Podcasts about Stasi

  • 790PODCASTS
  • 1,425EPISODES
  • 43mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 31, 2023LATEST
Stasi

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about Stasi

Show all podcasts related to stasi

Latest podcast episodes about Stasi

The Strong[HER] Way | non diet approach, mindset coaching, lifestyle advice
How to prepare for and navigate the peri-menopause years successfully w/ guest expert Stasi Kasianchuk [PART 2]

The Strong[HER] Way | non diet approach, mindset coaching, lifestyle advice

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2023 43:04


Hey friend! We are back for part 2 of our peri menopause conversation with special guest expert Stasi Kasianchuk of Gennev. Stasi has over 10 years experience in the exercise and nutrition field, and has found her calling helping women navigate the oft confusing and frustrating time surrounding menopause. In part 1 we discussed what menopause is and isn't. As well as the peri-menopause years which can be up to 7-10 years BEFORE you actually go through menopause. In this episode we are focusing more on the practical things you can do with nutrition, exercise, and lifestyle management to support your body as it goes through these hormonal changes. If you want to connect with Stasi or learn more about what they are doing at Gennev, you can click the link. ________________________________________Ready for this to be the year of FOOD FREEDOM and feeling good in your body independent of what the scale says. If you're tired of letting the scale dictate your mood and basically every other area of your life, then I want to invite you to 1. grab your free ticket to the Ditch the Diet Summit happening February 17-192. Message or email me to set up a free chat to learn more about my non diet approach and how it can help you get to the root of your food issues so that you can get your life back. Email: alisha@alishacarlson.comIGFB

Captivated
The Power of Testimony Part Two | Elaine Supple

Captivated

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 38:53


As this series continues, Stasi's friend Elaine Supple shares her heart's journey. Because of her story, Elaine struggled with a sense of not belonging for many years. In today's podcast, she shares ways God has invited her into his comforting love – finding his steadfast heart to be her true Home. Friends, God is calling each one of us deeper into His heart to find the love we long for, the security we are meant to know, and the ability to love ourselves and others well.SHOW NOTES:Verses: Ephesians 3:16-19 (NIV) — I pray that out of his glorious riches he may strengthen you with power through his Spirit in your inner being, so that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith. And I pray that you, being rooted and established in love, may have power, together with all the Lord's holy people, to grasp how wide and long and high and deep is the love of Christ, and to know this love that surpasses knowledge—that you may be filled to the measure of all the fullness of God. Isaiah 62:4 (NLT) — Never again will you be called “The Forsaken City” or “The Desolate Land.” Your new name will be “The City of God's Delight” and “The Bride of God,” for the Lord delights in you and will claim you as his bride.Psalm 21 (NIV) — the entire chapterThe Sacred Romance by Brent Curtis and John Eldredge Homecoming 2019: BelongingElaine Supple Bio:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fintans/As a qualified counselor, Elaine has a passion for helping people discover the gift of who they truly are and to encourage them to embrace their own story and live centered in their innate value as a human being. She believes each person has unique gifts, and by tapping into what they really love, dismantling toxic beliefs, and mastering their emotions, they can unlock their true potential. Elaine loves spending quality time with her family and friends around great food and deep conversations. She takes great pleasure in understanding new concepts, loves working with and learning from the next generation, and have a vision to unite the world of counseling and coaching to bring the best results for people.

The Strong[HER] Way | non diet approach, mindset coaching, lifestyle advice
How to prepare for and navigate the peri-menopause years successfully w/ guest expert Stasi Kasianchuk (part 1)

The Strong[HER] Way | non diet approach, mindset coaching, lifestyle advice

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 40:02


Hello friend,Menopause. If you haven't already gone through it, you will one day. And, as I learned from today's expert it is never too early to start preparing or too late to make some lifestyle changes to best support your body as it goes through this major hormonal shift. Today's expert, Stasi Kasianchuk has taken her 10+ years experience in nutrition and exercise, and has channeled it into helping women rock the peri-menopausal years. She uses a lifestyle medicine approach with her clients, and offers great encouragement to all women. In this episode we talk about what exactly menopause is,  the peri menopause years, and we get into some practical ways you can begin to support your body through food, exercise, stress management, and other lifestyle factors.If you want to learn more about Gennev or contact Stasi directly, you can do so here:Stasi@gennev.comwww.gennev.comAnd...if you've been listening to the show, applying what you've been learning, and are ready to take it deeper in your own life, you can email alisha@alishacarlson.com to get started. InstagramFacebook

Captivated
The Power of Testimony

Captivated

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 36:01


There is power and encouragement in sharing, listening to, and remembering the testimonies of the saving grace and love of God. In this first episode of a series, Stasi shares her story of God's rescue and ongoing intervention in her life with awe and deep thanksgiving. Friends, Jesus has come for us and he is coming still. No one is out of reach of his amazing love.SHOW NOTES:Verses: Matthew 11:28 (NIV) — Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Ephesians Chapter 1 — In its entirety Ephesians 3:14-18 (NIV) — For this reason, I kneel before the Father, from whom every family in heaven and on earth derives its name. I pray that out of his glorious riches, he may strengthen you with power through his Spirit in your inner being, so that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith. And I pray that you, being rooted and established in love, may have power, together with all the Lord's holy people, to grasp how wide and long and high and deep is the love of Christ, and to know this love that surpasses knowledge—that you may be filled to the measure of all the fullness of God. Neil Anderson BooksThe Steps to Freedom in ChristBondage BreakerWho I Am In Christ: Click here for a link to the Book Who I Am in Christ  Click here for a link to a printable list of truths that Stasi read about Who I Am in Christ Prayer of Salvation – Receiving Christ by faith as your Lord and Savior is the most vital act anyone will ever do. We want life. He is Life. We need cleansing. He is the Living Water. This link will take you to a simple prayer if you have not yet invited Jesus into your life, or if you would like to ask him again.

The Ann & Phelim Scoop
The Media Is The New Secret “Stasi” Police – With Mark Judge

The Ann & Phelim Scoop

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 40:29


Welcome to the first Scoop of the New Year! Ann is out sick this week, but we're joined by a fascinating guest to discuss how the mainstream media has become the new secret police, like the German Stasi who infiltrated art and culture to shut down dissent. Author and journalist, Mark Judge is here to share his own experience being accused and demonized by the leftist media for his connections to future Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanagh during the infamous assault investigation. Also on the Scoop, we look at how being an environmentalist means never saying sorry, especially when you're Paul Ehrlich whose work has consistently been proven wrong yet still wins awards from the left. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ap-scoop/message

Mythes Mythos
Les grandes manipulations de l'histoire - 1982 : Les méthodes de la Stasi - 2/6

Mythes Mythos

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 12:55


Infiltration, répression et surveillance de masse… Replongez en pleine guerre froide dans les techniques de manipulation de la Stasi. L'ancienne agence d'espionnage de l'Allemagne de l'Est, dont les méthodes inspirent encore aujourd'hui les plus grands services de renseignements.

American Conservative University
The Devil's Triangle: Mark Judge vs the New American Stassi. The Eric Metaxas Show.

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 41:29


The Devil's Triangle: Mark Judge vs the New American Stassi. The Eric Metaxas Show. The Eric Metaxas Show Mark Judge (Encore)  Dec 27 2022   Mark Judge, with his new book, "The Devil's Triangle: Mark Judge vs the New American Stassi," recalls his incredible ordeal involving an old classmate named Brett Kavanaugh. (Encore Presentation) The Eric Metaxas Show- https://metaxastalk.com/podcasts/ About the book- The Devil's Triangle: Mark Judge vs the New American Stasi Paperback – November 10, 2022 by Mark Judge  (Author) A harrowing account of one man's ordeal during the contentious Brett Kavanaugh hearings at the hands of the New American Stasi⎯a sinister cabal of partisan journalists, Democratic politicians, and shadowy oppo researchers the author calls “The Devil's Triangle.” “Do you remember the woman in To Kill a Mockingbird who falsely accuses a black man of raping her? What could possess anyone to do such an evil thing—to viciously attempt to destroy a life by knowingly lying? For that answer look no farther than the riveting and gloriously candid The Devil's Triangle by Mark Judge, who himself was targeted for destruction by that same evil, and who lived to tell the tale, if only so that we might all recognize the dark forces at work in our nation. In a voice evoking J.D. Salinger, Hunter S. Thompson, and yes, Lester Bangs—within a narrative that brings to mind All the President's Men and Fast Times at Ridgemont High—Judge tells us the truth, in all of its brutality and beauty. May this book open the way for a spate of similar memoirs, whose honesty will lead this once-great nation out of the fetid triangular swamp of lies that is this brave book's eponymous Devil's Triangle—and toward a new sunlit frontier, in which genuine liberty and unvarnished truth once more become our beacons and our hope.” —Eric Metaxas, #1 New York Times Bestselling author of Fish Out of Water: A Search for the Meaning of Life and Host of Socrates in the City In 2018, in the midst of a contentious Supreme Court confirmation battle, Christine Blasey Ford named Mark Judge as a witness to her alleged attempted rape over thirty years earlier at the hands of a teenaged Brett Kavanaugh. Overnight, the unassuming writer, critic, videographer, and recovering alcoholic was unwillingly thrust into the national media spotlight. Reporters combed through Judge's writings, pored over his high school yearbook, hounded him with emails and phone calls, and invaded the privacy of his relatives, friends, and former girlfriends. He was mauled in the press, denounced in the Senate, received threatening late-night calls, became the target of a classic honey trap, and was even called out by Matt Damon on Saturday Night Live. As the lunacy reached its crescendo, Judge began to fear for his sanity⎯and even his life. A year later, still traumatized by this Kafkaesque experience, Judge found himself washing dishes in a Maryland restaurant, trying to piece his shattered life back together. Even at the time, it was clear that Judge himself was not the target of this campaign of vilification. Instead, it was an attempt to use his spotty record as a teenage alcoholic, and later, a political and cultural conservative, to destroy Brett Kavanaugh by proxy. The actors in this malicious and cynical plot were an informal cabal of partisan reporters, Democrats in Congress, and shadowy opposition researchers: a “Devil's Triangle” whom Judge aptly compares to the Stasi, the dreaded East German secret police who terrorized citizens during the Cold War. Now, in a frank, confessional, and deeply moving book that stands comparison to Arthur Koestler's Cold War classic Darkness at Noon, Judge rips the mask from the new American Stasi. Using pop culture, politics, the story of his friendship with Kavanaugh, and the fun, wild, and misunderstood 1980s, Judge celebrates sex, art, and freedom while issuing a timely warning to the rest of us about our own endangered freedoms.   You can purchase this book at your favorite bookseller or on Amazon at- https://www.amazon.com/Devils-Triangle-Judge-American-Stasi/dp/163758072X   HELP ACU SPREAD THE WORD!  Please go to Apple Podcasts and give ACU a 5 star rating. Apple canceled us and now we are clawing our way back to the top. Don't let the Leftist win. Do it now! Thanks. Forward this show to friends. Ways to subscribe to the American Conservative University Podcast Click here to subscribe via Apple Podcasts Click here to subscribe via RSS You can also subscribe via Stitcher FM Player Podcast Addict Tune-in Podcasts Pandora Look us up on Amazon Prime …And Many Other Podcast Aggregators and sites   Please help ACU by submitting your Show ideas. Email us at americanconservativeuniversity@americanconservativeuniversity.com Please go to Apple Podcasts and give ACU a 5 star rating. Apple canceled us and now we are clawing our way back to the top. Don't let the Leftist win. Do it now! Thanks.   Metaxas charities mentioned- -------------------------------------------------------- Pre-Born! Saving babies and Souls. https://preborn.org/ OUR MISSION To glorify Jesus Christ by leading and equipping pregnancy clinics to save more babies and souls. WHAT WE DO Pre-Born! partners with life-affirming pregnancy clinics all across the nation. We are designed to strategically impact the abortion industry through the following initiatives:… -------------------------------------------------------- Help CSI Stamp Out Slavery In Sudan Join us in our effort to free over 350 slaves. Listeners to the Eric Metaxas Show will remember our annual effort to free Christians who have been enslaved for simply acknowledging Jesus Christ as their Savior. As we celebrate the birth of Christ this Christmas, join us in giving new life to brothers and sisters in Sudan who have enslaved as a result of their faith. https://csi-usa.org/metaxas   https://csi-usa.org/slavery/   Typical Aid for the Enslaved A ration of sorghum, a local nutrient-rich staple food A dairy goat A “Sack of Hope,” a survival kit containing essential items such as tarp for shelter, a cooking pan, a water canister, a mosquito net, a blanket, a handheld sickle, and fishing hooks. Release celebrations include prayer and gathering for a meal, and medical care for those in need. The CSI team provides comfort, encouragement, and a shoulder to lean on while they tell their stories and begin their new lives. Thank you for your compassion  Giving the Gift of Freedom and Hope to the Enslaved South Sudanese --------------------------------------------------------

The Tara Show
The American Stasi

The Tara Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 15:01


The FBI has grown more powerful than any group of voters or political party. Here's how the Twitter files prove that. Now what will we do about it?

Battleground America Podcast
The American Stasi

Battleground America Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 15:01


The FBI has grown more powerful than any group of voters or political party. Here's how the Twitter files prove that. Now what will we do about it?

Erfurter Stadtgespräch
20.12.22: Stadtgeschichte: Die friedlcihe Besetzung der Stasi-Zentrale in Erfurt 1989

Erfurter Stadtgespräch

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 45:30


Am 4. Dezember 1989 besetzten mutige Menschen des Erfurter Bürgerkomitees die Stasi-Zentrale in der Andreasstraße. Sie wollten damit verhindern, dass weitere Akten vernichtet wurden. Barbara Sengewald aus Erfurt war dabei und sie erzählt für das Projekt „Wende.punkte Erfurt“, wie die gewaltfreie Aktion ablief und mit welchen Ergebnissen sie endete. Funktion und Arbeitsweise der Bildungsstätte Andreasstraße erläutert Dr. Jochen Voit. In dem medienpädagogischen Geschichtsprojekt wende.punkte Erfurt wurde Erfahrungen von Menschen unterschiedlichster Berufsgruppen und Funktionen aufgezeichnet. Dieses Projekt, an dem Richard Schaefer beteiligt war, entstand mit der Aktivschule Erfurt, des Thüringer Medienbildungszentrums und der Funke-Mediengruppe. https://www.youtube.com/@wende.punkteerfurt4434 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NGr6KLPYc0U

Uppgång och Fall
Nord Stream: gasledningen som sprängdes 2/3 - KGB, FSB, STASI

Uppgång och Fall

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 37:56


Två av världens mäktigaste män är på spralligt humör för idag är en stor dag. Med svart bläck undertecknads det avtal som ska förse Tyskland med rysk gas i decennier framöver. Ute i Östersjön börjar en hallänning spränga minor för att göra plats åt de 120 mil långa stålrören. Men vad är det för personer som leder Nord stream egentligen?Om du inte vill vänta går det redan nu att låsa upp alla delar genom att bli prenumerant - då får du full tillgång till den här podden och alla andra program vi gör på Third Ear Studio. Gå in på thirdearstudio.com och välj själv vilken poddspelare du vill lyssna i. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/uppgangochfall. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Captivated
Friends of Jesus with Annie Downs

Captivated

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 36:51


In today's podcast, Stasi and author, speaker, and podcaster Annie Downs invite you into their delightful conversation on experiencing joy even in the hard and practicing friendship with Jesus as he invites us into a beautiful story with him. There is a deep joy in knowing that he sits with us in everything. We are not alone. With Jesus, we have a guide and a friend.Show Notes:VERSES: Luke 17:10 (NIV) — So you also, when you have done everything you were told to do, should say, ‘We are unworthy servants; we have only done our duty.'”ANNIE DOWNSWebsite:  https://www.anniefdowns.com/Podcast – That Sounds Fun: https://www.anniefdowns.com/thatsoundsfun/Podcast – Let's Read the Gospels:  https://www.anniefdowns.com/letsreadthegospels/Blog: https://www.anniefdowns.com/blog/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/anniefdowns/Books: That Sounds Fun  Looking for Lovely  For the complete list of Annie's books, visit https://www.anniefdowns.com/books/#Annie Downs Bio:Annie F. Downs is a New York Times bestselling author, sought-after speaker, and successful podcast host based in Nashville, TN. Engaging and honest, she makes readers and listeners alike feel as if they've been long-time friends. Co-founder of the That Sounds Fun Network—which includes her aptly named flagship podcast, That Sounds Fun—and author of multiple bestselling books including Chase the Fun, That Sounds Fun, 100 Days to Brave and Remember God, Annie is the friend who will shoot straight with you, remind you that God is good, and still manage to make you laugh in the process. For more about Annie's work, visit anniefdowns.com.

John Eldredge and Ransomed Heart (Audio)
Beholding the King

John Eldredge and Ransomed Heart (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 Very Popular


In this Christmas message, John and Stasi share how we receive greater love, hope, and grace as we fix our gaze on Jesus.

Hearts of Oak Podcast
Matthew Tyrmand - Brazil Saying No to Communism Rule and Election Fraud

Hearts of Oak Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 50:09 Transcription Available


The worlds media are doing their best to ignore what has been happening in Brazil following the Presidential Elections. Matthew Tyrmand is one of the worlds top investigative journalists and he has been one of the most outspoken in calling out this South American steal. A great many Brazilians are refusing to accept the election results, remember that Lula had his 12 year jail sentence overturned by the Supreme Court just so that he could run against Bolsonaro. After nearly 2 months of silence, Bolsonaro finally spoke to his people last week to say he would fight on and win. Join us this episode for all the latest and Matthew's expert analysis of the situation. #VivaBrazil Matthew Tyrmand is a journalist (both investigative and editorial), political strategist, activist, consultant, and investment banker. He is a dual Polish and American citizen deeply engaged in the battle of political ideas in both the USA and Europe. As an unabashed nationalist and populist, he is an outspoken critic of the European Union and American-engineered globalist multi-lateralism and is a consistent voice in the battle to take back Westphalian nation state sovereignty. In the U.S. he works closely with organizations focused on bringing robust fiscal transparency, prudence, and accountability to the public sector as well as rooting out corruption in both the public and private sectors. In Poland, where his father was a pivotal mid-20th century anti-communist writer and dissident (and Holocaust survivor) and later an informal advisor to Presidents Nixon and Reagan on defeating communism, Mr. Tyrmand frequently appears in mass media commenting on Polish, American, and European political issues and contributes twice a week to Polish Television's (TVP) main English language news commentary show. For several years he penned a weekly column for one of Poland's top conservative newsweeklies, Do Rzeczy. He has contributed to numerous English language platforms in the U.S. and Europe including, but not limited to; Breitbart, Forbes, The American Mind, The American Thinker, The American Conservative, The Jerusalem Post, The European Conservative, Big League Politics, Human Events, and numerous outlets in Poland including Wprost, Gazeta Polska, and SuperExpress in addition to authoring two books in the Polish market. He is an actively engaged board member of the guerilla journalism platform Project Veritas working closely alongside it's founder and leader, the modern-day muckraker, James O'Keefe on operations and strategy. Mr. Tyrmand is a Claremont Institute Lincoln Fellow, a Conservative Partnership Institute Haggerty-Richardson Fellow, and a member of the Philadelphia Society. Before getting involved in politics, policy, and activism, he spent his years after graduation from the University of Chicago as an analyst and trader on Wall Street, running equity long/short portfolios in the healthcare, tech, media, and telecommunications sectors for well known New York based hedge funds. Those who know him describe him as "enfant terrible" and describe his mouth as "a weapon of mass destruction." Follow and support Matthew on..... GETTR: https://gettr.com/user/MatthewTyrmand Twitter: https://twitter.com/MatthewTyrmand?s=20&t=DvFAH3osks4PFfPBfFDk0w Originally broadcast live 15.12.22 *Special thanks to Bosch Fawstin for recording our intro/outro on this podcast. Check out his art https://theboschfawstinstore.blogspot.com/ and follow him on GETTR https://gettr.com/user/BoschFawstin To sign up for our weekly email, find our social media, podcasts, video, livestreaming platforms and more https://heartsofoak.org/connect/ Please like, subscribe & share! Transcript of episode (Hearts of Oak) And it's an absolute pleasure to have Mr. Matthew Tymrand back with us once again. Matthew, thank you. (Matthew Tyrmand) Good to be with you, Peter. It's a pleasure being with you. Last time you blew up Sweden, now it's Brazil's turn. So, I think we talked about Sweden, France, Germany, all the sovereignist movements in Europe. It was Europe. I guess now Latin America's my beat. Now you're going Latin. All good. (HoO) You can follow Matthew, of course, at Matthew Tymrand on GETTR, on Twitter, and he is regularly on War Room giving an update of what's happening. I think Matthew and Gateway Pundit are the two main sources for actually getting an update on what's happening in Brazil. But Matthew, Brazil, the elections were the second and 30th of October with the 30th being the runoff. It's been six weeks ago and you've been on this from day one, day to day following it. Do you want to give us an overview of what's happened before we get into some of the nitty gritty stuff. (MT) Sure. So I've been following Brazil. I never expected Latin America to be my beat as we discussed last time. I've got Polish family roots, Polish citizen, a lot of time in Europe working, Poland, Hungary, Sweden, Britain, France, Germany, Belgium, Italy, Spain. You know, Europe's my beat, you know, working right wing party, covering... Populist movements, Sovereign Justice movements. But last year in September, 2021, I went down to CPAC Brazil to speak about media and other issues and was with Jason Miller. And we met with Jair Bolsonaro, and set up a meeting for us. And that was widely covered. And we were detained at the airport by the Supreme Court, which as we'll discuss is not really a court as much as a dictatorship, a bunch of political appointees who are running rough shot over Brazilian constitution and rule of law. They detained us and interrogated us and wanted to know who we met with and wanted us to literally write down names of politicians, journalists, activists, very Stasi-like so that they could be added to the enemies list. Obviously we declined to take part in such exercise, but we were held there and we were finally let go. And I sort of wanted to understand what just happened there. I knew it was bad. I knew that there was a strong bifurcation in Brazilian society along political lines, much like the US, much like Poland, much like many countries in Europe and the West. And what I discovered in the following eight, nine months was as it really did deep dives into the people, the players, the politics, that it is been a judicial dictatorship and autocracy by the judiciary. Judges in theory, judges are supposed to adjudicate rule of law, constitutionality, especially at the Supreme Court level. And here you had a Supreme Court led by a guy who was appointed by the same political cabal as Lula De Silva, the guy who just ran against Bolsonaro for president. And by background, he was president before. And he was convicted of many crimes. Public corruption was sent to prison. But he appointed a lot of judges before that, and after he went to prison, his vice president slash chief of staff, Chief of Staff there, sort of the second in line to the throne in the executive branch, Dilma Rousseff, she served as president for a few years before she was ensnared in the same corruption game, the very famous Operation Car Wash, where the Marxists, and they really are, Sao Paulo Forum Marxists, people that sort of come from the same sort of ideological bent, and this includes Chavez and Maduro, and we'll go through some of the Forum Sao Paulo people, that have swept Latin America. But she was also convicted and impeached. And then Temer came in and served out the rest of her time before Bolsonaro was elected. Now, all these judges on the Supreme Court, not all of them, two were appointed by Bolsonaro and eight were appointed by Lula, Dilma and Temer, Lula and Dilma, eight, and then Temer was one. Alexander de Marais, this Supreme Court head, was appointed by Temer, a former Sao Paulo prosecutor. And he basically prosecutes from the bench. And he has given this court, just, you know, Audubon Bismarck said politics is the art of the possible. He's just taking control. These are not endowed rights, constitutionally endowed rights that the court has. But as I wrote about in this long article that I erred to really break down this dynamic ahead of the election a week or so ahead of the first round of the Brazilian election, I wrote this or published this in September. The first round was October 2nd, as you noted. And I wrote that these are guys that if you could roll up the powers in the U.S. Corollary would be the Supreme Court on a constitutional law basis, the prosecutors like the heads of the DOJ, or Justice Minister in European parliamentary parlance, the head of the prosecutor's office, the head of the investigative criminal division. They've got subpoena power. They've got a law enforcement that they have taken over, like an FBI or an MI5, I think it would be, in the UK, where it would be domestic criminality, the Police that would come and have sort of jurisdictional rights, federally, nationally, as opposed to locally. And you rolled up all these powers in the US, like Sonia Sotomayor and Eric Holder and Jared Nadler and Merrick Garland and legislative members of the legislature who are political animals. You rolled up all these powers, you would have Marais in the Supreme Court. And so of course, they're running rough shot over Brazilian society with these powers in their hands. They're censoring journalists, they're arresting journalists. They are Censoring politicians from Bolsonaro's camp and they're arresting them. Over the last two to three years they've been at war with the right. Everything that the right accuses them of, they then get convicted of. They say the right says the court is assaulting democracy and Constitutional law, so then they get arrested for the charge of assault on democratic institutions. If you criticize the court for overreaching, for abusing its power, then they actually arrest you or censor you, force you to be de-platformed by big tech under the guise of it's an assault on, institutional democracy, which is incredible projection. We know the left likes to project, but I mean, this is whole new levels of evil hypocrisy in a political sphere. So they've put politicians under house arrest, journalists. There's a journalist who has been in exile in, in the US. Recently, Marais revoked his passport. They tried to execute an Interpol red notice against him because of what he writes. Again, journalism, writing. This is not violence. This is not calls for coups or insurrection. This is him writing very, very well-founded in constitutional law about their overreach. And so they tried to get Interpol to arrest him in the US and extradite him to Brazil so they can put him in prison. Obviously, Interpol declined to execute this red notice because they saw the frivolity and the abuse that was inherent in it. So I mean, that's sort of like how we entered into this election cycle and at the same time. Very important to note, Lula De Silva was convicted by three separate courts long before Bolsonaro was appointing any judges anywhere. This was 2015-16, the trials, convicted by three separate courts, 12 charges, 19 judges, 19 judges across three courts, so like tribunal instead of juries, it's you know a bunch of judges on a panel, unanimously voted to convict him. You know people 2012, when he was pushed out of office there were protests in the street and the military helped defend those protests because they saw what he was doing it was widely exposed that he was selling state assets to China for cash in bags laundering it through car wash chain of car washes owned by this party's friends that's hence the name operation car wash and it was his judges that he appointed or his subsequent president appointed or the subsequent president to that appointed, who let him out of prison, vacated his sentences and then annulled the convictions and expunged his record. So let him out of prison, annulled the sentences, first pending never-ending appeal, claiming that the courts didn't have jurisdiction. Now he was convictable in any court in the country because he stole from the whole country. So that's a canard, total bullshit. And then they just said, pending never-ending appeal, you're now free. And then as the appeals started, which never really went through, because before there ever was an appeal heard, they vacated and annulled and expunged his record. And why is that important? Because in Brazil, there's a law, if you're a convicted felon, you cannot run for office. (HoO) So, I mean, this seemed to be that the Supreme Court wanted Lula to run. I mean, a 12-year sentence suddenly disappears under the orders of the Supreme Court, so he can run. (MT) 580 days out of a 12-year sentence he served, and he got off light because there should have been many, many more prosecutions. And there might have been had this not played out because they were always discovering more stuff on the public corruption, whether selling state assets, diverting state funds to friends, including the mainstream media, who are truly died in the wool leftists and Marxist sympathizers. You saw on election night, when they announced it for Lula, claps, there were two places where there were audible cheers. The newsrooms of the mainstream press and the prisons. There are videos of of the prisons and everybody in the prisons is clapping and whoop, whoop, whooping about Lula. His base is narco Traficant, he even wears a hat from a from a famous Rio de Janeiro guerrila narco trafficking group called CPX He wore the hat in his limited campaigning, he couldn't really campaign too wide because everybody knows hes a corrupt convicted felon and he would be met with jeers, even when he was certified on Monday there was nobody there supporting him and the one thing the leftists do really well is they go to the streets and they protest, they turn them out, they frequently astroturf. They try to make themselves look bigger and more prevalent than they really are in terms of representation in society. Meanwhile, you've got 10 million Brazilian patriots by my estimate over the last 46 days now on the streets of every city in Brazil and predominantly obviously Brasilia the capital but also Rio, São Paulo, Belo Horizonte, even places that are leftist strongholds in the north like Recife, Bahia, everywhere. And the revolution will not be televised. None of the global mainstream press is covering it all. The largest human manifestations in at least a democratic country, maybe during the late stages of communism, when people went to the street in places like Hungary, and Czech Republic and Poland, there might've been comparable numbers per capita. And remember Brazil, big country, six largest country in the world, third largest economy in the Western hemisphere, and second largest country in the Western hemisphere after US, Canada, then Brazil, massive 220 million people. And you have a measurable amount of representation per capita on the streets, rain, shine, monsoon, whatever. They're there a lot of times outside military barracks, praying and begging the military to come and save them. And this is a point Bolsonaro made that I'm absolutely co-opted and using in a speech he gave at. He invited the protesters into the grounds of the Alvarado Palace, the White House, Buckingham Palace, the presidential residence. He gave a speech last Friday, then did a demonstration and a prayer vigil on Sunday and then another one on Monday. And by the way, letting, I mean how populous is that, letting people into the presidential grounds so that he could, you know, walk up, hug people. And by the way, he could walk through a crowd and nobody would hurt him. They would hug him, they would love him. Lula cannot go anywhere without 100 plus security guards because everyone wants to rip him shred from shred, limb from limb like Gaddafi. And the police who are on his detail are tipping off the protesters where he is so they come and protest with, like when he was at a hotel last week or a week and a half ago meeting Jake Sullivan, Biden's national security advisor, because obviously they're part of the fix. Global leftism works together. If the military does not act, if they do not invoke Article 142 of the Brazilian Constitution, which is very constitutionally fitting and relevant here, it says in separated power, disputes, which certainly exists right now between the judiciary and the executive branch, as well as election fraud, they have a constitutional right to audit the election, and in their attempt to do so, the TSE, a subsidiary court to the Supreme Court, the STF, blocked them out. They wouldn't give them the machines, they wouldn't give them the source code, they wouldn't give them the tabulation data. So they have very much grounds to act and stabilize society and the Constitution says the military is the stabilizing force in society because they're the institution that's most governed and built up by the fundamentals of hierarchy and discipline and order. And if you notice on Brazilian flag, it's ordum and and progress, so order and progress. So you can't have progress unless you have order. And if you look at Latin America's history, military coups, you know, there was one 1965 that lasted 20 something years. They have a lot of belief in rule of law at this stage. Brazil is one of the most successful constitutional republics in terms of really taking to Western classical liberal standards of rule of law and freedom. They do not have the unfettered First Amendment the US has, but they do have the right to assemble and protest and use their voice, that's constitutionally protected. And then as they're trying to exercise that, Marais, who by the way is also the head of the TSC, the Supreme Electoral Court. So the subsidiary court that oversees the elections. So the Chicanery, the pure evil, I mean, they're arresting now indigenous peoples who have become protest leaders. Indigenous peoples saw they were disenfranchised because they were historically left-wing voters. All their votes in many of these precincts went to Lula, even though they physically voted for Bolsonaro. And they say, what gives? The left has used them as a tool, a device for pushing their agenda for generations. They petitioned the UN committee on indigenous rights and said, hey, what gives? You're supposed to protect their indigenous rights. But I guess that only works if we vote the right way, which is left. So they've been ignored. And now they're arresting them. arrested, they violently arrested one of the major guys, the chief of the Givenchy tribe on Monday after certification, in what I believe is an attempt to try and get the protesters to increase and escalate their volatility and then inject violence. And the left did inject violence. Antifa came in, very few, but enough that they burned some buses, burned some cars, broke some windows. And of course Reuters took Globo, which is sort of CNN of Brazil, major mainstream media, dominant media player, took their account. Bolsonaro protesters are violent and you know, set fire to cars and break windows of cars. And by the way, every car window that was broken had a Brazilian flag on it or the symbol of this movement. The Brazil was stolen flag, which is Brazilian flag that's black and white with Brazil was stolen on it. And so those are the windows getting broken, and there were even gas masks. I mean, in 45 days, 46 days, there had not been a single incidence of violence, vandalism, arson, and you know how we know there wasn't a single incidence? Because if there was even a single incidence, it would be the only thing Globo was running and the only thing they're sending to their their fellow traveling useful idiot leftist Marxists across the globe whether that's Reuters or BBC or Washington Post, New York Times, but it's been crickets. It's been crickets, in the New York Times did run a few reports, dispatches by Jack Nikis, their correspondent at Brazilian, saying that it's a little bit worrisome about the powers that Marais has taken and abused, censoring politicians. At the same time, the courts previously said that Bolsonaro should be held criminally liable for blocking trolls on his Twitter, as the same court is saying, and personal Twitter, the same court is saying, we can remove the voices of anybody we claim, as assaulting democratic institutions by criticizing us, including Villa-Kesis, one of the leading senators, major parliamentarians, House of Deputies, lower house members of the legislature, Gustavo Guyer, Nicholas Ferreira, Carlos Zambelli, tons of journalists today. They just arrested four more journalists, a mixture of journalists, a pastor and an elected. I think it was two journalists, pastor and elected. Four more arrests. So, you know, Marais has said that if the protesters stay out there, they're going to start proceedings to take away protesters' kids because they say it's child abuse. Obviously, lefties, you know, brainwash their kids and bring them to all sorts of manifestations, frequently violent ones, if you look at the Antifa types. So it's pretty fucked up there. It's pretty fucked up. (HoO) Where does Bolsonaro, because Bolsonaro basically was silent for like 45 days and suddenly had, not press conference, but he engaged with his supporters. That was on what, Friday, Saturday? And that was the first time he stepped in and said, no, we're going to win. We're going to fight this. (MT) Why didn't they say that directly? It's not in his hands. I know a lot of people around him. I've got very good sources, whether it's military people, legislative people, executive branch people in the ministries, as well as around Bolsonaro advisors. I'm getting some really good feel. Nobody's telling me anything directly because it's so fog of war. Nobody knows. Of course, when you're talking to government sources, everybody has their own agenda and strategy, so you'll hear a lot of different things. I'll talk to one guy who says, no, we're acting tomorrow. We're going to do this. Another guy goes, nothing's happening. Another guy says, we're going to do it this way in three days, and by the way, these things are probably in motion. They're just trying to push their strategy that they want and have me run it out as a reflexive sort of, you know, create a self fulfilling prophecy through the media. But the timeline is important. Bolsonaro did not concede the night of, he did not concede the next day. On Tuesday, he came out at three o'clock or two o'clock and gave a little press conference, spoke for two minutes and said, follow the constitution, we will follow the constitution. You know, if you believe protesting is warranted in assembling, that's your constitutional right, go to it. Then his chief of staff, who was kind of a technocrat, said we're gonna follow the transition protocols, also constitutionally, but that wasn't a concession. That was them just trying to figure out what their move would be. They were gonna engage in this audit. The military was blocked out in their audit. In the meantime, there's been lots of fraud discovered. Their political party, the Liberal Party, party of the party of the liberal, Bolsonaro's party, put their own report together about fraud and what did the court do with it? They fined the party 22 million reais, about four or five million bucks, and put the head of the party, who is an elder statesman in Brazilian politics, been around for generations, a very serious guy, nobody has ever accused of anything untoward, put him on a criminal law, the same fake news investigation list he's been writing, so put them on the criminal list, that they're gonna investigate him for criminal activity. Now, by the way, they're adding all sorts of other people, Bolsonaro's former cabinet members and previous in the first part of government. Now they're going on criminal lists where they're gonna be investigated by this court. There's no grounds, there's no due process, there's no probable causes we have on the US constitutional basis for such things. But hey, Marxists do what Marxists do, communists do what communists do, we've seen that all over the world. So the timeline, go back to the timeline. So he didn't say anything for a couple of days, then he went silent. A couple of times he went out, waved, moved through people, but no public statements, and I think that was smart. This is not about Bolsonaro. This is what I've tried to drum home, whether it's on Tucker Carlson or on Vantage show or on Emerald Robin show or whoever. That this is not about Bolsonaro. This is about the Brazilian constitution, the Brazilian transition in power, Brazilian elections. This is not a cult of personality. Bolsonaro, if the military acts is not gonna be engaged in a coup, this would be a quelling of a coup by the judicial dictatorship, with the military has a constitutional right to do, to defend against the sovereignty and against the sovereigns enemies, the nation states enemies, foreign and domestic, within and without. They have buffered the borders because Venezuela and Chile keep threatening that if Lula's not seated, they're gonna invade. These are one team, one dream communists. Shaba's in school. But then last Friday, he gave a speech, and then Sunday, the vigil. And in between the time, there've been some military edicts signed, expanding the reserves a week ago, and the site crashed the second they put up a site saying, if you want to be in the Brazilian reserves, and the site crashed within moments because it was so overwhelming. They just passed one yesterday, or Bolsonaro and the Defense Ministry pushed through one yesterday, about mobilization of emergency food suppliers and expedited contracting process. Tells me something's kind of up, and people I know in the military, connected to the military have been absolutely quiet with me, which by the way is a good thing, I got a big mouth, I am who I am. I'm a journalist. If I know something, I'm probably gonna run it out. So it's good they're silent with me on this. If they're gonna bring something to bear in this process, then they should be doing it by the book, by their way, and not leaking it to me or anybody in the Western or domestic media. That being said, the military has moved. There are videos all over. Yesterday morning at 4.30 a.m., what was described as, well, you know, drills or practice or, you know, routine practicing, whatever they call it, right by the Venezuelan border columns, and columns of soldiers, you know, because Venezuela is a risk point, as is Peru, as is Colombia, as is Chile. They're all led by the same millier South Paliform Marxists. And we'll go into South Paliform in a moment. So the military's moving, there've been firefights in the favelas with what's rumoured to be Venezuelan paramilitary operators that moved through these sort of drug trafficking networks. Cause if you recall, you know, Venezuela's laden with that just as Columbia was with FARC. And there's another FARC like Narco trafficking paramilitary guerrilla group that Petro, the new head of Columbia was a long time member of. So the South Palo form where all these people were incubated, people have to recall It was founded in 1990 by two people, Lula and Fidel Castro. Tells you a lot, tells you a lot. 1990 because in 89 to 91, The Soviet Union was falling. Soviet Union was the big funder of Cuba and all the Latin American, Marxist guerilla movements to try and create an Orwellian style, continental nation state construct, In Orwell were three major nation states, Eurasia, Oceania and whatever the other one was, and so this always been the vision for the latin american marxist.Simon Bolivar . He's he is to you know, whoever politically who they want him to be the conservatives hold up the Bolivarians, Bolivarianism as the Marxists do but Marxist Bolivarianism suggests we have to break down all the borders of Latin America of South America and just make one continental super state led. Of course by Marxist is right out of Orwell So Palo forum was formed when Soviet Union money stopped coming in, Cuba needed you know, how do we, you know operate this build this out Marxist workers of the world unite, so Lula and Fidel got together and all sorts of other criminals from across that continent and they incubated such wonderful political leaders and talent as Hugo Chavez Ava Morales RC, the Mora, Bolivia. Uh, Fuji Mari had some connections certainly Castillo who just tried to run this coup last week and dissolving congress, dissolving legislature, South California, the Kirchners, I mean Fernandez, I mean it's a who's who of the war, Ortega, I mean if there's a Marxist in Latin America who was incubated by South Calif and the head of the South California in Brazil, a woman named Monica Valente, she's a part, they even use words like party secretary, it's like they, when people tell you who they are, believe them, party secretary, she's head of Lula's transition now, and she said early on, right after October 30th. We need to protect Brazil's democracy like we have to protect Maduro's hard-fought Venezuelan democracy. And they really believe it. They really believe that Venezuela is the kind of democracy they'd like to make Brazil. So the Brazilian people aren't stupid. Modern history, pre-modern history, they know Latin American history, communism, and all across Latin America. What's happened in Venezuela? What just happened in Chile with Boerich and other young Marxist revolutionaries from the South Hallow Forum and Petro in Colombia? They know it. They haven't lost the plot. They get it. And we will never be communist is one of their refrains. Give us paper ballots is another one. Give us auditable ballots. And that's a whole great, you know, sock we can get into. Bolsonaro pushed it as a congressman and got a paper balloting bill, a backup paper ballot against the machines. So you have the machines, but you also have a paper ballot printout. That thing gets locked for audit purposes. And so when I was in Brazil last September, there was tons of chance in the freedom Independence Day March, give us paper ballots, give us audible ballots. Bolsonaro as a congressman, and I think it was 2016, maybe it was a little over 15, got a bill passed, which by the way, getting bills passed in Brazilian legislature, very, very tough. I mean, there's essentially, I put it on a spectrum of five different, it's like parliamentary politics, there's dozens of parties, but there's really five cohorts. You've got far right, centre right, centre, centre left and far left. So figure 20% give or take. By the way, going forward in this next session, far right and centre right are dominant because Bolsonaro down ballot pulled everybody over the line, governors, senators, lower house legislators. It was like unheard of level of galvanized unity and performance for the right in Brazil. So the fact that he lost to Lula, we all know it's bullshit. We all, there's no way. None of these politicians even exist except for his endorsement. And they won overwhelmingly in places that were left to stronghold for 50 years. That they're now gonna be led on the provincial level and the federal level state-wide by Bolsonaro people, whether they're far right or centre right. But they're all together one thing, anti-communist, anti-socialist, anti-South Paulo Forum, anti-China, anti-globalist. They believe in Brazilian sovereignty and they believe in God, which does bring them together. But so, so Bolsonaro gets this bill passed, Dilma Rousseff is president, so I guess it was pre-16. She vetoes it. Back to legislature and the Congress overrode her veto with a super super majority. Never happens. So then what happens, Supreme Court comes out, by the way, her veto was predicated on something I find hilarious. It's like truth is stranger than fiction with these idiots. She vetoed it because it would cost too much to put a printer, a hundred dollar printer next to their $20,000 voting machine. So she said, Oh, no, fiscally it would be irresponsible. Have you ever noticed socialists or communists to cite fiscal policy as to why they shouldn't Spend money, spend government money? Of course not, it's a fig leaf, it's a canard, it's ridiculous. So Supreme Court takes this congressionally overrode veto legislation and they nix it on constitutional grounds, but on bullshit. They said it would open up privacy concerns. Now at the same time, by the way, I've exposed with Argentinian forensic analyst, Fernando Ceramito, who's hiding in Argentina because they wanna really go at him, because he's exposed huge amounts of fraud, from day three after the election, we expose that Oracle has a undisclosed contract to suck up everybody's private data. So all the voting data, all the personal data, the Ministry of Information is being run out of the electoral court overseen by Marais. So more corruption, more communists, stasi tactics, they've got the Praetorian Guard and the federal police force who are arresting indigenous peoples and journalists and harassing Miller, Jason Miller and myself when we were in Brazil, detaining us, surveilling us, which the mainstream press had the day before we left that broke all the news wires there that we were being surveilled from the moment we landed, which I told them, I mean, like I've dealt with stuff Poland and Central Europe, which has been time in Ukraine, Ive spent time all over the place. So I said, we're probably being surveilled. He goes, Whatever. I said, then when that news story broke, he goes, he was like, Oh, well, you're right. And I said, well, probably gonna be detained at the airport tomorrow. And he goes, Oh, shit, I go, no, it's gonna be good. Be great. Made a big international incident. I credit Mariah for getting me off the side-lines. I wouldn't, I wouldn't have been doing jack shit on Brazil. I wouldn't have been doing, you know, deep dives into the forum and the who appointed the judges and who their friends with and what laws they're breaking and who they put in prison unjustly and under house arrest. I wouldn't have any edge on Brazilian politics and society if it wasn't for Marais detaining us and me getting intrigued. I don't like getting detained illegally. So I like to punch back. So here we are. So now I've been doing 10 to 20 hours of press today. So as a lot of Brazilians say, they want to if the military comes in and they they circumvent Lula and the completion of this coup that's been run out of the, judicial dictatorship, then there's I think there'll be a push to give me honour citizenship, which I'd be all about. I love Brazil. I love the Brazilian people. Brazilian women are the most beautiful women in the world. The food is like the best food in the world. The weather, the cities, just the whole, the people are just so awesome. They're so thoughtful. They're so intelligent. They're so motivated to protect their society. They understand the difference between rule of man and rule of God, higher natural law, and even the truckers, the truckers blockaded, these wasn't like Canadian trucker blockades, and all due respect to the Canadians, they do a great job on that. But they got busted up pretty quickly and it wasn't a huge amount of population saying we're going to we're willing to stay here forever how long it takes. The Brazilians are willing to blockade the ports and the roads and the major arteries. Brazil's one, sixth of the world's food supply. They're willing to blockade it forever if need be. They're willing to starve to protect their sovereignty because they know that if they lose it, if they lose their their constitutionally protected natural rights of natural law and their constitutional rights that that have been. That they work toward and building a robust constitutional republic if they lose that, it's gulags. I think the military knows that too. I think the military, but Lula even said last week, he even publicly stated who he's going to replace all the high command military generals with, his communist cronies. So if they're not motivated to act, then you know what, to be honest, they deserve to go to the gulag. They deserve to have their hands up. (HoO) Tell me more about the military, and I love Brazil as much as you and I've only been once, but a beautiful country. But tell me about the military, where do they fit in? Where is the clash? Where is their allegiance? I mean, you've talked about the legal side, about the Supreme Court and the battles legally, which reminds me of the same situation in the US in the 2020 elections. But over the military, which is again quite different, and I guess from anyone in the West, you don't think the military has been separate from the government or separate from the judicial is just all in one. But I guess Latin America is quite different. So where did the military fit into this? Cause I read a number of reports, the military being on the sidelines, what does that mean? And who are they accountable to? (MT) The military had, you know, a 65 page report about the, the, the elections and saying, you know, we can't prove fraud yet because you won't give us the machine source code of tabulation data, but it certainly doesn't look good. And the fact that you're blocking us out, the military and you know, Latin America's got this history of communism, then reaction back. And Pinochet was an anti-communist reactionary. He threw the communists from helicopters, which I would never condone until watching, until getting to know Brazil. To be honest, Marais and these judges who have so subverted rule of law and arrested their political enemies, just as bad, just on a level of the Soviet Union, of Stalin, of Khrushchev, of Brezhnev, of Lenin, of Jurginsky. I mean, they are ends justify the means leftist and the corrupt as shit. I mean, the Politburo will live well. You know, Animal Farm, you know, the Napoleon and Snowball will live high on the hog. And these people are totally corrupt. Their friends are going to feed and everybody else, they'll rob the wealth of the country, sell to China, give it to help buffer Cuba. You remember when Lula was there, last time he was giving Petrobras, Petrobras was a big center of the biggest company in the country. the state oil giant and they were helping buffer and support Cuba and Venezuela and selling to China. So this is a repeat. I think the military knows, given the history, there's a lot of generals who actually have not remained silent. They're not running their mouth off the way I do, the way Miller does, or the way our friends who are analysts, journalists, and political activists do, they're military guys. And by the way, Bolsonaro was a career military guy before entering politics. But they have made public statements. One of them, and a lot of these military guys have also gone into politics when they retire, very senior guys. So there's a very strong connection ideologically and politically. But there are some scumbag military guys as well. There were four guys that Paolo Figurito, an exiled journalist here in Florida who's left Brazil because he can't go back for the same reasons that Alonso Santos is exiled in Virginia. That's who they put the red notice for, revoked his passport. By the way, they've also revoked issuance of new passports because I think they don't want anyone to escape the impending communism because they want to go after everyone. I mean, this is a court that was airing private businessmen's WhatsApp messages when they were bashing the court and saying we defend Bolsonaro. So they publicized it and then they tried to arrest them. Business guys, just normal guys, not breaking any laws, just saying the court's really running amok. Okay, we're gonna subpoena the stuff because they hear about it and they leak it and then they air it all. I mean, really dirty pool, Soviet style tactics, Stasi style tactics. But Paulo Figueredo named three or four generals who were trying to push back on any military guys, who were saying we should invoke Article 142, we need to take action, saying, no, no, we'll be fine under Lula. Trust us. Palo named them publicly and effectively took them off the field. And there have been rumors in the last couple of days that they'll be fired in the next few days by the Defense Ministry in Bolsonaro. Hopefully they will. Also important to note that Bolsonaro has still elevated other generals There have been ceremonies that have gotten publicized, putting the new rank on the chest of a couple of naval guys, a couple of generals. So there is movement, but there are a few very senior generals. And by the way, Brazil is the most social media engaged country in the world. So when you lose your social media voice, whether you're a politician or whoever you are, it's a big deal there. And some of the politicians who have been leading the charge, calling out the court, who have lost it, the generals have said, that is unconstitutional. One general who was a running mate for Bolsonaro, Hamilton Mourao, a political guy now, very well respected. And again, because Brazil has so much social media engagement, these generals have like 2 million followers. They have as many followers as the party leaders, the legislature leaders in the Senate and the Chamber of Deputies, the lower house of the legislature. So they have gravitas when they say something. Hamilton Mourao was the first one to come out. This was a few weeks ago. This was right after the second round. And he said, he cited on the anniversary, the 87th anniversary of a communist insurgency, the first one in Brazil in 1935 that came from within the military. He said, we put that one down and we are on guard. We are ever vigilant. Another one said, echoed those statements a few days later. Another general said, load up on food, gas and cash, which tells you a little bit of something. Just said public announcement, public service announcement, load up on food, fuel and cash. I mean, that kind of tells you something. I think something's coming. I think they were waiting. I was incorrect in my initial assessment about the certification, which is very equivalent to the January 6th in the US with a certified president. And that's when they had Antifa come down from the hills and set buses on fire. And Reuters said, Bolsonaro supporters are setting buses on fire. Meanwhile, there's video of some of the guys who had, they turned out the next day that some of these guys they found and they were paid 200 Riyals to do it. They were vagabonds. They were homeless drifter, grifter types. And then there were some guys yelling. ...... Which means out-Bolsonaro. So, I mean, you know, but Reuters, without uncritically, unanalytic ally, just runs out what Globo says. Globo's even said, I mean, to give you an example, how corrupted this media is. They're all in the tank with the court. The court says we now need to arrest the First Lady because she was beating the protesters, aiding and abetting the illegal protests, which, by the way, are not illegal. I mean, it's a real mess. I mean, you see, and it's been so fluid. Gateway Pundit's been great on writing the stuff. It says, plug, Richard Abelson there has been covering like crazy. We talk every day. We compare notes on our sources. And I've been doing a lot of this stuff, the talking, the live action, Tucker, Bannon, you, Emerald, Gaffney on, Senator CSP, just tons of this stuff, live streams on GETTR. So, you know, very, very fluid. Another, point I do want to make just to show you how big the fix was in. In November, all eight of the Dilma and Lula and Temer appointed justices, went to New York for a meeting at the Harvard Club. They convened a conference with the incoming Lula cabinet ministers. By the way, he's supposed to be separate powers. Judges supposed to judge the law and not party with their communist cronies. After they certified him, Lula the other day, Marius and a bunch of them went and partied with a well-known, together, Lula and them. With a well-known communist lawyer, like a major communist figure down there. So, but in November in New York at the Harvard club, they convened this conference with the incoming Lula cabinet ministers and these eight communist Marxist, Sao Paulo forum, Lula, Dilma, Temer appointed judges. They booked the room well before the second round of the election months ago. They knew, they knew. And for the, you would even say that if you're in Brazil, you lose your social media. Are you even getting potentially arrested as they're doing now? So the certification, my mistake on timing was, I thought that the certification was less of a formality and more of a big deal. And what I've learned since is it's not the only big deal is does Lula walk up the ramp as they say, That's the sort of terminology. Walk up the ramp and the equivalent of a swearing in for the president where he puts his hand on the Bible in the US, walk up the ramp and accept the sash and become anointed head of state. And that's right after New Year's Day. So that'll be January 2nd or January 3rd. I think January 2nd, Monday, January 2nd. By the way, the certification was supposed to be this coming Monday, the 19th, but the electoral court moved it up to the 12th. No constitutional allowance for that exists. They just did it. Again, they are very Bismarckian. Politics to the art of the possible. Just do it, and hey, see what happens, come at me bro." So they did the certification on Monday, and after the certification Marais gave a public statement saying, mission assigned, mission accomplished. I mean, it's like, they don't even hide what they're doing, and that if you criticise them and point out the granular fallacy of it all, then you get arrested. I mean, it's right out of Sovietism. It's pretty nuts. (HoO) Where does the pressure come? Because there isn't any pressure from surrounding countries in Latin America. Democracy works to varying degrees in different countries. (MT) It's pressure from Venezuela, Colombia under Petro, Chile under Boric, Peru, that they better seat Lula or they're going to invade. Another reason you're seeing military moving around the countries from the Chocos and securing the borders. But they have no allies, which is insane. I mean a couple of people, Ted Cruz gave a moderately sympathetic statement, but none of the politicians in the West and the US and Europe, nobody even knows what's going on. Swedish press, Polish press, Hungarian press, Slovakian press, but right-wing press, alternative press, the way you and I always are. So this thing doesn't have a critical mass like the BBC or, you know, Rye in Italy or Odyssey France press or, but, you know, TVP has been good. You know, Polish television has been good. I'm a contributor there, so, because I'm a dual citizen. But they don't have any allies. I'm guessing the US politicians who are aware of this, I've talked to many of them, and just said, you know, what's going on here? You should know what's going on here, guys. I mean, Marco Rubio runs Latin American policy in this country, and he's like, the guy. Nothing, nothing. Now, if Bolsonaro does see Article 142 invoked, in theory, he has to sign a letter authorizing the defense ministry to activate the military and invoke this constitutional article. Some rumors say that it's been signed already. I would argue that the military should do this unilaterally and ignore the executive under the guise that he's a lame duck and he's essentially out of power. I know he's still in power. The problem is that the second something does happen that's kinetic and they take action, they raid the Supreme Court and the electoral court, they go out and they take the machines by force. By the way, we have a video of a Sunday in Sao Paulo a week after the second round, a Sunday afternoon, four o'clock, all the machines, not all, but a cache of machines, voter machines from this. And by the way, some of the work done on this machine shows that certain modern series are programmed by default to annul votes and to be programmed, have communication device and all the things that the laws passed on the running of the election it flies in the face of. But this one cache in Sao Paulo of machines was being moved in boxes onto the back of a truck, an unmarked truck. And it looked to be unconfirmed, but looked to be a trucking logistics company because we got the weaponized autists everywhere, that it was a truck belonging to a company that is run and owned by a PT Lula party legislator. So it tells you a lot. The law is very clear, by the way. The machines can't be touched for 60 days. They can't be disassembled, can't be touched for 60 days. So a week after they're being moved. So there's a lot of different things. But I think that if the military does take action, which I believe they will, I think they will, even rumors that Bolsonaro has resigned as president in a private military sort of convocation and given the powers of the executive branch to the military as a caretaker. I don't believe that's true, but it is floating around. So I'm throwing that out there just because it's one of the things I've heard from certain sources. I think that will get publicized pretty quickly if that were the case. But whenever anything does occur, something does occur, I believe that what you're going to see is the revolution now will be televised by the entire global media complex and it, will go, Bolsonaro executes military coup against democratic elections that elected Lula. Nowhere in those articles will it say that Lula was let out of prison by his appointees for looting the country for 10 years. Nowhere will that be said. I read something in Brookings, they're fucking embarrassment, by an analyst saying that Lula was the most popular president ever. His socialist policy, Bolsa Familia, elevated so many people out of poverty and he will win in a landslide because he's so popular and never even mentions he was convicted for anything. And nobody in the country, I mean, you go to stadiums, people are watching the World Cup in stadiums, they're watching it remotely, and they were chanting, or car races, they were chanting, Lula's a convicted thief, Lula is convicted thief. They call him Squid. His nickname across the country is Squid. And it ain't for anything good. So I mean, we're gonna see the global media, you know, take action and run an info war. And then what's gonna happen? I told this to Bannon, I'll tell it to your audience. We need to get real vocal. That's why I'm doing so many of these things because I want people to have real fact pattern. You know me and I think people can hear me. I'm nothing if not comprehensive. I will throw out facts all day long and put them into context so that we can fight back because the leftist media, the mainstream media, the global media, they ain't gonna talk facts. They're gonna say these poor maligned Supreme Court justices that Bolsonaro's trying to go over, never mention they're imprisoning journalists, they're deplatforming everybody, that their ties to South Valle forum. They'll never mention the South Valle forum and how it was started by Fidel Castro and Lula in 1990. Lula's criminal history, Lula being close to all the drug gangs, wears a CPX hat as I said. I mean his base is criminals, criminals and media. So that's a redundancy I guess. (HoO) Just to finish off, where does this leave democracy in many parts if the system is an electronic system that can be controlled by those on the left and the left also have a big hand in the judicial system as we basically saw in the States, even when it went to the Supreme Court, actually they wouldn't call it out. It's very different than where we are. I mean, in Britain, it's just the stupidity of our electorate, basically put to say, it's a paper ballot. So yeah, it's different. (MT) But you also have some really shitty issues going on there where rule of law is also under attack and it's not getting publicized. When constabularies can go to the homes of somebody for tweeting something and arrest them as we've now seen several dozen times in the provinces and these are not you know lefty strongholds then you know this is fraying you know the Orwellian dystopic vision is playing out thanks to big tech thanks to the consolidated powers of information flow that government has control or access to so i mean it is worrisome Brazil is the bulwark I say you watch Bannon and i sit on Bannon and every single time, Brazil falls the far so takes over South America, a very wealthy continent, Brazil itself, you know, one sixth of the world's food supply, but also iron ore, oil, manganese, bauxite, tin, cobalt, copper, gold, I mean, very wealthy. The most, and Amazon, stuff in the Amazon, we don't even know the drugs and therapeutics that we're going to make from species of plants and bugs and shit that we don't even, we've never even discovered yet. And that's part of the play. It's the same thing that what's her face, Maloney was saying about France and the French colonies in Africa. You know that, okay, you're so egalitarian as you rape, you're still raping the colonies of Africa, even if they're quote unquote independent, you're still treating them like protectorates. Well, if Brazil falls, then all of Latin America is gone. We saw Colombia and Chile, the two furthest generally right nation states in Latin America, at least in South America, because Guatemala is pretty decent and Honduras give or take sometimes. But you know scaled up societies that have fallen out to the foreign so Paulo in the left. Brazil falls, China owns all of South America and that's obviously a threat to the Pax American in the west and the US. I mean AMLO, López Obrador in Mexico also a Sao Paulo foreign guy. So I mean it's it ain't good and there's a reason. The useful idiots of our side, the lefties on our side who believe, oh yeah, little socialism and big government's fine and they're not even averse to communism, they're the proverbial, you know, what Lenin said, they're the capitalists who will sell us the rope with which they'll hang them. Biden, the corrupt comatose vegetable that he is, said, and obviously he didn't say it, he probably fell asleep at four o'clock after his ice cream cone or his jello, but he had said right after, like moments after the tabulation was done. Congratulations Lula for the fair free and credible elections. How the fuck would you know that one minute after the tabulation? They don't have, IRI, the International Republican Institute, whose job it is to look at election fraud around the world, silent. Organization of American states, silent. UN, silent. EU, silent. State departments, silent. NSA, silent. I mean it's like, it's a giant global fix because they hate Bolsonaro like they hate Trump. Meanwhile more popular maybe than any leader anywhere in the world. He's probably the most popular, at least in a country of more than 10 million people. We're talking 220 million people. (HoO) Yeah, absolutely, Matthew, thank you so much for your time. Our viewers and listeners can follow you at @MatthewTyrmand. Make sure and follow Matthew on GETTR or Twitter for keep your finger on the pulse and also make sure and watch Gateway Pundit that are bringing daily articles, keeping you posted on what is happening. So we'll certainly watch this closely. (MT) And Bannon's War Room, I'm doing Bannon sometimes multiple times a day. He's kind of tipped the spear on this. Because Bannon and I were talking about Brazil for the last two to three years. We saw what was going to happen. I wrote about this a year ago and talked about it. And then, then obviously everything played out exactly as I wrote about, you know, and published in details in August, September. And so War Room, Emerald Robinson, I'm doing a few times a week and sort of all over the place, posting as much as I can on social media as I get information or as I do these segments and pods. I throw them up there as quick as I can so that people are informed and have information. And again, Brazilian people, the best people in the world. We need to stand with our Brazilian brothers and sisters in arms and cousins, because if they do not fail this coup, it will be Venezuela within a year. The gulags will start in a few months. Hell, he's not even president yet. They're already gulagging people for arrest today. The indigenous leader on Monday, they're already doing it. They've already censored. Now they're already starting Gulag. So, I mean, we've got to fight this. (HoO) Yeah, completely, completely. Matthew, thank you so much.

god united states american new york university amazon canada donald trump chicago trust business english europe china bible uk house politics france hell state mexico new york times french canadian germany west walk africa joe biden ukraine european elections italy global european union ministry western public police spain chief forbes brazil congress modern white house bbc fbi cnn argentina harvard supreme court hearts states sweden wall street world cup britain whatsapp washington post colombia chile mt cuba senate columbia democracy venezuela poland rio latin peru indigenous south america swedish judges belgium brazilian latin america holocaust oracle guatemala polish janeiro soviet union soviet hungary honduras jair bolsonaro bolivia communism presidential election latin american joseph stalin castillo ted cruz first lady saying no czech republic napoleon antifa reuters nsa first amendment fernandez south american squid constitutional hungarian ortega marxist tucker carlson venezuelan chavez maduro bahia fidel castro marius emerald sao paulo globo rye argentinian interpol lenin buckingham palace bannon war room snowball amlo election fraud petro oceania csp marco rubio project veritas orwellian obrador palo maloney eurasia recife fidel stf tells stasi breitbart sonia sotomayor animal farm farc temer brazilians narco liberal party marxists gulag central europe brasilia censoring american mind brookings jason miller populist petrobras deputies muammar gaddafi tse gaffney marais jerusalem post eric holder gettr american conservative boric dilma dilma rousseff nikita khrushchev slovakian jake sullivan iri tvp tsc justice minister human events gateway pundit chicanery politburo american thinker harvard club simon bolivar defense ministry brezhnev praetorian guard corollary south california wprost shaba cpx james traficant operation car wash westphalian presidents nixon big league politics bolsa familia philadelphia society bosch fawstin
Captivated
Holiday Perfection

Captivated

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 30:31


Our desire for memorable and beautiful moments during the Christmas season can lead us to put incredible pressure on ourselves to make it amazing. In today's podcast, Stasi sits down with Stacey Burton to talk about the desires and demands of the holidays and the goodness we can experience when we rest in God being the Amazing One. When we trust in him, the pressure is off. 

I Am Refocused Podcast Show
Ramona Reed - Red Elvis

I Am Refocused Podcast Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 8:23


Dean Reed's Hollywood career was brief, but he became an international superstar during the height of the Cold War, living in Latin America and communist Europe. After going public about wanting to return home to the United States, Dean's life came to a mysterious end. Decades later, his daughter Ramona is determined to find out what really happened to him.Episodes here:https://www.iheart.com/podcast/1119-red-elvis-105219647/ABOUT RAMONA REEDRamona Reed is the daughter of Dean Reed who Red Elvis is about. Decades after her dad's mysterious disappearance she is she is determined to find out what really happened to him. Ramona is executive producer, narrator and advisor to the documentary film Red Elvis: The Coldwar Cowboy,, now streaming on Amazon Prime.ABOUT THE FILM DEAN REED: THE COLDWAR COWBOY BY ELENA RINGO OF INDIE-CINEMA.COMThe film is a documentary dedicated to an American singer Dean Reed, who became a superstar in the Soviet Union and Eastern Germany. In a way he was much more than Elvis Presley. He was not only a singer, he was also a film director, a writer, an actor and a social activist. He was a rebel with a strong feeling of social injustice and was fighting the existing capitalist system of the Western World. American Rebel - it is written on his grave and he lived as a rebel.The film was released in 2022 and was screened on British Sky TV and American documentary streamer Curiosity. The story of Dean Reed told by several people, including Dean's daughter Ramona Reed is touching and captivating. It is illustrated by numerous footage which show the actor in Latin America, in the USA, in Russia and Eastern Germany.The life of Dean Reed reflects also the complexity of that time. For the first time he visited Russia in the sixties - time of hope and freedom. Dean Reed was a breath of fresh air in Soviet Union and Eastern Germany. He was singing revolutionary songs but at the same time he represented to Russian people the American dream; tall, artistic charismatic cowboy with a Hollywood smile. He was like a ray of sunshine coming through the iron curtain.In the seventies Dean Reed often appeared on Soviet TV, and he was very popular. He toured the Soviet Union and crowds of people cheered him at stadiums. Women fell in love with him and men wanted to copy his haircut. For the Soviet Government Dean was a useful tool of propaganda - he was singing revolutionary songs and was a living proof that the West is on the brink of revolution.But in the eighties his popularity started to decline. The leaders of communist regime were carefully preparing the perestroika - demolition of communism and privatization of manufacturers. They were preparing to benefit from the new order. Red Elvis was not needed for them anymore.Russia little by little opened up to Western culture. When in the eighties I studied at university, we were listening to Joe Dassin, Boney M, ABBA, Frank Sinatra and other western music. Seldom to Dean Reed.When Dean Reed died there was very little information in Soviet press concerning his death. He was supposed to have drowned, but this version obviously did not look credible, as he was an excellent swimmer and was found near the shore. Later it was suggested he committed suicide.Ramona Reed, daughter of Dean Reed, raised in the film concern regarding her father's death. She did not believe in the official version of events. Other American relatives of Dean also did not believe in accidental death and neither in his suicide. And they have a reason because this tragic story has many missing links. Unfortunately, this horrible end was not investigated properly and even now, after many years, no more facts came out. As it turns out, secret services guard their secrets properly.It is interesting that in 2007 a German film "Der Rote Elvis" was made. The creators of the German film interviewed several people, but not American relatives. Somehow the film wanted to leave the impression that Dean committed suicide. I personally do not believe in that because too many clues show that it was a murder. I personally do not believe Stasi or KGB could kill Dean Reed. It was the time when these secret services did not kill people like that and they were especially careful with foreign citizens. To spy on them? Yes. To murder? No. It just was not possible. And even if we suggested that secret services for some very important reasons wanted to eliminate Dean Reed they would not do it in a park just a mile away of his house in Eastern Berlin. It was not the style of secret services, that is for sure.It was stupid and reckless to put a body so near the shore and so near his house. This botched murder was not a deed of professionals, but of a desperate person who hardly knew what he or she was doing. It looks like Dean did not die in the lake, where he was found in shallow water covered with stones. Probably the body was taken there by the murderer.Dean Reed's car was found near the shore. It hit the tree.I cannot imagine that Dean Reed himself hit a tree. He was a very good driver and he was not drunken. But the person who hit the tree was probably the killer, scared out of his wits and disoriented. Probably it was planned to drive further away and bury Dean in a place where he would not be discovered soon. But the accident stopped this plan and he was left very near the beach and covered with stones to prevent his body to come up.The murder of a foreign national and especially a famous singer would be a huge international scandal. Suicide version or accident suited authorities better. So the killer or killers escaped from punishment.I do not believe for a moment that such a clumsy murder could be work of any secret service or professional killers. But Stasi and other authorities did everything to cover it up. Death of Dean was announced an accident, then suggested it was a suicide. Even a suicide note was found in archive, but it does not look remotely authentic. The man who appreciated justice and was fighting for social justice did not get it at the very end.Now that the capitalism won in Russia, the music of Dean Reed is not promoted there anymore, nor in Russia, nor in the USA, not in Germany. But despite this, his music is still listened by many and loved by many. Now the real ugly face of capitalism has hypocrisy, cruelty - everything what Dean hated and now position of Marxist Dean Reed becomes more and more understandable and current. Sometimes I like to listen Dean Reed singing "My Way". He put more special meaning into this song than any other singer because he really lived his life his own way, fought for truth and justice.The film "Red Elvis: The Cold War Cowboy" is a loving tribute to a singer and a person, whose name should not be forgotten. His talent, his struggle for peace and social justice will be with us as a candle in the darkness of modern times and a bridge between two societies divided by a New Cold War.

Cold War Conversations History Podcast
How East Germany doped its athletes (264)

Cold War Conversations History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 57:40


In the early 1970s, the athletes of East Germany started to achieve incredible sports results, winning medals and setting new world records with astonishing frequency. For many years, their sporting supremacy was hailed as a triumph of the socialist government's commitment to scientific research and innovative training methods. However, after the Cold War ended, the Stasi archives revealed a sinister secret behind the successes: a perverse doping system imposed by the government itself. Drugs were administered to young athletes, often without their consent, and the price their bodies are now paying is very high, both physically and mentally. I talk with Joseph Tudor, whose new book Synthetic Medals reveals the events that led to the discovery of the state-doping system and the subsequent trial. It also explores the state's motives for this crime against its own people.BOOK GIVEAWAY detail here https://coldwarconversations.com/episode264/ Buy the book here https://amzn.to/3gVZbtI and support the podcast.==========================================================Cold War history is disappearing; however, a simple monthly donation will keep this podcast on the air. You'll become part of our community and get a sought after CWC coaster as a thank you and you'll bask in the warm glow of knowing you are helping to preserve Cold War history. Just go to https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/If a monthly contribution is not your cup of tea, We also welcome one-off donations via the same link.==========================================================Buy a gift for the Cold War enthusiast in your life https://coldwarconversations.com/store/ Find the ideal gift for the Cold War enthusiast in your life! Just go to https://coldwarconversations.com/store/Support the showSupport the project! https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/ Follow us on Twitter here https://twitter.com/ColdWarPodFacebook https://www.facebook.com/groups/coldwarpod/Instagram https://www.instagram.com/coldwarconversations/Youtube https://youtube.com/@ColdWarConversations

Choses à Savoir HISTOIRE
Quel était le but de l'opération INFEKTION ?

Choses à Savoir HISTOIRE

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 2:30


Au début des années 1980, l'URSS est dans une situation assez difficile. En effet, le pays est enlisé dans la guerre qui, depuis 1979, l'oppose à l'Afghanistan. Il a également du mal à maintenir ses positions dans les pays du Tiers-Monde. l'URSS doit également faire face à un Président américain plus déterminé. Élu en 1980, Ronald Reagan définit en effet L'Union soviétique comme "l'Empire du mal". Et il fait mettre en chantier un système de défense anti-missiles baptisé "Guerre des étoiles". Les relations entre les deux grandes puissances sont donc très tendues. Au point qu'on parle parfois de "guerre fraîche" pour les caractériser. C'est dans ce contexte que l'opération "INFEKTIONN" est préparée. Il s'agit d'un plan de désinformation, mis au point par l'un des services du KGB, le principal service de renseignements de l'URSS. Il s'agit du département des "mesures actives". Son rôle est d'influencer, de toutes les manières possibles, le cours des événements dans les pays adverses. Le but est, bien entendu, de servir les intérêts soviétiques. L'un des moyens utilisés est la propagation de ce que nous appelons aujourd'hui les "fake news". L'opération "INFEKTION" relève de ces campagnes de désinformation. Il est à noter que les services secrets est-allemands, la STASI, ont joué un rôle notable dans cette affaire. Alimentées par les services soviétiques et est-allemands, des rumeurs ont commencé à circuler, en 1983, sur la possible implication de l'armée américaine dans la diffusion du virus du sida. On trouve d'abord ces allégations dans un journal indien. Puis elles sont reprises par certains médias américains. Selon ces bruits, le virus aurait même été créé dans un laboratoire de l'armée américaine, avant d'être ensuite diffusé dans la population. Le but est de déstabiliser le gouvernement américain, d'autant qu'il est accusé de vouloir se débarrasser de populations jugées indésirables, comme les migrants haïtiens ou les homosexuels, très touchées par le virus. En 1987, les Soviétiques qui, cinq ans plus tard, avoueront que le KGB était à l'origine de l'opération "INFEKTION", y renoncent sous la pression américaine. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Plattdeutsches aus MV
De Plappermoehl aus Alt Schwerin

Plattdeutsches aus MV

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 65:53


Ein Kirchenlied aus Tansania passt hervorragend auf den wohl berühmtesten Tarnowschen Text... Klaus Hinrichs, Pastor im Ruhestand, hat das herausgefunden. Außerdem erzählt er, wie im Wendeherbst sie die Stasi buchstäblich in Grund und Boden gesungen haben. Irma Becker sitzt in Tracht am Mühlentisch, erzählt von einer großen Reise nach Südamerika und den Begegnungen dort mit anderen Volkstanzgruppen aus aller Welt. Jan Tessin trägt einen Hut mit breiter Krempe und seine Gitarre hat er hinter seinem Stuhl versteckt. Er macht Musik auf Platt- und Hochdeutsch und bringt in seinem Beruf Kindern und Erwachsenen den Umgang mit Medien bei. Traditionelle norddeutsche Musik gespielt auf Sackpfeife, Knopfakkordeon und Maultrommel hat Ralf Gehler dabei.

Powojnie
Tajemnice tajnych służb NRD. Przywileje, luksusy, rekrutacja i zarobki w Stasi. Życie na podsłuchu.

Powojnie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 17:01


O nrdowskich tajnych służbach powstał już jeden odcinek serii Powojnie. Jednak jako, że jest to temat niezwykle interesujący postanowiłem ponownie zająć sytuacją w służbach Niemieckiej Republiki Demokratycznej. Tym razem jednak nacisk położyłem na prywatne życie tajnych agentów Stasi. Ile zarabiali pieniędzy? Jak łączyli obowiązki służbowe z życiem rodzinnym? Jak wyglądała rekrutacja do tajnych służb NRD? Tego dowiecie się słuchając najnowszego odcinka serii Powojnie Zapraszam! Natomiast w sprzedaży jest już pierwsza książka z serii Powojnie: Jak Moskwa oszukała Zachód w 1945 roku. Jest ona dostępna na oficjalnej stronie kanału: https://powojnie.sklep.pl

Stories of our times
The Stasi's Romeo Agents (Pt 2) - The Spy Who Left Me

Stories of our times

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 32:11


Romeo agents have infiltrated the West German Government by wooing secretaries of high-up officials. In the second part of this two-part series, a new agent reveals information about corruption at the very top.You can read Oliver Moody's article here.This podcast was brought to you thanks to the support of readers of The Times and The Sunday Times. Subscribe today: thetimes.co.uk/storiesofourtimes. Guests:Gunnar Take, historian at the University of Stuttgart.Katja Hoyer, historian and author of 'Beyond the wall'.Host: Oliver Moody, Berlin Correspondent, The Times.Clips from: Timeline, Tele Studio West, Operation Romeo: The Love Commandos of the Stasi Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Stories of our times
The Stasi's Romeo Agents (Pt 1) - School for Seduction

Stories of our times

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 27:37


What's the best way to spy on your enemies? Sleep with their secretaries. In part one of this two-part series, new evidence is unearthed of East Germany‘s ruthless blueprint for Cold War sexpionage, revealing for the first time stories of the agents sent to seduce young women working for West Germany's top politicians.You can read Oliver Moody's article here.This podcast was brought to you thanks to the support of readers of The Times and The Sunday Times. Subscribe today: thetimes.co.uk/storiesofourtimes. Guests:Gunnar Take, historian at the University of Stuttgart.Katja Hoyer, historian and Visiting Research Fellow at King's College London.Host: Oliver Moody, Berlin Correspondent, The Times. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Anyone Can Play Guitar
ACPG 150: DC Gore

Anyone Can Play Guitar

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 28:31


Hello and welcome to episode 150 of the ACPG podcast. This week Ben is zooming with DC Gore (Dom) to talk about his new album All These Things, his plans for the future, playing live again and much much more. Dom was currently moving when they spoke. Both literally and in general. So expect some transit at the start of the conversation. Dom is a great musician and he is new album All These Things, expertly layers fantastically dystopian imagery against twinkling tapestries of electronics and propulsive beats. It's a shift akin to the Pet Shop Boys' development between Introspective and Behaviour: from bright, dancefloor-focused pop to melancholic mini-symphonies. Thank you to Dom and Stasi for the interview. See you in a week where will be zooming again.

John Eldredge and Ransomed Heart (Audio)

John and Stasi reveal how releasing expectations and extending forgiveness can increase our capacity for gratitude in this conversation from Thanksgiving 2021.

Kill James Bond!
S2E12.5: The Lives of Others

Kill James Bond!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 87:43


This week, Alice takes us to the GDR as we watch our first-ever German-language movie, a movie that poses the question: What if a Stasi guy got into a parasocial relationship with the people he is assigned to monitor? ------ THE WINTER OF CONTENT The UCU has a fighting fund that you can contribute to here: https://www.ucu.org.uk/fightingfund If you do feel you have money to spare, please consider supporting your local food banks with money or time! donate to the Trussell Trust here: https://www.trusselltrust.org/make-a-donation/ or the Independent food aid network here: https://www.foodaidnetwork.org.uk/donate There are several ongoing strike funds that could do with some donations, and several can be found here: https://www.cwu.org/ Additionally, please consider joining a renter's union like ACORN, as rising mortgage rates will surely result in rising rent, here: https://www.acorntheunion.org.uk/join ------ Consider supporting us on our reasonably-priced patreon! https://www.patreon.com/killjamesbond ------   *WEB DESIGN ALERT*  Tom Allen is a friend of the show (and the designer behind our website). If you need web design help, reach out to him here:  https://www.tomallen.media/   Kill James Bond is hosted by Alice Caldwell-Kelly, Abigail Thorn, and Devon. You can find us at https://killjamesbond.com and https://twitter.com/killjamesbond

Dubious
Putin's Rise To Power Part 1

Dubious

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 65:52


In the first of a two part series, we discuss Putin's assignment in Dresden to the KGB office that managed Soviet support of international leftist terrorists such as Carlos "The Jackal" Sanchez, the PLO, and the RAF.Putin's time in the Stasi represents his formative years as a KGB administrator working with the East German intelligence police. Putin was tasked with two activities during this time that carry through to the rest of his political career. Please become a patron if you enjoy our content and would like to support us directly, you'll get all of our public episodes ad-free. In addition to providing money and weapons to people like the RAF (Red Army Faction), PLO (Palestinian Liberation Organization), and Carlos The Jackal, Putin was also on the board of directors for the first collaborative corporation formed between East Germany and Russia called SPAG. This company was later investigated by German authorities for connections to money laundering, particularly for organized crime syndicates like the Colombian cocaine cartels and the Russian mafia. We then discuss Putin's time on the staff of St. Petersberg mayor Anatoly Sobchak, the primary author of the Russian constitution that was established after the fall of the Soviet party, and how Putin continued his penchant for getting himself into positions tasked with distributing formerly state-owned property to private hands, and how Putin used this authority to buy favor within the ranks of Russia's oligarchy. We finally discuss Putin's time doing basically the same tasks for the Yeltsin administration on the staff of Pavel Borodin who was the Moscow figure also tasked with redistributing former state property to business interests, and finally Putin's appointment to the head of the FSB, after which Putin killed his law school mentor and long-time friend Sobchak during his first run for the Russian Presidency. The books of two authors were invaluable for the research for this episode. First, Dr Karen Dawisha at Miami Ohio University and her research into the Stasi records that survived from Putin's time in East Germany, and secondly the articles and books of Catherine Belton. 1, 2, 3, 4 1. Karen Dawisha, Vladimir Putin, Operation LUCH, and Matthias Warning: The Secret KGB-Stasi Relationship (appendix), Miami Ohio University, 2014. ⇤2. Catherine Belton, Did Vladimir Putin Support Anti-Western Terrorists as a Young KGB Officer?, Politico, June 2020. ⇤3. Catherine Belton, Putin's Name Surfaces in German Probe, The Moscow Times, May 2003. ⇤4. Catherine Belton, PUTIN'S PEOPLE: How the KGB Took Back Russia and Then Took On the West, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, June 2020. ⇤

Captivated
Beauty from Ashes

Captivated

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 38:22


Stasi invites guest Danita Jenae, author of When Mountains Crumble, into the studio for this week's podcast to share about the faithfulness of Jesus amidst tragedy and grief. With practical wisdom, Stasi and Danita talk about finding peace even when things fall apart, grieving without shame, and what Danita came to know of God through her heartbreaking loss. Her story is filled with beauty and pain, and the conversation is a blessing of knowing God's unshakable presence. Show Notes:DANITA JENAEWebsite: danitajenae.comWebsite: WhenMountainsCrumble.comInstagram: @CompanionInSorrow and @danitajenaeBook: When Mountains CrumbleDanita Jenae Bio:Danita Jenae is a young mom and recent military widow learning to carry both joy and sorrow in the same breath. As an author, speaker, poet, and artist, she walks alongside the broken-hearted, offering practical and creative ways to lead a Spirit-led life at danitajenae.com and @CompanionInSorrow. To help you find your way in sorrow, Danita invites you to grab your free copy of her Find Your Footing Grief Guide at WhenMountainsCrumble.com.

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 75 – Unstoppable Theater Writer and What? with Jennifer Lieberman

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 71:57


Jennifer Lieberman comes by her writing and creativity honestly. She has been writing, organizing, and working toward a career in theater writing ever since she was a student in school. She has written her own one-person play as well as a book entitled “Year of the What” based on the play.   As Jennifer tells us about her life, she discusses living in New York City during the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. She will discuss how her life changed after that day.   Jennifer clearly is a person who set goals for herself and then worked to achieve them. She is absolutely unstoppable. I think you will enjoy this interview and the creative personality of this wonderful person.   About the Guest: After years of pounding the pavement and knocking on doors with no success of breaking into the entertainment industry, Jennifer decided to take matters into her own hands and created the solo-show Year of the Slut. This show proved to be her break and the play went on to win the Audience Choice Award in New York City and is now the #1 Amazon Best Selling novel Year of the What? and was awarded the Gold Medal at the Global Book Awards 2022 for Coming of Age Books. Since deciding to make her own break Lieberman has appeared in over 30 international stage productions, has produced over 40 independent film and theatre productions and has helped over 100 creatives make their own break through her coaching and consulting work. She has penned a number of stage and screen plays and her short films have screened at the Festival de Cannes Court Métrage among other international festivals. She is currently gearing up to direct her first feature film.   Social Media Links: Twitter: https://twitter.com/iamjenlieberman Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/iamjenlieberman/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/iamjenlieberman Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jennifer-lieberman-33b20426/       About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:21 Hi, again, it's Michael Hingson, and you are listening to unstoppable mindset, the podcast where inclusion diversity in the unexpected me. And today, Jennifer Lieberman, our guest I think certainly has lots of unexpected things that she's going to tell us about. If you don't know, Jennifer, and you may or may not know who she is, I will just tell you that you want to talk about unexpected. She wrote her own one person play called The year of the slug, and we're gonna get into that I am sure, along with a lot of other things. So Jennifer, welcome to unstoppable mindset. How are you?   Jennifer Lieberman  02:00 I'm fabulous. Michael, thank you so much for having me. I'm so excited to chat with you today.   Michael Hingson  02:07 Well, we're really excited that you're here. And I know you do have lots of stories and you faced a lot of challenges. And it will be good to go through some of those. Why don't we start new sort of telling me a little bit about your early life and how you kind of progressed a little bit?   Jennifer Lieberman  02:21 Sure. So I started off as the competitive gymnast. And I was in competition. By the time I was five, and was training almost every day after school. By the time I was eight years old. I kind of had a natural aptitude for the sport. And that was my main focus for a really long time. And then I ended up coaching, I founded a high school team. And I think it's relevant because from a very early age, I had to have like a certain amount of discipline. And that discipline has really helped me with longevity in the creative world where it's It's a thankless business a lot of the time.   Michael Hingson  03:11 So where are you from originally?   Jennifer Lieberman  03:13 Oh, yes, I'm from. I was born in Toronto raised in Maple, Canada, just outside of Toronto. I went to York University in Toronto, I studied philosophy and English Lit. And when I graduated, I moved to New York City to pursue a career in theatre. I started writing at a young age, I was about eight years old when I started writing scripts. Originally, it started off as fan fiction for shows that I wanted to be on as a child. And then by the time I was 12, I my imagination evolved enough to create my own plots and characters and storylines that weren't borrowing from worlds that were previously created by other writers. So it was always something in me. But like I said, gymnastics was the main focus, you know, until halfway through high school when I had a career ending knee injury. But like, I still love the sport and love being in the gym. So coaching kind of allowed me to stay in the world that I was used to. And then in university is when I started taking acting classes, and I just kind of never looked back like I am in love with the creative process, whether it's writing performance, filmmaking, and I've developed a lot of skills over the years in order to stay working and stay in the game. Because especially as an actor, you don't have a lot of agency or control over when you get picked And what you get picked for.   Michael Hingson  05:02 So for you, philosophy ended up sort of being a means to an end, as opposed to being a career that you are going to go into in some way. Well,   Jennifer Lieberman  05:11 actually, I studied philosophy, it's interesting that you bring it up, but the Greeks are who invented theatre. That's where a theater was born in these Greek Dionysian festivals, and, you know, East Escalus. Like all of these writers wrote, theatrically, and that's kind of, you know, philosophy played on these stories, or at least in the earlier days, so it always felt connected to me. Philosophy, Greek philosophy, mythology, it was all kind of wrapped up in some sort of performance.   Michael Hingson  05:53 But you went through and got a degree in philosophy, and then you move to New York, is that because you wanted to go into Broadway? Oh, yeah. And   Jennifer Lieberman  06:01 also, like, my parents didn't consider a degree in theater a degree, you know. And I knew, I also knew that I was a writer. And then I wanted to tackle, you know, topics that were, you know, that would challenge people. And that would make people think and different points of view. So I thought, for the writing side of it, because it was never just to be an actor, it was always an actor who wrote projects. So the philosophy and the English Lit just seemed like a great jumping off point in order to develop my skills, grappling different difficult subject matters and structure and theatrical writing and all of that stuff.   Michael Hingson  06:49 Well, so you move to New York. And I guess something that none of us would know. Listening to you and talking with you here is your half African did that have a an impact on you and being able to break into this industry? Or?   Jennifer Lieberman  07:07 No, not at all, because I look, I look like a white girl, I'm my dad's side is Polish. My mother is tunisienne from Tunis. 10 is yeah, she immigrated to Canada with her parents and siblings, and she was the young girl. So so nobody has any inkling of my African roots, unless I actually mentioned it. So, um, so yeah, that's kind of something that's very unexpected, and people don't really place me in that category. Even though I really identify with my 10 ASEAN, heritage and culture, especially traditions, you know, family traditions, things like that my was very close to both of my 10 ASEAN grandparents, I they grew up five houses away from where I grew up, so I saw them almost every day. And that is just ingrained in who I am.   Michael Hingson  08:12 So does that make you essentially a bi racial person?   Jennifer Lieberman  08:16 Um, you know, it's funny, cuz my sense, it's, my family is North African. And like I said, like, my grandfather had dark skin, but my grandmother had light skin. I don't even know if I would be considered biracial. Because once again, like, by looking at me, you couldn't really tell I don't appear to be bipoc. So it's not something that really comes up. Actually. I don't even know what people would consider me to be honest.   Michael Hingson  08:49 A writer and an actress. Yes, so so it really didn't have much of an impact, which is, which is cool. Well, it shouldn't anyway, but it seemed relevant to ask the question. You know, so you, you move to New York. Tell us about that. Where did you go? What did you do in New York? And and what's your favorite bagel place? You know, all the important things?   Jennifer Lieberman  09:17 Yes. Um, so I basically after my last exam, I didn't even wait around for graduation. I wasn't there. On the day, they gave out diplomas because I really didn't care about a diploma. I felt like that was more an obligation I had to fulfill for my parents sake, and then I could start my life. So I showed up in New York and like I say, with a duffel bag and a dream and I was just like, I'm here and stumbled my way. I had rented an apartment sight unseen, which was not a great apartment and last in there very long. And I'm Just basically there was a newspaper back then called Backstage, it used to be a physical newspaper, now you can get an online subscription. And I just started looking in the newspaper that was specifically for the acting world and started circling different auditions I could show up at or submit to. And that's how it all began. And I was fortunate enough to get in with a couple of different theatre companies. And I was able to work with the same people. consistently over time, there were three different companies that I was working with consistently. So that helped me grow and develop as an artist. And one of the companies I ended up becoming a producer at 22. So I learned every aspect, from carpentry using power tools to help get the sets made to running the lighting and sound stage management, costuming, anything that was needed. You just kind of when you're an off off Broadway company without any real funding. You just scraped together whatever you can to make it happen. But also, pardon? Go ahead. Oh, but also those lessons have been invaluable for where I am now. Because, you know, not having the perfect sort of circumstances, or the amount of money we wish we had has never deterred me from making something happen.   Michael Hingson  11:37 So you wore many hats. And you obviously learned a lot as you went along. What was kind of the biggest challenge that you had back in those early days?   Jennifer Lieberman  11:47 Oh, well, I grew up in a really small town. My neighbors were trees. So getting used to the fast paced kind of hustle and bustle of New York City. It was a huge culture shock for me, I grew up in the middle of nowhere, and then move to the center of the world, with everything happening. And just as I was starting to get my footing in New York, 911 happened. And   Michael Hingson  12:18 where were you at the time,   Jennifer Lieberman  12:21 I was on my way to work. I was walking towards the subway at Astor Place, I was living in Alphabet City, and witnessed the first plane, fly into the World Trade Center and thought it was a fluke accident and got on the subway and continued with my day.   Michael Hingson  12:49 So for people who don't know where is Alphabet City, and what is   Jennifer Lieberman  12:52 Oh, yes, so Alphabet City is like the East most part of the East Village. So I was at Avenue D and 10th street. That's where I was living. I didn't last very long in that apartment. I moved in there. And on September 1, and I think by the 15th of September, I had packed everything up and went back to Canada for a while because I couldn't handle the reality of what happened. And I needed to go home. As   Michael Hingson  13:31 I went, he didn't last long either. You just   Jennifer Lieberman  13:35 got damnit, I'm going back to New York.   Michael Hingson  13:38 So you, you said you argued with people, as you were going on the subway and so on. Tell us about that if you want.   Jennifer Lieberman  13:46 I argued with people who were saying it was a terrorist attack. Because at that age, you know, the level of innocence being raised very sheltered in a small town in Canada. I was just like, This doesn't happen, like we're living in, you know, 2001 like, What do you mean? No, this is impossible that somebody hijacked a plane and flew it into a building in the United States. Like it's impossible. I just thought it was a freak accident and continued to work. And you know, there were arguments on the subway because some people saw it as we were all getting on the subway together. But then there were other people who had been on the subway for a while and are hearing it for the first time. So there was a panic. And then I got to two I was working at 34th and Park at a real estate company. That was my side hustle at the time. And I told my boss what happened. And he got really angry with me. And he said that it's not funny, like we don't joke about these things. And I was like, I'm not joke like, who wouldn't joke about these things? Like, turn on the radio. And he did. And that's when we heard about the second plane. And I just remember, like my soul leaving my body at the realization that it couldn't be an accident if there were two that happened in that short amount of time. Like, it was just literally, I felt my innocence Leave me. And yeah, I became a different person that day.   Michael Hingson  15:32 I think a lot of us did. One of my employees was on the PATH train paths stands for Port Authority, trans Hudson, it goes under the river. But he was on the PATH train coming in from Hoboken. They just pulled into the path station under tower Well, under the central part of the World Trade Center. Yep. At the fourth sub level when the second plane hit. And he told me later, the train just started shaking and so on in the pilot, the pilot, the conductor, and the engineer just said, don't leave the train. And they just literally turned around and went back. Right, in Hoboken, because I think they may have known that something was going on. But they didn't know, of course, about the second plane, because it was happening in real time. But nevertheless, they just turned around, went back to New Jersey. Yeah. Yeah, it was just Well, and, of course, who would have thought, right? Exactly. It's one of those things that it's really hard to imagine. And I can understand your reaction. And it did change all of us who were there. And as I've said to many people, and my wife has really pointed this out the problem for most people, certainly the people outside of the immediate area where this occurred that is outside New York City and so on, or further away, who just couldn't see what was happening. Your view, not yours, because you were there. But the view of people was only as large as your TV screen or your newspaper. And you couldn't have the same impact in your mind as all of us who were there at the time did. So you went back to Canada for a couple of months. And that's sort of understandable. You had a place to escape to as it were.   Jennifer Lieberman  17:33 Yeah. First I went to the Poconos. So I had a good friend Heather. She was initially my roommate. And then we, you know, we both ended up living in Alphabet City, actually. But she moved in with a boyfriend. And you know, no cell phones were working. As you know, all the cell towers were down because they were in the Trade Center. So we couldn't get I couldn't call my parents. I couldn't call anyone in Canada. But Heather and I somehow found each other on the street. And I guess it took two or three days for her dad to be able to drive to the city and get us because the city was closed. They weren't letting any vehicles in or out of the city. And I ended up going her dad picked us up. It was her boyfriend at the time. She and myself. And we went to their house in the Poconos for a few days. And then I got back to the city. And I don't know if planes were back up in the air yet, but I took the train home to Toronto, it was like a 12 hour train ride. And I just like packed up everything I had and just hopped on the train. Because I also felt like my dreams were so trite and insignificant compared to the weight of what happened. And I felt silly. I felt you know that everything that was so important to me the day before, was completely superfluous after that incident.   Michael Hingson  19:12 Yeah, what could you do? And it it makes perfect sense that you just left. You're fortunate to be able to do that. Some cell phones were working that day because I was able to call my wife in New Jersey. She couldn't call me. But I could call her interesting. And we were able to, to communicate learned later that day that the trains had started running from Penn Station in New York to Penn Station in Newark. So I was able to get a train later that evening, back to Newark, and then catch the train going from Newark out to Westfield, where we lived. So we got home at about seven that night. It was interesting being on the train, going from New York to New Jersey, people came up to me and said, You're really dirty. Were you downtown? And I said, Yeah, I was in Tower One. And it was interesting while we were going to the train station, from the apartment of a friend of my colleague, David's who I was with, although it wasn't the same as typical, still cars were moving, there was traffic. And it seemed like even only being a few miles away, it was already so significantly different than what we were experiencing downtown.   Jennifer Lieberman  20:40 Oh, yeah, the whole world stopped. If you were on the island of Manhattan, the whole world stopped, you know, and I ended up in New Jersey as well, actually. Because I was beneath 14th street and they didn't really want anybody coming back home if you were below 14th street because they didn't know. Like we talked about before we started recording, you know, gas leaks, fires under the city, things like that the fires could travel through the subway lines, you know, through the tunnels and stuff. So I ended up in New Jersey at a colleague's place for I guess, the first couple of nights. And yeah, it was it's It's surreal. It was just, that's the only word. You know, I can think   Michael Hingson  21:30 of was just how did you get to New Jersey?   Jennifer Lieberman  21:32 I believe I took a train from Penn Station.   Michael Hingson  21:35 Okay, so you were able to catch a train too, which was cool.   Jennifer Lieberman  21:39 Yeah, I was able to catch a train. Yeah, it was. I can't even   Michael Hingson  21:45 Well, let's, let's go back to you. So you moved back to Canada for a little while. Yeah.   Jennifer Lieberman  21:50 Canada. And you know, that didn't last? No, it didn't last because, you know, after I got over the initial shock of what actually happened. I was like, Yeah, you know, my dreams are important to me. And art is just as important as ever, especially during a crisis, having writers and having theater and having stories and people who are able to tell stories in compelling ways. And I basically did a, I did a one ad. And when all I went right back to what I was doing before, with an even stronger conviction than I had previously.   Michael Hingson  22:37 So what happened?   Jennifer Lieberman  22:40 So I continued with the theatre company that I was with, and I got into, like I said, couple other theatre companies I was performing off off Broadway pretty regularly. I was with a mime company called the American mime theatre, and trained and performed as a mime for a few years. And this company was quite special. It was funded by the National Endowment for the Arts. And it was its own medium. It wasn't a copy of French pantomime. It was its own discipline. And that was actually coming. You know what, when we got to the one woman shows, but doing the mind training was the best foundation I could have asked for moving forward and doing one person shows where I was playing multiple characters and had to snap in and out of them very quickly. And being able to just snap into a physicality that made it very clear to the audience that I was somebody new, or somebody different as to the character who was previous. So yeah, I ended up producing a bunch of shows off Broadway got into film production. I was in New York for about six years and, and just try to learn as much as I could and craft as much as I could. I started working with a director named Jim craft offered rest in peace he passed a couple years ago during the pandemic, not from COVID. But he was a phenomenal writer and director he studied under Ilya Khazanah at the actor studio, and his play to patch it was a real tipping point in my artistic career. I had to play a mentally challenged girl who was raped and murdered. And once I was able to get through that, I realized like yeah, I really prove to myself like okay, this is where I belong. You know, I have the I have the chops. I have the stamina, I have the drive and you You know, that was like a big milestone, also, in terms of it was the most challenging role that I had ever come across. And I really had to rise to the occasion. And a lot of times in creative work, like until you were given the opportunity to rise to the occasion, you don't know what you're made of. So that was a huge milestone for me. And then, while I was working after I was working on capatch it, my grandma got sick, and I ended up back in Toronto for about a year and a half to help my mom, and my grandma got better and which was great. And then I decided to give la a try. One of the films that I had produced in New York was in a festival in LA and I went to the festival, the film won a couple of awards. And I was like, Okay, I'm gonna give Hollywood a shot now. And that's, that's what happened next.   Michael Hingson  26:01 Well, typically, people always want to get noticed and seen and so on. So what kind of was really your big break? And in terms of whether it be Broadway or wherever? And why do you consider it a big break?   Jennifer Lieberman  26:16 Okay, um, so I, when I was in LA, I had been there for about a year and this is where Europe the sled came into play. A friend suggested that I create a vehicle for myself that, you know, everybody comes from all over the world, to have their, you know, hat in the ring and give it a try to be a star in Hollywood. And very, very, very few people make it. And you have to kind of come up with a way to get noticed. So a friend of mine suggested, do a one woman show, showcase your writing, showcase your acting ability, and you can invite agents, you can invite directors, you can invite people that can hire you people that can represent you, and that will be a good vehicle. So I did what she said. And nobody from the industry really showed up, I kind of compare it to the movie lala land with Emma Stone where she does this one woman show and there's like one person in the audience, I had more than one person, because I had supportive friends from acting class and my mom came from Canada. But in terms of industry, nobody, nobody who could represent me or hired me show up showed up. However, I had so much fun creating the characters working on the show, and taking so this was like the next plateau in my career to patch it, where I played the mentally challenged girl was like the first kind of plateau of being like, okay, you know, you really have to rise to the occasion, doing an hour and a half on stage by yourself playing 10 characters was a whole different level of rising to the occasion. And I did it successfully expecting to fail. And not only that, so much of my time in LA up until that point, had been trying to get in the door, trying to get the job trying to get the audition. And none of that was actually doing what I went there to do, which was being creative, and performing. So I realized, like, okay, of course, I'm still going to submit to auditions. And I'm still going to try and get an agent and all of that. But in the meantime, I have the agency and the ability to create this piece and develop it and keep going with it. And I did and I did a few different workshops in LA and then I got invited to be in a festival in New York, I won the Audience Choice Award at the festival and then Doom like that was the next kind of plateau because now not only could I did I prove to myself, I could do a one woman show, but I proved that it could be recognized and successful. And that led to another one woman show in Australia. And then when I got back from Australia, because at this point in time, I had been a producer for hire for many, many years I had been producing since I was 22. And I had produced well over a dozen film and theatre projects at this point. And I was like huh, I I can help other actors who are frustrated spinning their wheels achieve what I achieved. And that's when I founded my company make your own break. So you know, nobody ever gave me a big break. I'd like them to if anyone has a big break waiting, I'll take it. But, um, but also realizing that I could do this for myself and I can do this for other actors and writers on a small scale was really exciting to me, because I love the creative process. And I love working with actors, and I love working with writers and storytelling, and I love helping I call it I love helping people dig for the gold that's inside of them, because everybody has a treasure buried inside. But a lot of times we're we're not put in situations that push ourselves to actually dig for it. Especially when we're in situations where other people are giving us opportunities, as opposed to us having to really dig down inside and figure out how do I create this opportunity for myself?   Michael Hingson  30:53 Well, and it's also true that oftentimes, we don't necessarily recognize the opportunities are right there for the taking.   Jennifer Lieberman  31:02 Exactly, exactly. And then so creating the one woman show set me on this whole trajectory of I'm just going to keep creating my own stuff. And I created a web series with a friend of mine from acting class, we wrote it together, we produced it together, we both starred in it. You know, it wasn't like commercially successful, like, there's dismal. You know, we did this almost 10 years ago, and there's like dismal YouTube views. It's very embarrassing, but it's also one of the things I'm the most proud of, I had the most fun working on it, I loved everything about it. And it's one of those projects where all the problems with it could have been solved if we had more money. And, to me, that's a success. Because, you know, we couldn't help the fact that we didn't have more money to make it. And the fact that you know, okay, fine, you know, the, the camera work wasn't fantastic, or the stats weren't fantastic, you know, but all the actors were fantastic. The directing was fantastic, the writing was fantastic, you know, so so I'm so super proud of that. And then Rebecca, my partner on that we made a short film together. And then I finally finally after decades of being a writer, because I started writing when I was eight, had the confidence to produce something that I had written on my own. And that was my short film leash. And that ended up screening at the short film corner at the Cannes Film Festival, which was like another huge milestone, I still couldn't get any agents or managers or anybody to take me on or represent me. But at this point, it's like, I got my film that I made that I wrote that, you know, that I produced that I was in to the biggest, most important film festival in the world. And I'm like, okay, that like, you know, even though the industry quote unquote, you know, hasn't recognized me yet. In terms of like, the agents and the managers and staff that's like, there must be something valid to my creativity. And then I made another short film, and it also got screened in the short film corner at the Cannes Film Festival on screen at the Cambridge Film Festival in the UK, and it just kind of, you know, so all these little bits of validation, they haven't turned into, you know, the career that I'm aspiring towards, but it's all encouragement. That helps me keep going.   Michael Hingson  33:57 You certainly are unstoppably optimistic.   Jennifer Lieberman  34:01 Well, the thing is, I don't even think it's that. I think it's just I don't have a choice. This is just who I am. It's what I do. I just keep creating, I can't help it. There was this movie years ago with Jeffrey rush called quills about the marquis decide, and how he was imprisoned because of his writing and how he was persecuted. And, you know, he kept writing no matter what he kept writing, he would write in blood on his bedsheets. And eventually he was just nude in a in a cell with nothing, because they needed to stop him from writing the depraved material that he was writing. And, you know, it was just I wouldn't say my my compulsion is that extreme. But yeah, I don't feel like this is something I chose. I feel like it chose me It's something inside of me. And I get very depressed when I'm not able to have a creative outlet. You know, it's almost survival, which I know sounds completely absurd, but any other creative who has the same conviction? I do, it makes complete sense to them.   Michael Hingson  35:23 Well, you wrote starred in and did everything regarding, of course, your, your one woman show your of the slot what happened to it? Because it did oh yeah appear and you had some awards with it and so on. So what happened?   Jennifer Lieberman  35:39 So, um, in the interim, so once we won the award in New York, some people, like lots of people, actually friends, colleagues, people that I didn't know, suggested that it would be a great Chiclet book, and that I should write the novel. So I did, I wrote, I wrote the novel and shopped it around for a couple years. But once again, I was so green, it didn't even occur to me, like, oh, you should hire an editor, and you should hire a proofreader. And you should get a whole team of people together before you start sending it to agents and, and, you know, publishing companies. So I gave up on it. Over a decade, I probably gave up on it about three times. You know, the first time, I was completely unprepared. The second time, I did hire an editor, and she just was the wrong fit. And it didn't resonate with her. So she was just very cruel in her feedback. And I couldn't look at it for another two years. And, and then finally, a friend of mine encouraged me to finish it and self publish it not to be successful, but just to get to the finish line, and not have one more project hanging over me that's unfinished. So with that state of mind, it was actually kind of a relief, because it's like, Oh, I'm not even trying to make this book successful. I'm just trying to get to the finish line. And then I did, and I, I self published Europe, the sled and it was censored. And for a good year, I tried my damnedest to get around the censorship issues with Amazon, Facebook, Instagram, in terms of advertising. It was allowed to be on Amazon, I was allowed to have a Facebook page, I was allowed to have an Instagram account, but it couldn't do any advertising, which means I couldn't break through my audience of peers. So if you weren't already my friend, I couldn't get the information to you. Which kind of made it dead in the water. A colleague of mine after a year suggested to change the title since that was the only barrier. And I was like, No, the title is what's you know, is why it was a success in the first place. That's what packed houses. Village Voice had no problem. Printing ads with the title timeout in New York had no problem none of the, you know, none of the entities that came to review the play had problems publishing the title. But I guess since it was published after the ME TOO movement, the climate had changed a little bit. And we weren't able to. Yeah, well, I just wasn't able to get it out there. So after a few months of hemming and hawing over the whole situation, because I had the title before I had the story. I'm just I was just pretty good at coming up with catchy titles. So I was really married to it and then finally revamped it, retitled it, rebranded it, relaunched it. And it's now a number one bestseller on Amazon. It recently won the gold medal at the Global Book Awards for Best Coming of Age book, it won a bronze medal at the independent publishing Awards for Best romance slash erotica ebook. And, yeah, it's won a couple more, but those are the most notable and it served me well to to retitle the book so,   Michael Hingson  39:30 and the title of the book is   Jennifer Lieberman  39:32 near of the what, so it rhymes with slut. But it's not as controversial. And it actually serves me because in the process of, of publishing this first one, I realized that it's a trilogy and Book Two is going to be year of the bitch and I'll have the same problems. So I'm just going to keep it under the year of the white umbrella. a lot.   Michael Hingson  40:01 I would I would submit, maybe not. I know there is, well, I suppose anything's possible. But my wife and I love to read a variety of books. And we've written or we've read a number of books by an author Barbara Nino. So she wrote the Stasi justice series. Have you ever read any of her books? I haven't been on familiar with her. So she's also written the bitches Ever After series published with that name, so maybe it won't be quite the same? Well,   Jennifer Lieberman  40:34 there's a big book out called the ethical slut, that? Well, you know, and they had no problems with censorship, either. But I think sometimes it can, it depends on who your publisher is and who you're connected to. But um, but anyway, I think the year of the web series serves me because as soon as someone opens the first page of the book, The subtitle is right there, right. Yeah,   Michael Hingson  41:00 so people should go look for year of the what? Yes. Well, I'm glad it has been really successful. And you have worn a lot of hats on, off off Broadway and Hollywood and so on. And now you're back in Canada, and so on. What do you like best of all those hats and all those jobs or opportunities.   Jennifer Lieberman  41:27 That's number one. That's always been my number one passion. That's why I started writing fan fiction when I was eight, is because I just wanted to be in these movies and shows that I watched, and I really enjoy writing, I actually really enjoy producing and helping bring projects to life, whether they're mine or somebody else's. But the there's something magical about performing and living and breathing in somebody else's skin and a different world that a writer created. And it's just incomparable. So   Michael Hingson  42:14 year of the well, we'll, we'll do the slot. What? Is it funny?   Jennifer Lieberman  42:21 It is yes. So what are the words that one was best rom com of 2021. So when I submitted it to book life through Publishers Weekly, one of the reviews was that it doesn't fit neatly into the romance genre. And it doesn't fit neatly into the erotica genre. And it doesn't fit into this genre and doesn't fit into that genre. They didn't even review the book, like didn't even give like a positive or negative review. All they did was list all the genres it didn't fit into. And, but it is quite humorous. Because it's about these dating misadventures, and coming of age and coming to terms with sexuality, being a young woman in New York City, and kind of having to reevaluate a lot of the stories or, you know, kind of expectations that were ingrained in the character. So it's not even about her being a slut. It's about her reevaluating what that word means to her, because she only planned to be with my one man. So anything more than that would put her in the slot category. But yeah, so it was her kind of, you know, reevaluating her perception of what is the slot? And, you know, how many partners is too many and all of that stuff? Because, also, in today's world, how realistic is it? For someone to be with just one partner for their whole life? I don't know. Especially like in Western society? I don't know.   Michael Hingson  44:14 Well, since you have been involved in writing something that's humorous and so on, have you at all been involved in comedy stand up comedy or any of those kinds of things?   Jennifer Lieberman  44:26 Yeah, I did do stand up comedy. I do it from time to time. I wouldn't call myself a stand up comedian. Because I don't love it enough to be hitting the clubs every single night trying to get on stage, which if you're trying to make a living as a stand up comedian, you have to be hitting the clubs every night. All of the legit stand up comedians, I know will hit 234 Different clubs at night to get up. And I'm not that committed to it. It's a nice muscle to flex, it's nice to know that I have the courage to get up and do it that I can make an audience laugh. But I'm no by no means a professional stand up. I got into it by accident, I responded to a casting notice looking for females who could be funny. And it was a promoter looking for more female comics to be on his shows. And he was willing to train and coach to coach women because he just felt like he wasn't getting enough women applying to be on his on his lineups. And he wasn't meeting enough women. This was this was a few years ago, this was like I think 2014 is when I started, it was just before Amy Schumer, like, had her breakout success and became a huge household name. Now, now when you go into the comedy scene, there are so many more women than then there was, you know, about eight years ago. So now, it's not the same climate. So his name? Matt Taylor, his name's Matt Taylor. So he kind of convinced me to give it a go and try five minutes. Because I was like, oh, no, like, That's too scary. I don't do that. But after doing two one woman shows where I was on stage by myself for over an hour, each one I was like, Okay, what's five minutes. And I did it. And when I was a hit, it was great. Nobody thought everybody thought I was quite seasoned. All the other comedians on the lineup thought that I had done it dozens of times before. And I, I did it pretty consistently for a couple of years. But once again, like I said, I just didn't love it enough. Like I'd rather I would run, I would run to a theater every night to do Shakespeare or Tennessee Williams, I wouldn't run to a theater every night to do stand up. So it's just not the type of creative that I am. But once again, nice to know that, that I can flex that muscle.   Michael Hingson  47:14 So how many books have you written so far? One novel,   Jennifer Lieberman  47:17 which we discussed, and then under Mike, my consulting business to make your own break business I've published to during the pandemic, I always intended to publish books, under the Make Your Own break umbrella, about low budget, film production, low, no budget is more accurate, no budget theatre production, how to develop a solo show. So all of those are still coming. But during the pandemic, I was asked to coach a few executives, to help them with their presentation skills and engaging their team. And I'm kind of like a nerd and I didn't feel qualified to coach these people. So I was like, Okay, I have to come up with a system before I feel confident enough to like go and actually, you know, do this and charge money. So I came up with these seven steps on how to master your virtual meeting. So that's one of the books make your own break, how to master your virtual meeting in seven simple steps. And then I also recorded my AUDIO BOOK during the initial lockdown, and I messed up a lot. And I had to I recorded the entire book and had to throw it in the garbage and start again from scratch. And then the same friend colleague who suggested I changed my title suggested that I write a how to book geared towards self published authors and indie authors on how they can record and publish their own audio books. So that's book number two how to record and publish your audio book in seven simple steps once again under the Make Your Own break umbrella. And yeah, so there are those two books and like I said, I I will be publishing more How To books under the Make Your Own break, but those will probably pertain more to film theater production and creative process.   Michael Hingson  49:23 And then the what? At pardon. And then more year of the what and then more   Jennifer Lieberman  49:28 year of the wet because that I've realized as a trilogy. You know, when women are young, if people want to attack us in our teens and 20s Regardless of what our personal lives are, people call us a sloth. Whether it's male or females, it's a woman it's a it's a word is weaponized against women. And then as we get older, more assertive, more confident, we're we're called a bitch. So I'm kind of going through the trajectory of words. are used as weapons against women, and how we can reframe them and own them, instead of being ashamed of them.   Michael Hingson  50:09 Then you can write the fourth book what bitch. But anyway, that's another story. Exactly. So did you publish an audiobook?   Jennifer Lieberman  50:18 I did, yes. This year of the what is available on Audible? Yes. So I did I, I was I finally recorded a successful version. And it was after that, that I decided that okay, yeah, maybe I can write the how to book on how to do this. And it's specifically encouraging self published authors. Because if you have enough conviction to write your story, you should be the one telling it.   Michael Hingson  50:47 It's interesting in the publishing world today, that and people will tell you, this agents and others will tell you this, that it isn't like it used to be, you have to do a lot of your own marketing, even if you get a publisher to take on your book and take that project. So the fact is doing an indie publishing project certainly uses a lot of the same rules, you still have to market it, you're gonna have to do it either way, you're still going to be doing a lot of the work, the publishing industry can help. But you still got to do a lot, if not most of the work.   Jennifer Lieberman  51:29 Yeah, and not just that, I don't know, if if you follow any celebrities, on on Twitter, or Instagram, but I believe nowadays, like I'm a, I'm a member of the Screen Actors Guild, that union in the US, and a lot of contracts now have social media obligations written into them, that you have to tweet that you have to post a certain amount to help promote the show. And a lot of decisions are based on how big of a following you have, there's actually, I'm not sure if you were a Game of Thrones fan, I was a big Game of Thrones fan. But one of the characters, it was between her and another actress and she had a bigger social media following. And that was the tipping point of how she got cast. So it you know, self promote, like that's what social media is, it's all self promotion. So it's not just the publishing world, it's the acting world, I think it's just become the norm of it doesn't matter what business you're in. It used to be that you needed a.com. In order to exist now you need a social media following in order to exist.   Michael Hingson  52:53 I know when we originally did fender Dogg, and Thomas Nelson put, picked it up and decided to publish it. Even then back in 2010, and 2011. One of the main questions was, how much will you be able to contribute to the marketing of the book? How much will you be able to help promote it? Now? We have a contract to do our next book, A Guide Dogs Guide to Being brave, unless the publisher decides once we're done to change the title. But still, it is all about how big of a following do you have? How much are you going to be able to contribute contribute to the book because you're probably not going to get some sort of big book tour or anything like that paid for by the publishing company, unless there's some compelling reason to do it. And it is all about what you can do. So publishing is changing, the landscape is changing. mainstream publishers are great, they do add a lot of value. But you do need to learn to sell and to market and be intelligent about it as an author, no matter how your book gets published.   Jennifer Lieberman  54:03 Yes. And, you know, it's a double edged sword, because it gives lots of opportunities to indie, indie authors, but it also, it's sad for me because it becomes a popularity contest. And it's not necessarily about how good your book is, or how good your work is. It's just if you, you know, have a buzz factor. And if you have a following or if you had, like some mishap in your life that went viral, then all of a sudden, you have this huge platform for all these opportunities, regardless of how talented or prepared you are for those opportunities. And you know, it like I said, it's a double edged sword. There are benefits to it. And there are, you know, there are detriments to it but also like I'm the type of artist. I'm gonna I'm willing to go outside of my integrity. So let the chips fall where they may.   Michael Hingson  55:05 Well, you have written both in the literary world, if you will. And in the theater world, which do you prefer? And why? Oh, that's a toughy. Because you're doing a lot with each one, aren't you?   Jennifer Lieberman  55:21 Yeah. And I'm still like, I'm, you know, and that's the thing, like I write plays, I write scripts for film, and I'm writing a TV pilot right now. And in the literary world, the benefit of writing in the literary world, is once the writing is finished, and when I mean writing, I mean, also the editing and the proofreading. Your job is done, like the project is complete. When you're writing theatrically, whether it's film or theatre, that's just step one, there's still a very, very, very long road ahead of you, you know, and trying to get into the right hands, trying to raise the money, trying to, you know, get the right team together, and the right actors, the right, you know, then you had, then there's the feat of filming it, and then the post production process, and then the distribution process. So there is something very satisfying when writing a book that's finished. But there's also something very exciting to me, you know, in the whole process of getting a project produced from you know, from step one to step 55.   Michael Hingson  56:45 So, as a writer in the theatrical world, you really can't just be a writer, and then you turn it over to someone, if you're going to make it successful, I gather, what you're saying is, you really have to be the driving force behind the whole project, not just the writing part.   Jennifer Lieberman  57:01 Well, at my level, because like I said, I don't have an agent, I don't, I'm trying to get things into other people's hands. So right now, I'm shopping around here of the what for theatrical opportunity, I went to the Cannes Film Festival to the market there, I've met with a certain number of people. And one of the questions was, how involved would you want to be in this project? And my answer is, however involved you would like, you know, because I'm not married to this project. Like I, I've been living with this for a decade, between writing it, workshopping it, and then the novel between the play and the novel, like, I'm ready to let this go. If somebody wants to write me a check. Go ahead, do what you will with it. You know, but then there are other pieces that are closer to my heart that I'm like, oh, no, like, this isn't for sale. We can partner on this and make this together. But this is, you know, staying under my under my wings, so to speak. But I have another I have a short piece, a short film, that a friend of mine is shooting in LA next month, and I'm not really gonna have any creative involvement in it.   Michael Hingson  58:26 Out of curiosity, when somebody asks you that question, is there sort of a general trend as to what do they want the answer to be? Or is it really something that varies? They they're not necessarily looking for you to be involved typically, or they'd like you to be involved typically, as a really an answer that makes more sense to most people than not,   Jennifer Lieberman  58:47 you know, it's interesting, because I've gotten both, I've gotten both opinions. You know, for, I guess the higher up people are on the food chain. They're very relieved to hear that I don't need to have any involvement in it at all, because they know how hard it is to get something made in the first place, let alone having all of these, you know, kind of stipulations. It's like, well, I can only get made, you know, she gets to approve the script and this and this and this and that, you know, so the less I think the less involvement I have, the easier it is for the producer because they have more freedom to negotiate. Right. But that's an instinct once again, I don't know, you know,   Michael Hingson  59:32 it probably does very well. How do you keep such a positive attitude and keep yourself to use the terminology of our podcast unstoppable as you get a lot of rejections as you face a lot of challenges. And as you said, you haven't had that huge break. But how do you keep yourself going?   Jennifer Lieberman  59:51 I love it. This is a love affair. This is a lifelong love affair for me. And I was on a podcast A few days ago, we had to write a creativity statement. And my creativity statement is that being a creative is like being in a one sided relationship, and you have to love it enough for both of you. Because the the industry isn't necessarily going to love you back. But if you love it enough, if you love the creative process enough, you're just gonna keep going.   Michael Hingson  1:00:22 I want you to extrapolate that to just anyone even outside the theatrical world. What would you tell somebody if they come up to you and say, How can I just keep myself going,   Jennifer Lieberman  1:00:35 find something that you love and do it as often as possible? It doesn't have to be your job, you don't have to make money at it. You just have to have something in your life that you really love and enjoy doing. You know, whether it's dancing, whether it's singing, you know, and that's the thing like, you don't have to be a superstar. I'm not a superstar. Maybe one day I will be universe. But I, I'm not going to stop what I do, because it just brings me so much joy. And I'm so happy and I do I get in a funk. I get in a funk when I'm not able to create. And, you know, for some people it might be hiking or kayaking or camping or connecting with nature. That's something that that I love to do. Also, that brings me joy. But yeah, I think a lot of us get so caught up. And also I would say close your screen. Go dark, go dark for a few days. Don't worry about what's going on on social media. Don't worry about the internet, like go outside and actually be in the real world connect with real people connect with nature. Be in your body. I find when I get in my head, too much I can spin out. But when you're in your body, you can you can feel your you can feel your essence. You   Michael Hingson  1:02:04 know, always good to step back.   Jennifer Lieberman  1:02:07 So that would be my advice.   Michael Hingson  1:02:10 It's always good to step back and look at yourself and just relax. And we don't do that often enough. We get too involved in that social media and everything else as you point out.   Jennifer Lieberman  1:02:22 Yeah, exactly. And it's proven like there are statistics, social media makes people depressed. People only put their Insta life best moments on social media. I'm sure someone will mention if they're going through a hard time or whatever. But that's not the majority of people. People will sift through their life find take a million photos of one of one scenario, find the best photo doctorate with with face tune filters and whatever and make their life look fabulous. And you know, everything's curated. I'm actually I wrote a poem about this. Would you mind I've never shared this publicly. Can I? Really?   Michael Hingson  1:03:09 Sure. Go ahead.   Jennifer Lieberman  1:03:11 Okay. It's called Black Sabbath. And basically, it's about going dark. Can we all just go dark for a day? Turn off the devices be still be silent and pray? No posts, no distractions? No waiting impatiently for strangers reactions. Can we all just go dark for a day? No selfie indulgence? No curated inspiration. No unsolicited motivation. Be present. Be awake. Meditate. Can we all just go dark for a day hold our loved ones dear if not in our arms in our consciousness spear. Make amends with our Maker, the true force of nature and submit to the power of our sublime creator. Can we all just go dark for a day, shut our screens, search our souls reclaim our minds that get hijacked every time we scroll. And finally take back our grip of the only thing we can control. That's it.   Michael Hingson  1:04:24 That's as powerful as it gets. And it is so true. Yeah. Yeah. It is absolutely so true. So what you've already alluded to it, what do you do when you're not writing and being creative? What do you like to do to relax? You said some of   Jennifer Lieberman  1:04:41 it. Yeah, I'm a yoga Holic. Like I said, I spent the first half of my life as a competitive gymnast. So I'm super active. I love physical activity. I don't work out in terms of like, I don't go to the gym and I don't do a certain amount of reps and I I'm on a treadmill for 20 minutes a day I do physical activities that I enjoy, so I enjoy yoga. I'm quite advanced at it with a gymnastics background so it's fun and acrobatic for me. I love hiking. I love connecting with nature whether it's stand up paddleboarding, kayaking, canoeing, waterskiing, I love all of that stuff. Not much of a snow skier though I don't really love the cold, even though I'm Canadian.   Michael Hingson  1:05:30 How lucky you were you live in? You don't like to call it okay.   Jennifer Lieberman  1:05:34 Yeah, I don't. But basically anything active and outdoors. There's a treetop trekking course not far from where my parents are. And like, that's next on the list. I'm really excited to do that. What is that? Basically, they have these like, kind of obstacle courses up in the trees. So you're on harnesses, and you know, whether it's like platforms that you walk across, or ropes courses that you have to, you know, I don't know, I haven't been but it sounds fun.   Michael Hingson  1:06:12 Well, you have to let us know what it's like after you, you get to go clearly not wheelchair accessible. So I'm sure my wife's not gonna want to do it. But nevertheless, you got to let us know how it goes once you do it.   Jennifer Lieberman  1:06:27 Yes, I will. I will. It's very exciting. Oh, and I love live music. So like rock shows. That's my jam. I'm a rocker chick.   Michael Hingson  1:06:36 There you go. Well, I want to thank you for being here. And spending the last hour and a little bit more with us. This has been fun. Clearly, you keep yourself going you do move forward, you're not going to let things stop you, you are going to be unstoppable, as I said, using the parlance of the name of the podcast, but I want to thank you for being here and inspiring all of us and telling us your story. If people want to reach out to you and contact you and learn more about you find your books or anything else. How will they do that?   Jennifer Lieberman  1:07:10 Okay, so year of the what.com is the website for the book, but it'll link you to almost everything. Or you can go to make your own break.com. Both of those have links to all of the books and all the social media. And they also have contact pages that will come to my inbox directly. So that's the best way. If you want to find out more about me, and on social media, whether it's Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. I am Jen Lieberman. So the at sign, and then I am Jen. J e n Lieberman L i E,B E R m a N.   Michael Hingson  1:08:00 Well, I hope people will reach out oh, I should ask you you written in your writing the How To books? Are you going to do anything like create any online courses or anything?   Jennifer Lieberman  1:08:10 You know, it's funny I was doing in person courses. I haven't gotten around to doing the online ones yet. But yes, that is also in the works. There's a laundry list. Bed. And like we talked about, I wear many hats. And I'm always more interested in the creative stuff. As opposed to the as opposed to the business side. So I you know, I always feel like, oh, there'll be time for the course there'll be time for that. And as it as it so happens, the more successful my creative career is, the more validity I have to teach these other courses. So it's all in good time.   Michael Hingson  1:08:49 Great. Well, again, thank you for being here with us people, please go visit your of the what.com or make your own break.com. And reach out to Jen, she would love to hear from you. And I would love to hear from you. I'd love to know what you thought about today, I would really appreciate you giving us a five star rating. Jennifer Lieberman needs a five star rating. So let's give her one you all. And I want to thank you all for for being here. Reach out to me, feel free to do so by emailing me at Michaelhi at accessibe.com Or go visit WWW dot Michael hingson.com/podcast. Or just go to Michael hingson.com and learn more about the things that I do. But either way, please help us give Jen rave reviews. And Jen one last time. Thank you very much for being here.   Jennifer Lieberman  1:09:48 Thank you so much, Michael. This was such a treat. I really appreciate you having me on.   Michael Hingson  1:09:53 Well, the fun and the honor was mine. So thank you you   1:09:59 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

John Eldredge and Ransomed Heart (Audio)

As the series concludes, Fintan and Elaine Supple join from Ireland to share stories of Jesus with John and Stasi.

We Are History
The Stasi Poetry Circle - the East Germans secret police advancing socialism through verse

We Are History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 68:49


Angela has read yet another book about East Germany (this one by Philip Oltermann) and explains how it was believed that loyalty to the Communist regime could be secured, not just by suppressing dissent and spying on your neighbours, but also with encouraging pro-government poetry . (Includes a hastily-penned socialist limerick written by John.) Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Es Cine
Estrenos en plataformas: Comedia, animación, acción y se da por inaugurada la Navidad

Es Cine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 5:43


Arconada y Sergio Pérez hablan de los estrenos en plataformas como Una comedia de la Stasi, La bala perdida 2, La peli del fútbol y Navidad de golpe.

The Brendan O'Neill Show
122: Rosie Kay: When the woke Stasi came for me

The Brendan O'Neill Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 48:26


Rosie Kay, CEO and artistic director of K2CO, talks to Brendan O'Neill about how she was forced out of her own dance company for challenging trans ideology. Become a spiked supporter: https://www.spiked-online.com/supporters/  Sign up to spiked's newsletters: https://www.spiked-online.com/newsletters/ Sponsored by ExpressVPN: https://www.expressvpn.com/spiked

Captivated
The Splendor and Sweetness of Jesus

Captivated

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 29:54


Stasi is so happy to have guest Eric Gilmour from Sonship International on today's podcast. Out of his deep love for Jesus, Eric shares what it means to abide in God and fix our gaze on him, as well as ways to access what God offers us. Friends, we won't know the depth of God's love until we have tasted the majesty and goodness of Jesus. As Jeremiah 29:13 says, "You will seek me and find me when you seek me with all your heart."SHOW NOTES:Verses: Ephesians 5:25 (NIV) — Husbands, love your wives, just as Christ loved the church and gave himself up for her Song of Solomon 2:14 (NIV) — My dove in the clefts of the rock, in the hiding places on the mountainside, show me your face, let me hear your voice; for your voice is sweet, and your face is lovely.Song of Solomon 1:2-3 (NIV) — Let him kiss me with the kisses of his mouth—for your love is more delightful than wine. Pleasing is the fragrance of your perfumes; your name is like perfume poured out.Jeremiah 29:13 (NIV) — You will seek me and find me when you seek me with all your heart.Hebrews 12:2 (NIV) — fixing our eyes on Jesus, the pioneer and perfecter of faith. For the joy set before him he endured the cross, scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of the throne of God.Psalm 25:15 (NIV) — My eyes are ever on the Lord, for only he will release my feet from the snare.Hebrews 1:4 (NIV) — So he became as much superior to the angels as the name he has inherited is superior to theirs.Hebrews 2:1 (NIV) — We must pay the most careful attention, therefore, to what we have heard, so that we do not drift away.Deuteronomy 6:8-9 (NIV) — Tie them as symbols on your hands and bind them on your foreheads. Write them on the doorframes of your houses and on your gates.Third Day Song Reference:Love Song — “I've heard it said that a man would climb a mountain. Just to be with the one He loves.”ERIC GILMOURWebsite: https://www.sonship-international.org/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/ewgilmourMusic: https://open.spotify.com/artist/6fVjCsKdS30DoRnMfOlG4jInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/sonshipintl/Eric Gilmour Bio:Eric Gilmour is an author, musician, and itinerant speaker who travels domestically and internationally.  He and his wife Brooke are the founders of Sonship International- a teaching ministry committed to strengthening the church. Their hearts are to bring the church into a deeper experience of God's presence in their daily lives.  With over one hundred thousand subscribers on YouTube Eric's music and teachings have aided millions of people in resting in the presence of God.Eric, Brooke and their two daughters, Madison and Lia, reside in Orlando, Florida. They have two golden retrievers, Mia and Oakley. When he's home you can find him spending time with his family, reading and/or with a camera in his hand filming or taking pictures, namely in the golden hour.

John Eldredge and Ransomed Heart (Audio)

The series continues as John, Stasi, Allen, and Kellye share current stories as well as one revisiting a pivotal childhood event.

Eine Stunde History  - Deutschlandfunk Nova
Erich Mielke und die Stasi - Podiumsdiskussion

Eine Stunde History - Deutschlandfunk Nova

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 58:21


Am 20. Oktober 2022 war "Eine Stunde History" zu einer Live-Aufzeichnung in der Universität Gießen. Es ging um Erich Mielke und die Stasi in der ehemaligen DDR. Markus Dichmann hat die anschließende Podiumsdiskussion mit Helmut Müller-Enbergs, Berliner Verfassungsschützer, Jens Gieseke, Stasi-Experte vom Zentrum für Zeithistorische Forschung in Potsdam sowie Grit Eggerichs und Matthias von Hellfeld aus dem History-Team moderiert. **********Ihr könnt uns auch auf diesen Kanälen folgen: Tiktok und Instagram.

Madam Athlete
Choosing to Focus on Work You Love with Associate Professor of Physical Therapy Stephanie Di Stasi

Madam Athlete

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 60:39


On today's episode, I'm talking to Associate Professor of Physical Therapy Dr. Stephanie Di Stasi about choosing to focus on work you love and where it feels like you can have the most impact.Dr. Di Stasi is an Associate Professor in the Division of Physical Therapy at The Ohio State University and a Research Scientist at the Sports Medicine Research Institute at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. As an athlete with an interest in the biomechanics of the human body, Steph initially started out on a clinical PT pathway before talking with a mentor and deciding to go back to school for her PhD. During her time as a PhD student, she fell in love with teaching and research and combined them into her current academic career.We talk about:Choosing to focus on work you love and where it feels like you can have the most impact rather than trying to do it all.The importance of mentorship, peer relationships, and being thoughtful with giving and receiving feedback.Getting rid of the mom guilt by sharing your excitement about work with your kids.You can find the show notes and more resources at https://madamathlete.comKeep an eye out for new content or let us know what you'd like to see next by following us on social:Instagram: @theMadamAthleteFacebook: @MadamAthleteTwitter: @MadamAthlete

Radio German Democratic Republic
Ralph Hänel, Part III - Opening the Memory Box: Ralph's Corner GDR Museum

Radio German Democratic Republic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 72:09


Hello, everyone, and welcome to our third installment of our interview with Ralph Hanel, Kung Fu Master, former Stasi prisoner and amazing storyteller. I am so glad you have enjoyed the first two installments, and Ralph and I sat down for a third interview to talk about the objects he has collected in recent years that remind him of his survival story. Today, Ralph tells us about his Stasi handcuffs, his GDR kung fu certificate, how special PanAm is in his life and about other objects that we really started called his "Corner GDR Museum." This was a really special experience for me, and Ralph has started posting pictures of these objects in the Facebook group. You will really enjoy this episode.   Ralph, we're so grateful to you for telling your stories. You MUST listen to Ian Sanders' three part interview of Ralph before listening to these. They will absolutely set the context for these episodes, and are MUST LISTENS.  Episode 1 - Ralph – DJing and Kung Fu in East Germany Episode 2 - Ralph – Arrested and interrogated by the Stasi Episode 3 - Ralph – A prisoner in an East German jail Read Ralph's short stories using this link Our ability to bring you stories from behind the Berlin Wall is dependent on monthly donors like you. Visit us at  https://www.eastgermanypodcast.com/p/support-the-podcast/ to contribute. For the price of a Berliner Pilsner, you can feel good you are contributing to preserve one of the most important pieces of Cold War history. If you feel more comfortable leaving us a review to help us get more listeners, we appreciate it very much and encourage you to do so wherever you get your podcasts or at https://www.eastgermanypodcast.com/reviews/new/. For discussions about podcast episodes and GDR history, please do join our Facebook discussion group. Just search Radio GDR in Facebook. Vielen dank for being a listener!

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand
Nick Reed PODCAST 10.21.22 - Banning Inappropriate Materials From State-Funded Libraries

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 43:17


Hour 1 -  Good Friday morning! Nick is live at Scramblers Diner: We're just a day away from the KSGF Heroic Hot Tub Giveaway! Join us on Saturday from 9-11 a.m. at BigShots Golf! Is America becoming a Stasi state? A proposed rule by the Missouri Secretary of State's Office would put in place measures to protect minors from non-age-appropriate materials at state-funded libraries. The Kansas City Star has an opinion piece that banning inappropriate materials for kids is a BAD thing. ALSO -  Ryan with A-1 Custom Car Care gives us our car care tip of the week: It's officially heater season. Have you checked yours yet? If your heater is not working, make sure to stop by A-1 today! Joshua with H.U.L.K Hot Tub Services stops by: Josh talks about the hot tub that you could win tomorrow at our event! From 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. we will be raising food donations for Veterans who are food insecure. For every pound of food you bring, you get one raffle ticket to win the hot tub! We'll have a scale on site to weigh your food! Food must be non-perishable food. Non-perishable food is food that has a long shelf life. Some examples of non-perishable food are: canned meats, canned fruits, canned veggies, canned nuts, granola bars, pasta, oats, rice, and peanut butter.

Family Plot
Episode 116 John E Robinson Midwestern Slavemaster

Family Plot

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 64:29


In this Episode, Krysta, Laura and Dean discuss John EEdward tRobinson, a serial killer and general bad guy who preyed on women that he lured to the Kansas City area. Holding himself out as a business executive and philanthropist, Robinson first preyed on women who were down on their luck and later used the internet to find victims. His victims were consigned to large chemical barrels, though a handful of his victims have never been recovered. Krysta tells us the advantages and disadvantage of featherless chickens and we posit dressing them up. All this and more on this October Episode of the Family Plot Podcast.

Mises Media
To Limit the Reach of America's Stasi, the FBI, Vacate All FISA Rulings

Mises Media

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022


The FBI operates as an agency whose players know they are untouchable in the current regime. Vacating FISA rulings is one way to fight back. Original Article: "To Limit the Reach of America's Stasi, the FBI, Vacate All FISA Rulings" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. '

Audio Mises Wire
To Limit the Reach of America's Stasi, the FBI, Vacate All FISA Rulings

Audio Mises Wire

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022


The FBI operates as an agency whose players know they are untouchable in the current regime. Vacating FISA rulings is one way to fight back. Original Article: "To Limit the Reach of America's Stasi, the FBI, Vacate All FISA Rulings" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. '