Podcasts about Clapton

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Best podcasts about Clapton

Latest podcast episodes about Clapton

Word In Your Ear
Jeff Beck “had a boom-tish anecdote about every step of his life”

Word In Your Ear

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 65:12


Our old pal from Word magazine Kate Mossman adored Jeff Beck and the whole range of his recordings and interviewed him recently for the New Statesman. This pod features the outlandish techniques he developed, his cars and Afghan hounds, his “six wives”, his unchanging look (with occasion detours into “satin leggings and boxing boots”), the “Clapton is God” myth, his job offer from the Stones, falling out with the Yardbirds and the Jeff Beck Group, great musical ventures and occasional lapses of taste (like the recent tour with Johnny Depp). And our love of Hi Ho Silver Lining which he hated so much he said it was like “having a pink toilet seat hung around your neck for the rest of your life”. Plus …… the chillingly strange life of Lisa Marie Presley - “opulent neglect” - and her four marriages.… best-ever B-sides (suggested by birthday patron Roger Millington who went for ‘Paris France' by the Red Guitars). The greatest B-sides never appeared anywhere else “and were like secret messages to the hardcore fans” - eg the Stones' The Under Assistant West Coast Promotion Man and the Spider And the Fly. Honourable mentions for Yes It Is, This Boy and You Know My Name (Look Up The Number). … the White Lotus and that fabulous Jennifer Coolidge Golden Globes speech. … what would you do if you were the new Radio 3 boss? … haircut and knitwear issues in ‘the Banshees of Inisherin'. … Peter Sellers in Only Two Can Play. Plus birthday patron Paul Knox joins us with theories about impact of the Incredible String on the Beatles and the sad, mysterious tale of the disappearance of Licorice McKechnie.  Kate Mossman in the New Statesmanhttps://www.newstatesman.com/culture/music-theatre/2023/01/jeff-beck-interview-tribute-guitar-hero The Yardbirds on Shindig!https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mn6q_jcc0uo And on the Milton Berle Show, 1966https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9oNDXsIulXwGrab your EXCLUSIVE NordVPN Deal by going to https://nordvpn.com/yourear to get up a Huge Discount off your NordVPN Plan + 4 months for free! It's completely risk free with Nord's 30 day money-back guarantee! Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Word Podcast
Jeff Beck “had a boom-tish anecdote about every step of his life”

Word Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 65:12


Our old pal from Word magazine Kate Mossman adored Jeff Beck and the whole range of his recordings and interviewed him recently for the New Statesman. This pod features the outlandish techniques he developed, his cars and Afghan hounds, his “six wives”, his unchanging look (with occasion detours into “satin leggings and boxing boots”), the “Clapton is God” myth, his job offer from the Stones, falling out with the Yardbirds and the Jeff Beck Group, great musical ventures and occasional lapses of taste (like the recent tour with Johnny Depp). And our love of Hi Ho Silver Lining which he hated so much he said it was like “having a pink toilet seat hung around your neck for the rest of your life”. Plus …… the chillingly strange life of Lisa Marie Presley - “opulent neglect” - and her four marriages.… best-ever B-sides (suggested by birthday patron Roger Millington who went for ‘Paris France' by the Red Guitars). The greatest B-sides never appeared anywhere else “and were like secret messages to the hardcore fans” - eg the Stones' The Under Assistant West Coast Promotion Man and the Spider And the Fly. Honourable mentions for Yes It Is, This Boy and You Know My Name (Look Up The Number). … the White Lotus and that fabulous Jennifer Coolidge Golden Globes speech. … what would you do if you were the new Radio 3 boss? … haircut and knitwear issues in ‘the Banshees of Inisherin'. … Peter Sellers in Only Two Can Play. Plus birthday patron Paul Knox joins us with theories about impact of the Incredible String on the Beatles and the sad, mysterious tale of the disappearance of Licorice McKechnie.  Kate Mossman in the New Statesmanhttps://www.newstatesman.com/culture/music-theatre/2023/01/jeff-beck-interview-tribute-guitar-hero The Yardbirds on Shindig!https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mn6q_jcc0uo And on the Milton Berle Show, 1966https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9oNDXsIulXwGrab your EXCLUSIVE NordVPN Deal by going to https://nordvpn.com/yourear to get up a Huge Discount off your NordVPN Plan + 4 months for free! It's completely risk free with Nord's 30 day money-back guarantee! Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Tony & Dwight
Hear Thomas Howell. Lisa Marie. Kato & Clapton. Selling Songs. Howard's Flowers & Crazy Catches.

Tony & Dwight

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 28:17


UnderGRAND radio
GIVE PEACE A CHANCE by Zontag #09 - Alexander Sidney Barnes

UnderGRAND radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 59:51


U sredu od 20h samo na UG radiju slušajte emisiju GIVE PEACE A CHANCE koja je posvećena životu i radu gospodina Sidney Barnes koji je Amerikanac, ali u poslednje vreme pomalo i Novosađanin. Izvršni direktor Motown Records-a i Chess Records-a (dve najače disko kuće crne moderne muzike) hitmejker, kompozitor, lead vokal Rotary Connection. Uz George Clintona jedan od osnivača Parliament Funkadelic. Njegove pesme sem njega su izvodili Bo Didley, Jackson 5, Dianna Ross, Muddy Waters, BB King, Clapton etc....... a na kraju emisije i pesma s poslednjeg albuma u produkciju Aleksandra Belobrka, koji je producirao novi album Barnesa.

CineNation
247 - The Last Waltz (1978)

CineNation

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 100:46


"We wanted it to be a celebration." For Episode 247, Thomas and Brandon sit down to talk about Martin Scorsese's classic concert film, THE LAST WALTZ. Listen as they discuss the history of The Band and why one person in the group made it his mission to make this film.  Check out our new Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/cinenation Contact Us: Facebook: @cinenation Instagram: @cinenationpodcast Twitter: @CineNationPod TikTok: @cinenation Letterboxd: CineNation Podcast E-mail: cinenationpodcast@gmail.com

What the Riff?!?
1978 - May: U.K. "U.K."

What the Riff?!?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 40:35


The supergroup U.K. was founded by former King Crimson percussionist Bill Bruford (also a former founder of Yes) and bassist and vocalist John Wetton (also a former member of Uriah Heep, and Roxy Music).  After failing to reform King Crimson, each of the two brought in a musician they thought would work well in the group.  Wetton brought in Eddie Jobson, violinist and keyboardist from Frank Zappa's band.  Bruford brought in Allan Holdsworth on guitars (who had worked on Bruford's prior solo project.  Their self titled debut album was released in May, 1978.  Although a couple of songs were edited for single release, the album U.K. is best known as a prog rock masterpiece, and is cited as inspirational to many musicians who followed in the prog rock genre. After an extensive tour supporting the album, Wetton and Jobson had a falling out with Holdsworth and fired him.  Bill Bruford left at that time and was replaced by Terry Bozzio, another alumnus of Frank Zappa's band and a future founding member of Missing Persons.  John Wetton would go on in the days after U.K. to be the front man for Asia.Rob brings us the prog rock monster-piece.   In the Dead of NightThe track that leads off the album was one of two songs to be edited for release as a single.  On the album it is the first of three songs which form a continuous suite on the first album side.  The 7/4 time and the synthesizer - the Yamaha CS-80 had just been released - are prog rock hallmarks.  The electric violin is an unusual addition.By the Light of DayThis track is the second movement of the "In the Dead of Night" suite.  Rather than have a clear change in tracks, there is a slow transition via a "spacey" interlude into the new song of the suite.  "Black clouds moving gray skies to thunder.  Kinetic sunrise fever and flood.  Fire and water element anger horizon melting to blood."Presto Vivace and RepriseThis is the third movement of the "In the Dead of Night suite.  This is a much faster piece (as the term Vivace would suggest) before transitioning back into a reprise of "In the Dead of Night."Time to KillThe abrupt start to this song is due to the way the tracks drift into each other.  The concept is that of boredom, of being stuck in a place.  "Time to kill, going nowhere, killing time, staying where there's time to kill, going nowhere..." ENTERTAINMENT TRACK:That'll Be the Day by Buddy Holly (from the motion picture "The Buddy Holly Story") Gary Busey was nominated for the Oscar for his portrayal of early rocker Buddy Holly in this film.  Busey would sing and play for the part. STAFF PICKS:Goodbye Girl by David Gates Bruce leads off the staff picks with a soft rock solo from former Bread front man David Gates.  The song is from the Neil Simon movie "The Goodbye Girl," which would lead to Richard Dreyfuss becoming the youngest man to win an Oscar for Best Actor at the time.    Lay Down Sally by Eric Clapton  Brian presents a pop hit from Clapton's album Slowhand.  It went to number 3 on the Billboard Hot 100.  It was written by Clapton, George Terry (guitar), and Marcy Levy (who sings the female parts on the song).  It was written in the country blues style of J.J. Cale, and hit number 26 on the Hot Country Songs chart, Clapton's best showing on that chart as a crossover.Ain't It Fun by Dead BoysWayne features a song from Cleveland's own Dead Boys.  This song appears on their second studio album, "We Have Come for Your Children."  They were known as one of the rowdiest bands on the punk scene.  It hit number 8 on the Mainstream Rock charts, and is an ode to the punk rock lifestyle.With a Little Luck by WingsRob brings us Paul McCartney with a song recorded largely in the Virgin Islands on a yacht equipped with a 24-track mobile recording studio installed on it.  This single from the album "London Town" hit number 1 on the pop charts.   INSTRUMENTAL TRACK:Alaska by U.K. This instrumental lets us do some double dipping with the track that leads off side 2 of the U.K. album.

DISGRACELAND
HOLIDAY RE-RELEASE Derek and the Dominos, Clapton, Cocaine, Motorcycles, and Murder

DISGRACELAND

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 43:11 Very Popular


This is a special holiday re-release of an episode that originally dropped on December 6, 2021. In 1960s London, for young guitar enthusiasts, believing that “Clapton is God” was practically the 11th Commandment. In 1970 he lent his big, sticky tone to yet another band: Derek and the Dominos. The group's white-hot blues burned bright for barely more than a year, but their impact was massive. Guided by drug, alcohol and heartbreak free-fall, Eric Clapton created one of rock's most recognizable guitar riffs, while drummer Jim Gordon contributed God's great piano coda. Except Gordon was guided by something far more sinister — something that started with incessant voices in his head, and ended with a hammer, a butcher knife, and a dead mother. To see the full list of contributors see the show notes at www.disgracelandpod.com. This episode was previously exclusive and is now available wherever you get your podcasts. 

DISGRACELAND
HOLIDAY RE-RELEASE Derek and the Dominos, Clapton, Cocaine, Motorcycles, and Murder

DISGRACELAND

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 37:21


This is a special holiday re-release of an episode that originally dropped on December 6, 2021.In 1960s London, for young guitar enthusiasts, believing that “Clapton is God” was practically the 11th Commandment. In 1970 he lent his big, sticky tone to yet another band: Derek and the Dominos. The group's white-hot blues burned bright for barely more than a year, but their impact was massive. Guided by drug, alcohol and heartbreak free-fall, Eric Clapton created one of rock's most recognizable guitar riffs, while drummer Jim Gordon contributed God's great piano coda. Except Gordon was guided by something far more sinister — something that started with incessant voices in his head, and ended with a hammer, a butcher knife, and a dead mother.To hear all episodes of Disgraceland for free, visit amazon.com/disgraceland. Show notes are available at disgracelandpod.com. Follow us @disgracelandpod on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook for music news, bonus episodes, and more.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Music Fun Facts
Clapton Hall Of Fame

Music Fun Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 0:28


Download the Volley.FM app for more short daily shows!

Podcast El pulso de la Vida
Mateo 26 (Negación) - Ruta 66 con José de Segovia

Podcast El pulso de la Vida

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 50:21


Somos tan contradictorios que a veces, a los que más hacemos daño, son a los que más queremos y llegamos a tratar peor que a los extraños. Uno no deja de asombrarse de la facilidad con que el amor se convierte en odio tan fácilmente. Somos tan ingratos. Es por eso que Jesús hizo de su última cena, una comida en la memoria de Aquel que estaban a punto de negar y traicionar, aquellos que consideraba sus amigos. Phil Keaggy es considerado por muchos como el mejor guitarrista cristiano contemporáneo. A menudo se cita para ello, los supuestos elogios de Hendrix en un programas de televisión, Clapton o Van Halen. Keaggy no se lo cree, porque Hendrix murió dos semanas antes de que él grabara su primer disco en su estudio del Village de Nueva York en 1970. Fue el año de la conversión de Keaggy. El es cristiano evangélico, pero usa en esta canción del año 2000 la expresión "Cáliz", más propia de ámbitos sacramentalistas, para hablar de la identificación del creyente en su sufrimiento con el partimiento del pan y la copa de vino de la Mesa del Señor, que Jesús instituye en este texto del Evangelio según Mateo (26:17-29). "La Última Cena" es también el título de una sorprendente canción de Larry Norman en su primer disco para Capitol en 1969, que muestra una imaginación en la letra y una creatividad en la música, realmente impresionante. La participación en la Mesa del Señor es la identificación también del creyente con la comunidad cristiana. Su alejamiento lleva a Bono a verse como un "Acróbata" en el tema de U2 del año 91, que expresa su deseo de "unirse a un movimiento en que pudiera creer / partir el pan y beber el vino / si hay una iglesia que le reciba / porque la necesita ya mismo". Ya octogenario, Clint Eastwood ha hecho una serie de películas poco apreciadas por el gran público y menos aún por la crítica que antes la había ensalzado, pero ahora contempla con perplejidad la desnudez de sus formas. Tanto "Sully" (2016) como "15:17 Tren a París" (2018) y "Richard Jewell" (2019) están basadas en hechos reales. Muestran la tragedia de individuos que son exaltados al principio como héroes, para en el caso de Sully y Jewell, ser considerados villanos a continuación. Lo voluble de la opinión pública es tan sorprendente como la negación de Pedro (vv. 30-35; 69-75), capaz de declarar a Jesús su lealtad hasta la muerte, para decir luego que no tiene nada que ver con Él a una desconocida. Jewell fue un guardia de seguridad que descubrió una bomba durante un concierto en los Juegos Olímpicos de Atlanta de 1996. Aclamado por los medios, es considerado a continuación sospechoso de poner él mismo la bomba, por los mismos medios que le habían convertido en un héroe. La analogía con el Evangelio es evidente. Escuchamos algunos diálogos de la película, comentados por José de Segovia con música de las bandas sonoras de esta trilogía de Eastwood. El nombre mismo de Judas se ha convertido en sinónimo de traidor. Escuchamos la canción que interpreta en su versión española, Teddy Bautista en "Jesucristo Superstar" (1974), aunque nosotros preferimos el relato de la "Traición" que hace Adrian Snell en su "Pasión" con la Royal Philarmonic Orchestra con la voz de Mark Williamson. En nuestra próxima parada en esta Ruta consideraremos lo ocurrido en Getsemaní desde la perspectiva de la relación eterna entre Padre e Hijo...

The Trout Show
Eric Clapton's Unplugged Album Changed His Life

The Trout Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 29:48


When Ed Struijlaart heard Eric Clapton's "Unplugged" album, released 30 years ago, he promised himself that he was going learn how to play acoustic guitar and learn how to play the songs on Eric's album. Now thirty years later, Ed has fulfilled his dream and he is touring his native country, The Netherlands, performing note for note each tune on the Unplugged album. As Ed tells The Trout during their interview, Eric Clapton's music changed his life. He now is full time professional musician providing his exceptional guitar skills to Clapton's music as well as he own original songs in concerts throughout the Netherlands and beyond. Come along to learn about Ed's musical journey in this episode of The Trout Show. https://www.edstruijlaart.nl/https://thetroutshow.com/ Thanks for listening for more information or to listen to other podcasts or watch YouTube videos click on this link >https://thetroutshow.com/

Gitaarmannen, de podcast
#44 - DIRK SCHEELE

Gitaarmannen, de podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 60:24


Wat een mooi verhaal...je schrijft liedjes voor kinderen, deze slaan op kleine schaal aan. Kindjes zingen de liedjes thuis en ouders vragen zich af van wie die leuke liedjes toch zijn? Dit gebeurde ook bij een grote platenbaas van het major label EMI. Zijn kinderen kwamen thuis met catchy liedjes waarvan hij niet wist wie het geschreven had. De zoektocht kwam uit bij Dirk Scheele, hij kreeg pardoes een contract aangeboden bij EMI en dat was het begin van Dirk z'n lancering als grootste kinderpopster van Nederland! Dit alles en meer vertelt Dirk in deze speciale aflevering van Gitaarmannen, de podcast. Naast kinderpopster is Dirk een grote gitaarfreak en hij heeft dan ook meerdere van zijn gitaren bij zich waar allemaal een verhaal bij hoort. Dirk vertelt honderd uit over zijn passie voor de gitaar! Wil je meer weten over Dirk en zijn optredens? Kijk dan eens op zijn website: www.dirkscheele.nlTer gelegenheid van het 30 jarig jubileum van Eric Clapton's Unplugged plaat ga ik dit najaar de theaters in met Gitaarmannen 2: een ode aan Clapton's legendarische Unplugged album.Voor data: www.gitaarmannen.nl / www.edstruijlaart.nl

Saturday Live
Pattie Boyd

Saturday Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 82:57


Pattie Boyd joins Nikki Bedi and Danny Wallace. The model, muse and photographer talks about her life, the influence of her early years and how she dealt with many years in the public eye, where relationships with George Harrison and Eric Clapton inspired songs such as Harrison's Something and Clapton's Layla and Wonderful Tonight. When listener Andrew Lock heard our science lesson call in it prompted him to get in touch and tell us about his surprising career as an inventor on a TV show in the late 1990s, while he was still a student. Andrew joins us to talk about his ingenious inventions and his brief taste of life as a TV presenter. Richie Barlow's childhood was littered with abuse and chaos, as he struggled to find his place in the world. He spent most of his childhood in care, from the age of nine. Richie talks about turning his life around and running a successful business, the women who helped him, and how Star Trek taught Richie how to survive and forgive. Howard Blake OBE is best known for composing the music for The Snowman, which is celebrating the fortieth anniversary of the film's debut and 25 years as a stage play. Outside this festive staple, Blake has a hugely varied body of work which includes creating the music for The Avengers and a string of big commercials. He was also commissioned to write a new piece for Princess Diana's thirtieth birthday. Pattie Boyd: My Life In Pictures is out now. Richie - Who Cares? by Richie Barlow – with Becky Bond is available online now.  To celebrate the fortieth anniversary of ‘The Snowman' Sony are releasing of a newly-remastered edition of the soundtrack. The Snowman stage show is running until 31 December at the Peacock Theatre in London. Producer: Claire Bartleet

The City's Backyard
The City's Backyard S3 E1: One of the top guitarists of all time Gary Hoey is on tour and drops by the city's backyard before his sound check and show at Mohegan Sun in Connecticut!

The City's Backyard

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 29:14


With a collection of 21 albums it's no wonder Gary Hoey is listed as one of the top 100 guitarists of all time.  The world renowned rock guitarist's first break came in 1987 when Ozzy Osbourne liked Hoey's tape enough to fly him to LA for an audition and encouraging him to move to the West Coast. In 1990 Hoey was signed to Reprise Records with a short lived band called Heavy Bones but followed up in 1993 with a solo album and Gary's cover of “Hocus Pocus” rocketed into the Billboard's Top 5 Rock Tracks.  He went on to score the successful “Endless Summer II” soundtrack for New Line Cinema and in 1995 started a trilogy of “Ho!Ho! Hoey,” a collection of instrumental Christmas classics that continues each year in his Rockin Holiday shows.  But whatever style he plays, one thing is certain, Gary Hoey is a fiery, charismatic player who connects with the crowd.Whether he's playing scorching originals or classic rock covers, his solos are thrilling and reminiscent of Clapton or Stevie Ray in their fiery youth. One thing that remains consistent is Hoey's impassioned command of the guitar. He can attack his instrument with feral intensity and then play something very soft and achingly beautiful. This ability to mix feeling, phrasing, technique and tone is the true mark of a master guitarist.http://garyhoey.com/

Million Dollar Session
REMEMBER HENDRIX

Million Dollar Session

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 59:37


Hendrix Live, Clapton, Bonamassa, Copacabana  Stan Getz , Astrud et Lao Gilberto, Dutronc & Dutronc, Mister Mat, She & Him.....

Rock & Roll Attitude
Rock and Roll Attitude 3/5 - Les ''Happy Songs'' avec Steve Winwood, Earth, Wind and Fire, Richard Ashcroft, The Rolling Stones et Springsteen

Rock & Roll Attitude

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 3:49


Le mot anglais ''Happy'' fait très certainement partie de cette poignée de mots que tout le monde comprend même sans être anglophone. D'ailleurs ''Happy'', est entré dans notre langage courant ; happy anniversaire, l'happy hour tant appréciée le vendredi fin de journée, l'happy end de tous bons films américains. Sinon, il y a des expressions typiquement anglaises qui sont vraiment mignonnes aussi ''Happy as a clam'' : heureux comme une palourde, ''Happy as a flea in a doghouse'' : heureux comme une puce dans une niche. Springsteen, malgré une atmosphère mélancolique, le titre " Happy " parle d'être heureux. En 1986, Steve Winwood, que l'on avait découvert dans le Spencer Davis Group, puis au sein de Traffic ou Blind Faith avec Clapton, est au sommet de sa carrière solo avec "Back in the High Life Again". Sorti en 1978, ''September'' d'Earth, wind and fire est le premier titre très happy cosigné avec la compositrice Allee Willis ainsi que pour ''Boogie Wonderland''. En 2018, Richard Ashcroft, ex-leader de The Verve, sort son cinquième album sur lequel on retrouve "Surprised By The Joy". En 1972, les Stones publient "Happy", ne pas tirer la tronche rend déjà plus heureux, titre chanté par Keith Richards. --- Du lundi au vendredi, Fanny Gillard et Laurent Rieppi vous dévoilent l'univers rock, au travers de thèmes comme ceux de l'éducation, des rockers en prison, les objets de la culture rock, les groupes familiaux et leurs déboires, et bien d'autres, chaque matin dans Coffee on the Rocks à 6h30 et rediffusion à 13h30 dans Lunch Around The Clock.

GBW Podcast
Episode 194: Clapton Rage!!!

GBW Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 245:22


There's not a lot that can send us into a ranting mess of rage but, this episode, we manage to get worked up twice!This time out we cover 20 films including the much maligned HALLOWEEN ENDS, another film noir that delivers the goods, Clint Eastwood in full-on macho/sexist mode, some kids being shot into space, a bonafide John Carpenter classic, the return of Robert Ginty to GBW, us questioning how Bert Convy became famous, RIGHTING WRONGS kicking all sorts of ass and so much more!Thanks for listening! Be sure to subscribe, rate and review the show wherever you listen to podcasts; join in the discussion on our Facebook group, and if you like what you hear - tell a friend and spread the word - every little bit helps!Links to all our web stuff at www.gbwpodcast.com

Everyone Loves Guitar
Barry Richman - Dad said "CUT SCHOOL today TO CHECK OUT this guy, JIMI HENDRIX”

Everyone Loves Guitar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 77:01


On this Barry Richman Interview: Tons of stories about playing with John Lee Hooker (his first gig), Buddy Miles, Eric Johnson, Greg Allman, Clapton, Derek Trucks flipping baseball cards at age 12, Roy Buchanan, Warren Haynes… not selling his ‘57 strat to Jerry Garcia, his cool vintage guitar and amp collection, playing Duane Allman's ‘59 Burst for 6 months… his dad, who was a top NYC session sax player, western wear and all kinds of cool stuff: Cool Guitar, Music & ELG T-Shirts!: http://www.GuitarMerch.com In a career that's spanned 50+ years, Barry has played, toured or recorded with John Lee Hooker, Allman Brothers, Eric Johnson, Gov't Mule, Eric Clapton, Les Paul, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Derek Trucks, Jimmy Herring, Steve Morse, Roy Buchanan, Sonny Landreth, Lee Ritenour, Stanley Jordan, Vivian Campbell, Rick Emmett & others Subscribe & Website:  https://www.everyonelovesguitar.com/subscribe Support this show: http://www.everyonelovesguitar.com/support

Generation Mix
Generation Mix Episode 34 - Eric Clapton

Generation Mix

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 43:45


Wow - it's been 3 months of inactivity.  Joel wasn't looking forward to recording this, but a bonus from the delay has been an increasing ability to analyse and understand music so he really digs in on this episode. 18 tracks drawn from Clapton's entire career from Cream to the solo years. We also have a sponsor - sort of... My YouTube channel: Pockenrop  Joel's YouTube Channel: FoxEatingNuggetsGaming

Beyond the Mic with Sean Dillon
Author Of "Loud" Tana Douglas

Beyond the Mic with Sean Dillon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 8:06


Author & Roadie Tana Douglas almost worked with Clapton & thinks Amy Winehouse is the best vocalist she's ever heard. Author of “Loud” joins us for a Beyond the Mic Short Cut. Beyond the Mic with Sean Dillon is the conversation series where actors, artists, authors, and more go deeper than a traditional interview. They go “Beyond the Mic”.

TopMusicGuitar Podcast
#026: Learning Guitar Secrets to Create a Full-Time Online Teaching Business feat. Den López

TopMusicGuitar Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 75:57


This episode features someone who has been helping beginning guitar players learn with some exciting and engaging secrets to make guitar playing a whole lot easier. Mr. Den López from Learning Guitar Secrets and host of his own podcast, That Beginner Guitar Podcast shares a whole lot of valuable information that you can implement in your studio today. If you want to get insights on how to keep students engaged in their guitar lessons or how to build your social media following, this podcast is for you. Den gives us a brief background of how he started as a guitar player and eventually transitioning into a teacher. Dan shares how he came up with the idea of Learning Guitar Secrets. The things he's done and implemented that made him different from other piano teachers. Tips for teaching beginner students to keep them interested. The idea of creating inflammatory headlines that can lead to the success of your business. Dealing with haters online. Tips on how he built his social media following. Advice for listeners who want to create a course or have created a course and can't get it off the ground. Dan shares more about his upcoming book. The importance of investing in yourself to grow your business. A typical day in the life of a content creator. Reasons why it's important to create stories that hook people. Insights on why many people resonate with him and what he teaches. Three learning secrets that you can use with your beginning guitar students that create results. Guest Links Den Lopez Facebook Learning Guitar Secrets Website Get the Beginner Guitarist Playbook for FREE! Guitar Teaching Resources Mentioned Free Guitar E-book Resources Today's Guest Den López from Barcelona, Spain is a guitar teacher, musician, loving husband, and a father of 2 boys. He is the founder of Learning Guitar Secrets where he helps wanna-be and beginner guitarists become the players they dream of. He started playing at the age of 14 and has been heavily influenced by players like Clapton, Gilmour, and Hendrix. After releasing his first studio album, he decided it was time to teach others what he knew. Hearing that 90-95% of the people who start playing quit, he became obsessed with finding the little tricks, the wins, and the easiest frameworks beginners needed to succeed. Although he has only been active in the online business for less than a year, he has put out 3 courses, a podcast, and has gained a following of 10k on Facebook. He is currently working on his next projects: a challenge and a membership. Thank you for tuning in! Consider implementing the ideas from this podcast by writing several actionable steps for your teaching practice if it's inspired you. If you enjoyed today's show, please leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, which helps other teachers find our show. Stay updated by subscribing to this show, and get automatic delivery to your device every time a new episode goes live! We publish on Fridays weekly.   Click here to find out more about TopMusicGuitar Membership  

You Talking To Me?!
The Kidnapping of Jimi Hendrix

You Talking To Me?!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 4:28


Do you remember the time Jimi Hendrix was kidnapped? Neither did he. Mark breaks down this surprisingly not well-known story.

The Regular Joe Show
RJS - 10/14/22 Segment 8

The Regular Joe Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 4:55


Caller Eric goes with Dylan but says Clapton has the best version.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Chewing the Gristle with Greg Koch

A "slide guitar potentate of unparalleled proportions", Sonny's slide work is known far and wide for his signature technique. As evidenced by his influential work with John Hiatt, Landreth's amazing playing always serves the song first. Eric Clapton says, “Sonny Landreth is probably the most underestimated musician on the planet, and also probably one of the most advanced.” His own albums have featured Mr. Clapton, along with Eric Johnson, Vince Gill, and others. He tells Greg about his journey from Chet Atkins to Delta Blues and beyond in today's gristle-filled conversation.2:08 - Sonny's relationship with John Hiatt; what brought them together, and the fun of reuniting7:52 - Sonny's slide playing; how it developed, cool tips and tricks, and thumb pickin'16:10 - Influences and adding to that stew of tasty morsels to feast upon21:29 - The magic of Sacred Steel slide guitar25:05 - Sonny's tone, and how it lends to his creative voice28:12 - Digging through old videos to discover the secrets of tone and creativity and the gear acquisition conundrum35:48 - TONE TALKTotal Length: 40:50Fishman Dedicated to helping musicians achieve the truest sound possible whenever they plug-in. Wildwood Guitars One of the world's premier retailers of exceptional electric and acoustic guitars.

The Greatest Non Hits
J. J. Cale: Troubadour

The Greatest Non Hits

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 70:09


This guy is a legend. He wrote Cocaine, After midnight, and a few others performed by famous 70's artists not named Eric Clapton.  If you've never heard this album,  you should. You can hear a little Clapton, Zeppelin, Smashing Pumpkins, Jimmy Buffet, Dire Straits, the list goes on. His musical depth is vast, and he plays with horn sections, harps, all kinds of crazy instruments, and talented musicians playing along. We have fun, and learn a lot along the way. We hope you enjoy!!PS., We learn more about Tim's plants, and a recent vacation that involved bikes, hotels, cabs, hostels and something else kind of sketch. Support the show

Unofficial Intelligence
Pumpkin Spice Paqui

Unofficial Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 84:34


This week the guys talk about Steve and Ben's golf outing with cousin Robbie. Thankfully Ben is a way better podcast host than he is a golfer. Cousin Seanimal writes in with some concerns over Anthony and Steve's garbage takes lately and sets the record straight on what he believes are the best cover songs of all time. Eric "The Jerk" Clapton and George "Everyones Favorite Beatle" Harrison pull off a successful wife swap. We get a NYFRANK Sports Minute and that sparks the MVP conversation with Aaron Judge and Shohei Ohtani (00:20:30). Anthony surprises the guys with 2022's Paqui One Chip Challenge in this week's Talking Snack (00:35:23). Ben and Aya check out the pizza and calzones at the Brooklyn staple, https://www.lucali.com/ (Lucali) and head south of the border for Michelin star mexican cuisine at https://www.oxomoconyc.com/ (Oxomoco) (00:51:05). Ben gets his wings! Steve's mustache is here to stay and Ben and Anthony review their facial hair choices through the years (01:02:10). Chef A-Bone whips up some homemade pretzels and Ben's family cookies make their rounds outside of the family. On the entertainment side of things, Severance wins two Emmys in categories that have nothing to do with the actual show. Unofficial Links: Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/unofficial_pod/ (@unofficial_pod) Website - https://www.unofficialpod.com (www.unofficialpod.com) Email - Hi@uipodcast.com https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxb295LgOPGf3AnpMnVwz8g (UI Podcast on YouTube) Unofficial Sponsors: https://www.amazon.com/Aluminum-Minimalist-Integrated-Expanding-Capacity/dp/B09L49NFY3/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?m=A1CSRHDH2QPKAY&marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&qid=1649779502&s=merchant-items&sr=1-1 (Vaulted Wallets) https://www.shopzealcbd.com/ (Zeal CBD)

The Greatest Non Hits
Episode Preview: JJ Cale

The Greatest Non Hits

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 0:24


Since the inception of our show 6 months ago, we've been meeting and recording each show live and relatively unscripted every Monday evening. A big thank you to our loyal listeners, subscribers, followers and haters, we appreciate you listening.  As a follow up the Clapton 461 Ocean Boulevard episode, JJ Cale's Troubadour album will be the subject of our next podcast. He was a prolific songwriter and guitarist who penned the songs Cocaine and After Midnight, which turned into big hits for Clapton, and big royalties (I hope) for JJ.  Support the show

On The Mix
Did You Know? | Ep #18 - How the iconic Layla album was Made + Why it Underwhelmed Fans

On The Mix

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 18:50


in 1969, Eric Clapton was looking for a fresh outlook on his music career after supergroup Cream disbanded. With a solo album made and was given lukewarm reception, he was struggling to figure out how to keep making music. In comes a band of friends with the likes of southern rock legend Duane Allman of the Allman Brothers to reignite Clapton's fire. Today we learn how the album was made, what the inspiration behind the classic album was, and why it didn't do well when it was released. Follow me for more music content, and how you can support OTM :) OTM Blog: https://onthemixpodcast.wordpress.com/blog/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/onthemixpodcast/ Donation/Tip: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/onthemixpodcast --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/on-the-mix/support

SECONDARY
Waking the Musician - The Cream of Clapton

SECONDARY

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 3:57


How I got from Eric Clapton to Van Halen

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 152: “For What It’s Worth” by Buffalo Springfield

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022


Episode 152 of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “For What It's Worth”, and the short but eventful career of Buffalo Springfield. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-five-minute bonus episode available, on "By the Time I Get to Phoenix" by Glen Campbell. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources As usual, there's a Mixcloud mix containing all the songs excerpted in the episode. This four-CD box set is the definitive collection of Buffalo Springfield's work, while if you want the mono version of the second album, the stereo version of the first, and the final album as released, but no demos or outtakes, you want this more recent box set. For What It's Worth: The Story of Buffalo Springfield by Richey Furay and John Einarson is obviously Furay's version of the story, but all the more interesting for that. For information on Steve Stills' early life I used Stephen Stills: Change Partners by David Roberts.  Information on both Stills and Young comes from Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young by David Browne.  Jimmy McDonough's Shakey is the definitive biography of Neil Young, while Young's Waging Heavy Peace is his autobiography. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A quick note before we begin -- this episode deals with various disabilities. In particular, there are descriptions of epileptic seizures that come from non-medically-trained witnesses, many of whom took ableist attitudes towards the seizures. I don't know enough about epilepsy to know how accurate their descriptions and perceptions are, and I apologise if that means that by repeating some of their statements, I am inadvertently passing on myths about the condition. When I talk about this, I am talking about the after-the-fact recollections of musicians, none of them medically trained and many of them in altered states of consciousness, about events that had happened decades earlier. Please do not take anything said in a podcast about music history as being the last word on the causes or effects of epileptic seizures, rather than how those musicians remember them. Anyway, on with the show. One of the things you notice if you write about protest songs is that a lot of the time, the songs that people talk about as being important or impactful have aged very poorly. Even great songwriters like Bob Dylan or John Lennon, when writing material about the political events of the time, would write material they would later acknowledge was far from their best. Too often a song will be about a truly important event, and be powered by a real sense of outrage at injustice, but it will be overly specific, and then as soon as the immediate issue is no longer topical, the song is at best a curio. For example, the sentencing of the poet and rock band manager John Sinclair to ten years in prison for giving two joints to an undercover police officer was hugely controversial in the early seventies, but by the time John Lennon's song about it was released, Sinclair had been freed by the Supreme Court, and very, very few people would use the song as an example of why Lennon's songwriting still has lasting value: [Excerpt: John Lennon, "John Sinclair"] But there are exceptions, and those tend to be songs where rather than talking about specific headlines, the song is about the emotion that current events have caused. Ninety years on from its first success, for example, "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" still has resonance, because there are still people who are put out of work through no fault of their own, and even those of us who are lucky enough to be financially comfortable have the fear that all too soon it may end, and we may end up like Al begging on the streets: [Excerpt: Rudy Vallee, "Brother Can You Spare a Dime?"] And because of that emotional connection, sometimes the very best protest songs can take on new lives and new meanings, and connect with the way people feel about totally unrelated subjects. Take Buffalo Springfield's one hit. The actual subject of the song couldn't be any more trivial in the grand scheme of things -- a change in zoning regulations around the Sunset Strip that meant people under twenty-one couldn't go to the clubs after 10PM, and the subsequent reaction to that -- but because rather than talking about the specific incident, Steve Stills instead talked about the emotions that it called up, and just noted the fleeting images that he was left with, the song became adopted as an anthem by soldiers in Vietnam. Sometimes what a song says is nowhere near as important as how it says it. [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "For What It's Worth"] Steve Stills seems almost to have been destined to be a musician, although the instrument he started on, the drums, was not the one for which he would become best known. According to Stills, though, he always had an aptitude for rhythm, to the extent that he learned to tapdance almost as soon as he had learned to walk. He started on drums aged eight or nine, after somebody gave him a set of drumsticks. After his parents got sick of him damaging the furniture by playing on every available surface, an actual drum kit followed, and that became his principal instrument, even after he learned to play the guitar at military school, as his roommate owned one. As a teenager, Stills developed an idiosyncratic taste in music, helped by the record collection of his friend Michael Garcia. He didn't particularly like most of the pop music of the time, but he was a big fan of pre-war country music, Motown, girl-group music -- he especially liked the Shirelles -- and Chess blues. He was also especially enamoured of the music of Jimmy Reed, a passion he would later share with his future bandmate Neil Young: [Excerpt: Jimmy Reed, "Baby, What You Want Me To Do?"] In his early teens, he became the drummer for a band called the Radars, and while he was drumming he studied their lead guitarist, Chuck Schwin.  He said later "There was a whole little bunch of us who were into kind of a combination of all the blues guys and others including Chet Atkins, Dick Dale, and Hank Marvin: a very weird cross-section of far-out guitar players." Stills taught himself to play like those guitarists, and in particular he taught himself how to emulate Atkins' Travis-picking style, and became remarkably proficient at it. There exists a recording of him, aged sixteen, singing one of his own songs and playing finger-picked guitar, and while the song is not exactly the strongest thing I've ever heard lyrically, it's clearly the work of someone who is already a confident performer: [Excerpt: Stephen Stills, "Travellin'"] But the main reason he switched to becoming a guitarist wasn't because of his admiration for Chet Atkins or Hank Marvin, but because he started driving and discovered that if you have to load a drum kit into your car and then drive it to rehearsals and gigs you either end up bashing up your car or bashing up the drum kit. As this is not a problem with guitars, Stills decided that he'd move on from the Radars, and join a band named the Continentals as their rhythm guitarist, playing with lead guitarist Don Felder. Stills was only in the Continentals for a few months though, before being replaced by another guitarist, Bernie Leadon, and in general Stills' whole early life is one of being uprooted and moved around. His father had jobs in several different countries, and while for the majority of his time Stills was in the southern US, he also ended up spending time in Costa Rica -- and staying there as a teenager even as the rest of his family moved to El Salvador. Eventually, aged eighteen, he moved to New Orleans, where he formed a folk duo with a friend, Chris Sarns. The two had very different tastes in folk music -- Stills preferred Dylan-style singer-songwriters, while Sarns liked the clean sound of the Kingston Trio -- but they played together for several months before moving to Greenwich Village, where they performed together and separately. They were latecomers to the scene, which had already mostly ended, and many of the folk stars had already gone on to do bigger things. But Stills still saw plenty of great performers there -- Miles Davis and Dizzy Gillespie and Thelonius Monk in the jazz clubs, Woody Allen, Lenny Bruce, and Richard Pryor in the comedy ones, and Simon and Garfunkel, Richie Havens, Fred Neil and Tim Hardin in the folk ones -- Stills said that other than Chet Atkins, Havens, Neil, and Hardin were the people most responsible for his guitar style. Stills was also, at this time, obsessed with Judy Collins' third album -- the album which had featured Roger McGuinn on banjo and arrangements, and which would soon provide several songs for the Byrds to cover: [Excerpt: Judy Collins, "Turn, Turn, Turn"] Judy Collins would soon become a very important figure in Stills' life, but for now she was just the singer on his favourite record. While the Greenwich Village folk scene was no longer quite what it had been a year or two earlier, it was still a great place for a young talented musician to perform. As well as working with Chris Sarns, Stills also formed a trio with his friend John Hopkins and a banjo player called Peter Tork who everyone said looked just like Stills. Tork soon headed out west to seek his fortune, and then Stills got headhunted to join the Au Go Go Singers. This was a group that was being set up in the same style as the New Christy Minstrels -- a nine-piece vocal and instrumental group that would do clean-sounding versions of currently-popular folk songs. The group were signed to Roulette Records, and recorded one album, They Call Us Au-Go-Go Singers, produced by Hugo and Luigi, the production duo we've previously seen working with everyone from the Tokens to the Isley Brothers. Much of the album is exactly the same kind of thing that a million New Christy Minstrels soundalikes were putting out -- and Stills, with his raspy voice, was clearly intended to be the Barry McGuire of this group -- but there was one exception -- a song called "High Flyin' Bird", on which Stills was able to show off the sound that would later make him famous, and which became so associated with him that even though it was written by Billy Edd Wheeler, the writer of "Jackson", even the biography of Stills I used in researching this episode credits "High Flyin' Bird" as being a Stills original: [Excerpt: The Au-Go-Go Singers, "High Flyin' Bird"] One of the other members of the Au-Go-Go Singers, Richie Furay, also got to sing a lead vocal on the album, on the Tom Paxton song "Where I'm Bound": [Excerpt: The Au-Go-Go Singers, "Where I'm Bound"] The Au-Go-Go Singers got a handful of dates around the folk scene, and Stills and Furay became friendly with another singer playing the same circuit, Gram Parsons. Parsons was one of the few people they knew who could see the value in current country music, and convinced both Stills and Furay to start paying more attention to what was coming out of Nashville and Bakersfield. But soon the Au-Go-Go Singers split up. Several venues where they might otherwise have been booked were apparently scared to book an act that was associated with Morris Levy, and also the market for big folk ensembles dried up more or less overnight when the Beatles hit the music scene. But several of the group -- including Stills but not Furay -- decided they were going to continue anyway, and formed a group called The Company, and they went on a tour of Canada. And one of the venues they played was the Fourth Dimension coffee house in Fort William, Ontario, and there their support act was a rock band called The Squires: [Excerpt: The Squires, "(I'm a Man And) I Can't Cry"] The lead guitarist of the Squires, Neil Young, had a lot in common with Stills, and they bonded instantly. Both men had parents who had split up when they were in their teens, and had a successful but rather absent father and an overbearing mother. And both had shown an interest in music even as babies. According to Young's mother, when he was still in nappies, he would pull himself up by the bars  of his playpen and try to dance every time he heard "Pinetop's Boogie Woogie": [Excerpt: Pinetop Smith, "Pinetop's Boogie Woogie"] Young, though, had had one crucial experience which Stills had not had. At the age of six, he'd come down with polio, and become partially paralysed. He'd spent months in hospital before he regained his ability to walk, and the experience had also affected him in other ways. While he was recovering, he would draw pictures of trains -- other than music, his big interest, almost an obsession, was with electric train sets, and that obsession would remain with him throughout his life -- but for the first time he was drawing with his right hand rather than his left. He later said "The left-hand side got a little screwed. Feels different from the right. If I close my eyes, my left side, I really don't know where it is—but over the years I've discovered that almost one hundred percent for sure it's gonna be very close to my right side … probably to the left. That's why I started appearing to be ambidextrous, I think. Because polio affected my left side, and I think I was left-handed when I was born. What I have done is use the weak side as the dominant one because the strong side was injured." Both Young's father Scott Young -- a very famous Canadian writer and sports broadcaster, who was by all accounts as well known in Canada during his lifetime as his son -- and Scott's brother played ukulele, and they taught Neil how to play, and his first attempt at forming a group had been to get his friend Comrie Smith to get a pair of bongos and play along with him to Preston Epps' "Bongo Rock": [Excerpt: Preston Epps, "Bongo Rock"] Neil Young had liked all the usual rock and roll stars of the fifties  -- though in his personal rankings, Elvis came a distant third behind Little Richard and Jerry Lee Lewis -- but his tastes ran more to the more darkly emotional. He loved "Maybe" by the Chantels, saying "Raw soul—you cannot miss it. That's the real thing. She was believin' every word she was singin'." [Excerpt: The Chantels, "Maybe"] What he liked more than anything was music that had a mainstream surface but seemed slightly off-kilter. He was a major fan of Roy Orbison, saying, "it's almost impossible to comprehend the depth of that soul. It's so deep and dark it just keeps on goin' down—but it's not black. It's blue, deep blue. He's just got it. The drama. There's something sad but proud about Roy's music", and he would say similar things about Del Shannon, saying "He struck me as the ultimate dark figure—behind some Bobby Rydell exterior, y'know? “Hats Off to Larry,” “Runaway,” “Swiss Maid”—very, very inventive. The stuff was weird. Totally unaffected." More surprisingly, perhaps, he was a particular fan of Bobby Darin, who he admired so much because Darin could change styles at the drop of a hat, going from novelty rock and roll like "Splish Splash" to crooning "Mack The Knife" to singing Tim Hardin songs like "If I Were a Carpenter", without any of them seeming any less authentic. As he put it later "He just changed. He's completely different. And he's really into it. Doesn't sound like he's not there. “Dream Lover,” “Mack the Knife,” “If I Were a Carpenter,” “Queen of the Hop,” “Splish Splash”—tell me about those records, Mr. Darin. Did you write those all the same day, or what happened? He just changed so much. Just kinda went from one place to another. So it's hard to tell who Bobby Darin really was." And one record which Young was hugely influenced by was Floyd Cramer's country instrumental, "Last Date": [Excerpt: Floyd Cramer, "Last Date"] Now, that was a very important record in country music, and if you want to know more about it I strongly recommend listening to the episode of Cocaine and Rhinestones on the Nashville A-Team, which has a long section on the track, but the crucial thing to know about that track is that it's one of the earliest examples of what is known as slip-note playing, where the piano player, before hitting the correct note, briefly hits the note a tone below it, creating a brief discord. Young absolutely loved that sound, and wanted to make a sound like that on the guitar. And then, when he and his mother moved to Winnipeg after his parents' divorce, he found someone who was doing just that. It was the guitarist in a group variously known as Chad Allan and the Reflections and Chad Allan and the Expressions. That group had relatives in the UK who would send them records, and so where most Canadian bands would do covers of American hits, Chad Allan and the Reflections would do covers of British hits, like their version of Geoff Goddard's "Tribute to Buddy Holly", a song that had originally been produced by Joe Meek: [Excerpt: Chad Allan and the Reflections, "Tribute to Buddy Holly"] That would later pay off for them in a big way, when they recorded a version of Johnny Kidd and the Pirates' "Shakin' All Over", for which their record label tried to create an air of mystery by releasing it with no artist name, just "Guess Who?" on the label. It became a hit, the name stuck, and they became The Guess Who: [Excerpt: The Guess Who, "Shakin' All Over"] But at this point they, and their guitarist Randy Bachman, were just another group playing around Winnipeg. Bachman, though, was hugely impressive to Neil Young for a few reasons. The first was that he really did have a playing style that was a lot like the piano style of Floyd Cramer -- Young would later say "it was Randy Bachman who did it first. Randy was the first one I ever heard do things on the guitar that reminded me of Floyd. He'd do these pulls—“darrr darrrr,” this two-note thing goin' together—harmony, with one note pulling and the other note stayin' the same." Bachman also had built the first echo unit that Young heard a guitarist play in person. He'd discovered that by playing with the recording heads on a tape recorder owned by his mother, he could replicate the tape echo that Sam Phillips had used at Sun Studios -- and once he'd attached that to his amplifier, he realised how much the resulting sound sounded like his favourite guitarist, Hank Marvin of the Shadows, another favourite of Neil Young's: [Excerpt: The Shadows, "Man of Mystery"] Young soon started looking to Bachman as something of a mentor figure, and he would learn a lot of guitar techniques second hand from Bachman -- every time a famous musician came to the area, Bachman would go along and stand right at the front and watch the guitarist, and make note of the positions their fingers were in. Then Bachman would replicate those guitar parts with the Reflections, and Neil Young would stand in front of him and make notes of where *his* fingers were. Young joined a band on the local circuit called the Esquires, but soon either quit or was fired, depending on which version of the story you choose to believe. He then formed his own rival band, the Squires, with no "e", much to the disgust of his ex-bandmates. In July 1963, five months after they formed, the  Squires released their first record, "Aurora" backed with "The Sultan", on a tiny local label. Both tracks were very obviously influenced by the Shadows: [Excerpt: The Squires, "Aurora"] The Squires were a mostly-instrumental band for the first year or so they were together, and then the Beatles hit North America, and suddenly people didn't want to hear surf instrumentals and Shadows covers any more, they only wanted to hear songs that sounded a bit like the Beatles. The Squires started to work up the appropriate repertoire -- two songs that have been mentioned as in their set at this point are the Beatles album track "It Won't Be Long", and "Money" which the Beatles had also covered -- but they didn't have a singer, being an instrumental group. They could get in a singer, of course, but that would mean splitting the money with another person. So instead, the guitarist, who had never had any intention of becoming a singer, was more or less volunteered for the role. Over the next eighteen months or so the group's repertoire moved from being largely instrumental to largely vocal, and the group also seem to have shuttled around a bit between two different cities -- Winnipeg and Fort William, staying in one for a while and then moving back to the other. They travelled between the two in Young's car, a Buick Roadmaster hearse. In Winnipeg, Young first met up with a singer named Joni Anderson, who was soon to get married to Chuck Mitchell and would become better known by her married name. The two struck up a friendship, though by all accounts never a particularly close one -- they were too similar in too many ways; as Mitchell later said “Neil and I have a lot in common: Canadian; Scorpios; polio in the same epidemic, struck the same parts of our body; and we both have a black sense of humor". They were both also idiosyncratic artists who never fit very well into boxes. In Fort William the Squires made a few more records, this time vocal tracks like "I'll Love You Forever": [Excerpt: The Squires, "I'll Love You Forever"] It was also in Fort William that Young first encountered two acts that would make a huge impression on him. One was a group called The Thorns, consisting of Tim Rose, Jake Holmes, and Rich Husson. The Thorns showed Young that there was interesting stuff being done on the fringes of the folk music scene. He later said "One of my favourites was “Oh Susannah”—they did this arrangement that was bizarre. It was in a minor key, which completely changed everything—and it was rock and roll. So that idea spawned arrangements of all these other songs for me. I did minor versions of them all. We got into it. That was a certain Squires stage that never got recorded. Wish there were tapes of those shows. We used to do all this stuff, a whole kinda music—folk-rock. We took famous old folk songs like “Clementine,” “She'll Be Comin' 'Round the Mountain,” “Tom Dooley,” and we did them all in minor keys based on the Tim Rose arrangement of “Oh Susannah.” There are no recordings of the Thorns in existence that I know of, but presumably that arrangement that Young is talking about is the version that Rose also later did with the Big 3, which we've heard in a few other episodes: [Excerpt: The Big 3, "The Banjo Song"] The other big influence was, of course, Steve Stills, and the two men quickly found themselves influencing each other deeply. Stills realised that he could bring more rock and roll to his folk-music sound, saying that what amazed him was the way the Squires could go from "Cottonfields" (the Lead Belly song) to "Farmer John", the R&B song by Don and Dewey that was becoming a garage-rock staple. Young in turn was inspired to start thinking about maybe going more in the direction of folk music. The Squires even renamed themselves the High-Flying Birds, after the song that Stills had recorded with the Au Go Go Singers. After The Company's tour of Canada, Stills moved back to New York for a while. He now wanted to move in a folk-rock direction, and for a while he tried to persuade his friend John Sebastian to let him play bass in his new band, but when the Lovin' Spoonful decided against having him in the band, he decided to move West to San Francisco, where he'd heard there was a new music scene forming. He enjoyed a lot of the bands he saw there, and in particular he was impressed by the singer of a band called the Great Society: [Excerpt: The Great Society, "Somebody to Love"] He was much less impressed with the rest of her band, and seriously considered going up to her and asking if she wanted to work with some *real* musicians instead of the unimpressive ones she was working with, but didn't get his nerve up. We will, though, be hearing more about Grace Slick in future episodes. Instead, Stills decided to move south to LA, where many of the people he'd known in Greenwich Village were now based. Soon after he got there, he hooked up with two other musicians, a guitarist named Steve Young and a singer, guitarist, and pianist named Van Dyke Parks. Parks had a record contract at MGM -- he'd been signed by Tom Wilson, the same man who had turned Dylan electric, signed Simon and Garfunkel, and produced the first albums by the Mothers of Invention. With Wilson, Parks put out a couple of singles in 1966, "Come to the Sunshine": [Excerpt: The Van Dyke Parks, "Come to the Sunshine"] And "Number Nine", a reworking of the Ode to Joy from Beethoven's Ninth Symphony: [Excerpt: The Van Dyke Parks, "Number Nine"]Parks, Stills, and Steve Young became The Van Dyke Parks Band, though they didn't play together for very long, with their most successful performance being as the support act for the Lovin' Spoonful for a show in Arizona. But they did have a lasting resonance -- when Van Dyke Parks finally got the chance to record his first solo album, he opened it with Steve Young singing the old folk song "Black Jack Davy", filtered to sound like an old tape: [Excerpt: Steve Young, "Black Jack Davy"] And then it goes into a song written for Parks by Randy Newman, but consisting of Newman's ideas about Parks' life and what he knew about him, including that he had been third guitar in the Van Dyke Parks Band: [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "Vine Street"] Parks and Stills also wrote a few songs together, with one of their collaborations, "Hello, I've Returned", later being demoed by Stills for Buffalo Springfield: [Excerpt: Steve Stills, "Hello, I've Returned"] After the Van Dyke Parks Band fell apart, Parks went on to many things, including a brief stint on keyboards in the Mothers of Invention, and we'll be talking more about him next episode. Stills formed a duo called the Buffalo Fish, with his friend Ron Long. That soon became an occasional trio when Stills met up again with his old Greenwich Village friend Peter Tork, who joined the group on the piano. But then Stills auditioned for the Monkees and was turned down because he had bad teeth -- or at least that's how most people told the story. Stills has later claimed that while he turned up for the Monkees auditions, it wasn't to audition, it was to try to pitch them songs, which seems implausible on the face of it. According to Stills, he was offered the job and turned it down because he'd never wanted it. But whatever happened, Stills suggested they might want his friend Peter, who looked just like him apart from having better teeth, and Peter Tork got the job. But what Stills really wanted to do was to form a proper band. He'd had the itch to do it ever since seeing the Squires, and he decided he should ask Neil Young to join. There was only one problem -- when he phoned Young, the phone was answered by Young's mother, who told Stills that Neil had moved out to become a folk singer, and she didn't know where he was. But then Stills heard from his old friend Richie Furay. Furay was still in Greenwich Village, and had decided to write to Stills. He didn't know where Stills was, other than that he was in California somewhere, so he'd written to Stills' father in El Salvador. The letter had been returned, because the postage had been short by one cent, so Furay had resent it with the correct postage. Stills' father had then forwarded the letter to the place Stills had been staying in San Francisco, which had in turn forwarded it on to Stills in LA. Furay's letter mentioned this new folk singer who had been on the scene for a while and then disappeared again, Neil Young, who had said he knew Stills, and had been writing some great songs, one of which Furay had added to his own set. Stills got in touch with Furay and told him about this great band he was forming in LA, which he wanted Furay to join. Furay was in, and travelled from New York to LA, only to be told that at this point there were no other members of this great band, but they'd definitely find some soon. They got a publishing deal with Columbia/Screen Gems, which gave them enough money to not starve, but what they really needed was to find some other musicians. They did, when driving down Hollywood Boulevard on April the sixth, 1966. There, stuck in traffic going the other way, they saw a hearse... After Steve Stills had left Fort William, so had Neil Young. He hadn't initially intended to -- the High-Flying Birds still had a regular gig, but Young and some of his friends had gone away for a few days on a road trip in his hearse. But unfortunately the transmission on the hearse had died, and Young and his friends had been stranded. Many years later, he would write a eulogy to the hearse, which he and Stills would record together: [Excerpt: The Stills-Young Band, "Long May You Run"] Young and his friends had all hitch-hiked in different directions -- Young had ended up in Toronto, where his dad lived, and had stayed with his dad for a while. The rest of his band had eventually followed him there, but Young found the Toronto music scene not to his taste -- the folk and rock scenes there were very insular and didn't mingle with each other, and the group eventually split up. Young even took on a day job for a while, for the only time in his life, though he soon quit. Young started basically commuting between Toronto and New York, a distance of several hundred miles, going to Greenwich Village for a while before ending up back in Toronto, and ping-ponging between the two. In New York, he met up with Richie Furay, and also had a disastrous audition for Elektra Records as a solo artist. One of the songs he sang in the audition was "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing", the song which Furay liked so much he started performing it himself. Young doesn't normally explain his songs, but as this was one of the first he ever wrote, he talked about it in interviews in the early years, before he decided to be less voluble about his art. The song was apparently about the sense of youthful hope being crushed. The instigation for it was Young seeing his girlfriend with another man, but the central image, of Clancy not singing, came from Young's schooldays. The Clancy in question was someone Young liked as one of the other weird kids at school. He was disabled, like Young, though with MS rather than polio, and he would sing to himself in the hallways at school. Sadly, of course, the other kids would mock and bully him for that, and eventually he ended up stopping. Young said about it "After awhile, he got so self-conscious he couldn't do his thing any more. When someone who is as beautiful as that and as different as that is actually killed by his fellow man—you know what I mean—like taken and sorta chopped down—all the other things are nothing compared to this." [Excerpt: Neil Young, "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing (Elektra demo)"] One thing I should say for anyone who listens to the Mixcloud for this episode, that song, which will be appearing in a couple of different versions, has one use of a term for Romani people that some (though not all) consider a slur. It's not in the excerpts I'll be using in this episode, but will be in the full versions on the Mixcloud. Sadly that word turns up time and again in songs of this era... When he wasn't in New York, Young was living in Toronto in a communal apartment owned by a folk singer named Vicki Taylor, where many of the Toronto folk scene would stay. Young started listening a lot to Taylor's Bert Jansch albums, which were his first real exposure to the British folk-baroque style of guitar fingerpicking, as opposed to the American Travis-picking style, and Young would soon start to incorporate that style into his own playing: [Excerpt: Bert Jansch, "Angie"] Another guitar influence on Young at this point was another of the temporary tenants of Taylor's flat, John Kay, who would later go on to be one of the founding members of Steppenwolf. Young credited Kay with having a funky rhythm guitar style that Young incorporated into his own. While he was in Toronto, he started getting occasional gigs in Detroit, which is "only" a couple of hundred miles away, set up by Joni and Chuck Mitchell, both of whom also sometimes stayed at Taylor's. And it was in Detroit that Neil Young became, albeit very briefly, a Motown artist. The Mynah Birds were a band in Toronto that had at one point included various future members of Steppenwolf, and they were unusual for the time in that they were a white band with a Black lead singer, Ricky Matthews. They also had a rich manager, John Craig Eaton, the heir to the Eaton's department store fortune, who basically gave them whatever money they wanted -- they used to go to his office and tell him they needed seven hundred dollars for lunch, and he'd hand it to them. They were looking for a new guitarist when Bruce Palmer, their bass player, bumped into Neil Young carrying an amp and asked if he was interested in joining. He was. The Mynah Birds quickly became one of the best bands in Toronto, and Young and Matthews became close, both as friends and as a performance team. People who saw them live would talk about things like a song called “Hideaway”, written by Young and Matthews, which had a spot in the middle where Young would start playing a harmonica solo, throw the harmonica up in the air mid-solo, Matthews would catch it, and he would then finish the solo. They got signed to Motown, who were at this point looking to branch out into the white guitar-group market, and they were put through the Motown star-making machine. They recorded an entire album, which remains unreleased, but they did release a single, "It's My Time": [Excerpt: The Mynah Birds, "It's My Time"] Or at least, they released a handful of promo copies. The single was pulled from release after Ricky Matthews got arrested. It turned out his birth name wasn't Ricky Matthews, but James Johnson, and that he wasn't from Toronto as he'd told everyone, but from Buffalo, New York. He'd fled to Canada after going AWOL from the Navy, not wanting to be sent to Vietnam, and he was arrested and jailed for desertion. After getting out of jail, he would start performing under yet another name, and as Rick James would have a string of hits in the seventies and eighties: [Excerpt: Rick James, "Super Freak"] Most of the rest of the group continued gigging as The Mynah Birds, but Young and Palmer had other plans. They sold the expensive equipment Eaton had bought the group, and Young bought a new hearse, which he named Mort 2 – Mort had been his first hearse. And according to one of the band's friends in Toronto, the crucial change in their lives came when Neil Young heard a song on a jukebox: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] Young apparently heard "California Dreamin'" and immediately said "Let's go to California and become rock stars". Now, Young later said of this anecdote that "That sounds like a Canadian story to me. That sounds too real to be true", and he may well be right. Certainly the actual wording of the story is likely incorrect -- people weren't talking about "rock stars" in 1966. Google's Ngram viewer has the first use of the phrase in print being in 1969, and the phrase didn't come into widespread usage until surprisingly late -- even granting that phrases enter slang before they make it to print, it still seems implausible. But even though the precise wording might not be correct, something along those lines definitely seems to have happened, albeit possibly less dramatically. Young's friend Comrie Smith independently said that Young told him “Well, Comrie, I can hear the Mamas and the Papas singing ‘All the leaves are brown, and the skies are gray …' I'm gonna go down to the States and really make it. I'm on my way. Today North Toronto, tomorrow the world!” Young and Palmer loaded up Mort 2 with a bunch of their friends and headed towards California. On the way, they fell out with most of the friends, who parted from them, and Young had an episode which in retrospect may have been his first epileptic seizure. They decided when they got to California that they were going to look for Steve Stills, as they'd heard he was in LA and neither of them knew anyone else in the state. But after several days of going round the Sunset Strip clubs asking if anyone knew Steve Stills, and sleeping in the hearse as they couldn't afford anywhere else, they were getting fed up and about to head off to San Francisco, as they'd heard there was a good music scene there, too. They were going to leave that day, and they were stuck in traffic on Sunset Boulevard, about to head off, when Stills and Furay came driving in the other direction. Furay happened to turn his head, to brush away a fly, and saw a hearse with Ontario license plates. He and Stills both remembered that Young drove a hearse, and so they assumed it must be him. They started honking at the hearse, then did a U-turn. They got Young's attention, and they all pulled into the parking lot at Ben Frank's, the Sunset Strip restaurant that attracted such a hip crowd the Monkees' producers had asked for "Ben Frank's types" in their audition advert. Young introduced Stills and Furay to Palmer, and now there *was* a group -- three singing, songwriting, guitarists and a bass player. Now all they needed was a drummer. There were two drummers seriously considered for the role. One of them, Billy Mundi, was technically the better player, but Young didn't like playing with him as much -- and Mundi also had a better offer, to join the Mothers of Invention as their second drummer -- before they'd recorded their first album, they'd had two drummers for a few months, but Denny Bruce, their second drummer, had become ill with glandular fever and they'd reverted to having Jimmy Carl Black play solo. Now they were looking for someone else, and Mundi took that role. The other drummer, who Young preferred anyway, was another Canadian, Dewey Martin. Martin was a couple of years older than the rest of the group, and by far the most experienced. He'd moved from Canada to Nashville in his teens, and according to Martin he had been taken under the wing of Hank Garland, the great session guitarist most famous for "Sugarfoot Rag": [Excerpt: Hank Garland, "Sugarfoot Rag"] We heard Garland playing with Elvis and others in some of the episodes around 1960, and by many reckonings he was the best session guitarist in Nashville, but in 1961 he had a car accident that left him comatose, and even though he recovered from the coma and lived another thirty-three years, he never returned to recording. According to Martin, though, Garland would still sometimes play jazz clubs around Nashville after the accident, and one day Martin walked into a club and saw him playing. The drummer he was playing with got up and took a break, taking his sticks with him, so Martin got up on stage and started playing, using two combs instead of sticks. Garland was impressed, and told Martin that Faron Young needed a drummer, and he could get him the gig. At the time Young was one of the biggest stars in country music. That year, 1961, he had three country top ten hits, including a number one with his version of Willie Nelson's "Hello Walls", produced by Ken Nelson: [Excerpt: Faron Young, "Hello Walls"] Martin joined Faron Young's band for a while, and also ended up playing short stints in the touring bands of various other Nashville-based country and rock stars, including Patsy Cline, Roy Orbison, and the Everly Brothers, before heading to LA for a while. Then Mel Taylor of the Ventures hooked him up with some musicians in the Pacific Northwest scene, and Martin started playing there under the name Sir Raleigh and the Coupons with various musicians. After a while he travelled back to LA where he got some members of the LA group Sons of Adam to become a permanent lineup of Coupons, and they recorded several singles with Martin singing lead, including the Tommy Boyce and Steve Venet song "Tomorrow's Gonna Be Another Day", later recorded by the Monkees: [Excerpt: Sir Raleigh and the Coupons, "Tomorrow's Gonna Be Another Day"] He then played with the Standells, before joining the Modern Folk Quartet for a short while, as they were transitioning from their folk sound to a folk-rock style. He was only with them for a short while, and it's difficult to get precise details -- almost everyone involved with Buffalo Springfield has conflicting stories about their own careers with timelines that don't make sense, which is understandable given that people were talking about events decades later and memory plays tricks. "Fast" Eddie Hoh had joined the Modern Folk Quartet on drums in late 1965, at which point they became the Modern Folk Quintet, and nothing I've read about that group talks about Hoh ever actually leaving, but apparently Martin joined them in February 1966, which might mean he's on their single "Night-Time Girl", co-written by Al Kooper and produced and arranged by Jack Nitzsche: [Excerpt: The Modern Folk Quintet, "Night-Time Girl"] After that, Martin was taken on by the Dillards, a bluegrass band who are now possibly most famous for having popularised the Arthur "Guitar Boogie" Smith song "Duellin' Banjos", which they recorded on their first album and played on the Andy Griffith Show a few years before it was used in Deliverance: [Excerpt: The Dillards, "Duellin' Banjos"] The Dillards had decided to go in a country-rock direction -- and Doug Dillard would later join the Byrds and make records with Gene Clark -- but they were hesitant about it, and after a brief period with Martin in the band they decided to go back to their drummerless lineup. To soften the blow, they told him about another band that was looking for a drummer -- their manager, Jim Dickson, who was also the Byrds' manager, knew Stills and his bandmates. Dewey Martin was in the group. The group still needed a name though. They eventually took their name from a brand of steam roller, after seeing one on the streets when some roadwork was being done. Everyone involved disagrees as to who came up with the name. Steve Stills at one point said it was a group decision after Neil Young and the group's manager Frazier Mohawk stole the nameplate off the steamroller, and later Stills said that Richey Furay had suggested the name while they were walking down the street, Dewey Martin said it was his idea, Neil Young said that he, Steve Sills, and Van Dyke Parks had been walking down the street and either Young or Stills had seen the nameplate and suggested the name, and Van Dyke Parks says that *he* saw the nameplate and suggested it to Dewey Martin: [Excerpt: Steve Stills and Van Dyke Parks on the name] For what it's worth, I tend to believe Van Dyke Parks in most instances -- he's an honest man, and he seems to have a better memory of the sixties than many of his friends who led more chemically interesting lives. Whoever came up with it, the name worked -- as Stills later put it "We thought it was pretty apt, because Neil Young is from Manitoba which is buffalo country, and  Richie Furay was from Springfield, Ohio -- and I'm the field!" It almost certainly also helped that the word "buffalo" had been in the name of Stills' previous group, Buffalo Fish. On the eleventh of April, 1966, Buffalo Springfield played their first gig, at the Troubadour, using equipment borrowed from the Dillards. Chris Hillman of the Byrds was in the audience and was impressed. He got the group a support slot on a show the Byrds and the Dillards were doing a few days later in San Bernardino. That show was compered by a Merseyside-born British DJ, John Ravenscroft, who had managed to become moderately successful in US radio by playing up his regional accent so he sounded more like the Beatles. He would soon return to the UK, and start broadcasting under the name John Peel. Hillman also got them a week-long slot at the Whisky A-Go-Go, and a bidding war started between record labels to sign the band. Dunhill offered five thousand dollars, Warners counted with ten thousand, and then Atlantic offered twelve thousand. Atlantic were *just* starting to get interested in signing white guitar groups -- Jerry Wexler never liked that kind of music, always preferring to stick with soul and R&B, but Ahmet Ertegun could see which way things were going. Atlantic had only ever signed two other white acts before -- Neil Young's old favourite Bobby Darin, who had since left the label, and Sonny and Cher. And Sonny and Cher's management and production team, Brian Stone and Charlie Greene, were also very interested in the group, who even before they had made a record had quickly become the hottest band on the circuit, even playing the Hollywood Bowl as the Rolling Stones' support act. Buffalo Springfield already had managers -- Frazier Mohawk and Richard Davis, the lighting man at the Troubadour (who was sometimes also referred to as Dickie Davis, but I'll use his full name so as not to cause unnecessary confusion in British people who remember the sports TV presenter of the same name), who Mohawk had enlisted to help him. But Stone and Greene weren't going to let a thing like that stop them. According to anonymous reports quoted without attribution in David Roberts' biography of Stills -- so take this with as many grains of salt as you want -- Stone and Greene took Mohawk for a ride around LA in a limo, just the three of them, a gun, and a used hotdog napkin. At the end of the ride, the hotdog napkin had Mohawk's scrawled signature, signing the group over to Stone and Greene. Davis stayed on, but was demoted to just doing their lights. The way things ended up, the group signed to Stone and Greene's production company, who then leased their masters to Atlantic's Atco subsidiary. A publishing company was also set up for the group's songs -- owned thirty-seven point five percent by Atlantic, thirty-seven point five percent by Stone and Greene, and the other twenty-five percent split six ways between the group and Davis, who they considered their sixth member. Almost immediately, Charlie Greene started playing Stills and Young off against each other, trying a divide-and-conquer strategy on the group. This was quite easy, as both men saw themselves as natural leaders, though Stills was regarded by everyone as the senior partner -- the back cover of their first album would contain the line "Steve is the leader but we all are". Stills and Young were the two stars of the group as far as the audience were concerned -- though most musicians who heard them play live say that the band's real strength was in its rhythm section, with people comparing Palmer's playing to that of James Jamerson. But Stills and Young would get into guitar battles on stage, one-upping each other, in ways that turned the tension between them in creative directions. Other clashes, though were more petty -- both men had very domineering mothers, who would actually call the group's management to complain about press coverage if their son was given less space than the other one. The group were also not sure about Young's voice -- to the extent that Stills was known to jokingly apologise to the audience before Young took a lead vocal -- and so while the song chosen as the group's first A-side was Young's "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing", Furay was chosen to sing it, rather than Young: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing"] On the group's first session, though, both Stills and Young realised that their producers didn't really have a clue -- the group had built up arrangements that had a complex interplay of instruments and vocals, but the producers insisted on cutting things very straightforwardly, with a basic backing track and then the vocals. They also thought that the song was too long so the group should play faster. Stills and Young quickly decided that they were going to have to start producing their own material, though Stone and Greene would remain the producers for the first album. There was another bone of contention though, because in the session the initial plan had been for Stills' song "Go and Say Goodbye" to be the A-side with Young's song as the B-side. It was flipped, and nobody seems quite sure why -- it's certainly the case that, whatever the merits of the two tracks as songs, Stills' song was the one that would have been more likely to become a hit. "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing" was a flop, but it did get some local airplay. The next single, "Burned", was a Young song as well, and this time did have Young taking the lead, though in a song dominated by harmonies: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Burned"] Over the summer, though, something had happened that would affect everything for the group -- Neil Young had started to have epileptic seizures. At first these were undiagnosed episodes, but soon they became almost routine events, and they would often happen on stage, particularly at moments of great stress or excitement. Several other members of the group became convinced -- entirely wrongly -- that Young was faking these seizures in order to get women to pay attention to him. They thought that what he wanted was for women to comfort him and mop his brow, and that collapsing would get him that. The seizures became so common that Richard Davis, the group's lighting tech, learned to recognise the signs of a seizure before it happened. As soon as it looked like Young was about to collapse the lights would turn on, someone would get ready to carry him off stage, and Richie Furay would know to grab Young's guitar before he fell so that the guitar wouldn't get damaged. Because they weren't properly grounded and Furay had an electric guitar of his own, he'd get a shock every time. Young would later claim that during some of the seizures, he would hallucinate that he was another person, in another world, living another life that seemed to have its own continuity -- people in the other world would recognise him and talk to him as if he'd been away for a while -- and then when he recovered he would have to quickly rebuild his identity, as if temporarily amnesiac, and during those times he would find things like the concept of lying painful. The group's first album came out in December, and they were very, very, unhappy with it. They thought the material was great, but they also thought that the production was terrible. Stone and Greene's insistence that they record the backing tracks first and then overdub vocals, rather than singing live with the instruments, meant that the recordings, according to Stills and Young in particular, didn't capture the sound of the group's live performance, and sounded sterile. Stills and Young thought they'd fixed some of that in the mono mix, which they spent ten days on, but then Stone and Greene did the stereo mix without consulting the band, in less than two days, and the album was released at precisely the time that stereo was starting to overtake mono in the album market. I'm using the mono mixes in this podcast, but for decades the only versions available were the stereo ones, which Stills and Young both loathed. Ahmet Ertegun also apparently thought that the demo versions of the songs -- some of which were eventually released on a box set in 2001 -- were much better than the finished studio recordings. The album was not a success on release, but it did contain the first song any of the group had written to chart. Soon after its release, Van Dyke Parks' friend Lenny Waronker was producing a single by a group who had originally been led by Sly Stone and had been called Sly and the Mojo Men. By this time Stone was no longer involved in the group, and they were making music in a very different style from the music their former leader would later become known for. Parks was brought in to arrange a baroque-pop version of Stills' album track "Sit Down I Think I Love You" for the group, and it became their only top forty hit, reaching number thirty-six: [Excerpt: The Mojo Men, "Sit Down I Think I Love You"] It was shortly after the first Buffalo Springfield album was released, though, that Steve Stills wrote what would turn out to be *his* group's only top forty single. The song had its roots in both LA and San Francisco. The LA roots were more obvious -- the song was written about a specific experience Stills had had. He had been driving to Sunset Strip from Laurel Canyon on November the twelfth 1966, and he had seen a mass of young people and police in riot gear, and he had immediately turned round, partly because he didn't want to get involved in what looked to be a riot, and partly because he'd been inspired -- he had the idea for a lyric, which he pretty much finished in the car even before he got home: [Excerpt: The Buffalo Springfield, "For What it's Worth"] The riots he saw were what became known later as the Riot on Sunset Strip. This was a minor skirmish between the police and young people of LA -- there had been complaints that young people had been spilling out of the nightclubs on Sunset Strip into the street, causing traffic problems, and as a result the city council had introduced various heavy-handed restrictions, including a ten PM curfew for all young people in the area, removing the permits that many clubs had which allowed people under twenty-one to be present, forcing the Whisky A-Go-Go to change its name just to "the Whisk", and forcing a club named Pandora's Box, which was considered the epicentre of the problem, to close altogether. Flyers had been passed around calling for a "funeral" for Pandora's Box -- a peaceful gathering at which people could say goodbye to a favourite nightspot, and a thousand people had turned up. The police also turned up, and in the heavy-handed way common among law enforcement, they managed to provoke a peaceful party and turn it into a riot. This would not normally be an event that would be remembered even a year later, let alone nearly sixty years later, but Sunset Strip was the centre of the American rock music world in the period, and of the broader youth entertainment field. Among those arrested at the riot, for example, were Jack Nicholson and Peter Fonda, neither of whom were huge stars at the time, but who were making cheap B-movies with Roger Corman for American International Pictures. Among the cheap exploitation films that American International Pictures made around this time was one based on the riots, though neither Nicholson, Fonda, or Corman were involved. Riot on Sunset Strip was released in cinemas only four months after the riots, and it had a theme song by Dewey Martin's old colleagues The Standells, which is now regarded as a classic of garage rock: [Excerpt: The Standells, "Riot on Sunset Strip"] The riots got referenced in a lot of other songs, as well. The Mothers of Invention's second album, Absolutely Free, contains the song "Plastic People" which includes this section: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Plastic People"] And the Monkees track "Daily Nightly", written by Michael Nesmith, was always claimed by Nesmith to be an impressionistic portrait of the riots, though the psychedelic lyrics sound to me more like they're talking about drug use and street-walking sex workers than anything to do with the riots: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Daily Nightly"] But the song about the riots that would have the most lasting effect on popular culture was the one that Steve Stills wrote that night. Although how much he actually wrote, at least of the music, is somewhat open to question. Earlier that month, Buffalo Springfield had spent some time in San Francisco. They hadn't enjoyed the experience -- as an LA band, they were thought of as a bunch of Hollywood posers by most of the San Francisco scene, with the exception of one band, Moby Grape -- a band who, like them had three guitarist/singer/songwriters, and with whom they got on very well. Indeed, they got on rather better with Moby Grape than they were getting on with each other at this point, because Young and Stills would regularly get into arguments, and every time their argument seemed to be settling down, Dewey Martin would manage to say the wrong thing and get Stills riled up again -- Martin was doing a lot of speed at this point and unable to stop talking, even when it would have been politic to do so. There was even some talk while they were in San Francisco of the bands doing a trade -- Young and Pete Lewis of Moby Grape swapping places -- though that came to nothing. But Stills, according to both Richard Davis and Pete Lewis, had been truly impressed by two Moby Grape songs. One of them was a song called "On the Other Side", which Moby Grape never recorded, but which apparently had a chorus that went "Stop, can't you hear the music ringing in your ear, right before you go, telling you the way is clear," with the group all pausing after the word "Stop". The other was a song called "Murder in my Heart for the Judge": [Excerpt: Moby Grape, "Murder in my Heart for the Judge"] The song Stills wrote had a huge amount of melodic influence from that song, and quite a bit from “On the Other Side”, though he apparently didn't notice until after the record came out, at which point he apologised to Moby Grape. Stills wasn't massively impressed with the song he'd written, and went to Stone and Greene's office to play it for them, saying "I'll play it, for what it's worth". They liked the song and booked a studio to get the song recorded and rush-released, though according to Neil Young neither Stone nor Greene were actually present at the session, and the song was recorded on December the fifth, while some outbursts of rioting were still happening, and released on December the twenty-third. [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "For What it's Worth"] The song didn't have a title when they recorded it, or so Stills thought, but when he mentioned this to Greene and Stone afterwards, they said "Of course it does. You said, 'I'm going to play the song, 'For What It's Worth'" So that became the title, although Ahmet Ertegun didn't like the idea of releasing a single with a title that wasn't in the lyric, so the early pressings of the single had "Stop, Hey, What's That Sound?" in brackets after the title. The song became a big hit, and there's a story told by David Crosby that doesn't line up correctly, but which might shed some light on why. According to Crosby, "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing" got its first airplay because Crosby had played members of Buffalo Springfield a tape he'd been given of the unreleased Beatles track "A Day in the Life", and they'd told their gangster manager-producers about it. Those manager-producers had then hired a sex worker to have sex with Crosby and steal the tape, which they'd then traded to a radio station in return for airplay. That timeline doesn't work, unless the sex worker involved was also a time traveller,  because "A Day in the Life" wasn't even recorded until January 1967 while "Clancy" came out in August 1966, and there'd been two other singles released between then and January 1967. But it *might* be the case that that's what happened with "For What It's Worth", which was released in the last week of December 1966, and didn't really start to do well on the charts for a couple of months. Right after recording the song, the group went to play a residency in New York, of which Ahmet Ertegun said “When they performed there, man, there was no band I ever heard that had the electricity of that group. That was the most exciting group I've ever seen, bar none. It was just mind-boggling.” During that residency they were joined on stage at various points by Mitch Ryder, Odetta, and Otis Redding. While in New York, the group also recorded "Mr. Soul", a song that Young had originally written as a folk song about his experiences with epilepsy, the nature of the soul, and dealing with fame. However, he'd noticed a similarity to "Satisfaction" and decided to lean into it. The track as finally released was heavily overdubbed by Young a few months later, but after it was released he decided he preferred the original take, which by then only existed as a scratchy acetate, which got released on a box set in 2001: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Mr. Soul (original version)"] Everyone has a different story of how the session for that track went -- at least one version of the story has Otis Redding turning up for the session and saying he wanted to record the song himself, as his follow-up to his version of "Satisfaction", but Young being angry at the idea. According to other versions of the story, Greene and Stills got into a physical fight, with Greene having to be given some of the valium Young was taking for his epilepsy to calm him down. "For What it's Worth" was doing well enough on the charts that the album was recalled, and reissued with "For What It's Worth" replacing Stills' song "Baby Don't Scold", but soon disaster struck the band. Bruce Palmer was arrested on drugs charges, and was deported back to Canada just as the song started to rise through the charts. The group needed a new bass player, fast. For a lipsynch appearance on local TV they got Richard Davis to mime the part, and then they got in Ken Forssi, the bass player from Love, for a couple of gigs. They next brought in Ken Koblun, the bass player from the Squires, but he didn't fit in with the rest of the group. The next replacement was Jim Fielder. Fielder was a friend of the group, and knew the material -- he'd subbed for Palmer a few times in 1966 when Palmer had been locked up after less serious busts. And to give some idea of how small a scene the LA scene was, when Buffalo Springfield asked him to become their bass player, he was playing rhythm guitar for the Mothers of Invention, while Billy Mundi was on drums, and had played on their second, as yet unreleased, album, Absolutely Free: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Call any Vegetable"] And before joining the Mothers, Fielder and Mundi had also played together with Van Dyke Parks, who had served his own short stint as a Mother of Invention already, backing Tim Buckley on Buckley's first album: [Excerpt: Tim Buckley, "Aren't You the Girl?"] And the arrangements on that album were by Jack Nitzsche, who would soon become a very close collaborator with Young. "For What it's Worth" kept rising up the charts. Even though it had been inspired by a very local issue, the lyrics were vague enough that people in other situations could apply it to themselves, and it soon became regarded as an anti-war protest anthem -- something Stills did nothing to discourage, as the band were all opposed to the war. The band were also starting to collaborate with other people. When Stills bought a new house, he couldn't move in to it for a while, and so Peter Tork invited him to stay at his house. The two got on so well that Tork invited Stills to produce the next Monkees album -- only to find that Michael Nesmith had already asked Chip Douglas to do it. The group started work on a new album, provisionally titled "Stampede", but sessions didn't get much further than Stills' song "Bluebird" before trouble arose between Young and Stills. The root of the argument seems to have been around the number of songs each got on the album. With Richie Furay also writing, Young was worried that given the others' attitudes to his songwriting, he might get as few as two songs on the album. And Young and Stills were arguing over which song should be the next single, with Young wanting "Mr. Soul" to be the A-side, while Stills wanted "Bluebird" -- Stills making the reasonable case that they'd released two Neil Young songs as singles and gone nowhere, and then they'd released one of Stills', and it had become a massive hit. "Bluebird" was eventually chosen as the A-side, with "Mr. Soul" as the B-side: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Bluebird"] The "Bluebird" session was another fraught one. Fielder had not yet joined the band, and session player Bobby West subbed on bass. Neil Young had recently started hanging out with Jack Nitzsche, and the two were getting very close and working on music together. Young had impressed Nitzsche not just with his songwriting but with his arrogance -- he'd played Nitzsche his latest song, "Expecting to Fly", and Nitzsche had said halfway through "That's a great song", and Young had shushed him and told him to listen, not interrupt. Nitzsche, who had a monstrous ego himself and was also used to working with people like Phil Spector, the Rolling Stones and Sonny Bono, none of them known for a lack of faith in their own abilities, was impressed. Shortly after that, Stills had asked Nitzsch

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Miami Oculto
Íconos de rock que han dejado su huella en Miami

Miami Oculto

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 37:44


Miami tiene su historia con figuras del rock como Hendrix, Clapton, Bee Gees, Beatles, The Doors, quienes ofrecieron conciertos, grabaron discos o enfrentaron una batalla legal. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

You Talking To Me?!
Sued by Eric Clapton

You Talking To Me?!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 3:02


Why was a woman sued by Eric Clapton over an $11 CD?

Danny Clinkscale: Reasonably Irreverent
Arts and Lifestyle Wednesday Presented by Healing Frequency Massage-Bullet Train to Velveeta Revisited

Danny Clinkscale: Reasonably Irreverent

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 19:23


Having a blast with a blast from the past. One of my first podcasts is a reconfigured blog I loved about the fine line between art and cheese in soft rock. A faithful reading and some fun surprises in a cool look back.

Café Brasil Podcast
Café Brasil 834 - A Lei de Gresham

Café Brasil Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 30:57


Quando lancei meu livro Brasileiros Pocotó em 2004, e junto com ele o Movimento pela Despocotização do Brasil, eu ansiava por um país que valorizasse a cultura, que apreciasse o talento intelectual, que construísse seu futuro sobre valores fundamentais. Para isso, teríamos de ser capazes de perceber o que é o belo, o fundamental, o pertinente, aquilo que nos traz crescimento intelectual. Duas décadas depois, qual é a sua avaliação, hein?

The Blues Guitar Show
Episode #85 Eric Clapton - Hey Hey

The Blues Guitar Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 11:03


To join the 12 bar challenge click on the link and get yourself into the private Facebook group https://thebluesguitarshow.com/the-12-bar-challenge/This week, we're learning the main riff from Clapton's version of the Big Bill Broonzy classic 'Hey Hey', taken from his 1992 unplugged album. Grab your guitar, slap on some headphones and let's get pickin'.Follow me on instagram @bluesguitarshowpodcast Make a small donation at 'Buy me a coffee' https://www.buymeacoffee.com/bluesguitarshowSupport the show

Pacific Street Blues and Americana
Episode 105: July 31, 2022 Focus on Clapton's latest 'Nothing But the Blues'

Pacific Street Blues and Americana

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 84:36


Pacific St Blues & AmericanaLike our Facebook pageThis week we focus on the latest from Eric Clapton, Nothing But the Blues. Noted film director Martin Scorsese is releasing a film to accompany Clapton's latest compilation/live album. 1. Sister Rosetta Tharpe / Didn't It Rain2. Maria Muldaur, Marcia Ball, Angela Stehli, Tracy Nelson / Shout, Sister Shout3. Eric Clapton / It Hurts Me Too 4. Cream / I'm So Glad (Skip James) 5. Swamp Boy / 100 Degrees in the Shade6. Blind Willie McTell / Statesboro Blues7. Eric Clapton / Early in the Morning 8. Darrell Nulisch / Trick or Treat 9. Blue House & the Rent to Own Horns / She Boogaloos10. Otis Redding / Hard to Handle 11. Eric Clapton / Everyday I Have the Blues 12. Tommy Castro / Blues Prisoner13. Trombone Shorty / Hurricane Season14. Maceo Parker / Compared to What 15. Eric Clapton / Have You Ever Loved a Woman 16. BB King / King of Guitar17. Dana Fuchs / Blue Mist Road 18. Sass Jordan / Still Alive and Well19. Eric Clapton / It Hurts Me Too 0. Mississippi Heat / Silent Too Long 

Dan Caplis
Ryan's Riffs, 7/28: Free, Mark Morrison, Aerosmith, Eric Clapton, Hank Williams, Jr., Queen

Dan Caplis

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 25:38


The Hunter - Free, Return of the Mack - Mark Morrison, Back in the Saddle - Aerosmith, Cocaine - Eric Clapton, Family Tradition - Hank Williams, Jr., Fat-Bottomed Girls - Queen

Dan Caplis
Ryan's Riffs, 7/22: R.E.M., Village People, The Cars, AC/DC, Eric Clapton, The Guess Who

Dan Caplis

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 26:10


Man on the Moon - R.E.M., In the Navy - Village People, Dangerous Type - The Cars, You Shook Me All Night Long - AC/DC, Change the World - Eric Clapton, Laughing - The Guess Who

Gavin Wood's Countdown Podcast
Richard Clapton - Gavin Woods Podcast Series 5 Episode 2

Gavin Wood's Countdown Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 46:35


Richard Clapton began his recording career in 1974. Australia was still in the vice-like grip of the cultural cringe. He plunged into the “deep water” and legends like Skyhooks and Paul Kelly, Cold Chisel, INXS, Midnight Oil, and hundreds of others, followed in his wake. Clapton's songs are still omnipresent on the radio to this day, his records charting the political landscape of the nation and the turbulent lives of two generations. Clapton grew up in Sydney in the 1960s before hopping a plane for London, and then later to Germany, where he wrote a first album, Prussian Blue (1973) which was one of the first major Australian “singer-songwriter” albums. Fast track to 1975, Clapton had the critics on side but his label at the time, Festival Records, insisted on a hit single. However, it was the song they picked as a B-side called “Girls On the Avenue” that reached #1 on the national charts and put Clapton at the top of his class. Like Americans Jackson Browne and Bruce Springsteen, Richard Clapton developed a sound based on melodic rock while his lyrics were poetic musings on his state of mind or the state of the nation. In 1980 he released the searing Dark Spaces, an indictment on the meanness and mendacity that would blow through the 1980s. Ten years after his first release, Richard Clapton was a tribal elder to whom younger artists like Jimmy Barnes, INXS and Cold Chisel turned as a mentor. INXS asked Clapton to produce their second album, Underneath the Colours, and they became firm friends. They, and Cold Chisel, returned the favour on Clapton's The Great Escape album with INXS drummer Jon Farriss going on to produce The Glory Road album. Few records of that time captured the roller coaster ride of the late 1980s as well as Glory Road. These albums brought Clapton's melodic gifts and his love of electric rock & roll into lockstep. In the 1990s Richard continued to write and record and tour and his 1990s songs reflect a hard-won maturity. Indeed, Richard counts 2003's Diamond Mine as amongst his best albums – and the critics unanimously agreed. In 1999 Richard Clapton was inducted into the ARIA Hall of Fame. In 2014, his first memoir “The Best Years of Our Lives” was published by Allen and Unwin. The book connected with people of all generations because it was not only a story of Clapton's journey, but it also documented the story of the lives of thousands of fans who had travelled the same road. Young people – fascinated by how it was “back in the day” also became a new generation of fans. The book continues to flourish through “word of mouth”, resonating with so many people in so many ways Richard Clapton has never been rich. He has never had the pleasure of passing through life in a luxurious rock star bubble. In a career that now spans over 40 years he has battled everything from bad managers and capricious record companies to debt, taxes, personal tragedy and a thousand room service dinners. The fact that he's come through it all with his sanity intact surprises all who know and love him.

It's Only Rock And Roll Podcast
Ep. 42 - Jim McCarty (The Yardbirds)

It's Only Rock And Roll Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 57:09


On this episode of The It's Only Rock And Roll Podcast, founding member and drummer of The Yardbirds, JIM McCARTY talks about the band's multi-decade career, starting out as England's most authentic rhythm & blues band, that gave rise to guitarists Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, Jimmy Page, and helped usher in progressive and heavy rock. We discuss the backstory behind classics like “For Your Love” and “Dazed and Confused”, why Clapton really left the group, recording one of their hit singles at Sun Studios with Sam Philips, recollections surrounding the sudden death of lead singer Keith Relf, and the current success of The Yardbirds following their induction into The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. ------------------------------------------------ ֎ For more on Jim McCarty and The Yardbirds including Tour Dates, News, Photos - http://www.jamesmccarty.com/ ֎ To purchase Jim McCarty's book “Nobody Told Me: My Life with The Yardbirds, Renaissance and Other Stories” - https://amzn.to/3AukwSg Visit the 'It's Only Rock And Roll PODCAST' online at: ● Homepage – http://www.ItsOnlyRockAndRollPodcast.com ● Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/ItsOnlyRockAndRollPodcast/ ● YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCFB7uJ3dg4IKSxsNny9Jiw/videos ● Audea.io - https://audea.io/ ● Instagram - @itsonlyrockandrollpodcast Be sure to check out our all-new OFFICIAL IORR PODCAST STORE! https://www.cafepress.com/iorrpodcast © 2022 Howlaround Productions. All rights reserved.

Learning Guitar Now: Learn blues guitar and slide guitar with these easy to follow guitar lessons from John W. Tuggle.

In this lesson I want to show you how to play an Erioc Clapton style slow blues solo in the key of B.

Guitar Speak Podcast
Iconic Signature Gear GSP #207

Guitar Speak Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 80:56


The Iconic team is back talking cool, quirky and classic signature gear. From EVH to Clapton, Vai to Wong and even some anime stars along the way, there is a lot to get across! And postscript...Rob now owns a Fireman m/. Rob Rhodes - www.rhodetripent.com Gabor Josika - SuperFunAwesomeHappyTime Pedal Show   This episode is brought to you by Fretboard Biology    Fretboard Biology - the online guitar college created by Joe Elliott, ex Head of Guitar at GIT and McNally Smith Music College. Fretboard Biology Guitar Speak Podcast #146 - Joe Elliott - ex guitar head of GIT - launches Fretboard Biology Guitar Speak Podcast Links PayPal Tip Jar Visit us at guitarspeakpodcast.com Subscribe and find previous episodes at: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher   Follow us on Facebook & Instagram   Contact us at guitarspeakpodcast@gmail.com  

What the Riff?!?
1970 - November: Derek and the Dominos “Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs”

What the Riff?!?

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 40:17


Today Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs is considered Eric Clapton's best work.  However, at the time that this double album debut by Derek and the Dominos came out it was considered both a commercial and critical failure.  Clapton met fellow Derek and the Dominos band members Bobby Whitlock (keyboards), Carl Radle (bass) and Jim Gordon (drums) when working with Delaney & Bonnie.  Whitlock and Clapton got together at Clapton's house and composed most of what would become the original songs on the Layla album.The name Derek and the Dominos was chosen by Eric Clapton because he was tired of the supergroup approach to music and did not want his fame to overshadow the band.  Derek and the Dominos played a lot of small clubs in England in August, then went to Miami to record the studio album.The group met up with Duane Allman in Miami, and Allman and Clapton struck up a close friendship from the start.  Allman would record on 11 of the 14 songs on the album.Most know that the song Layla was inspired by Clapton's infatuation with Pattie Boyd Harrison, George Harrison's wife.  In truth, many of the songs on the Layla album were performed with Pattie Boyd in mind.Unfortunately this double album is the only record these musicians would make together.  Clapton would struggle with drug addiction and depression for several years afterward, and Allman would die in a tragic accident in 1971.  The reputation of this album would grow over time, however, and is iconic today. Bell Bottom BluesThis song was the first single, and was written by Clapton and Whitlock.  The inspiration for the song was that Pattie Boyd had asked Clapton to get her a pair of bell-bottom blue jeans while he was in the United States.  It's Too LateThe album contains five covers including this blues song originally benned by Chuck Willis in 1956.  Clapton and Whitlock trade off on vocals, and guitar work is from Eric Clapton and Duane Allman.  The song would be performed on Derek and the Dominos' only TV appearance, on the Johnny Cash Show in January 1971.Why Does Love Got to Be So SadYou can hear a terrific jam between Clapton and Allman on guitar in this song.  It swings from A minor on the verses to D major on the chorus.  Whitlock and Clapton trade off vocal work.LaylaThis signature track was inspired by a 12th century tale called “The Story of Layla and Majnun.”  It is about a young man who falls hopelessly in love with a young girl only to be rebuffed by her father because of his obsession with her.  Clapton of course identified with the story of hopeless love because of his feelings toward Pattie Boyd Harrison. ENTERTAINMENT TRACK:Main theme from the television series “The Goodies”This offbeat comedy series premiered in the UK in this month. STAFF PICKS:Share the Land by the Guess WhoBrian starts off the staff picks with the title track from the Guess Who's seventh studio album, and the first after the departure of guitarist Randy Bachman.  The lyrics reflect the growing popularity of the environmental movement.  Burton Cummings wrote this song and sings lead.Cherryhill Park by Billy Joe RoyalWayne brings us a story song about a young girl named Mary Hill who “was a thrill after dark in Cherryhill Park.”  The thrills end when Mary Hill marries a rich man.  Billy Joe Royal was born in Valdosta, Georgia.Montego Bay by Bobby BloomRob finds an early reggae-influenced rock song.  Bobby Bloom and Jeff Berry wrote this one-hit wonder.  It made it to number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100.  Sadly, Bobby Bloom died in 1974 at the age of 28.Somebody's Been Sleeping in My Bed by 100 Proof (Aged in Soul)Bruce's staff pick comes from the songwriting team of Holland-Dozier Holland after they left Motown Records to set up a separate label.  This song about discovering evidence of infidelity went to number 8 on the US pop charts, and was 100 Proof's biggest hit INSTRUMENTAL TRACK:Overture by the WhoIn the tradition of symphonic music, the Who began their rock opera Tommy with this overture. 

Page Avenue Crew
#92 - This Episode Brought to You by Tom Cruise

Page Avenue Crew

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 57:11


Story of the Year: The Pittsburgh Pirates of music. DIY Kinko's Gangsters. No viable eggs. Plug into that thermos and let me hear some Clapton licks. Lemme get a dose of Momma's Mucinex. Two buttons at once so you don't cut your hands off. Support Story of the Year on Patreon: patreon.com/storyoftheyear Get Story of the Year merch: storyoftheyearmerch.com Follow Story of the Year on social media: Instagram twitter Dan: Instagram twitter Adam: Instagram twitter Josh: Instagram twitter Ryan: Instagram Story of the year, page avenue, in the wake of determination, the black swan, the constant, wolves, until the day I die, Pabst blue ribbon, liquid death, emo, emo nite, emo's not dead, pop-punk, punk, screamo, warped tour, vans warped tour, Kevin Lyman, the used, Atreyu, my chemical romance, Yellowcard, William Ryan key, bayside, Silverstein, Shane told, Saosin, every time I die, Anberlin, Glassjaw, he is legend, destroy rebuild until god shows, 105.7 the point, toby morse, lead singer syndrome, prs guitars, Ernie ball, music man, A Day to Remember, Beartooth, Top Gun Maverick --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/pageavenuecrew/support

Randy Baumann and the DVE Morning Show
Neal Schon Chose Santana over Clapton, Sean Collier Applauds Another Serious Sandler Movie, PA Medical Kushy and more

Randy Baumann and the DVE Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 166:05


Neal Schon's bay area journey around between two guitar legends, Sean Collier is not a fan of the newest installment in the Jurassic Park series, and PA Medical Kushy has all your legal weed reviews on YouTube.

Sunday Papers
Sunday Papers w/ Greg and Mike Ep: 115 5/22/22

Sunday Papers

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 94:44 Very Popular


Elon Musk is making jokes about his penis, Nancy Pelosi can't eat those Jesus wafers, Clapton has the Vid and a Florida Man is on fire this week!    

Here's The Thing with Alec Baldwin
Daniel Roher and Christo Grozev Tell the Story of “Navalny”

Here's The Thing with Alec Baldwin

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 42:38 Very Popular


Canadian documentary film director Daniel Roher is known for his 2019 film Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson and the Band, which features the elite of rock and roll, including Springsteen and Clapton. Bulgarian investigative journalist Christov Grozev is the lead Russia investigator with Bellingcat, an open-source journalism group. The two collaborated on the documentary “Navalny,” which was directed by Roher and has received widespread acclaim from critics and moviegoers. The gripping real-life thriller took home the Festival Favorite and U.S. Documentary Audience Awards at the 2022 Sundance Film Festival. “Navanly” follows Russian opposition leader and outspoken Putin critic Alexei Navany in the wake of his 2020 poisoning as he works to uncover those responsible for the assassination attempt.  Roher and Grozev spoke with Alec about Nava