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Best podcasts about supposedly

Latest podcast episodes about supposedly

Wit and Wisdom of JoeMagician

I was looking through my live streams, and I realized I had not actually had a dedicated stream about the Others. Where they come from, where are they going, and what exactly is going on with their giant ice spiders? Supposedly as big as hounds is the legends can be believed. A thorough look at the big icy bads of ASOIAF and where their story is going and where it has been.  Link to stream: https://youtu.be/z3sX3tCiOb8

The 90th Minute
Ep 12 - Manchester United Players "Supposedly" Unhappy & AFCON Storylines

The 90th Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 50:34


With reports of Manchester United players being unhappy about Ralf Ragnick, Woz questions everything. Was it overblown? What about the Lukaku situation? We move into the hot topic about whether players are playing way too much and whether their well-being should be considered? The African Cup of Nations has started, and Lucas has several things he wants to mention! Finally, Woz went viral... ➤Use code 90minute for 10% off GFuel: https://gfuel.ly/2XQPCmo 0:00 - Intro 1:39 - Manchester United & Phil Jones 8:04 - Lukaku and Chelsea 10:45 - Player well-being 16:03 - AFCON & Choosing our AFCON Teams 27:25 - The FIFA Best awards 37:37 - Woz went mega Viral on TikTok 43:57 - New Years Resolutions

Catch my Killer
Episode 116: Alicia Markovich

Catch my Killer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 45:36


This week's story focuses on a Pennsylvania teenager named Alicia Markovich who was 15 when she vanished on April 26, 1987 from Dunn Avenue in Blairsville, Pennsylvania. At the time, she was visiting with her father John Markovich. This year will be the 35th year anniversary of Alicia's disappearance. Unfortunately, Alicia's mother, Marcie Smith, has long given up hope that she will ever see her daughter alive again. The day seemed like any other day. Alicia, an eighth-grader at Windber High School in Somerset County, left with her father to spend time with him at his Blairsville home. Alicia's parents were divorced. It wasn't an overnight stay. Alicia was supposed to return home that same evening. Supposedly, Alicia and her father got into an argument around 5pm. Allegedly, Alicia stormed out of the house and has never been seen again. She is listed as a missing person with state police and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. But everyone who was close to Alicia don't believe she is alive. For this story I spoke to Chrissie Boyer, who was Alicia's childhood friend. Chrissie is one of Alicia's advocates and is also close friends with Alicia's mother Marcie. I also spoke a Laura Valdez, who has been friends with Marcie since childhood. She knew Alicia from birth and used to take Alicia out for pizza when she was a child. I also reached out to John Markovich and his wife and asked them to participate in this episode. Neither responded to my request. I also want to state that many people think John Markovich knows more about his daughter's fate than he has ever said publicly. However, I must state that no criminal charges have ever been brought against him and he must be considered innocent of any wrong doing in the eyes of the law. If you know what happened to Alicia Markovich, please contact Pennsylvania Crime Stoppers anonymously at 1-800-472-8477 or the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children at 1-800-843-5678. You can also visit www.justiceforaliciamarkovich.com for additional information about Alicia's story. *** Opening audio clip provided by WTAE-TV Pittsburgh (https://www.wtae.com/)Please also visit my website for more information about my true crime and paranormal newspaper columns at www.themarcabe.com. You can also help support my podcast by purchasing a cup of $5 coffee every month. To help support the podcast, please visit https://www.buymeacoffee.com/catchmykiller. If you would like to contact me about this podcast, please visit my websites www.catchmykiller.com or www.themarcabe.com

American Insanity
⛪️Holy are the Drugs Lord

American Insanity

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 16:15


Twas the week b4 Xmas. All through my nose. White powder dancing. Snow flakes galore. White Xmas. Powdery joy. Mountains of cocoa. Chemically. Crispy: tin foil hats. Blue veins. Red nosed. Melting skin. Rotten entrails. Decaying dreams. Bleeding anus. Crusty face sores. This is Constantly. A Chemist. Arrives to my abode. Mixing strange liquids from vials. Vile humans! He chants as he Balances. And balances the equations. A spoonful. Takes the strongest down. A sniff of it. Down. Down. Down. Or up. If god is the devil and they agree on anything!?. Earth is one possibility. The universe unending. Heaven got me tweaking. I'll earn wings one day oh glory. Flying and flying away and away. As I sing. Hallelujahs bye and buy. Slow breathing. Heart dropping. Toes cold. Brain flickering. Memories I forgotten. Life and all that happens. Drugged my spirits. So I can see. The satellites pointing at me. Supposedly. Snapping. Crackling. My life voyeurs enjoying. Voyager 69 & a bottle of your darkest spirit. Blow it all up to start all over. Like the big bang. When I cum. Yeah so. This planet calls me last night. Through my dreams and thoughts. Sent images of aliens feasting on us. Your people perish for lack. I said lack of guts. Slime oozing from alien eyes. Smeared on my face. The reality you partake of. Is fake. You'll know soon enough. How fake it all is. Try this as a test. Do good instead. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Broadcasts – Christian Working Woman

“Merry" is a word we hear a lot at this time of year. Not my name, Mary, but merry as in Merry Christmas. Have you noticed we don't use that word much at other times of the year? It seems to be a word reserved for Christmas. Well, it's a traditional word, an old-fashioned word. It seems to go automatically with "Christmas.” What do we mean when we say, "Merry Christmas"? Do we mean anything at all—or is it like "How are you today?" Supposedly we're saying, "I hope your Christmas is happy.” We like to think of Christmas as a merry time for everyone. But for many people, Christmas is not merry at all. In fact it can be one of the saddest, loneliest times of all the year. For instance, if you have no family to be with at Christmas, you may not feel so merry. If you can't make it to your family's celebration, it may not be merry. If your family is separated by more than miles—by divorce or death—or if your celebration of Christmas is not loving and warm, your Christmas may not be so merry. If you have financial difficulties, Christmas may not seem merry this year. So, at a time when everyone is proclaiming that this is a "merry" time of year—a time for all to be happy and jovial—you may be acutely and painfully reminded that your circumstances are not conducive for a Merry Christmas. How can you be merry this Christmas, regardless of the circumstances? How can you have a merry Christmas in spite of your problems and trials, in spite of the hardships of Covid? In spite of your own personal hardships and tough times? We usually hear a message or a sermon at this time of year about keeping the Christmas spirit all year long. Well, wouldn't it be something if Christians kept a merry heart all year long? A heart overflowing with thankfulness, joy, caring, compassion and love. If you have a merry heart, you will have a merry Christmas. Nobody can take away your joy if your heart is merry. Circumstances won't affect it; people can't rob you of joy if your heart is merry. So, I truly pray that you will have a Merry Christmas because your heart is filled with God's goodness.

SchiffGold Friday Gold Wrap Podcast
Taking a Pea Shooter to a Bazooka Fight: SchiffGold Friday Gold Wrap 12.17.21

SchiffGold Friday Gold Wrap Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 16:10


We got more bad inflation news this week as the Federal Reserve wrapped up its final FOMC meeting of the year. Supposedly, the central bank has launched its war on inflation. Has it though? In this episode of the Friday Gold Wrap podcast, host Mike Maharrey talks about inflation and the Fed meeting and explains why it looks more like the Fed is taking a pea shooter into a bazooka fight. You can visit the show notes page here: https://bit.ly/3q27LHW Tune in to the Friday Gold Wrap each week for a recap of the week's economic and political news as it relates to gold and silver, along with some insightful commentary. For more information visit https://schiffgold.com/news.

Midnight Train Podcast
Mary Shelley, The Birth of Frankenstein

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 83:38


We've all heard the story of "Frankenstein's Monster." A bat shit crazy scientist wants to reanimate dead tissue and basically create a fucking zombie baby… BECAUSE THAT'S HOW YOU GET FUCKING ZOMBIES! Anyway, Dr. Frankenstein and his trusty assistant, Igor, set off to bring a bunch of random, dead body parts together, throw some lightning on the bugger and bring this new, puzzle piece of a quasi-human back to "life." At first, the reanimated corpse seems somewhat ordinary, but then flips his shit and starts terrorizing and doing what I can only imagine REANIMATED ZOMBIES FUCKING DO!    Mary Shelley was born Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin in Somers Town, London, in 1797. She was the second child of the feminist philosopher, educator, and writer Mary Wollstonecraft and the first child of the philosopher, novelist, and journalist William Godwin.  So, she was brought into this world by some smart fucking people. Mary's mother died of puerperal fever shortly after Mary was born. Puerperal fever is an infectious, sometimes fatal, disease of childbirth; until the mid-19th century, this dreaded, then-mysterious illness could sweep through a hospital maternity ward and kill most new mothers. Today strict aseptic hospital techniques have made the condition uncommon in most parts of the world, except in unusual circumstances such as illegally induced abortion. Her father, William, was left to bring up Mary and her older half-sister, Fanny Imlay, Mary's mother's child by the American speculator Gilbert Imlay. A year after her mother's death, Godwin published his Memoirs of the Author of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, which he intended as a sincere and compassionate tribute. However, the Memoirs revealed Mary's mother's affairs and her illegitimate child. In that period, they were seen as shocking. Mary read these memoirs and her mother's books and was brought up to cherish her mother's memory. Mary's earliest years were happy, judging from the letters of William's housekeeper and nurse, Louisa Jones. But Godwin was often deeply in debt; feeling that he could not raise Mary and Fanny himself, he looked for a second wife. In December 1801, he married Mary Jane Clairmont, a well-educated woman with two young children—Charles and Claire SO MANY MARY'S! Sorry folks. Most of her father's friends disliked his new wife, describing her as a straight fucking bitch. Ok, not really, but they didn't like her. However, William was devoted to her, and the marriage worked. Mary, however, came to hate that bitch. William's 19th-century biographer Charles Kegan Paul later suggested that Mrs. Godwin had favored her own children over Williams. So, how awesome is it that he had a biographer? That's so badass.  Together, Mary's father and his new bride started a publishing firm called M. J. Godwin, which sold children's books and stationery, maps, and games. However, the business wasn't making any loot, and her father was forced to borrow butt loads of money to keep it going. He kept borrowing money to pay off earlier loans, just adding to his problems. By 1809, William's business was close to closing up shop, and he was "near to despair." Mary's father was saved from debtor's prison by devotees such as Francis Place, who lent him additional money. So, debtor's prison is pretty much EXACTLY what it sounds like. If you couldn't pay your debts, they threw your ass in jail. Unlike today where they just FUCK UP YOUR CREDIT! THANKS, COLUMBIA HOUSE!!!  Though Mary received little education, her father tutored her in many subjects. He often took the children on educational trips. They had access to his library and the many intelligent mofos who visited him, including the Romantic poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge and the former vice-president of the United States Aaron Burr. You know, that dude that shot and killed his POLITICAL opponent, Alexander Hamilton, in a fucking duel! Ah… I was born in the wrong century.   Mary's father admitted he was not educating the children according to Mary's mother's philosophy as outlined in works such as A Vindication of the Rights of Woman. However, Mary still received an unusual and advanced education for a girl of the time. She had a governess, a daily tutor, and read many of her father's children's Roman and Greek history books. For six months in 1811, she also attended a boarding school in Ramsgate, England. Her father described her at age 15 as "singularly bold, somewhat imperious, and active of mind. Her desire of knowledge is great, and her perseverance in everything she undertakes almost invincible." My father didn't know how to spell my name until I was twelve.  In June of 1812, Mary's father sent her to stay with the family of the radical William Baxter, near Dundee, Scotland. In a letter to Baxter, he wrote, "I am anxious that she should be brought up ... like a philosopher, even like a cynic." Scholars have speculated that she may have been sent away for her health, remove her from the seamy side of the business, or introduce her to radical politics. However, Mary loved the spacious surroundings of Baxter's house and with his four daughters, and she returned north in the summer of 1813 to hang out for 10 months. In the 1831 introduction to Frankenstein, she recalled: "I wrote then—but in a most common-place style. It was beneath the trees of the grounds belonging to our house, or on the bleak sides of the woodless mountains near, that my true compositions, the airy flights of my imagination, were born and fostered."   Mary Godwin may have first met the radical poet-philosopher Percy Bysshe Shelley in between her two stays in Scotland. When she returned home for a second time on 30 March 1814, Percy Shelley became estranged from his wife and regularly visited Mary's father, William Godwin, whom he had agreed to bail out of debt. Percy Shelley's radicalism, particularly his economic views, alienated him from his wealthy aristocratic family. They wanted him to be a high, upstanding snoot and follow traditional models of the landed aristocracy. He tried to donate large amounts of the family's money to projects meant to help the poor and disadvantaged. Percy Shelley, therefore, had a problem gaining access to capital until he inherited his estate because his family did not want him wasting it on projects of "political justice." After several months of promises, Shelley announced that he could not or would not pay off all of Godwin's debts. Godwin was angry and felt betrayed and whooped his fuckin ass! Yeah! Ok, not really. He was just super pissed. Mary and Percy began hookin' up on the down-low at her mother Mary Wollstonecraft's grave in the churchyard of St Pancras Old Church, and they fell in love—she was 16, and he was 21. Creepy and super fucking gross.   On 26 June 1814, Shelley and Godwin declared their love for one another as Shelley announced he could not hide his "ardent passion,." This led her in a "sublime and rapturous moment" to say she felt the same way; on either that day or the next, Godwin lost her virginity to Shelley, which tradition claims happened in the churchyard. So, the grown-ass 21-year-old man statutorily raped the 16-year-old daughter of the man he idolized and dicked over. In a graveyard. My god, how things have changed...GROSS! Godwin described herself as attracted to Shelley's "wild, intellectual, unearthly looks." Smart but ugly. Got it. To Mary's dismay, her father disapproved and tried to thwart the relationship and salvage his daughter's "spotless fame." No! You don't say! Dad wasn't into his TEENAGE DAUGHTER BANGING A MAN IN THE GRAVEYARD!?! Mary's father learned of Shelley's inability to pay off the father's debts at about the same time. Oof. He found out after he diddled her. Mary, who later wrote of "my excessive and romantic attachment to my father," was confused. Um… what? She saw Percy Shelley as an embodiment of her parents' liberal and reformist ideas of the 1790s, particularly Godwin's view that marriage was a repressive monopoly, which he had argued in his 1793 edition of Political Justice but later retracted. On 28 July 1814, the couple eloped and secretly left for France, taking Mary's stepsister, Claire Clairmont, with them.  After convincing Mary's mother, who took off after them to Calais, that they did not wish to return, the trio traveled to Paris, and then, by donkey, mule, carriage, and foot, through France, recently ravaged by war, all the way to Switzerland. "It was acting in a novel, being an incarnate romance," Mary Shelley recalled in 1826. Godwin wrote about France in 1814: "The distress of the inhabitants, whose houses had been burned, their cattle killed and all their wealth destroyed, has given a sting to my detestation of war...". As they traveled, Mary and Percy read works by Mary Wollstonecraft and others, kept a joint journal, and continued their own writing. Finally, at Lucerne, lack of money forced the three to turn back. Instead, they traveled down the Rhine and by land to the Dutch port of Maassluis, arriving at Gravesend, Kent, on 13 September 1814. The situation awaiting Mary Godwin in England was packed with bullshit, some of which she had not expected. Either before or during their journey, she had become pregnant. She and Percy now found themselves penniless, and, to Mary's stupid ass surprise, her father refused to have anything to do with her. The couple moved with Claire into lodgings at Somers Town, and later, Nelson Square. They kept doing their thing, reading, and writing and entertained Percy Shelley's friends. Percy Shelley would often leave home for short periods to dodge bill collectors, and the couple's heartbroken letters would reveal their pain while he was away. Pregnant and often sick, Mary Godwin had to hear of Percy's joy at the birth of his son by Harriet Shelley in late 1814 due to his constant escapades with Claire Clairmont. Supposedly, Shelley and Clairmont were almost certainly lovers, which caused Mary to be rightfully jealous. And yes, Claire was Mary's cousin. Percy was a friggin' creep. Percy pissed off Mary when he suggested that they both take the plunge into a stream naked during a walk in the French countryside. This offended her due to her principles, and she was like, "Oh, hell nah, sahn!" and started taking off her earrings in a rage. Or something like that. She was partly consoled by the visits of Hogg, whom she disliked at first but soon considered a close friend. Percy Shelley seems to have wanted Mary and Hogg to become lovers; Mary did not dismiss the idea since she believed in free love in principle. She was a hippie before being a hippie was cool. Percy probably just wanted to not feel guilty for hooking up with her cousin. Creep. In reality, however, she loved only Percy and seemed to have gone no further than flirting with Hogg. On 22 February 1815, she gave birth to a two-months premature baby girl, who was not expected to survive. On 6 March, she wrote to Hogg: "My dearest Hogg, my baby is dead—will you come to see me as soon as you can. I wish to see you—It was perfectly well when I went to bed—I awoke in the night to give it suck it appeared to be sleeping so quietly that I would not awake it. It was dead then, but we did not find that out till morning—from its appearance it evidently died of convulsions—Will you come—you are so calm a creature & Shelley (Percy) is afraid of a fever from the milk—for I am no longer a mother now." The loss of her child brought about acute depression in Mary. She was haunted by visions of the baby, but she conceived again and had recovered by the summer. With a revival in Percy's finances after the death of his grandfather, Sir Bysshe Shelley, the couple holidayed in Torquay and then rented a two-story cottage at Bishopsgate, on the edge of Windsor Great Park. Unfortunately, little is known about this period in Mary Godwin's life since her journal from May 1815 to July 1816 was lost. At Bishopsgate, Percy wrote his poem Alastor or The Spirit of Solitude; and on 24 January 1816, Mary gave birth to a second child, William, named after her father and soon nicknamed "Willmouse." In her novel The Last Man, she later imagined Windsor as a Garden of Eden. In May 1816, Mary, Percy, and their son traveled to Geneva with Claire Clairmont. They planned to spend the summer with the poet Lord Byron, whose recent affair with Claire had left her pregnant. Claire sounds like a bit of a trollop. No judging, just making an observation. The party arrived in Geneva on 14 May 1816, where Mary called herself "Mrs Shelley." Byron joined them on 25 May with his young physician, John William Polidori, and rented the Villa Diodati, close to Lake Geneva at the village of Cologny; Percy rented a smaller building called Maison Chapuis on the waterfront nearby. They spent their time writing, boating on the lake, and talking late into the night. "It proved a wet, ungenial summer," Mary Shelley remembered in 1831, "and incessant rain often confined us for days to the house." Sitting around a log fire at Byron's villa, the company amused themselves with German ghost stories called Fantasmagoriana, which prompted Byron to propose that they "each write a ghost story." Unable to think up an account, young Mary became flustered: "Have you thought of a story? I was asked each morning, and each morning I was forced to reply with a mortifying negative." Finally, one mid-June evening, the discussions turned to the principle of life. "Perhaps a corpse would be reanimated," Mary noted, "galvanism had given token of such things." Galvanism is a term invented by the late 18th-century physicist and chemist Alessandro Volta to refer to the generation of electric current by chemical action. The word also came to refer to the discoveries of its namesake, Luigi Galvani, specifically the generation of electric current within biological organisms and the contraction/convulsion of natural muscle tissue upon contact with electric current. While Volta theorized and later demonstrated the phenomenon of his "Galvanism" to be replicable with otherwise inert materials, Galvani thought his discovery to confirm the existence of "animal electricity," a vital force that gave life to organic matter. We'll talk a little more about Galvani and a murderer named George Foster toward the end of the episode. It was after midnight before they retired, and she was unable to sleep, mainly because she became overwhelmed by her imagination as she kept thinking about the grim terrors of her "waking dream," her ghost story: "I saw the pale student of unhallowed arts kneeling beside the thing he had put together. I saw the hideous phantasm of a man stretched out, and then, on the working of some powerful engine, show signs of life, and stir with an uneasy, half vital motion. Frightful must it be; for supremely frightful would be the effect of any human endeavour to mock the stupendous mechanism of the Creator of the world." She began writing what she assumed would be a short, profound story. With Percy Shelley's encouragement, she turned her little idea into her first novel, Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus, published in 1818. She later described that time in Switzerland as "when I first stepped out from childhood into life." The story of the writing of Frankenstein has been fictionalized repeatedly, and it helped form the basis for several films. Here's a cool little side note: In September 2011, the astronomer Donald Olson, after a visit to the Lake Geneva villa the previous year and inspecting data about the motion of the moon and stars, concluded that her waking dream took place "between 2 am and 3 am" 16 June 1816, several days after the initial idea by Lord Byron that they each write their ghost stories. Shelley and her husband collaborated on the story, but the extent of Percy's contribution to the novel is unknown and has been argued over by readers and critics forever. There are differences in the 1818, 1823, and 1831 versions. Mary Shelley wrote, "I certainly did not owe the suggestion of one incident, nor scarcely of one train of feeling, to my husband, and yet but for his incitement, it would never have taken the form in which it was presented to the world." She wrote that the preface to the first edition was her husband's work "as far as I can recollect." James Rieger concluded Percy's "assistance at every point in the book's manufacture was so extensive that one hardly knows whether to regard him as editor or minor collaborator." At the same time, Anne K. Mellor later argued Percy only "made many technical corrections and several times clarified the narrative and thematic continuity of the text." Charles E. Robinson, the editor of a facsimile edition of the Frankenstein manuscripts, concluded that Percy's contributions to the book "were no more than what most publishers' editors have provided new (or old) authors or, in fact, what colleagues have provided to each other after reading each other's works in progress." So, eat one, Percy! Just kidding. In 1840 and 1842, Mary and her son traveled together all over the continent. Mary recorded these trips in Rambles in Germany and Italy in 1840, 1842, and 1843. In 1844, Sir Timothy Shelley finally died at the age of ninety, "falling from the stalk like an overblown flower," Mary put it. For the first time in her life, she and her son were financially independent, though the remaining estate wasn't worth as much as they had thought. In the mid-1840s, Mary Shelley found herself in the crosshairs of three separate blackmailing sons of bitches. First, in 1845, an Italian political exile called Gatteschi, whom she had met in Paris, threatened to publish letters she had sent him. Scandalous! However, a friend of her son's bribed a police chief into seizing Gatteschi's papers, including the letters, which were then destroyed. Vaffanculo, Gatteschi! Shortly afterward, Mary Shelley bought some letters written by herself and Percy Shelley from a man calling himself G. Byron and posing as the illegitimate son of the late Lord Byron. Also, in 1845, Percy Shelley's cousin Thomas Medwin approached her, claiming to have written a damaging biography of Percy Shelley. He said he would suppress it in return for £250, but Mary told him to eat a big ole bag of dicks and jog on! In 1848, Percy Florence married Jane Gibson St John. The marriage proved a happy one, and Mary liked Jane. Mary lived with her son and daughter-in-law at Field Place, Sussex, the Shelleys' ancestral home, and at Chester Square, London, and vacationed with them, as well. Mary's last years were blighted by illness. From 1839, she suffered from headaches and bouts of paralysis in parts of her body, which sometimes prevented her from reading and writing, obviously two of her favorite things. Then, on 1 February 1851, at Chester Square, Mary Shelly died at fifty-three from what her doctor suspected was a brain tumor. According to Jane Shelley, Mary had asked to be buried with her mother and father. Still, looking at the graveyard at St Pancras and calling it "dreadful," Percy and Jane chose to bury her instead at St Peter's Church in Bournemouth, near their new home at Boscombe. On the first anniversary of Mary's death, the Shelleys opened her box-desk. Inside they found locks of her dead children's hair, a notebook she had shared with Percy Bysshe Shelley, and a copy of his poem Adonaïs with one page folded round a silk parcel containing some of his ashes and the remains of his heart. Romantic or disturbing? Maybe a bit of both. Mary Shelley remained a stout political radical throughout her life. Mary's works often suggested that cooperation and sympathy, mainly as practiced by women in the family, were the ways to reform civil society. This view directly challenged the individualistic Romantic ethos promoted by Percy Shelley and Enlightenment political theories. She wrote seven novels / Two travel narrations / Twenty three short stories / Three books of children's literature, and many articles. Mary Shelley left her mark on the literary world, and her name will be forever etched in the catacombs of horror for generations to come. When it comes to reanimation, there's someone else we need to talk about. George Forster (or Foster) was found guilty of murdering his wife and child by drowning them in Paddington Canal, London. He was hanged at Newgate on 18 January 1803, after which his body was taken to a nearby house where it was used in an experiment by Italian scientist Giovanni Aldini. At his trial, the events were reconstructed. Forster's mother-in-law recounted that her daughter and grandchild had left her house to see Forster at 4 pm on Saturday, 4 December 1802. In whose house Forster lodged, Joseph Bradfield reported that they had stayed together that night and gone out at 10 am on Sunday morning. He also stated that Forster and his wife had not been on good terms because she wished to live with him. On Sunday, various witnesses saw Forster with his wife and child in public houses near Paddington Canal. The body of his child was found on Monday morning; after the canal was dragged for three days, his wife's body was also found. Forster claimed that upon leaving The Mitre, he set out alone for Barnet to see his other two children in the workhouse there, though he was forced to turn back at Whetstone due to the failing light. This was contradicted by a waiter at The Mitre who said the three left the inn together. Skepticism was also expressed that he could have walked to Whetstone when he claimed. Nevertheless, the jury found him guilty. He was sentenced to death and also to be dissected after that. This sentence was designed to provide medicine with corpses on which to experiment and ensure that the condemned could not rise on Judgement Day, their bodies having been cut into pieces and selectively discarded. Forster was hanged on 18 January, shortly before he made a full confession. He said he had come to hate his wife and had twice before taken his wife to the canal, but his nerve had both times failed him. A recent BBC Knowledge documentary (Real Horror: Frankenstein) questions the fairness of the trial. It notes that friends of George Forster's wife later claimed that she was highly suicidal and had often talked about killing herself and her daughter. According to this documentary, Forster attempted suicide by stabbing himself with a crudely fashioned knife. This was to avoid awakening during the dissection of his body, should he not have died when hanged. This was a real possibility owing to the crude methods of execution at the time. The same reference suggests that his 'confession' was obtained under duress. In fact, it alleges that Pass, a Beadle or an official of a church or synagogue on Aldini's payroll, fast-tracked the whole trial and legal procedure to obtain the freshest corpse possible for his benefactor. After the execution, Forster's body was given to Giovanni Aldini for experimentation. Aldini was the nephew of fellow scientist Luigi Galvani and an enthusiastic proponent of his uncle's method of stimulating muscles with electric current, known as Galvanism. The experiment he performed on Forster's body demonstrated this technique. The Newgate Calendar (a record of executions at Newgate) reports that "On the first application of the process to the face, the jaws of the deceased criminal began to quiver, and the adjoining muscles were horribly contorted, and one eye was actually opened. In the subsequent part of the process the right hand was raised and clenched, and the legs and thighs were set in motion."  Several people present believed that Forster was being brought back to life (The Newgate Calendar reports that even if this had been so, he would have been re-executed since his sentence was to "hang until he be dead"). One man, Mr. Pass, the beadle of the Surgeons' Company, was so shocked that he died shortly after leaving. The hanged man was undoubtedly dead since his blood had been drained and his spinal cord severed after the execution.   Top Ten Frankenstein Movies https://screenrant.com/best-frankenstein-movies-ranked-imdb/

Chthonia
Black Annis

Chthonia

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 48:58


This week we look at Black Annis, a female hag figure from fairy lore that devours children and wears their skins. Supposedly living in the Dane Hills near Leicester, we look at the different stories of her origin, and alleged sightings near the church of St. Mary De Castro.

ReddX Neckbeards and Nerd Cringe
ReddX's Full Saga of Historybeard: Fascist sympathizer supposedly obsessed with history? Hmmm

ReddX Neckbeards and Nerd Cringe

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 42:55


In this episode of r/NeckbeardStories we compare notes with Historybeard. He's an idealist in the purest form, but he doesn't just spend all his time dreaming. He uses his interests to fuel his education and while he is weird, as most neckbeards are, he has certain qualities about him that I can't help but admire.YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/reddxyDiscord: https://discord.gg/Sju7YckUWuPayPal: https://www.paypal.me/daytondoesPatreon: http://patreon.com/daytondoesTwitter: http://www.twitter.com/daytondoesFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/ReddXD/Teespring: https://teespring.com/stores/reddx

Bears & Beers
Chicago Bears vs Green Bay Packers on Sunday Night Football

Bears & Beers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 32:58


Da Bears face off against their arch nemesis, the Green Bay Packers, tonight.  Aaron Rodgers proclaimed, "I still own you" a few weeks back in Chicago.  With his 22-5 record against Da Beloved, it is hard to dispute.  Can the Bears use this as motivation?  Justin Fields gets his first taste of the rivalry in Lambeau.  Very important for the young QB to experience this and show leadership.  Rumors continue to swirl over the future of Chicago Bears' management, with Trace Armstrong's name as top management being floated.  Supposedly, he spoke with Bears brass this week and is tied to Ohio State HC Ryan Day, as his agent.   We feature Door County Brewery in Baileys Harbor, WI.  True to Wisconsin, their signature beer is the Polka King Porter. We love the Chicago Bears and we love Beers!  Go Bears!

Catch my Killer
Episode 113: Alex VanDalsen

Catch my Killer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 44:01


I spoke with a mother named Jennifer VanDalsen about her son Alex VanDalsen, a twenty-one-year old, who died under mysterious circumstances. Alex was born Jasmine Mckenzie Danaher, but planning on transitioning into a man. Therefore, I will refer to him as Jennifer's son throughout this story. At 15, Alex decided he knew he was a male and wanted to live as one. Throughout this episode I'll refer to the victim as Alex and use male pronouns. He lived in Lafayette, Indiana. On February 3, 2021, it was a cold and snowy Indiana evening. Alex left home before midnight for unknown reasons. He did not tell anyone where he was going. On February 9th, two thousand twenty one, Alex was found dead. His death was ruled a suicide without any investigation.Alex's family has taken issue with the ruling. Police told Alex's family that "There was no immediate sign of trauma on the body." However, it wasn't until Alex's body arrived at the funeral home that they discovered he died from a gunshot wound to the head. The family asked the detective why he said there was no trauma to the body when there was a gunshot wound? It was less than twenty degrees when Alex was found 10 miles from his home. He also had asthma and wasn't dressed for the weather. Such treacherous weather would have made it impossible for him to walk ten miles. He would have died from exposure. Alex's family is certain he met with someone who knows what happened to him. The family also had a concern about the actual bullet wound. I was informed the entrance wound was larger than the exit. As someone who fired weapons in the military, this isn't feasible. The exit wound is typically larger when leaving the human body. The family also said Alex wasn't tested for having gunshot residue on his hands and the weapon wasn't checked for fingerprints. Also, Alex didn't own a gun, so where did this gun come from and who owned it? There were also no shell casings. How could Alex kill himself with a gun and not leave a shell casing behind? And there was no blood splatter at the scene. If Alex killed himself, there would be a casing and blood present at the scene. Most likely Alex was picked up by someone, shot to death and then dumped where he was found. Unfortunately, law enforcement hasn't waivered from the suicide ruling. Do you know what happened to Alex? Who did he go to meet on the night of his death? How did he end up dead 10 miles near his home? Supposedly, he killed himself. Problem is there were no shells or blood evidence. If have any information regarding Alex VanDalsen, please contact the Tippecanoe County Sheriff sheriff's department at 765-423-9388. And if you would like more information about this case, please visit the Justice for Alex Blake VanDalsen Facebook page. **** This week's podcast was sponsored by the Raw Truth: Stories of Female Infidelity podcast. For additional information about this podcast, please visit their website: https://www.rawtruthstoriesoffemaleinfidelity.com/Please also visit my website for more information about my true crime and paranormal newspaper columns at www.themarcabe.com. You can also help support my podcast by purchasing a cup of $5 coffee every month. To help support the podcast, please visit https://www.buymeacoffee.com/catchmykiller. If you would like to contact me about this podcast, please visit my websites www.catchmykiller.com or www.themarcabe.com

WBZ NewsRadio 1030 - News Audio
Supposedly Haunted East Bridgewater Antique Shop To Make TV Appearance

WBZ NewsRadio 1030 - News Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 0:47


WBZ's Chris Fama goes to an antique shop in East Bridgewater that's being featured on the travel channel because of its supposed paranormal happenings.

The Shrieking Shack
Episode 152: Magic. Fantastic.

The Shrieking Shack

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 148:45


We make our glorious return to shake off the cobwebs, chat about scams involving beloved 2000s brands, and lay out some predictions for the third Fantastic Beasts movie that is still happening, somehow. SUPPOSEDLY the real answers are out there... we wouldn't know, though. We're talking about Fantastic Beasts a lot here which means I should give a general content warning for that movie which, if you've forgotten, involves a surprising amount of sexual violence for a Harry Potter movie, as well as general tastelessness.

Sentientism
87: "You CAN change other people!" - Howie Jacobson of Plant Yourself - Sentientist Conversation

Sentientism

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 80:06


Howie (@askhowie & plantyourself.com) is a coach & author & podcast host. His coaching work with people & organisations focuses on leadership, values, productivity & health. In Sentientist Conversations we talk about the two most important questions: “what's real?” & “what matters?” Sentientism is "evidence, reason & compassion for all sentient beings." The video of our conversation is here on YouTube. We discuss: 00:00 Welcome 02:01 Howie's Intro - Coaching & writing - "Not a big fan of capitalism" - Effective altruism through organisations - "Helping people respond to reality" - Not knowing "what's real?" or "what matters?" but let's try to work it out 04:54 What's Real? - Growing up in a conservative Jewish household in New Jersey - Culturally Jewish but "kind of atheist" - Mother's history of the holocaust & kindertransport - Father's "Jewish identity & socialism." Needling the Rabbi: "We have to rest on the Sabbath so now I have to walk up 30 flights of stairs?!" - Being given "The Truth About the Bible" book. Bible inconsistencies & immorality - "The Jews have learned to argue & doubt & question" - "The Jewish people must survive" as a core commitment - Einstein, Marx, Freud - A militant zionist phase - "It was safe." There was no danger to the ritual vs. sweatlodges - A "safe, conventional, suburban religion" - Attending an Ivy League college - "There are smart people who believe in ghosts" - Exploring parapsychology - "There were serious academics questioning my worldview which was completely materialistic" - Rejecting the exclusive tribalism & the simplistic narratives of religion but "There is a big effing mystery out there" - Shamanic practices "oh honey, it's all bullshit" - Being sceptical of our own perceptions & reasoning. Be open - Predictive dreams - Contextualism... "How is this working for me?" - "Look for & assume positive intent... then act like it's true" - Talking to trees, brambles as defences, mycorrhizal fungi as comms networks - Narratives of dominion vs. "consciousness in everything" - Arbitrary vs. narratives grounded in reality - "Supposedly using evidence & reason we've destroyed the planet" - Checks: 1) consistency with the natural world & 2) compassion 32:50 What Matters? - Be nice to people - Mother's experience of Nazi occupation of Austria. "The teachers & her so called friends were wearing Nazi armbands" & "Punch a Nazi". ...and much more. Full show notes at Sentientism.info and on YouTube. Sentientism is “Evidence, reason & compassion for all sentient beings.” More at Sentientism.info. Join our "I'm a Sentientist" wall via this simple form. Everyone, Sentientist or not, is welcome in our groups. The biggest so far is here on FaceBook. Come join us there! Thanks Graham.

Rising Star - The New Music Showcase
Tarah Who? - Supposedly, A Man

Rising Star - The New Music Showcase

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 64:54


https://tarahwho.com Tarah Carpenter of L.A. band Tarah Who? talks about their latest single "Supposedly, A Man" and the current state of women in rock.

2 Guys from Vegas
Episode 97 Covid and The Rolling Stones

2 Guys from Vegas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 84:22


Jason and his girl get Covid. Todd and his son get free tickets to The Rolling Stones. Who says life isn't fair? Why do people continue to lie about the Rittenhouse case and Ivermectin? Supposedly healthy athletes dropping dead early. Jose Canseco's balls and much more.

The Reality Revolution Podcast
The Law Of One - Densities Of Experience

The Reality Revolution Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 72:21


There has been a lot of confusion in the explanation of the word density and what 4th density truly is as it is explained in the ra material and the law of one.  Density is about complexity.  Photons of light with a greater density of information. The densities of experience are a series of environments, from the firstthrough the seventh density, each succeeding density designed to funion tooffer us material for the evolution of our bodies, minds and spirits. Eachdensity or grade has inner or thought planes and outer or physical planes. Supposedly we are now in third density. But what is a density, exactly?Various disciplines use the word in different ways. The dictionary definitionof density is the quality of being dense, close or compact or the quantity ornumber of something per unit. In physics it is defined as the ratio of themass of an object to its volume. A trustworthy Ra/Larson scholar, BrucePeret, makes a distinction between the thought planes and the outer planes: What I understood from The Ra Material is that “density” is a measurement of the overall complexity of some structure, form or entity, in atemporal, rather than spatial, sense. To use Ra terms, the density of anobject is the “size of the time/space” it occupies, whereas the volume isthe “size of the space/time” it occupies. For more on the law of one, ra and q'uo check out llresearch.org Alternate Universe Reality Activation  get full access to new meditations, new lectures, recordings from the reality con and the 90 day AURA meditation schedulehttps://realityrevolutionlive.com/aura45338118 BUY MY BOOK! https://www.amazon.com/Reality-Revolution-Mind-Blowing-Movement-Hack/dp/154450618X/ Listen my book on audible https://www.audible.com/pd/The-Reality-Revolution-Audiobook/B087LV1R5V Music by Mettaverse inner worldssolsticeinto the omniversenocturnejourney through the multiversefield of onenesslight quotienttravel lightdream flowbloomnocturne  ➤ Listen to them on Soundcloud: http://bit.ly/2KjGlLI➤ Follow them on Instagram: http://bit.ly/2JW8BU2➤ Join them on Facebook: http://bit.ly/2G1j7G6➤ Support their Work at Patreon: http://bit.ly/2TXQhu3➤ Subscribe to their channel here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyvjffON2NoUvX5q_TgvVkw For all episodes of the Reality Revolution – https://www.therealityrevolution.com Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/The-Reality-Revolution-Podcast-Hosted-By-Brian-Scott-102555575116999 Join our facebook group The Reality Revolution https://www.facebook.com/groups/523814491927119 Subscribe to my Youtube channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOgXHr5S3oF0qetPfqxJfSw Contact us at media@advancedsuccessinsitute.com #quo #harvest #lawofone #ramaterial #newearth #dolorescannon #greatawakening

The Reseller Hangout Podcast
How This Retired Couple Makes $12K/Mo Flipping Large Items Online

The Reseller Hangout Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 27:09


Check out our FREE workshop to see if flipping high profit items would be a good fit for you: https://courses.fleamarketflipper.com/flipper-university-workshop-webinarTRANSCRIPT:Rob: All right today, Jack, we're so happy that you're jumping on here to give us some great information about your reselling business. So Jack, welcome to the podcast. Please give us a little bit of information on your background, and kind of where you're at in your reselling business right now. Jack: I can do that, Rob. Welcome, everybody. Let's go back a ways. Very early in, in my life and career, I was a dairy farmer. Okay, [00:01:00] that's getting up and milking cows, feeding animals, doing hay. That, that whole bit, I did it through high school, did it through college, did it after college for full-time for a while. It was family. It was my single uncle.And that really is the compass that set my direction in life. I knew, at college, if this man could get up at five o'clock and milk cows, I could get up and study and be a better person. So, it's made my compass throughout life. College was environmental studies. After college working on the farm, I was also a regional writer and conservation periodical.And over the years, it morphed into me starting up working in the horticulture industry, getting away from animal husbandry into horticulture. And that's what I've done for the last 30 years. I started a national employment newspaper for horticulture employment back in the [00:02:00] mid nineties called Farrell's Jobs In Horticulture. I sold it in the late, late nineties and in 2000, my largest advertiser asked me to come to Florida. They were executive recruiters for the horticulture industry. So in 2000 we left Pennsylvania moved to Florida, and work with a Sanford company called Floor Search, retiring the very last day of 2018.And I'm married to my life partner and partner in the flipping business, Joan, and I cannot say enough about how genuine a person Joan is. We have two daughters, Jacqueline and Gina and two son-in-laws, Joe and Mark, and now we have three granddaughters. Abigail is three, Ellis two, and little Weston's 10 months, but he'll turn one in January. So we'll have a 3, 2, 1, and maybe it's done. We don't know yet. [00:03:00] So that's a little bit about me and a little about, about the family. Rob: I love it. I love it. And the cool thing about this is your story is totally different than our story I've been flipping for over 20 years. Now, you don't have any experience in the flipping industry. So how did you go to that next level? What caused you, a little over a year ago, what caused you to, to jump into the flipping industry? Jack: Well, it's partially right and let me add some, some depth to it. Flipper University, yes. We're alumni 12 months, now. How do you like that term? Alumni?But I would look back over the years. We've flipped various items. I'm the only person I can think of that I've had two open houses and I've sold two homes by having open houses. And I just have the feeling if you can make things look good and of course need to be good that somebody will buy it.So we did that, Joan [00:04:00] and I rehabbed three mobile homes, two single-wides and a double-wide. So we sold those. We also have flipped five RVs. We had three class B units, the van type RVs and two travel trailers that we've used and sold. And I guess lastly, I've had six maxi motor scooters, Suzukis, Hondas, and have sold those. So we have flipped things.But never with the continuity, the uniformity that you all have put together in the Flipper University. And I heard about it and I called Joan, and I was traveling said, Hey, you know, we need to listen to, to this and, and track it out. And we did, and firm believers that education is cheap compared to ignorance. So we got the education. Rob: Awesome. So you do have some history [00:05:00] and it's actually larger stuff, houses, RVs, motorcycles, and stuff like that. That is you have some experience on the flipping realm. Melissa: And I know Joan's very thrifty too. Like she likes to save money so that the two of you together are good, are an awesome pair.Rob: Exactly. That's really, that's really, really cool. So. Cool. Good, good. So now we have a little bit of background. Melissa: And so right now, are you flipping part-time or full-time? Jack: Right now we are flipping full-time. However, once the school year started, we are taking care of our infant grandson. So we're trying to figure that one out, and we've come up with a strategy. I would work mornings, Joan would take over and work the afternoon. So she would have Weston during the morning, I have him in the afternoon, and for the most part it works, but it sure slows down momentum. Now I'm not saying it begrudgingly, family comes first and we're glad to have the little guy in our life. He also brings some possible [00:06:00] germs with him because Joan has been ill, I've been ill, Joan's ill again. So it's just one of those things where it could be related. It could not be, but we're working through it. Rob: That's it. That's awesome. And I want to definitely point out one key point you said: family comes first. Melissa and I are strong believers everything that we do in this business is so we can spend time with each other and with our kids. So that is one of the main reasons why we flip, so kudos to you. Yeah. You guys, you have our schedule, you could take it the wrong way and say, oh man, I don't want to take care of my grandkids, but I applaud you. That is amazing that that is your outlook on it. And I agree a hundred percent. That's why we do what we do as well. Melissa: It gives you the flexibility to be able to make those choices, which is pretty cool. Rob: Absolutely. Absolutely. Jack: Yeah, I said to Joan last evening if I had some type of job or part-time job, I don't have the flexibility that this provides. And here we are, we can take care of, we can help our daughter and son-in-law, taking care of the little one. Supposedly beginning of [00:07:00] the January, he'll be old enough to go into a daycare where his sister now attends. So that should be, should be happening early January. Rob: Awesome. Awesome. Melissa: Give it a little more time.Rob: Cool. Melissa: So what right now, where are you selling? What platform is your platform of choice to sell on? Jack: Yeah, I think, eBay is definitely our, our platform of choice. Normally we can achieve higher profit margins with the items that we sell and, you know, either palletize package, the items for boxing, FedEx, or YRC shipments. The item's out the door. It's pretty much handled on our timeline with our ability to be flexible. We do sell things locally. Facebook Marketplace, OfferUp, Craigslist, and you're coordinating schedules. You're, you know, you have scammers, you have low ballers, you have no shows. You, you have a lot [00:08:00] of things. You meet a lot of nice people, I'm not bashing it, but you have to be a little more diligent and, less flexible. And I know that, Joan recently got us set up on Amazon, so we'll be on Amazon. We were approached by a gentleman that we know that manufacturers automotive detailing products, and he talked to us about selling those on eBay and Amazon, so we're in the process. Not sure if that'll come together, but that's a possibility. But eBay is our go-to thing with items that justify being on eBay. Rob: I love it. I love it. And you're not limiting it to eBay, so you're actually looking other avenues. And if they come through, they do, if they don't, they don't. But that's, that's us as well.We love eBay. We use eBay for probably 90% of our sales, so, but don't ever close your mind. There could be something out there and when you close your mind, that's when you miss it. So you have to be able to look at those other avenues, look at other, other opportunities that that approach [00:09:00] you, or that come into your, your path that you're able to take advantage of. So that's awesome for sure. Melissa: And so what are some of your favorite items that you guys sell? Like what are, what are some of the things that you like to sell? Jack: I would say that our categories right now, Melissa, would be automotive, exercise equipment, restaurant equipment, recreation. And I'm wanting to know if I could possibly interest any of the listeners into a rotisserie.Now the rotisserie I'm talking about, it's not for pigs, it's not for chickens. This thing is a massive thing that you put up like a pickup truck on or a car on, and you can rotate it around to work on it. We had a, a neighbor in our warehouse development that moved recently, and he was not going to take a lot of items that didn't apply to his business. His business model had morphed about 10 years ago and he had a lot of stuff that he inventoried. So [00:10:00] I don't how many pallets of stuff he brought to us, maybe 8, maybe 10. It's a lot. So we're working through that now, but one of them is this giant quote, unquote rotisserie is what you call it.Rob, you may have seen, seen a rotisserie before, but, it's a big old thing that hopefully we'll make some decent money on it. And likewise, we've sold some other things that he's brought already, but we're working through that, you know, have a food warmer, it's really nice. You've been to a buffet meal where the you're sitting there and these servers bringing a full plated meal and take the lid off and put it in front of you, well I have one of those that we cleaned up and looking good.It's listed on eBay. I even have a two-wheel golf cart. Don't know if you've ever heard of a two-wheel golf cart, but there is such an animal. It's essentially a scooter that the manufacturer puts up place where you put your golf bag on the back and all the other accoutrements you'd [00:11:00] find in a four-wheel golf cart.So those are some of the things we chose the scale up early on to bigger items. Find that there's more profitability trying to find if there's demand on eBay. And so, you know, I've sold a Bowflex to a gentlemen in Colorado and there's plenty of Bowflexes out there, but man, that time it took to tear it apart and wrap it and palletize it and then ship it.I haven't tackled another one of those again. So some things we make mistakes on too. I have a Baskin and Robbins ice cream cooler, big, old thing that you would walk up to any Baskin and Robbins counter and be looking through the glass at the various ice creams inside. I was giving it a good cleaning. I think I messed up the little thermostat on it. It's a little controller, tell it when to turn on and when not to. No big deal, $75 plug a new one in. Well found out [00:12:00] that they don't log, they no longer, make this particular controller, so I've been struggling to find used or even a new one. So things that, that happened, some things go sideways, but most things don't, and that's the, the point I want to make, not everything's going to be peaches and cream.Rob: 100%. We would agree with that. Yeah, but you're learning from it. So you're learning you're from your mistakes and you're learning from the process that you're going through, which is awesome. You always want to be learning in this business. And you have to have the outlook on it. Okay, what can I learn from this situation rather than getting bitter at it and being like, okay, that's it. I had a bad experience. I'm I'm not flipping anymore. Right. You know, I'm not reselling anymore because of this bad experience. So yeah. That's an awesome mindset. I applaud you on that as well. Because that is how you become successful. You have to be able to take the good with the bad and realize, okay, what can I learn from this situation, which is totally awesome. For sure. Melissa: So what would you say was one of your most memorable flips or biggest flips that you've had? Jack: Well, it's somewhat [00:13:00] of a circuitous story, but I'll try to hit it straight on. We purchased seats out of a 15-passenger Ford transit van. This person contacted us because we'd purchased Mercedes seats from a conversion van company.So anyway, there was a connection there. So we bought his seats and he came, I took them out. We bought the hardware, everything associated with it. He's a lawyer he's going to travel the U.S. converting it into a mobile office, and I hope he's out there having a big old time. He should be. And so we advertise the seats on eBay, advertise locally, get local call when we were traveling the, the SunRail for, to celebrate Joan's birthday in Winter Park, which to everybody listening to it, it's a local commuter train in the Orlando area.And anyway, this lady said her husband wanted to buy a particular seat, so [00:14:00] son came to pick up the seat a few days later. Showed the son, you know, we have more seats. We had hardware and the son comes back, well, he said he may, his father may be interested in the hardware. So I follow up a week later and they got back to me and said, yeah, we are interested in the hardware to hold the seats to the floor of our van.So they picked that up. And a couple of weeks later, the son calls and says, hey, we have some things we'd like for you to look at. Could you come over in a, not too far away, 15 miles away. So we drive over, didn't ask what they were and we walk into one room and there's this tall, it's called a turbo air. It's something you would see, like in a row, in a airport where you walk by, reach in and grab a sandwich or fruit. There's no doors to open. It's an open air thing, gleaming brand new, never used. It turns out they'd been in the restaurant business for a long time, [00:15:00] eateries all over the United States, food service. And for whatever reason, this one never got implemented.Of course, they wanted a decent dollar for it and they sell for $5,500 well, they sell for about $7,000 new, can resell a new one for $5,500. We ended up buying it for $3,500, a little more than we surely would like to but we, they had a lot of other things. We offered pennies on the dollar, and got those. The keystone thing was getting this cooler off their hands, which they wanted, but we got the other stuff cheap and we've been selling it.Next phase. We have it on eBay. The cooler sells in a couple of weeks to a gentleman in Brooklyn. I think he's English was his second language. Got it shipped. It was a challenge to lift this heavy thing around and call it, ties it, but that all got accomplished. It got shipped up there by YRC freight. Fine. Let the man know that it's sitting there on the terminal and [00:16:00] in Brooklyn and he's and I said he can go get it now. He's coming back to me in his broken English corresponding. How do you mean? I said well you need to pick it up and he didn't get upset. I gave him options and how I could get it, rent a truck, know somebody who has a truck anyway, he picked it up. He got it unwrapped at his place uncrated. And then he's coming back to us saying, I'd like to buy another one, just like it. And of course, in the flipping business you usually don't have another one just like, but the point is, if you're doing right by people and getting them the right things at a good price, you know, you'll have people, very happy with you and that's what builds your business.Melissa: Yeah, Rob: So many great nuggets in that story, for sure. So, I mean, you could dissect that yet. You created a contact by selling something to somebody, which is amazing. We always Melissa: Now you know somebody who wants one. Rob: That's right. We [00:17:00] always love making contacts. And at the same time, once you sold this one, you made another contact of a gentleman who wants more when you come across them if you can come across them. Yes, so many great nuggets in that story. Absolutely love it, Jack. That is the key to this business is, is making your customers happy, and creating those contacts and creating that more of a, what would you call it like, relationships with, you know, just other people that you can, and you have that relationship with that you can talk to, and sell other stuff too, or buy other stuff from, so, yeah, that's awesome. That is a huge point in this business for sure. Melissa: That's helped our business a lot. It's fun to create those contexts and it doesn't come naturally at first, but then if you're just nice to people, you, it's amazing what a friend of a friend wants to give you. It's kinda crazy. So I know, you jumped in, you guys jumped in feet first, like ready, like hit the ground running didn't even like stop to breathe, like you were going for it. So the first three months you guys hit about $6,800, I think it was in sales your first three months. Since then, what has been your [00:18:00] biggest month? Do you know? On eBay? Jack: I know about two months ago before we started taking care of Weston and I looked and Joan might know, but we were on a 90-day average at $36 or $39 thousand. Rob: Wow.Melissa: That's awesome. Jack: I know it's come down. I have it. That's I think it was 36, maybe it was 39, but that was back two months ago.Melissa: You posted it in the group. I can't remember what it was either, but I knew it was up there. So that's a that's awesome. 90 days time. Rob: That's amazing, not 3,900, not $3,500, $35,000, $39,000. Jack is moving some inventory. Melissa: In three months time. Rob: In three months time, which is awesome. That is amazing. And again, he's only been doing this for the last 12 months, and he's really learning a lot as you guys can hear from his stories. He's learning a lot, he's taking all this in and it's amazing to see his progression. So that is awesome. Melissa: So what would [00:19:00] be three things that you've maybe would attribute to the success of your business?Jack: I think one thing is division of duties and, you know, Joan does administration side of the business, the listings, and bill like, you know, paying bills, sourcing product. She's good at that. I focus on operations so I refurbish and clean, I photograph, I do the boxing and the shipping. So trying to stay off, trying to stay out of each other's hair as much as possible. Small businesses, it's impossible, but as much as possible. And I think the work ethic, you know, bring that full circle. Farming, those 5:00 AM milkings, it's just, as I said, it's been a compass, my approach to work and you've met Joan, but most of you haven't. Joan is a dedicated person to anything and everyone, family, friends, community, and this business. So she's this extremely [00:20:00] dedicated, course she's dedicated to me, which I'm not sure sometimes she gets the best end of the stick, but she's just a great, great person to be in with. And we have fun. And I guess the third thing is exceeding the expectations of customers.I sold something just short story sold an LG Sidekick. If anybody knows what that is, because five months ago, I didn't, but it's a, it's a little pedestal washing machine that fits under a standard size LG washing machine. So if you have a small load of whites or something, you can be pushing up through while your big machine on top is running it.So it takes the place of a pedestal that a lot of machines are on. One evening a lady inquired from Mississippi about it, and we were on it. And within an hour it was sold to her, and by the time I got done out at the warehouse at say nine o'clock that night, she had the [00:21:00] pro number so she could track it through YRC.And she's saying all these accolades, "Nobody's ever done this with me on eBay. And this is so wonderful. You guys are such great." And at one point I said, "You're gonna have to stop saying this Trish, because you're gonna make me blush," all laughing, but you know, that's our approach. Try to exceed expectations, try to have things clean and look good. It goes back to the flipping those houses years ago. You know, just make it real. Melissa: Yeah. Rob: I love it. Those are a great three tips. Jack, thank you so much for those business duties and in Jack's case, he is working with his wife. They both are retired and they're doing this full time. So they're able to delegate who does what and try to stay out of each other's hair, which is awesome, and then ethics. Work ethics is huge. Guys, this is not a get rich quick. All you resellers know this, you know that it takes work at this. You just, hopefully you'll love it. I love sourcing items. That's what I'm really good at.[00:22:00] So hopefully you guys, you guys understand that. And then the third one is definitely, and that's a big one that Melissa and I always say is under promise and over deliver. You want your customers to be happy. If they're happy, they come back to you. They give you other contacts, they give you other stuff. So that is the biggest thing is you want to make sure that item is meeting or exceeding the expectations that your buyers have. So, Jack amazing, amazing tips. We love them. Thank you so much for jumping on here. Do we have any more questions? Melissa: Just some fun questions. Like, so just to get to know Jack a little bit. So what is one of your hobbies besides flipping or is flipping your hobby really, at that pace? Jack: I created an edible landscape at the house we lived in, so I had this bonanza of oranges, grapefruit kumquats, limes, pecans, mulberries, figs, blueberries. And then we sold our home and moved into a condominium. So I pivoted and, you know, [00:23:00] hiking, kayaking, bicycling, things that I had done, but I do more of now.And Joan loves fishing. She's just passionate, always has been. I don't have her passion though. I fished a lot. I don't have her passion for that. And the things I mentioned, she enjoys doing this well. So we're, you know, really a well-matched team in the harness. We really enjoy doing a lot of the same things.Rob: That's awesome. Melissa: We talk about that a lot, because it is important to do stuff, even if maybe your fishing's not your thing, but you enjoy doing it with her. So like, that's the same thing that we like to do stuff with each other. Like, I don't really love the water, surprise, because we're on the water almost every week on the lake, but I like to go out there with you. And the same thing with running, he hated running, but he likes to do it with me. So now it's, we've learned. Now we like it. Now we really like each other, what we do.Rob: It helps to grow each other together. So, yeah. That's awesome that you in general like that, so, [00:24:00] yeah, that's, that's really cool.Jack: We have a tandem kayak and it's pedal driven and it only has one pedal drive. So I sit in the back and I pedal this sucker and she's up front and she's casting and doing, doing her thing. And it's funny, we were in the think was the Dead River over near Leesburg, and these boats were going by and, you know, pontoon boats full of people and they were laughing, making fun of her, "She's not doing anything up there and he's doing all the work back there." So, but you know, it, it works. I I'm getting exercise and she's having fun. Rob: That's awesome. I love it. Melissa: Last fun question. So your favorite vacation destination, I think you guys like to travel, don't you and then this whole craziness hit, but you, before that you liked to travel, I think. Jack: Yeah, we, we love traveling, I would say if it's a destination, Key West is pretty cool. Pretty cool place to go [00:25:00] to. I guess our point of view is there's so many places to explore that we're not one of those couples that would go to the same place year after year standing reservation. We're going to be going somewhere different. You know, we had a chance to, to go to Paris with our daughter and son-in-law, and they had a two-month-old at the time. That was a couple of years ago, right before COVID hit. So we're going to West Virginia this weekend. Friends are celebrating an anniversary up there. And so we're going to hop on a plane and do that thing, but we're talking about that yesterday. Once we get around the corner of this year, do a little bit more traveling. Melissa: And always a stop in at the thrift stores and stuff nearby right? Jack: There's always something to look forward to. Rob: We totally agree. We love traveling and sourcing while we're on the road. It's fun. It's a, it's a good time. And we're like you as well. We, we don't like any specific destination, but it's fun to see new things. We have so many [00:26:00] things to be able to see. So we're always trying to find new things and do that. Awesome. Well, Jack. Jack: I was living vicariously through you two last summer, when you were on your marathon trip, it was great. Rob: It was a blast. Yeah. Thank you, so well, cool. Well Jack, thank you so much for your time. Thank you so much for your value bombs that you've been dropping through this interview. We're so thankful for you, thankful to watch your growth and help you along the way as well. So, like I said, we, we, we greatly appreciate your time that you've taken to come on this interview with us and, and give some great, great value bombs for, for the audience. Melissa: Yes, thank you so much. Jack: Hats off to you and Melissa, keep up the great work. We're listening. Rob: Thanks, Jack. Have a great day, guys. See ya! 

The Rebuild: A Cleveland Browns Pod
A Win Is A Win...Supposedly. Browns Escape Against Lions

The Rebuild: A Cleveland Browns Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 26:21


On this episode, Jordan and Henry react to the Browns narrow victory over the winless Lions and try to be as optimistic as possible. Should Baker Mayfield have even played in this game? What is going on with John Johnson III? Can you expect anything from the Browns against the Ravens next week? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Animal Radio®
1146. Another Supposedly Euthanized Pet Found Alive - Crooked Veterinarian?

Animal Radio®

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 79:48


The Science Behind Loving Our Pets Anthrozoologist John Bradshaw says our love for pets is in our DNA. It's likely that if our parents carried the gene, you'll inherently love pets. John explains why humans are genetically encoded to enjoy companion animals. Listen Now The Importance of Pet Enrichment It isn't enough to supply food, shelter and health care for your pet. They need more. Your pet needs enrichment. This could mean anything from food puzzles to exercise. Dr. Marty Becker explains in the next segment of the Fear Free Expert Series. Listen Now Facebook Data Reveals Differences Between Cat and Dog Owners Facebook is all about the data. Facebook combed through its user base collecting information from 160,000 users in the United States who shared photos of cats or dogs (or both). They used object recognition technology to identify photos. They found dog people have more friends and more likely to be in a relationship. 30% of cat people are not in a relationship, compared to 24% of dog people. This is just the tip of the data iceberg. Listen Now Another Supposedly Euthanized Pet Found Alive A New Jersey woman who thought her dog was dead believed that her 15-year-old Mini Pinscher named Caesar had been euthanized 5 months earlier at her vet's office.  However, she recently found out that the dog had actually been living with an employee of the vet. Caesar's owner had even picked up his collar, paid the bill and received a letter from the staff with their condolences.  The woman received an anonymous tip from someone who told her that her dog was still alive and in the care of a vet technician that worked at the hospital but that the veterinarian no longer worked there. Listen Now Holiday Statistics Paint An Ugly Picture For Our Pets The busiest time of the year for a veterinarian is between Halloween and Christmas. Well meaning pet parents could be feeding their pets fixings from the dinner table, unknowingly causing pancreatitis. Redbarn's Lindsay Tracy is back with tips and tricks to avoid being a holiday statistic, while sharing the holiday with your your furry-family. Listen Now Read more about this week's show.

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show
Supposedly Better Than Superhead

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 4:05


A 54 year working girl retires. Her oral talents and abilities are well documented. In her prime she could easily satisfy 50 to 100 per night. DAMN!!! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
Is Your Firewall Actually Protecting You? What Should You Be Doing?

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 84:27


Is Your Firewall Actually Protecting You? What Should You Be Doing? New stats are out this week. So what's the number one vector of attack against us? Our Firewalls. And they're failing. So, what's going on. And what can you do about it? [Automated transcript follows] [00:00:16] And of course, I'm always talking about cyber security, because if you ask me that is one of the biggest problems we have in business. [00:00:27] Today. Well, yeah, you got to find employees. In fact, uh, it's almost impossible to find them in the cyber security space as well. And it's been hard for years. So I try to keep you up-to-date here. We've got boot camps that are coming up and you are really going to like them. We've been working on some supplemental materials for it. [00:00:47] And of course these boot camps are always free, so you can join it. You can have your friends come and learn the. Basics. It's not one of these high sell things. Right. I, I got a little letter in the mail this week saying, Hey, you can come and get a free steak dinner. And of course it's kind of like a timeshare, right? [00:01:09] Jay, you have to listen to the pitch. Yes. Stay over. On us. And you are going to be sitting there for four hours listening to this crazy pitch that's going on. That's not what my bootcamps are. Anybody that's been to. One of them will tell you we work on it. I explain it. You know what you have to do, how you have to do it, the wise, the winds, the wherefores. [00:01:35] So if you would like to learn more for yourself, Make sure you sign up Craig peterson.com sign up for my newsletter. And when a bootcamp is coming up, I will be sure to tell you about it in the newsletter so that you can attend. And it's important to, to understand that this is yeah. Aimed at business, the, these boot camps, but almost everything businesses have to do or shouldn't be doing the same thing applies to you in your. [00:02:08] So, if you are a small business person, if you're someone who has some it experience, and you've been assigned to worry about cyber security, this is for you. If you are a very small business and you're kind of the Jack of all trades, and you've got to worry about cybersecurity, this is for you. And I just got. [00:02:31] This week from someone on my email list who is retired and she was talking about her husband and her, they don't have any kids, no errors. They're trying to protect their financial investments. And of course I responded saying, Hey, I'm not a financial investment advisor, but I can certainly give you some cyber security input, which I did. [00:02:53] And you can ask your questions as well. I'm more than glad to hear them. And you probably, if you've sent them in, you know, I always answer them now. My big man, a few days might take me a week, but I will get around to it. And I try and respond to the emails. Sometimes I answered here on the radio show or on my podcast, but usually it's via email me. [00:03:17] At Craig peterson.com. And of course, that's also on my website, Craig peterson.com. And that's also my name Craig Peters on.com. So let's get into the firewall thing. When you have a network, you are connecting that network to your computers, maybe. To your security cameras, to your printers that you have, maybe there's a lock system. [00:03:44] Maybe there's more, all of this stuff is interconnected and it's all rather well and good. You can have a whole lot of fun with it, but it is not as particularly good if you can't get out to the internet. So what do we do? We hook our network, whether it's home or if it's business to the internet. Now, you know, all of this stuff so far, right? [00:04:06] You're following me. The internet is actually inter connected networks. In case you didn't know, there are now millions of networks that are connected on the internet. There are core networks out there. We were my company like number 10,000. I think it was, uh, a S an R a S number autonomous system. So we were fairly early on. [00:04:32] And of course, as you know, I've been on the internet in various forums since the early 1980s and helping to develop the protocols, but it is important to remember it is an interconnected network of networks. You might ask why? Well, the bottom line is you aren't connecting your network with other networks that have malicious software on them. [00:04:58] Maybe they're just poorly configured. Maybe they're causing a denial of service attack effectively because there's so badly configured. But whatever the case may be, you are still exposed. If you look at the traffic that's coming to your router. So your router is sitting at the edge of your network connected to your internet service provider. [00:05:19] So it might be Comcast or Verizon or a whole slew of others. But your network is connected via a router. Then the router knows how do I get my data from the input to the output or from the output to the input, if you will upstream and downstream data, that's what the router is for. And if you look at the data on your router and most of us can't, but if you were able to, what you will see is hundreds of thousands of internet packets coming to, and from your. [00:05:55] Router your endpoint every day. Usually these are bad guys doing what are called scans. They do port scans. They're primarily looking for services. So what do you, do you have a firewall now in many cases, you'll get a device from your Janette service provider that has a router built in and has a firewall built in, and it has wifi. [00:06:19] All of this stuff, all built in together makes life all nice and warm and fuzzy and Catalina, doesn't it. But in reality, it's not necessarily a good thing to have it all in one, because you're definitely not going to get the best of breed and router or firewall or wifi, but that's a different story. What is that firewall for that router? [00:06:41] Of course, it's getting all this internet traffic and anything that's on the internet that is. I'm trying to get to you is going to go through the. And anything that you are trying to send up to the internet, like for instance, to try and get a web page or something is also going to go up through that router. [00:07:02] So how do you protect yourself time? Was that there wasn't really much of a way to protect yourself. And frankly, there weren't a lot of reasons. To try and protect yourself. And the internet was just this wonderful open thing, lots of fun and played around a lot. Back in the early nineties, it was, it was just a joy in the late eighties to, to be connected up to the internet and then bad guys started doing bad things. [00:07:30] We took the concept of what you have in an automobile and applied it to the. If you're driving your car, your in the passenger compartment and that passenger compartment is hopefully warm in the winter and cool in the summertime. And you are protected from that big mean nasty engine that's in front of you, or if you're driving an electric car from those mean nasty batteries that are probably below you in that car and what's between you and the. [00:08:04] Of course a firewall. And the idea is to keep the nastiness of that engine, all of the heat, the oil, the grime, the wind, everything else is associated with that engine. Keep that away from you so that you can now drive that car just comfortably in that controlled climate of the passenger compartment, that concept was then applied to the inter. [00:08:30] And in fact, I designed and implemented one of the first firewalls ever made way back when and the firewall in the internet Partland is very similar to the car in the car. You have some protrusions through that fire. Don't you, you you've got a steering wheel. How does that get up to the front of the car? [00:08:53] Well, it goes through the firewall and around that steering wheel, of course there's some EBDM, some rubber type stuff that helps stop anything from coming through right next to that steering column. Same, thing's true with the brake pedal and the gas pedal. At least it used to be. Nowadays, it's so much of this as drive by wire, that the only thing going through the firewall is a wire and there's no mechanical linkage. [00:09:24] Unlike my car, which is a 1980 Mercedes-Benz diesel. Where yes, indeed. Direct linkages to everything. So the firewall in the cars protecting you from the nastiness in the engine compartment and the firewall, when it comes to your internet is doing something very similar. Think about your house for a minute, you have a house with doors and windows. [00:09:53] I would hope. And a chimney and maybe a couple of other protrusions that are going outside of the house. Well, you have some similar problems and when it comes to the internet and when it comes to the firewall, With your house, sir. Sure. You could post a guard out front, a whole series of them. You've got a dozen guards out front and they are all guarding that front door. [00:10:19] But if no, one's watching the back door, if no one's paying attention to the windows, there's still ways for the bad guys to get in. And that's what we're going to talk about. How does the internet firewall tie into this analogy of cars and the analogy of your home? Because it's a very important point when you get right down to it. [00:10:44] We need to understand this because the number one tactic reported this week by MITRE and Cisco is exploitation of public facing application. So I'm going to explain what that is. What's your firewall can do for you and what you should do for your firewall. A stick around. We've got a lot more coming up. [00:11:09] I want to invite you to go. Of course, right now, online to Craig peterson.com. Once you're there, just sign up for mind's newsletter. Simple Craig peterson.com. [00:11:25] This week, we found out what the top five tactics are that are most frequently being used by bad guys to attack us. This is done by MITRE and Cisco systems. Number one, public facing applications. What does that mean? [00:11:42] We've been talking about this report, but really what we've been delving into is how data flows on your network, whether it's a home network or maybe it's a business network, how does this whole mess work? [00:11:58] And when miters talks about the biggest problem here, 91% of the time being what's called an exploit of a public facing application, what does that mean? We went through the basics of a firewall and a router. So all of the data coming from the internet, coming into the router, then handed to the firewall. [00:12:24] Any data going out, goes into the firewall. And then the. So that's the pretty simplistic version. And of course the firewall on your network does a similar thing to the firewall in your car. It stops the bad stuff, at least it's supposed to, but your home and your car both have different ways of getting. [00:12:48] Past the firewall in the house. It's your doors and your windows in the car. Of course, it's where the steering column goes through where the brake pedal and the gas pedal go through the clutch, all of that stuff that perch, um, permeates, it goes through. That firewall. And of course, you've probably, if you're been around for awhile, you've had leaks coming through your firewall and, uh, you know, how poorest they can be sometimes. [00:13:18] Well, we have the same type of thing on our internet firewalls. Every home has doors and what we call the doors in on the internet is similar to what they call them. On the, in the Navy, on the water, the reports. So think about a porthole in a boat, or think about a, a door, a port, which is the French word for door. [00:13:45] What happens on the internet? For instance, if you're trying to connect to Craig peterson.com, you are going to connect to a specific port on my server. So the address typically, uh, is going to be resolved by DNS. And then once it gets to the server, you can connect to port 4 43. You might try and connect to port 80, but I'll do a redirect, but that's neither here nor there. [00:14:12] So you're going to connect to that port four 40. So my firewall has to say, Hey, if somebody is coming in and wants to get to port 4 43, which is called a well-known port, that's the port that all web server. Listen on. So if someone's trying to get to my port, my web server on port 4 43, let them in. But if someone's trying to get to another port, don't let them in. [00:14:48] Now there's multiple ways to respond or not respond. I can talk about that right now. That'd be for deep dive workshop, but the idea is. Each application that you are connecting to, or that your providing has. Part of the problem that we've been seen. And this is a very big problem is that people are not changing the administrative passwords on their machines. [00:15:20] So administrative passwords mean things like admin for the username and admin for the password on your firewall. So. Your firewall, if you have what's called when admin enabled, what that means is someone on the wide area network. In other words, The internet, someone on the internet or on the, when can connect to your firewall and control it. [00:15:51] This is, as you can imagine, a very big thing, and it is something that we cover in one of our workshops, explained it all and all of the details and what to do, but most businesses and most people have not properly configured their firewalls. When we're talking about number one, problem, 91% of the time being an exploit against public facing applications. [00:16:18] What that means is they could very well just be trying to connect to the administrative interface on your firewall. Unfortunately, they will often offer. Change the software on your firewall. So they won't just reconfigure. They'll just change it entirely. And they'll do all kinds of evil things. Again, we're not going to get into all of that and what to look for and what can happen. [00:16:44] But number one thing everybody's got to do, and I saw some stats this week as well, that made me want to bring the. Most people and most businesses about two thirds have not changed the default passwords on the hardware that they have. Now it can understand sometimes the kids confusing. No question about. [00:17:07] But if you don't change the password on something that's public facing, in other words, something that can be reached from the internet or again, the wide area network. I know there's a lot of terms for this, but something that someone else can get at from outside your network. And it's the default password like admin admin, you could be in a whole lot of. [00:17:35] So check that right now, please double check that triple check that because even if you have a router from a big internet service provider, again, like the Comcast Verizon's, et cetera of the world, they will almost always have it set up. So you can change that administrative password and Jewish. Now I, again, for clients, I have some different advice than I have for, for just regular users, but make sure you change that. [00:18:09] And here's the second part of the problem. What happens if you have a business and let's say you're not hosting your own website, like I've been doing for a couple of decades and how three 30 years, I guess now. Um, and so you've got your website hosted at some. Web height site, hosting place, you know, Gator or one eye and one eye and one or GoDaddy or whatever. [00:18:35] Okay. So, okay. That's fine. So let's not inside our network. Uh, w we don't worry about the security because that's the vendor's problem. Now we're talking about, okay, what happens. My users who need to work from home. This gets to be a very big problem for so many people, because work from home is important. [00:19:00] So what are you going to do? Well, basically in most cases, unfortunately, businesses are just exposing an application to the internet. So they might, they might. Terribly configured networks, where there is a direct connection that goes right to the files. So you connect to a port on their firewall and it immediately redirects it internally. [00:19:30] Remaps it to the file server. And some people are really, really clever. Alright. Or so they think, because what they'll do is they'll say, okay, well, you know, that, that normal port number. Okay. So I'm going to move. Port number. So you're going to connect to port 17, 17 on my firewall, and it's going to connect you to the file share on my file server so that people from home can just connect to port 17, 17, and ta-da, there are all the files and yeah, we're, we're using passwords, so it'll be okay. [00:20:06] It'll be fine. Um, but, uh, guess what it isn't for a few. Different reasons are we're going to be talking about those here in just a minute. Yeah, I want to encourage you right now. Take a minute. Go online. Craig peterson.com. You'll find lots of information there. I've got 3,500 articles, all searchable, Craig peterson.com. [00:20:32] But more importantly, make sure you sign up for my newsletter. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. So that you can keep up to date on everything that is important in all of our lives. [00:20:51] We're talking about firewalls at home at the office, what it means to have public facing services, really applications, people working from home. How can you make it easy for them and hard for the bad guy? [00:21:15] Many businesses had to quickly change the way their computers were set up because of course the lockdown and people working from home. [00:21:26] And, um, unfortunately. Many mistakes were made. And some of this, in fact, I'm going to talk a lot of this problem up to these managed services providers break, fix shops. My, my fellow information technology contractors, if you will, because they didn't know any. Most of these people have been computer people, their whole lives, right. [00:21:55] They played with PCs when they were young and they might've taken a course or two and wow. MCSC certified. Believe me, this is not something that a straight up MCSC or. And frankly, most of the it certifications can really understand or really handle the cybersecurity can be done, but there's so many things they overlook just like what I was just talking about, exposing a file server directly to the internet. [00:22:29] I mentioned, okay. While they thought it was going to be safe because there's a username and password, but there's a couple of huge problems here. Problem. Number one. When you're exposing a service to the internet, like for instance, the files server, you are exposing software that may have exploitable, but. [00:22:54] And again, going back to those stats from earlier this week, more than half of all of the systems that are out there are not patched to date. It's so bad that president Biden just ordered the federal government agencies to apply patches some as old as three years. So what happens now? Well, the bad guy scan, and guess what they found. [00:23:23] Port that you thought was just so clever because it wasn't the standard port number for that service. Maybe it's SMB or CIFS or something else. And, uh, they found it because they scan, they look, they see what the response is that tells them what type of a server sitting there. And then they try, well, let me see. [00:23:45] There's the zero day exploits, but why bother with those? Let's just start with the good old standard ones. And unfortunately, because so many machines are not patched up at all, let alone properly patched up. You, they end up getting into the machine. It's really that simple, just because it's not patched up. [00:24:08] How does that sound? Huh? Yeah, it's just plain, not patched up. It's not available for anyone to be able to use anybody to be able to access. Right. It there it's not restricted. So the passwords don't matter if you haven't patched your systems. And then the second problem is that. Are brute force attacks against so many servers out there. [00:24:36] And most of the time, what we're talking about is Microsoft, but, you know, there's the share of bugs kind of goes around, but Microsoft and really, they get nailed a lot more than most beet, mainly because they're probably the number one out there that's in use today, not in the server community, certainly, but certainly also in the. [00:24:59] It's been, you know, small businesses, that's all they know. So they just run a Microsoft server and more and more, you kind of have to run it because I, I get it. You know, there's so many apps that depend on the various functions that are provided by the active directory server at Microsoft and stuff. So we, we do that for our customers as well. [00:25:19] So are you starting to see why the brute force against a server will often get them in and the smarter guys figure out what the business is? And then they go to the dark web and they look up those business emails. Addresses that they have that have been stolen along with the passwords that were used. [00:25:43] That's why we keep saying, use a different password on every site because that stolen password now. Is going to be tried against your service, your, your file server. That might be there. You might be trying to have a VPN service that the people are VPN in from home. You might have remote desktop, which has been. [00:26:08] Abject failure when it comes to cybersecurity, it's just been absolutely terrible. So you might have any of those types of things. And if they've got your email address and they've got the passwords you've used on other sites, which they've stolen and they try them, are they going to work? Odds are yes, because most people, I got another set of stats this week. [00:26:36] Most people use the same password for every site out there or every type of site. So they might get a second, most common is they use one password for all of their social media sites. They use another one for all of their banking sites. So we cover this in some depth in our bootcamp so that you understand how to do the whole password thing. [00:27:03] And what I recommend is a piece of software called one password. I don't recommend that you just use one password for everything. I was misunderstood by someone the other day. You mean just w w I use one password for everything. Yeah, you do. And then I talked to them a little bit more because I thought that was an odd question. [00:27:24] And it turned out, he was thinking, you just have the one password, like, like, you know, P at sign SSW, zero RD. Right? You use that everywhere. No, there's a piece of software go to one password.com. That's what I recommend as a password manager. And I show you how to use that and how to use it effectively in my bootcamp. [00:27:48] Absolutely free. Just like the radio is free. I'm trying to get the information out to as many people as possible, but you gotta be on my list. Craig peterson.com. Make sure you go there. So I've explained the basics here of what happens. We have a door open or windows, open ports on our servers, on our firewalls at home. [00:28:15] And at work. So the thing to do, particularly if you're a business, but even if your home user is check that firewall configuration. And let me tell you something that probably won't come as a surprise. Most of these internet server. The providers are in the business to make as much money as possible. And cybersecurity is very much secondary. [00:28:40] They know they talk about it and they talk about software defined networks and things that sound really cool. But in reality, what they give you is. Configured very well and is going to expose you. So make sure you go in, they will set it up. For instance, if they're providing you with television services, they'll set it up so that they can just bypass your firewall and get into the cable box that they installed in your house. [00:29:09] Yeah. Obviously that's not something they should be doing because now they are opening you up to attack. What happens when there's a cybersecurity problem with the cable box? We've seen this problem too, with television vendors where they poke a hole out through your firewall so that they can then gather statistics and do firmer updates and everything else. [00:29:34] It's insane. It really is. These vendors are not thinking about you. They're not thinking about the consequences. It is a very, very sad situation, but now you know what to do and how to do it. Okay. I explained today, firewalls. I explained router. I explained ports, which should be open, which should not be open. [00:29:58] And the reasons why I even mentioned passwords, I get into that in a lot of detail in my bootcamp, Craig peterson.com to get on that waiting list. Craig peterson.com, just subscribe and you'll be kept up to date. [00:30:14] There has been a whole lot of discussion lately about Metta. You might've heard. In fact, you probably did that. Facebook changed its name to Metta and they're aiming for something called the metaverse. So what is it exactly and what's it going to do for or to you? [00:30:32] The metaverse oh my gosh. I had a great discussion this week about the metaverse this came out in, um, and originally anyways, in this novel called the what was it now? [00:30:47] A snow crash. That's what it was 1992, Neil. Stevenson or Steffenson. I'm not sure how he pronounces it, but in this book, which was a cyberpunk model and I've, I've always thought cyber punk was cool. Uh, is the metal versus an imaginary place that's made available to the public over the world wide fiber optics network. [00:31:13] And it's projected onto virtual reality goggles sound familiar yet. And in the. You can build a buildings park signs as well as things that do not exist. In reality, such as vast hovering overhead light show, special neighborhoods were three where the rules of three-dimensional spacetime are ignored and free combat zones where people can go hunt and kill each other. [00:31:42] Great article about this in ARS Technica this week. And, uh, that was a little quote from the book and from the article. Phenomenal idea. Well, if you have read or seen the movie ready player one, and I have seen the movie, but a friend of mine this week said the book is so much better. So I'm going to have to read that book, ready player one. [00:32:06] But in it, you have these people living in. Dystopian future where everything is badly worn down, the mega cities, people building on top of each other and they get their entertainment and relaxation and even make money in. Prison time by being inside this virtual world, they can go anywhere, do anything and play games, or just have fun. [00:32:39] One of the vendors that we work with at my company mainstream has this kind of a virtual reality thing for. I kind of a summit, so people can go and watch this presentation and I think it's stupid, but they, you walk in. And it's, uh, this is just on a screen. They're not using like those Oculus 3d graph glasses, but you walk into an auditorium. [00:33:13] So you've got to make your little avatar walked on. Dun dun, dun dun, dun, dun, dun, dun, dun, and then go to an empty seat. And then you have to make your avatar sit down. Right? I, I have never played a game like this. I never played second life. Never any of that sort of thing. It was kind of crazy to me. And then I was doing a presentation, so I had to go Dundon then, then, then the, up onto the rostrum there and stand behind the podium and, and then put my slides up on this virtual screen. [00:33:49] It was ridiculous. I have a full television production studio here in my, in my lab. Right. And that's, this is where I do the radio show. This is where I do my television appearances. This is where I do pretty much everything. Right. And so what I can do is I can split screen with my face, with the desktop. [00:34:12] You can see my desktop, I can draw on it, circle things, highlight things or whatever I want to do. Right. But no, no, no, no. I was in their virtual reality. And so all I could do is. I have the slides come up. In fact, I had prepared beforehand, pre-taped it? A, the whole presentation, but I couldn't play that video. [00:34:37] No, no, no. I had to show a slide deck, you know, death by PowerPoint. I'm sure you've been there before. It's very, very frustrating in case you can tell for me, well, we've seen this type of thing. I mentioned some of the things like that. I'm in second life. I'm sure you've heard of that before. Sims is another one you've probably heard of before. [00:35:01] These types of semi metaverses have been around a very long time. And, and in fact, all the way on back to the nineties is Habbo hotel. G I don't know if you ever heard of that thing, but it was non-line gaming and social space. I helped to develop one for a client of mine back in the early nineties. [00:35:23] Didn't really go very far. I think it was ahead of its time. It's it's interesting right now, enter. Mark Zuckerberg. Do you remember a few years ago, mark Zuckerberg had a presentation. He was going to make this huge announcement, right? They bought Oculus. What was it? It was like crazy amount of money. And then he came in the back of the hall. [00:35:50] And nobody noticed he walked all the way up to the front and nobody even saw him because they were all wearing these 3d glasses. And of course, today they are huge. They are awkward and they don't look that great, the pictures inside, but the idea is you can move your head around and the figures move as your head moves, almost like you're in the real world. [00:36:13] And that's kind of cool and people thought it was kind of cool and they didn't see Zuckerberg because they all had these things on. And the inside was playing a little presentation about what Facebook was going to do with Oculus. Well, they just killed off the Oculus name anyways here a couple of weeks ago, over at Facebook about the same time that got rid of the Facebook name and went to meta. [00:36:39] The Facebook product is so-called Facebook and it appears what they are going to be doing is taking the concept of a metaverse much, much further than anyone has ever taken it before. They're planning on there's speculation here. Okay. So, you know, don't obviously I don't get invested. I don't give investment advice, investment advice. [00:37:10] Um, but I do talk about technology and, uh, I've been usually five to 10 years. I had so take that as well. They as the grain of salt, but I think what they're planning on doing is Facebook wants to become the foundation for Mehta versus think about things like world of Warcraft, where you've got the. Gain that people are playing. [00:37:39] And it's a virtual reality, basically, right? It might be two D, but some of it's moving into the three-dimensional world. Other games like Minecraft and roadblocks, they have some pretty simple building blocks that people can use network effects and play your creativity to make your little world and the ability. [00:38:04] To exchange and or sell your virtual property. That's where I think Mr. Zuckerberg is getting really interested now because if they can build the platform that everybody else the wants to have a virtual world builds their virtual world on top of. Man, do they have a moneymaker? Now? People like me, we're going to look at this and just poo poo it. [00:38:35] I I'm sure I'm absolutely sure, because it will be another 20 years before you really think it's. You know, some of these scifi shows have talked about it. You know, you can feel someone touching you, et cetera, et cetera. Yeah. That's going to be very crude for a very long time. And now CGI is pretty good. [00:38:57] Yeah. You watch the movies. CGI is great, but that takes weeks worth of rendering time on huge farms, clusters of servers. So it's going to take quite a while. Looking at the normal advancement of technology before this really becomes real. Now there have also been us court cases over who owns what in bad happened with Eve online. [00:39:28] Second life where disagreements over player ownership of the virtual land created by the publisher, which was Linden labs. When. And I've also mentioned in the past how our friends over at the IRS have tried to tax some of the land that you own inside these virtual worlds. So ownership, do you really own it? [00:39:55] Does it really exist? What would non fungible tokens maybe it does. And these non fungible tokens are. Basically just a check, some verification, I'm really oversimplifying of some sort of a digital something rather lately. And initially it was mostly pictures. And so you had a picture of something and you owned that and you could prove it because of the blockchain behind it. [00:40:27] But I think this is where he's really interested because if he can build the base platform. Let the developers come up with the rules of what's it called it a game and come up with what the properties look like and how people can trade them and sell them and what kind of upgrades they can get. Right. [00:40:48] So let's nothing Zuckerberg has to worry about. Uh, Metta or Zuckerberg then worries about, okay. So how do we collect money for these? How do we check with the transactions? Uh, somebody wants to buy those sort of Damocles. How does that transaction work and how do we Facebook Metta? How do we get a slice of the act? [00:41:16] You got to believe that that's where things are going. And if they have the ability to make this base platform and be able to take characters from one part of a developer to another part of the developer, you could have worlds where Gandalf might be fighting bugs bunny. Right? Interesting. Interesting and Warner brothers, all these movie companies would probably be coming out with complete virtual reality. [00:41:49] So when you're watching James Bond, you're not just watching James Bond, you can look around, you can see what's happening. People sneaking up behind. And ultimately you could be James Bond, but that's decades away. I think a good 20 years. All right, everybody. Thanks for sticking around here. Make sure you go online. [00:42:11] Craig peterson.com/subscribe. Get my weekly newsletter. Find out about these free boot camps and other things that I have. So we can keep you up to date and keep you safe. [00:42:25] We already talked about Metta and their name, change the metaverse, but there's something else. Facebook did this last week that surprised a lot of users, something they started in 2010, but has been controversial ever since. [00:42:41] We had a pretty big announcement, frankly, this last week from our friends over at Facebook, not the one where they change their name and the. [00:42:51] Basically trying to create a metaverse platform. That's going to be the one platform that rules the world. Although those are my words by the way. But Facebook has announced plans now to shut down a decade old. Facial recognition system this month. We'll see what they do with this. If they follow through entirely, but they're planning on deleting over 1 billion faces that they have already gone through and analyzed. [00:43:26] You might remember. In 2010, Facebook had a brand new feature. It started announcing, Hey, did you know that so-and-so just posted your picture? Is this you? Is this your friend, is this sewn? So do you remember all of those questions? If you're a Facebook user back in the day? Well, they were automatically identifying people who appeared in digital photos and suggested that users or users tagged them with a click we're going to get to and admitted here. [00:43:57] Uh, and of course that then linked the Facebook account for. The picture that you tagged to the images and let that person know. And of course Facebook's ultimate goal is to get you to stay on long, as long online, as long as possible. Because if you're online, you are going to be looking at ads that are aimed primarily at. [00:44:18] Well, facial recognition has been a problem. We've seen it a worldwide. I just read through a restatement from the electronic frontier foundation, talking about facial recognition and the problems with it, how some people have been arrested based on facial recognition and held for over a day. We'll have cases where the police use to kind of a crummy photograph of them from a surveillance video sometimes also from a police car, in some areas, the police cars are continually taking video and uploading it to the internet, looking for things like license plates, to see if a car. [00:45:00] Parking ticket that hasn't been paid or it hasn't paid us registration all the way through looking at faces, who is this person? And some in law enforcement have kind of thought it would be great to have kind of like Robocop. You remember Robocop, not the ed 2 0 9. There was also in that movie. That's also very scary, but when they look at someone who's on a street at autonomous. [00:45:24] Pops up in their glasses, who it is, any criminal record, if there any sort of a threat to et cetera. And I can understand that from the policemen standpoint. And I interviewed out at the consumer electronic show, a manufacturer of. That technology, it was kind of big and bulky at the time. This was probably about six or eight years ago, but nowadays you're talking about something that's kind of Google glass size, although that's kind of gone by the wayside too. [00:45:54] There are others that are out there that you. Facial recognition. Technology has really advanced in its ability to identify people, but you still get false positives and false negatives. And that's where part of the problem becomes from they have been taking and they been private companies primarily, but also some government agencies they've been taking pictures from. [00:46:21] They can find them. We've talked about Clearview AI before this is a company that literally stole pitchers, that it could get off the internet. They scan through Facebook, Instagram, everywhere. They could find faces and they tied it all back in. They did facial recognition. On all of those photos that they had taken and then sold the data to law enforcement agencies. [00:46:49] There's an app you can get from Clearview AI. That runs on your smartphone and you can take a picture of someone in the street, clear view. AI will run that face through their database and we'll tell you who it is, what their, what their background is, where their LinkedIn page is their Facebook page, wherever it found them online. [00:47:13] Basically what they've been doing. Now Clearview had a problem here this last couple of weeks because the Australian government ordered them to delete all facial recognition, data belonging, to anyone that lives. In Australia. Now that's going to be a bit of a problem for clear view, because it's hard to identify exactly where people live just based on a photograph. [00:47:40] And the United Kingdom is also considering doing this exact same thing. Now, clear views have been sued. They violated the terms of service from Facebook and some of these other sites that I mentioned, but they did it anyway. And clear view was. To destroy all the facial images and facial templates they had retrieved about any Australian. [00:48:08] I think that's probably a pretty good idea. I don't like the idea of this data being out there. Well, if your password is stolen and we're going to be talking about that in our bootcamp, coming up here in a couple of weeks about how to determine if your username or your password is stolen. But, uh, and of course, if you want to get that. [00:48:29] Bootcamp and go to that. There's no charge for it, but you have to know about it. And the only way is to sign up. You have to make sure you're on my email list@craigpeterson.com. But what happens when your email address is stolen or your password, or both are stolen from a web. Oh, typically they end up on the dark web. [00:48:50] They sell personal identification for very little money. In some cases it's only a few dollars per thousand people's identities. It is absolutely crazy. So the bad guys are looking for that information, but you can change your password. You can change your email address, but if your facial information is stolen, Can't change your face. [00:49:18] If your eye print is stolen, you can't change your eye. I have a friend who's pretty excited because he got to go right through the security at the airport ever so quickly. Cause all they had to do was scan his eyeball. Well, that data is valuable data because it cannot be changed. And it can, in some cases be replicated. [00:49:41] In fact, the department of Homeland security and the transportation safety administration had the database of face print stolen from them in 2019. To about 200,000 people's identities were stolen, the face sprints. It's just absolutely crazy. And this was some, a vendor of us customs and border protection. [00:50:05] And it, it, you can't write down to it. I read the detailed report on it just now. And the report that came out of the federal government said, well, it went to a contractor who. Took the data, all of the face prints off site over to their own site. And it wasn't encrypted when they took it over there. But it does mention that it was taken from an un-encrypted system at customs and border protection. [00:50:34] So wait a minute. Now you're blaming the contractor that you hired because it wasn't encrypted and yet you didn't encrypt it yourself either. I, you know, I guess that kind of goes around, but they want to. They want your biometric information just as much as they want anything else. Think about your phones. [00:50:53] Nowadays, apple has done a very good job with the biometrics and the fingerprints and making sure that that information is only ever stored on the phone. It never goes to apple, never leaves the phone it's in what apple calls, the secure long term. And if you mess with it at all, it destroys itself, which is part of the problem with replacing a cracked screen yourself on an iPhone, because you're going to disturb that secure enclave and the phone will no longer work. [00:51:24] That is not true when it comes to many other devices, including most of your Android phones that are out there. It is. So if the bad guys have. Your face print, they, and they can create 3d models that can and do in fact, go ahead and fool it into letting you in that that's information they want. So why are we allowing these companies to like clear view AI? [00:51:52] And others to buy our driver's license photos to the federal government, to also by the way, by our driver's license photos, by them from other sites and also our passport information. It's getting kind of scary, especially when you look into. China has a social credit system. And the Biden administration has made rumblings about the same here in the U S but in China, what they're doing is they have cameras all over the place and your faces. [00:52:27] And they can identify you. So if you jaywalk, they take so many points off of your social credit. If you don't do something that they want you to do or be somewhere, they want you to be, you lose credits again, and you can gain them as well by doing various things that the government wants you to do. And. [00:52:49] And ultimately, if you don't have enough social credit, you can't even get on a train to get to work. But the real bad part are the users. This is a minority in China and China's authorities are using. Us facial recognition, technology and artificial intelligence technology. Hey, thanks Google for moving your artificial intelligence lab to China in order to control and track the users. [00:53:19] Absolutely amazing in the United States law enforcement is using this type of software to aid policing, and we've already seen problems of overreach and mistaken IRS. So Facebook to you're leading a billion of these frameworks. If you will, of people's faces biometrics. Good for them. Hopefully this will continue a tread elsewhere. [00:53:46] Well, we've talked a little bit today about firewalls, what they do, how your network is set up. If you miss that, make sure you catch up online. My podcast@craigpeterson.com, but there's a whole new term out there that is changing security. [00:54:03] It's difficult to set up a secure network. [00:54:07] Let's just say mostly secure because if there's a power plug going into it, there's probably a security issue, but it's difficult to do that. And historically, what we've done is we've segmented the networks. So we have various devices that. Maybe be a little more harmful and on one network, other devices at a different level of security and many businesses that we've worked with, we have five different networks each with its own level of secure. [00:54:38] And in order to get from one part of the network, for instance, let's say you're an accounting and you want to get to the accounting file server. We make sure your machine is allowed access at the network level. And then obviously on top of that, you've got usernames and passwords. Maybe you've got multifactor authentication or something else. [00:54:59] I'll make sense, doesn't it? Well, the new move today is to kind of move away from that somewhat. And instead of having a machine or a network have firewall rules to get to a different network or different machine within an organization. There's something called zero trust. So again, think of it. You've, you've got a network that just has salespeople on it. [00:55:25] You have another network that might have just your accounting people. Another network has your administrative people and other network has your software developers, et cetera. So all of these networks are separate from each other and they're all firewalled from each other. So that only for instance, at county people can get to the accounting server. [00:55:44] Okay, et cetera. Right? The sales guys can enter the sales data and the programmers can get at their programs. And maybe the servers that are running their virtual machines are doing testing on what was zero trust. It is substantially different. What they're doing with zero trust is assuming that you always have to be authentic. [00:56:11] So instead of traditional security, where, where you're coming from helps to determine your level of access, you are assuming that basically no units of trust. So I don't care where you're coming from. If you are on a machine in the accounting department, We want to verify a lot of other information before we grant you access. [00:56:38] So that information probably does include what network you're on. Probably does include the machine you're on, but it's going to all. You as a user. So you're going to have a username. You're going to have an ID. You're going to have a multi-factor authentication. And then we're going to know specifically what your job is and what you need to have specific access. [00:57:04] Because this follows the overall principle of least privilege to get your job done. Now you might've thought in the past that, oh my gosh, these firewalls, they're just so annoying. It's just so difficult to be able to do anything right. Well, zero trust is really going to get your attention. If that's what you've been saying. [00:57:23] But here's an example of the traditional security approach. If you're in the office, you get access to the full network. Cause that's pretty common, right? That's not what we've been doing, but that's pretty common where we have been kind of working in the middle between zero trust and this traditional you're in the office. [00:57:41] So you can potentially get it. Everything that's on the off. And if you're at home while all you have to do is access a specific portal, or as I've explained before, well, you are just connecting to an IP address in a hidden port, which won't remain hidden for. So maybe in a traditional security approach, the bouncer checks your ID. [00:58:08] You can go anywhere inside this club and it's multi floor, right. But in a zero trust approach, getting into the club, having that bouncer look at your ID is only the first check, the bartender or the waiter. They also have to check your ID before you could be served. No matter where you are in the club and that's kind of how they do it right now, though, they'll make a mark on your hand or they'll stamp it. [00:58:35] And now they know, okay, this person cannot get a drink for instance. So think of it that way, where every resource that's available inside the business independently checks whether or not you should have access to. This is the next level of security. It's something that most businesses are starting to move towards. [00:58:57] I'm talking about the bigger guys, the guys that have had to deal with cybersecurity for awhile, not just the people who have a small business, most small businesses have that flat network that. Again about right. The traditional security approach of all you're in the office. So yeah, you can get at anything. [00:59:15] It doesn't matter. And then you, you have the sales guys walking out with your client list and who knows what else is going on? Think of Ferris, Bueller, where he was updating his grades and miss days at high school, from his home computer. And you've got an idea of why you might want to secure. You are network internally because of, again, those internal threats. [00:59:40] So keep an eye out for it. If you're looking to replace your network, obviously this is something that we've had a lot of experience with. Cisco is probably the best one out there for this, but there are a few other vendors that are pretty good. If you want to drop me an email, I'll put together a list of some of the top tier zero. [01:00:02] Providers so that you can look at those. I don't have one right now, but I'd be glad to just email me M e@craigpeterson.com. We can point you in the right direction, but if you have an it person or department, or whether you outsource it to an MSP, a managed services provider, make sure you have the discussion with them about zero. [01:00:28] Now, when I'm looking at security, I'm concerned about a bunch of things. So let me tell you something that Karen and I have been working on the last, oh man, few weeks. I mentioned the boot camp earlier in the show today. And one of the things that we're going to do for those people that attend the bootcamp is I think incredible. [01:00:49] This has taken Karen so much time to dig up. Once she's done is she's worked with me to figure out what are the things that you need to keep tabs on. Now, again, this is aimed primarily at businesses, but let me tell you, this is going to be great for home users as well. And we've put together this list of what you should be doing. [01:01:15] About cybersecurity every week. And in fact, a couple of things that are daily, but every week, every month, every quarter, every six months and every year, it's a full checklist. So you can take this and sit down with it and, you know, okay. So I have to do these things this week and this isn't. Response to anything in particular, it does meet most requirements, but frankly, it's something that every business should be doing when it comes to the cybersecurity. [01:01:53] It includes things like passwords. Are they being done? Right? Did you do some training with your employees on fishing or a few other topics all the way on down to make sure you got some canned air and blew out the fan? In your workstations, you'd be amazed at how dirty they get. And he is the enemy of computers that makes them just fail much, much faster than, than 82, same thing with server. [01:02:22] So it is everything. It is a lot of pages and it is just check she'd made it nice and big. Right. So even I can read it. But it's little check marks that you can mark on doing while you're going through it. So we're doing some more work on that. She's got the first couple of iterations done. We're going to do a couple more, make sure it is completely what you would need in order to help keep your cyber security in. [01:02:50] But the only way you're going to get it is if you are in the BR the bootcamp absolutely free. So it was this list, or of course you won't find out unless you are on my email list. Craig Peterson.com/subscribe. [01:03:06] One of the questions I get asked pretty frequently has to do with artificial intelligence and robots. Where are we going? What are we going to see first? What is the technology that's first going to get into our businesses and our homes. [01:03:22] Artificial intelligence is something that isn't even very well-defined there's machine learning and there's artificial intelligence. [01:03:33] Some people put machine learning as a subset of artificial intelligence. Other people kind of mess around with it and do it the other way. I tend to think that artificial intelligence is kind of the top of the heap, if you will. And that machine learning is a little bit further down because machines can be programmed to learn. [01:03:54] For instance, look at your robot, your eye robot cleans the floor, cleans the carpet. It moves around. It has sensors and it learned, Hey, I have to turn here. Now. I robot is actually pretty much randomly drew. But there are some other little vacuum robots that, that do learn the makeup of your house. The reason for the randomization is while chairs move people, move things, move. [01:04:22] So trying to count on the house, being exactly the same every time isn't isn't exactly right. Uh, by the way, a lot of those little vacuums that are running around are also sending data about your house, up to the manufacturer in the. So they often will know how big the house is. They know where it's located because you're using the app for their robot. [01:04:47] And that, of course it has access to GPS, et cetera, et cetera. Right. But where are we going? Obviously, the little by robot, the little vacuum does not need much intelligence to do what it's doing, but one of the pursuits that we've had for. Really since the late nineties for 20, 25 years are what are called follower robots. [01:05:13] And that's when I think we're going to start seeing much more frequently, it's going to be kind of the first, um, I called it machine learning. They call it artificial intelligence who you really could argue either one of them, but there's a little device called a Piaggio fast forward. And it is really kind of cool. [01:05:34] Think of it almost like R2D2 or BB eight from star wars following you around. It's frankly, a little hard to do. And I want to point out right now, a robot that came out, I think it was last year from Amazon is called the Astro robot. And you might remember Astro from the Jetsons and. This little robot was available in limited quantities. [01:06:01] I'm looking at a picture of it right now. It, frankly, Astro is quite cute. It's got two front wheels, one little toggle wheel in the back. It's got cameras. It has a display that kind of makes it look like kids are face, has got two eyeballs on them. And the main idea behind this robot is that it will. [01:06:23] Provide some protection for your home. So it has a telescoping camera and sensor that goes up out of its head up fairly high, probably about three or four feet up looking at this picture. And it walks around your one rolls around your home, scanning for things that are out of the normal listening for things like windows breaking there, there's all kinds of security. [01:06:50] That's rolled into some of these. But it is a robot and it is kind of cool, but it's not great. It's not absolutely fantastic. Amazon's dubbing the technology it's using for Astro intelligent motion. So it's using location and mapping data to make sure that Astro. Gets around without crashing into things. [01:07:18] Unlike that little vacuum cleaner that you have, because if someone loves something on the floor that wasn't there before, they don't want to run over it, they don't want to cause harm. They don't want to run into your cats and dogs. And oh my maybe lions and bears too. But, uh, they're also using this computer vision technology called visual ID and that is used. [01:07:41] With facial recognition, drum roll, please, to recognize specific members of the family. So it's kind of like the dog right in the house. It's sitting there barking until it recognizes who you are, but Astro, in this case, Recognizes you and then provide you with messages and reminders can even bring you the remote or something else and you just drop it in the bin and off it goes. [01:08:08] But what I am looking at now with this Piaggio fast forward, you might want to look it up online, cause it's really. Cool is it does the following, like we've talked about here following you around and doing things, but it is really designed to change how people and goods are moving around. So there's a couple of cool technologies along this line as well. [01:08:35] That it's not, aren't just these little small things. You might've seen. Robots delivery robots. The Domino's for instance, has been working on there's another real cool one out there called a bird. And this is an autonomous driving power. Basically. It's a kind of a four wheel ATV and it's designed to move between the rows of fruit orchards in California or other places. [01:09:01] So what you do to train this borough robot is you press a follow button on it. You start walking around the field or wherever you want it to go. It's using, uh, some basic technology to follow you, cameras and computer vision, and it's recording it with GPS and it memorizes the route at that point. Now it can ferry all of your goods. [01:09:29] Around that path and communicate the path by the way to other burrow robots. So if you're out doing harvesting or whether it's apples out in the east coast, or maybe as I said out in California, you've got it. Helping you with some of the fruit orchards. It's amazing. So this is going to be something that is going to save a lot of time and money, these things, by the way, way up to 500 pounds and it can carry as much as a half a ton. [01:09:58] You might've seen some of the devices also from a company down in Boston, and I have thought that they were kind of creepy when, when you look at it, but the company's called Boston dynamics and. They were just bought, I think it was Hondai the bought them trying to remember. And, uh, anyway, These are kind of, they have robots that kind of look like a dog and they have other robots that kind of look like a human and they can do a lot of different chores. [01:10:33] The military has used them as have others to haul stuff. This one, this is like the little dog, it has four legs. So unlike a lot of these other robots that are on wheels, this thing can go over very, very. Terrain it can self write, et cetera. And they're also using them for things like loading trucks and moving things around, um, kind of think of Ripley again, another science fiction tie, uh, where she's loading the cargo in the bay of that spaceship. [01:11:05] And she is inside a machine. That's actually doing all of that heavy lifting now. Today, the technology, we have a can do all of that for us. So it is cool. Uh, I get kind of concerned when I see some of these things. Military robots are my favorite, especially when we're talking about artificial intelligence, but expect the first thing for these to be doing is to be almost like a companion, helping us carry things around, go fetch things for us and in the business space. [01:11:40] Go ahead and load up those trucks and haul that heavy stuff. So people aren't hurting their backs. Pretty darn cool. Hey, I want to remind you if you would like to get some of the free training or you want some help with something the best place to start is Craig peterson.com. And if you want professional help, well, not the shrink type, but with cyber security. [01:12:06] email me M E at Craig peterson.com. [01:12:10] Just in time for the holidays, we have another scam out there and this one is really rather clever and is fooling a lot of people and is costing them, frankly, a whole lot of money. [01:12:26] This is a very big cyber problem because it has been very effective. And although there have been efforts in place to try and stop it, they've still been able to kind of get ahead of it. There's a great article on vice that's in this week's newsletter. In my show notes up on the website and it is talking about a call that came in to one of the writers, Lorenzo, B cherry, um, probably completely messy and that name up, but the call came in from. [01:13:03] Supposedly right. Paid pals, uh, fraud prevention system. Someone apparently had tried to use his PayPal account to spend $58 and 82 cents. According to the automated voice on the line, PayPal needed to verify my identity to block the transfer. And here's a quote from the call, uh, in order to secure your account, please enter the code we have sent to your mobile device. [01:13:32] Now the voice said PayPal, sometimes texts, users, a code in order to protect their account. You know, I've said many times don't use SMS, right? Text messages for multi-factor authentication. There are much better ways to do it. Uh, after entering a string of six digits, the voice said, thank you. Your account has been secured and this request has been blocked. [01:13:57] Quote, again, don't worry. If any payment has been charged your account, we will refund it within 24 to 48 hours. Your reference ID is 1 5 4 9 9 2 6. You may now hang up, but this call was actually. Hacker they're using a type of bot is what they're called. These are these automated robotic response systems that just dramatically streamlined the process for the hackers to gain access into your account. [01:14:31] Particularly when you have multi-factor authentication codes where you're using. An SMS messages, but it also works for other types of one-time passwords. For instance, I suggest to everybody and we use these with our clients that they should use something called one password.com. That's really you'll find them online. [01:14:54] And one password.com allows you to use and create one time password, same thing with Google authenticator, same thing with Microsoft authenticator, they all have one-time password. So if a bad guy has found your email address and has found your password online in one of these hacks, how can they possibly get into your PayPal account or Amazon or Coinbase or apple pay or. [01:15:26] Because you've got a one time password set up or SMS, right? Multifactor authentication of some sort. Well they're full and people and absolute victims. Here's what's happening. Th this bot by the way, is great for bad guys that don't have social engineering skills, social engineering skills, or when someone calls up and says, hi, I'm from it. [01:15:51] And there's a problem. And we're going to be doing an upgrade on your Microsoft word account this weekend because of a bug or a security vulnerability. So what, what I need from you is I need to know what username you're normally using so that I can upgrade the right. So we don't, it doesn't cost us a whole bunch by upgrading accounts that aren't being used. [01:16:15] So once the account name that you use on the computer and what's the password, so we can get in and test it afterwards, that's a social engineering type attack. That's where someone calls on the phone, those tend to be pretty effective. But how about if you don't speak English very well? At all frankly, or if you're not good at tricking people by talking to them, well, this one is really great. [01:16:44] Cause these bots only cost a few hundred bucks and anybody can get started using these bots to get around multi-factor authentication. See, here's how it works. In order to break into someone's account, they need your username, email address and password. Right? Well, I already said. Much many of those have been stolen. [01:17:07] And in our boot camp coming up in a few weeks, we're going to go through how you can find out if your username has been stolen and has been posted on the dark web and same thing for your password. Right? So that's going to be part of the. Coming up that I'll announce in the newsletter. Once we finished getting everything already for you guys, they also go ahead and buy what are called bank logs, which are login details from spammers who have already tricked you into giving away some of this information. [01:17:41] But what if you have multi-factor authentication enabled something I'm always talking about, always telling you to do. Well, these bots work with platforms like Twilio, for instance, uh, and they are using other things as well, like slack, et cetera. And all the bad guy has to do with that point is going. [01:18:07] And, uh, say, they're trying to break into your account right now. So they're going to, let's get really, really specific TD bank. That's where my daughter works. So let's say you have a TD bank account. And the hacker has a good idea that you have a TD bank account knows it because they entered in your username and password and TD bank was letting them in. [01:18:32] But TD bank sent you a text message with that six character code, right? It's usually digits. It's usually a number. So what happens then? So the bad guys says, okay, so it's asking me for this six digit SMS

In Touch
Touch Screen Card Machines; Your Emails

In Touch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 18:55


Recently, a number of In Touch listeners have told us they're finding more touch screen card machines in their daily lives. These are the machines that do not have any raised buttons or tactile feedback. Supposedly, this type of machine is the future because most are operated by a similar technology as what is inside a smart phone. This gives a business a wider variety of payment options, and they can often be quicker and more reliable than the traditional machines we're all used to. But just how accessible are they when blind or visually impaired people are not able to use the contactless payment feature? We speak to three visually impaired people about their experiences on this, we ask a small business why they decided to opt for a touch screen machine, we ask a manufacturer about whether accessibility is considered in the design process of their machines and to The RNIB about what you can do if you are unable to use one. Presenter: Peter White Producer: Beth Hemmings

Yah Lah BUT...
#231 - SG allows “soft” music in F&B outlets & YouTube removes “Dislike” numbers

Yah Lah BUT...

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 59:10


SG has finally allowed F&B outlets to play background music, albeit only “soft recorded music”. This comes alongside the easing of several other measures that signifies SG's move towards living with COVID, so we discuss what the next couple of weeks will look like. Elsewhere, YouTube announced that after extensive testing, it will be making private the numbers of “Dislikes” from all videos going forward. Supposedly, this is for the benefit of creators, but is it really?   Find us here! Our YLB Subreddit for detailed show notes and mindblowing discussions! YLB's own TikTok featuring 2 boom-llenials attempting to connect with Gen Z uwu Our YLB YouTube channel to watch videos of all our guest interviews! Our NEW YLB IG account run by our intern, Daras!   SG allows “soft” music in F&B outlets Singapore prepares to rock softly as Covid music ban partially relaxed - CNN Recorded music to resume at F&B outlets, event zone sizes to increase from Nov 10 Those vaxxed, living in same household can dine in groups of 5 “What About People With No NRIC?” Restaurant Owners Cheer 5-Pax From Same Household Dine-in, Concerned About Enforcement Singapore to End Free Covid Treatment for Those 'Unvaccinated by Choice' - The New York Times Trevor Noah & Ronnie Cheng on SG's COVID restrictions Forum: Expiry date for 'fully vaccinated' status a matter of public interest   YouTube removes “Dislike” numbers YouTube is making dislike counts private for everyone  - The Verge YouTube Removes Dislikes So Now Nobody Will Know How Much We Hate Chris Pratt As Mario - The Gamer Facebook and Instagram will now allow users to hide ‘Like' counts on posts | TechCrunch   One Shiok Comment Comment from Cuban_Kiwi Comment from F4HM1 For reference  Chowing Down With Singapore's Minorities | On The Red Dot | Who We Are, What We Eat - Part 1   One Shiok Thing Narcos: Mexico | Season 3 Trailer | Netflix Best Of: Bill Burr | Netflix Is A Joke

Midnight Train Podcast
Cursed Movies

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 119:32


 In a world, where the midnight train podcast is at the top of the podcast game, one thing has the power to destroy everything they have worked for. This week their world will come crumbling down as everything they've achieved will be tested and possibly destroyed due to the madness that is (dun dun duuuuuuuunnnnn) cursed Movies!!! Tonight on the midnight train we are combining two of our favorite things…. This podcast and lots and lots of beer…YEAH! Oh wait, we do that every week… Oh, that's right, it's this podcast and….moooovies!! But… In true midnight train fashion, we can't just talk about movies…. We're gonna talk about cursed movies!!! That's right we are going to look at movies that for one reason or another have led to tragedy during and after the movies were made! Everything is on the table from health issues like cancer, accidental deaths while filming, people going crazy after filming, and just about everything else you can think of. Should be a fun and creepy ride discussing all these movies with you passengers and, in case you're wondering, yes we're still going to have a movies list at the end.    Ok so let's get into this and see what we have as far as cursed movies!   We're gonna start it with a big one since we just covered the subject matter of the film! The first cursed movie on our list is the exorcist. The filming of THE EXORCIST was done over nine months. The main set, a reproduction of the Georgetown home, was built in a warehouse in New York. During the filming, several curious incidents and accidents took place on the set and plagued those involved with the production. In addition, the budget of the film rose from $5 million to more than twice that amount. Obviously, any film production that lasts for more than a month or so will see its share of accidents and mishaps, but THE EXORCIST seems to have been particularly affected by unforeseeable calamities. Coincidence? Perhaps, but it left the cast and crew rightfully shaken.    The first incident occurred around 2:30 a.m. one Sunday morning when a fire broke out on the set. There was only one security guard at the Ceco 54th Street Studios when the McNeil house set caught fire and burned. The fire was the result of a bad electrical circuit, but it shut down filming for six weeks while the set was reconstructed from scratch. Ironically, as soon as the new set was ready, the sprinkler system broke down, causing an additional two-week delay.    Few of the actors in the film escaped personal troubles during the shoot. Just as Max Von Sydow (who played Father Merrin) touched down in New York to film his first scenes, he received a phone call saying that his brother died unexpectedly in Sweden. Von Sydow himself later became very ill during the filming. Irish actor Jack MacGowran (who played Burke Dennings) died only one week after his character was killed by the demon in the movie. Jason Miller (who played Father Karras) was stunned when his young son, Jordan, was struck down on an empty beach by a motorcyclist who appeared out of nowhere. The boy ALMOST died. THAT'S GOOD NEWS! Ellen Burstyn (who played Chris McNeill) wrenched her back badly during one scene when she was slapped by the possessed girl. The stunt went badly awry and she was laid up in bed for several weeks afterward, causing more delays in the filming. They had a rig attached to her where a guy offscreen would pull a rope that was tied to her to get that “smacked hard as shit and launched across the room” look the director wanted. Apparently, the director didn't like the first take or two and told the guy with the rope to yoke the living piss out of her. He got his shot. She screwed up her back.    In New York, one of the carpenters accidentally cut off his thumb on the set and one of the lighting technicians lost a toe. This was all over the news at the time due to the mixup at the hospital where they put the wrong appendages on the wrong patients. Yep, they switched the toe for the thumb. And if you believed that, well… I'm not sorry even a little bit. Anyway, The exorcist's location trip to Iraq was delayed from the spring, which is relatively cool, to July, the hottest part of the summer, when the temperature rose to 130 degrees and higher. Out of the eighteen-man crew that was sent there, Friedkin lost the services of nine of them, at one time or another, due to dysentery (which is super shitty) or sunstroke. To make matters worse, the bronze statue of the neo-Assyrian winged demon Pazazu, which was packed in a ten-foot crate, got lost in an air shipment from Los Angeles and ended up in Hong Kong, which caused another two-week delay.    "I don't know if it was a jinx, really," actress Ellen Burstyn later said. "But there were some really strange goings-on during the making of the film. We were dealing with some really heavy material and you don't fool around with that kind of material without it manifesting in some way. There were many deaths in the film. Linda's grandfather died, the assistant cameraman's wife had a baby that died, the man who refrigerated the set died, the janitor who took care of the building was shot and killed … I think overall there were nine deaths during the course of the film, which is an incredible amount… it was scary." Unholy shit, batman!   Things got so bad that William Friedkin took some drastic measures. Father Thomas Bermingham, S.J., from the Jesuit community at Fordham University, had been hired as a technical advisor for the film, along with Father John Nicola, who, while not a Jesuit, had been taught by Jesuit theologians at St. Mary of the Lake Seminary in Mundelein, Illinois. Friedkin came to Bermingham and asked him to exorcise the set. The priest was unable to perform an actual exorcism, but he did give a solemn blessing in a ceremony that was attended by everyone then on the set, from Max Von Sydow to the technicians and grips. "Nothing else happened on the set after the blessing,” Bermingham stated, "but around that time, there was a fire in the Jesuit residence set in Georgetown." And while nothing else tragic occurred on the set, strange events and odd coincidences were reported during the post-production work on the film. "There were strange images and visions that showed up on film that were never planned," Friedkin later claimed. "There are double exposures in the little girl's face at the end of one reel that are unbelievable."   As we talked about in previous episodes, The film opened on December 26, 1973, to massive crowds. Within weeks of the first public screenings of the film, stories started to make the rounds that audience members were fainting and vomiting in the theaters. There were also reports of disturbing nightmares and reportedly, several theater ushers had to be placed under a doctor's care, or quit their jobs, after experiencing successive showings of the movie. In numerous cities that were checked after THE EXORCIST had run for several weeks, reporters found that every major hospital had been forced to deal with patients who reported, after seeing the film, severe cases of vomiting and hallucinations. There were also reports of people being carried out of theaters in stretchers. What do you think, passengers? Mere publicity stunts, or was this the real thing?    The info for this cursed movie came from a great article on americanhauntingsink.com check them out!   Next up we're gonna dive into a sweet little movie about a tree, a child's toy, and REAL SKELETONS IN THE SWIMMING POOL! Yep, you guessed it, poltergeist! The curse of Poltergeist spawned many theories about why the movie and its sequels were cursed with so much tragedy, with one suggesting the use of real-life human bones in the original film caused the hauntings.   Actress JoBeth Williams - who played the mother, Diane Freeling - is seen dropping into a pool of skeletons in one spooky scene and she later reveals the bones were real. She told TVLand: "In my innocence and naiveté, I assumed that these were not real skeletons.   "I assumed that they were prop skeletons made out of plastic or rubber . . . I found out, as did the crew, that they were using real skeletons, because it's far too expensive to make fake skeletons out of rubber."   Just four months after the film's release, tragedy struck with actress Dominique Dunne, who played the family's eldest daughter Dana, who became the victim of a grisly murder. On the day before Halloween in 1982, the actress, 22, was strangled by her ex-boyfriend John Thomas Sweeney outside their home in West Hollywood. She survived the attack but was left in a coma. She never regained consciousness and died five days later. Sweeney was later convicted of voluntary manslaughter and spent three and half years of a six-year sentence behind bars for the killing. He changed his name to John Maura so if you want to let him know what a twat he is, I mean… we can't stop you.   In the years after the film's release movie bosses plowed ahead with plans for a sequel and Poltergeist II: The Other Side hit cinemas in 1986. Among the cast was Will Sampson, best known for playing Chief Bromden in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest opposite Jack Nicholson. The actor - cast as shaman Taylor in the movie - was concerned about the use of real skeletons in the first film and offered to perform a real-life exorcism. He's believed to have conducted the ceremony alone and in the middle of the night, but the cast reportedly felt relieved afterward. However, less than a year after the film's release - the curse had claimed another victim. Sampson had long-term health problems as he suffered from a degenerative condition called scleroderma, which affected his heart and lungs. He underwent a heart and lung transplant in the summer of 1987 but died of post-operative kidney failure on June 3.    Ok, this one is sad and you've probably heard of it. The most famous victim of the Poltergeist curse was Heather O'Rourke. She appeared as Carol Anne in the first two films as well as the third installment, Poltergeist III, which hit cinemas in 1988. She died just four months before the movie's release at only 12 years of age. In January 1988, Heather fell ill with what appeared to be flu-like symptoms. She collapsed at home the following day and was rushed to the hospital. She suffered a cardiac arrest but doctors were able to revive her and they diagnosed her with intestinal stenosis - a partial obstruction of the intestine. She underwent surgery, but went into cardiac arrest again in recovery and doctors were unable to save her. She passed away in February 1988, just weeks after her 12th birthday, and it was later reported she died from congenital stenosis and septic shock. Absolutely heartbreaking.   Character actor Lou Perryman became the second cast member to fall victim to murder. He played Pugsley in the original movie and suffered a brutal end in 1992 when he was hacked to death with an ax aged 67. A convict recently released from prison, Seth Christopher Tatum, confessed he had killed Perryman at his home after coming off his medication and going on a drinking binge. Tatum pleaded guilty to his murder in 2011 and was sentenced to life in prison.   Actor Richard Lawson played one of the parapsychologists, Ryan, in the original film (not the guy who ate the chicken with the maggots… you're welcome) and he came close to becoming another victim of the curse in 1992. He was involved in a terrifying plane crash in 1992 when the USAir Flight 405 crashed into New York City's Flushing Bay on route to guess where? Cleveland friggin Ohio. The crash claimed the lives of 27 of the 51 passengers, but Lawson was among the survivors. He put his lucky escape down to a last-minute seat change that saved his life. Lawson went on to be part of showbiz royalty when he married Beyonce's mother, Tina Knowles in 2015.   Info for this movie was taken from mirror.co.uk.    Next up how about… Hmm…. Oh, I know… The omen! The 2976 version of course. Obviously, Moody is a time traveler and saw the upcoming remake, 955 friggin years in the future! No! It was 1976! Of all the world's cursed film productions, The Omen is considered to have one of the worst movie curses of all time. The 1976 film tells the story of a man who accidentally adopts Damien the Antichrist as his son and the movie remains one of horror's most successful franchises. But what was so odious about the set that led producers to believe the devil was punishing them for making the movie? Is The Omen really cursed? The Omen film set haunting includes death, injury, and lots of lightning bolts: after all, the creator himself warned the cast and crew that Satan wasn't going to like what they were doing. Here's what happened behind the scenes of The Omen movie and why, despite its several sequels and a 2006 remake, it remains one of history's movies that indeed may have angered Satan himself!   In June 1975, Gregory Peck's son, Jonathan Peck, killed himself with a bullet to the head, two months before filming was to start. Several strange events then surrounded the production.   For protection on the set of "The Omen," Bernhard wore a Coptic cross. In an interview, Bernhard spoke about the production's eerie events, which included the death of an animal trainer.   Precisely one day after they shot the sequence involving the baboons at the animal center, Bernhard said that a tiger seized the animal trainer by the head, causing his death immediately. Whhhaat the fuuuuuck?   One of the most haunting stories surrounding The Omen didn't happen during the shoot, but during the production of the World War II epic A Bridge Too Far. John Richardson, who did special effects on The Omen, was involved in a head-on collision that beheaded his girlfriend, eerily mirroring the decapitation scene with David Warner. Supposedly, after the crash, Richardson saw a street sign that said, "Ommen, 66.6 km." This accident occurred after The Omen had wrapped production, but many of course linked it to the evil aura of the film.   Several planes were also set ablaze, including the plane carrying Peck and screenwriter David Seltzer. Meanwhile, Bernhard said they had to land in Nova Scotia after flying back from England. He added:   "We had the film on board... Dick [Donner] and I were very, very nervous." IRA bombs ripped through a hotel, in which executive producer Mace Neufeld and his wife stayed, and another in which prominent executives and stars, including Peck, were to have dinner.   Once word got back to Fox about all the terrible incidents that plagued production, the studio saw it as a great way to drum up a ton of publicity and add to the film's ominous aura. They also put a great tagline into the film's ad campaign:                        You have been warned. If something frightening happens to you today, think about it. It may be The Omen.   As Donner recalled in The Omen: Curse or Coincidence, "If we had been making a comedy, you would have recalled all the funny, great, ridiculous, silly moments that happened in that film. if you were doing a love story, you'd remember all the times somebody left their wife, fell in love... You're doing The Omen, anything that happens on that film, you don't tell about the jokes, you don't talk about the love stories, you don't even think about them. You think about things that coincidentally could have been something to do with The Omen. We had lots of them."   Creepy stuff right there my friends.   Next up we have one of my personal all-time favorites, the crow! The Crow began filming in Wilmington, North Carolina, in 1993. Cursed Films revealed that before production got underway, a mysterious caller left a voicemail message warning the crew not to shoot the movie because bad things would happen. Eerily, two on-set electricians were involved in an accident in which their truck hit a live wire. One of the men experienced second and third-degree burns and lost both ears.   Disaster also struck the entire production when a hurricane destroyed the movie set. That is when the “curse of The Crow” rumors began circulating in Hollywood. The star of The Crow, Brandon Lee, was the son of martial arts legend, Bruce Lee. The elder Lee died during the production of his final film. Some fans speculated that the Chinese mafia had placed a hit on the actor for betraying martial arts secrets. Others suspected that he had been struck by an insidious death blow at an earlier time.   The most popular theory about The Dragon's death is that he was a victim of the Lee Family Curse. His older brother had died, and Lee's parents believed there was a demon targeting the males in the Lee family.   Like his father, Brandon Lee died before he finished filming The Crow. In a fluke accident, the performer was shot while completing an action sequence, as described in Cursed Films. The crew used what are called ‘dummy rounds,' for the scene, but there was something in the barrel of the gun that acted as a lethal projectile, killing Lee.    To complete the final photography for The Crow, the man who had been working as Lee's stunt double wore a mask in his image.   Crazy stuff!   How about some of our patented quick hitters!    The Conqueror" is a whitewashed 1956 film with John Wayne as Genghis Khan. The film was shot at a location downwind from a nuclear testing site, causing dozens of crew members to eventually die of cancer. so maybe not so much a curse as a poor choice of locations.   Apocalypse Now"   The horror! Francis Ford Coppola was tempting fate when he decided to film "Apocalypse Now" during monsoon season. Big mistake. The monsoon destroyed multiple sets, Martin Sheen suffered a heart attack during filming, and Coppola was so stressed that he suffered a seizure, according to The Independent. "Apocalypse Now" (1979) turned out to be a masterpiece anyway, but the documentary "Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse" about its making is just as engrossing.    "Fitzcarraldo"    Dysentery. Injuries. Fights among the crew. Nothing seemed to go right during the filming of 1982's "Fitzcarraldo." The story concerns hauling a boat over a hill, which the crew literally accomplished, but not without the same nightmarish difficulty as is depicted in the film. And in the end, director Werner Herzog looked as mad and overly driven as its hero. Check out the documentary "Burden of Dreams" for more.   The Superman Curse    Comic book movie fans may know about the "Superman Curse," which is said to afflict multiple actors involved in Superman films. Christopher Reeve was paralyzed following a horse accident. And Margot Kidder, who played Lois opposite Reeve, suffered from bipolar disorder, according to TCM. Also, the original Superman, George Reeves, supposedly committed suicide. His death at age 45 from a gunshot remains a controversial subject; the official finding was suicide, but some believe that he was murdered or the victim of an accidental shooting.   "The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers"    Bad luck ran amok in Middle Earth during the filming of 2002's "The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers." DVD interviews revealed that multiple actors and stuntmen suffered injuries while shooting the film's elaborate fight sequences. The worst was Viggo Mortensen, who broke his toe and chipped his tooth while filming.   The Exorcism of Emily rose   Dexter star Jennifer Carpenter reported that during the making of The Exorcism of Emily Rose — in which she played a big-screen version of German woman Anneliese Michel, whose poor health and subsequent death was blamed on a failed exorcism — her radio would mysteriously turn on and off. From an interview with Dread Central:   Q: A common question when making a film like this; did anything weird happen during filming?   JC: I thought about that when it happened, and two or three times when I was going to sleep my radio came on by itself. The only time it scared me was once because it was really loud and it was Pearl Jam's “Alive” (laughs). Laura's TV came on a couple of times.   Q: At 3:00 a.m.?   JC: Mine wasn't 3:00 a.m. I was born at 3:00 a.m. but it hasn't happened to me. I did check.   We'll totally do an episode on Analiese one of these days   Psycho Myra Jones (aka Myra Davis) was the uncredited body double/stand-in for Psycho star Janet Leigh during the making of Hitchcock's 1960 film. A handyman named Kenneth Dean Hunt, who was supposedly a Hitchcock “obsessive,” murdered her.   The Conjuring   Real-life ghost hunters Ed and Lorraine Warren, who aided the real-life Amityville Horror case, investigated the haunting of the Perron family home — a farmhouse plagued by generations of death, disaster, and a possessed doll. The case inspired James Wan's supernatural film, which left some audiences in the Philippines with such a fright there were priests available at screenings to bless viewers and provide counseling. On and off-set paranormal incidents — including strange claw marks on star Vera Farmiga's computer, Wan's tormented dog growling at invisible intruders, a strange wind (that apparently put Carolyn Perron in the hospital), and fire — were reported.   The Innkeepers   Filmed at the reportedly haunted hotel the Yankee Pedlar Inn in Torrington, Connecticut, The Innkeepers director Ti West was skeptical about the strange occurrences during the making of his movie. Still, creepy stories from the set became the focus in the press. From an interview with West:   I'm a skeptic so I don't really buy it. But I've definitely seen doors close by themselves; I've seen a TV turn off and on by itself; lights would always burn out in my room. Everyone on the crew has very vivid dreams every night, which is really strange.   The one story that is the most intriguing to me — In the film, the most haunted room is the Honeymoon Suite. That's where the ghost stuff started in the hotel. The only reason I picked the room that I picked to shoot in, was because it was big enough to do a dolly shot. No more thought went into it other than pure technical reasons. So when we're finishing the movie, I find out that the most haunted room in real life is the room I picked to be the haunted room in the movie. It could be a coincidence. It's weird that it happened that way. . . . [Star] Sara Paxton would wake up in the middle of the night thinking someone was in the room with her. Everyone has stories, but I was too busy saying, “Let's shoot this! We have 17 days!   Atuk"    "Atuk" is a movie so cursed that it never got made. The project, based on a 1963 Mordecai Richler novel about an Eskimo in New York, had four different men attached to play the lead while in development hell through the 1970s and '80s: John Belushi, Sam Kinison, John Candy, and Chris Farley. All four died shortly after entering negotiations to be in the film. Holy shit!    Ok how about twilight zone the movie. The 1983 film 'Twilight Zone: The Movie' directed by John Landis and Steven Spielberg gained publicity pre-release because of the deaths of lead actor Vic Morrow and two child extras during the filming of the helicopter crash scene. The children were illegally hired to play the role in this scene, as Landis would go on to reveal in the subsequent trial. It was also prohibited to make children work after a certain hour in the evening. However, Landis insisted that the scene would have to entail a late-night setting to seem more authentic. This was the last scene in the film. It also included explosions as a helicopter flew over the village while Morrow would run across the street to save the Vietnamese children from the explosion. Testing for the scene sparked concerns when the helicopter seemed to vigorously rock at the explosion but despite this, Landis' need to capture the explosion took priority. He reportedly said, "You think that was big? You ain't seen nothing yet." At the controls of this helicopter was a Vietnam War veteran named Dorcey Wingo, who had just joined the movie business. When the cameras began filming, the pyrotechnic fireball that had been fired as part of the explosion hit the helicopter, engulfing it in flames. The helicopter then crashed into the river where the actors were standing — Morrow, 6-year-old Renee Chen, and 7-year-old Myca Dinh Le. Almost a hundred people were present when the tragedy occurred. The helicopter skidded right onto Renee, crushing her to death and when it toppled over, the main blade sliced through Morrow and Myca.   Rosemary's baby is next up on the list. Over the years, the myth surrounding Roman Polanski's 1968 film Rosemary's Baby has only grown in stature. The film is based on the 1967 novel of the same name by American novelist Ira Levin. He came up with the idea for the book in 1965, drawing inspiration from his wife who was pregnant at the time, his New York apartment, and the anxiety of being a parent.   The struggling writer imagined a world where there was no God and the devil was allowed to reign freely. This is evident in the iconic ending where Rosemary finds out that her husband sold her womb to Satan and that her child is the Antichrist. Levin was catapulted into the highest echelons of the literary world due to the success of his novel and a year later, a European auteur who was looking for his own Hollywood break decided to direct the film adaptation of his novel.   However, not everyone was pleased with Levin's attacks on religion. He faced severe backlash from the Catholic Church for his “blasphemy” and his wife left him the year the film was released. He was never the same man again, growing increasingly paranoid over the years. Levin repeatedly had to make public statements denouncing Satanism and told Dick Cavett that he had become “terrified” as he grew older. 30 years after the release of the film, Levin came up with a sequel titled Son of Rosemary but it tanked.   William Castle was the man who first recognized the potential of Levin's work and secured the rights to make a film adaptation. Best known for his work on B-grade horror films, Castle wanted to direct it initially but Paramount Pictures executive Robert Evans agreed to go ahead with the project only if Castle worked as a producer. In April of 1969, Castle was hospitalized because of severe kidney stones. He was already under a lot of stress due to the sheer volume of hate mail he received, a terrible consequence of being attached to Rosemary's Baby. In his autobiography, he claimed that he began to hallucinate scenes from the film during his surgery and even shouted, “Rosemary, for God's sake drop that knife!” Although Castle recovered, he never reached that level of success again.   Producer Robert Evans was not exempt from this alleged curse either. He had risen to the top with major hits like Rosemary's Baby and The Godfather. However, he was convicted of cocaine trafficking in 1980 and got a suspended prison sentence. As a part of his plea bargain, Evans had to make an anti-drug commercial. Three years later, the producer would get caught up in the high-profile murder of Roy Radin which has come to be known as the “Cotton Club murder”. Despite two witnesses testifying that Evans was involved in the case, he was later cleared of the charges. In 1993, he told The New York Times, “I had 10 years of a horrific life, Kafkaesque. There were nights I cried myself to sleep.”   This is arguably the most renowned story that is related to Rosemary's Baby. In autumn of 1968, composer Krzysztof Komeda, who worked on the film, fell off a rocky escarpment while partying and went into a four-month coma. Coincidentally, this affliction is exactly what the witches in Levin's book subject Rosemary's suspicious friend to. Komeda never came out of the coma and died in Poland the following year.   John Lennon was assassinated outside The Dakota in 1980, the famous building where they filmed Rosemary's Baby. Producer Robert Evans claimed that the whole time he was on set at the apartment building he felt a “distinctly eerie feeling”. Lennon was gunned down by alleged “fan” Mark David Chapman who was influenced by Salinger's novel The Catcher in the Rye and the loneliness of protagonist Holden Caulfield. However, the fleeting association with the film has led fans of the film to link Lennon's assassination with the “curse” of the film. It can be said that the primary reason why the myth of the curse came about was the brutal murder of Polanski's wife, actress Sharon Tate. Polanski even wanted to cast Tate as Rosemary but Evans was adamant about Mia Farrow's involvement. A year after the film's release, Tate and her friends were stabbed to death by followers of cult leader Charles Manson. Tate was eight-and-a-half months pregnant at the time of her demise. The members of the Manson Family delivered around 100 stab wounds to the four victims and wrote “Helter Skelter” on the wall in blood.   After his wife and unborn son were killed, Polanski indulged in substance abuse to cope with things but he ended up exemplifying human depravity. While guest editing the French edition of Vogue in 1977, the director preyed upon a 13-year old girl and persuaded her to participate in multiple photoshoots. During the second shoot at Jack Nicholson's house, he incapacitated the minor with champagne and half a Quaalude before sexually violating her multiple times.   Although he was arrested for the felony and spent 42 days in jail, Polanski became a fugitive and fled to France to avoid facing charges. Since then, he has lived the life of a criminal and has avoided traveling to countries where he can be extradited back to the US.   Ok, let's round things out with the wizard of oz. Despite its commercial success, The Wizard of Oz is seen by some as cursed. There were so many serious accidents onset that those Oscar-nominated special effects almost cost cast members their lives, from the two actors playing winged monkeys crashing to the ground when the wires that hoisted them up in the air broke, to the Wicked Witch of the West's stunt double Betty Danko injuring her left leg when the broomstick exploded.   Buddy Ebsen was originally cast in the role of the Tin Woodman, a.k.a. the Tin Man, but he was essentially poisoned by the makeup, which was made of pure aluminum dust. Nine days after filming started he was hospitalized, sitting under an oxygen tent. When he was not getting better fast enough, the filmmakers hired Jack Haley to be the Tin Man instead. This time, instead of applying the aluminum powder, the makeup artists mixed it into a paste and painted it on him. He did develop an infection in his right eye that needed medical attention, but it ended up being treatable.   Margaret Hamilton — who played the Wicked Witch of the West and was the one tipped who Harmetz off to the turmoil on set more than three decades later for her 1977 book — got burns, and the makeup artists had to rush to remove her copper makeup so that it wouldn't seep through her wounds and become toxic. Unlike Ebsen, she didn't get fired because they could live without her on the set for several more weeks.   An actor playing one of the Wicked Witch of the West's soldiers accidentally jumped on top of Dorothy's Toto, Carl Spitz, the dog trainer on set, told Harmetz. The dog (a female Cairn terrier named Terry) sprained its foot, and Spitz had to get a canine double. Terry did recover and returned to the set a few weeks later.   In a memoir by Judy Garland's third husband, Sid Luft, published posthumously in 2017, he writes that, after bar-hopping in Culver City, the actors who played the munchkins “would make Judy's life miserable by putting their hands under her dress.” Harmetz says it's true that the actors would go drinking near the Culver City hotel where they stayed, but she says their interactions with Garland did not rise to the level of what Luft described. “Nobody on the movie ever saw her or heard of a munchkin assaulting her,” said one worker on the film. Garland did say the drinking was annoying in an interview with talk-show host Jack Paar, but experts on Garland's life say that her rant about being scarred by the rowdy behavior on set may have been a deflection from the real damage she suffered during that time, at the hands of the studio. Garland was only 16 when she made The Wizard of Oz, and her struggles with depression and disordered eating started at an early age and continued for the rest of her life. She claimed that the studio executives gave her uppers and sleeping pills so she could keep up with the demanding pace of show business. She struggled with drug addiction and attempted suicide several times before she died of an accidental overdose on June 22, 1969, at just 47 years old.   The film went through four different producers by the time it was through.   Richard Thorpe, the first director, insisted that Judy Garland wear a blonde wig and thick makeup to depict Dorothy. When Buddy Epsen got sick from his Tin Man makeup and filming shut down for two weeks, the studio fired Thorpe and replaced him with George Cukor of My Fair Lady fame. Cukor encouraged Garland to wear natural makeup and play Dorothy less cartoonish and more natural. Cukor later left the film to work on Gone with the Wind instead and Viktor Fleming took his place. However, Cukor came back a few weeks later after getting fired from Gone With the Wind by Clark Gable (supposedly he was fired when Gable found out he was homosexual).   Director King Vidor was responsible for most of the sepia sequences and also helped Mervyn LeRoy with editing in post-production.   Not only did the public think former kindergarten teacher Margaret Hamilton was really evil following the first airing of The Wizard of Oz — she also suffered physically for the role. Hamilton received second and third-degree burns all over her body when the green copper makeup she was wearing got too hot during the fire scene. Her stunt double spent months in the hospital after a prop broom exploded — they were using a double because Hamilton got injured on an earlier take.   Stage makeup and prosthetics in 1939 were nowhere near what they are today. Ray Bolger's Scarecrow makeup left deeply embedded marks in his skin that didn't disappear for more than a year after the movie wrapped up filming. Luckily, this would never happen today.   How bout that hanging munchkin… Well, sorry folks. That seems to be fake. In a scene where Dorothy, the Scarecrow (Ray Bolger), and the Tin Man (Jack Haley) are skipping down the Yellow Brick Road, singing “we're off to see the wizard, the wonderful Wizard of Oz,” some think the dark, moving figure hanging from a tree in the background is an actor who hanged himself on set. More likely, it's one of the exotic birds that the filmmakers borrowed from the Los Angeles Zoo to create a wilderness setting. The rumor has been circulating since around 1989, the time of the 50th anniversary of the film's release. Alright, there you have it… Cursed movies!!!  Obscure 90s horror movies you need to see   https://www.ranker.com/list/obscure-1990s-horror-movies/christopher-myers

movies tv dvd new york los angeles chinese hitchcock american german bruce lee halloween god vietnamese philippines new york city world war ii richardson new york times french castle hearts dragon hollywood psycho west injuries illinois poland england european france testing nest superman irish vietnam war iraq dreams wind baby holy peck vogue apocalypse cursed north carolina judy garland wilmington connecticut crow ohio sweden wizard supposedly middle earth oz francis ford coppola thorpe sweeney jack nicholson steven spielberg jesuits alive hong kong luft evans cleveland hamilton viggo mortensen catcher rye fights john wayne ironically reeve beyonce ti west independent werner herzog john landis friedkin charles manson landis william friedkin satan unholy moody omen sharon tate clark gable godfather toto helter skelter poltergeist pearl jam nova scotia janet leigh pugsley paramount pictures george reeves catholic church levin manson family my fair lady fordham university ray bolger exorcism cuckoo sampson west hollywood exorcist coppola chris farley one flew over brandon lee mere gregory peck christopher reeve coincidence john belushi culver city john candy satanism burden cotton club genghis khan salinger innkeepers ira levin roman polanski john richardson georgetown lorraine warren antichrist cairn jason miller martin sheen wan kafkaesque sam kinison tcm tin woodman wicked witch yellow brick road bernhard gable dick cavett morrow emily rose amityville horror ellen burstyn polanski george cukor coptic perryman tin man apocalypse now david seltzer jack haley holden caulfield vera farmiga max von sydow david warner james wan poltergeist ii the other side poltergeist iii perron scarecrows assyrian mia farrow coincidentally margaret hamilton eerily los angeles zoo dominique dunne quaalude spitz anneliese michel vic morrow bermingham bridge too far jennifer carpenter robert evans mcneil ceco myca mundelein eskimos jack paar atuk krzysztof komeda komeda street studios honeymoon suite carol anne fitzcarraldo mark david chapman tina knowles ommen torrington von sydow father karras cukor mordecai richler cursed films
Midnight Train Podcast
Creepy Antarctica

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 126:33


Grab your parkas, put on those winter boots, don't forget those big ol mittens and hang out with us tonight as we head to the place where the coldest temperature on earth has ever been recorded, a mild -89.2°C (-128.6°F). Maybe we should bring swim trunks instead, eh? Well, aside from the coldest temps known anywhere, there is also possibly Nazis, maybe a hole to the center of the earth, a blood waterfall, and giant sea spiders with legs ranging up to 70cm, and for those of you who aren't sure if that's big or not cus we're a bunch of archaic buttholes that don't do metric… It's big.. Like close to 28 inches big… oh and how could we forget… the Penguins!! Lots of penguins! Well, if you haven't figured it out yet, we're heading to Antarctica! We're going to be discussing the continent and find out a little about it and then we'll talk about some creepy natural things going on and of course creepy conspiracies. It should be a fun one so let's get going!!!   So let's learn a little about Antarctica first off. Antarctica, on average, is the coldest, driest, and windiest continent, and has the highest average elevation of all the continents. Most of Antarctica is a polar desert, with annual precipitation of 200 mm (8 in) along the coast and far less inland; yet 80% of the world's freshwater reserves are stored there, enough to raise global sea levels by about 60 metres (200 ft) if all of it were to melt. The temperature in Antarctica has dropped to −89.2 °C (−128.6 °F) (or even −94.7 °C or −138.5 °F, as measured from space), although the average for the third quarter (the coldest part of the year) is −63 °C (−81 °F). Organisms native to Antarctica include many types of algae, bacteria, fungi, plants, protista, and certain animals, such as mites, nematodes, penguins, seals and tardigrades. Vegetation, where it occurs, is tundra. Wanna know some fun facts… Well, tough shit negative Nancy, we're gonna tell ya anyways.    Antarctica holds most of the world's fresh water An incredible 60-90% of the world's freshwater is locked in Antarctica's vast ice sheet. The Antarctic ice sheet is the largest on Earth, covering an incredible 14 million km² (5.4 million square miles) of Antarctic mountain ranges, valleys and plateaus. This leaves only 1% of Antarctica permanently ice-free. Some areas are ice-free in the summer, including many of the areas we visit on the Antarctic Peninsula.   At its deepest, Antarctica's ice is 4.5km (2.7 miles) thick – that's half the height of Mt Everest! Again, If it all melted, global sea levels would rise about 60 m (200 ft).   As mentioned, Antarctica is a desert With all of that fresh water held in the ice sheet, how could Antarctica be a desert?   When most of us think of deserts we think of sand dunes, cactuses and sizzling temperatures, but technically a desert doesn't have to be hot or sandy, it's more about how much precipitation the area receives as rain, snow, mist or fog. A desert is any region that receives very little annual precipitation.   The average annual rainfall at the South Pole over the past 30 years was just over 10 mm (0.4 in). Although there is more precipitation towards the coast, the average across the continent is low enough to classify Antarctica as a polar desert.   So, while Antarctica may be covered in ice, it has taken an incredible 45 million years to grow to its current thickness, because so little rain falls there.   As well as being one of the driest continents on Earth, Antarctica is also the coldest, windiest and highest.   Antarctica used to be as warm as Melbourne Australia! Given that the coldest ever land temperature was recorded in Antarctica of -89.2°C (-128.6°F), it can be hard to imagine Antarctica as a warm, temperate paradise. But Antarctica hasn't always been an icy land locked in the grip of a massive ice sheet. In fact, Antarctica was once almost as warm as Melbourne is today.   Researchers have estimated that 40-50 million years ago, temperatures across Antarctica reached up to 17°C (62.6°F). Scientists have also found fossils showing that Antarctica was once covered with verdant green forests and inhabited by dinosaurs!   The Antarctic Peninsula is one of the most rapidly warming areas on Earth The Antarctic Peninsula is warming more quickly than many other areas on Earth. In fact, it is one of the most rapidly warming areas on the planet. Over the past 50 years, average temperatures across the Antarctic Peninsula have increased by 3°C (37.4°F), five times the average increase on Earth.   This has led to some changes, for example where and when penguins form colonies and sea ice forms. It also means that the lush mosses of the Antarctic Peninsula have a slightly longer growing season.   There is no Antarctic time zone The question of time in Antarctica is a tricky one. At the South Pole the lines of longitude, which give us different time zones around the globe, all meet at a single point. Most of Antarctica experiences 6 months of constant daylight in summer and 6 months of darkness in winter. Time starts to feel a little different without the normal markers for day and night.   Scientists working in Antarctica generally stay in the time zone of the country they departed from, but this can cause some issues. For example, on the Antarctic Peninsula you can find stations from Chile, China, Russia, the UK and many other countries. You can imagine that if all of these neighbouring stations keep to their home time zones it could get a little confusing trying to share data and resources without accidentally waking one another up in the middle of the night!   For travellers with Aurora Expeditions, they generally stay on Ushuaia time – unless they're travelling to the Falkland Islands and South Georgia. Then they adjust to their local times, changing as they travel.   Every way is north! If you stand at the South Pole, you are at the southernmost point on Earth. It doesn't matter which way you look, every direction is north. So why do we talk about the Antarctic Peninsula as being in West Antarctica, and the section directly south of Australia as East Antarctica?   It's based on the prime meridian, an imaginary line which passes through Greenwich in the UK at 0 degrees of longitude. If you stand at the South Pole and face towards Greenwich, everything to your left is west Antarctica and everything to your right is east Antarctica. Got that?   Antarctica has active volcanoes Antarctica is home to several volcanoes and two of them are active. Mount Erebus, the second-highest volcano in Antarctica, is the southernmost active volcano on Earth. Located on Ross Island, this icebound volcano has some unique features such as ice fumaroles and twisted ice statues that form around gases that seep from vents near the volcanic crater.   The first ascent of Mt Erebus was made in 1908, when a team led by Australian scientist Edgeworth David, and including Douglas Mawson, completed an arduous and very chilly five day climb to the steaming crater.   The second active volcano is on Deception Island, a volcanic caldera in the South Shetland Islands. Once home to a thriving whaling station and later a scientific station, it was abandoned after the most recent eruption in 1969, and today it is a fascinating place that we visit on some of our Antarctic Peninsula voyages.   Antarctica has its own Treaty When humans caught their first glimpse of Antarctica in 1820, it was the only continent without an indigenous population. Several nations quickly made claims to the continent, which led to significant tension. While some countries argued that Antarctica was rightfully theirs, others heartily disagreed.   As tension mounted, everyone agreed on the need for a peaceful resolution. In December 1959, 12 countries signed the Antarctic Treaty, an unprecedented international agreement to govern the continent together as a reserve for peace and science. Since then, 41 other countries have signed the Treaty and participate in annual meetings, where decisions are made about how human activity in Antarctica is managed. All decisions made within the Antarctic Treaty System are made by consensus, with collaboration and agreement as the central pillars. Today, the Antarctic Treaty System has expanded to include strict guidelines for commercial fishing, sealing, and a complete ban on mining and mineral exploration.    We got those fun facts  from Aurora expeditions. Com   So let's look at some of the weird natural phenomena that goes on in Antarctica.    You guys like weird sounds? Well we got weird sounds for you. Scientists and researchers at the Ross ice shelf have recorded a slow seismic hum being generated by wind whipping across the Antarctic ice shelves. The scientists also discovered that the frequency of the vibrations changed in response to changing weather conditions on the shelf — when the temperature rose or fell, for instance, and when storms resculpted the shelf's snow dunes. The firn was "alive with vibration," Douglas MacAyeal, a glaciologist at the University of Chicago, said in a written commentary that accompanied the paper. "This vibration was found to be driven by the wind blowing across the firn layer and interacting with the intrinsic roughness of the surface called sastrugi." MacAyeal also offered a more poetic description of the sound, comparing it to "the buzz produced by thousands of cicada bugs when they overrun the tree canopy and grasses in late summer."   Julien Chaput, a geophysicist and mathematician at Colorado State University in Fort Collins and the leader of the research, told NBC News MACH in an email that the sound was "a little like yodeling, except with 10 people all singing in dissonance. It's a little eerie." But the singing ice is more than a sonic curiosity. Chaput and his colleagues argue in their paper that it might be possible to tap into seismic data to help monitor the health of ice shelves, which have been thinning in response to global warming — and causing sea levels to rise around the world. so that's all pretty crazy. Antarctica is singing to us. (Play sound)   Ever hear of a solar pillar? Well you're about to. The air in Antarctica is frequently very dry. The low temperatures mean that little or no water vapour is held in the air, instead it freezes and falls out, or builds up on surfaces as frost. Sometimes however, depending on the particular atmospheric conditions, the frozen water vapour remains in the air as suspended ice crystals. In these conditions the crystals can reflect sunlight in a variety of ways forming atmospheric phenomena of different types.   One of these phenomena is the "Solar Pillar" in the picture. The sun is reflected very strongly off tiny suspended flat ice crystals in the air which are oriented at or almost horizontally, so that the reflection is almost as bright as the sun itself. Like a rainbow, this sight depends on the viewing angle, where the light is coming from and where the observer is standing. The pillar appears to move when the observer moves, but always remains directly below the sun because the ice crystals are found throughout the air but only act as mirrors for the sun at the correct viewing angle.   Most of you have heard of the northern lights, but did you know there are southern lights? The Southern Lights, commonly known as the Aurora Australis, is one of the world's greatest wonders. The Southern lights are much more elusive than their Northern Hemisphere counterpart-Aurora Borealis. There is significantly less land mass in the Southern Hemisphere and fewer ideal viewing spots to see the Aurora. However, the Southern Lights are just as, if not more, impressive. Boasting a breathtaking colour palette that goes beyond the green and blues commonly seen at the Northern Lights, to include pinks, purples, oranges and golds.   Here's a little nerdy science for ya: The Aurora Australis phenomenon occurs when charged particles from solar winds bombard the Earth's atmosphere and interact with gases in our planet.   These highly energised particles are emitted from the sun and smash into the Earth's magnetic field at more than 6 million kilometres per hour.   For the most part, Earth is protected from solar winds by the magnetosphere, which sounds like Magneto from the X-Men franchise's bachelor pad. The magnetosphere is a region of space that surrounds the Earth's magnetic field and has a primary purpose of preventing cosmic rays, such as solar winds from entering Earth's atmosphere. However, occasionally, at particular times of the year, a few charged particles from solar winds make their way through the magnetosphere into our atmosphere. The charged particles move along the Earth's magnetic field lines towards the south and north pole. When they reach the each pole, they collide with atoms in the atmosphere, particularly nitrogen and oxygen, and become increasingly charged. Once the electrons settle back down to their normal level of excitement they glow, creating the magnificent light display, we know as an Aurora.   One more fun natural thing for you guys and probably the creepiest. BLOOD FALLS! THIS FIVE-STORY, BLOOD-RED WATERFALL POURS very slowly out of the Taylor Glacier in Antarctica's McMurdo Dry Valleys. When geologists first discovered the frozen waterfall in 1911, they thought the red color came from algae, but it's true nature turned out to be much more spectacular.   Roughly two million years ago, the Taylor Glacier sealed beneath it a small body of water which contained an ancient community of microbes. Trapped below a thick layer of ice, they have remained there ever since, isolated inside a natural time capsule. Evolving independently of the rest of the living world, these microbes exist in a place with no light or free oxygen and little heat, and are essentially the definition of “primordial ooze.” The trapped lake has very high salinity and is rich in iron, which gives the waterfall its red color. A fissure in the glacier allows the subglacial lake to flow out, forming the falls without contaminating the ecosystem within. If you've never seen the falls it's pretty awesome and metal. We'll post pics for sure.   Ok so enough of the sciency and nerdy stuff let's get into the crazy shit.    The first one is a fun one. In 2020 a clip from Google Earth was loaded onto youtube showing what appears to be an ice ship! So what exactly is it? Well friends, it depends on what you want to believe. The video sparked a conversation of epic conspiracy proportions! Some think that the "ship" is something connected to a secret Nazi base, which we'll get to later. Others claim ties to the secret elite and illuminati.    “I was told a couple of years ago that there are ships built underground somewhere on upper east coast (like the ones in the movie 2012) to save the rich and powerful when canary islands get hit with massive earthquake that will take out east coast,” one commenter wrote.    Other theory's range from military and government cover ups to some claiming it to be Noah's ark. The mundane exfoliation is that it's our minds playing a trick on us… but that's fucking lame and we're going with the fact that it's something creepy and crazy!!   Another fun thing found by Google Earth is a giant mountain sized alien face. Yes you heard right. And if you don't think this is leading to crazy talk… You are seriously mistaken.    Conspiracy theorists Blake and Brett Cousins – of YouTube channel thirdphaseofmoon – shared their thoughts on the Google Earth image.   "It appears to be a massive, ancient structure of some kind of face that is being revealed for the first time on Google Earth,” Blake said in his video.   "I would have to concur that whatever we're looking at resembles some sort of megastructure."   Brett added: "Could this be something that was left behind by the ancient civilisations of Antarctica?   "Ice melting could be revealing structures that would baffle the world."    There it is folks, a giant alien face structure hiding a civilization under Antarctica. Can't argue with the facts. I mean I guess you could say that it's just a case of pareidolia but that's not really that fun so… You know… Alien civilization it is.    Speaking of aliens, A video posted to an “alien" sub-section on Reddit shows how zooming in on a certain area of South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands reveals a mysterious vast section of disturbed snow. It shows what looks like something that crashed into the snow and skidded some 3000ft. Of course that brought out the nut jobs, and moody, claiming that it is a ufo crash site.    Reddit user Hey-man-Shabozi captioned the post: "What's over 200ft long, casts a shadow of 50ft, and appears to have crashed on an antarctic  island, moving so fast that it slid over 3,000ft?”   The island, located near Antarctica, has a strange snow formation in the area near Mount Carse.   It looks very similar to an avalanche but the video posted on Reddit goes into detail about how it could be more than what it seems. The main point of contention for the Reddit user is that there appears to be a long thin object that has created a lengthy straight track away from the disrupted area as if it crashed at speed. The Reddit user estimated that the tracks were more than 3,000 feet long.   He also claims to have worked out that the object responsible was 200 feet long.   Let's be honest… If you can't trust a reddit user… Who can you trust these days? Of course most people will say “oh it was just a big rock falling during an avalanche”, but everyone else who actually knows… They know it's a ufo. And they all know that the claims of a rock falling during an avalanche is just another global cover up to hide the fact that there are aliens.  Another one comes thanks to a visual grab from Google Earth, which seems to suggest that there might actually be a tall building standing on the ice in Antarctica. These findings have been uploaded to YouTube Channel MrMBB33 (who coincidentally was also responsible for finding the ice ship we discussed earlier) and the conspiracy theorist who runs this channel suggests that this structure is as much as 2,000 feet in height and the width spans six football fields. Viewers are clearly interested in what they are seeing. “Strange that all countries want to take over land but no country claims Antarctica. I think there is something they know that we don't," comments a user Lorrie Battistoni. Another user suggested that something on the lines of the Project Iceworm was active in Antarctica—the Project Iceworm was a then top-secret project of the United States Army which attempted to build a network of tunnel based and mobile nuclear missile launch sites under the ice sheet in Greenland. Equally, there are sceptics who suggest this is nothing more than a block of ice, albeit with a slightly different shape.     Since we brought up tunnels, there's supposedly an air vent on top of a “metallic shield” in a no-fly zone on the icy continent. Estimates are that the area is over 150 feet wide — based on measurements using Google Earth tools. Its two distinctive features: a pitch-black “opening” and a metal-like “shield.”   "That looks like some sort of vent, a thermal vent that goes underground. You can tell that the snow is darker than any other snow in the surrounding area,” one person said “That would imply to me that there is heat transfer going on” and suggests the top section is some metal or metal alloy man-made structure “over an opening that goes underground.   Someone else points out there is no volcanic activity nearby: “It is just there all by itself.”   So what is it? Just a cave? A man made structure hiding a secret underground base? Should we just go back to aliens for this one? What do you guys think? Ok how about Hitler and the Nazis? Well since people believe there are Nazis and maybe even Hitler himself still hiding out in Antarctica. This theory originates from a story about a Nazi expedition to Antarctica.  The story says that while exploring and mapping the area, they uncovered a multitude of underground caves and rivers.  One of the caves was particularly large and was turned into a large city that would be home to both Nazi's and other powerful groups, like the illuminati.  Along the way, the Germans either came across alien technology or made contact with the aliens.  The Germans learned how to use the technology and were able to build a number of weapons.  This belief is extraordinary because there is no evidence that the Nazis ever did, or were even capable of building such a base.  Geologist and Oceanographer, Colin Summerhayes, partnered with journalist and historian, Peter Beeching, to examine evidence about Antarctica and the Nazis. In  support of this claim is the fact that the Nazis did at one point carry out an expedition to Antarctica in 1938.  Many conspiracy theorists claim that this was a large-scale expedition, with militarized and scientific ships. Another bit of evidence for this theory is about the Nazi's agreeing to The Antarctic treaty.  The treaty makes Antarctica a research zone and states that Antarctica cannot be targeted in any way by bombs or missiles.  Conspiracy theorists jump on this and say why would Nazi Germany sign this agreement?  The claim is that they signed this agreement to deter other nations from visiting Antarctica and stumbling upon their base and the research being done there.  There has been no evidence found to corroborate that point.  Additionally, some claim that Hitler himself is actually in Antarctica.  The evidence for this idea is based on the claim that a German ship arrived at an Argentinian base located in Antarctica after the war ended.  Another popular conspiracy theory is that Hitler escaped to Argentina at the end of the war, and so therefore he was picked up by a German ship, and sent to Antarctica to live at the secret bunker.  However there is no evidence that Hitler ever made it to Argentina or that the supposed German boat ever went to Argentina's Antarctic base… At least that's what they want you to believe! Since there have been other strange military activity there such as supposed German boats coming or the U.S. project “Operation Highjump”, since people really think that this is a feasible thing. Of course These strange events, and the lack of information around them, often lead people to conclude that it must be because there is something going on there that the government doesn't want us to know about.  Many of these beliefs actually come from Flat Earth.  Flat Earthers often propose that it is illegal to go to Antarctica and has a constant military presence, that's why none of them can go investigate if the ice wall is out there.  There is a subgroup of flat earth who believes that part of the reason you “can't go” to Antarctica is because of the Nazi base there. So think about that one...flat earthers believing there are Nazis bases in Antarctica… Good Lord. In 1978, Miguel Serrano, a Chilean diplomat and Nazi sympathizer, published El Cordón Dorado: Hitlerismo Esotérico [The Golden Thread: Esoteric Hitlerism] (in Spanish), in which he claimed that Adolf Hitler was an Avatar of Vishnu and was, at that time, communing with Hyperborean gods in an underground Antarctic base in New Swabia. Serrano predicted that Hitler would lead a fleet of UFOs from the base to establish the Fourth Reich. In popular culture, this alleged UFO fleet is referred to as the Nazi flying saucers from Antarctica. Oh boy. We really gotta figure out if the Nazis are on the moon or in Antarctica!   How about pyramids… You like pyramids? We got pyramids… maybe. THE oldest pyramids on Earth are hidden away under the deep cold snow of Antarctica, conspiracy theorists have shockingly claimed . Ancient alien theorists who are certain secret pyramids are concealed all around the globe, think some may be hidden on Antarctica. Conspiracy theorists, in particular, point to a pyramid-like structure near the Shackleton mountain range on the icy continent. The “pyramid” in question, when viewed on satellite imagery, does appear to have four steep sides much like the Great Pyramid of Giza. Conspiracy theory author David Childress told Ancient Aliens there is a distinct possibility the Shackleton pyramid is the oldest of its kind on Earth.   He said: “If this gigantic pyramid in Antarctica is an artificial structure, it would probably be the oldest pyramid on the planet and in fact, it might be the master pyramid that all the other pyramids on planet Earth were designed to look like.” Another conspiracy theorist agreed, saying: "All the way around the world we find evidence of pyramid structures.   "We should start looking at the possibility there was habitation on Antarctica.   "Was it a lost civilization? Could it be ancient astronauts?   "And just maybe, the earliest monuments of our own civilization came from Antarctica.”    But the theory was challenged by Dr Michael Salla, author of Exopolitics Political Implications of the Extraterrestrial Presence. The alien expert argued the Antarctic pyramid is just one node in a global network of power-generating pyramids strategically placed around Earth.   A popular pyramid conspiracy claims the triangular structures act as power generators of sorts, built for the purpose of transiting vast amounts of energy wirelessly.   Dr Salla said: “There has been extensive research done on pyramids throughout the world, in terms of their structure and what they really are.   “One of the theories is that pyramids are power generators and so if you have these pyramids strategically placed around the world generating a charge, it's possible to create a general standing wave around the world that is a wireless transmission of energy.”   Also There is a claim that the British set up a base called Maudheim-1 (there are no records) in Dronning Maud Land during the war to observe the apparent Nazi base, this was supposedly attacked by the Nazis in July 1945 followed by SAS led (failed) retaliatory attacks from October to December that year.   How about a couple quick hits:    Some think that the remains of a  Motte and Bailey castle were uncovered. Motte-and-bailey castle is a European fortification with a wooden or stone keep situated on a raised area of ground called a motte, accompanied by a walled courtyard, or bailey, surrounded by a protective ditch and palisade. Relatively easy to build with unskilled labour, but still militarily formidable, these castles were built across northern Europe from the 10th century onwards, spreading from Normandy and Anjou in France, into the Holy Roman Empire in the 11th century. The Normans introduced the design into England and Wales. Motte-and-bailey castles were adopted in Scotland, Ireland, the Low Countries and Denmark in the 12th and 13th centuries.    The structure is about 120m across which makes it of the appropriate size range and has two sort-of circles, though the whole thing appears to be more or less completely flat rather than having any significant raised earthworks which in part define a Motte and Bailey castle, the mounds of such castles in towns, cities and in the countryside in Europe are particularly enduring across the centuries. There's a scientific explanation for it but that doesn't stop people from believing what they want.    Then of course you have the flat earthers . There is a weird conspiracy theory that Antarctica and the South Pole do not exist. This belief is most common among flat-earthers who claim that our planet is flat. Flat-earthers believe that the North Pole is at the center of the world while the South Pole surrounds the Earth. According to flat-earthers, Antarctica is actually a thick wall about 30 to 60 meters (100 to 200 ft.) high that surrounds our planet. The wall stops everything from falling over the edge of the Earth. Flat-earthers say we cannot confirm the existence of the wall because world governments and the United Nations have strict no-fly and no-sail zones around Antarctica. Conspiracy theorists believe that the British Captain Cook is one of the few humans to have ever seen the wall apart from government agents. Supposedly, Captain Cook reported seeing the huge wall during the three voyages he made to Antarctica. The wall covered the entire coastline, and he could not land anywhere because it was just too tall to climb.   Speaking if stupid, we touched on this not long ago so we'll just mention it in passing… But apparently there's a hole at the south pole that is the entrance to the hollow earth...I mean… Come On people… Is this where we are as a society??   Going along with this theory of a hole at the pole, there are people that think the world is hiding that fact with a fake south pole. So when people go to the spot that is thought to be the south pole is actually an arbitrary random spot chosen by the powers of the world to throw everyone off the trail of hollow earth.    Some people also believe that there is actually a tropical region that is  hidden in Antarctica. Yes, a tropical region. Some say it is in the no fly zone that is also attributed to the spot where the hole to hollow earth is… we think these guys should fight it out. To the death. Like, no survivors. On the other hand there is recent evidence that there used to be rain forests on the continent so maybe the believers aren't as crazy as we think. Just kidding. They're nuttier than squirrel turds.   Some other crackpots also really believe Antarctica is the Land of The Ancient Race of Super-Beings With Big Angular Heads. Some of them tried to leave many years ago and made it to Easter Island where their enormous weight made them sink into the ground and a simple common bacterial infection turned them to stone. The bacterium cannot live in Antarctica so they continue their highly sophisticated secret society under the ice, dude we can't make this stuff up. Maybe it was Medusa… see, we can make shit up, too!   And finally… Is Antarctica really the lost city of atlantis? The theory that Antarctica is Atlantis is a relatively new one, dating back to the mid 20th Century.   According to Charles Hapgood's 1958 book 'Earth's Shifting Crust',  the continent of Antarctica was in fact originally much further north than its current position. Due to the shifting of the Earth's crust, the continent was displaced, and the climate of the continent, which had been mild, plummeted to below freezing.   This shift in location and temperature has led some to argue that an ancient Civilisation existed on the continent, which was subsequently destroyed by this monumental geographical realignment.   In 2016, faint credence was given to this claim with the revelation that remains of a human settlement had been found under the Antarctic ice.   One report claimed, 'the pictures, taken using remote sensing photography for NASA's Operation IceBridge mission to Antarctica, show what online sleuths believe could be a city.' Ranker list of best winter thriller movies https://www.ranker.com/list/thriller-movies-set-in-snow/ranker-film

CreepGeeks Podcast
Dead Children's Playground, Listener Comments, and Where we'll be next?

CreepGeeks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 49:18


You're listening to CreepGeeks Podcast This is Season 6 Episode 227: Dead Children's Playground, Listener Comments, and Where we'll be next? In this episode: We Investigate the Dead Children's Playground in Huntsville Alabama, Listener Comments plus Wild and Weird West Virginia. Thank you to our Patreon Supporters: Dav, Isiss, James, Bobby, John and John! Want to Support the podcast? Join us on Patreon! CreepGeeks Paranormal and Weird News is creating Humorous Paranormal Podcasts, Interviews, and Videos!  What is the CreepGeeks Paranormal and Weird News Podcast? CreepGeeks Podcast is an off-beat podcast exploring the paranormal, cryptid, supernatural, and simply absurd nonsense circulating the web. Broadcasting paranormal news and strange experiences from our underground bunker in the mountains of Western North Carolina. Hey Everyone! You can call the show and leave us a message!  1-575-208-4025 Use Amazon Prime Free Trial! Did you know YOU can support the CreepGeeks Podcast with little to no effort! Won't cost you anything!  When you shop on Amazon.com use our affiliate link and we get a small percentage!  It doesn't change your price at all. It helps us to keep the coffee flowing and gas in the Albino Rhino!  CreepGeeks Podcast is an Amazon Affiliate CheapGeek and CreepGeeks Amazon Page's Amazon Page    We've got Bigfoot Coffee! Support the Show: CreepGeeks Swag Shop!  Website- CREEPGEEKS PARANORMAL AND WEIRD NEWS Hey everyone! Help us out!  Rate us on iTunes!  ‎CreepGeeks Paranormal and Weird News Podcast on Apple Podcasts   FORTEAN TERM OF THE DAY: Stone Tape Theory: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stone_Tape   The speculation that ghosts and hauntings are analogous to tape recordings, and that mental impressions during emotional or traumatic events can be projected in the form of energy, "recorded" onto rocks and other items and "replayed" under certain conditions.  Listener Comments:  Hello! First of all, I just wanted to say I enjoy the podcast and have been tuning in every week for some time now. You guys do a wonderful job highlighting the paranormal throughout the region.  In honor of the upcoming spooky season I think it would be great if you guys could do a podcast on haunted locations in western North Carolina. My friends and I are looking to get a road trip together to explore some of the more famous and off the beaten path haunted locations in the area. I'm a skeptic who wants to believe, and I'm hoping that this year will be my year to experience something paranormal. I'll start off the list by sharing a couple of the reportedly haunted locations in my neck of the woods.  Golden Valley Ghosts  I've been to the Fellowship Baptist Church many times during the day and the night. While I've never had any experiences there, it is creepy because the church is semi-abandoned (they only have church there twice a year), and it's very isolated up on a mountain with a couple mile gravel road leading up to it. You even have to drive over a small (and reportedly haunted - see link) creek to get to it. The church is ramshackle and is open to visitors to come in and sign the guest book. The graveyard is extremely old, which adds to the creepy ambience. See link for details about the hauntings. As I mentioned before, I've yet to experience anything there yet, so I can't relay any stories of my own at this time.  https://www.angelfire.com/in/lottgreene/hallodan.html  This is my town's most famous ghost story by far. I'm a middle grades teacher in the area, and we always read this story around Halloween time. Supposedly, the place where Daniel Keith was executed (the old city gallows) was cursed, causing every business that operated there to fail, until Dominoes took over in the 2000's. The address is 114 S Washington St, Rutherfordton, NC 28139; however, the shadow hasn't been reported there since 1949 for reasons explained in the story. Again, I've never experienced anything here myself, but I make sure to drive by there every year sometime during the Halloween season. Unfortunately, It's not very creepy because it's in the downtown area of Rutherfordton. Daniel Keith is reportedly buried in an unmarked grave at the nearby Gilboa Church graveyard. This area is much more atmospheric, and I always have a good time trying to figure out where he is buried.  So here are my stories, feel free to use them if you want to. I think it would be awesome if you (and maybe some of your listeners) could share your local haunts in Western NC so that we can all go out and enjoy them this Fall. I hope that you consider this as a possible episode for your podcast.  Thanks,  Shawn P. I'm interested in exploring places in the western Carolinas thought to be locales of strange happenings. I'm also wondering if you have looked into the Meadow,  aka the southern Skinwalker Ranch, currently being researched by Trey Hudson et al? Thanks for any reply. I'm looking forward to your next show!  Warm Regards, -Jim  Why is this important?  Our Spooky Season RoadTrip Begins: Late Start Appalachia Doesn't want us to go! Dead Children's Playground, Huntsville Alabama Our Video: https://youtu.be/mkjl4ue_yoY  Location Map: https://goo.gl/maps/ECZW64S4LtbHDLuG8  The legend of Alabama's ‘Dead Children's Playground'  Dead Children's Playground – The most haunted park in America | MRU MEDIA  Where we'll be next!  Wild & Weird West CON UFO -Cryptid and Paranormal Conference: https://www.facebook.com/events/801375254080182?acontext=%7B%22event_action_history%22%3A[%7B%22surface%22%3A%22page%22%7D]%7D  Wild & Weird West Virginia - Home  For your Free Audiobook today go to www.audibletrial.com/cheapgeek      Again, that's  http://www.audibletrial.com/cheapgeek for your free audiobook.   Beyond the Fray- Paramalgamation Shannon LeGro and G. Michael Hopf-   Beyond the Fray: Paramalgamation (Audible Audio Edition): Shannon LeGro, G. Michael Hopf, Tanya Eby, Alex Knox, Tantor Audio: Audible Audiobooks    Hunt for the SkinWalker- George Knapp and Colm Kelleher-  Hunt for the Skinwalker: Science Confronts the Unexplained at a Remote Ranch in Utah    The Dover Demon, Hunter Shea. The Dover Demon eBook: Shea, Hunter: Kindle Store      Monsters Among Us: An Exploration of Otherworldly Bigfoots, Wolfmen, Portals, Phantoms, and Odd Phenomena Monsters Among Us: An Exploration of Otherworldly Bigfoots, Wolfmen, Portals, Phantoms, and Odd Phenomena  The Mark of the Bell Witch Preorders for Bell Witch + Legacy Blurays are Restocked! — Small Town Monsters  Enjoy this with your free trial:  “Through the Brown Mountain Lights” by Christy Tillery French  Through the Brown Mountain Lights: Brown Mountain Lights, Book 1 (Audible Audio Edition): CC Tillery, Christy Tillery French, Cynthia Tillery Hodges, Reagan Boggs, CC Tillery: Audible Audiobooks   CreepGeeks Paranormal and Weird News is creating Humorous Paranormal Podcasts, Interviews, and Videos!   Looking for something unique and spooky? Check out Omi's new Etsy, CraftedIntent: CraftedIntent: Simultaneously BeSpoke and Spooky. by CraftedIntent  This Patron supported episode is brought to you by Dav, Isiss, James, Bobby, John and John!  We really appreciate their Patronage! What to watch:   Currently Free for Amazon Prime   Seth Breedlove Small Town Monsters https://amzn.to/2yemd8x     On the trail of UFO's Watch On the Trail of UFOs | Prime Video     Native Bigfoot: Watch Native Bigfoot | Prime Video      Recommended Reading:  WA Harbinson: PROJEKT UFO: https://amzn.to/2S4InUu  Kent Carliss: Foo Fighter https://amzn.to/3v7EBbI  Lyle Blackburn: Sinister Swamp: Sinister Swamps: Monsters and Mysteries from the Mire Stanton Friedman- Crash at Corona:The U.S. Military Retrieval and Cover-Up of a UFO Crash at Corona: The U.S. Military Retrieval and Cover-Up of a UFO  Shannon Legro -Beyond the Fray: Bigfoot: Beyond The Fray: Bigfoot, LeGro, Shannon, Hopf, G. Michael  Ramdas - The One Eyed Turtle by Robert Goerman:  Ramdas - The One Eyed Turtle: Robert A. Goerman and Dinesh Patel, Kiran Yalamanchi: 9781558565050 John A. Keel: The Man, The Myths, and the Ongoing Mysteries: John A. Keel: The Man, The Myths, and the Ongoing Mysteries   Brown Mountain Lights: History, Human Nature, and Science Explain an Appalachian Mystery  The Brown Mountain Lights: History, Science and Human Nature Explain an Appalachian Mystery (Contributions to Southern Appalachian Studies Book 40)  Get Something From Amazon Prime! CheapGeek and CreepGeeks Amazon Page's Amazon Page     Cool Stuff on Amazon -Squatch Metalworks Microsquatch Keychain:  Microsquatch Keychain Bottle Opener with Carabiner. Laser-cut, stone-tumbled stainless steel. DESIGNED AND MANUFACTURED IN THE USA.  Amazon Influencer!  CheapGeek and CreepGeeks Amazon Page's Amazon Page   Instagram?  Creep Geeks Podcast (@creepgeekspod) • Instagram photos and videos   Omi Salavea (@craftedintent) • Instagram photos and videos  CreepGeeks Podcast (@creepgeekspodcast) TikTok | Watch CreepGeeks Podcast's Newest TikTok Videos  Need to Contact Us? Email Info: contact@creepgeeks.com  Attn Greg or Omi  Want to comment about the show? omi@creepgeeks.com   greg@creepgeeks.com   Business Inquiries: contact@creepgeeks.com   https://teespring.com/stores/creepgeeks-podcast-store   Music: Music is Officially Licensed through Audiio.com. License available upon request. #ghost #cryptid #hauntedplayground

Relatable Reality
Therapy, Separate Beds, TikTok, Job Market, Pop Culture and Bravo Greatness

Relatable Reality

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 91:47


Get ready because this week is a long one, but we just had so much to share with everyone.To start the episode Liz and Bree talk about how stressful this year has been and Liz shares how she has (and still does) debate going to therapy. Overwhelming things have all been heightened because of the uncertainty of the world and it doesn't seem to be getting easier. Bree also asks Liz if she would ever consider sleeping in different rooms that Christian. Liz is a hard no, but Bree considers it a lot because of how restless her sleep is. Mainly because of Miles, but a good night sleep is something we all know is duo needed. They also talk about why they have a hard time getting rid of belongings, sometimes its just hard when you haven't always had it.Bree has fallen deep into TikTok dinners and she is obsessed. Easy to follow instructions for new dinner ideas, and the kids love helping! Then she talks about the job market now and how even though everywhere is hiring it is hard to get a hold of people to work. Supposedly nobody will answer their phone anymore and you have to text people to come in for an interview. Seems so strange, but this is a wild world.Pop Culture this week (really the day we recorded) was INSANE! Two huge news stories with Dorit Kemsley (from RHOBH) being robbed at gunpoint  and the altercation with Zayn Malik and Yolanda Hadid. Both such incredibly sad stories and so sad to see on social media today. Of course we talk about all our favorite shows,  the Potomac ladies, Salt Lake City housewives, very little about the Beverly Hills part 3 reunion then of course the huge bomb dropped on Vanderpump Rules and HubHouse coming into the Winter House. All Bree and Liz's thoughts on all these shows and so much more!Be sure to follow on instagram @relatablerealitypodcastLIKE, SUBSCRIBE, DOWNLOAD

Sparking Faith Podcast
Believe: Living Fossils – Mon – 21-11-01

Sparking Faith Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 2:00


Do you remember playing hide and seek as a child? Someone hid their eyes and everyone else scattered and hid. You always wanted to have a good hiding spot. Hiding the longest was how you won the game! Now, imagine hiding for 273 million years! Ok, so I'm not talking about a game. I am talking about a recent news article. Two living fossils have been discovered. No, not dinosaurs! It is a non-skeletal coral living on a crinoid. They were discovered in the Pacific Ocean 330 feet deep off the coast of Japan. Supposedly, both creatures became extinct 273 million years ago. That's the estimated age of the rock containing the fossils of these two creatures.* But they obviously did not go extinct. Generations of the creatures must have lived for the modern pair to exist. I guess the deep ocean is a good hiding place! Also, this is not the first time a living creature has been discovered that scientists believed to be extinct by millions of years. I also predict it won't be the last! Perhaps there is something wrong with the assumptions evolutionists use about the dating of rocks or of the fossil forming process. Perhaps fossils were formed in a catastrophe such as a global flood. Maybe the fossils were formed only thousands of years ago. At any rate, discovery of so called “living fossils” should make us reconsider accepted scientific theories. *Hannah Sparks, "‘Living fossil' rediscovered in Pacific Ocean after 273 million years," New York Post, May 10, 2021, https://nypost.com/2021/05/10/living-fossil-rediscovered-after-273-million-years/. Please provide feedback and suggestions at: https://www.sparkingfaith.com/feedback/ Bumper music “Landing Place” performed by Mark July, used under license from Shutterstock.

The PARAcast
Let's Go YeeMin Episode 310

The PARAcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 76:27


We're doing another show. I don't know what we're going to talk about. Supposedly there is some guy named Brandon the country is excited about.

Unsolved Mysteries: Solved?
#64 - Stull Cemetery and the Mysterious Portal to Hell

Unsolved Mysteries: Solved?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 52:31


Fifteen minutes outside of Lawrence, KS in the United States is a tiny, unincorporated town called Stull with a tiny cemetery that bears a dark secret.  Supposedly one of the seven portals to hell lies there, and Satan himself appears twice a year.  Is it true?  We'll tell you in this special Halloween episode!

Sydney Writers' Festival
Have A Go, Get A Go

Sydney Writers' Festival

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 57:01


“I think that's where we see the limits of our compassion. It's always tempered by the biases that we are comfortable continuing with and not interrogating.” – Kishor Napier-Raman The myth that Australian society is egalitarian enough to give everyone a ‘fair go' is pervasive. Supposedly, if you have a go, you'll get a go. Yet it's an idea rarely reflected in our economic policies. Welfare recipients are demonised as dole bludgers, wealth is protected and the divide between rich and poor feels ever more acute. Two of our finest economic and political commentators, Rick Morton (On Money) and Kishor Napier-Raman, examine where money meets policy – from their predictions on the then-upcoming COVID vaccine roll-out to housing affordability – with Vice-Chancellor and Principal of the University of Sydney, Mark Scott. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Dale Jackson Show
Dale discusses how the media is the source of most lies including "missing white woman syndrome" with Gabby Petio, and the Jan. 6th riots being supposedly being created and lead by GOP members - 10-25-21

The Dale Jackson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 18:21


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

有待俱乐部
【劲哥金曲】暮春秋色

有待俱乐部

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 75:21


2021.10.25 劲哥金曲 Vol.24 暮春秋色1.Intro - 译乐队2.Universal Traveler - Air3.Sugar for the Pill - Slowdive4.The Boy With The Gun - David Sylvian5.Hoppípolla - Sigur Rós6.Wait For Her - Roger Waters7.Supposedly, We Were Nightmares - Mogwai8.The Rain Song - Led Zeppelin9.No Surprises - Radiohead10.I Talk To The Wind - King Crimson11.暮春秋色 - 窦唯/译乐队12.A Living Island - Yes13.Cannonball - Damien Rice14.Holiday Frost - Freescha

The Roddenberry Podcast Network
P1P: 528 - Unpacking Pakleds, and the Cat's Out of The Bag

The Roddenberry Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 38:00


This week on Episode 528 of Priority One: We delve into the whale-filled washup of the season finale of Lower Decks, Anson Mount discusses literally sitting in the captain's chair, and is that a star on top of the Christmas tree or a Borg baby spray-painted gold? In gaming news, we take a closer look at Star Trek Online's Halloween event, and roll for shield strength in a new release from Star Trek Adventures! TREK IT OUT Edited by Thomas Reynolds What's the Deal With All These Feels, McMahan? By Elio Lleo Mike McMahan, the creator of Star Trek: Lower Decks, isn't resting on his laurels! Nope! After a (generally) well-received Season 2 of the Star Trek animated adventure, McMahan is making the rounds talking about the season–which wrapped last week on October 14th. Sam Stone of Comic Book Resource jumped right in and asked about its unusual villain: the Pakleds. McMahan's explanation: When we were writing the first season, we were in the thick of a pretty dark time across the world–the re-rise of fascism across multiple countries, obviously a lot of politics happening in this country and, not to put too fine a point to it, things that had seemed like a joke in the first place suddenly becoming much more dangerous because we weren't vigilant about it. The Pakleds seemed like a perfect opportunity for that… [This sight gag doesn't work in a podcast app but I stand by it nonetheless–Ed.] Image: ViacomCBS, via Comic Book Resource. Really Be Careful What You Wish For, Mariner What about that incredible cliffhanger? Well according to McMahan, the goal of Season 2 was meant to show Mariner “grappling with themes of betrayal and being left.” Supposedly, Mariner's got some past trauma that we haven't been privy to yet. Nevertheless, McMahan explains that Mariner will start Season 3 struggling to deal with having her mother taken from her. [NOT JUST HER, MIKE–Ed.] When talking with StarTrek.com he explained, “...in the first season we were really creating a family, and in the second season we kind of tested them. And in the finale of the second season, we're dealing with the loss, the family breaking up.”  What about our other characters? Well, there seems to be something deeper going on with Rutherford. Something more than just a faulty cybernetic implant. MacMahan tells CBR.com, “... it's about Rutherford. There's stuff about Rutherford that he doesn't even realize and this is his second implant.” They go on to discuss some of the other character dynamics–like the “will they/won't they” tension between Rutherford and Tendi–along with some takeaways McMahan learned from the first two seasons. Mainly that anyone you talk to could secretly be Jeffrey Combs. Anyone. Image: ViacomCBS, via Comic Book Resource. Center Chair, Hot Seat, Call It What You Will By Cat Hough If you have not had a chance to see the new trailer for the upcoming History Channel docu-series The Center Seat: 55 Years of Star Trek, you should definitely trek it out. According to the press release, The Center Seat will be “the ultimate Star Trek documentary that everyone has always wanted, and now they're getting.” Each episode of the series will focus on a different chapter in Star Trek history, starting with the inception of the original Star Trek series at Desilu. But even the trailer features some pretty saucy quotes from the cast and crew of the various shows and movies. https://youtu.be/J_IOHcPuN3Q For example, we hear more from Wil Wheaton, Denise Crosby, Kate Mulgrew and Robert Beltran about their less than ideal working circumstances and for Cirroc Lofton–we hear about his extreme dislike for having to wear the “onesie” uniform while also going through puberty. Nicolas Meyer, writer of The Undiscovered Country, speaks about how much William Shatner hated the script for the movie and the effect that had on, well, pretty much everyone else involved [yeah and you thought Final Frontier was a good idea, now sit down–Ed.] Mmmm. Taste that grain. Image: ViacomCBS, via Deadline. The show doesn't cover any of the new Trek series, but definitely appears to be a comprehensive and detailed exploration of the Star Trek universe over the first 55 years of the show. Created by the Nacelle Company, who also produced Netflix's The Movies That Made Us and The Toys That Made Us, the series is narrated by Dr. Beverly Crusher herself, Gates McFadden, and directed by Nacelle Company founder Brian Volk-Weiss. There's not been an official release date given other than it should premiere sometime this fall. Festivities Will Now Commence By Rosco McQueen It's the most wonderful time of year; when the nanoprobes gently come to rest on ornaments hanging from the boughs of a tree, and assimilation tubules shine in the festive glow of twinkling lights.  Christmas is soon upon us, and you can count down to festive assimilation with the 2021 Borg Cube advent calendar. The calendar features 24 Trek gifts behind alcoves (or windows if you prefer) and includes gifts of socks, coasters, and an espresso cup commemorating the first warp speed flight in 2063. It's made by Eaglemoss, the same company who also made a TARDIS-shaped advent calendar for devout Whovians, and is available for purchase now. It could be just the thing to put you in the mood for Picard season 2, with the Borg Queen to feature as part of the time-travelling tale. And speaking of season 2… I hope one of those is an apology to Icheb and Hugh. Image: Eaglemoss. Soji's Sojourn By Rosco McQueen In an interview with Trekmovie.com, Isa Briones spoke about where we find Soji in Picard season 2: a place where she can finally be herself, now that being an android is no longer outlawed.   “We're definitely seeing a new kind of level of her evolution as she's coming into her own. She's finally allowed to be who she is and be accepted by the universe, the galaxy, whatever you want to call it. So yeah, we get to see her in this new, more certain place of who she is. And that's very exciting.” The more certain place also has a pool? Jealous. Image: ViacomCBS, via TrekMovie.com The interview covered working under strict COVID conditions, as well as the broader strokes of season two and how it connects to the world we're living in. “There's a big emphasis, I think, on mental health, for sure. We're seeing these characters going through some hard moments and really leaning on each other and prioritizing their own mental health in order to save everyone else. And I think that's a very relatable storyline and a storyline that we need right now.” Your classic Good Cop/Borg Cop dynamic. Image: ViacomCBS, via TrekMovie.com We're All Batty for Strange New Worlds By Rosco McQueen The hype train continues heading towards the station for Strange New Worlds–even Anson Mount starring as Batman in the new DC animated movie Injustice can't stop interviewers from asking about the new series.   Either that, or they ask about his starship's extended warranty. Image:ViacomCBS, via SYFY. Mount will play the role of the Dark Knight in the animated adaptation of the video game Injustice, where a traumatized Superman turns evil.  In an interview with SYFY Wire, Mount talks about the recording process, and not being the first Christopher Pike to take a turn at Batman. (If you're playing along at home, Bruce Greenwood has voiced Batman a couple of times, and was also the Kelvin Universe's version of one of Starfleet's greatest captains). But when the discussion turned to Strange New Worlds, Mount reinforced the episodic nature of the show, as well as a moment that would give every Trek fan goosebumps. “I was just there as Anson in my own clothes and I sat down in the chair and it was in that moment that I flashed back to playing Star Trek as my make-believe game when I was like eight years old. Something about it was just really strangely emotional for me, and I'm still doing that. I don't even know really how to articulate it, but it's surreal and it's weird... but it's something that I'm so grateful for.” STAR TREK GAMING NEWS Edited by Thomas Reynolds Fanatical Devotion to the Many By Cat Hough Star Trek Online tweeted earlier today that the recent partnership with Fanatical offering in-game bundles to benefit the Boys and Girls Clubs of America raised more than $77,000. Well done, everyone who donated! Cat's Tale of “Cat's Tale” By Cat Hough Well, it's been a week since the “Cat's Tale” Halloween TFO was released, and while it took players a few days to get to know how to navigate the phases of the TFO, it seems that most people are enjoying the mission. As you and your team are first transported to the castle on Pyris VII (or is it Boreth?) the music and lighting definitely set the mood for battling skeletons, witches, skulls and Devidians. In a creepy surprise, you're treated to some Bonnie-Kin voice-over as you make our way downstairs and through the hallways lighting candles–because it's dark in this castle! In the first phase, you are attacked by skeletons, but you can only kill them when they are standing within the circles of candlelight. Some equipment that we highly recommend is the Universal Kit Module - Gravity Containment Unit Mk XII. You can get this kit module as a Tier IV reward from the Discovery reputation; if you use it while you're standing in the circles, then you can just pull those skeletons over to you. 

Priority One: A Roddenberry Star Trek Podcast
528 - Unpacking Pakleds, and the Cat's Out of The Bag

Priority One: A Roddenberry Star Trek Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 38:00


This week on Episode 528 of Priority One: We delve into the whale-filled washup of the season finale of Lower Decks, Anson Mount discusses literally sitting in the captain's chair, and is that a star on top of the Christmas tree or a Borg baby spray-painted gold? In gaming news, we take a closer look at Star Trek Online's Halloween event, and roll for shield strength in a new release from Star Trek Adventures! TREK IT OUT Edited by Thomas Reynolds What's the Deal With All These Feels, McMahan? By Elio Lleo Mike McMahan, the creator of Star Trek: Lower Decks, isn't resting on his laurels! Nope! After a (generally) well-received Season 2 of the Star Trek animated adventure, McMahan is making the rounds talking about the season–which wrapped last week on October 14th. Sam Stone of Comic Book Resource jumped right in and asked about its unusual villain: the Pakleds. McMahan's explanation: When we were writing the first season, we were in the thick of a pretty dark time across the world–the re-rise of fascism across multiple countries, obviously a lot of politics happening in this country and, not to put too fine a point to it, things that had seemed like a joke in the first place suddenly becoming much more dangerous because we weren't vigilant about it. The Pakleds seemed like a perfect opportunity for that… [This sight gag doesn't work in a podcast app but I stand by it nonetheless–Ed.] Image: ViacomCBS, via Comic Book Resource. Really Be Careful What You Wish For, Mariner What about that incredible cliffhanger? Well according to McMahan, the goal of Season 2 was meant to show Mariner “grappling with themes of betrayal and being left.” Supposedly, Mariner's got some past trauma that we haven't been privy to yet. Nevertheless, McMahan explains that Mariner will start Season 3 struggling to deal with having her mother taken from her. [NOT JUST HER, MIKE–Ed.] When talking with StarTrek.com he explained, “...in the first season we were really creating a family, and in the second season we kind of tested them. And in the finale of the second season, we're dealing with the loss, the family breaking up.”  What about our other characters? Well, there seems to be something deeper going on with Rutherford. Something more than just a faulty cybernetic implant. MacMahan tells CBR.com, “... it's about Rutherford. There's stuff about Rutherford that he doesn't even realize and this is his second implant.” They go on to discuss some of the other character dynamics–like the “will they/won't they” tension between Rutherford and Tendi–along with some takeaways McMahan learned from the first two seasons. Mainly that anyone you talk to could secretly be Jeffrey Combs. Anyone. Image: ViacomCBS, via Comic Book Resource. Center Chair, Hot Seat, Call It What You Will By Cat Hough If you have not had a chance to see the new trailer for the upcoming History Channel docu-series The Center Seat: 55 Years of Star Trek, you should definitely trek it out. According to the press release, The Center Seat will be “the ultimate Star Trek documentary that everyone has always wanted, and now they're getting.” Each episode of the series will focus on a different chapter in Star Trek history, starting with the inception of the original Star Trek series at Desilu. But even the trailer features some pretty saucy quotes from the cast and crew of the various shows and movies. https://youtu.be/J_IOHcPuN3Q For example, we hear more from Wil Wheaton, Denise Crosby, Kate Mulgrew and Robert Beltran about their less than ideal working circumstances and for Cirroc Lofton–we hear about his extreme dislike for having to wear the “onesie” uniform while also going through puberty. Nicolas Meyer, writer of The Undiscovered Country, speaks about how much William Shatner hated the script for the movie and the effect that had on, well, pretty much everyone else involved [yeah and you thought Final Frontier was a good idea, now sit down–Ed.] Mmmm. Taste that grain. Image: ViacomCBS, via Deadline. The show doesn't cover any of the new Trek series, but definitely appears to be a comprehensive and detailed exploration of the Star Trek universe over the first 55 years of the show. Created by the Nacelle Company, who also produced Netflix's The Movies That Made Us and The Toys That Made Us, the series is narrated by Dr. Beverly Crusher herself, Gates McFadden, and directed by Nacelle Company founder Brian Volk-Weiss. There's not been an official release date given other than it should premiere sometime this fall. Festivities Will Now Commence By Rosco McQueen It's the most wonderful time of year; when the nanoprobes gently come to rest on ornaments hanging from the boughs of a tree, and assimilation tubules shine in the festive glow of twinkling lights.  Christmas is soon upon us, and you can count down to festive assimilation with the 2021 Borg Cube advent calendar. The calendar features 24 Trek gifts behind alcoves (or windows if you prefer) and includes gifts of socks, coasters, and an espresso cup commemorating the first warp speed flight in 2063. It's made by Eaglemoss, the same company who also made a TARDIS-shaped advent calendar for devout Whovians, and is available for purchase now. It could be just the thing to put you in the mood for Picard season 2, with the Borg Queen to feature as part of the time-travelling tale. And speaking of season 2… I hope one of those is an apology to Icheb and Hugh. Image: Eaglemoss. Soji's Sojourn By Rosco McQueen In an interview with Trekmovie.com, Isa Briones spoke about where we find Soji in Picard season 2: a place where she can finally be herself, now that being an android is no longer outlawed.   “We're definitely seeing a new kind of level of her evolution as she's coming into her own. She's finally allowed to be who she is and be accepted by the universe, the galaxy, whatever you want to call it. So yeah, we get to see her in this new, more certain place of who she is. And that's very exciting.” The more certain place also has a pool? Jealous. Image: ViacomCBS, via TrekMovie.com The interview covered working under strict COVID conditions, as well as the broader strokes of season two and how it connects to the world we're living in. “There's a big emphasis, I think, on mental health, for sure. We're seeing these characters going through some hard moments and really leaning on each other and prioritizing their own mental health in order to save everyone else. And I think that's a very relatable storyline and a storyline that we need right now.” Your classic Good Cop/Borg Cop dynamic. Image: ViacomCBS, via TrekMovie.com We're All Batty for Strange New Worlds By Rosco McQueen The hype train continues heading towards the station for Strange New Worlds–even Anson Mount starring as Batman in the new DC animated movie Injustice can't stop interviewers from asking about the new series.   Either that, or they ask about his starship's extended warranty. Image:ViacomCBS, via SYFY. Mount will play the role of the Dark Knight in the animated adaptation of the video game Injustice, where a traumatized Superman turns evil.  In an interview with SYFY Wire, Mount talks about the recording process, and not being the first Christopher Pike to take a turn at Batman. (If you're playing along at home, Bruce Greenwood has voiced Batman a couple of times, and was also the Kelvin Universe's version of one of Starfleet's greatest captains). But when the discussion turned to Strange New Worlds, Mount reinforced the episodic nature of the show, as well as a moment that would give every Trek fan goosebumps. “I was just there as Anson in my own clothes and I sat down in the chair and it was in that moment that I flashed back to playing Star Trek as my make-believe game when I was like eight years old. Something about it was just really strangely emotional for me, and I'm still doing that. I don't even know really how to articulate it, but it's surreal and it's weird... but it's something that I'm so grateful for.” STAR TREK GAMING NEWS Edited by Thomas Reynolds Fanatical Devotion to the Many By Cat Hough Star Trek Online tweeted earlier today that the recent partnership with Fanatical offering in-game bundles to benefit the Boys and Girls Clubs of America raised more than $77,000. Well done, everyone who donated! Cat's Tale of “Cat's Tale” By Cat Hough Well, it's been a week since the “Cat's Tale” Halloween TFO was released, and while it took players a few days to get to know how to navigate the phases of the TFO, it seems that most people are enjoying the mission. As you and your team are first transported to the castle on Pyris VII (or is it Boreth?) the music and lighting definitely set the mood for battling skeletons, witches, skulls and Devidians. In a creepy surprise, you're treated to some Bonnie-Kin voice-over as you make our way downstairs and through the hallways lighting candles–because it's dark in this castle! In the first phase, you are attacked by skeletons, but you can only kill them when they are standing within the circles of candlelight. Some equipment that we highly recommend is the Universal Kit Module - Gravity Containment Unit Mk XII. You can get this kit module as a Tier IV reward from the Discovery reputation; if you use it while you're standing in the circles, then you can just pull those skeletons over to you. 

Garage Logic
10/19 Ilhan Omar tells Minneapolis voters to reject Jacob Frey, thus betraying the black community that she supposedly cares about

Garage Logic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 101:21


Ilhan Omar tells Minneapolis voters to reject Jacob Frey, thus betraying the black community that she supposedly cares about. Student at Oberlin College is traumatized by the installation of new radiators in his dorm. Johnny Heidt with guitar news.

4717
On Negroni Fever

4717

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 17:40


According to Drinks International, it's the No. 2 cocktail in the world, five years running. It's the Negroni, and it had better explain itself! Supposedly the brianchild of an Italian count having a bad day, the cocktail is ideally suited  for instagram cocktail porn it is visually stunning, bitter and has just the right touch of Eurosleaze. But how does it taste?

Knockin' Doorz Down
Dave Host of the Dopey Podcast | Heroin, Rehab, Podcasting, Losing Co-Host Chris to Addiction, Support Groups, Fatherhood & Celebrities

Knockin' Doorz Down

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 78:12


Dave grew up in Manhattan, and since he could remember, he always wanted to be a TV show host.  He would watch all the famous late-night shows and TV shows with his mom growing up.  Regis Philbin would make him feel relaxed, and was a huge inspiration for him. In his early teenage years, Dave always thought of drug users as “poseurs” and was never interested in them.  One night though after drinking heavily at a party, he started smoking pot, to help with his nausea.  His first real drug experience was taking Acid at a Grateful Dead concert his Junior year in High School.  Not too long after that, his drug use quickly escalated to heroin use. In his early 20's, Dave was in & out of rehab multiple times, but it finally took on his 3rd time trying.  Dopey Podcast hosts Dave and Chris first met at a rehab center in Connecticut in 2011, where they were both getting help.  Dave worked (and still works at) the famous Katz Deli in Manhattan, New York.  At first, he wanted to do a show about “The Last Jewish Waiter” based on his experience at the deli.  He soon realized that his life was mess and needed to focus on his well-being and getting help.  Chris still liked the idea of doing something with the waiter thing, and it eventually morphed into the podcast they have now. Dave & Chris founded the Dopey Podcast in 2016.  Their style was a little different than other podcasts; they didn't focus on recovery stories, as they found them boring.  Instead, they would tell their “war stories” of their addiction and using years, with doses of edgy humor mixed in.  They've had some amazing guests like Dr. Drew Pinsky, Marc Maron & Jamie Lee Curtis.  In 2018, Chris was getting his PhD, working in a sober house, and was engaged to his new found love.  His life was on the right track, but started falling back into bad habits. Supposedly, he had been injured while on vacation with his girlfriend, was prescribed painkillers, and soon was again taking heroin and other substances.  Shortly after, Chris passed away from a drug overdose.  When he died, Dave plugged himself back into his rehab support system, by attending meetings.  He was determined to not relapse.  Dave has no plans to get another co-host, and now does the show solo.  Also, hear some of Dave's tales of meeting and partying with celebrities at the world famous Katz's Deli. For more on the Dopey Podcast, check out www.dopeypodcast.com This is Dave of the Dopey Podcast in his own words, on Knockin' Doorz Down. For more on the Recovery in the Middle Ages podcast www.MiddleAgesrecovery.com  For more on the Knockin' Doorz Down podcast and to follow us on social media https://linktr.ee/knockindoorzdown  For Carlos Vieira's autobiography Knockin' Doorz Down https://www.kddmediacompany.com/ For 51FIFTY use the discount code KDD20 for 20% off! https://51fiftyltm.com/ For more information on the Carlos Vieira Foundation and the Race 2B Drug-Free, Race to End the Stigma and Race for Autism programs visit: https://www.carlosvieirafoundation.org/ Listen to and Subscribe to the podcast wherever you listen for more Celebrity, everyday folks, and expert conversations at https://www.KDDPodcast.com © 2021 by KDD Media Company. All rights reserved.  

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
What Happened With Facebook's Outage? When Will It Happen Again?

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 9:08


What Happened With Facebook's Outage? When Will It Happen Again? Facebook had a huge outage all of its properties. So why did it happen? How did it happen? And what's going to happen in the future? The frankly, some of this technology just isn't that stable. And I'm going to explain why right now! [Automated transcript follows] [00:00:20] I've already talked about it a little bit this morning on the show, but Facebook was. Facebook was down a lot. Facebook too was down a long time. And Mr. Zuckerberg has now lost about $7 billion because of how long it was down. And Craig Peterson joins us now to talk a little bit about exactly what happened, why it matters, what it means and so much more. [00:00:39] Craig, how are you this morning? [00:00:41] Hey, good morning. Doing well. [00:00:42] Thanks. Good to have you as always. So tell me first. What actually happened yesterday. I read that the explanation from Facebook seems like not a big deal as just a configuration problem, a little unexpected issue. They're not sure exactly what happened or looking into it. [00:00:57] It's not a big deal though. Continue on with your day. What's the reality, what actually happened. [00:01:01] Yeah, nothing to see here. You look at the number of companies and the companies Facebook has bought over the years, basically since 2005, they've spent $410 billion on all these companies named some names. [00:01:17] You might actually recognize you remember Friendster? [00:01:20] I do remember friends. Yes. That was a little, that's a little bit back there, but yeah. [00:01:25] That was about 10 years ago, they paid $40 million for that. But of course, Facebook has moved on from that and owned all kinds of companies. Right now. [00:01:35] It's got Instagram, WhatsApp, by the way they paid 19 billion is what it's wiping sorts out Oculus live rail and many [00:01:45] others basically. That's when Ben one of the main complaints events. Supposedly being a monopoly is that they've been gobbling up their competition and other things that maybe even weren't competition, but things they could just add to the big beast and have it consolidated at all under Facebook's banner. [00:02:02] Yeah. So the problem that tech guys have is this scale, massive scale. So on top of all of that, they have they claimed to have almost half the people. Earth go logging on to Facebook. So how do you deal with numbers like these and gets very difficult. And what appears to have happened is they're using a tool. [00:02:26] There's a few that we use. And in fact, we'd had a similar problem yesterday with my company's networks, where w here's what happened? Here's the basics, right? You heard it was a DNS problem. Some people have said that. That's not the real problem. The real problem lies underneath that. And it's something that we have to deal with because we're working with multiple companies that have multiple network connections, and that's where it comes from the multiple network connections. [00:02:56] So on the internet, what happens if you're going to go to Facebook, you're typing in facebook.com that has to be turned into an internet address. And to do that, you use DNS. But how bout beneath that basically the street directory who has main street in downtown Portsmouth. For instance, if you want to get there, there's another protocol that's used beneath DNS, and this protocol is used to actually map the, these addresses, these internet numbers. [00:03:32] So that was the problem yesterday. And I checked it online myself with a site that we use to monitor all of this type of ad dressing. And what turned out had happened is Facebook stopped advertising where it addresses. If you tried to look up Facebook, you couldn't find it. And you got a DNS error because the DNS servers addresses were unknown. [00:03:57] You knew the address, but you didn't know how to get to that address on the. And Facebook has become so big. They're using automated tools in order to push the configurations to all of these, what are called BGP servers. So what probably happened yesterday in reading some things on Reddit and other places where there are some people who claim to be working for Facebook, what probably happened. [00:04:26] Somebody forgot to put the peer configurations into their BGP routing tables, pushed it out to all of their BGP routers worldwide. Now I've got to say on the outage that lasted six or eight hours with a problem. This is amazing because now you have to worry about the cold start of the whole. Some kind of like Texas, another four minutes, they would have been without power in some areas for months, [00:04:57] we were referring to it. [00:04:58] I'm thinking of a cold start your side. It sounds like you're starting a car. It's too cold outside and the car just doesn't have enough juice in the battery. So it's a, is that basically what happened? [00:05:06] Yeah. Yeah. What happened is you couldn't get to anything. Facebook probably could not get to its own routers to update the configuration. [00:05:14] Similarly took so long then is that they really were having a difficult time even gaining access to the thing that would be necessary to fix it. [00:05:20] Exactly. And there were a lot of people, myself included that were thinking man, it's going to be days because the cold start also has problems with like caches. [00:05:31] For instance, you go to a page. There's pictures, there's videos, there's texts while all of that information gets stored in a cache. So it doesn't have to be generated every time somebody sees something. So there would be cold Cassius out there that would need to be updated. It's a nightmare. This was a nightmare scenario for them and was probably caused by letting some junior guy. [00:05:55] We'll make some changes through their BGP table. [00:05:59] That is remarkable. We're talking with Craig Peterson, our tech guru. He joins us on Wednesdays typically to go over the world of technology. And of course we'll do that tomorrow as well, but we wanted to have him join us to talk a little bit about Facebook before I let you go. [00:06:11] Craig. I The implications of this, I think are massive. I take to consider, even if you don't care about Facebook, if you don't use it, it's not part of your life. Obviously it is such a big part of not just American life, but this is a worldwide issue, right? I It is used by billions and billions of people and this kind of an outage lasting this long is not only unprecedented, but really important in terms of having good Lord. [00:06:34] If you're a, if you're a Facebook. I was talking about that a little bit earlier this morning. If you had Facebook stock, how do you feel today? I know mark Zuckerberg doesn't feel great. That's why he lost $7 million of value yesterday. How does this affect at Facebook, the company going forward here, this, and when you combine this with the whole whistleblower thing, it's not exactly been a good week. [00:06:51] Yeah, not at all. This problem frankly, comes from the early days or earlier days of the internet. I was on the internet back in the early 1980s and helping to develop the protocols. And back then, we were not worried that. That's type of massive scale. We were not worried about hackers, really getting in. [00:07:13] Cause it was a great community. I'm most of us knew each other and we used to joke around and have a lot of fun. These protocols were not designed for the types of problems we're seeing today. So until these problems are solved, not by Facebook, but by the internet community as a whole, these types of things can happen again. [00:07:37] So Facebook, it could go down again because frankly we have seen times where for instance, traffic from the Washington DC area was all routed through Moscow. So you would send data from the white house and I'm know to someone in the building, across the street. And it was referred through mosque gal who knows what the Russians are doing with all of that data, but we just don't have the safeguards in place that would support, frankly, the way we are using the internet today. [00:08:12] Facebook could face this problem. Again, we're talking about fiber as much as I've seen numbers, $500 million an hour in lost revenue from Facebook, but it could happen to anyone. And I'm sure there will be a lot of work here. Others, people sharpening pencils, and finally getting in line on how do we actually do. [00:08:33] The stop work at huge scale. Huge. We're talking now hundreds of billions, probably trillions of devices connected to the internet by 2025. [00:08:46] They're actually sharpening pencils. Craig, you think anybody uses pencils anymore? I begged to do. Not a technology companies. Craig Peterson, we appreciate it as always. [00:08:55] Of course you hear them on Saturdays as well on WGAN and we'll hear his voice tomorrow, joining us for the more traditional tech topics, other things besides Facebook to chat about, obviously, but we appreciate him joining this morning. Thanks a lot, Greg. And we'll talk to you tomorrow. [00:09:07] Take care.

Muscle Spasms
HIIT it or QuIIT it? The Pros and Cons of High Intensity Interval Training

Muscle Spasms

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 36:30


Mara and Elysia talk about the popular trend HIIT. Everyone is doing it, but should everyone be participating? LISTEN AND SEE! But for those who love to read...here's a little written preview: What is HIIT Training:   High-intensity interval training is a form of interval training, a cardiovascular exercise strategy alternating short periods of intense anaerobic exercise with less intense recovery periods, until too exhausted to continue.  It's great for those who are short on time as a way of maximizing your time spent in the gym. A typical HIT session, not including your warm up, SHOULD last a maximum of 20 minutes. Many of the benefits of HIIT training have been vastly overstated by the media and marketers but there are definitely some advantages to it. PROS: HIIT training SUPPOSEDLY leads to greater EPOC (excess post-exercise oxygen consumption) when compared to continuous exercise. This means that after you have finished exercising, your body will continue to burn calories at a higher rate than normal. The evidence base is small, but at least one study has shown that you can match the training effect of continuous training in less time using a proper HIIT protocol.  You get maximum benefit for decreased time investment. Since we are all super busy and stressed for time, and can't find the time in the day to exercise, this can be very valuable. It has been shown to also increase muscle growth, however, that is not the gold standard of muscle building.  Strength training always wins. Even though there has been shown some benefit, it's not the most valuable way to build muscle.   CONS: Increased Injury HIIT workouts often call for complicated exercise moves, like burpees and box jumps. Trainers warn that doing these moves with the wrong form can lead to pulled muscles and other injuries. Combine that with the rapid-fire pace of HIIT, and you've got a recipe for fitness injuries. Plus, intense routines often put heavy stress on your body, which can cause overuse injuries and joint strains. Work ‘till hurts, like “fitspo” Instagrammers encourage, and you'll find yourself with strained knees and shoulders. HIIT workouts should usually be done no more than 3 times a week. Also, you should start under the guidance of a professional trainer who can ensure your form is stable and correct. This will help prevent injuries from HIIT. Advanced Preparation Despite articles everywhere promise five fat-shredding minutes to a beach body, HIIT workouts aren't for fitness newbies. The complicated moves and intense demands mean this style of training works best for experienced gym-goers. If you want to start a HIIT workout with little prior experience, you need to prepare yourself with weeks of lower-intensity training. There's also plenty of workout prep to do before and after. Dynamic stretching or warm-up exercises before HIIT will minimize the odds of soreness and injuries. Post-workout static stretches are also a good idea to avoid injury and soothe strained muscles. This prep work might take as long or longer than your five minutes of training. Make sure to check out the instagram @muscle.spasms as well as our hosts @Elysian.form and @maramarek           

Kings and Generals: History for our Future
2.58. History of the Mongols: Fall of the Ilkhanate

Kings and Generals: History for our Future

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 36:15


    November, 1335. The Khan of the Ilkhanate, Abu Sa'id Bahadur, is dead. Allegedly poisoned by a spurned wife, Baghdad Khatun, his death was the unravelling of the Ilkhanate. Facing an invasion by the mighty Ozbeg of the Golden Horde, and a succession crisis due to Abu Sa'id's failure to produce an heir, the Ilkhanate rapidly, and violently, tore itself to pieces. Today, we look at the disintegration of the Mongol Ilkhanate, the stories of two men named Hasan, and the history of the region up until the arrival of Emir Temur, fearsome Tamerlane, at the end of the fourteenth century. I'm your host David, and this is Kings and Generals: Ages of Conquest.       Abu Sa'id had not been an incompetent monarch by any stretch of the means, and his rule was remembered as a golden age, at least in comparison to the mess that followed. A great-great-grandson of the Ilkhanid founder Hulegu, Abu Sa'id's reign had seen the consolidation of the islamization of the Mongol state, as well as the end of the long war with the Mamluks of Egypt. Il-Khan since 1316, Abu Sa'id had been controlled by the emir Choban, until he nearly eradicated the house of Choban in the late 1320s in an effort to marry Baghdad Khatun, one of Choban's daughters. For a few years Abu Sa'id had enjoyed a comparatively quiet majority, pursuing art, culture, poetry, building and architecture, as well as efforts to produce an heir. Baghdad Khatun, despite her beauty and the violence he had undertaken to acquire her- which included, among others things, killing her father, brothers and forcing her to divorce her husband- simply did not provide him his much desired son. When Abu Sa'id's eyes fell upon her niece, Dilshad Khatun, the Il-Khan basically forgot about his current wife, wed her niece and soon enough got her pregnant. For Baghdad Khatun to be humiliated like this, after suffering through the destruction of her family, this was the last straw. The widespread belief was that she had him poisoned in some manner- in Ibn Battuta's account, this was administered via a handkerchief that she used to clean themselves after sexual intercourse. So did Abu Sa'id die, aged 30 years old, in what is now Azerbaijan while marching north to repel an invasion by the Khan of the Golden Horde, Ozbeg.       With Abu Sa'id's death, the line of Hulegu became extinct- or at least, the line through Hulegu's son Abaqa, which had provided most of the Il-Khans. Abu Sa'id uncle, Ghazan, had done much to prune the lineage during his reign, and it seems alcoholism took care of much of the rest. The fact that few Il-Khans lived past 35, with fewer and fewer heirs each generation, has led many to search for underlying causes beyond just alcohol. Scholars such as Charles Melville and Anne F. Broadbridge have pointed to possible consequences of consanguinity among the Il-Khans: that is, essentially inbreeding, given the Il-Khan's preferences for marrying into the same families, like the Oirats, over generations. The combined effects of rampant alcohol abuse among both men and women and the consanguinity may be the answer behind the alarming drop off in fertility of the Ilkhanid elite over the last decades of the thirteenth century. While Hulegu had produced quite the brood of little Chinggisids- at least 25 sons and daughters-, by the end of the century Ghazan had only a daughter survive childhood, while his brother Oljeitu Il-Khan had an alarming amount of children stillborn or died young. From his twelve wives, Oljeitu only had three children ever reach marriageable age; Abu Sa'id and two daughters, Sati Beg and Dawlandi: the last of whom still died before her father. For Abu Sa'id himself, despite considerable efforts, by his death he had only succeeded in getting his widow Dilshad Khatun pregnant. With no surviving brothers, sons or clear male figure to step into the role, the Ilkhanate suddenly faced a new problem; no clear monarch of the line of Hulegu to head the state.       The explanation of Abu Sa'id's death without heir directly causing the fall of the Ilkhanate has been, in the opinion of scholars like Charles Melville, somewhat overstated. The image of the Ilkhanate falling without a decline -a counter to the model popularized by Edward Gibbon so long ago- encourages us to overlook problems which had developed. Essentially, Melville notes, a gap had widened between the military elite, the noyad, and the Il-Khan, which accompanied a lack of respect for the Chinggisids. The death of a monarch with no clear heir was hardly a new issue in the Mongol Empire- in fact, the quriltai system wherein a candidate put his name forward and was confirmed by the princes served to supply new khans at need. Additionally, neither were regents unheard of within the empire's history. The 1240s had seen two regencies, with Ogedai's widow Torogene and Guyuk's widow Oghul Qaimish steering the empire in the absence of a Khan- Oghul Qaimish of course, doing this much less successfully than her predecessor. In the form of Baghdad Khatun the Ilkhanate certainly had a powerful woman who could have stepped into the role. Well connected and from a prestigious family, she could have called upon connections established by her late father, Choban. Baghdad Khatun was described as an intimidating, intelligent and proud woman, who openly walked around with a sword strapped to her waist and greatly influenced matters of state. In the opinion of some, Abu Sa'id was bossed around by her. In a more classic Mongolian system, Baghdad Khatun would have guided the state until an heir could have been selected.       But as Melville argues, the actions of the Khans from Ghazan onwards had alienated the military elite. More or less, they must have felt disenfranchised from the government and that the old Mongolian way of life was being abandoned. Certainly Islamization was the most obvious demonstration of this. Ghazan and Oljeitu both abandoned the traditional secret burials of Mongol Khans in favour of massive, expensive and very public mausoleums. The quriltai as a means of choosing the next ruler and affecting major decisions was abandoned, and even the end of the war with the Mamluks- not by conquest, but by diplomacy- must have felt like a betrayal of Mongol imperial ideology. Recall how the contemporary Chagatai Khan Tarmashirin was accused of abandoning the yassa as well- specifically by no longer continuing the annual assembles with the noyad in the eastern half of the Chagatai realm, and thus making them feel they no longer had a role, or a stake, in the Khanate's government. Tarmashirin was overthrown by a rebellion in 1334, a year before Abu Sa'id's death, which precipitated the descent of the Chagatai ulus into open war.       By removing their stake in government, and not replacing it with a new loyalty to adhere to in the replacement system, the Ilkhans had gradually removed the need of the various noyans to maintain their loyalty to the Chinggisid ideology. When Abu Sa'id came to the throne in 1317, he was but a 12 year old boy. The long period of Choban's regency further reduced the khan's authority and increased that of the military elite. Abu Sa'id largely accepted and seems to have went along with Choban's oversight up until Choban denied him Baghdad Khatun, at that time married to Shaykh Hasan Jalayir. Only from the very end of the 1320s, after Choban's death, did Abu Sa'id really rule in his own right. While he did face minor rebellion, there is indication of resentment as efforts undertaken by the central Ilkhanid government. Abu Sa'id's vizier, Ghiyath al-Din Muhammad, the son of the former vizier Rashid al-Din Hamadani, sought to enforce tax reforms that in effect, would have restrengthened the hand of the central government towards the regional princes and their appanages. As Melville notes, the details are poorly known but it seems to have been an ineffective measure that angered these military princes. Per Melville's theory, the only outcome of such failed measures would only have been widening the gap between the Il-khan and the military elite.       On Abu Sa'id's death at the end of November 1335, it fell to the vizier Ghiyath al-Din Muhammad to try and steer the ship in the face of Ozbeg's invasion. Only five days later, on December 5th, Ghiyath al-Din orchestrated the enthronement of a successor, a man named Arpa Ke'un. Arpa was a Chinggisid, and a member of the house of Tolui… but of the line of Ariq Boke, Hulegu's younger brother who had fought their brother Khubilai for the throne in the 1260s. Plucked from obscurity by Ghiyath al-Din, it seems he was chosen for his ability to lead the army, for all indication is that Arpa Khan was a man of military background, a “old school Mongol,” in the words of every secondary source that mentions him. Arpa was given command of the Il-Khanid army, and in the snows of the Caucasus he forced back Ozbeg in winter 1335, who once again retreated to the Golden Horde.        Arpa Khan returned triumphant, and Ghiyath al-Din must have had high hopes for his new protege. Arpa was a competent commander who was militarily proven in his defence of the Ilkhanate- a promising figure to rally the Mongols around. Apparently he had little taste for court procedure or niceties, and it is unclear if he was a Muslim. One anonymous Armenian chronicler asserts Arpa was a Christian, and at the very least he was very proud of the “old ways.” At best, he was a Muslim with little care for the specifics of the faith.  We might wonder if Ghiyath al-Din was deliberate here too, choosing a man who would be more palatable to the noyad due to his distaste of courtly life. In the opinion of Oleg Grabar and Sheila Blair, it was shortly after Arpa's ascension that Ghiyath al-Din ordered the commission of the Great Mongol Shahnama, a wonderful illustrated version of the Persian national epic, the Shahnama of Firdausi. An undertaking of massive expense, given the large and lovingly detailed artwork, it certainly indicates that the top levels of the Ilkhanid elite did not imagine they were entering into a crisis anytime soon.       Arpa Khan was not on solid footing though. The fact that he was not of the line of Hulegu certainly hurt his legitimacy. The fact that Abu Sa'id's widow, Dilshad Khatun, was pregnant and had fled to Abu Sa'id's uncle, ‘Ali-Padshah, the governor of Diyarbakir, was unnerving too. ‘Ali-Padshah's sister, Abu Sa'id's mother Hajji Khatun, also opposed Arpa's enthronement. Thus, his position needed to be shored up. A marriage was arranged to Abu Said's sister, Sati Beg; commanders who had been alienated or jailed by Abu Sa'id were given expensive gifts or freed from prison. And the blame for Abu Sa'id's death was laid squarely on Baghdad Khatun, who had never had the chance to assume the regency. Accused not just of poisoning Abu Sa'id, but of being in correspondence with Ozbeg Khan and inviting him to attack the Ilkhanate, Baghdad Khatun was found guilty and executed, supposedly beaten to death by a Greek slave with a club while she was in the bathhouse. A number of other executions followed of potential rivals.        But Arpa Khan looked for enemies in the wrong direction. ‘Ali-Padshah, the Oirat governor of Diyarbakir, was becoming something of a rallying point for those unhappy with Arpa's placement as Khan- or unhappy with an energetic man on the throne who might reduce their privileges. Dilshad Khatun had finally given birth to Abu Sa'id's only child, a girl, but this did not stop ‘Ali-Padshah's maneuvering. At the start of 1336 he raised his own candidate, Musa, as Il-Khan. Supposedly a grandson of Baidu, who had only held the throne for a few months before Ghazan's rise, Musa was, unlike Arpa, entirely a puppet of ‘Ali-Padshah. In alliance with Hajji Khatun and Shaykh Hasan Jalayir, who had once been forced to give up his wife Baghdad Khatun to Abu Sa'id and now knew Arpa killed her, ‘Ali-Padshah in the name Musa Il-Khan armed a revolt against Arpa Il-Khan. In the April of 1336, Arpa's army was defeated in the field. He and Ghiyath al-Din Muhammad fled to Sultaniyya, where they were captured and killed later that month. So ended the reign of Arpa Khan, the final Il-Khan to wield any individual authority.       Arpa's death in many ways can be considered the true end of the Ilkhanate, for it seems to have removed any attachment the regional commanders held to the Ilkhanid state. ‘Ali-Padshah's enthronement of Musa Khan gave all of them the realization that each, too, could rule through his own puppet Chinggisid, if he happened to believe hard enough and have one on hand. From 1335 until 1343, no less than 8 Chinggisids were to be declared Il-Khan by these commanders. Little is known of most of them beyond their names and who controlled them. Shortly after Arpa's death Shaykh Hasan Jalayir announced his own puppet khan, a young boy named Muhammad, and attacked ‘Ali-Padshah. By July 1336, ‘Ali-Padshah was dead and Musa Il-Khan sent running. Shaykh Hasan married Abu Sa'id's widow, Dilshad Khatun.   At the same time in the far east of the Ilkhanate, the noyans of Khurasan elected their own Il-Khan, Togha-Temur. Togha-Temur was not even a descendant of Chinggis Khan, but his brother Jochi-Qasar! But he came with military backing, and at the end of 1336 Togha-Temur's armies had overrun Iran and pushed into Iraq and Azerbaijan, forcing Shaykh Hasan Jalayir to flee before him. Even the wandering Musa found his way into Togha-Temur's employment, and it seemed that the Ilkhanate's period of disunity would soon be ended… only for Togha-Temur to suddenly withdraw back east in spring 1337. Musa was left with an army to attempt to crush Shaykh Hasan, but Hasan defeated and killed him in July 1337. Though he would threaten Iraq and the Caucasus again on occasion, Togha-Temur mostly contented himself with mastery over Khurasan and Mazandaran for the next 16 years, until his death in 1353 at the hands of the Sarbadars of Sabzavar.   With Togha-Temur's withdrawal, Shaykh Hasan now faced a new challenger in the form of a different Shaykh Hasan. Our first Shaykh Hasan was of the Jalayirid lineage, a descendant of one of Hulegu's top generals. Often you'll see him called Hasan-i Buzurg, or “Big Hasan.” Hasan-i Kuchik, or “Little Hasan,” was meanwhile a grandson of Choban, via his son Temur-tash. Temur-tash had been governor of Anatolia and revolted twice against Abu Sa'id, before being killed by the Mamluk Sultan al-Nasir Muhammad when seeking support from him. Yet, Temur-tash's name still carried weight in Anatolia. While the other Ilkhanid claimants fought for power in the Caucasus and northern Mesopotamia, Little Hasan and his brother Malik Ashraf brought his father back to life, so to speak, in the form of a slave who looked a lot like him. Rather young, the boys lacked the experience or prestige to rally an army around themselves, and so required a puppet dead father.  The slave, named Qarajari, in Mamluk accounts was the true leader of the uprising, while in Jalayirid and Temurid sources it was Little Hasan and his brother Malik Ashraf.  At the very least, it indicates the level of friction in the movement was apparent.With an army composed of urban militias, nomadic cavalry and military slaves, it was a bit of a motley force, but the return of the Chobanids undermined Big Hasan Jalayir.   Big Hasan's problem was the fact he just had so many members of Choban's family in his entourage. His new wife, Dilshad Khatun, was a granddaughter of Choban; one of his most important supporters, Oljeitu's daughter Sati Beg, had been married to emir Choban, and had a son by him, Surghan. With their help, and the help of a grandson of Choban named Pir Husayn, Big Hasan had overcome Musa Khan and retaken Tabriz, which had long been the capital of the Ilkhanate. But the rise of new Chobanid claimants made Big Hasan unsure of his own Chobanid supporters. Antagonizing his Chobanid followers, Sati Beg and her son Surghan fled to join Little Hasan, who forced Big Hasan from Tabriz in 1338, forcing him to retreat to Baghdad. In the process, Little Hasan succeeded in killing Big Hasan's puppet Chinggisid, the young Muhammad Khan. But seizing Tabriz weakened the bonds between Little Hasan and his fake father; the Fake Temurtash decided he wanted real power and stabbed Little Hasan, who survived and escaped, then publicized the news that Fake Temurtash was actually, well, a fake. “You're not my real dad!” We may imagine Little Hasan screamed as he ran out of the palace of Tabriz, blood dripping from a wound.   Little Hasan fled to Georgia, meeting with Sati Beg and his cousin Surghan, while the isolated fake Temurtash was pushed from Tabriz by Big Hasan, who in turn was pushed out again by Little Hasan. Still, it was felt a non-Chinggisid could not rule yet in his own right, especially since Little Hasan had, in the eyes of most, simply been serving his “resurrected” father. So, Little Hasan made the nearest Chinggisid the new Il-Khan. And the nearest Chinggisid was none other than his grandfather Choban's widow, Sati Beg, daughter of the late Il-Khan Oljeitu, sister of Abu Sa'id and also widow of Arpa Khan. For the first time, late in 1338, a Chinggisid woman became Khan- not regent, not khatun,  but Khan. Coins were minted in her name bearing the title, the khutba was read in her name and she was officially the ruler of the Ilkhanate, such as it was.  But Sati Beg Khan, the only Chinggisid female Khan, held no real power, and largely was a tool through which Little Hasan maintained his power. A scheming, cruel man, Little Hasan offered Sati Beg to be the bride of a rival, solely in an effort to lure the rival into a trap. He also sought to portray himself as a restorer of the Ilkhanate and its protector by commandeering symbols and persons associated with it, such as appointing descendants of Rashid al-Din and other Ilkhanid viziers to chief posts, while continuing to promote Tabriz as the capital in an effort at continuity with the Ilkhanate. Little Hasan himself, along with Sati Beg's son and two other top figures, took the titles of the ulus emirs, the commanders of the realm, but there could be no question of who was actually in charge…   … or could there be? Restoring a Chinggisid monarchy in place of their fake father Temurtash meant, in effect, the demotion of Little Hasan and his brother Malik Ashraf. Making Little Hasan but one of the ulus emirs further divided his power. Coins in the name of Sati Beg Khan are found even outside of territory the Chobanids directly controlled in this period, suggesting Sati Beg's enthronement had wider support. Rumours circulated that Sati Beg was in contact with Big Hasan Jalayir in Baghdad, and plotting to kill Little Hasan. Worse still, Togha-Temur, the “eastern Il-Khan,” returned to western Iran at the very start of 1339, having been invited to take the throne by Big Hasan.    Togha-Temur's great army seemed poised to wash away Little Hasan's state. Sati Beg Khan and her soon fled west, leaving Little Hasan alone to face Togha-Temur. But the lil' guy had one last card play. Knowing he faced no chance of overcoming Togha-Temur Khan in battle, instead Little Hasan sent messengers to Togha-Temur offering his submission, and that he would gladly come to submit to Togha-Temur in person, but could not dare leave Tabriz yet due to the danger posed by Big Hasan, at that time in Baghdad. Togha-Temur accepted this gladly, happy to take the former Ilkhanid capital without trouble. He promised to keep Little Hasan in power, and sent a letter describing how he would rid them of Big Hasan… which Little Hasan promptly forwarded to Big Hasan. The latter had already allied with Togha-Temur and was naturally unhappy to find his new overlord so willing to remove him from the scene, so Big Hasan abandoned Togha-Temur Khan. Losing face, his local allies and commanders unsatisfied with the process, Togha-Temur withdrew back east.   The entire incident served to strengthen Little Hasan's little hands. A few months later in July 1339, he forced Sati Beg Khan to marry another of Little Hasan's allies, a descendant of Hulegu's son Yoshmut, who took the throne name of Sulayman, and became Sulayman Khan, though the Mamluks suspected his ancestry was fictive. So ended Sati Beg's nine month tenure as Khan, losing whatever little authority she held and subsequently disappearing from the sources, though coinage in her name continued to be minted in Georgia well into the 1340s. Her final fate remains uncertain.    In the meantime, Big Hasan down in Baghdad had another ploy to employ. His requests to the Mamluk Sultan al-Nasir Muhammad for miltiary aid in recognition of Mamluk overlordship did not materialize into any actual support, in addition to the failure of the affair with Togha-Temur. Taking matters into his own hands, he appointed a grandson of Geikhatu Il-Khan, Jahan-Temur, as Il-Khan, then marched north to face Little Hasan in battle.    In June 1340, the two Hasans, each with their khans, met on the field. Little Hasan had the better of the engagement, forcing Big Hasan to flee back to Baghdad. Angered at the turn of events, Big Hasan deposed his puppet Khan Jahan-Temur, and ruled in his own name- the official start of the independent Jalayir Dynasty. Ruling from Baghdad, the Jalayirids oversaw most of modern Iraq to the border with Syria. The Chobanids kept their puppet Chinggisid only a little longer. Sulayman Khan actually outlasted Little Hasan: the little trickster finally met his end when murdered by his own wife in December 1343.  With no heir, he was succeeded by his brother, Malik Ashraf, who soon after deposed Sulayman and appointed another puppet monarch, a non-Chinggisid called Anushirvan, from an epithet for the ancient Sassanian shahanshah, Khosrow I. It was an interesting dabble in movement away from legitimacy associated with the house of Chinggis Khan, harkening even back to pre-Islamic Iran. What sort of lineage he was supposed to represent is unclear, as the Mamluks thought that he had essentially crowned a stable boy and then locked him in a gilded cage. Coins were minted in Anushirvan's name until 1353, the year of Togha-Temur's death.   Little Hasan had been unpopular in Tabriz and Azerbaijan, but Malik Ashraf was widely hated. Paranoid, violent men, their oppressive tendencies alienated many supporters: both found it easy to be cruel to their families and vassals on the slightest hints of disloyalty- such cruelty was the certain cause of Little Hasan's wife preemptively murdering him. Mongol allies were angered with the movement away from Chinggisid legitimacy or by the enfranchisement of non-Mongols. The cities of the Caucasus felt exploited as tax sources due to wild expenditure by both Little Hasan and Malik Ashraf, who built large public works in efforts to boost their images and to fund their standing army.  The latter of which they struggled to fund, resulting in troops attempting to supply themselves by raiding Chobanid subjects from Azerbaijan, Georgia to eastern Anatolia. At one point at the very start of his reign, Malik Ashraf was locked out of Tabriz, the city barring its gates against him in reaction to his exploitative money grabbing.    All of this was worsened by rounds of Plague- as in, Black Plague. The trade cities of the Caucasus which the Chobanids so relied upon were struck repeatedly and made the situation even more unstable, as the economy was disrupted, trade slackened and key demographic centres depopulated. To distract from troubles and bring in some glory- or share the suffering, Malik Ashraf decided to attack Baghdad in 1347, but the Jalayirids repulsed him. Either through order, or because he no longer had control over his troops, the Chobanid army then ravaged much of the Chobanid kingdom. Facing revolts and rebellions across his kingdom, somehow he managed to maintain his post into the 1350s, when faced with an overwhelming, ultimate threat: the new Khan of the Golden Horde, Jani Beg, son of Ozbeg Khan.  Just as this episode began with the threat of a Jochid attack by Ozbeg, so this episode ends with his son coming to finish the job.    The Jochids never forgot Hulegu's seizure of the Azerbaijani pastures, and repeated attempts to regain were met with failures. Even great and long-reigning Ozbeg Khan had failed to seize them. Jani Beg, in all things, was determined to outdo his father, and in 1357 his messages arrived in Tabriz, bearing a clear ultimatum to Malik Ashraf:   “I am coming to take possession of the ulus of Hulegu. You are the son of Choban whose name was in the decree of the four uluses. Today three realms are under my command, and I also wish to appoint you commander of the ulus; get up and come to meet me.”       Malik Ashraf put on a brave face, dismissing the messenger and replied that Jani Beg only had claim to rule within the lands of Jochi, while Malik Ashraf was the protector of the lands of Hulegu. Malik Ashraf's sudden claim to support the Toluids, not surprisingly, did not convince Jani Beg, or anyone else. His decision to then imprison Jani Beg's ambassador did not help matters either. But Malik Ashraf's defiance was hollow, and he was well aware of the danger he was in. We are told by the Azerbaijani writer al-Ahri, writing about 1360, that Malik Ashraf in fear turned to his attendants and admitted, “This is the son of Khan Ozbeg. He is of the family of Chinggis Khan and has an overwhelming army of three hundred thousand men. I cannot hold out against him.” Ashraf planned to flee to a fortress and hold out there  until Jani Beg withdrew or, failing that, flee to Anatolia. News of his cowardice elicited a loud response from the elite and people of Tabriz, who cried out for resistance and claimed that Jani Beg's only strength was his numbers, and in terms of equipment the Chobanid troops would have the better. Only once it seemed that government was breaking down in the face of the Golden Horde attack, reluctantly Malik Ashraf summoned the troops and rode out to face the approaching Jani Beg Khan. Promptly, his men fled when they caught sight of Jani Beg's host. Years of mistreatment had generated no loyalty to the person of Malik Ashraf or his office, and none were willing to put their lives on the line in a doomed fight. His army disintegrated and looted his own coffers. Finally Malik Ashraf was betrayed, captured, and paraded through the streets of Tabriz and handed over to Jani Beg. Supposedly Jani Beg would have let him live, if the people of Tabriz had not demanded his death- though it should be said, mercy was not a quality Jani Beg ever had in abundance, so we might wonder about this detail.         Malik Ashraf, son of Temur-Tash and brother of Little Hasan, grandson of Choban Noyan, was thus put to death on Jani Beg Khan's orders in 1357. The Chobanid state, after a tumultuous two decades, was dismantled, its few surviving representatives scattered to the winds. Jani Beg Khan succeeded where no Jochid Khan had before, in occupying Tabriz and the pastures of Azerbaijan, Arran and the Mughan Plain. Many of the other regional powers, including the Jalayirids recognized Jani Beg's overlordship. Jani Beg left his son Berdi Beg to govern Azerbaijan, then returned to the Qipchaq steppe- only to soon die, of sickness or, as some accuse, of being poisoned by Berdi Beg. This caused a general withdrawal of the Jochid troops as Berdi Beg left to assume the position of Khan, leaving one of Malik Ashraf's former deputies in charge on behalf of the Golden Horde.       Finally, it was time for the Jalayirids to return to Tabriz. Big Hasan's son with Dilshad Khatun was Shaykh Uvays, who succeeded his father to the throne in 1356. Having accepted Jani Beg's overlordship, the Jalayirids had managed the storm of the Jochid assault well. With their long time Chobanid enemies annihilated, it was now time to seize the Azerbaijani pastures. In summer 1358 Shaykh Uvays successfully retook Tabriz twenty years after his father had last been pushed from the city. In the historical sources, Jalayirid rule is contrasted heavily with the Chobanids. Where the Chobanids appear as scheming, violent and oppressive men, the Jalayirids in contrast are presented as benevolent, respectful to Islamic and Chinggisid norms, ushering in an era of peace and prosperity after years of upheaval. Ruling from the Caucasus across Iraq, the Jalayirids were mighty, and deserved a new title for it. So did Shaykh Uvays begin to style himself Sultan. It was not an easy task, for many former supporters of the Chobanids had to be hunted down, and indeed, in 1359 Uvays was pushed out of Tabriz by another Ilkhanid successor state, the Muzaffarids, albeit briefly. But by the next year Uvays had retaken Tabriz, killed Malik Ashraf's still resisting son and properly secured Jalayirid control. The Jalayirid Sultanate saw a brief renaissance in art and culture, a restoration of economy and trade following the post-Ilkhanid disruptions. While respect was paid to the house of Chinggis Khan and certain norms associated with the Ilkhanate, this was no Chinggisid state. No Chinggisid puppet was maintained, and neither Uvays nor his sons based their rule on their Chinggisid ancestry, even though they could trace their lineage to a daughter of  Arghun Il-Khan. Chinggisid legitimacy as the basis for governance did not long survive Abu Sa'id, and the Ilkhanid successors at most portrayed themselves as protectors of the Il-Khanid dynasty, rather than its continuators.       Thus by the end of the fourteenth century, most of the western portion of the former Ilkhanate, that is the Caucasus, northwestern Iran and Iraq, was ruled by the Jalayirid Dynasty. Iran itself was largely divided between regional forces, the most prominent being the Muzaffarids and Injuids and Sarbadars of Sabzavar. None were of Mongol origin, but were rather local Persian dynasties which had emerged out of the Ilkhanid political structure. In rare cases, pre-existing dynasties like the Kartids of Herat simply reasserted themselves. A few Turkic nomadic confederations, of unclear political origins, emerged in the second half of the fourteenth century, most notably the Black Sheep Turkomans, the Qaraqoyunlu. In Anatolia, a number of Turkic beyliks rose out of the splintered ruins of the Ilkhanid government there, including one on the western end of the peninsula founded by a ghazi named Osman. You may know them better as the Ottomans. The Mamluks maintained their hold on Egypt, with al-Nasir Muhammad enjoying a very long third reign until his death in the 1340s, which then saw a rapid succession of his numerous sons and grandsons on the Mamluk throne, preventing any Mamluk expansion at the expense of the weak post-Ilkhanid states.       Such was the more situation of the late fourteenth century post-Ilkhanid world, soon to be turned over by the rival of a powerful emir from the western Chagatai Khanate named Temur, or Tamerlane. But that's a story for another day, so be sure to subscribe to the Kings and Generals podcast for more. If you enjoyed this and would like to help up continue bringing you great content, then consider supporting us on Patreon at www.patreon.com/kingsandgenerals. This episode was researched and written by our series historian, Jack Wilson. I'm your host David, and we'll catch you on the next one. 

Dermot & Dave
'Quantum Of Snickers': Noni Might Be The New 007

Dermot & Dave

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 4:03


''The man with the Golden Crisp'' [audio mp3="https://media.radiocms.net/uploads/2021/09/30124229/Noni_3009.mp3"][/audio] Limerick's favourite chawwwwwwklit seller, Noni is very excited about the release of 'No Time To Die', the new James Bond movie. Noni joined Dermot and Dave to chat about her memories of Bond! Supposedly she has a bit of history with him. There's also a possibility that she's the next 007! You can listen to the full chat by clicking the Play button. 

糖蒜广播
DARKEST HOUR·糖蒜爱音乐之The Selector

糖蒜广播

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 29:42


The Selector英伦音乐前沿电台,由英国文化协会发起,通过英国大使馆文化教育处与@糖蒜广播 合作,全球同步播出,全方位展示英国本土现代多元文化的流行音乐。每周一精心挑选出最新最前卫的音乐,紧握英国当今时尚音乐的脉搏。本期歌单:Supposedly, We Were Nightmares,Smile (Mastered Radio Edit),Floating Points, Pharoah Sanders -The London Symphony Orchestra - Movement,Fre

Midnight Train Podcast
Hollow Earth Shenanigans

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 109:16


Hollow Earth Theory   Well hello there passengers, and welcome to yet another exciting day aboard the MidnightTrain. Today we delve deep into the mysterious, creepy, possibly conspiratorial world that is our own. What do I mean by that? Well we are digging our way to the center of truth! Today, we learn about Hollow Earth… and for the flat earthers out there… you're gonna wanna hang out for a minute before you dip outta here… also fuck you.   (Cinematic trailer voice) In a World where there exists people who think the world is a flat piece of paper with trees growing out of it and a big guy who flips the piece of paper over to switch between day and night. One man wants to change that idea. His name… is Edmund Halley. Yes that Halley. The one known for the comet he discovered. But before we explore more about him and his findings, let's discuss what led us to this revolutionary hypothesis.   So besides idiots who believe the earth is flat, I mean stupid-endous personalities, there are other more interesting characters that believe the earth is completely hollow; or at least a large part of it. This is what we call the Hollow Earth Theory. Now where did this all come from? Well, nobody cares, Moody. That's the show folks!   Ok, ok, ok… fine. Since the early times many cultures, religions, and folklore believed that there was something below our feet. Whether it's the lovely and tropical Christian Hell, the Jungle-esque Greek Underworld, the balmy Nordic Svartálfaheim, or the temperate Jewish Sheol; there is a name for one simple idea. These cultures believed it to be where we either come from or where we go when we die. This may hold some truth, or not. Guess we will know more when the time comes.   The idea of a subterranean realm is also mentioned in Tibetan Buddhist belief. According to one story from Tibetan Buddhist tradition, there is an ancient city called Shamballa which is located inside the Earth. According to the Ancient Greeks, there were caverns under the surface which were entrances leading to the underworld, some of which were the caverns at Tainaron in Lakonia, at Troezen in Argolis, at Ephya in Thesprotia, at Herakleia in Pontos, and in Ermioni. In Thracian and Dacian legends, it is said that there are caverns occupied by an ancient god called Zalmoxis. In Mesopotamian religion there is a story of a man who, after traveling through the darkness of a tunnel in the mountain of "Mashu", entered a subterranean garden. Sounds lovely.  In Celtic mythology there is a legend of a cave called "Cruachan", also known as "Ireland's gate to Hell", a mythical and ancient cave from which according to legend strange creatures would emerge and be seen on the surface of the Earth.​​ They are said to be bald, taller than most with blue eyes and a big, bushy beard… fucking Moody. There are also stories of medieval knights and saints who went on pilgrimages to a cave located in Station Island, County Donegal in Ireland, where they made journeys inside the Earth into a place of purgatory. You guys know purgatory, that place or state of suffering inhabited by the souls of sinners who are shedding their sins before going to heaven. In County Down, Northern Ireland there is a myth which says tunnels lead to the land of the subterranean Tuatha Dé Danann, who are supposedly a group of people who are believed to have introduced Druidism to Ireland, and then they said fuck it and went back underground. In Hindu mythology, the underworld is referred to as Patala. In the Bengali version of the Hindu epic Ramayana, it has been depicted how Rama and Lakshmana were taken by the king of the underworld Ahiravan, brother of the demon king Ravana. Later on they were rescued by Hanuman. Got all that? The Angami Naga tribes of India claim that their ancestors emerged in ancient times from a subterranean land inside the Earth. The Taino from Cuba believe their ancestors emerged in ancient times from two caves in a mountain underground. Natives of the Trobriand Islands believe that their ancestors had come from a subterranean land through a cavern hole called "Obukula". Mexican folklore also tells of a cave in a mountain five miles south of Ojinaga, and that Mexico is possessed by devilish creatures who came from inside the Earth. Maybe THAT'S where the Chupacabra came from! In the middle ages, an ancient German myth held that some mountains located between Eisenach and Gotha hold a portal to the inner Earth. A Russian legend says the Samoyeds, an ancient Siberian tribe, traveled to a cavern city to live inside the Earth. Luckily, they had plenty of space rope to make it back out.  The Italian writer Dante describes a hollow earth in his well-known 14th-century work Inferno, in which the fall of Lucifer from heaven caused an enormous funnel to appear in a previously solid and spherical earth, as well as an enormous mountain opposite it, "Purgatory". There's that place, again. In Native American mythology, they believed that the ancestors of the Mandan people in ancient times emerged from a subterranean land through a cave at the north side of the Missouri River. There is also a tale about a tunnel in the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation in Arizona near Cedar Creek which is said to lead inside the Earth to a land inhabited by a mysterious tribe. It is also the belief of the tribes of the Iroquois that their ancient ancestors emerged from a subterranean world inside the Earth. The elders of the Hopi people believe that a Sipapu entrance in the Grand Canyon exists which leads to the underworld. Brazilian Indians, who live alongside the Parima River in Brazil, claim that their forefathers emerged in ancient times from an underground land, and that many of their ancestors still remained inside the Earth. Ancestors of the Inca supposedly came from caves which are located east of Cuzco, Peru. So, this is something that has been floating around a shit ton of ancient mythos for a long ass time. Well, ya know… before that silly thing called SCIENCE. Moving on. Now to circle back to our friend Edmund. He was born in 1656, in Haggerston in Middlesex (not to be confused with uppersex or its ill-informed cousin the powerbottomsex). He was an English astronomer, geophysicist, mathematician, meteorologist, and physicist; because what else was there to do in the 1600's but be a know-it-all? He was known to work with Sir Isaac Newton among other notable (but not gonna note them here) proponents to science.  In 1692 he proffered the idea that the earth was indeed hollow and had a shell about 500 miles thick with two inner concentric (having a common center, as circles or spheres… hear that flat earthers??) shells and an inner core. He proposed that the atmospheres separated the shells and that they also had their own magnetic poles and that the shells moved at different speeds. This idea was used to elucidate(shed light upon… yes pun intended) anomalous(ih-nom-uh-luhs) compass readings. He conceptualized that the inner region had its own atmosphere and possibly luminous with plausible inhabitants. MOLE PEOPLE!! He also thought that escaping gases from the inner earth caused what is now known as the Northern Lights.   Now another early ambassador to this idea was Le Clerc Milfort. Jean-Antoine Le Clerc, or known by a simpler name, Louis Milfort. Monsieur Milfort was a higher ranking French military officer who offered his services during the late 1700's. He is most notably known for leading Creek Indian warriors during the American Revolutionary War as allies of the British. I guess having a common enemy here would make sense as to why he chose this group to lead. He emigrated in 1775 to what was then known as the British Colonies of North America. But we all know there is nothing Bri'ish about us.    Now why would a higher ranking French military Officer want to emigrate from his home to a place of turmoil? Great question Moody! I knew you were paying attention. Well, a little about this French saboteur.   He was known by many aliases, but we will just stick with Louis (Louie) for all intents and purposes. Louis was born in Thin-le-Moutier, near Mezieres, France. He served in the French Military from 1764 to 1774. Now this is according to his memoir that was dated in 1802. He left France after he ended up killing a servant of the king's household in a duel. Apparently, the king's servant loved the king. So much so that when Louis read aloud a poem that he had written that included the king, the servant jumped up, tore off his glove and slapped Louis across the face not once, but 4 fucking times! This is obviously something that Louis could not just let happen, so he challenged the servant to a duel. Not just any duel, mind you. He challenged him to a duel of what was then known as a “mort de coupes de papier.” The servant died an excruciating death and Louis fled. Here is the poem that started the feud.  There's a place in France Where the naked ladies dance There's a hole in the wall Where the men can see it all But the men don't care Cause they lost their underwear And the cops never shoot Cause they think it's kind of cute There a place in France Where the alligators dance If you give them a glance They could bite you in the pants There's a place on Mars Where the ladies smoke cigars Every puff she makes Is enough to kill the snakes When the snakes all die They put diamonds in their eye When the diamonds break The dancing makes them ache When the diamonds shine They really look so fine The king and the queen Have a rubber ding-a-ling All the girls in France Have ants in their pants Yes, this is 100% bullshit… but, you'll have that shit stuck in your head for days. Now as much as we tried to find ACTUAL information as to why there was duel and why it was with a servant of the king, we couldn't find much. But after digging up some more information on Louis we found out that he ended up going back to France to be a part of the Sacred Society of Sophisians.    This group is also known as the secret society of Napoleon's Sorcerers… This may have to be a bonus episode so stay tuned for more!   Now back to the “Core” of our episode. The Creek Indians who are originally from the Muscogee [məskóɡəlɡi](Thank wikipedia) area which is southeast united states which roughly translates to the areas around Tennessee, Alabama, western Georgia and Northern Florida. Louis adapted their customs and assimilated into their Tribe.  He even married the sister of the Chief.   Now after Louis and the rest of the people in the American Revolutionary War lost to the U.S. he decided to lead the Creek Tribe on an expedition in 1781 because, well, they had nothing else to do. On this expedition they were searching for caverns where allegedly the Creek Indians ancestors had emerged from. Maybe even the Origin of Bigfoot.   Yes, the Creek Indians had believed that their ancestors lived below the earth and lived in caverns along the Red River junction of the Mississippi River. Now during the expedition they did come across these caverns which they suspected could hold 20,000 of their family in. That's pretty much all they found. They didn't have video cameras back then otherwise, I'm pretty sure they would have found footage of bigfoot though.   Another advocate was Leonhard Euler, yes, you heard right. Buehler… Buehler… No Leonard Euler. A great 18th century mathematician; or not so great if you didn't enjoy math in school unlike moody who was the biggest nerd when it came to math.    Euler founded the study of graph theory and topology. No moody, not on-top-ology. Mind always in the gutter. Euler influenced many other discoveries such as analytic number theory, complex analysis, and the coolest subject ever; Infinitesimal Calculus. Which is Latin for BULLSHIT.   But anyways I digress. This guy knew his stuff BUT he did think with all his “infinite” wisdom that the earth was in fact hollow and had no inner shells but instead had a six hundred mile diameter sun in the center. The most intriguing and plausible theory he had within this whole idea was that you could enter into this interior from the northern and southern poles. Let's hold to that cool hypothesis for right now and move along with our next Interesting goon of the hollow earth community.   With Halley's spheres and Eulers's Holes came another great man with another great theory. Captain John Symmes! Yes you know Captain Symmes. HE was a hero in the war of 1812 after being sent with his Regiment to Canada and providing relief to American forces at the battle of Lundy's Lane. He was well known as a trader and lecturer after he left the army.    In 1818 Symmes announced his theory on Hollow Earth to the World! With his publication of his Circular No. 1.   “I declare the earth is hollow, and habitable within; containing a number of solid concentric spheres, one within the other, and that it is open at the poles 12 or 16 degrees; I pledge my life in support of this truth, and am ready to explore the hollow, if the world will support and aid me in the undertaking.”— John Cleves Symmes Jr., Symmes' Circular No. 1  While there were few people who would consider Symmes as the “Newton of the West”, most of the world was less than impressed. Although his theory wasn't as popular as one would expect, you gotta admire the confidence he had.   Symmes sent this declaration at a rather hefty cost to himself to “each notable foreign government, reigning prince, legislature, city, college, and philosophical societies, throughout the union, and to individual members of our National Legislature, as far as the five hundred copies would go.”15]   Symmes would then be followed by an exorbitant amount of ridicule for his proclamation, as many intellectuals were back then. This ridicule would later influence a rather bold move, Cotton. We'll touch on this later.    What was so special about his theory that got 98% of the world not on the edge of their seats? Well, to start he believed the Earth had five concentric spheres with where we live to be the largest  of the spheres. He also believed that the crust was 1000 miles thick with an arctic opening about 4000 miles wide and an antarctic opening around 6000 miles wide. He argued that because of the centrifugal force of the Earth's rotation that the poles would be flattened which would cause such a gradual gradation that you would travel into the Hollow Earth without even knowing you even did it.   Eventually he refined his theory because of such ridicule and criticism. Now his theory consists of just a single hollow sphere instead of five concentric spheres. So, now that we know all about symmes and his theory, why don't we talk about what he decided to do with his theory?    What do you think, Moody? You think he created a cult so he could be ostracized? Or do you think he gave up and realized he was silly? Hate to be the bearer of bad news here but he decided to take his theory and convince the U.S. congress to fund and organize an expedition to the south pole to enter the inner earth.    Good news and bad news folks. Good news, congress back then actually had some people with heads on their shoulders as opposed to those today and they said fuck that noise and denied funding for his expedition. Hamilton, Ohio even has a monument to him and his ideas. Fuckin' Ohio. Next up on our list of “what the fuck were they thinking?” We have Jeremiah Reynolds. He also delivered lectures on the "Hollow Earth" and argued for an expedition. I guess back in those days people just up and went to the far reaches of the earth just to prove a point. Reynolds said “look what I can do” and went on an expedition to Antarctica himself but missed joining the Great U.S. Exploring Expedition of 1838–1842, even though that venture was a result of his craziness, I MEAN “INTEREST”. He gained support from marine and scientific societies and, in 1828, successfully lobbied the House of Representatives to pass a resolution asking then-President John Quincy Adams to deploy a research vessel to the Pacific. The president, for his part, had first mentioned Reynolds in his November 4, 1826, diary entry, writing: “Mr Reynolds is a man who has been lecturing about the Country, in support of Captain John Cleves Symmes's theory that the Earth is a hollow Sphere, open at the Poles— His Lectures are said to have been well attended, and much approved as exhibitions of genius and of Science— But the Theory itself has been so much ridiculed, and is in truth so visionary, that Reynolds has now varied his purpose to the proposition of fitting out a voyage of circumnavigation to the Southern Ocean— He has obtained numerous signatures in Baltimore to a Memorial to Congress for this object, which he says will otherwise be very powerfully supported— It will however have no support in Congress. That day will come, but not yet nor in my time. May it be my fortune, and my praise to accelerate its approach.”  Adams' words proved prophetic. Though his administration opted to fund Reynolds' expedition, the voyage was waylaid by the 1828 presidential election, which found Adams roundly defeated by Andrew Jackson. The newly elected president canceled the expedition, leaving Reynolds to fund his trip through other sources. (The privately supported venture set sail in 1829 but ended in disaster, with the crew mutinying and leaving Reynolds' ass on shore.) Per Boston 1775, the U.S. Exploring Expedition only received the green light under the country's eighth president, Martin Van Buren. As Howard Dorre explains on his Plodding Through the Presidents blog, multiple media outlets (including Smithsonian, in an earlier version of this article) erroneously interpreted Adams' description of Reynolds' ideas as “visionary” as a sign of his support for the hollow earth theory. In fact, notes Bell in a separate Boston 1775 blog post, the term's connotations at the time were largely negative. In the words of 18th-century English writer Samuel Johnson, a visionary was “one whose imagination is disturbed.” The president, adds Dorre, only agreed to support the polar expedition “after Reynolds abandoned the hollow earth idea.”  I had always heard that he was a believer in mole people and hollow earth, turns out his words were just misinterpreted. Hmm… I wonder if there are any other books out there where the overall ideas and verbage could and have been misinterpreted causing insane amounts of disingenuous beliefs? Nah!   Though Symmes himself never wrote a book about his ideas, several authors published works discussing his ideas. McBride wrote Symmes' Theory of Concentric Spheres in 1826. It appears that Reynolds has an article that appeared as a separate booklet in 1827: Remarks of Symmes' Theory Which Appeared in the American Quarterly Review. In 1868, a professor W.F. Lyons published The Hollow Globe which put forth a Symmes-like Hollow Earth hypothesis, but failed to mention Symmes himself. Because fuck that guy, right? Symmes's son Americus then published The Symmes' Theory of Concentric Spheres in 1878 to set the record straight. I think the duel would have been a better idea. Sir John Leslie proposed a hollow Earth in his 1829 Elements of Natural Philosophy (pp. 449–53). In 1864, in Journey to the Center of the Earth, Jules Verne described a hollow Earth containing two rotating binary stars, named Pluto and Proserpine. Ok… fiction. We get it. William Fairfield Warren, in his book Paradise Found–The Cradle of the Human Race at the North Pole, (1885) presented his belief that humanity originated on a continent in the Arctic called Hyperborea. This influenced some early Hollow Earth proponents. According to Marshall Gardner, both the Eskimo and Mongolian peoples had come from the interior of the Earth through an entrance at the North Pole. I wonder if they knew that.    NEQUA or The Problem of the Ages, first serialized in a newspaper printed in Topeka, Kansas in 1900 and considered an early feminist utopian novel, mentions John Cleves Symmes' theory to explain its setting in a hollow Earth. An early 20th-century proponent of hollow Earth, William Reed, wrote Phantom of the Poles in 1906. He supported the idea of a hollow Earth, but without interior shells or inner sun. Ok, no sun. Got it. The spiritualist writer Walburga, Lady Paget in her book Colloquies with an unseen friend (1907) was an early writer to mention the hollow Earth hypothesis. She claimed that cities exist beneath a desert, which is where the people of Atlantis moved. Mmmk. Deserts and Atlantis. Check. She said an entrance to the subterranean kingdom will be discovered in the 21st century. Pretty broad brush she's painting with there. Next up we're gonna talk a little about Admiral Richard E. Byrd. According to Hollow Earth theorists, Byrd met an ancient race underground in the South Pole. According to Byrd's “diary,” the government ordered Byrd to remain silent for what he witnessed during his Arctic assignment:              March 11, 1947 “I have just attended a Staff Meeting at the Pentagon. I have stated fully my discovery and the message from the Master. All is duly recorded. The President has been advised. I am now detained for several hours (six hours, thirty- nine minutes, to be exact.) I am interviewed intently by Top Security Forces and a Medical Team. It was an ordeal!!!! I am placed under strict control via the National Security provisions of this United States of America. I am ORDERED TO REMAIN SILENT IN REGARD TO ALL THAT I HAVE LEARNED, ON THE BEHALF OF HUMANITY!!! Incredible! I am reminded that I am a Military Man and I must obey orders.” After many polar accomplishments, Byrd organized Operation Highjump in 1947. The objective: construct an American training and research facility in the South Pole. Highjump was a significant illustration of the state of the world and the cold war thinking at the time. The nuclear age had just begun, and the real fears were that the Soviet Union would attack the United States over the North Pole. The Navy had done a training exercise there in the summer of 1946 and felt it needed to do more. The northern winter was coming, and Highjump was a quickly planned exercise to move the whole thing to the South Pole. Politically, the orders were that the Navy should do all it could to establish a basis for a [land] claim in Antarctica. That was classified at the time.Now Operation High jump could probably be its own episode, or is at minimum a bonus. But we'll get some of the important details on how it pertains to this episode. Some say the American government sent their troops to the South Pole for any evidence of the rumored German Base 211. Nazis were fascinated with anything regarding the Aryan race. They traveled all over the world including Antarctica to learn more of alleged origins. The Germans did make their mark in the South Pole. However, what they have discovered doesn't compared to what Byrd recorded in his diary. the time. The nuclear age had just begun, and the real fears were that the Soviet Union would attack the United States over the North Pole. The Navy had done a training exerci but was that all it was   “For thousands of years, people all over the world have written legends about Agartha (sometimes called Agarta or Agarthi), the underground city. Agartha (sometimes Agartta, Agharti, Agarath, Agarta or Agarttha) is a legendary kingdom that is said to be located in the Earth's core. Agartha is frequently associated or confused with Shambhala which figures prominently in Vajrayana Buddhism and Tibetan Kalachakra teachings and revived in the West by Madame Blavatsky and the Theosophical Society. Theosophists in particular regard Agarthi as a vast complex of caves underneath Tibet inhabited by demi-gods, called asuras. Helena and Nicholas Roerich, whose teachings closely parallel theosophy, see Shambhala's existence as both spiritual and physical. Did Byrd find it? He claims to have met “The Master,” the city's leader, who told him of his concerns about the surface world: “Our interest rightly begins just after your Race exploded the first atomic bombs over Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. It was that alarming time we sent our flying machines, the ‘Flugelrads' to your surface world to investigate what your Race had done…You see, we have never interfered before in your Race's wars and barbarity. But now we must, for you have learned to tamper with a certain power that is not for your Man, mainly that of atomic energy. Our emissaries have already delivered messages to the power of your World, and yet they do not heed.” Apparently, the government knew about Agartha before Byrd. Marshall Gardner wrote A Journey to the Earth's Interior in 1913 and published an expanded edition in 1920. He placed an interior sun in the Earth (ah ha! The Sun's back!) and built a working model of the Hollow Earth which he actually fucking patented (U.S. Patent 1,096,102). Gardner made no mention of Reed, but did criticize Symmes for his ideas. DUEL TIME! Around the same time, Vladimir Obruchev wrote a novel titled Plutonia, in which the Hollow Earth possessed an inner Sun and was inhabited by prehistoric species. The interior was connected with the surface by an opening in the Arctic. The explorer Ferdynand Ossendowski wrote a book in 1922 titled Beasts, Men and Gods. Ossendowski said he was told about a subterranean kingdom that exists inside the Earth. It was known to Buddhists as Agharti. George Papashvily in his Anything Can Happen (1940) claimed the discovery in the Caucasus mountains of a cavern containing human skeletons "with heads as big as bushel baskets" and an ancient tunnel leading to the center of the Earth. One man entered the tunnel and never returned. This dude was a sniper with the Imperial Russian Army during World War I Moody is going to love these next examples.  Novelist Lobsang Rampa in his book The Cave of the Ancients said an underground chamber system exists beneath the Himalayas of Tibet, filled with ancient machinery, records and treasure. Michael Grumley, a cryptozoologist, has linked Bigfoot and other hominid cryptids to ancient tunnel systems underground. According to the ancient astronaut writer Peter Kolosimo a robot was seen entering a tunnel below a monastery in Mongolia. Kolosimo also claimed a light was seen from underground in Azerbaijan. Kolosimo and other ancient astronaut writers such as Robert Charroux linked these activities to DUN DUN DUNNNN….UFOs. A book by a "Dr. Raymond Bernard" which appeared in 1964, The Hollow Earth, exemplifies the idea of UFOs coming from inside the Earth, and adds the idea that the Ring Nebula proves the existence of hollow worlds, as well as speculation on the fate of Atlantis and the origin of flying saucers. An article by Martin Gardner revealed that Walter Siegmeister used the pseudonym "Bernard", but not until the 1989 publishing of Walter Kafton-Minkel's Subterranean Worlds: 100,000 Years of Dragons, Dwarfs, the Dead, Lost Races & UFOs from Inside the Earth did the full story of Bernard/Siegmeister become well-known. Holy fucking book title, Batman!   The science fiction pulp magazine Amazing Stories promoted one such idea from 1945 to 1949 as "The Shaver Mystery". The magazine's editor, Ray Palmer, ran a series of stories by Richard Sharpe Shaver, claiming that a superior pre-historic race had built a honeycomb of caves in the Earth, and that their degenerate descendants, known as "Dero", live there TO THIS DAY, using the fantastic machines abandoned by the ancient races to torment those of us living on the surface. As one characteristic of this torment, Shaver described "voices" that purportedly came from no explainable source. Thousands of readers wrote to affirm that they, too, had heard the fiendish voices from inside the Earth. The writer David Hatcher Childress authored Lost Continents and the Hollow Earth(1998) in which he reprinted the stories of Palmer and defended the Hollow Earth idea based on alleged (cough… “alleged”) tunnel systems beneath South America and Central Asia. Hollow Earth proponents have claimed a number of different locations for the entrances which lead inside the Earth. Other than the North and South poles, entrances in locations which have been cited include: Paris in France, Staffordshire in England, Montreal in Canada, Hangchow in China, and The Amazon Rain Forest.   Ok, have you two gents heard of the Concave Hollow Earth Theory? It doesn't matter, we're still going to talk about this lunacy. Instead of saying that humans live on the outside surface of a hollow planet—sometimes called a "convex" Hollow Earth hypothesis—some whackamuffins have claimed humans live on the inside surface of a hollow spherical world, so that our universe itself lies in that world's interior. This has been called the "concave" Hollow Earth hypothesis or skycentrism. Cyrus Teed, a doctor from upstate New York, proposed such a concave Hollow Earth in 1869, calling his scheme "Cellular Cosmogony". He might as well have called it Goobery Kabooblenuts. See, I can make up words, too. Anyway, Teed founded a group called the Koreshan Unity based on this notion, which he called Koreshanity. Which sounds like insanity and would make far more sense. The main colony survives as a preserved Florida state historic site, at Estero, Florida, but all of Teed's followers have now died. Probably from eating Tide Pods. Teed's followers claimed to have experimentally verified the concavity of the Earth's curvature, through surveys of the Florida coastline making use of "rectilineator" equipment. Which sounds like something you use to clean out your colon.   Several 20th-century German writers, including Peter Bender, Johannes Lang, Karl Neupert, and Fritz Braut, published works advocating the Hollow Earth hypothesis, or Hohlweltlehre. It has even been reported, although apparently without historical documentation, that Adolf Hitler was influenced by concave Hollow Earth ideas and sent an expedition in an unsuccessful attempt to spy on the British fleet by pointing infrared cameras up at the sky. Oh boy. The Egyptian mathematician Mostafa “Admiral Akbar” Abdelkader wrote several scholarly papers working out a detailed mapping of the Concave Earth model In one chapter of his book On the Wild Side (1992), Martin Gardner discusses the Hollow Earth model articulated by Abdelkader. According to Gardner, this hypothesis posits that light rays travel in circular paths, and slow as they approach the center of the spherical star-filled cavern. No energy can reach the center of the cavern, which corresponds to no point a finite distance away from Earth in the widely accepted scientific cosmology. A drill, Gardner says, would lengthen as it traveled away from the cavern and eventually pass through the "point at infinity" corresponding to the center of the Earth in the widely accepted scientific cosmology. Supposedly no experiment can distinguish between the two cosmologies. Christ, my head hurts. Gardner notes that "most mathematicians believe that an inside-out universe, with properly adjusted physical laws, is empirically irrefutable". Gardner rejects the concave Hollow Earth hypothesis on the basis of Occam's razor. Occam's razor is the problem-solving principle that "entities should not be multiplied beyond necessity", sometimes inaccurately paraphrased as "the simplest explanation is usually the best one." Purportedly verifiable hypotheses of a Concave Hollow Earth need to be distinguished from a thought experiment which defines a coordinate transformation such that the interior of the Earth becomes "exterior" and the exterior becomes "interior". (For example, in spherical coordinates, let radius r go to R2/r where R is the Earth's radius; see inversive geometry.) The transformation entails corresponding changes to the forms of physical laws. This is not a hypothesis but an illustration of the fact that any description of the physical world can be equivalently expressed in more than one way.   Contrary evidence   Seismic The picture of the structure of the Earth that has been arrived at through the study of seismic waves[52] is quite different from a fully hollow Earth. The time it takes for seismic waves to travel through and around the Earth directly contradicts a fully hollow sphere. The evidence indicates the Earth is mostly filled with solid rock (mantle and crust), liquid nickel-iron alloy (outer core), and solid nickel-iron (inner core).[53]   Gravity Main articles: Schiehallion experiment and Cavendish experiment Another set of scientific arguments against a Hollow Earth or any hollow planet comes from gravity. Massive objects tend to clump together gravitationally, creating non-hollow spherical objects such as stars and planets. The solid spheroid is the best way in which to minimize the gravitational potential energy of a rotating physical object; having hollowness is unfavorable in the energetic sense. In addition, ordinary matter is not strong enough to support a hollow shape of planetary size against the force of gravity; a planet-sized hollow shell with the known, observed thickness of the Earth's crust would not be able to achieve hydrostatic equilibrium with its own mass and would collapse.   Based upon the size of the Earth and the force of gravity on its surface, the average density of the planet Earth is 5.515 g/cm3, and typical densities of surface rocks are only half that (about 2.75 g/cm3). If any significant portion of the Earth were hollow, the average density would be much lower than that of surface rocks. The only way for Earth to have the force of gravity that it does is for much more dense material to make up a large part of the interior. Nickel-iron alloy under the conditions expected in a non-hollow Earth would have densities ranging from about 10 to 13 g/cm3, which brings the average density of Earth to its observed value.   Direct observation Drilling holes does not provide direct evidence against the hypothesis. The deepest hole drilled to date is the Kola Superdeep Borehole,[54] with a true vertical drill-depth of more than 7.5 miles (12 kilometers). However, the distance to the center of the Earth is nearly 4,000 miles (6,400 kilometers). Oil wells with longer depths are not vertical wells; the total depths quoted are measured depth (MD) or equivalently, along-hole depth (AHD) as these wells are deviated to horizontal. Their true vertical depth (TVD) is typically less than 2.5 miles (4 kilometers).   Ok, then let's discuss what actual scientists, like ALL OF THEM, believe the earth is actually composed of. The inner core This solid metal ball has a radius of 1,220 kilometers (758 miles), or about three-quarters that of the moon. It's located some 6,400 to 5,180 kilometers (4,000 to 3,220 miles) beneath Earth's surface. Extremely dense, it's made mostly of iron and nickel. The inner core spins a bit faster than the rest of the planet. It's also intensely hot: Temperatures sizzle at 5,400° Celsius (9,800° Fahrenheit). That's almost as hot as the surface of the sun. Pressures here are immense: well over 3 million times greater than on Earth's surface. Some research suggests there may also be an inner, inner core. It would likely consist almost entirely of iron.   The outer core   This part of the core is also made from iron and nickel, just in liquid form. It sits some 5,180 to 2,880 kilometers (3,220 to 1,790 miles) below the surface. Heated largely by the radioactive decay of the elements uranium and thorium, this liquid churns in huge, turbulent currents. That motion generates electrical currents. They, in turn, generate Earth's magnetic field. For reasons somehow related to the outer core, Earth's magnetic field reverses about every 200,000 to 300,000 years. Scientists are still working to understand how that happens.   The mantle   At close to 3,000 kilometers (1,865 miles) thick, this is Earth's thickest layer. It starts a mere 30 kilometers (18.6 miles) beneath the surface. Made mostly of iron, magnesium and silicon, it is dense, hot and semi-solid (think caramel candy). Like the layer below it, this one also circulates. It just does so far more slowly. Near its upper edges, somewhere between about 100 and 200 kilometers (62 to 124 miles) underground, the mantle's temperature reaches the melting point of rock. Indeed, it forms a layer of partially melted rock known as the asthenosphere (As-THEEN-oh-sfeer). Geologists believe this weak, hot, slippery part of the mantle is what Earth's tectonic plates ride upon and slide across.   Diamonds are tiny pieces of the mantle we can actually touch. Most form at depths above 200 kilometers (124 miles). But rare “super-deep” diamonds may have formed as far down as 700 kilometers (435 miles) below the surface. These crystals are then brought to the surface in volcanic rock known as kimberlite.   The mantle's outermost zone is relatively cool and rigid. It behaves more like the crust above it. Together, this uppermost part of the mantle layer and the crust are known as the lithosphere. The crust   Earth's crust is like the shell of a hard-boiled egg. It is extremely thin, cold and brittle compared to what lies below it. The crust is made of relatively light elements, especially silica, aluminum and oxygen. It's also highly variable in its thickness. Under the oceans (and Hawaiian Islands), it may be as little as 5 kilometers (3.1 miles) thick. Beneath the continents, the crust may be 30 to 70 kilometers (18.6 to 43.5 miles) thick.   Along with the upper zone of the mantle, the crust is broken into big pieces, like a gigantic jigsaw puzzle. These are known as tectonic plates. These move slowly — at just 3 to 5 centimeters (1.2 to 2 inches) per year. What drives the motion of tectonic plates is still not fully understood. It may be related to heat-driven convection currents in the mantle below. Some scientists think it's caused by the tug from slabs of crust of different densities, something called “slab pull.” In time, these plates will converge, pull apart or slide past each other. Those actions cause most earthquakes and volcanoes. It's a slow ride, but it makes for exciting times right here on Earth's surface.   https://www.imdb.com/list/ls003260126/?sort=user_rating,desc&st_dt=&mode=detail&page=1   BECOME A P.O.O.P.R.!! http://www.patreon.com/themidnighttrainpodcast   Find The Midnight Train Podcast: www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com www.facebook.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.twitter.com/themidnighttrainpc www.instagram.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.discord.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.tiktok.com/themidnighttrainp   And wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts.   Subscribe to our official YouTube channel: OUR YOUTUBE   Support our sponsors www.themidnighttraintrainpodcast.com/sponsors   The Charley Project www.charleyproject.org

new york canada science japan russian china moving american mexico america german master elements man hindu smithsonian origin brazil north earth south tibet men race ireland chief congress samuel johnson english dead french italian north america kansas world gods house west theory mind england british france president south america phantom pacific batman hell hiroshima united states nazis buddhist tribe tennessee oil arizona beasts holy adams jungle cinematic ages pluto alabama baltimore north pole sun ohio natives mississippi river scientists iroquois supposedly egyptian caves bigfoot inferno dragons reynolds sphere gardner mexican cuba peru montreal latin atlantis hamilton holes navy northern lights edmund interior red river cotton antarctica memorial chupacabra lucifer beneath northern ireland grand canyon patent moody soviet union adolf hitler fahrenheit amazing stories napoleon thousands himalayas central asia rama ramayana purgatory pentagon r2 extremely dwarfs presidents incredible jesus christ inca mongolia hopi bengali md arctic ancestors remarks officer mcbride siberian heated cuzco john quincy adams thin newton bullshit bri ancients lyons shenanigans nickel mongolian shambhala martin gardner deserts ufos hanuman massive byrd drilling south pole nah druidism jules verne taino politically geologists moutier celsius lundy poles national security topeka missouri river regiment madame blavatsky staffordshire azerbaijan caucasus abdelkader middlesex ray palmer shaver shaver mystery hyperborea hawaiian islands leonhard euler mole people hollow earth theory wild side tide pods creek indians ancient greeks andrew jackson martin van buren occam fuckin nagasaki anything can happen shamballa dero ahd american revolutionary war hollow earth cedar creek nicholas roerich sir isaac newton ravana euler highjump tvd temperatures pressures medical team all of them estero americus muscogee william reed staff meeting eskimos pontos gotha human race dacian tuatha d danann natural philosophy british colonies military man tibetan buddhists county donegal mandan in native american amazon rainforest vajrayana buddhism northern florida eisenach john cleves symmes theosophists operation highjump edmund halley agartha david hatcher childress cruachan theosophical society lakshmana teed symmes colloquies
Free Agent Lifestyle
Which Generation Is SUPPOSEDLY Going To Save Marriage?

Free Agent Lifestyle

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 153:38


Which Generation Is SUPPOSEDLY Going To Save Marriage? Coach Greg Adams YouTube Channel Free Agent Lifestyle YouTube Channel

Relatable Reality
Episode 33: Lets Get Personal

Relatable Reality

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 42:02


This week we had to split the episode into two... because we had a lot to talk about personally and we were all over the place.  Its been a week people. We start off talking about Bree's awful day and how she was cranky and in a terrible mood all day and could not shake it. She also talked about how she has been on an emotional roller coaster from her cycle being late this month to Miles getting really triggering news at the cardiologist.  It seems like there is always something when your child is sick.Then Liz talks about how she struggled at work this week because she had off  Labor Day, so the week just seemed to drag on forever. This brought up the topic of the work/life balance and how incredibly insane it is that we work more than we are able to see our family and friends and have a normal life outside of working. Should we only be working 4 days instead of 5? Bree explains the science behind "time flies" and also what she has read about the breakfast and snack phenomenon. Supposedly we aren't supposed to be eating snacks, and well Liz thinks that's bullshit lol. Then Liz shares how if she were around during the women's right movement she would not have been burning her bra to have to work a full time job at home and another one away from home... Bree on the other hand would have burned any bra she could find to get out of the house. Liz talks about how ideal it sounds in theory to homeschool kids, but Bree shares how that is not a reality she wants to live with her kids. The break is needed. Let us know all your thoughts and opinions on these topics on Instagram @relatablerealitypodcast and don't forget to download, subscribe and RATE US! 

The Dimah Podcast
Yajuj and Majuj (Gog and Magog)

The Dimah Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 31:22


What's Good Dimah Fam! In this episode Nila and Adise dive into the story of Gog and Magog otherwise known as Yajuj and Majuj. The story originates in the time of the prophets peace be upon them all, and is quite a scary one. This story marks the end of times if proven to be true, which really creeps us out. Supposedly, there is a tribe of primitive people who amass over hundreds of millions, who are pure evil. For every one person on this earth, there is 999 of them. At the time, they were so evil that villagers and tribes surrounding them were so terrified they sought protection from a noble king, Dhul Qarnayn. This king protected them by building a wall no one can penetrate, climb over, or dig underneath. But some believe that the wall has since been opened and they are amongst us now or will be in the near future. CREEPIANA TDP FAMILY. Let us know your thoughts in the comment section. We love you! Thanks for listening! 

The History of Computing
Spam Spam Spam!

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 11:42


Today's episode on spam is read by the illustrious Joel Rennich. Spam is irrelevant or inappropriate and unsolicited messages usually sent to a large number of recipients through electronic means. And while we probably think of spam as something new today, it's worth noting that the first documented piece of spam was sent in 1864 - through the telegraph. With the advent of new technologies like the fax machine and telephone, messages and unsolicited calls were quick to show up. Ray Tomlinson is widely accepted as the inventor of email, developing the first mail application in 1971 for the ARPANET. It took longer than one might expect to get abused, likely because it was mostly researchers and people from the military industrial research community. Then in 1978, Gary Thuerk at Digital Equipment Corporation decided to send out a message about the new VAX computer being released by Digital. At the time, there were 2,600 email accounts on ARPANET and his message found its way to 400 of them. That's a little over 15% of the Internet at the time. Can you imagine sending a message to 15% of the Internet today? That would be nearly 600 million people. But it worked. Supposedly he closed $12 million in deals despite rampant complaints back to the Defense Department. But it was too late; the damage was done. He proved that unsolicited junk mail would be a way to sell products. Others caught on. Like Dave Rhodes who popularized MAKE MONEY FAST chains in the 1988. Maybe not a real name but pyramid schemes probably go back to the pyramids so we might as well have them on the Internets. By 1993 unsolicited email was enough of an issue that we started calling it spam. That came from the Monty Python skit where Vikings in a cafe and spam was on everything on the menu. That spam was in reference to canned meat made of pork, sugar, water, salt, potato starch, and sodium nitrate that was originally developed by Jay Hormel in 1937 and due to how cheap and easy it was found itself part of a cultural shift in America. Spam came out of Austin, Minnesota. Jay's dad George incorporated Hormel in 1901 to process hogs and beef and developed canned lunchmeat that evolved into what we think of as Spam today. It was spiced ham, thus spam. During World War II, Spam would find its way to GIs fighting the war and Spam found its way to England and countries the war was being fought in. It was durable and could sit on a shelf for moths. From there it ended up in school lunches, and after fishing sanctions on Japanese-Americans in Hawaii restricted the foods they could haul in, spam found its way there and some countries grew to rely on it due to displaced residents following the war. And yet, it remains a point of scorn in some cases. As the Monty Python sketch mentions, spam was ubiquitous, unavoidable, and repetitive. Same with spam through our email. We rely on email. We need it. Email was the first real, killer app for the Internet. We communicate through it constantly. Despite the gelatinous meat we sometimes get when we expect we're about to land that big deal when we hear the chime that our email client got a new message. It's just unavoidable. That's why a repetitive poster on a list had his messages called spam and the use just grew from there. Spam isn't exclusive to email. Laurence Canter and Martha Siegel sent the first commercial Usenet spam in the “Green Card” just after the NSF allowed commercial activities on the Internet. It was a simple Perl script to sell people on the idea of paying a fee to have them enroll people into the green card lottery. They made over $100,000 and even went so far as to publish a book on guerrilla marketing on the Internet. Canter got disbarred for illegal advertising in 1997. Over the years new ways have come about to try and combat spam. RBLs, or using DNS blacklists to mark hosts as unable to send blacklists and thus having port 25 blocked emerged in 1996 from the Mail Abuse Prevention System, or MAPS. Developed by Dave Rand and Paul Vixie, the list of IP addresses helped for a bit. That is, until spammers realized they could just send from a different IP. Vixie also mentioned the idea of of matching a sender claim to a mail server a message came from as a means of limiting spam, a concept that would later come up again and evolve into the Sender Policy Framework, or SPF for short. That's around the same time Steve Linford founded Spamhaus to block anyone that knowingly spams or provides services to spammers. If you have a cable modem and try to setup an email server on it you've probably had to first get them to unblock your address from their Don't Route list. The next year Mark Jeftovic created a tool called filter.plx to help filter out spam and that project got picked up by Justin Mason who uploaded his new filter to SourceForge in 2001. A filter he called SpamAssassin. Because ninjas are cooler than pirates. Paul Graham, the co-creator of Y Combinator (and author a LISP-like programming language) wrote a paper he called “A Plan for Spam” in 2002. He proposed using a Bayesian filter as antivirus software vendors used to combat spam. That would be embraced and is one of the more common methods still used to block spam. In the paper he would go into detail around how scoring of various words would work and probabilities that compared to the rest of his email that a spam would get flagged. That Bayesian filter would be added to SpamAssassin and others the next year. Dana Valerie Reese came up with the idea for matching sender claims independently and she and Vixie both sparked a conversation and the creation of the Anti-Spam Research Group in the IETF. The European Parliament released the Directive on Privacy and Electronic Communications in the EU criminalizing spam. Australia and Canada followed suit. 2003 also saw the first laws in the US regarding spam. The CAN-SPAM Act of 2003 was signed by President George Bush in 2003 and allowed the FTC to regulate unsolicited commercial emails. Here we got the double-opt-in to receive commercial messages and it didn't take long before the new law was used to prosecute spammers with Nicholas Tombros getting the dubious honor of being the first spammer convicted. What was his spam selling? Porn. He got a $10,000 fine and six months of house arrest. Fighting spam with laws turned international. Christopher Pierson was charged with malicious communication after he sent hoax emails. And even though spammers were getting fined and put in jail all the time, the amount of spam continued to increase. We had pattern filters, Bayesian filters, and even the threat of legal action. But the IETF Anti-Spam Research Group specifications were merged by Meng Weng Wong and by 2006 W. Schlitt joined the paper to form a new Internet standard called the Sender Policy Framework which lives on in RFC 7208. There are a lot of moving parts but at the heart of it, Simple Mail Transfer Protocol, or SMTP, allows sending mail from any connection over port 25 (or others if it's SSL-enabled) and allowing a message to pass requiring very little information - although the sender or sending claim is a requirement. A common troubleshooting technique used to be simply telnetting into port 25 and sending a message from an address to a mailbox on a mail server. Theoretically one could take the MX record, or the DNS record that lists the mail server to deliver mail bound for a domain to and force all outgoing mail to match that. However, due to so much spam, some companies have dedicated outbound mail servers that are different than their MX record and block outgoing mail like people might send if they're using personal mail at work. In order not to disrupt a lot of valid use cases for mail, SPF had administrators create TXT records in DNS that listed which servers could send mail on their behalf. Now a filter could check the header for the SMTP server of a given message and know that it didn't match a server that was allowed to send mail. And so a large chunk of spam was blocked. Yet people still get spam for a variety of reasons. One is that new servers go up all the time just to send junk mail. Another is that email accounts get compromised and used to send mail. Another is that mail servers get compromised. We have filters and even Bayesian and more advanced forms of machine learning. Heck, sometimes we even sign up for a list by giving our email out when buying something from a reputable site or retail vendor. Spam accounts for over 90% of the total email traffic on the Internet. This is despite blacklists, SPF, and filters. And despite the laws and threats spam continues. And it pays well. We mentioned Canter & Sigel. Shane Atkinson was sending 100 million emails per day in 2003. That doesn't happen for free. Nathan Blecharczyk, a co-founder of Airbnb paid his way through Harvard on the back of spam. Some spam sells legitimate products in illegitimate ways, as we saw with early IoT standard X10. Some is used to spread hate and disinformation, going back to Sender Argic, known for denying the Armenian genocide through newsgroups in 1994. Long before infowars existed. Peter Francis-Macrae sent spam to solicit buying domains he didn't own. He was convicted after resorting to blackmail and threats. Jody Michael Smith sold replica watches and served almost a year in prison after he got caught. Some spam is sent to get hosts loaded with malware so they could be controlled as happened with Peter Levashov, the Russian czar of the Kelihos botnet. Oleg Nikolaenko was arrested by the FBI in 2010 for spamming to get hosts in his Mega-D botnet. The Russians are good at this; they even registered the Russian Business Network as a website in 2006 to promote running an ISP for phishing, spam, and the Storm botnet. Maybe Flyman is connected to the Russian oligarchs and so continues to be allowed to operate under the radar. They remain one of the more prolific spammers. Much is sent by a small number of spammers. Khan C. Smith sent a quarter of the spam in the world until he got caught in 2001 and fined $25 million. Again, spam isn't limited to just email. It showed up on Usenet in the early days. And AOL sued Chris “Rizler” Smith for over $5M for his spam on their network. Adam Guerbuez was fined over $800 million dollars for spamming Facebook. And LinkedIn allows people to send me unsolicited messages if they pay extra, probably why Microsoft payed $26 billion for the social network. Spam has been with us since the telegraph; it isn't going anywhere. But we can't allow it to run unchecked. The legitimate organizations that use unsolicited messages to drive business help obfuscate the illegitimate acts where people are looking to steal identities or worse. Gary Thuerk opened a Pandora's box that would have been opened if hadn't of done so. The rise of the commercial Internet and the co-opting of the emerging cyberspace as a place where privacy and so anonymity trump verification hit a global audience of people who are not equal. Inequality breeds crime. And so we continually have to rethink the answers to the question of sovereignty versus the common good. Think about that next time an IRS agent with a thick foreign accent calls asking for your social security number - and remember (if you're old enough) that we used to show our social security cards to grocery store clerks when we wrote checks. Can you imagine?!?!

Jim Harold's Campfire
When A Black Eyed Kid Knocks - Campfire 513

Jim Harold's Campfire

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 112:17


Black Eyed Kids are the entities with solid black eyeballs that are reported to demand that people let them in their home and cars. When they are let in? Supposedly, death and destruction ensue. We share some of our best BEK Campfire stories, an interview with the person who had the most famous BEK experience and an interview with BEK expert and author David Weatherly. You can find David's website at eerielights.com Thanks David! –NATIVE– Don't stink! Native deodorant is my deodorant of choice…it is aluminum-free and is made with ingredients you actually know like coconut oil and shea butter. Make the switch to Native TODAY by going to NativeDeo.com/campfire or use promo code campfire at checkout, and get 20% OFF your first order. -STAMPS.COM- Stamps.com brings the Post Office, and UPS shipping, right to your computer. Mail and ship anything from the convenience of your home or office. Use Stamps.com for all of your shipping needs! With my promo code, CAMPFIRE, you get a special offer that includes a 4-week trial PLUS free postage and a digital scale. No long term commitments or contracts. Just go to Stamps.com, click on the Microphone at the TOP of the homepage and type in CAMPFIRE. Never go to the Post Office again! EARNEST- It's time to break out of the student debt cycle. Earnest can help you by refinancing your student loan. Earnest is offering our listeners a $100 cash bonus. Refinance your student debt at Earnest.com/campfire Terms & conditions apply