire similar patterns of activity. The team has tested versions of this prosthesis in animals and in some human volunteers with epilepsy who already had electrodes implanted in their brains.  Two versions:Memory decoding model (MDM), mimics patterns of electrical activity across the hippocampus that occur naturally when each volunteer successfully forms memories. Multi-input, multi-output (or MIMO), more closely mimics how the hippocampus works by learning the patterns of electrical inputs and outputs that correspond with memory encoding, and then mimicking them. The research team saw memory test improvements ranging from 11% to 54% for the MDM prosthetics. The MIMO model had even better results, on average. The biggest improvements were seen in people who had the worst memory performance at the start of the experiment. The researchers hope that their memory prosthesis could one day be widely used to restore memory in people with memory disorders.   Team Says It Assembled the Most Complex Synthetic Microbiome | GenEngNews (20:15) Scientists at Stanford University report that they have built the most complex and well-defined synthetic microbiome, creating a community of over 100 bacterial species that was successfully transplanted into mice. The ability to add, remove, and edit individual species will allow scientists to better understand the links between the microbiome and health.Additionally, this could lead to developing first-in-class microbiome therapies. Each cell in the microbiome occupies a specific functional niche, performing reactions that break down and build up molecules.   To build a microbiome: Was remarkably stable, with 98% of the constituent species colonizing the gut of these germ-free mice. Ensure that the final mixture is stable, meaning maintains a balance without any single species overpowering the rest. Needs to be functional, performing all the actions of a complete, natural microbiome. They selected over 100 bacterial strains that were present in at least 20% of the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) individuals. They grew in individual stocks and then mixed into one combined culture to make what they call human community one, or hCom1. They found over 20 new bacterial species that inserted themselves in at least two of their three fecal transplant studies.Adding those to their initial community and removing those that failed to take root in mouse guts gave them a new community of 119 strains, dubbed hCom2.  Why is this important?The researchers believe that hCom2, or future versions of it, will enable similar reductionist studies that reveal the bacterial agents involved in other areas, like immunotherapy responses. New AI Algorithm Could Lead to an Epilepsy Cure | SciTechDaily (26:00) Researchers working under the direction of University College London have created an artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm that can identify subtle brain abnormalities that cause epileptic seizures.Multicentre Epilepsy Lesion Detection (MELD) Analyzed more than 1,000 patient MRI images from 22 international epilepsy centers. Focal cortical dysplasia are brain regions that have developed abnormally and often cause drug-resistant epilepsy.Finding the lesions on an MRI is an ongoing problem for physicians since MRI scans for FCDs can appear normal. The scientists utilized about 300,000 locations throughout the brain to develop the algorithm, which measured cortical features using MRI scans.How thick or folded the cortex/brain surface was. Then professional radiologists classified MRI examples as either having FCD or having a healthy brain, which served as the algorithm's training data. According to the results, the algorithm was successful in identifying the FCD in 67% of cases in the cohort (538 participants). The MELD algorithm was able to detect FCD in 63% of instances where professional radiologists did not detect the existing abnormality. Co-senior author, Dr. Konrad Wagstyl stated:“This algorithm could help to find more of these hidden lesions in children and adults with epilepsy, and enable more patients with epilepsy to be considered for brain surgery that could cure epilepsy and improve their cognitive development. Roughly 440 children per year could benefit from epilepsy surgery in England.” The MELD FCD classifier tool can be run on any patient with a suspicion of having an FCD who is over the age of 3 years and has an MRI scan.

MLOps.community
Bringing DevOps Agility to ML// Luis Ceze // Coffee Sessions #121

MLOps.community

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 64:35


MLOps Coffee Sessions #121 with Luis Ceze, CEO and Co-founder of OctoML, Bringing DevOps Agility to ML co-hosted by Mihail Eric. // Abstract There's something about this idea where people see a future where you don't need to think about infrastructure. You should just be able to do what you do and infrastructure happens. People understand that there is a lot of complexity underneath the hood and most data scientists or machine learning engineers start deploying things and shouldn't have to worry about the most efficient way of doing this. // Bio Luis Ceze is Co-Founder and CEO of OctoML, which enables businesses to seamlessly deploy ML models to production making the most out of the hardware. OctoML is backed by Tiger Global, Addition, Amplify Partners, and Madrona Venture Group. Ceze is the Lazowska Professor in the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington, where he has taught for 15 years. Luis co-directs the Systems and Architectures for Machine Learning lab (sampl.ai), which co-authored Apache TVM, a leading open-source ML stack for performance and portability that is used in widely deployed AI applications. Luis is also co-director of the Molecular Information Systems Lab (misl.bio), which led pioneering research in the intersection of computing and biology for IT applications such as DNA data storage. His research has been featured prominently in the media including New York Times, Popular Science, MIT Technology Review, and the Wall Street Journal. Ceze is a Venture Partner at Madrona Venture Group and leads their technical advisory board. // MLOps Jobs board https://mlops.pallet.xyz/jobs MLOps Swag/Merch https://mlops-community.myshopify.com/ // Related Links Landing page: https://octoml.ai/ The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics by Daniel James Brown: https://www.amazon.com/Boys-Boat-Americans-Berlin-Olympics/dp/0143125478 --------------- ✌️Connect With Us ✌️ ------------- Join our slack community: https://go.mlops.community/slack Follow us on Twitter: @mlopscommunity Sign up for the next meetup: https://go.mlops.community/register Catch all episodes, blogs, newsletters, and more: https://mlops.community/ Connect with Demetrios on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dpbrinkm/ Connect with Mihail on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mihaileric/ Connect with Luis on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/luis-ceze-50b2314/ Timestamps: [00:00] Introduction to Luis Ceze [06:28] MLOps does not exist [10:41] Semantics argument [16:25] Parallel programming standpoint [18:09] TVM [22:51] Optimizations [24:18] TVM in the ecosystem [27:10] OctoML's further step [30:42] Value chain [33:58] Mature players [35:48] Talking to SRE's and Machine Learning Engineers [36:32] Building OctoML [40:20] My Octopus Teacher [42:15] Environmental effects of Sustainable Machine Learning [44:50] Bridging the gap from OctoML to biological mechanisms [50:02] Programmability [57:13] Academia making the impact [59:40] Rapid fire questions [1:03:39] Wrap up

Science Friday
New COVID Vaccines, “Nope” Creature, NJ Toxic Site, Germicidal Coating. Sep 2, 2022, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 47:21 Very Popular


New, Extra Protective COVID Vaccines Are On The Way Earlier this week, the FDA approved brand new COVID-19 vaccines from both Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech that are designed to better protect people from the BA.4 and BA.5 omicron subvariants. At the same time, the U.S. is scaling back free testing and precautionary measures, putting more pressure on vaccines. Casey Crownhart, a climate and technology reporter at MIT Technology Review, joins Ira to talk about COVID updates and other science news of the week. They also discuss how the U.S. is bracing for a record-breaking heatwave, the devastating floods in Pakistan, how the city of Jackson, MI ended up without running water, why Greenland's “zombie ice” is causing concern, a massive investment in solar power, and a clue as to how the Ancient Egyptians built the pyramids of Giza.   New Jersey's Lenape Nation Fights Ford's Toxic Legacy The Turtle Clan of the Ramapough Lenape Nation has lived in the wooded hills around Ringwood for centuries, enduring the impacts of European settlement and the building up of America. But the toxic waste that now surrounds the Passaic County community is from an invasion of an entirely different kind. And it wasn't long before residents started getting sick. When the federal government created the National Priorities List, better known as Superfund, in 1980, abandoned iron mines in Ringwood were among the first sites to be listed; they made the list in 1983. Between 1965 and 1974, the Ford Motor Company dumped hundreds of thousands of gallons of paint sludge, solvents and other waste into the mines scattered throughout the Turtle Clan's homeland. By then, the southern portion of the site had been sold off by Ford to the Ringwood Solid Waste Management Authority, which went on dumping more waste onto and into the already toxic land. Arsenic and lead, benzene and 1,4-dioxane leached into groundwater. Kids played among slabs of hardened paint sludge. Adults scavenged the dump sites for copper and other valuable metals. Read the rest at sciencefriday.com. Coming Soon: A Germ-Killing Countertop? From restaurant tables to office door knobs, not to mention anything inside a hospital, the world is full of surfaces that need sanitizing, lest someone catch a surface-borne viral or bacterial infection like the flu or MRSA. The typical solution involves sanitizing those surfaces with sprays and fluid cleaners. Or, sometimes, using materials that are hostile to microbes, such as silver or copper. But a team of engineers at the University of Michigan has another solution in mind: a spray-on coating that combines the stabilizing power of polyurethane with the well-documented germicidal qualities of essential oils such as cinnamon, tea tree, and lemon. As the team reports in the journal Matter this week, their coating seems to kill pathogens like SARS-CoV2, MRSA and E. coli within minutes—and lasts for months before it must be refreshed. Research co-author Anish Tuteja joins Ira to talk about the innovation, and how he thinks it might be useful.   The Surprising Animal Science Behind Jordan Peele's ‘Nope' One of the summer's biggest blockbusters has been the alien horror film “Nope,” from director Jordan Peele. “Nope” has elements of many classic UFO films, with the Spielbergian charm of “Close Encounters of the Third Kind,” and the horror and destruction from “The War of the Worlds.” For the spoiler-averse, this is your warning to turn back now. The big twist in “Nope” that differentiates it from other alien films is that it isn't a UFO hanging out in the skies above our main characters. The saucer-shaped figure is the alien itself. Writer and director Jordan Peele attributes much of the inspiration for the alien as coming from sea creatures. He enlisted the help of scientific consultants including marine biologist Kelsi Rutledge to help bring the creature, known in the film as Jean Jacket, to life. She even gave it a scientific name: Occulonimbus edoequus, meaning “hidden dark cloud stallion eater.” Kelsi, who is a PhD candidate at UCLA in Los Angeles, California, talks to Ira about the ingredients that went into creating a new creature to scare audiences.   Transcripts for each segment will be available the week after the show airs on sciencefriday.com.

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
Tech News Weekly 250: Cable vs. 5G: Internet Showdown

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 70:32 Very Popular


Jared Newman from Fast Company talks about some big changes coming to traditional cable internet companies and why 5G is causing these changes. Tate Ryan-Mosley of MIT Technology Review discusses beauty filters and the bans these filters are facing online.  Jason talks about an AI-generated artwork that won first place at a state fair and what this means for artists overall. Mikah got access to Google's AI Test Kitchen and demos the service on the show. Hosts: Jason Howell and Mikah Sargent Guests: Jared Newman and Tate Ryan-Mosley Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/tech-news-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit

Tech News Weekly (Video HD)
TNW 250: Cable vs. 5G: Internet Showdown - "Instagram Face", AI Artwork, AI Test Kitchen

Tech News Weekly (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 70:49 Very Popular


Jared Newman from Fast Company talks about some big changes coming to traditional cable internet companies and why 5G is causing these changes. Tate Ryan-Mosley of MIT Technology Review discusses beauty filters and the bans these filters are facing online.  Jason talks about an AI-generated artwork that won first place at a state fair and what this means for artists overall. Mikah got access to Google's AI Test Kitchen and demos the service on the show. Hosts: Jason Howell and Mikah Sargent Guests: Jared Newman and Tate Ryan-Mosley Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/tech-news-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit

Tech News Weekly (MP3)
TNW 250: Cable vs. 5G: Internet Showdown - "Instagram Face", AI Artwork, AI Test Kitchen

Tech News Weekly (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 70:32 Very Popular


Jared Newman from Fast Company talks about some big changes coming to traditional cable internet companies and why 5G is causing these changes. Tate Ryan-Mosley of MIT Technology Review discusses beauty filters and the bans these filters are facing online.  Jason talks about an AI-generated artwork that won first place at a state fair and what this means for artists overall. Mikah got access to Google's AI Test Kitchen and demos the service on the show. Hosts: Jason Howell and Mikah Sargent Guests: Jared Newman and Tate Ryan-Mosley Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/tech-news-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit

Total Jason (Video)
Tech News Weekly 250: Cable vs. 5G: Internet Showdown

Total Jason (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 70:49


Jared Newman from Fast Company talks about some big changes coming to traditional cable internet companies and why 5G is causing these changes. Tate Ryan-Mosley of MIT Technology Review discusses beauty filters and the bans these filters are facing online.  Jason talks about an AI-generated artwork that won first place at a state fair and what this means for artists overall. Mikah got access to Google's AI Test Kitchen and demos the service on the show. Hosts: Jason Howell and Mikah Sargent Guests: Jared Newman and Tate Ryan-Mosley Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/tech-news-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: expressvpn.com/tnw infrascale.com/TWIT itpro.tv/tnw promo code TNW30

Total Jason (Audio)
Tech News Weekly 250: Cable vs. 5G: Internet Showdown

Total Jason (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 70:32


Jared Newman from Fast Company talks about some big changes coming to traditional cable internet companies and why 5G is causing these changes. Tate Ryan-Mosley of MIT Technology Review discusses beauty filters and the bans these filters are facing online.  Jason talks about an AI-generated artwork that won first place at a state fair and what this means for artists overall. Mikah got access to Google's AI Test Kitchen and demos the service on the show. Hosts: Jason Howell and Mikah Sargent Guests: Jared Newman and Tate Ryan-Mosley Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/tech-news-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: expressvpn.com/tnw infrascale.com/TWIT itpro.tv/tnw promo code TNW30

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
Tech News Weekly 250: Cable vs. 5G: Internet Showdown

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 70:49


Jared Newman from Fast Company talks about some big changes coming to traditional cable internet companies and why 5G is causing these changes. Tate Ryan-Mosley of MIT Technology Review discusses beauty filters and the bans these filters are facing online.  Jason talks about an AI-generated artwork that won first place at a state fair and what this means for artists overall. Mikah got access to Google's AI Test Kitchen and demos the service on the show. Hosts: Jason Howell and Mikah Sargent Guests: Jared Newman and Tate Ryan-Mosley Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/tech-news-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit

Total Mikah (Audio)
Tech News Weekly 250: Cable vs. 5G: Internet Showdown

Total Mikah (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 70:32


Jared Newman from Fast Company talks about some big changes coming to traditional cable internet companies and why 5G is causing these changes. Tate Ryan-Mosley of MIT Technology Review discusses beauty filters and the bans these filters are facing online.  Jason talks about an AI-generated artwork that won first place at a state fair and what this means for artists overall. Mikah got access to Google's AI Test Kitchen and demos the service on the show. Hosts: Jason Howell and Mikah Sargent Guests: Jared Newman and Tate Ryan-Mosley Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/tech-news-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: expressvpn.com/tnw infrascale.com/TWIT itpro.tv/tnw promo code TNW30

Tech News Weekly (Video LO)
TNW 250: Cable vs. 5G: Internet Showdown - "Instagram Face", AI Artwork, AI Test Kitchen

Tech News Weekly (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 70:49


Jared Newman from Fast Company talks about some big changes coming to traditional cable internet companies and why 5G is causing these changes. Tate Ryan-Mosley of MIT Technology Review discusses beauty filters and the bans these filters are facing online.  Jason talks about an AI-generated artwork that won first place at a state fair and what this means for artists overall. Mikah got access to Google's AI Test Kitchen and demos the service on the show. Hosts: Jason Howell and Mikah Sargent Guests: Jared Newman and Tate Ryan-Mosley Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/tech-news-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit

Tech News Weekly (Video HI)
TNW 250: Cable vs. 5G: Internet Showdown - "Instagram Face", AI Artwork, AI Test Kitchen

Tech News Weekly (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 70:49


Jared Newman from Fast Company talks about some big changes coming to traditional cable internet companies and why 5G is causing these changes. Tate Ryan-Mosley of MIT Technology Review discusses beauty filters and the bans these filters are facing online.  Jason talks about an AI-generated artwork that won first place at a state fair and what this means for artists overall. Mikah got access to Google's AI Test Kitchen and demos the service on the show. Hosts: Jason Howell and Mikah Sargent Guests: Jared Newman and Tate Ryan-Mosley Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/tech-news-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit

Total Mikah (Video)
Tech News Weekly 250: Cable vs. 5G: Internet Showdown

Total Mikah (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 70:49


Jared Newman from Fast Company talks about some big changes coming to traditional cable internet companies and why 5G is causing these changes. Tate Ryan-Mosley of MIT Technology Review discusses beauty filters and the bans these filters are facing online.  Jason talks about an AI-generated artwork that won first place at a state fair and what this means for artists overall. Mikah got access to Google's AI Test Kitchen and demos the service on the show. Hosts: Jason Howell and Mikah Sargent Guests: Jared Newman and Tate Ryan-Mosley Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/tech-news-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: expressvpn.com/tnw infrascale.com/TWIT itpro.tv/tnw promo code TNW30

Zukunft Denken – Podcast
061 — Digitaler Humanismus, ein Gespräch mit Erich Prem

Zukunft Denken – Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 68:04


Meinen heutigen Gast habe ich ebenfalls schon länger auf meiner Wunschliste und es hat mich gefreut, dass er auch sofort zugesagt hat! Erich Prem ist nicht nur Vertreter des "digitalen Humanismus" (DH) — das Thema der heutigen Episode — sondern ein breit gebildeter, interdisziplinärer Denker, wie in dieser Episode deutlich werden wird. Er ist in seiner Erstausbildung Computerwissenschafter, der sich mit künstlicher Intelligenz beschäftigt. Er hat am ÖFAI in Wien am sogenannten Symbol Grounding Problem gearbeitet und am MIT in den USA an verhaltensbasierter Robotik. Er leitet seit über zwei Jahrzehnte ein strategisches Technologieberatungsunternehmen, Eutema, in Wien, das neben der EU Kommission auch Ministerien und Universitäten berät.  Er beschäftigt sich als Philosoph — seiner Zweitausbildung — mit komplizierten Fragen an der Schnittstelle von Ethik, Digitalisierung und Technologiepolitik.  Neben vielen anderen Publikationen ist er Mitherausgeber des jüngst erschienen Buches »Perspectives of digital humanism«. Er unterrichtet Digitalen Humanismus an der TU-Wien und Datenethik an der Universität Wien. In dieser Episode beginnen wir mit der Frage, wie unsere tägliche interaktion mit digitalen Geräten tatsächlich aussieht und wie wir uns das eigentlich wünschen würden. Wie verändert sich die Arbeitswelt? Wie gehen junge Menschen mit digitalen sozialen Räumen um? Welche Rolle spielen digitale Technologien im geopolitischen und ökonomischen Sinne auch für Europa? Denken wir an Überwachung, langfristige Absicherung wesentlicher Technolgien. Dann setzen wir uns mit dem relativ neuen Begriff des »digitalen Humanismus« etwas konkrete auseinander: Was ist Humanismus? Was ist die Rolle des Menschen, vom Menschenbild des alten Griechenlands über klassische Bildungsideale zur heutigen Zeit. Spielt Humanismus heute überhaupt noch eine Rolle und sollte er eine Rolle spielen? Was ist nun der DH und warum braucht es diesen neuen Begriff? Die Kritik von Adorno und Horkheimer am Humanismus wird im DH aufgenommen und Freiheit, Menschenrechte — liberale, westliche Werte verankert, bei einigen Vertretern ist auch eine starke Kapitalismuskritik zu finden, sowie Hinweis zum Überwachungskapitalismus. Allerdings betont Erich, dass das Individuum nicht alleine im Zentrum stehen darf, sondern sich immer in Reflexion mit der Gesellschaft befindet. Denn digitale Technologien sind auch Machtinstrument und bedürfen politischer und gesellschaftspolitischer Debatte um die Frage zu beantworten: wer formt »das Digitale« eigentlich, wem nutzt es? Dann diskutieren wir die unterschiedliche Wahrnehmung digitaler Technologien zwischen Kulturen und Nationen, etwa am Beispiel des Techniums von Kevin Kelly, europäischer Philosophie und der Globalisierung, sowie der Frage, woher eigentlich das Design von Technik stammt: top down, bottom up oder gar ungesteuert? Eine Besonderheit des DH, auch als Abgrenzung anderer wissenschaftlicher Strömungen wie etwa der Technikfolgenabschätzung ist, dass DH von Informatikern geprägt ist, mit dem Anspruch, die Folgen der eigenen Technologie besser zu bestimmen. Dies geschieht nicht Technologie-feindlich, sondern in der Erkenntnis, dass wir uns in Frühzeit der Digitalisierung befinden, die in vielen Bereichen schlicht noch nicht gut genug ist, beziehungsweise falsche Wege eingeschlagen hat. Der DH nimmt also an, dass es kein Schicksal ist sondern nach gesellschaftlichen Vorstellungen Technik gestaltbar ist. Ich stelle dann die Frage, ob wir nicht teilweise auf Medien-Hypes hereinfallen und die Bedrohungen möglicherweise gar nicht so groß sind. Als Stichworte könnte man nennen: Social Score in China, Google Flue Trends oder Covid AI, und unterscheiden sich die rechtlichen Prinzipien in der analogen Welt wirklich so stark von der digialten, wie manchmal behauptet wird? Auch wenn es hier und da Übertreibungen gibt, so erkennen wir doch zahlreiche Folgen der Digitalisierung, die sich mit dem Bild, den digitale Humanisten haben, nicht zur Deckung bringen lässt. Darf eine Person etwa auf ihre beobachtbaren Effekte reduziert werden — vor allem von der Vergangenheit in die Zukunft mit vielleicht anderen Kontexten? Wie sieht es mit dem Filtern und der Moderation von Inhalten auf Plattformen aus? Oder, was ist schlimmer: gute oder schlechte »künstliche Intelligenz«? Einen Kritikpunkt des DH spreche ich noch an, nämlich die Frage des Anthtropozentrismus? Fokussiert sich der DH zu stark auf den Menschen? Was ist mit Nachhaltigkeit und anderen systemischen Fragen? Zuletzt grenzen wir noch den Digitalen Humanismus vom ähnlich klingenden Begriff der Digital Humanities ab und, was wesentlicher ist, stellen die Frage, was unter Digitaler Souveränität zu verstehen ist: ist Souveränität das gleiche wie Autarkie? Was haben wir in Europa in dieser Hinsicht in den letzten Jahren übersehen, wie sollten wir politisch reagieren? Referenzen Andere Episoden Episode 4 und Episode 5: »Was will Technologie«, wo ich genauer auf die Ideen von Kevin Kelly eingehe, die wir im Gespräch erwähnen Episode 28 mit Prof. Jochen Hörisch zur Idee und aktueller Situation der Universität Episode 24 mit Peter Purgathofer: Hangover: Was wir vom Internet erwartet und was wir bekommen haben  Episode 30 mit Tim Prilove über Techno-Optimismus Erich Prem Homepage von Erich eutema ÖFAI Technikphilosophie der Uni-Wien fachliche Referenzen Manifest zum digitalen Humanismus Hannes Werthner, Erich Prem, Edward A. Lee, Carlo Ghezzi, Perspectives on Digital Humanism, Springer (2022) Erich Prem, A brave new world of mediated online discourse, Communications of the ACM (Feb. 2022) Shoshanna Zuboff, Das Zeitalter des Überwachungskapitalismus, campus (2018) Kevin Kelly, What Technology Wants, Penguin (2011) Edware Lee, The Coevolution, MIT Press (2020) Social Score China: Spectator Podcast, Chinese Whispers: Mythbusting the social credit system (2022) Why Google Flu is a Failure, Forbes (2014) What we can learn from the epic failure of Google Flu Trends, Wired (2015) Hundreds of AI tools have been built to catch covid. None of them helped. | MIT Technology Review (2021) Jonathan Haidt, Why the Past 10 Years of American Life Have Been Uniquely Stupid, The Atlantic (2022) Coleman Hughes on The Death Of Conversation with Jonathan Haidt (2022) Cathy O'Neill, Weapons of Math Destruction, Crown (2016) David Edgerton, The Shock of the Old (2019)

What is California?
Season 3 Trailer

What is California?

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 3:55


Greetings from What is California? HQ, where I'm excited to share with you the trailer for Season 3 of your favorite podcast about the Golden State.This season promises to be an enlightening, amusing, challenging, and all-around compelling set of conversations with notable Californians in our ongoing quest to understand this crazy, fascinating place. I'm thrilled about this season's guest lineup to date, which includes some of our state's most intriguing voices weighing in with their unique, thought-provoking perspectives about California.You can look forward to hearing from (in alphabetical order)…Allison Arieff, the editorial director for print of MIT Technology Review and one of our foremost thinkers about urban designAnita Chabria, the California columnist at the Los Angeles TimesAlicia Garza, the principal at Black Futures Lab and co-creator of #blacklivesmatterFranklin Leonard, the creator of the influential Hollywood industry website The Black ListGreg Lucas, the California State LibrarianZeke Lunder, the creator of the California fire-tracking resource The LookoutEllen Pao, the former CEO of Reddit and current co-founder of the tech-industry nonprofit Project IncludeMiyoko Schinner, the vegan food impresario behind Miyoko's Creamery and the Marin County farm sanctuary Rancho CompasiónDr. Garen Wintemute, a UC Davis Medical Center epidemiologist who is one of the nation's preeminent researchers of firearm violence…among other excellent guests currently in the works.Look forward to our annual Year in Review episode in December as well, when our blue-ribbon panel of experts will look back on the ups and downs of 2022 and the challenges and opportunities awaiting California in 2023.Spread the word and save the date for Sept. 6! I'm so pleased to be back with you.Keep your eye on the bear!

Building Better Worlds
Lucia Gallardo manifesting new enterprises out of a suitcase.`

Building Better Worlds

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 33:00


Lucia Gallardo is a digital nomad who is joyfully living out of her suitcase while building companies out of her love for experimentation. Her significant and multiple accomplishments as a serial entrepreneur follow her around the world. Lucia is a Future of Goods 21 Founders to Watch, one of MIT Technology Review's 2020 Innovators under 35 for her work with Blockchain, and she is a Royal Bank of Canada's Entrepreneur of the Year nominee. Lucia is the Founder and CEO of Emerge, an end-to-end solutions development lab that has consistently merged public and private sectors in projects related to digital identification for displaced persons, food traceability, financial inclusion for inconsistent income earners, rainforest protection, loyalty rewards programs, and more. Emerge has been nominated for the 2018 Global SDG Awards and Newsweek's 2019 Blockchain Impact Awards. Lucía's impact on social causes is advanced through her board activities with: Penta Network, a company building foundational blockchain infrastructure; Crypto Kids Camp, a non-profit organization that connects kids from lower income households to emerging technologies; Rainforest Partnership, a non-profit organization promoting the protection of the world's tropical rainforests; the Caribbean Blockchain Alliance, a regional organization promoting the adoption of decentralized technologies across the region; and, WE Global Studio, an innovation studio supporting the world's female entrepreneurs. Lucía is an Advisor to Metis, a Layer 2 solution focused on the decentralized future of work. Prior to starting Emerge, Lucia co-founded Dona un Libro, Cambia una Mente, a Honduran education focused non-profit and 2016 recipient of President Obama's Young Leaders of the Americas Fellowship. Lucia has past experience in both the public and private sectors, ranging from immigration and trade relations on diplomatic missions to AI-enabled mobile tech and early-stage investments. Lucia is a 2017 Venture for Canada Fellow, a 2018 RBC Future Launch Fellow, a 2018 Money 20/20 Rise Up Fellow, and a certified UN SDG Advocate. She was listed as one of MIT Technology Review's Innovators under 35 and a Royal Bank of Canada's 2019 Women of Influence. # About Better Worlds Better Worlds is a communication and community building platform comprised of weekly podcasts, engaging international conferences and hack-a-thons to encourage and support the development of Web3 solutions. Our programs celebrate voices from every continent to forge a shared and abundant future.

In Machines We Trust
EmTech Digital: How to craft effective AI policy

In Machines We Trust

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 20:08 Very Popular


A conversation about equity and what it takes to make effective AI policy taped before a live audience at MIT Technology Review's annual AI conference, EmTech Digital. We Meet: Nicol Turner Lee, director of the Center for Technology at the Brookings Institution Anthony Green, producer of the In Machines We Trust podcast Credits: This episode was created by Jennifer Strong, Anthony Green, Erin Underwood and Emma Cillekens. It was edited by Michael Reilly, directed by Laird Nolan and mixed by Garret Lang. Episode art by Stephanie Arnett. Cover art by Eric Mongeon. Special thanks this week to Amy Lammers and Brian Bryson.

Disrupted
Consumerism and inequality are shaping our relationship with technology

Disrupted

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 49:00


This week on Disrupted, we look at how technology influences us and how we influence technology. We speak with journalist Karen Hao about the ways artificial intelligence is mirroring historical European colonial practices. Policy expert Dr. Nicol Turner Lee joins us to talk about the state of digital privacy in post-Roe America. And, PC Mag's Sascha Segan talks about what the T-Mobile/Sprint merger means for consumers.  GUESTS: Karen Hao: China Tech Reporter for the Wall Street Journal and the former Senior AI Editor at MIT Technology Review. Dr. Nicol Turner Lee: Senior Fellow in Governance Studies and the Director of the Center for Technology Innovation at the Brookings Institution. She's author of the new book Digitally Invisible: How the Internet is Creating the New Underclass. Sascha Segan: Lead Mobile Analyst at PC Mag This program was produced by James Szkobel-Wolff, J. Carlisle Larsen, Kevin Chang Barnum, and Catie Talarski. Thanks to our interns, Anya Grondalski and Mira Raju.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

A Need To Read
#175 Technology is moving FAST! with Azeem Azhar

A Need To Read

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 55:51


Azeem Azhar is one of the world's most trusted voices in technological innovation. He has worked within the tech industry since the early 90s with companies like the BBC, The Guardian, and The Economist. More recently, Azeem has become an active startup investor and has advised organizations like the World Economic Forum. He is a contributor to publications including the Financial Times, Wired, and the MIT Technology Review. He's been producing the Exponential view newsletter— which looks at intersections between technology and business— for the last 7 years and has attracted a high-profile readership. Azeem's new book, Exponential, looks at how technology has come to advance so rapidly, and the different ways we are struggling to keep up.    In this podcast we discuss: What are the characteristics of The Exponential Age Why the Metaverse is a bit meh Which technologies that have been getting exponentially cheaper How clean energy is being held back The ways big tech firms use your data Cyber security and the threat of misinformation  Russia's cyber antics  How advanced does tech have to be for us to be suspicious of living in a simulation?    Azeem can be found on Twitter: @Azeem Or at Exponential View: https://www.exponentialview.co/  Support   The best thing you can do is share the podcast with a friend, or sign up for my new weekly newsletter. You can also see my older newsletters with this link.   This podcast is sponsored by BetterHelp, so if you want to learn to understand your behavior or emotions with the help of a professional you can get 10% off your first month of therapy by heading to www.betterhelp.com/aneedtoread from there you'll just need to run through a 5-minute questionnaire and you'll be matched with a therapist within 48 hours.   This podcast is also sponsored by Athletic Greens so you can get an additional 5 free travel packs and a year's supply of Vitamin D3 with your Athletic Greens subscription at www.athleticgreens.com/aneedtoread    Get a Free audiobook with Audible!    Get in touch: www.aneedtoread.co.uk/contact 

On the Way to New Work - Der Podcast über neue Arbeit
#330 Thomas Bachem | Softwareentwickler, Risikokapitalgeber, Unternehmer und Uni-Kanzler

On the Way to New Work - Der Podcast über neue Arbeit

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 64:17


Unser heutiger Gast ist Softwareentwickler, Risikokapitalgeber, Unternehmer sowie Gründer und Kanzler einer Universität. Doch der Reihe nach: Bereits im Alter von 12 Jahren brachte er sich selbst das Programmieren bei und er entwickelte bereits in jungen Jahren Webseiten für Unternehmen. Parallel zu seinem Studium an der Cologne Business School entwickelte er 2005 das Videoportal sevenload, dass er später erfolgreich an Hubert Burda Media verkaufte. Neben zahlreichen weiteren Gründungen ist vor allem die CODE University of Applied Sciences in Berlin zu nennen, die unser Gast 2016 gründete. Sie ist seit 2017 staatlich anerkannt und laut wikipedia ist er der jüngste Hochschulkanzler Deutschlands. Er wirkt in zahlreichen ehrenamtlichen Aufgaben, wie z.B. als Gründungsmitglied und später als Vorsitzender des Kuratoriums im Bundesverband Deutsche Startups. Weitere Beispiele sind seine Arbeit als Kuratoriumsmitglied im Fraunhofer-Institut für System- und Innovationsforschung und als Mitglied im Digitalrat der Bundesvereinigung der Deutschen Arbeitgeberverbände. Er wurde für seine Leistungen bereits mehrfach ausgezeichnet, z.B. vom Handelsblatt als „Gründer des Jahres 2017“ und von Capital im selben Jahr als Top 40 unter 40“. 2019 wurde er von der deutschen Ausgabe des MIT Technology Review als einer von zehn „Innovatoren unter 35“ sowie als „Social Innovator of the Year“ ausgezeichnet. Seit mehr als 5 Jahren beschäftigen wir uns mit der Frage, wie Arbeit den Menschen stärkt - statt ihn zu schwächen. Wie kann ein Thema, das einen so wesentlichen Anteil in unserem Alltag einnimmt, wieder mehr Sinn in unserem Leben stiften? Was sind die Fähigkeiten, die in Zukunft gebraucht werden? Und warum ist das “Coden” eine davon? Wir suchen nach Methoden, Vorbildern, Erfahrungen, Tools und Ideen, die uns dem Kern von New Work näher bringen! Und darüber hinaus beschäftigt uns auch diese Woche wieder die Frage, ob wirklich alle Menschen das finden und leben können, was sie im Innersten wirklich, wirklich wollen. Ihr seid bei On the Way to New Work - heute mit Thomas aka Tom Bachem.

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism
How to improve climate change coverage. Ideas from three reporters around the world

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 36:27


In this episode of our podcast, we speak to members of our Oxford Climate Journalism Network (OCJN) on their experience participating in the network. In this episode of our podcast, we speak to members of our Oxford Climate Journalism Network (OCJN) on their experience participating in the network, what they have learned, how it has improved their understanding of the climate and how to improve its coverage, and the importance of solidarity and community among journalists covering climate change. The speakers: Elisângela Mendonça is an award-winning journalist at the Bureau of Investigative Journalism specialising in climate breakdown and human rights. She is a fellow at the Pulitzer Center Rainforest Investigations Network. She is member of the OCJN. Krixia Subingsubing is a journalist at the Philippine Daily Inquirer covering politics, social justice, human rights and the environment. She is member of the OCJN. Ethan van Diemen is a South African data and investigative journalist based for the Daily Maverick. He writes about the intersection of climate change, energy and development in sub-Saharan Africa. He is a member of the OCJN. Our host Diego Arguedas Ortiz Network Manager at the Oxford Climate Journalism Network. His work has been published by BBC Future, MIT Technology Review, Le Monde Diplomatique, Univision and Anthropocene. He has covered several UN climate change conferences, the Panama Papers, and founded and edited Ojo al Clima, Central America's first climate news outlet. Read a transcript of the podcast here: https://reutersinstitute.politics.ox.ac.uk/news/our-podcast-how-improve-climate-change-coverage-ideas-three-reporters-around-world

Innovation Storytellers
65: How Plants Inspire The Newest Robots at Purdue University

Innovation Storytellers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 45:16


Laura Blumenschein, assistant professor of mechanical engineering, appeared on my radar after being selected for MIT Technology Review's Innovators Under 35 list in the category of AI and robots. She was chosen for her work on the Vine robot project, a growing robot inspired by the growth and adaptability of plants. Her contribution to the field of soft robotics expands upon the potential uses for autonomous robotic systems to interact in the human world. Laura joins me on this week's episode of the Innovation Storytellers podcast to share her insights on working with innovation teams and exploring the history of robotics. In addition, she shares how her research focuses on creating more robust and adaptable, soft robots inspired by plants. Finally, I learn more about how robots grow to explore their environments and build structures that pave the for more seamless human-robot interaction.

FUTURES Podcast
Biofabrication w/ Ritu Raman

FUTURES Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 61:19


Biomedical engineer Ritu Raman shares her insights on designing biological robots, how new developments in tissue engineering may allow us to grow organs, and what biofabrication means for the future of food and medicine. Ritu Raman, PhD is the d'Arbeloff Career Development Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at MIT. Her lab is centered on engineering adaptive living materials for applications in medicine and machines. The Raman Lab's current focus is building neuromuscular actuators to restore mobility and power robots. Prof. Raman has received several recognitions for scientific innovation, including being named a Kavli Fellow by the National Academy of Sciences and being named to the Forbes 30 Under 30 and MIT Technology Review 35 Innovators Under 35 lists. She is the author of the upcoming MIT Press book Biofabrication. She is passionate about increasing diversity in STEM and has championed many initiatives to empower women in science, including being named a AAAS IF/THEN ambassador and founding the Women in Innovation and STEM Database at MIT (WISDM). Find out more: futurespodcast.net CREDITS Produced by FUTURES Podcast Recorded, Mixed & Edited by Luke Robert Mason FOLLOW Twitter: twitter.com/futurespodcast Facebook: facebook.com/futurespodcast Instagram: instagram.com/futurespodcast

Boletim de Tecnologia
O problema das inteligências artificiais que escrevem e desenham como humanos

Boletim de Tecnologia

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 46:20


⭐️ Oferecimento: Promobit Ofertas de verdade, lojas seguras e os melhores preços da internet. Baixe agora o aplicativo do Promobit e tenha tudo isso na palma da mão. Neste podcast, Rodrigo Ghedin e Jacqueline Lafloufa refletem juntos sobre inteligências artificiais que fazem coisas — de maneira convincente — em domínios até então exclusivos de seres humanos. Pense na GPT-3 ou LAmDA para a escrita de textos, DALLE-2 e Imagen para desenhos e o GitHub Copilot para a programação. Quais os impactos, imediatos ou não, dessas coisas na humanidade? Ghedin está pessimista, Jacque tenta achar o lado positivo dessa história toda — um clássico episódio do Guia Prático. Apoie o Manual pelo preço de um cafezinho Nas última semana, o Manual ganhou uma nova apoiadora: Van Lima. Obrigado! Gosta do podcast? Toque aqui e torne-se um(a) apoiador(a). A partir do plano II (R$ 16/mês), você acompanha as gravações ao vivo e ganha outros mimos. Indicações culturais Jacque: O livro Respire, de James Nestor, publicado pela Intrínseca. Ghedin: O filme Juventude [Belas Artes À La Carte], de Ingmar Bergman. Links citados A inteligência artificial mais esperta do mundo criou sua primeira capa de revista (em inglês), na Cosmopolitan. Por que a GPT-3 é o melhor e o pior da IA atualmente, na MIT Technology Review. Craiyon, versão mais simples para gerar imagens automaticamente. Gerador de lero-lero. Este podcast é editado pelo estúdio Tumpats.

The Tim Ferriss Show
#607: Luis von Ahn, Co-Founder and CEO of Duolingo — How to Be (Truly) Mission-Driven, Monetization Experiments, 10x Growth, Org Chart Iterations for Impacting Metrics, The Intricate Path to an IPO, Best Hiring Practices, Catching Exam Cheaters, The All

The Tim Ferriss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 120:41 Very Popular


Luis von Ahn, Co-Founder and CEO of Duolingo — How to Be (Truly) Mission-Driven, Monetization Experiments, 10x Growth, Org Chart Iterations for Impacting Metrics, The Intricate Path to an IPO, Best Hiring Practices, Catching Exam Cheaters, The Allure of Toto Toilets, The Future of Duolingo, and How to Stand Out in Your Career | Brought to you by Athletic Greens all-in-one nutritional supplement, Helix Sleep premium mattresses, and LinkedIn Jobs recruitment platform with 800M+ users. More on all three below.Luis von Ahn (@LuisvonAhn) is an entrepreneur and consulting professor at Carnegie Mellon University, who is considered one of the pioneers of crowdsourcing. He is known for co-inventing CAPTCHAs, being a MacArthur fellow, and selling two companies to Google in his twenties.He is currently the co-founder and CEO of Duolingo, a language-learning platform created to bring free language education to the world. With more than 500 million users, it is now the most popular language-learning platform and the most downloaded education app in the world.Luis has been named one of the Brilliant 10 by Popular Science, one of the 50 Best Brains in Science by Discover, one of the Innovators Under 35 by MIT Technology Review, and one of the 100 Most Creative People in Business by Fast Company. Luis also won the 2018 Lemelson-MIT prize, the largest cash prize for invention in the U.S.This episode is brought to you by LinkedIn Jobs. Whether you are looking to hire now for a critical role or thinking about needs that you may have in the future, LinkedIn Jobs can help. LinkedIn screens candidates for the hard and soft skills you're looking for and puts your job in front of candidates looking for job opportunities that match what you have to offer.Using LinkedIn's active community of more than 800 million professionals worldwide, LinkedIn Jobs can help you find and hire the right person faster. When your business is ready to make that next hire, find the right person with LinkedIn Jobs. And now, you can post a job for free. Just visit LinkedIn.com/Tim.*This episode is also brought to you by Athletic Greens. I get asked all the time, “If you could use only one supplement, what would it be?” My answer is usually AG1 by Athletic Greens, my all-in-one nutritional insurance. I recommended it in The 4-Hour Body in 2010 and did not get paid to do so. I do my best with nutrient-dense meals, of course, but AG further covers my bases with vitamins, minerals, and whole-food-sourced micronutrients that support gut health and the immune system. Right now, Athletic Greens is offering you their Vitamin D Liquid Formula free with your first subscription purchase—a vital nutrient for a strong immune system and strong bones. Visit AthleticGreens.com/Tim to claim this special offer today and receive the free Vitamin D Liquid Formula (and five free travel packs) with your first subscription purchase! That's up to a one-year supply of Vitamin D as added value when you try their delicious and comprehensive all-in-one daily greens product.*This episode is also brought to you by Helix Sleep! Helix was selected as the #1 overall mattress of 2020 by GQ magazine, Wired, Apartment Therapy, and many others. With Helix, there's a specific mattress to meet each and every body's unique comfort needs. Just take their quiz—only two minutes to complete—that matches your body type and sleep preferences to the perfect mattress for you. They have a 10-year warranty, and you get to try it out for a hundred nights, risk-free. They'll even pick it up from you if you don't love it. And now, Helix is offering up to 200 dollars off all mattress orders plus two free pillows at HelixSleep.com/Tim.*For show notes and past guests on The Tim Ferriss Show, please visit tim.blog/podcast.For deals from sponsors of The Tim Ferriss Show, please visit tim.blog/podcast-sponsorsSign up for Tim's email newsletter (5-Bullet Friday) at tim.blog/friday.For transcripts of episodes, go to tim.blog/transcripts.Discover Tim's books: tim.blog/books.Follow Tim:Twitter: twitter.com/tferriss Instagram: instagram.com/timferrissYouTube: youtube.com/timferrissFacebook: facebook.com/timferriss LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/timferrissPast guests on The Tim Ferriss Show include Jerry Seinfeld, Hugh Jackman, Dr. Jane Goodall, LeBron James, Kevin Hart, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Jamie Foxx, Matthew McConaughey, Esther Perel, Elizabeth Gilbert, Terry Crews, Sia, Yuval Noah Harari, Malcolm Gladwell, Madeleine Albright, Cheryl Strayed, Jim Collins, Mary Karr, Maria Popova, Sam Harris, Michael Phelps, Bob Iger, Edward Norton, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Neil Strauss, Ken Burns, Maria Sharapova, Marc Andreessen, Neil Gaiman, Neil de Grasse Tyson, Jocko Willink, Daniel Ek, Kelly Slater, Dr. Peter Attia, Seth Godin, Howard Marks, Dr. Brené Brown, Eric Schmidt, Michael Lewis, Joe Gebbia, Michael Pollan, Dr. Jordan Peterson, Vince Vaughn, Brian Koppelman, Ramit Sethi, Dax Shepard, Tony Robbins, Jim Dethmer, Dan Harris, Ray Dalio, Naval Ravikant, Vitalik Buterin, Elizabeth Lesser, Amanda Palmer, Katie Haun, Sir Richard Branson, Chuck Palahniuk, Arianna Huffington, Reid Hoffman, Bill Burr, Whitney Cummings, Rick Rubin, Dr. Vivek Murthy, Darren Aronofsky, and many more.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

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The Sydcast
George Boateng: The Impact Entrepreneur from Ghana

The Sydcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 48:03


Episode SummaryWhat happens when a tech-savvy entrepreneurial young man from Africa comes to America for school? It's his first time in the US and what does he learn? As he describes on this episode of The Sydcast, George Boateng learns that he is black. That simple, and powerful, observation will strike many listeners as profound, yet George understands that his identity is what he makes it to be. As we will hear, that includes an EdTech start-up that is teaching young people in Africa to code, an effort to mentor young Africans to develop solutions to the real problems they are confronting, and his own work on his Ph.D. in Switzerland.Sydney Finkelstein Syd Finkelstein is the Steven Roth Professor of Management at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College. He holds a Master's degree from the London School of Economics and a Ph.D. from Columbia University. Professor Finkelstein has published 25 books and 90 articles, including the bestsellers Why Smart Executives Fail and Superbosses: How Exceptional Leaders Master the Flow of Talent, which LinkedIn Chairman Reid Hoffman calls the “leadership guide for the Networked Age.” He is also a Fellow of the Academy of Management, a consultant and speaker to leading companies around the world, and a top 25 on the Global Thinkers 50 list of top management gurus. Professor Finkelstein's research and consulting work often relies on in-depth and personal interviews with hundreds of people, an experience that led him to create and host his own podcast, The Sydcast, to uncover and share the stories of all sorts of fascinating people in business, sports, entertainment, politics, academia, and everyday life.George Boateng George Boateng is a Computer Scientist, Engineer, Educator, and Social Entrepreneur who has been recognized as a Pioneer in the 2021 MIT Technology Review's 35 Innovators Under 35. He is currently a PhD Candidate and Doctoral Researcher at ETH Zurich, Switzerland focusing on Applied Machine Learning, and a Visiting Researcher at the Department of Computer Science and Technology at the University of Cambridge, U.K. George is also the CEO and co-founder of SuaCode.ai, an EdTech AI start-up that is enabling young Africans to learn to code using smartphones and AI. He is also the President and co-founder of Nsesa Foundation, an education nonprofit that is training and mentoring young Africans to be innovators. He previously worked as an Applied Scientist at Amazon (Alexa AI) and a Software Engineer at Sapho (acquired by Citrix). George has a BA in Computer Science and an MS in Computer Engineering from Dartmouth College, U.S. where he was an E.E. Just STEM Scholar and an E.E. Just Graduate Fellow.Insights from this episode: What George learned along the wayWhat it means to have an impact on people's livesWhat led George to start the coding companyHow George is able to manage his time (doing his Ph.D. and running a startup)George's journey to engineeringGeorge's journey to Dartmouth UniversityWhat it means to show up in America coming from AfricaInsights on how arthritis led him to wearable technologyQuotes from the show:“The goal was to teach people across Ghana to code so that we can reach more people” -George Boateng [9:03]“We have a lot of good data, we haven't made good use of it yet, but I think at some point it will really be useful data that other companies might want” -George Boateng [13:28]“Now is the single best time to have talent of any type because you are going to be in such demand, and you're going to get paid for it, maybe more than you have been before” -Sydney Finkelstein [13:49]“One of the challenging aspects of coming to the US was having to embrace this new identity called black” -George Boateng [32:49]“I have been in Ghana all my life, the concept of race was not part of my experience” -George Boateng [33:03]“I think there's got to be an evolutionary reason for it, but we do like to separate people into groups and when they don't exist, we create them, and if they do exist, we highlight them” -Sydney Finkelstein [34:03]“I consider myself an accidental academic because the main reason i am in academia is because I didn't get a job. If I had gotten a job, I definitely wouldn't be doing my PhD” -George Boateng [34:41]“Very few people ever have it figured out, you just have to do the best you can and you try to go for it” -Sydney Finkelstein [45:56]Stay connected:Sydney FinkelsteinWebsite: http://thesydcast.comLinkedIn: Sydney FinkelsteinTwitter: @sydfinkelsteinFacebook: The SydcastInstagram: The SydcastGeorge Boateng LinkedIn: George Jojo Boateng Twitter: George Boateng Instagram: George Boateng Subscribe to our podcast + download each episode on Stitcher, iTunes, and Spotify.This episode was produced and managed by Podcast Laundry.

MeatRx
Scientists Should Hang Their Heads In Shame | Dr. Shawn Baker & Sam Apple

MeatRx

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 55:28 Very Popular


Sam Apple is on the faculty of the MA in Science Writing and MA in Writing programs at Johns Hopkins. Prior to his arrival at Johns Hopkins, Apple taught creative writing and journalism at the University of Pennsylvania for ten years. He holds a BA in English and Creative Writing from the University of Michigan and an MFA in Creative Nonfiction from Columbia University. Apple is the author of Ravenous American Parent, and Schlepping Through the Alps. He has published short stories, personal essays, satires, and journalistic features on a wide range of topics. In recent years, he has primarily written about science and health. His work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Wired, The Los Angeles Times, The Financial Times Magazine, ESPN The Magazine, The MIT Technology Review, and McSweeney's, among many other publications. Schlepping Through the Alps was a finalist for the PEN America Award for a first work of nonfiction. Timestamps: 00:00 Cancer as a metabolic disease 05:07 Hitler's fear of cancer 08:29 Hitler and vegetarianism 10:29 Otto Warberg's theories on cancer 14:06 Metabolic health and cancer 19:51 Heart disease vs cancer mortality decrease 22:36 Average life expectancy and child mortality 26:33 Obesity and cancer 32:15 Cancer and hyperinsulinemia research 36:00 The Inuit 41:15 Sugar 45:00 Sugar substitutes 49:44 Critique of sugar triggers 52:27 Future book on Stefansson See open positions at Revero: https://jobs.lever.co/Revero/ Join Carnivore Diet for a free 30 day trial: https://carnivore.diet/join/ Book a Carnivore Coach: https://carnivore.diet/book-a-coach/ Carnivore Shirts: https://merch.carnivore.diet Subscribe to our Newsletter: https://carnivore.diet/subscribe/ . ‪#revero #shawnbaker #Carnivorediet #MeatHeals #HealthCreation   #humanfood #AnimalBased #ZeroCarb #DietCoach  #FatAdapted #Carnivore #sugarfree  ‪