Podcasts about Epic Records

American record label

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Best podcasts about Epic Records

Latest podcast episodes about Epic Records

Radio Influence
DJ Ekin Podcast: To Live and Die In L.A

Radio Influence

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 84:29


Epic Records exec Sylvon Marshall gives some insight on growing up minutes from where PnBRock was gunned down and how he navigates marketing some of the biggest in the game in his hometown and the world. Thanks for listening to this episode of the DJ Ekin Podcast and show your support for the podcast by […] The post DJ Ekin Podcast: To Live and Die In L.A appeared first on Radio Influence.

Dem Vinyl Boyz
Dem Vinyl Boyz EP 11 - Thriller

Dem Vinyl Boyz

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 51:29


Thriller is the sixth studio album by the American singer and songwriter Michael Jackson, released on November 30, 1982, by Epic Records. It was produced by Quincy Jones, who had previously worked with Jackson on his 1979 album Off the Wall. Jackson wanted to create an album where "every song was a killer". With the ongoing backlash against disco music at the time, he moved in a new musical direction, resulting in a mix of pop, post-disco, rock, funk, and R&B sounds. Thriller foreshadows the contradictory themes of Jackson's personal life, as he began using a motif of paranoia and darker themes. Paul McCartney appears on "The Girl Is Mine", the first credited appearance of a featured artist on a Michael Jackson album. Recording took place from April to November 1982 at Westlake Recording Studios in Los Angeles, California, with a budget of $750,000. With 32 million copies sold worldwide by the end of 1983, Thriller became the best-selling album of all time. It was the best-selling album of 1983 worldwide, and in 1984 it became the first album to become the best-selling in the United States for two years. It set industry standards with its songs, music videos, and promotional strategies influencing artists, record labels, producers, marketers, and choreographers. The success gave Jackson an unprecedented level of cultural significance for a black American, breaking racial barriers in popular music, earning him regular airplay on MTV and leading to a meeting with US President Ronald Reagan at the White House. Thriller was among the first albums to use music videos as promotional tools; the videos for "Billie Jean", "Beat It" and "Thriller" are credited for transforming music videos into a serious art form. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Audio Off The Shelf
Ep.058 (The Fall of 1992, Vol. 1)

Audio Off The Shelf

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 25:38


Email: audioofftheshelf@gmail.com. Instagram: @audioofftheshelf Twitter: @AOTS204 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/audioofftheshelf Sugar. “If I Can't Change Your Mind.” Copper Blue. Rykodisk, September 4, 1992. CD. LP. Screaming Trees. “Nearly Lost You.” Sweet Oblivion. Epic Records, September 8, 1992. Cassette. LP. Public Enemy. “Air Hoodlum.” Greatest Misses. Def Jam Recordings, September 15, 1992. Cannibal Corpse. “Beyond the Cemetery.” Tomb of the Mutilated. Metal Blade Records, September 22, 1992. Cassette. LP. Stone Temple Pilots. “Plush.” Core. Atlantic Records, September 29, 1992. CD. LP. Copyright Disclaimer under Section 107 of the copyright act 1976, allowance is made for fair use for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favour of fair use.

Booked On Rock with Eric Senich
Episode 81 | Brian J. Kramp ["This Band Has No Past: How Cheap Trick Became Cheap Trick"]

Booked On Rock with Eric Senich

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 91:44


"This band has no past" was the first line of the farcical biography printed on the inner sleeve of Cheap Trick's first album, but the band, of course, did have a past—a past that straddles two very different decades: from the tumult of the sixties to the anticlimax of the seventies, from the British Invasion to the record industry renaissance, with the band's debut album arriving in 1977, the year vinyl sales peaked.“This Band Has No Past: How Cheap Trick Became Cheap Trick”, featuring a foreword by Pearl Jam bassist Jeff Ament, tells the story of a bar band from the Midwest—the best and weirdest bar band in the Midwest— and how they doggedly pursued a most unlikely career in rock'n'roll. It traces every gnarly limb of the family tree of bands that culminated in Cheap Trick, then details how this unlikely foursome paid their dues—with interest—night after night, slogging it out everywhere from high schools to bars to bowling alleys to fans' back yards, before signing to Epic Records and releasing two brilliant albums six months apart.Drawing on more than eighty original interviews, “This Band Has No Past: How Cheap Trick Became Cheap Trick” is packed full of new insights and information that fans of the band will devour. How was the Cheap Trick logo created? How did the checkerboard pattern come to be associated with the band? When did Rick Nielsen start wearing a ballcap 24/7? Who caught their mom and dad rolling on the couch? What kind of beer did David Bowie drink? And when might characters like Chuck Berry, Frank Zappa, Don Johnson, Otis Redding, Eddie Munster, Kim Fowley, John Belushi, Jim Belushi, Elvis Presley, Leslie West, Groucho Marx, Robert F. Kennedy, Patti Smith, Andy Warhol, Lou Reed, The Coneheads, Tom Petty, Harvey Weinstein, Michael Mann, Linda Blair, Eddie Van Halen, Elvis Costello, Matt Dillon, and Pam Grier turn up? Read “This Band Has No Past” and find out and you may even get an answer to a few of those questions today with our guest Brian J. Kramp.I also ask Brian a question that has nothing to do with Cheap Trick or rock and roll, but the paranormal. Here is what his bio says: "Brian J., short for Brian James, hails from Waukesha, where he was raised in two houses, one across the street from a bowling alley, the other haunted. The bowling alley was the Sunset Bowl, where Cheap Trick were ‘discovered' by Jack Douglas. Douglas also happened to be the name of the ghost: a seven-year-old boy, one of the previous owner's nine children, who fell off the roof of a neighborhood building."In the mid-nineties, Brian attended the University of Wisconsin in Madison, where it seemed like every other person he met had a great Cheap Trick story and was eager to tell it. The band were legendary in that town, icons already, and for Brian, an ardent rock fan and budding record collector, Cheap Trick pressed all the right buttons. Thirty years and thousands of records later, here we are: Brian is now the proud author of this, his first book, about his favorite band.Brian has lived in Queens, New York, and Austin, Texas, but now resides near Madison with his wife and daughter. He has been a featured host on the long running podcasts Cheap Talk (a podcast devoted to Cheap Trick) with Ken Mills; and Rock and/or Roll, a part of the Pantheon Podcast Network.Purchase a copy of “This Band Has No Past: How Cheap Trick Became Cheap Trick” through Amazon: www.amazon.com/This-Band-Has-No-Past/dp/1911036874/ref=sr_1_2?keywords=brian+kramp&qid=1662419299&sr=8-2Visit Brian J. Kramp's "This Band Has No Past" blog: https://thisbandhasnopast.blogspot.com/Listen to Brian's podcast Rock And/Or Roll: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/rock-and-or-roll/id654789361Listen to a playlist of the music discussed in this episode: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/1hLWZemL56WNyvoLilQSez?si=98d0ed9077cd4f14The Booked On Rock Website: www.bookedonrock.comFollow The Booked On Rock with Eric Senich:FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/bookedonrockpodcastTWITTER: https://twitter.com/bookedonrockINSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/bookedonrockpodcast/?hl=enSupport Your Local Bookstore! Find your nearest independent bookstore here: www.indiebound.org/indie-store-finderContact The Booked On Rock Podcast:thebookedonrockpodcast@gmail.comThe Booked On Rock Music: “Whoosh” & “Nasty” by Crowander (www.crowander.com)

Main Pod Girl
Secrets of a Hitmaker (feat. Bonnie McKee)

Main Pod Girl

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 62:46


With ten #1 hits to her name, legendary songwriter Bonnie McKee joins us on Main Pod Girl! Tune in to hear Bonnie discuss songwriting tips, leaving Epic Records, music leaks, her two new albums, and so much more! Stick around to the end to hear our Top 5 songs written by Bonnie McKee! You can follow Bonnie at @bonniemckee, AJ at @ajmarksofficial, Sola at @iamsolamusic and popheads at r/popheads on Reddit, @popheads on Twitter, or @popheadsreddit on Instagram. Please rate and review this show if you haven't already, every rating helps us grow! As always, episodic artwork by @crxpeek.

Bandana Blues, founded by Beardo, hosted by Spinner
Bandana Blues #962 - This One's On Time

Bandana Blues, founded by Beardo, hosted by Spinner

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 96:49


Show #962 This One's On Time 01. Silent Partners - Good To Myself (3:52) (Changing Times, Little Village Foundation, 2022) 02. Patty Tuite - I Want A Lover (3:23) (Hard Case Of The Blues, Thread City Productions, 2022) 03. Matt Lomeo - Take The Boulevard (4:03) (When You Call, self-release, 2022) 04. Breezy Rodio - Underground Blues (4:48) (Underground Blues, WindChill Records, 2022) 05. The Blackwater Fever - The Hurt (3:41) (Temptator, self-release, 2022) 06. The New Bardots - Just Another Dance In The City (3:35) (Single, self-release, 2022) 07. Shemekia Copeland - The Dolls Are Sleeping (2:56) (Done Come Too Far, Alligator Records, 2022) 08. Mitch Grainger - Hollywood (3:16) (Single, self-release, 2022) 09. Sugaray Rayford - No Limit To My Love (4:26) (In Too Deep, Forty Below Records, 2022) 10. Laura Tate - Lovers Game (3:46) (Smokey Tango, Blue Heart Records, 2022) 11. Buddy Guy (ft. Jason Isbell) - Gunsmoke Blues (3:09) (The Blues Don't Lie, RCA Records, 2022) 12. Mel Brown - Goin' Down Slow (10:25) (Big Foot Country Girl, ABC Records, 1973) 13. Charlie Daniels Band - It's My Life (5:57) (Saddle Tramp, Epic Records, 1976) 14. James Montgomery Band - Train (8:28) (First Time Out, Capricorn Records, 1973) 15. Catch 23 - If It Ain't Broke (3:13) (Blues Hotel, self-release, 2022) 16. Zoom With Shawn Kellerman - Born To Sing The Blues (3:41) (Chocolate Cake, self-release, 2021) 17. Jeff Chaz - Category 2 (5:59) (Single, JCP Records, 2022) 18. The Texas Horns - Whatcha Got To Lose (4:01) (Everybody Let's Roll, Blue Heart Records, 2022) 19. Dan Doiron - It Is What It Is (3:25) (Livin' Centre Stage, Earwig Music, 2018) 20. miXendorp - Alogna (5:22) (Single, Black and Tan Records, 2022) Bandana Blues is and will always be a labor of love. Please help Spinner deal with the costs of hosting & bandwidth. Visit www.bandanablues.com and hit the tipjar. Any amount is much appreciated, no matter how small. Thank you.

Hommage Collatéral
Pas trop vieux pour ces conneries 16 | Thriller (1982)

Hommage Collatéral

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 80:09


RÉUPLOAD — Émission initialement mise en ligne le 24 octobre 2018.Le flux de Hommage Collatéral hébergera désormais son podcast "cousin" dédié aux œuvres marquantes de notre enfance ou adolescence. En attendant les nouveaux épisodes à la rentrée, retrouvez tous les anciens numéros ici même, au rythme d'un par jour. Bonne écoute !Comme ça faisait longtemps qu'on avait pas parlé d'un album, on vous propose cette fois une conversation sur ce qui était il y a quelques semaines encore l'album le plus vendu de tous les temps. Évidemment, la carrière de Michael Jackson est telle qu'on a débordé un peu… pour autant, vous remarquerez que la durée de cet épisode est tout à fait raisonnable. Et pour cause, on n'était “que” quatre : Fabrice aka Nekofurioso, community manager et blogueur sur Le Goûteur culturel Jean-Victor, rédacteur et critique chez Cloneweb, chroniqueur des podcasts Happy Hour et La Contrebande | Twitter personnel | Page Facebook de Cloneweb | Twitter de La Contrebande | Page Facebook de La Contrebande Arnold, chanteur des groupes Nemost et Not Bad, traducteur, rédacteur pour Tim-Burton.net et Superpouvoir.com, responsable de La Grande Hanterie Le résultat, c'est une conversation dont je suis vraiment très content. On a l'air posés, sympas, intéressant et presque pas trop bourrés. Mais ça c'est parce que j'ai fais des petites coupes... Playlist : 01 - Michael Jackson - Thriller | Thriller © 1982 Epic Records, MJJ Music02 - Michael Jackson - Human Nature | Thriller © 1982 Epic Records, MJJ Music03 - Michael Jackson - Beat It | Thriller © 1982 Epic Records, MJJ Music04 - Michael Jackson - Wanna Be Startin' Somethin' | Thriller © 1982 Epic Records, MJJ Music05 - Michael Jackson - Billie Jean | Thriller © 1982 Epic Records, MJJ Music Par toute la force de votre imaginaire, projetez-vous en moonwalk vers Apple Podcast afin de voter pour cette charmante émission. Lâchez autant d'étoiles que vous voulez, ainsi qu'un petit commentaire. Pour rappel, vous pouvez vous abonner aux différents réseaux sociaux du podcast pour suivre son actualité et rigoler un peu : Facebook Twitter Instagram Bonne écoute et rendez-vous au prochain numéro. On parlera d'une super gamme de jeux vidéo…

On Purpose with Jay Shetty
Meghan Trainor ON: Breaking Generational Trauma & How to Be Confident From the Inside Out

On Purpose with Jay Shetty

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 62:38


Today, I sit down with Meghan Trainor, an award-winning singer, songwriter, producer, and multi-instrumentalist that has garnered a GRAMMY for Best New Artist, achieved eight multi-platinum singles and two platinum albums, sold out three world tours, penned multi-platinum hits for peers across pop and country, received countless industry awards and nominations, and has recently started her own podcast with her brother Ryan Trainor entitled Workin' On It, while also becoming a TikTok star. She has just released her new single “Bad For Me,” featuring Teddy Swims, and has announced her fourth full-length album, Takin' It Back, arriving October 21st, 2022, via Epic Records.Meghan shares what her childhood was like growing up on a small community island, her passion for song writing and how having supportive parents helped her get recognition for her talent and eventually led to releasing her debut song, All About That Bass. We talk about how being authentic and just showing up as yourself online and in real life will make people appreciate you more, why appreciating the body you have is the best way to love yourself, the crippling panic attacks that were overcome by asking for help and working with the right people, and how she has found love with a man who accepted her flaws and sees her true value. Meghan shows us how our life may be built within a bubble and still find the courage to dream big, break free from any limitations, and find success in doing things we are passionate about.What We Discuss:00:00:00 Intro00:03:59 The secret door00:06:50 And we got two toilets00:09:00 Growing up in Nantucket00:11:24 The songwriting journey00:17:21 Supportive parents00:20:47 Why I am who I am00:24:34 What inspires you then and now?00:27:44 Showing up authentically on social media00:29:36 Worst panic attack00:35:19 Taking antidepressants while pregnant00:39:36 “I don't want to end up in a psych ward…”00:47:08 Our biggest crisis is a crisis of habits00:51:29 “When I met Daryl…”00:54:03 Loving your own body00:58:28 Meghan on Final FiveEpisode ResourcesMeghan Trainor | InstagramMeghan Trainor | TwitterMeghan Trainor | FacebookMeghan Trainor | TikTokMeghan Trainor | WebsiteWorkin' On It with Meghan Trainor & Ryan TrainorDo you want to meditate daily with me? Go to go.calm.com/onpurpose to get 40% off a Calm Premium Membership. Experience the Daily Jay. Only on CalmWant to be a Jay Shetty Certified Life Coach? Get the Digital Guide and Workbook from Jay Shetty https://jayshettypurpose.com/fb-getting-started-as-a-life-coach-podcast/

Audio Off The Shelf
Ep.057 (Music of Controversy, Vol. 1)

Audio Off The Shelf

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 45:24


Email: audioofftheshelf@gmail.com. Instagram: @audioofftheshelf Twitter: @AOTS204 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/audioofftheshelf Davis, Miles. “Black Satin.” On The Corner. Columbia Records, 1972. Vinyl. LP. Radiohead. “The National Anthem.” Kid A. Parolophone / Capitol, 2000. CD. LP. Clash, The. “The Sound of Sinners.” Sandinista! Epic Records, 1980. 3LP. Public Enemy. “Caught, Can I Get A Witness?” It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back, Def Jam Records 1987. CD LP. Stravinsky, Igor. The Rite of Spring. “Part 1 - Adoration of the Earth.” Perf. The Cleveland Orchestra. Cond. Pierre Boulez. Deutsche Grammophon, 1992. CD. LP. Copyright Disclaimer under Section 107 of the copyright act 1976, allowance is made for fair use for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favour of fair use.

LADYDIVA LIVE RADIO
R &B singersongwriter Mar-K has the 'Best Kept Secret' album

LADYDIVA LIVE RADIO

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 48:15


Mar-K- a hidden gem, an American R&B singer and dancer, former member of Public Announcement. Born and raised in Cincinnati, Ohio, he is 1 of 6 children. Mar-k's venture into music and dance came at a very young age of 5 years old. He began singing in the church along with his mom and siblings. At the age of 16 he and his best friend formed a dance group Murder rock, even at this young age, he was able to perform with Cincinnati owns the Callaway Band in the early 90s. With influences of the 90's era of music such as Jodeci, H-town he decided to go for his dream and formed a group of three known as Deeper than black in 1990. From community and talent shows, this R&B trio took the Cincinnati community by storm. 1997 Deeper than Black was introduced to UnoHoo Entertainment, which developed this trio to be able to perform and be the opening act for Multi-Platinum Group Public Announcement. Deeper than black was dismantled in 1999. Mar-k continued to pursue his dream, and continue to work with Earl Robinson of Public Announcement to develop his artistry and to learn the business of entertainment. 2003 Mar-K became an official member of Public Announcement 2006 Public Announcement released “When the Smoke Clear” Album 2018 Mar-K begins working on other projects. Mar-K linked up with Singer/Songwriter Ty Juan and formed a Duo called 2Kingz. 2Kingz released a single  'Satisfied'  that received race reviews and even caught the attention of Sylvia Rhone of Epic Records. Mar-K has just finished his first solo project entitled Best Kept Secret.

Not Skinny But Not Fat
181. TIKTOK STAR MEGHAN TRAINOR

Not Skinny But Not Fat

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 47:16


Singer-songwriter and now also podcaster-TikToker Meghan Trainor dishes w/ me on new mom life, some surprising facts about her Spy Kids husb Daryl Sabara, breastfeeding struggles, that moms-only trip she took with Hilary Duff and Ashley Tisdale, and ofc her new record!! Takin' It Back drops October 21st via Epic Records! Produced by Dear Media

Black Is America
Ledger Smith: Rolling Towards Freedom

Black Is America

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 28:44


In August 1963, people traveled far and wide to Washington DC to advocate for civil rights. They took planes, trains, and automobiles. However, one man traveled there in a different way.    To commemorate the 59th anniversary of the March on Washington For Jobs and Freedom, we lace up our skates to tell the story of Ledger “Roller Man” Smith and his almost 700-mile journey to Washington DC.    In this episode, you will hear: Why Ledger Smith went to the March On Washington on roller skates Why Dr. King thought it was essential for Civil Rights to desegregate places of leisure Ledger Smith route from Chicago to Washington DC Why media was essential to the Civil Rights movement More about an unlikely ally in the Civil Rights movement The Children's March and Kelly Ingram park Notable figures mentioned in this episode: Martin Luther King Jr. John Lewis Mamie Chalmers Bayard Rustin  A.G. Gaston A. Phillip Randolph President John F. Kennedy  Attorney General Robert Kennedy President Barack Obama The Black Is America podcast, a presentation of OWLS Education, was created and is written, researched, and produced by me, Dominic Lawson. Executive Producer Kenda Lawson Cover art was created by Alexandria Eddings of Art Life Connections. Credit for this episode's cover art: The Baltimore Afro American Sources to create this episode come from The National Civil Rights Museum, History.com, The New York Times, The Baltimore Afro American,  The National Museum of African American History & Culture, WAMU National Public Radio in DC Scenes from United Skates are courtesy of Vice and HBO Documentary Films, a Warner Brothers Discovery Company.   Mamie Chalmers audio courtesy of Comcast NBCUniversal's Voices of the Civil Rights Movement David Vann and A.G. Gaston audio courtesy of the Youtube Channel curated by Geoff Hiron (Note: The host could not locate the original source of audio) "Beat It" is written and performed by Michael Jackson and produced by Michael Jackson & Quincy Jones for Epic Records.  "I'm On My Way" performed by Mamie Brown & Choir from "Lest We Forget, Vol. 2: Birmingham, Alabama, 1963 - Mass Meeting" from Smithsonian Folkways Recordings. Audio of Martin Luther King Jr. courtesy of Martin Luther King Jr Research and Education Institute at Stanford University Audio of John Lewis courtesy of the National Archives Audio of President Barack Obama courtesy of BBC News Be sure to Like, review and subscribe to the Black Is America Podcast on Apple Podcast, Spotify, where ever you like to listen to podcasts. Also, let people know about the podcast. We would appreciate that very much.  For a full transcript of this episode and other resources, go to www.blackisamericapodcast.com. You can read our blog, leave us a review, or leave a voicemail where you can ask a question or let us know what you think about the show we may play in an episode. You can also hit the donation button if you like what you heard, which helps us to create more educational content like this. 

Rick & Bubba University Podcast
Ep 134 | The Benefits of Learning a Musical Instrument | Will Mason

Rick & Bubba University Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 46:48


Will Mason, founder of Mason Music, learned to play classical piano as a kid in the typical "boring" way. He truly fell in love with music once he picked up a guitar and got to choose the songs he would learn to play. He went on to join a band, get signed by Epic Records, and tour the country. Will Mason now spends his time as CEO of Mason Music which offers music lessons in a totally unique way. Their ground-breaking "Rock Band League" shows kids they can work together and pursue a hobby that develops their brain and expands their world! Learn about the music industry, running a business and non-profit, and the benefits of playing an instrument on this episode of "Rick & Bubba University"! Sponsors: Tommy John is here to keep you comfortable. Treat yourself and upgrade to a few pairs of Tommy John underwear in the softest, most breathable fabrics you've ever worn. Tommy John obsesses over every little detail and stitch by using proprietary fabrics that perform like nothing you have ever worn before. All of Tommy John's loungewear and leggings are built for next-level comfort. Whether you're in the hunt for lounge pants, sleep shorts or lazing-around joggers, Tommy John has you covered. Tommy John is so confident in their underwear that if you don't love your first pair, you can get a full refund with their Best Pair You'll Ever Wear Or It's Free Guarantee. Tommy John, no adjustment needed. Hurry to save 15% on your first order at https://TommyJohn.com/RickBubba!  Patriot Mobile - We are proud to partner with Patriot Mobile because they never sent a penny to the left, they will NEVER SILENCE YOU and they are America's ONLY Christian Conservative wireless provider. Switching is easy! Keep your phone number, bring your own phone or buy a new one. Build your own bundle with multi-line discounts and save even more. Go to https://PatriotMobile.com/RICKBUBBA or call their US-based customer service team at 972-PATRIOT. Veterans and first responders save even more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Let It Roll
Sly Stone Embodied the Optimism of Woodstock Nation Until He Didn't

Let It Roll

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 60:13


Host Nate Wilcox asks Joel about the rapid rise, positive peaks, sudden descent and long-slow decline of Sly Stone.Buy the book and support the podcast.Download this episode.Have a question or a suggestion for a topic or person for Nate to interview? Email letitrollpodcast@gmail.comFollow us on Twitter.Follow us on Facebook.Let It Roll is proud to be part of Pantheon Podcasts.

Bandana Blues, founded by Beardo, hosted by Spinner
Bandana Blues #959 - Last Century Blues

Bandana Blues, founded by Beardo, hosted by Spinner

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 96:17


Show #959 Last Century Blues 01. Colin James - Triple Shot (4:00) (Colin James & the Little Big Band II, Elektra/Asylum Records, 1998) 02. John Dummer Band - Time Will Tell (3:24) (Blue, Vertigo Records, 1972) 03. Jimmy Johnson - Talking 'Bout Chicago (4:50) (North // South, Delmark Records, 1982) 04. Carey Bell - Good Luck Man (5:24) (Good Luck Man, Alligator Records, 1997) 05. Freddie King - Me And My Guitar (4:07) (The Texas Cannonball, Shelter Records, 1972) 06. Kid Bangham & Amyl Justin - I Go Crazy (3:48) (Pressure Cooker, Tone-Cool Records, 1997) 07. Sonny Landreth - Congo Square (5:14) (Down In Louisiana, Epic Records, 1985) 08. Savoy Brown - Highway Blues (4:04) (Boogie Brothers, Deram Records, 1974) 09. Finis Tasby - The Sun Is Shining (4:46) (Jump Children, Evidence Music, 1998) 10. Fenton Robinson - Nightflight (3:55) (Nightflight, Alligator Records, 1984) 11. Son Seals - Four Full Seasons Of Love (2:50) (Midnight Son, Alligator Records, 1976) 12. Scott Henderson - Smelly Ol' Dog Blues (7:59) (Dog Party, Mesa Records, 1994) 13. Livin' Blues - Midnight Blues (3:18) (Blue Breeze, Ariola Records, 1976) 14. Downchild Blues Band - Please Forgive (2:58) (Dancing, Special Records, 1974) 15. Mark Dufresne - A Song In There (3:08) (There's A Song In There, Jeromed Records, 1999) 16. Paul Mark & the Van Dorens - Credit Line (4:13) (Disposable Soul, Radiation Records, 1997) 17. Pete Haycock - Follow That Frog (3:03) (Guitar And Son, IRS Records, 1987) 18. Clarence Gatemouth Brown - Just Lippin' (3:10) (Pressure Cooker, Alligator Records, 1985) 19. Ford Blues Band - Somebody Help Me (4:28) (The Ford Blues Band, Blue Rock'It Records, 1999) 20. Al Copley & the Fabulous Thunderbirds - Good Understanding (6:48) (Good Understanding, Bullseye Blues, 1994) 21. Barry Levenson - Cobra Days/Blue Tears (7:13) (Heart to Hand, Storyville Records, 1998) Bandana Blues is and will always be a labor of love. Please help Spinner deal with the costs of hosting & bandwidth. Visit www.bandanablues.com and hit the tipjar. Any amount is much appreciated, no matter how small. Thank you.

Perpetual mOetion With Dr mOe Anderson
Life As A Working Class Rock Star With Ivan Bodley

Perpetual mOetion With Dr mOe Anderson

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 34:06


If you think being a rock star isn't hard work, think again. Ivan Bodley aka Funkboy is a bass player who has appeared on Broadway and been inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame. He's performed with music icons like Sting, Carlos Santana, and the Temptations. Plus, he's a magna cum laude graduate of the premier Berklee College of Music. In this interview, he chats with Dr. mOe about his impressive career, life on the road, and his new book "Am I Famous Yet? - Memoir of a Working-Class Rock Star." Hear Ivan perform and learn more about his journey at   Transcript is auto-generated: [00:00] Dr. mOe Anderson: Welcome, Ivan. [00:02] Ivan Bodley: Thanks so much. Great to see you. [00:04] Dr. mOe Anderson: And you as well. I've been looking forward to talking to the legendary Funk Boy. We're going to have some fun today. You're quite the god. My goodness, talk about being versatile. You have a BA in psychology from V Two Lane University in New Orleans. I'm headed there soon. You were also a publicist with Epic record Sony Music. How did you go from that to working class musician? How did this journey begin? [00:35] Ivan Bodley: You know, that was an interesting kind of career transition. Yes, you're right. I have an undergraduate degree, and then I went into the music business, and I was a junior executive, and I had a corporate Amex card, and I seemed to be on that path as a career path for life. And after about three years of being in the music business, I realized that the music business is pretty much a marketing company. It had very little to do with creativity and creation of music. Certainly we were getting to hang out with the rock stars we were promoting, but we weren't involved in any of the creative aspects of making this product. So I kind of had a moment of realization, and it was kind of a difficult one because I realized there really wasn't anything else I wanted to do but to try to be an actual performer. And when you come to realization like that, you kind of realize, like, wow, that's a tough road to ho, as they say. There's no guarantees of success, and I have nothing else I really wanted to fall back on. There's nothing else I wanted to do regardless of education or qualifications or anything else. So I was like, I kind of resigned myself. Well, I guess I got to try to make it go of this if I'm going to do that. And then once I came to that realization, I was like, all right, well, if I'm going to do this, I need to go ahead and get myself more specifically formally educated in music, because most of my study at that point had been self study or with private teachers or that kind of thing. So then I went back as a slightly older person. I was in my mid twenties after 26, I think. Then I went to the Berkeley College of Music. Well, and then I'll slip in that I managed to graduate from there, magna cum laude, too. So I really tried to dedicate myself to my studies to give myself the tools that I needed to hopefully then have any success in the business. In a business where no success is ever guaranteed, you then have to have a good deal of hard work and good fortune on your side to try to rent. That's what happened. I kind of took a bizarre leap of faith after I was resigned to my fate, and somehow, looking back now, 30 years later, it worked out. [03:13] Dr. mOe Anderson: Absolutely. I talked about your impressive CV in the intro. I would say it has more than worked out. And what I'm particularly impressed by is that I'm a creative as well. So I know how it is when you have those two sides, the corporate and then the fashion and artsy side of you, but that you fully committed to what you wanted to do, whether it was the corporate side or the music that you went all in. And a lot of people get stuck because they want to love everything, but we got to do some stuff we don't like so much to get to the point where we can do what we really want to do. That's just part of the process. So from there you've studied, you've got a great background in business and music based on that investment in yourself. How did you go from that to becoming a freelance professional musician because you've worked with some of the biggest people in the music business. [04:13] Ivan Bodley: Well, after I got my degree from Berkeley, I came back to New York City because that's kind of where I thought I knew that I always sort of wanted to be musically. A lot of the music that I was sort of interested in was coming was emanating from here. So I had a grand career set of goals, and what I was going to do was I was going to become a famous musician. I was going to play at Madison Square Garden. I was going to play on The Tonight Show and the David Letterman Show and Saturday Night Live. These are my career goals, the trifecta, right? And I can tell you with great confidence, 30 years later, exactly none of those things actually happened. But a bunch of other things happened along the way that sort of made it worthwhile. When I got here, I started typing resumes. I was a temp secretary. I had the temp gig for like three years during the day, world's longest temp gig. It was three years long, and I was typing resumes for the people that the phone company was laying off. It was this bizarre, weird, good karma job I was trying to help, working this career resource center of the phone company, believe it or not. And then little by little, step by step, inch by inch, just over time, over that three year period, the evening freelance music career became just enough to tip the balance, to go ahead and pay the rent and take an additional leap of faith and leave the temp gig. And that was the last time I had a day job, was 1995. [05:52] Dr. mOe Anderson: Oh, you lucky, lucky man. [05:54] Ivan Bodley: I know. True. That is true. That is true. [05:57] Dr. mOe Anderson: But you worked hard at it. You even took a job that you were overqualified for until you could fully pursue your commitment and your passion, your talent for music. And, you know, you call yourself almost famous, but you performed at Carnegie Hall the Kennedy Center. You're in the Blues freaking hall of Fame, right? You've been music director for Sam and Moore, Sam and Dave for my old schoolers, Martha and the Vandelas. But you've also performed with Sting the Temptations. Benny King,  Chaka Khan Wynonna Judd and David Foster! I don't normally tik off a list like that, but most people don't have a list like that. [06:45] Ivan Bodley: It's funny. I have a joke sort of my resume, which is included in the end of my book, and I will send it out to some people. It's on my website. It's seven pages long. It's unconscionably long. There's no possible reason people shouldn't have that much information. But what happens is I find over and over again and you just demonstrated this exactly. I'd never know which name on the resume is going to resonate with somebody. Like, you have a personal relationship to, say, Sam and Dave, for instance, and people go, wow, you play with Sam and Dave. But it's always one that I don't expect. Like, I'll have seven pages of information and some people will say, like, wow, you play with Buster Point extra. I'm like, yeah, I did. That's the one that turned you on. Great. Perfect. Now we can talk about that. [07:30] Dr. mOe Anderson: Yeah, it is funny. And it just tells us that we have some lives well lived when we can make references to people throughout multiple generations. And that's exactly what you've done. Because, like, my mom would be way Sam and Dave, right? And she listened to music all the time. And I'm not that much older than you. I'm not trying to throw shade, but no, that's my Sam and Dave and Martha Reid's reference. But then when you get to Chakra Khan and Rufus and why not especially David Foster. Oh, my God, he's a genius. That's when you're getting into my influences and just all around. It's just exciting reading, and I can't imagine what it was like. Do you have any funny story you can share with us about your life on the road or with one of these celebrities? I know there's a bunch of them in the book, but is there one you can share with us now? [08:26] Ivan Bodley: There's a whole bunch of them. Actually, you're right. That's the reason I did write the book, because there's so many of them. I do want to correct you on one small point. I didn't ever actually play with the band Rufus. I played with Rufus Thomas, the world's oldest teenagers of the man who did the funky chicken down in Memphis, Tennessee. I don't want to misappropriate my strange celebrity resume. [08:49] Dr. mOe Anderson: Hey, my bad. That's so mean. Folks, I corrected and I'm okay with that. [08:54] Ivan Bodley: All good. We opened for Chaka. I was playing with Solomon Burke at the where was this? The Saratoga Jazz Festival in New York. Excuse me. And the act immediately after us was Chaka Kahn So I feel like I've been on the same stage with her, but I've not actually played in her band yet. I'm available, Chaka, if you're around. If you need me, I'd be happy to come out. I love sliding medieval, that's all. It's all a shameless self promotion that never kind of ends. And a funny story, that show with Solomon Burke, I think we had a twelve piece band. Solomon Burke at that time in his career was, I believe, £425. He was a formidable gentleman of certain stature. So on his technical rider, he had a king's throne to be placed at the front of the stage and he sat down on the throne and conducted his business from the front of the stage using just the power of his voice. And he ran for 15,000 people and he moved, like emotionally moved the entire audience with just the sound of his voice. It was the most extraordinary thing I've ever seen. He also had on his technical writer two dozen long stem roses with the thorns removed that he had to have by the throne. So he gave them out one at a time to ladies in the front row in the audience as he was performing. He was a master showman and very sort of like old school, old world RMB. And then at the end of the show, like for the big climax of the night, his big stage move was he stood up on a high note, he stood up from the throne and the audience was like, wow. It was just unbelievable. Like you see performers dancing and sweating for 2 hours. He had one move and it was as effective as any Britney Spears concert you've ever seen. Amazing former. [11:04] Dr. mOe Anderson: And that's what I always say about singers versus entertainers. I'm a big deal fan, for example, I don't think she has a move other than turning to one profile side or the other. But she doesn't need one. [11:18] Ivan Bodley: She doesn't need it. [11:19] Dr. mOe Anderson: It's so amazing. Now, if you can sing and dance to Kudos to you, but if you got a pig, I'll take a singer over an entertainer any day and I just can't even imagine someone just sitting on their throne like a sovereign management rising 15,000 people. That is a gift. That's a form of genius. And whether people recognize it or not, that is not an easy thing. Thanks for sharing that story. [11:47] Ivan Bodley: Furthermore, as the band, as the backing band, I think we rehearsed with him one time, the first time we met him, and then never again. Because what he did was the other thing too. Like all of his songs, the only thing you knew about what he was about to say was that it was in the key of G. He stayed in the same key for the entire evening and it was never, ever dull. So he had a group of songs that were hits for him back in the Atlantic record spaces. So I kind of had, like, a little cheat sheet sort of in front of me, like a three or four page thing that kind of happened. So what he would do, he would just start singing a melody, a capella. And as the backing band, we had to figure out what song he was on. And then we had to catch up because he was already two bars into the song. So he got to get you into my life. And we're like, okay, all right. Figure out what song was. Figure out what the changes were and catch up. And he did this over and over again. And it was just such an amazing exercise for us to try to listen and try to respond to him live like that. [12:50] Dr. mOe Anderson: And then he would do that with you guys. Said he had a lot of confidence in you, too, and your musical abilities, because that is really some Southern Black Baptist Church stuff right there. [13:04] Ivan Bodley: Exactly what it is. Never had a set list, never premeditate. What's going to happen now that you said that? Now I can tell you the next story. We're playing with him at Lincoln Center. At Avery Fisher Hall. This is the jazz festival thing. We're in this very prestigious concert event opening for Wilson Ticket. Wilson, the mighty, wicked Picket. So Dr. Burke is like to be referred as he was a doctor of mortuary sciences. Dr. Burke started Sigma. I'm 100,000% serious. He was a many faceted, individual, fascinating human being. [13:50] Dr. mOe Anderson: That's crazy. [13:51] Ivan Bodley: He started singing in the same manner I just described to you. He would just start singing a melody. So he started singing the Ray Charles classic drowned in My Own Tears. And between, I looked at the keyboard player and the keyboard player look at the guitar player, and the guitar player looked at me. And we realized between the three of us, none of us knew the changes exactly to the song. We're like, oh, we're live on stage being reviewed by The New York Times at Lincoln Center, and we don't know the song that he's now singing. And he realizes within 20 seconds or 10 seconds, like, we're not with it. So he sings a couple of lines of it, then he moves on to something else, and we're back in the fold, and the concert continues on. We got away with it, really. Probably. We were only the ones that noticed it. But then as we're leaving the stage at the end of the night, triumphant standing ovation, he got the whole thing. The greatest jockey and record producer, Bob Porter with the MC for the evening. So if we're coming up to the wings, bob Porter looks at me and he says, Drowning My Own Tears. So I was like, oh, man, you heard that? [15:04] Dr. mOe Anderson: There's a lot of nonverbal kind of back and forth. I'm not a musician. I'm a creative. I write and speak. But just that, you guys. I mean, I kind of see it when I see the biopics and the movies, but you guys just kind of feed off of each other, get to know each other to that degree that he knew to just move on. Okay, they're not getting it. He moved on. And it's just like a seamless communication. [15:34] Ivan Bodley: We don't call it eyeballing. We call it earballing. [15:37] Dr. mOe Anderson: Earballing. I was searching for a word. Thank you. I was like, there's got to be a term for that. And that makes sense. And it is a relationship just like every other relationship, even if it's just for an hour or two. And that's what's another thing that's so beautiful about music and what you do and that you've been able to perform with all these different types of musicians. You've also worked for a major record label and you've been a musician. What is it like to work for a major record label? You alluded to it, but a little bit more of what that life is like. [16:21] Ivan Bodley: Well, that's what I did coming out of my college years. While I was at Two Lane, I was also the music director of the campus radio station. There's a station there called Wtwo two Lane radio. And it was a 1500 watt station which covered all greater metro New Orleans. So had a potential listenership of like a million people. Not that we had those kind of numbers, but it had a very wide coverage and as such, it was a very influential station. So the record companies knew this and they would promote directly to us and have us interview their artists when they would come through town and send us. So my job was to sort of be in contact with the record companies and make sure that the station had all the latest product and all this kind of thing. So that was kind of my entree into the music business, was doing it from the radio station side. And because I really didn't pick up a bass guitar until I was a senior in high school, I was 17 years old. So when it was time to make the decision to go to college, I was in no position to say, I'm going to be a music major. I didn't have that much experience. I actually started Tulane as a biomedical engineering major first, and after about two years of that majoring actually in college, radio, I ended up with a psych degree. So because of the context that I'd made through the music directorship, then that's how I was able to parlay that into an assistant job in the publicity department at Epic Records. And then at which you start out making Xerox copies and making coffee and running errands, whatever you need to do. [17:51] Dr. mOe Anderson: Back in the days when we worked. [17:53] Ivan Bodley: Our way up from the bottom, that's exactly what happened. [17:56] Dr. mOe Anderson: You know, they come in privileged and expecting to have a corner office. Initially, no shade. [18:03] Ivan Bodley: That's exactly what it is. And then after about a year and a half of being successful doing that, an office opened up and it was the manager of West Coast publicity I was in New York initially, the manager of West Coast publicity for Epic Portrait and CBS Associated Labels. So I had to move out to Los Angeles midway through my record company career. And that's when I got the business card, the corporate Amex card. And it wasn't the corner office, but it was an office with a window and all that kind of nonsense. And I was working for, I guess, my sort of pride and joy projects from that time where the band Living Color, we were working on their first project called Personality on the Vivid album. I was working with Stanley Clark, the great jazz bass player who's been a dear friend of mine ever since George Duke. [18:53] Dr. mOe Anderson: Stanley Clark. [18:54] Ivan Bodley: George, exactly. Big Daddy. We called George Duke Big Daddy. And I was working with near. Not directly with, but certainly near. I have a platinum plaque on my wall now. That was all the gold and platinum records. I'm looking at it right now from the year 1988. So in no particular order. Gloria Estefan, Cheap Trick, Luther Vandross, Michael Jackson, Ozzy Osbourne the Band europe Shade Joan Jet And The blackhearted Weird Al Yankovic Alexander O'Neill and REO Speed Wagon So those were the clients that I was dealing with at the label at that time. [19:33] Dr. mOe Anderson: I saw some of those during our pre call. You have a very interesting office or whatever the room you were in as we were talking, I was just looking at the guitars and all the boards and the gold platinum records. Just amazing just being in that environment. And sometimes people like, I have some degrees and family pictures and art in the room on my office. And sometimes people are like, oh, that's your ego wall. But you know what? For me, it's a hustle wall. It's like what you can do when you try really hard. And frankly, I'm the one in here ten to 12 hours a day. It's not like I'm out on the street like, look at this, look at this. It just reminds me that hard work and effort gets results. And to keep at it, keep at it, don't get discouraged. [20:25] Ivan Bodley: I remember when I saw the picture of your office as well. I call them my own. I call them the bowling trophies. These are the bowling trophies. And having a platinum record up that I was presented with 35 years ago, does that mean something now? Like, yes and no. It's part of my origin story. And it's one of those things when you see it, it looks impressive. And occasionally I'm reminded to look at it and go like, oh, yeah, I did that. [20:48] Dr. mOe Anderson: I did that. And at the end of the day, it's by you for you to do what you want to with. That's why I love it. I was very inspired just seeing it, honestly, and I'm glad I had that opportunity. [21:01] Ivan Bodley: Yes, good. Thank you. [21:02] Dr. mOe Anderson: So you talked about all the sides of it, that you've been on the corporate side file, you've done whatever was necessary, ultimately. We Heard You trifecta The Tonight Show, medicine Square Garden And So forth. [21:19] Ivan Bodley: None of that happened, by the way. [21:20] Dr. mOe Anderson: None of it happened, but none of it a lot of people have lofty goals like that. What advice would you give to someone chasing fame and fortune. [21:32] Ivan Bodley: That is so difficult? Because I'm not sure I've gotten either one, even though I've been a successful, quote unquote, successful, working class musician my whole life. [21:40] Dr. mOe Anderson: Right. The key was the chase, though. For someone, that's their objective, to chase rather than producing something excellent or a service or commitment or a mission. But that's the end goal. I just want to be famous, right? [21:59] Ivan Bodley: Yeah. The fame part of it, that's a very tenuous thing. And I've had brushes with fame. Certainly you've seen the photo album, stood next to some very famous people for very short periods of time to get a photo. But like, for instance, when I was doing the Broadway show Rock of Ages, which was like the 80s rock musical, the band was on stage, we were on stage, we were in costume and makeup and flipping our hair around for two and a half hours. So when we would come out of the stage door, very often there would be people waiting to meet the actors and get their playbills signed and maybe take a picture of that kind of thing. So when you would come out the stage door, people go like, Yay, it's the bass player. And then you were known by an audience all the way up until you turn the corner on 7th Avenue and you're famous for half a block. And then as soon as you turned the corner on 7th Avenue, you were right back into obscurity. Nobody knew who you were, nobody seen you, and it was right back to normal, everyday life. To me, fame is tenuous at kind of every level. I mean, even if you look at somebody sort of uber famous, like, I don't know, Justin Bieber or something, I have to understand that my parents generation have no idea who he is, and they don't care. It's not for them. So, yeah, he's as famous as you can get, and still not everybody is going to know him. But for me, the key was to give myself the tools that I needed to allow myself to be able to succeed. And for me, that was going back to musical, that's what I needed to do was sort of plug in the gaps in my education and give myself the possibility of them succeeding. Then once I had that possibility, then I knew it was just going to be a lot of hard work. It's still hard work. I'm still taking jobs that require a lot of transcription time, a lot of practice time, preparation time, sometimes a lot of driving, you know, like drive from New York City to Buffalo is going to be 6 hours to do a job that's going to pay me $300 which barely pays for the gas and tolls in my time. But it's all part of it. It's all part of the journey because you never know what leads to what. And all the gigs that I've told you solomon Burke and Sam Moore and all those Martha Reeves, all those gigs came from working with a band here in New Orleans called the Uptown Horns Review. The uptown Horns. They're the Horns section who played on James Brown Living in America. B 52 Loveshack Cameo ward up. They're a very famous, well established horn section. So I became their bass player through two things. One, I was touring with the Sherrells and their drummer Crusher Green was also the drummer in the Uptown Horns Review. And the other thing was, I did a $50 blues gig in Manhattan one night with a friend of mine named Timothy Beckerman, the blues siren of New Orleans. She was up here in New York and the sax player was Crispincio, who's the lead alto player in the Uptown Horn. So from a $50 job and then also from this recommendation, I got from the drummer, suddenly I started working with this group which introduced me to everybody on that list that we just talked about. And there's no way to have anticipated that that $50 job is going to lead to everything else. So you just kind of have to take everything, do everything, be prepared and show up on time. [25:32] Dr. mOe Anderson: Unfortunately. I just like to that you're saying that it was your dedication to the craft not just do anything outrageous, outlandish or whatever to get attention and be famous, but your dedication to the craft led to you getting in the company of the right people and networking and just having what is really an amazing life. These names you drop like they're nothing are just people who are legends to me. I've got vinyl in there with these folks pictures on them, which is the closest I'll ever get to them. So I'm just a little bit envious. Don't be upset with me, but I'm a little bit envious. [26:15] Ivan Bodley: I'm not mad at all. I'm a fan too. That's how I started doing this. I'm a fan of this music. My mom's record collection was Gladys Knight and the Pips and Stevie Wonder and King Floyd and I can tina Turner. Those are the records that I grew up in the house and they trained in Georgia. Thank you. That's what I grew up with. Gladys was my mom's absolute favorite. So then dedicating myself to working with these classic soul artists. This is, for me, a pilgrimage. Yeah. I love it. I can't get enough of it. The other thing too, is sort of like preparing yourself, what you're talking about, sort of doing things to get attention. That's all well and good, but then once you're given the opportunity, you need to have the goods to back it up, to be able to do the job right. Yeah, publicity stuff, that's all great, but then they say, okay, come on our stage and play. If you're not really dedicated and ready to do the job, you're not going to get a second call. It'll be a one and done. [27:17] Dr. mOe Anderson: I know, exactly. And there's a maturity and growth that happens, too. Personal growth that happens during all that. You've been through all that. I've been through all that. So many people who've worked hard and suddenly are almost famous, and people don't see everything that came before that. Which leads me to your memoir. What inspired you to write? Am I famous yet? Memoir of a working class rock star. [27:46] Ivan Bodley: I think the title describes exactly who I am. I stand next to rockstars occasionally for long enough to take a photo or play a concert, but most of what I do is I lift my own amps, I drive my own car, I work for a living. Definitely what would happen was if something crazy would happen at a sound check, for instance, between sound check and the show, usually there's a dinner break for the abandoned crew. We'll sit down and have a little catering or somebody who's going to order out sandwiches or pizza. And what would happen was I would be like, you know that thing that just happened? It reminded me of another thing that just happened on another job that was even stranger or even weirder. And I would start telling these stories to my bandmates and my compatriots and anyone who would listen. And I was told over and over again, they say, you should really write these things down because you've got so many of these road stories at this point. And I was thinking to myself, back in my publicity days for the label, I used to write the artist BIOS and the liner notes and the press releases and that kind of stuff. I always had the writing gene has always been part of what I do. So as I was being encouraged to do this, maybe about four years ago, I sat down during the winter, which is kind of my slow season, and I said, Let me start to see if I can assemble enough of these stories to see if it's a book. And I started writing and writing and writing and writing in my spare time, such as it was. And about three months in, I'm like, yeah, I think it's a book. I think we have a book there, but never quite got it finished until the world shut down two years ago. And suddenly all the live gigs dried up and we basically sat home for 15 months. It was a very scary. Time in the music business for us, everybody. But what I tried to do during that time was make lemonade out of the lemon. So I had time to finish the book, get it edited and send it to my aunt is a copy editor for Time magazine, so she kindly copied the whole book. I got it formatted. I got it put up on Amazon. I was able to finish it sort of with the time that I had. All the while, I was also, like doing home recordings via file sharing with all my other musician friends who were similarly displaced and out of work, and they're all happy to play. So I did about two albums worth of material during that time, too, which got me signed to a record label for the first time in my life as well. [30:24] Dr. mOe Anderson: Congratulations. Which record label, if I may ask? [30:28] Ivan Bodley: It's a company called Color Red. Music. Color REDCOM out in Colorado. It's run by Eddie Roberts, who is the leader of the new Master Sounds, which is a British band, like a new British version of The Meters or Booker T. And the Mg is kind of like an instrumental funk band. Really interesting. And it's a great platform for these independent musicians and they have a whole licensing wing. So hopefully one day one of my songs will show up in a TV show or commercial and like, that returns on investment. [31:02] Dr. mOe Anderson: I hope that for you. And again, congratulations. That's great news. A lot did happen during that period, but I saw some videos, I think, on YouTube, and I didn't jot down was a crab walk or crab tree. [31:20] Ivan Bodley: Crab walk. [31:22] Dr. mOe Anderson: I got to drop that in the show notes. You are hilarious. A talented musician, but also very funny and a great, great storyteller. Ivan. [31:32] Ivan Bodley: Oh, thank you. Yeah, that was another thing. During the Quarantine, I had all the time in the world to shoot my own little independent video clips to go with these projects. All that stuff is on YouTube as well. [31:43] Dr. mOe Anderson: And people can hear you and get engaged and they can connect with you on YouTube. But where else can people find you? Learn more about you download this book on Amazon guys, and my famous yet memoir of a working class rock star. But how can they connect with you online? [32:00] Ivan Bodley: The book is available as hardcover, soft cover, Kindle edition, as a podcast, as YouTube clips in any possible format that you consume. Media. I believe there's a version for you. Links to everything, everything are at my website, funkboy. Net. Funkboy. Net. Not Funky Boy. Funk Boy. Everybody spelling counts in this day and age. But it's got links to Amazon. It's got links to the YouTube stuff, it's got links to all of the recordings and way too many pictures of me standing next to famous people, which are highly amusing. [32:40] Dr. mOe Anderson: I think there is no such thing. I happen to love looking at videos and photos. And Instagram is leading the social media war right now because of their big focus on Photos. So keep posting those, keep doing your videos and keep making great music. You guys connect with Ivan. Follow him online. He is a fun and talented guy. And you just heard a story of perseverance, excellence and success. And for this moment, for this episode, I thank you. Ivan the famous Funkboy. [33:21] Ivan Bodley: Thank you so much, Doctor mOe. I really appreciate you taking interest in my work. [33:27] Dr. mOe Anderson: Wasn't that a great program? Oh, love that episode. I enjoyed it. I hope you did too. Please remember to like, subscribe and share. Learn more about me on my website, dr. Moanderson.com. That's Moe. You can read book excerpts, watch videos, learn about the services that I offer, and book me for a speaking engagement. I'd love to talk with your group and I'd love to work with you. So until the next time, review, renew and renew. Thank you.

No Jumper
Kokane and Cold 187um On Fighting Ice Cube, Eazy E's Mysterious Death & More

No Jumper

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 110:30


Kokane shares some wild hip hop stories about Tupac, reacts to T-Pain's comment, Dre, Cube, Eazy-E, Aaliyah, Suge Knight, new music on the way, and more! ----- 00:00 Intro 0:25 - OG Kokane says he's the most featured artist in the world. Doing over 4,000 features over 30 years 5:02 - Growing up with famous Motown composer father Jerry Long 8:12 - Creating Above the Law's first big song “M___ Rap” 9:10 - Pitching the 3-song demo to Eazy-E that landed Kokane his deal in 1989 10:09 - The controversy around Kokane's name, says which Epic Records executives that pressured him to change his name 15:20 - Ghostwriting and producing for Eazy-E and NWA 16:00 - Kokane explains how some of the greatest artists have had ghostwriters 21:56 - Hutch remembers the breakup of NWA. First Ice Cube left, then thrown in the hot seat when Dre left 24:25 - Kokane watched Hutch put hands on Ice Cube 25:14 - Hutch breaks down what led to the beef between him and Ice Cube and gives a play-by-play of their fight 34:48 - Hutch says he can't rule out foul play regarding Eazy's death 35:45 - Addressing the conspiracy theory that Suge Knight injected Eazy with HIV. Eazy was worth $100M when he passed 38:05 - Eazy-E never got stomped out by Suge. How Eazy got 25% of The Chronic 41:20 - Kokane remembers running into Tupac on Sunset Blvd right before he passed 45:38 - When Tupac coined the term G-Funk 47:05 - Reacting to T-Pain saying “Tupac would've gotten ate up lyrically in 2022.” Hutch explains the genius and range of Tupac 49:38 - Remembering their last conversation with Tupac about attending the Mike Tyson fight 50:15 - Giving their side of Snoop's story about when Tupac pressed Nas in NYC 51:40 - The real reason for the East Coast vs West Coast beef was because Biggie wouldn't tell Tupac who shot him 55:28 - Reacting to Funk Flex calling Tupac a fake gangster 57:50 - Conway the Machine was right to call out Flex because he's not respecting the younger generation 1:10:20 - Hutch explains why he was the real creator of G-Funk, not Dr.Dre. Breaking down the real definition of G-Funk 1:18:02 - How Hutch became the VP of Death Row Records 1:20:05 - Reacting to Suge's legal troubles. Not understanding why he got so much time 1:21:15 - Hutch on leaving Death Row a year after Wack100 joined because there was too much emphasis on beef 1:23:33 - Reacting to Wack's comments about Nipsey not being a legend. Working with Nipsey since his ‘Bullets Have No Names' 1:29:15 - Remembering Lisa Left Eye, asked her why she burned Andre Rison's house down 1:31:04 - Remembering how Aaliyah was into hardcore gangster rap 1:31:55 - Kokane and Hutch call out R Kelly 1:32:35 - Meeting Jada Pinkett through Tupac. Believed she was the first woman Tupac really loved 1:33:54 - Hutch feels like Jada was really in love with Pac but wanted to be married to Will Smith 1:43:15 - Creating the Architects of G-Funk Album, book, and biopic. Getting ready to drop the album in September. 1:44:50 - Kokane stills gets inquiries from young new artists. Happy to see young guys tapping in with the OGs 1:47:58 - Shoutout to Ceddy Nash for connecting Kokane and Hutch with Flakko Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Yuksel Urer
DJ Khaled Ft. Drake & Lil Baby - STAYING ALIVE (Yuksel Urer Remix)

Yuksel Urer

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 3:22


I made a remix work in the disco and funk style for DJ Khaled & Drake & Lil Baby new track "Staying Alive". I hope you like it. https://youtu.be/zd0Law5y-Dw https://www.instagram.com/yukselurer/ Orjiginal Song Credits: Featuring: Drake & Lil Baby Produced By: Nyan (Producer) & Tim Suby Written By: DJ Khaled, Drake, Lil Baby, Nyan, Tim Suby, Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb & Robin Gibb Co-Producer: Tim Suby Recording Engineer: Noel Cadastre Copyright: We The Best Music, Epic Records & Sony Music Entertainment

3Q
3Q Episode Sixteen: Dylan Brewer

3Q

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 26:25


No matter where you are in your career, you'll benefit from listening to 3Q. 3Q provides a window into the careers of some of the best in the music business. Every episode is an insider's view of the realities of life as a music executive. Topics include issues of empowerment, uncertainty, trust, finances, etc; issues that will impact you both personally and professionally. The executives we interview represent every aspect of the industry including but not limited to A&R, Marketing, Music Supervision, Artist Management, Promotion, and more. The best part? Every executive answers the same three questions and 3Q never takes more than 15 minutes of your time. About Dylan: Clio Award-winning executive Dylan Brewer is the VP of Marketing & Head of Experiential at Epic Records. Dylan started his career right out of college at Google in Music Partnerships, collaborating with artists such as Ariana Grande, Sam Smith, Jennifer Lopez, Demi Lovato, and The 1975. He then left to work in Marketing at Def Jam Recordings where he worked with Justin Bieber on his ‘Purpose' album -- ultimately pivoting his passion to focus on creative direction + experiential marketing. Brewer arrived at Epic in 2018 as Director of Marketing, where he spearheads marketing strategy for, among others, Ozzy Osbourne, Madison Beer, Bakar, BEAM, AG Club, Headie One and J Hus. He received his CLIO in recognition of the largest global release event in rock and roll history, a global tattoo campaign for Ozzy's Ordinary Man album which saw concurrent listening parties at tattoo shops in 57 cities worldwide.

Classic 45's Jukebox
Peace Of Mind by Boston

Classic 45's Jukebox

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022


Label: Epic 50381Year: 1977Condition: M-Price: $8.00The A side of this essential Boston single is a specially edited version of a 4:55 album track. Note: This beautiful copy comes in a vintage Epic Records factory sleeve. It has pristine Mint audio.

Media Industry Guru
From Music Publishing to Director of Brand Partnerships @ Epic Records (Sony Music) |Season 4, Episode 6|

Media Industry Guru

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 41:47


Here is Carla Bennahmias. She works at Epic Records, a division of Sony Music Entertainment the Director of Brand Partnerships. At UCLA, she interned at Primary Wave Entertainment in publishing, Universal Pictures in Sync, and Sony Music in Sync. Here, she will talk about how she broke into the biz, what her advice is, as well as what her day-to-day responsibilities are in the intersection of sync and brand partnerships. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Classic 45's Jukebox
I Could Be So Good To You by Don & The Goodtimes

Classic 45's Jukebox

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022


Label: Epic 10145Year: 1967Condition: M-Price: $18.00Both sides of this single are terrific, tuneful mid-1960s Sunshine Pop. Note: This beautiful copy comes in a vintage Epic Records factory sleeve. It grades very close to Mint across the board (labels, Vinyl, Audio).

MetalProgPop Cast
174: Aviary - Aviary

MetalProgPop Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 63:59


Aviary (1979) es el disco debut de la banda norteamericana Aviary.  Se formó en Seattle a mediados de los 70. Brad Love en los teclados y Toby Bowen en la guitarra principal fueron la fuerza impulsora detrás de la banda. Tuvieron un éxito modesto en Oregón, lanzando el primer álbum homónimo con gran éxito de crítica antes de mudarse a Los Ángeles, donde EPIC Records esperaba firmarlos.

Classic 45's Jukebox
Frankenstein by The Edgar Winter Group

Classic 45's Jukebox

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022


Label: Epic 10967Year: 1973Condition: MLast Price: $12.50. Not currently available for sale.It's just not possible to put together a playlist of classic hard rock from the early 1970s without including this amazing track. So many surprises lurking around each corner... just like its namesake! This hit single is specially edited from a 4:45 album track. Note: This beautiful copy comes in a vintage Epic Records factory sleeve. It has Mint labels and pristine sound.

This Is An Experiment
59. Dylan Brewer & Jerry Lang II

This Is An Experiment

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 33:38


Today we have two guests! Dylan Brewer is the VP of marketing for Epic Records, and Jerry Lang II is a producer and piano player. We talk about the industry, both creative and business. This is their experiment.Support them @yooooitsjerry @dylabrewGet 20% OFF @manscaped + Free Shipping with promo code EXPERIMENT at MANSCAPED.com!

Black Men Vent Too
BMI: Music & Entertainment In A Black With Waldo Daniels

Black Men Vent Too

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 65:55


Good Morning Nashville ☀️ We want to welcome you guys again to another episode of Black Men Vent Too. We present to you guys today our first episode into our ALL NEW SEASON for the month of July . As we've mentioned, this month we will focus squarely on “Music & Entertainment” in a black man . This season will host artists, producers, and musical minds across the city to come and vent about how they deal with the pros and cons of the industry as a black man

Icons and Outlaws
Cyndi Lauper

Icons and Outlaws

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 95:48


www.iconsandoutlaws.com    Cynthia Ann Stephanie Lauper Thornton was born June 22, 1953, in Brooklyn, New York City, right here in the U.S., to Catholic parents, Fred and Catrine. Her mother was from Sicily. She has two siblings, a younger brother Fred (nicknamed Butch), and an older sister, Ellen. Her parents divorced when she was five.   Her earliest childhood days were spent in Brooklyn, but when she was about four years old, the family moved to Ozone Park, Queens, where she lived in a railroad-style apartment through her teenage years. Growing up, Lauper felt like an outcast. She grew up listening to such artists as The Beatles and Judy Garland. Then, at only 12 years old, she began writing songs and playing an acoustic guitar that she got from her sister.   Cyndi was primarily raised by her mother, who worked as a waitress to support the family. Mom loved the arts and frequently took Cyndi and her siblings to Manhattan to see Shakespeare plays or visit art museums. However, Cyndi did not do particularly well in school. She was reportedly kicked out of several parochial schools in her youth. Raised in the Roman Catholic faith, Cyndi Lauper recounted in Boze Hadleigh's "Inside the Hollywood Closet" the time a nun attacked her after catching a nine-year-old Lauper scratching a friend's back: "A nun ran in, ripped me off her back, threw me against the lockers, beat the s**t out of me, and called me a lesbian."   As many kids do, she expressed herself with various hair colors and eccentric clothing. She took a friend's advice to spell her name as "Cyndi" rather than "Cindy." Unfortunately, her" unusual" sense of style led to classmates bullying her and even throwing stones at her.   Lauper went to Richmond Hill High School, where she was expelled but later earned her GED. In her book, Cyndi revealed that after her stepfather threatened to sexually assault her and her sister and then secretly watched her take a bath, she left home for good. Cyndi left Home at 17 to escape her creepy ass stepfather, intending to study art. Her journey took her to Canada, where she spent two weeks in the woods with her dog Sparkle, trying to find herself. She eventually traveled to Vermont, taking art classes at Johnson State College and supporting herself by working odd jobs. Money was sparse, so she waitressed, served as an office assistant, and even sang in a Japanese restaurant for a time. At one point, her boyfriend at the time hunted and shot a squirrel, which she cooked up and ate. Lauper also faced an unplanned pregnancy, which she wanted, but her boyfriend did not. So, Lauper terminated the pregnancy.   "Nobody wants to run in and do that," She later told HuffPost. "It's just that I didn't want to have a kid that I love come into the world and not be able to share the kid with a dad." During this period, Cyndi got around by hitchhiking. Unfortunately, she put herself into close quarters with some potentially crappy individuals, such as the man who gave her a ride and forced her to perform a sexual act on him. "I just wanted to be able to live through it, get to the other side of it." On another occasion, she was assaulted by a bandmate and two accomplices.   Sometimes, it all understandably got too overwhelming for Lauper. "A lot of times I couldn't take it anymore, so I just lay in bed all the time," Lauper wrote. "When I really couldn't deal with anything, I used to get the shakes, just complete anxiety attacks." In 2019, Lauper gave the commencement address at Northern Vermont University-Johnson, the academic institution that now includes Johnson State. At this event, NVU awarded her the honorary degree of Doctor of Letters.   In the early 1970s, Cyndi performed as a vocalist with several different cover bands. One of those bands, Doc West, covered disco songs and Janis Joplin. A later band, Flyer, was active in the New York metropolitan area, singing songs by bands including Bad Company, Jefferson Airplane, and Logan's favorite, Led Zeppelin. Although She was performing on stage and loving that part, she was not happy singing covers. One night, while singing a cover of Kiki Dee's "I've Got the Music in Me" in 1974, her voice gave out. But it came back shortly after, and Lauper continued to sing in cover bands and a Janis Joplin tribute act. Then, in 1977, Cyndi's pipes said no more. Her voice disappeared again, and doctors discovered that she'd suffered a collapsed vocal cord.   Recommended by her temporary replacement in the Joplin cover band, Lauper sought the help of vocal coach Katie Agresta. She helped heal Cyndi and provided her with the tools and techniques to prevent it from happening again. Agresta also helped her realize that she was singing the wrong music entirely, discovering that she was more suited to pop, not hard rock. As Lauper wrote in her memoir, "[I realized] what I was aching for — to sing my own songs, in my own voice, in my own style, that I made up myself." In 1978, Lauper met saxophone player John Turi through her manager Ted Rosenblatt. Turi and Lauper formed a band named Blue Angel, Combining a New Wave look with a '60s throwback sound, and recorded a demo tape of original music. Steve Massarsky, manager of The Allman Brothers Band, heard the tape and liked Lauper's voice. He bought Blue Angel's contract for $5,000 and became their manager. "The playing was bad. There was something interesting about the singer's voice, but that was all," he later told Rolling Stone. Massarky set up a few major label showcases, but they all thought the same thing; the band wasn't great, but the singer was something special. Lauper received recording offers as a solo artist but held out, wanting the band to be included in any deal she made. She even turned down the chance to record a song by herself for the soundtrack to the MeatLoaf movie Roadie, produced by legendary disco song crafter Giorgio Moroder, the founder of the former Musicland Studios in Munich, Germany. Blue Angel was eventually signed by Polydor Records and released a self-titled album on the label in 1980. Lauper hated the artwork, saying it made her look like Big Bird. Still, Rolling Stone magazine later included it as one of the 100 best new wave album covers (2003). Despite critical acclaim, the album sold poorly ("It went lead," as Lauper later joked), and the band broke up. The members of Blue Angel had a falling-out with Massarsky and fired him as their manager. He later filed an $80,000 suit against them, which forced Cyndi into bankruptcy. She then temporarily lost her voice due to an inverted cyst in her vocal cord.   After Blue Angel broke up, Cyndi worked in retail stores, waitressing at IHOP (which she quit after being demoted to the hostess when the manager sexually harassed her), and singing in local clubs. Her most frequent gigs were at El Sombrero, which sounds like they have amazing chimichangas. Music critics who saw Her perform with Blue Angel believed she had star potential due to her four-octave singing range, which was not an easy feat. Then, in 1981, while singing in a local New York bar, Cyndi met David Wolff. He took over as her manager and had her sign a recording contract with Portrait Records, a subsidiary of Epic Records. On October 14, 1983, Cyndi released her first solo album,"  She's So Unusual." The album became a worldwide hit, peaking at No. 4 in the U.S. and reaching the top five in eight other countries. She became extremely popular with teenagers and critics, partly due to her hybrid punk image, which was crafted by stylist Patrick Lucas.   Lauper co-wrote four songs on She's So Unusual, including the hits "Time After Time" and "She Bop." On the songs she did not write, Lauper sometimes changed the lyrics. Such is the case with "Girls Just Want to Have Fun," originally written and recorded by Robert Hazard, which you can find on YouTube, and it's pretty awesome. She found the original lyrics misogynistic, so she rewrote the song as an anthem for young women.    The album includes five cover songs, including The Brains' new wave track "Money Changes Everything" (No. 27 on the Billboard Hot 100) and Prince's "When You Were Mine." The album made Cyndi Lauper the first female artist to have four consecutive Billboard Hot 100 top five hits from one album. The L.P. has stayed in the Top 200 charts for over 65 weeks and sold 16 million copies worldwide.   Cyndi won Best New Artist at the 1985 Grammy Awards. She's So Unusual also received nominations for Album of the Year, Record of the Year, Best Female Pop Vocal Performance (for "Girls Just Want to Have Fun"), and Song of the Year (for "Time After Time"). She wore almost a pound of necklaces at her award ceremony. It also won the Grammy for Best Album Package, which went to the art director, Janet Perr.   The video for "Girls Just Want to Have Fun" won the inaugural award for Best Female Video at the 1984 MTV Video Music Awards, making Cyndi an MTV staple. The video featured professional wrestling manager "Captain" Lou Albano as Lauper's father and her real-life mother, Catrine, as her mother, and also featured her attorney, her manager, her brother Butch, and her dog Sparkle. She was a huge wrestling fan. In 1984–85, Cyndi appeared on the covers of Rolling Stone magazine, Time, and Newsweek. In addition, she appeared twice on the cover of People and was named a Ms. magazine Woman of the Year in 1985.   In 1985, she participated in "USA for Africa's" famine-relief fund-raising single "We Are the World," which has sold more than 20 million copies since then.   At the Grammys in 1985, She appeared with another professional wrestler, a Mr. Terry" Hulk" Hogan, who played her "bodyguard." "'The Grammy means a lot to me,' said Cyndi (in the arms of Hulk Hogan) after winning Best New Artist, 'Because I never thought I would amount to anything. I always wanted to make art.'" She would later make many appearances as herself in a number of the World Wrestling Federation's "Rock 'n' Wrestling Connection" events and played Wendi Richter's manager in the very first WrestleMania event. Dave Wolff, Lauper's boyfriend and manager at the time, was a wrestling fan as a boy and helped set up the rock and wrestling connection.   In 1985, Cyndi released the single "The Goonies' R' Good Enough," from the soundtrack to the movie The Goonies and an accompanying video that featured several wrestling stars. The song reached number 10 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.   She then received two nominations at the 1986 Grammy Awards: Best Female Rock Vocal Performance for "What a Thrill" and Best Long Form Music Video for Cyndi Lauper in Paris.   Cyndi released her second album, "True Colors," in 1986. It entered the Billboard 200 at No. 42 and has sold roughly 7 million copies.   In 1986, She appeared on the Billy Joel album The Bridge, with a song called "Code of Silence." She is credited with having written the lyrics with Joel, and she sings a duet with him. In the same year, Cyndi also sang the theme song for Pee-wee's Playhouse, credited as "Ellen Shaw." In 1987, David Wolff produced a concert film called Cyndi Lauper in Paris. The concert was broadcast on HBO.   Cyndi made her film debut in August 1988 in the comedy Vibes, alongside a nobody named Jeff Goldblum, Peter Falk, and Julian Sands. She played a psychic in search of a city of gold in South America. To prepare for the role, Cyndi took a few finger-waving and hair-setting classes at the Robert Fiancé School of Beauty in New York and studied with a few Manhattan psychics. The film flopped and was poorly received by critics but would later be considered a cult classic.   Cyndi then contributed a track called "Hole in My Heart (All the Way to China)" for the Vibes soundtrack, but the song was not included. Instead, a high-energy, comic action/adventure romp through a Chinese laundry video for the song was released. The song reached No. 54 on the U.S. charts, but did way better in Australia, reaching No. 8. Cyndi's third album, A Night to Remember, was released in 1989. The album had one hit, the No. 6 single "I Drove All Night," originally recorded by Roy Orbison, three years before his death on December 6, 1988. Cyndi received a Grammy nomination for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance at the 1990 Grammy Awards for That track. Still, overall, album sales for the album were down. A side note; The music video for the song "My First Night Without You" was one of the first to be closed-captioned for the hearing impaired. That record sold around 1.3 million copies.   Due to her friendship with a familiar name here at Icons and Outlaws, Yoko Ono, Cyndi was a part of the May 1990 John Lennon tribute concert in Liverpool. She performed the Beatles song "Hey Bulldog" and the John Lennon song "Working Class Hero." She was also involved in Sean Lennon's project, "The Peace Choir, "performing a new version of John Lennon's "Give Peace a Chance."   Shortly after, the album was met with a dismal response, and she split with her boyfriend and manager, David Wolff. Cyndi lived alone in a New York hotel, emotionally drained and considering suicide. "I had come so far but felt like I had failed," she wrote in Cyndi Lauper: A Memoir (via Bullyville). "I would go to the studio, and then sit in my dark room and drink vodka. I had to spend most of my time alone. I was grieving. I thought the sadness would never go away." Indirectly, it was Cyndi's best-known song that encouraged her to try to crawl out of her low place: "The only thing that always ­prevented me from suicide is that I never wanted a headline to read, 'Girl who wanted to have fun just didn't.'" On November 24, 1991, Cyndi married actor David Thornton, who's been in home alone 3, John Q with Denzel, and that god-awful tear-jerker, the Notebook.   Cyndi's fourth album, "Hat Full of Stars," was released in June 1993 and was met with critical acclaim but failed commercially, unsupported by her label. The album tackled topics like homophobia, spousal abuse, racism, and abortion, sold fewer than 120,000 copies in the United States and peaked at No. 112 on the Billboard charts. The album's song "Sally's Pigeons" video features the then-unknown Julia Stiles playing a young Cyndi. You may remember Julia from ten things I hate about you, alongside a young Heath Ledger.   In 1993, Cyndi returned to acting, playing Michael J. Fox's ditzy secretary in the movie Life with Mikey. She also won an Emmy Award for her role as Marianne Lugasso in the hugely popular sitcom Mad About You with Paul Reiser and Helen Hunt. On November 19, 1997, Cyndi gave birth to her son, Declyn Wallace Lauper Thornton, who is now a trap rapper. Her fifth album," Sisters of Avalon," was released in Japan in 1996 and worldwide in 1997. Just like "Hat Full of Stars," some songs on "Sisters of Avalon" addressed dark themes. The song "Ballad of Cleo and Joe" addressed the complications of a drag queen's double life. The song "Say a Prayer" was written for a friend who had died from AIDS. "Unhook the Stars" was used in the movie of the same name. Again without support from her label, the release failed in America, spending a week on the Billboard album chart at No. 188. This album also received much critical praise, including People magazine, which declared it "'90s nourishment for body and soul. Lauper sets a scene, makes us care, gives us hope." Let's just say it… her label sucks!   On January 17, 1999, Cyndi appeared as an animated version of herself in The Simpsons episode "Wild Barts Can't Be Broken." She sang the National Anthem to the "Girls Just Want to Have Fun" melody. That same year, she opened for Cher's Do You Believe? Tour alongside Wild Orchid. Yeah, that group with a young Fergie. Cyndi also appeared in the films "Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle" and The "Opportunists." In addition, she contributed to the soundtrack of the 2000 animated film, Rugrats in Paris: The Movie, performing the song "I Want a Mom That Will Last Forever." On October 12, 2000, Cyndi took part in the television show Women in Rock, Girls with Guitars performing with Ann Wilson of Heart and with the girl group Destiny's Child and the queen B herself!. A CD of the songs performed was released exclusively to Sears stores from September 30 to October 31, 2001, and was marketed as a fundraiser for breast cancer.   In 2002, Sony issued a best-of CD, The Essential Cyndi Lauper. Cyndi also released a cover album with Sony/Epic Records entitled At Last (formerly Naked City), which was released in 2003. At Last received one nomination at the 2005 Grammy Awards: Best Instrumental Arrangement Accompanying Vocalist(s) for "Unchained Melody." The effort was also a commercial hit, selling 4.5 million records.    In April 2004, Cyndi performed during the VH1's benefit concert, "Divas Live" 2004, alongside Ashanti, Gladys Knight, Jessica Simpson, Joss Stone, and Patti LaBelle. This event supported the Save the Music Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to restoring instrumental music education in America's public schools and raising awareness about the importance of music as part of each child's complete education. She made appearances on Showtime's hit show "Queer as Folk" in 2005, directed a commercial for the Totally 80s edition of the board game Trivial Pursuit in 2006, served as a judge on the 6th Annual Independent Music Awards, and made her Broadway debut in the Tony-nominated "The Threepenny Opera" playing "Jenny." In addition, she performed with Shaggy, Scott Weiland of Velvet Revolver/Stone Temple Pilots, Pat Monahan of Train, Ani DiFranco, and The Hooters in the VH1 Classics special Decades Rock Live. In 2006, she sang "Message To Michael" with Dionne Warwick and "Beecharmer" with Nellie McKay on McKay's Pretty Little Head album.   On October 16, 2006, Cyndi was inducted into the Long Island Music Hall of Fame. In 2007, she served as a guest performer on the song "Lady in Pink" on an episode of the Nick Jr. show, The Backyardigans. Cyndi's sixth studio album, "Bring Ya to the Brink," was released in the United States on May 27, 2008. Regarded as one of her best works when it was released, the Songwriters Hall of Fame has regarded the album track 'High and Mighty' as one of her essential songs. The album would be Cyndi's last release to date of original material, in addition to being her last for Epic Records, her label since her 1983 debut solo album. The album debuted at #41 on the Billboard 200, with 12,000 copies sold. Other projects for 2008 included the True Colors Tour and a Christmas duet with Swedish band The Hives, entitled "A Christmas Duel." The song was released as a CD single and a 7" vinyl in Sweden. Lauper also performed on "Girls Night Out," headlining it with Rosie O'Donnell in the U.S.   On November 17, 2009, Cyndi performed with Wyclef Jean in a collaboration called "Slumdog Millionaire," on The Late Show with David Letterman. In January 2010, Mattel released a Cyndi Lauper Barbie doll as part of their "Ladies of the 80s" series.   In March 2010, Cyndi appeared on NBC's The Celebrity Apprentice with the then-future president, Donald Trump, coming in sixth place.   Cyndi's 7th studio album, Memphis Blues, was released on June 22, 2010, and debuted on the Billboard Blues Albums chart at No. 1 and at No. 26 on the Billboard Top 200. The album remained No. 1 on the Blues Albums chart for 14 consecutive weeks; Memphis Blues was nominated for Best Traditional Blues Album at the 2011 Grammy Awards. According to the Brazilian daily newspaper O Globo, the album had sold 600,000 copies worldwide by November 2010. In addition, Cyndi set out on her most extensive tour ever, the Memphis Blues Tour, which had more than 140 shows, to support the album.   Cyndi made international news in March 2011 for an impromptu performance of "Girls Just Want to Have Fun" while waiting for a delayed flight at Aeroparque Jorge Newbery in Buenos Aires. A video was later posted on YouTube.   In November 2011, she released two Christmas singles exclusive to iTunes. The first release was a Blues-inspired cover of Elvis Presley's classic "Blue Christmas," and the second was a new version of "Home for the holidays," a duet with Norah Jones. In June 2012, Lauper made her first appearance for WWE in 27 years to promote WWE Raw's 1000th episode to memorialize "Captain" Lou Albano.   In September 2012, Cyndi performed at fashion designer Betsey Johnson's 40-year Retrospective Fashion show. She also released a New York Times best-selling memoir, "Cyndi Lauper A Memoir," which detailed her struggle with child abuse and depression.   Cyndi then composed music and lyrics for the Broadway musical Kinky Boots, with Harvey Fierstein writing the book. The musical was based on the 2006 independent film Kinky Boots. The musical tells the story of Charlie Price. Having inherited a shoe factory from his father, Charlie forms an unlikely partnership with cabaret performer and drag queen Lola to produce a line of high-heeled boots and save the business. It opened in Chicago in October 2012 and on Broadway at the Al Hirschfeld Theatre on April 4, 2013. She won Best Score for Kinky Boots in May at the 63rd annual Outer Critics Circle Awards. The musical led the 2013 Tony Awards, with 13 nominations and six wins, including Best Musical and Best Actor. In addition, she won the award for Best Original Score. Cyndi was the first woman to win solo in this category. After a six-year run and 2,507 regular shows, Kinky Boots ended its Broadway run on April 7, 2019. It is the 25th-longest-running Broadway musical in history. It grossed $297 million on Broadway.    In the summer of 2013, celebrating the 30th anniversary of her debut album "She's So Unusual," Cyndi embarked on an international tour covering America and Australia. The show consisted of a mix of fan favorites and the entirety of the She's So Unusual record.  She stated:"  It's been such an amazing year for me. When I realized it's also the anniversary of the album that started my solo career, I knew it was the perfect time to thank my fans for sticking with me through it all. I'm so excited to perform She's So Unusual from beginning to end, song by song and I can't wait to see everyone!" The tourtour grossed over $1 million   She was a guest on 36 dates of Cher's Dressed to Kill tour, starting April 23, 2014. In addition, a new album was confirmed by her in a website interview.   Cyndi hosted the Grammy Pre-Telecast at the Nokia Theatre, L.A., on January 26,  later accepting a Grammy for Kinky Boots (for Best Musical Theater Album).   On April 1 (March 1 in Europe), Cyndi released the 30th Anniversary edition of She's So Unusual through Epic Records. It featured a remastered version of the original album plus three new remixes. The Deluxe Edition featured bonus tracks such as demos, a live recording, and a 3D cut-out of the bedroom featured in the 'Girls Just Want to Have Fun' music video with a reusable sticker set.   On September 17, 2014, Cyndi sang on the finale of America's Got Talent. Then, on September 25, as part of the Today Show's "Shine a Light" series, she re-recorded "True Colors" in a mashup with Sara Bareilles' "Brave" to raise awareness and money for children battling cancer. By October, the project had raised over $300,000.   The Songwriters Hall of Fame added Cyndi to its nomination list in October 2014. Also, her fourth consecutive 'Home for the Holidays' benefit concert for homeless gay youth was announced in October. Acts included 50 Cent and Laverne Cox, with 100% of the net proceeds going to True Colors United. In July 2015, She announced a project with producer Seymour Stein. She later told Rolling Stone it was a country album co-produced by Tony Brown.   On September 15, 2015, Kinky Boots opened at the Adelphi Theatre in London's West End.   In January 2016, Cyndi announced she would release a new album on May 6, 2016. This record was made up of her interpretations of early country classics entitled "Detour." The announcement was supported by a release of her version of Harlan Howard's "Heartaches by the Number" and a performance on Skyville Live with Kelsea Ballerini and Ingrid Michaelson. Then, on February 17, 2016, she released her version of Wanda Jackson's "Funnel of Love."   In February 2016, Cyndi was nominated for an Olivier Award for contributing to the U.K. production of the play "Kinky Boots" along with Stephen Oremus, the man in charge of the arrangements. In January 2017, this production's album was nominated for the Grammy Award for Best Musical Theater Album.   In May 2016, she was featured on "Swipe to the Right" from Electronica 2: The Heart of Noise by French producer Jean-Michel Jarre. This second album of the Electronica project is based on collaborations with artists like Tangerine Dream, Moby, Pet Shop Boys, and more.   In October 2016, her son Dex Lauper was the opening act for her in Scottsdale, Arizona, and Las Vegas, Nevada, for her dates on her Detour Tour.   In January 2017, Cyndi was featured on Austin City Limits' 42nd season, performing some classic bangers alongside some of her country tunes from the "Detour." album. The episode aired on PBS.   In March 2018, it was announced that Cyndi and co- "Time After Time" songwriter Rob Hyman would compose the score for the musical version of the 1988 film "Working Girl." Ya know the movie that starred Melanie Griffith and Sigourney Weaver. She teamed up with Hyman because she wanted "the music to sound like the 80s". The musical would be staged by Tony Award winner Christopher Ashley. A developmental production premiere of the musical is planned for the 2021/2022 season.   For Grandin Road, Cyndi exclusively designed her own Christmas collection, 'Cyndi Lauper Loves Christmas', available from September 2018. "I've always loved Christmas. It reminds me to find some happiness in the little things," she said.   Her annual Home For The Holidays concert at the Beacon Theatre in New York was held on December 8, 2018.   Cyndi guest starred, playing a lawyer in an episode of the reboot of the television series Magnum P.I.. The episode, titled "Sudden Death", aired on October 22, 2018.   On November 15, 2018, iBillboard announced that Cyndi would receive the Icon Award at the Billboard's 13th annual Women in Music Event on December 6 in New York City. According to Billboard's editorial director, Jason Lipshutz, "The entire world recognizes the power of Cyndi Lauper's pop music, and just as crucially, she has used her undeniable talent to soar beyond music, create positive change in modern society and become a true icon."    The song "Together" was featured in the Canadian computer-animated film Race time, released in January 2019. Originally written and performed in French by Dumas, Cyndi performed the English translation in the English version of the film initially titled La Course des tuques.   On June 26, 2019, she performed at the opening ceremony of Stonewall 50 – WorldPride NYC 2019. Backed by the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra, Cyndi played two concerts on July 12 and 13, 2019, at the iconic Hollywood Bowl.   In September 2019, it was announced that Cyndi would star alongside Jane Lynch in the new Netflix comedy series described as "kind of The Golden Girls for today." However, as of March 2021, there have been no updates on this project. On April 23, 2020, Cyndi participated in an online fundraising concert to raise money for LGBTQ nightlife workers who struggled financially because of the coronavirus pandemic. Her finale was her performing "True Colors." The show was initiated by the Stonewall Inn Gives Back nonprofit organization of the historic Greenwich Village gay bar.    In November 2020, She dueted with former top ten "American Idol" finalist Casey Abrams on a cover version of the song 'Eve of Destruction.   In November last year, Shea Diamond featured Cyndi as a guest vocalist on the track 'Blame it on Christmas.' An official video was released in December.   She then performed at this year's MusiCares Person of the Year Tribute Show, honoring folk icon Joni Mitchell on April 1.   It was announced in May this year that Alison Ellwood will direct a career retrospective documentary about Cyndi. The project is already in production but does not yet have a release date. "Let The Canary Sing" will be the title of this career-spanning documentary produced by Sony Music Entertainment.   Still killing it after all these years!   "Shes So Unusual" ranked No. 487 on Rolling Stone's list of 500 Greatest Albums of All Time in 2003. In addition, the album ranked No. 41 on Rolling Stone's Women Who Rock: The 50 Greatest Albums of All Time in 2012.   "Time After Time" has been covered by over a hundred artists and was ranked at No. 22 on Rolling Stone's 100 Best Songs of the Past 25 Years and at No. 19 on VH1's 100 Greatest Songs of the 80s.   "She Bop," the third single from She's So Unusual, is the first and only top ten song to directly mention a gay porn magazine. An ode to masturbation, it was included in the PMRC's "Filthy Fifteen" list, which led to the parental advisory sticker appearing on recordings thought to be unsuitable for young listeners. Rolling Stone ranked it the 36th best song of 1984, praising its unusual playfulness regarding sexuality.   "True Colors" is now considered a gay anthem, after which True Colors United, which advocates for runaway and homeless LGBT youth, is so “colorfully” named.   Info used from: Nickiswift.com Wikipedia.com

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Jess Finesse Presents
Jess Finesse Presents; Kah-Lo

Jess Finesse Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 89:58


Joining us this week is the Grammy award winning Queen of party anthems - Kah-lo! In this episode, we compare nightlife in Lagos and New York, talk about her deal with Epic Records, the culture of bootleg remixes and older artists selling their catalog.If you enjoyed this episode (like we're sure you would), don't forget to rate us and share - That way, even more people can enjoy the podcast as well! Follow us on Instagram: @JessFinessePresents @JessJessFinesse

Classic 45's Jukebox
One Girl Too Late by Brenda & the Tabulations

Classic 45's Jukebox

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022


Label: Epic 10954Year: 1973Condition: M-Last Price: $20.00. Not currently available for sale.Here's another terrific, rarely heard Van McCoy production. Note: This beautiful copy comes in a vintage Epic Records factory sleeve. Its labels are Mint except for the tiny "x" inked on the A label (see scan). Although the vinyl (styrene) grades below Near Mint, reflecting some light scuffing, the A side audio sounds pristine Mint!

Was It Chance?
#17 - Morgan James: From Broadway to Indie Artist Superstar

Was It Chance?

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 67:57


This week we welcome the brilliant Morgan James to the show. Morgan is a singer/songwriter with a set of pipes that can blow the roof off of any house she's performing in. She made her Broadway debut in The Addams Family, nabbed a few other Broadway credits including Godspell and Motown the Musical, and signed with Epic Records before deciding to take her creative destiny into her own creative hands. Morgan takes a completely unique approach to producing her own albums with the direct support of her fans.  She frequently collaborates with Postmodern Jukebox, has her own comedy podcast called Gettin' Peggy Wit It where she roasts her Broadway friends, and has just released a new EP called “Jesus Christ Superstar: Highlights From the All-Female Studio Cast Recording,” which completes the She Is Risen series of EPs. And when we say all women, we mean down to the interns, production staff, and everyone else! Morgan shared that working with an all-female crew was a first for everyone and it was the reason many women signed onto the project.  Morgan has a truly unique approach to creating that always includes her fans. Be sure to follow her on all the socials: Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, and of course get all the details on her website. Make sure to follow this podcast everywhere you find podcasts, leave a rating and a review, and slip into our Instagram DMs at @wasitchance. More about Heather via @vickeryandco on Instagram, @Braveheather on TikTok, and listen to The Brave Files More about Alan via @theatre_podcast on Instagram and listen to The Theatre Podcast with Alan Seales EPISODE TAKEAWAYS Everything has shaped me. Everything has led to where I am.  I look back and thank all of the things that didn't work out.  You don't always have to “know how.” Just start, you'll figure it out.  You never know who's listening and watching you. Be prepared. And always do your best.  Sometimes you can get “in” via a different opening. The door isn't always open. Don't let that stop you.  Go out on the limb. Have faith. Put yourself out there.  Sometimes passing dreams can become real things. Listen to your subconscious.  Cut through the bullshit and create your own path. Use others as inspiration but don't try to follow their path - you can't have their path. It's already taken.  When your biggest fear comes true, you realize you can and will achieve anyway. Just don't quit.  Allow life to humble you.  Get to know the process of your passions.  Keep creating. Always creating. Don't worry about it being “good.” Just show up! Perfection gets in the way. Don't chase it.  Be real. Show real. That's what folks desire most from any creator.  If you're lucky, your dreams evolve. You're never finished! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Icons and Outlaws
Michael Jackson Part 1 of 2

Icons and Outlaws

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 65:35


The future king of pop, Michael Joseph Jackson, was born on August 29, 1958 in Gary, Indiana.   Joe Jackson, Michael's dad, was a former boxer and crane operator at U.S. Steel during the 1950s in Gary – according to a fantastic article by Rolling Stone, quoted in the book; Dave Marsh's Trapped: Michael Jackson and the Crossover Dream, there were actual quotas in place on how many black workers were allowed to move up the ladder into skilled trades in the city's mills. This idiocy meant black workers were paid less than white workers. Unfortunately, this also meant they were subject to higher rates of fatal industry-related illnesses – but Papa Joe hoped that music would lift his life. Michael's mother, Katherine Scruse, was from Alabama but lived in East Chicago, Indiana when she met Joe. Momma Katherine played clarinet and piano, had dreams of being a country-and-western performer, worked part-time at Sears, and was a Jehovah's Witness. She grew up listening to country & western music, and even though she had a dream to be a musician, she was stricken with a bout of polio that had left her with an unfortunate and permanent limp. Papa Joe and Momma Katherine were young when they married in 1949 and started on the idea of a big ol family. The first of the bunch was Maureen (aka Rebbie) in 1950, then Sigmund (aka Jackie) in 1951, Toriano (Tito) followed up in 1953, Jermaine in 1954, La Toya in 1956, Marlon in 1957. Then there came Michael in 1958, Randy in 1961, and little baby Janet in 1966, making her 16 years younger than Rebbie. Marlon was actually a twin but their brother, Brandon, died shortly after birth.   M.J. and his cluster of brothers and sisters constantly had music around them. Papa Joe was super into the new electric R&B sound tearing up Chicago, which wasn't far away, not to mention the beginning stages of early rock & roll. So Papa Joe formed a band with his brothers called "the Falcons," making some extra coin in the surrounding area at parties and small clubs. In his 1988 autobiography, Moonwalk, Michael wrote, "They would do some of the great early rock & roll and blues songs by Chuck Berry, Little Richard … you name it," Going on to say, "All those styles were amazing, and each had an influence on … us, though we were too young to know it at the time."   The Falcons eventually broke up, and Papa Joe put down his guitar and hid it in his bedroom closet. He wouldn't let anyone near it, let alone touch it, giving us insight into his control over the household. Regardless of Papa Joe's musical dismay, Momma Katherine taught her flock of kiddies how to harmonize while listening to her favorite country/western songs. Tito, just like daddy, was drawn to music and one day thought it was a bright idea to snag Papa Joe's precious guitar from the closet and take it to practice with his brothers. Well, guess what? He broke a string. Michael later said Joe whipped Tito for the infraction and, "he let him have it,." After the whoopin', Papa Joe told Tito to show him what he could do on the guitar. Well, Papa joe was floored. Tito impressed the crap out of him.   Is it possible that at that very moment, Papa Joe's lightbulb blew a breaker and saw his musical dreams come to fruition vicariously through his kids? First, he bought Tito his own guitar and taught him some Ray Charles music, then he got Jermaine a bass. Soon he was working all his sons into an ensemble. So, I'm going to say yes, the breaker blew. Papa Joe loved the blues, but he appreciated that his kids liked the new R&B – Motown and soul – and more than likely saw dollar signs every time they mentioned it. Joe wanted Jermaine to be the lead singer with Jackie and Tito, and Michael and Marlon playing the tambourine and congas. Michael has said that his father told him he had a "fat nose" (just a little foreshadowing here) and abused him during rehearsals. Michael recalled that Joe often sat in a chair with a belt in his hand as his children rehearsed, ready to punish any mistakes. Joe acknowledged that he regularly whipped Michael. Katherine said that although whipping came to be considered abuse, it was a common way to discipline children when Michael was growing up. Jackie, Tito, Jermaine, and Marlon have said that their father wasn't abusive and that the whippings, which were harder on Michael because he was younger, kept them disciplined and out of trouble. Michael said his childhood was lonely and isolated.   At just four years old, Momma Katherine saw Michael singing along to a James Brown song, and she saw – in both his voice and moves – he was already better than his older brother. So she told Joe, "I think we have another lead singer." Katherine would later say that sometimes Michael's precocious abilities frightened her – she probably saw that his childhood might give way to stardom – but she also noticed that there was something undeniable about his young voice. Michael was also a natural entertainer. He absolutely loved singing and dancing, and because he was so young, the choice was clear, Michael was young, AND Michael was BAD. Get it? No? He was fantastic, OK?   Joe Jackson was good at what he did. "He knew exactly what I had to do to become a professional," Michael later said. "He taught me exactly how to hold a mic, make gestures to the crowd, and handle an audience." But by Joe's own admission, he was also unrelenting. "When I found out that my kids were interested in becoming entertainers, I really went to work with them," he told the time in 1984. "I rehearsed them about three years before I turned them loose. That's practically every day, for at least two or three hours. … They got a little upset about the whole thing in the beginning because the other kids were out having a good time. … Then I saw that after they became better, they enjoyed it more." That isn't always how Michael remembered it. "We'd perform for him, and he'd critique us," he wrote in Moonwalk. "If you messed up, you got hit, sometimes with a belt, sometimes with a switch. … I'd get beaten for things that happened mostly outside rehearsal. Dad would make me so mad and hurt that I'd try to get back at him and get beaten all the more. I'd take a shoe and throw it at him, or I'd just fight back, swinging my fists. That's why I got it more than all my brothers combined. I'd fight back, and my father would kill me, just tear me up." Those moments – and probably many more – created a loss that Jackson never got over. He was essential to the family's music-making, but there was no other bond between father and son. Again, from Moonwalk: "One of the few things I regret most is never being able to have a real closeness with him. He built a shell around himself over the years, and once he stopped talking about our family business, he found it hard to relate to us. We'd all be together, and he'd just leave the room."   Around 1964, Joe began entering the Jackson brothers in talent contests, many of which they handily won. Michael started sharing lead vocals with Jermaine, and the group's name was changed to the Jackson 5. In 1965, the group won a talent show; Michael performed the dance to Robert Parker's 1965 song "Barefootin'" and sang the Temptations' "My Girl." From 1966 to 1968, the Jackson 5 toured the Midwest; they frequently played at a string of black clubs known as the Chitlin' Circuit as the opening act for artists such as Sam & Dave, the O'Jays, Gladys Knight, and Etta James. Oh, and James Brown. No one was as important to Michael as James Brown.  "I knew every step, every grunt, every spin and turn," he recalled. "He would give a performance that would exhaust you, just wear you out emotionally. His whole physical presence, the fire coming out of his pores, would be phenomenal. You'd feel every bead of sweat on his face, and you'd know what he was going through….You couldn't teach a person what I've learned just standing and watching." The chitlin circuit was a collection of performance venues throughout the eastern, southern, and upper Midwest areas of the United States that provided commercial and cultural acceptance for African American musicians, comedians, and other entertainers during the era of racial segregation in the United States through the 1960s. The Jackson 5 also performed at clubs and cocktail lounges, where striptease shows were featured, and local auditoriums and high school dances. In August 1967, while touring the East Coast, they won a weekly amateur night concert at the Apollo Theater in Harlem, NY.   "At first, I told myself they were just kids," Joe said in 1971. "I soon realized they were very professional. There was nothing to wait for. The boys were ready for stage training, and I ran out of reasons to keep them from the school of hard knocks." So in 1966, he booked his sons into Gary's black nightclubs and some in Chicago. Many of the clubs served alcohol and several featured strippers. "This is quite a life for a nine-year-old," Katherine would remind her husband, but Joe was undaunted. "I used to stand in the wings of this one place in Chicago and watch a lady whose name was Mary Rose," Michael recalled. "This girl would take off her clothes and panties and throw them to the audience. The men would pick them up and sniff them and yell. My brothers and I would be watching all this, taking it in, and my father wouldn't mind." Sam Moore of Sam and Dave recalled Joe locking Michael – who was maybe 10 years old – in a dressing room while Joe went off on his own adventures. Michael sat alone for hours. He also later recalled having to go onstage even if he'd been sick in bed that day.   On those tours, the most famous place was the Apollo in New York, where the Jackson 5 won an Amateur Night show in 1967. Joe had invested everything he had in his sons' success, though any accurate recognition or profit would also be his success. While on the circuit, Joe had known Gladys Knight, who was enjoying a string of small wins with Motown, America's pre-eminent black pop label. With the encouragement of both Knight and Motown R&B star Bobby Taylor, of Bobby Taylor and the Vancouvers, Joe took his sons to Detroit to audition for the label after they opened for Taylor at Chicago's Regal Theater in 1968. Taylor produced some of their early Motown recordings, including a version of "Who's Lovin' You."   In 1969, Motown moved the Jackson family to Los Angeles, set them up at the homes of Diana Ross and the label's owner, Berry Gordy, and began grooming them. Finally, Motown executives decided Ms. Ross should introduce the Jackson 5 to the public. Michael remembered Gordy telling them, "I'm gonna make you the biggest thing in the world. … Your first record will be a number one, your second record will be a number one, and so will your third record. Three number-one records in a row."  In 1959, Gordy founded Tamla Records – which soon became known as Motown – in Detroit. By the time he signed the Jackson 5, Motown had long enjoyed its status as the most essential black-owned and -operated record label in America, spawning the successes of Smokey Robinson and the Miracles, the Temptations, Mary Wells, the Four Tops, and Diana Ross and the Supremes, among others. Unlike Stax and Atlantic, Motown's soul wasn't incredibly bluesy or gritty, nor was it music that spoke explicitly to social matters or to the black struggle in the U.S. By its nature, the label exemplified black achievement. Still, its music was made to be consumed by the pop mainstream – which of course, meant a white audience as much as a black one (the label's early records bore the legend "The Sound of Young America"). At the time, rock music was exceedingly becoming a medium for full-length albums. However, Motown maintained its identity as a label that manufactured hit singles, despite groundbreaking albums by Stevie Wonder and Marvin Gaye. Gordy was looking for a singles-oriented group to deliver hits for young people and give them somebody to identify as their own and admire. The Jackson 5, Gordy said, would exemplify "bubblegum soul." The Jackson 5 made their first television appearance in 1969 in the Miss Black America pageant, performing a cover of "It's Your Thing." Rolling Stone later described the young Michael as "a prodigy" with "overwhelming musical gifts" who "quickly emerged as the main draw and lead singer."   The Jackson 5's first three singles – "I Want You Back," "ABC" and "The Love You Save" – became Number One hits as Gordy had promised, and so did a fourth, "I'll Be There." "I Want You Back" became the first Jackson 5 song to reach number one on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100; it stayed there for four weeks. It was originally written for Gladys Knight and The Pips and Diana Ross. The group was established as the breakout sensation of 1970. Fred Rice, who would create Jackson 5 merchandise for Motown, said, "I call 'em the black Beatles. … It's unbelievable." And he was right. The Jackson 5 defined the transition from 1960s soul to 1970s pop as much as Sly and the Family Stone. When many Americans were uneasy about minority aspirations to power, the Jackson 5 displayed an agreeable ideal of black pride, reflecting kinship and aspiration rather than opposition. Moreover, they represented a realization that the civil rights movement made possible, which couldn't have happened even five or six years earlier. Not to mention, the Jackson 5 earned the respect of the critics. Reviewing "I Want You Back" in Rolling Stone, Jon Landau wrote, "The arrangement, energy and simple spacing of the rhythm all contribute to the record's spellbinding impact." Yes, we all they were a fantastic group. However, there was no question about who the Jackson 5's true star was and who they depended on. Michael's voice also worked beyond conventional notions of male-soul vocals – it surpassed genders. Cultural critic and musician Jason King wrote, "It is not an exaggeration to say that he was the most advanced popular singer of his age in the history of recorded music. His untrained tenor was uncanny. By all rights, he shouldn't have had as much vocal authority as he did at such a young age." In May 1971, the Jackson family moved into a large house on a two-acre estate in Encino, California. Michael turned from a child performer into a heart-throbbing teen idol during this period.   Michael and his brothers seemed like they were everywhere for at least the first few years and enjoyed the praise of the masses. But soon, they experienced some problematic limitations. The music they were making wasn't really of invention – they didn't write or produce it – and after Michael was relegated to recording throwback tunes like "Rockin' Robin," in 1972, he worried that the Jackson 5 would become an "oldies act" before he left adolescence.    Michael released four solo studio albums with Motown: Got to Be There (1972), Ben (1972), Music & Me (1973), and Forever, Michael(1975). "Got to Be There" and "Ben," the title tracks from his first two solo albums, sold well as singles, as did a cover of the aforementioned, Bobby Day's "Rockin' Robin."   They were frustrated by Motown's refusal to give creative input, so The Jackson 5 started producing themselves and creating their own sound. When given creative leeway, Stevie Wonder and Marvin Gaye showed the ability to grow and change – and sell records. And with 1974's "Dancing Machine," the Jacksons proved they could thrive when they tackled a funk groove and brought the robot dance into popularity. Motown, however, wouldn't consider it. "They not only refused to grant our requests," Michael said in Moonwalk, "they told us it was taboo to even mention that we wanted to do our own music." Michael understood this: Motown would not let the Jackson 5 grow. But unfortunately, they also wouldn't let him grow as an artist. So Michael waited, studying the producers he and his brothers worked with. "I was like a hawk preying in the night," he said. "I'd watch everything. They didn't get away with nothing without me seeing. I really wanted to get into it."   In 1975, The Jackson 5 left Motown, and Joe Jackson negotiated a new deal for his sons with Epic Records for a 500 percent royalty-rate increase and renamed themselves the Jacksons, with younger brother Randy joining the band around this time. The contract also stipulated solo albums from the Jacksons (though the arrangement did not include Jermaine, who married Gordy's daughter Hazel and stayed with Motown, creating a rift with the family that lasted for several years). Motown tried to block the deal and stopped the brothers from using the Jackson 5 name. Instead, epic initially placed them with Philadelphia producers Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff. Still, it wouldn't be until 1978's "Destiny" that the Jacksons, with Michael as their primary songwriter, finally took control over their music and rebranded their sound with the dance-tastic hits "Blame It on the Boogie" and "Shake Your Body (Down to the Ground)," while bringing a newly found emotional embellishment in songs like "Push Me Away" and "Bless His Soul." Destiny, however, was just the start. After that, Michael was ready to make significant changes to establish his dominance as a solo artist.    In 1977, Michael moved to New York City to star as the Scarecrow in The Wiz. It costarred Diana Ross, Nipsey Russell, and Ted Ross. The movie was a box-office failure but has gained significant traction as a cult classic. Its score was arranged by a gentleman named Quincy Jones, who later produced three of Michael's solo albums. In New York, Jackson often hung out at the Studio 54 nightclub, where he discovered early hip hop; this influenced his beatboxing on future tracks such as "Working Day and Night." In 1978, Jackson broke his nose during a dance routine. A rhinoplasty led to breathing difficulties that later affected his career.    During this time, he fired his father as his manager and found himself a new father figure, that guy Quincy Jones. Jones was a respected jazz musician, bandleader, composer, and arranger who had worked with Clifford Brown, Frank Sinatra, Lesley Gore, Count Basie, Aretha Franklin, and Paul Simon. In addition, he wrote the film scores for The Pawnbroker, In Cold Blood, and In the Heat of the Night.    Michael liked Quincy's ear for mixing complex hard beats with soft overlayers. "It was the first time that I fully wrote and produced my songs," Jackson said later, "and I was looking for somebody who would give me that freedom, plus somebody who's unlimited musically." Specifically, Michael said his solo album had to sound different than the Jacksons; he wanted a cleaner and funkier sound. These two getting together was history in the making. Quincy brought an ethereal buoyancy to Michael's 5th solo album, Off the Wall, and his soft erotic fever on songs like "Rock With You" and "Don't Stop' Til You Get Enough," and in a fantastic moment like "She's Out of My Life," Where Quincy pulled out and left the intense heartbreak in Michael's voice. The tears in She's Out of My Life are real. Jackson would break down in tears at the end of each studio take. "We recorded about - I don't know - 8 to 11 takes, and every one at the end, he just cried," producer Quincy Jones said. "I said, 'Hey - that's supposed to be, leave it on there.'" The resulting album was a massive hit, selling more than 5 million copies in the U.S. alone by 1985 and producing four top ten singles. It reached number 3 on the Billboard 200 and sold more than 20 million copies worldwide. “Don't Stop Til You Get Enough” was solely written by Michael. He decided to write the song after constantly humming the melody at home.   Michael won three American Music Awards for his solo work in 1980: Favorite Soul/R&B Album, Favorite Soul/R&B Male Artist, and Favorite Soul/R&B Single for "Don't Stop 'Til You Get Enough." He also won a Grammy Award for Best Male R&B Vocal Performance for "Don't Stop 'Til You Get Enough." However, he thought he should have taken away more.  The Doobie Brothers' "What a Fool Believes" won Record of the Year, and Billy Joel's 52nd Street won Album of the Year. Michael was stunned and kind of bitter. "My family thought I was going crazy because I was weeping so much about it," he later said. "I felt ignored and it hurt. I said to myself, 'Wait until next time' – they won't be able to ignore the next album. … That experience lit a fire in my soul."  Michael told Quincy and others that his next album wouldn't simply be more immense than "Off the Wall," it would be the biggest album ever. Man, he wasn't lying.   In 1981, Michael was the American Music Awards winner for Favorite Soul/R&B Album and Favorite Soul/R&B Male Artist. In 1980, he secured the highest royalty rate in the music industry: 37 percent of wholesale album profit.   So what are royalties, you may ask? Music royalties are compensation payments received by songwriters, composers, recording artists, and their respective representatives in exchange for the licensed use of their music.   Michael recorded with Freddie Mercury, the star-studded frontman of future Icons Queen, from 1981 to 1983, recording demos of "State of Shock," "Victory," and "There Must Be More to Life Than This." The recordings were supposed to be for an album of duets, but, according to Queen's manager Jim Beach, the relationship went to crap when Jackson brought a llama into the recording studio. Yes, a llama. Also, Michael was upset by Mercury's drug use. But yet... a llama.  Luckily, those songs were released in 2014. Michael recorded "State of Shock" with Mick Jagger for the Jacksons' album Victory (1984), the fifteenth studio album by the Jacksons. The album was the only album to include all six Jackson brothers together as an official group; also, it was the band's last album to be entirely recorded with Michael as lead singer. In 1982, Michael contributed "Someone in the Dark" to the audiobook for the film E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial.