Podcast appearances and mentions of ingrid rojas contreras

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Best podcasts about ingrid rojas contreras

Latest podcast episodes about ingrid rojas contreras

Musings with Montse: Artists and Their (Honest) Stories

Ingrid Rojas Contreras is a writer who was born and raised in Bogotá, Colombia and now lives in San Francisco, California. Her first book was the novel Fruit of the Drunken Tree and her most recent book is a family memoir called The Man Who Could Move Clouds.In this episode we chat all about language. On writing between two languages and cultures, and the evolution of language. We also talk about anxiety, dreams (what they can tell us about ourselves!) and much more.This episode was audio produced by Aaron Moring. Music is by Madisen Ward.

KPL Podcast
KPL Podcast September 2022 Week 3 with Special Guest Angie Cruz

KPL Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 23:50


Welcome to another amazing episode of the KPL Podcast.  This week we have bestselling author Angie Cruz to tell us about her latest novel, "How Not to Drown in a Glass of Water".  Learn more about her wonderful protagonist Cara Romero.Recommendations1. Dominicana by Angie Cruz2. The Man Who Could Move Clouds by Ingrid Rojas Contreras

The Chills at Will Podcast
Episode 141 with Ingrid Rojas Contreras, Brilliant Storyteller and Master of the Ethereal and the Concrete, and Author of the Stunning The Man Who Could Move Clouds

The Chills at Will Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 73:40


Episode 141 Notes and Links to Ingrid Rojas Contreras' Work    On Episode 141 of The Chills at Will Podcast, Pete welcomes Ingrid Rojas Contreras, and the two discuss, among other topics, her childhood in Colombia that was full of incredibly-interesting, loving, and charismatic family members and memorable experiences, roots for her storytelling, her pivotal accident that led to amnesia, how she wrote so skillfully and memorably about such an event, ideas of curanderismo and medicines of all types, the roles that ghosts have played in her family history, links between her and her mother and her paternal grandfather, and how her genre-bending book thrills with a varied approach to history, sociology, family stories, etc.  Ingrid Rojas Contreras' first novel, Fruit of the Drunken Tree, was the silver medal winner in First Fiction from the California Book Awards, and a New York Times editor's choice. Her essays and short stories have appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Buzzfeed, Nylon, and Guernica, among others. Her latest book, The Man Who Could Move Clouds, has been universally-beloved and covered on NPR and in The New York Times.  Ingrid Rojas Contreras' Website   Buy The Man Who Could Move Clouds   New York Times Book Review by Miguel Salazar for The Man Who Could Move Clouds   Ingrid talks about Her Book on NPR All Things Considered with Ari Shapiro     At about 2:00, Ingrid talks about the importance of finding writing community/ies and the support systems and paths that help writers on their way and supporting the arts   At about 4:35, Ingrid describes a relaxing and productive getaway during a recent writing retreat/fellowship    At about 5:35, Ingrid responds to Pete's questions about indigenous roots in the many forms of speaking Spanish in Colombia   At about 7:30, Indrig describes the “creativity” and “speak” that comes with Spanglish and similar iterations of languages    At about 8:00, Ingrid describes the ways in which she and her mom and tias played a funny game of telling the most boring, mundane stories    At about 10:20, Ingrid shares examples of beautiful tinkering with Spanish   At about 11:20, Ingrid breaks down the connotations of the terms “curandero” versus “homeopath,” as used by her grandfather, Nono   At about 13:00, Ingrid reflects on who is/are the protagonist(s)   At about 14:40, Pete highlights the journalistic and varied writing skill used by Ingrid, and he asks her about the experience of observing others but also writing about herself   At about 17:50-20:05, Ingrid replicates the pitch she had made originally to her editor and recounts the circumstances that led her editor to meet Ingrid's mother   At about 20:05, Ingrid discusses the significance of the ways in which she inserted photo in her book   At about 21:50, The two discuss the amnesia events linking mother and daughter and how Ingrid was able to write about such an ethereal experience   At about 26:00, the two discuss mirrors as a motif and as literal in the book, especially regarding Ingrid's first view into a mirror after her accident; they also talk about conceptions of “what are we”/“who are we” in history and in connecting to the book  At about 31:45, Pete asks about The Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind and Ingrid points him towards a strong depiction of amnesia with the movie Solaris (1972 version)   At about 38:00, the two discuss the immediate aftereffects of Ingrid's accident and how her family    At about 39:00 Ingrid talks about ideas of storytelling and metaphor that she learned directly and indirectly from her mother and grandfather and how it affected her outlook on the world and on writing    At about 44:40, the two analyze the term “desandar” and the multiple ways in which ghosts run throughout the book   At about 48:00, Ingrid describes a sense of wanting a fresh start and living a life surrounded by the ocean and people who didn't know her after her accident   At about 50:00, Ingrid responds to Pete's questions about ideas of the pull of “home”   At about 54:00, Pete and Ingrid discuss ideas of history manifested in her book   At about 55:30, The two discuss some almost-unbelievable stories related in the book, including a possible ghostly possession of her grandfather    At about 1:00:00, Ingrid discusses her interactions with her grandfather when she was a baby and ways in which he tried to safeguard her future, and he responds to Pete's questions about her grandfather's duality   At about 1:03:00, Pete highlights the interesting history recounted in the book and asks Ingrid about the use of the term “The Situation” to describe Colombian conflicts   At about 1:05:00, Ingrid discusses the “yin and yang” of her parents' relationship     You can now subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, and leave me a five-star review. You can also ask for the podcast by name using Alexa, and find the pod on Stitcher, Spotify, and on Amazon Music. Follow me on IG, where I'm @chillsatwillpodcast, or on Twitter, where I'm @chillsatwillpo1. You can watch other episodes on YouTube-watch and subscribe to The Chills at Will Podcast Channel. Please subscribe to both my YouTube Channel and my podcast while you're checking out this episode.  This is a passion project of mine, a DIY operation, and I'd love for your help in promoting what I'm convinced is a unique and spirited look at an often-ignored art form. Please note that the show will offer exciting Patreon benefits starting in October, with merchandise and extra content that you'll want to check out. More details forthcoming in the next few weeks. The intro song for The Chills at Will Podcast is “Wind Down” (Instrumental Version), and the other song played on this episode was “Hoops” (Instrumental)” by Matt Weidauer, and both songs are used through ArchesAudio.com.     Please tune in for Episode 142 with Robert Lopez. He is author of three novels, including Kamby Bolongo Mean River—named one of 25 important books of the decade by HTML Giant, All Back Full, two story collections, and a novel-in-stories, A Better Class Of People. The LA Times wrote, "Lopez has the ability to give readers whiplash with his unconventional and bewitching stories."  The episode will air on September 9.

The Stacks
Ep. 230 How to Write an Autobiographical Novel by Alexander Chee -- The Stacks Book Club (Ingrid Rojas Contreras)

The Stacks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 64:07


Author Ingrid Rojas Contreras joins us again to talk about our book club selection How to Write An Autobiographical Novel by Alexander Chee. Our discussion of this essay collection covers the artists' relationship to critical reviews, and how much day jobs and everyday life inform art. We also ask, how important is truth to fiction, and what constitutes a life well-lived? You can find everything we discuss on today's show on The Stacks' Website: https://thestackspodcast.com/2022/08/31/ep-230-how-to-write-an-autobiographical-novelBe sure to listen all the way to end of the episode to find out what our September book club pick will be!Connect with Ingrid: Instagram | Twitter | WebsiteConnect with The Stacks: Instagram | Twitter | Shop | Patreon | Goodreads | SubscribeSUPPORT THE STACKSJoin The Stacks Pack on PatreonAthletic Greens - visit atheleticgreens.com/thestacks to get a free one-year supply of vitamin D and five free travel packs with your first purchase.Missing Pages - subscribe on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts.Purchasing books through Bookshop.org or Amazon earns The Stacks a small commission. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Chills at Will Podcast
Episode 140 with Oscar Hokeah, Author of Calling for a Blanket Dance and Storyteller of the Old Made New, Subtle Master of Dialogue and Realism, and Builder of Unforgettable Characters

The Chills at Will Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 67:11


Episode 140 Notes and Links to Oscar Hokeah's Work        On Episode 140 of The Chills at Will Podcast, Pete welcomes Oscar Hokeah, and the two discuss, among other topics, Oscar's childhood and adulthood living in and being interested by the confluence of multiple languages, his early reading of Stephen King, his love of Alice Munro and N. Scott Momaday, discussions of decolonization through his work and in the outside world, and the myriad themes, symbols, and allusions contained in his dynamic and profound debut novel.      Oscar Hokeah is a regionalist Native American writer of literary fiction, interested in capturing intertribal, transnational, and multicultural aspects within two tribally specific communities: Tahlequah and Lawton, Oklahoma.  He was raised inside these tribal circles and continues to reside there today.       He is a citizen of Cherokee Nation and the Kiowa Tribe of Oklahoma from his mother (Hokeah and Stopp families), and he has Mexican heritage from his father (Chavez family) who emigrated from Aldama, Chihuahua, Mexico. You can find the Stopp family (Cherokee) in Tahlequah, Oklahoma and the Hokeah family (Kiowa) in Lawton, Oklahoma.  Family on his Kiowa side (Hokeah, and Tahsequah through marriage) organized the Oklahoma Gourd Dance Club for over a decade, and he has family members actively involved with the Kiowa Tia-Piah Society, Comanche War Scouts Society, and Comanche Little Ponies Society. Oscar has spent nearly 20 years empowering Native American communities.  From his work in Santa Fe, NM with Intermountain Youth Centers and the Santa Fe Mountain Center, he has worked with Pueblo, Apache, and Diné peoples.  Currently, living in his home town of Tahlequah, Oklahoma (in the heart of Cherokee Nation), he works with Indian Child Welfare, where he gives back to the community that nurtured and embedded the Indigenous values he passes along to his children. He is a recipient of the Truman Capote Scholarship Award through IAIA, and also a winner of the Native Writer Award through the Taos Summer Writers Conference. His writing can be found in World Literature Today, American Short Fiction, South Dakota Review, Yellow Medicine Review, Surreal South, and Red Ink Magazine. His highly-anticipated debut novel, Calling for a Blanket Dance, came out on July 26. Oscar Hokeah's Website   Buy Waiting for a Blanket Dance   New York Times Book Review by Antonia Angress for Waiting for a Blanket Dance   Oscar Gives a Sketch of his Book's Plot and Themes   Waiting for a Blanket Dance Review from Minnesota Star Tribune At about 3:00, Oscar talks about the blitz and fun accompanying the recent publication of his book   At about 6:00, Oscar describes emotional connections and favorite characters that readers have shared with him    At about 7:30, Kristin Apodaca is touted as having a “Salvador Dali-style” as Oscar describes the cover and its background   At about 10:20, Pete asks Oscar about growing up and his relationship with languages and the printed word, including his early work based on favorite writers like Stephen King   At about 15:50, Oscar continues to discuss intersections of language and how he has used Kiowa, Spanish, English, and Cherokee in his life and in his writing   At about 18:30, Oscar responds to Pete's questions about formative writers in life, including N. Scott Momaday, Kafka, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and Alice Munro   At about 22:10, Pete and Oscar laugh about a cool book cameos by a “Hokeah” and an N. Scott Momaday shout out   At about 23:20, Oscar references the varied reading he has done in recent times, including Velorio by Xavier Navarro Aquino, and he also shouts out “an amazing time for Native writers'   At about 26:00, Pete highlights the recent NYT reviews for the book, and Oscar to Pete's question about the book's pitch   At about 27:50, Oscar describes his rationale in including an N. Scott Momaday quote as his epigraph   At about 30:00, Pete and Oscar discuss the book's POVs and how “telling someone else's story” serves as a successful craft piece; Oscar explains the power of this “peripheral narration”   At about 32:30, the two discuss a pivotal scene that starts the book and Oscar highlights “male-on-male violence” and the concept of “indigenous landscapes” with a shifting lense   At about 38:40, Pete and Oscar discuss ideas of “home” and Vincent's chapter and the importance of Vincent's redemption; Oscar highlights real-life connections    At about 43:00, The two chart Ever's development and setbacks while noting the significance of a gift given in the form of a booger mask   At about 44:30, Oscar captures moments of familial and community love   At about 45:10, The two discuss the implications of the phrase “Ni modo” and an incident with Ever and his father that was “too little, too late”   At about 46:20, the two discuss “per caps” and the chapter that focuses on them    At about 46:55, Pete and Oscar reflect on ideas of communication or lack thereof with regard to Lena Stopp and Sissy and Ever, as Oscar talks about a character based on his mom and parenting when one's children are in transition to maturity   At about 49:25, Oscar discusses ideas of addiction in the book and connections to his own communities, including how the character of Lonnie acts differently as a woman in the drug world   At about 50:45, The two discuss hearsay and its connections to perceptions of people, including how every character in the book is sketched so skillfully in order that they are all objects of sympathy/empathy   At about 52:45, Ever's surrogate son Leander and hope and his question of “How did I get here?” is discussed and ideas of breaking generational habits, too   At about 54:15, Oscar points out an important scene that involves Leander and his memories and art as an outlet   At about 55:50, Pete asks Oscar about the book's title in complimenting the chapter dealing with quilts and family legacy   At about 57:00, Oscar gives the real-life details that he experienced that gave rise to the book's powerful and moving last chapter that involved Cherokee housing   At about 58:10, Oscar connects an important series of quotes to the idea of community parenting in Cherokee     At about 58:10, Pete points out the last chapter's stand-alone and combined greatness that uses ideas of community and implementing ideas learned throughout Ever's life   At about 1:00:05, Oscar responds to Pete's questions about the title's larger implications   At about 1:01:55, Oscar highlights future projects    At about 1:03:20, Oscar does some casting for an aspirational movie/tv show based on the book   At about 1:04:15, Oscar gives contact info and social media info and shouts out Too Fond of Books in Tahlequah, OK        You can now subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, and leave me a five-star review. You can also ask for the podcast by name using Alexa, and find the pod on Stitcher, Spotify, and on Amazon Music. Follow me on IG, where I'm @chillsatwillpodcast, or on Twitter, where I'm @chillsatwillpo1. You can watch other episodes on YouTube-watch and subscribe to The Chills at Will Podcast Channel. Please subscribe to both my YouTube Channel and my podcast while you're checking out this episode.      This is a passion project of mine, a DIY operation, and I'd love for your help in promoting what I'm convinced is a unique and spirited look at an often-ignored art form. The intro song for The Chills at Will Podcast is “Wind Down” (Instrumental Version), and the other song played on this episode was “Hoops” (Instrumental)” by Matt Weidauer, and both songs are used through ArchesAudio.com.     Please tune in for Episode 141 with Ingrid Rojas Contreras, whose first novel, Fruit of the Drunken Tree, was the silver medal winner in First Fiction from the California Book Awards, and a New York Times editor's choice. Her essays and short stories have appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Buzzfeed, Nylon, and Guernica, among others. Her latest, The Man Who Could Move Clouds, has been universally-beloved and covered on NPR and in The New York Times.      The episode will air on September 6.

The Stacks
Ep. 229 Destabilizing Whiteness with Mohsin Hamid

The Stacks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 59:10


Award-winning novelist Mohsin Hamid joins this episode of The Stacks to talk about his newest book The Last White Man. We discuss what inspired the story, his exploration of how whiteness works through fiction, and the ongoing conversation between a reader and the author. We also get into Mohsin's monastic writing rituals, his elite professors, and how his writing fills a need in his understanding of life.You can find everything we discuss on today's show on The Stacks' Website: https://thestackspodcast.com/2022/08/24/ep-229-mohsin-hamidThe Stacks Book Club selection for August is How To Write An Autobiographical Novel by Alexander Chee. We will discuss the book on August 31st with Ingrid Rojas Contreras.Connect with Mohsin: WebsiteConnect with The Stacks: Instagram | Twitter | Shop | Patreon | Goodreads | SubscribeSUPPORT THE STACKSJoin The Stacks Pack on PatreonAthletic Greens - visit atheleticgreens.com/thestacks to get a free one-year supply of vitamin D and five free travel packs with your first purchase.Missing Pages - subscribe on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts.Libro.Fm – use promo code THESTACKS to get 2 audiobooks for the price of 1 and to support your favorite independent bookstore.Purchasing books through Bookshop.org or Amazon earns The Stacks a small commission. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Open Form
Episode 41: Ingrid Rojas Contreras on Solaris

Open Form

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 27:40


Welcome to Open Form, a weekly film podcast hosted by award-winning writer Mychal Denzel Smith. Each week, a different author chooses a movie: a movie they love, a movie they hate, a movie they hate to love. Something nostalgic from their childhood. A brand-new obsession. Something they've been dying to talk about for ages and their friends are constantly annoyed by them bringing it up. In this episode of Open Form, Mychal talks to Ingrid Rojas Contreras (The Man Who Could Move Clouds) about the 1972 film Solaris, directed by Andrei Tarkovsky. Ingrid Rojas Contreras was born and raised in Bogotá, Colombia. Her debut novel, Fruit of the Drunken Tree, was the silver medal winner in First Fiction from the California Book Awards, and a New York Times editor's choice. Her essays and short stories have appeared in the New York Times Magazine, The Believer, and Zyzzyva, among others. She lives in California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Stacks
Ep. 228 Grief is Love with Marisa Renee Lee

The Stacks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 60:47


Today we're joined by entrepreneur and author Marisa Renee Lee, whose book Grief is Love: Living with Loss offers a framework for healing after tragedy. We discuss grief's connection to capitalism and white supremacy, and how our relationship with love is connected to our relationship with loss. We also ask, how can we help people who are grieving, and why are Americans so bad at it? You can find everything we discuss on today's show on The Stacks' Website: https://thestackspodcast.com/2022/08/17/ep-228-marisa-renee-leeThe Stacks Book Club selection for August is How To Write An Autobiographical Novel by Alexander Chee. We will discuss the book on August 31st with Ingrid Rojas Contreras.Connect with Marisa: Instagram | Twitter | WebsiteConnect with The Stacks: Instagram | Twitter | Shop | Patreon | Goodreads | SubscribeSUPPORT THE STACKSJoin The Stacks Pack on PatreonCare/of - go to TakeCareOf.com and enter code stacks50 for 50% off your first order.Missing Pages - subscribe on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts.Purchasing books through Bookshop.org or Amazon earns The Stacks a small commission. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Crosscurrents
Emeryville's Affordable Housing / Photographer Kori Suzuki / New Arrivals: Ingrid Rojas Contreras

Crosscurrents

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 23:14


Today, we hear how Emeryville is building an affordable housing project for two underserved social groups, senior citizens and foster youth. Then, we listen as a Bay Area photographer's recounts his experience covering the George Floyd protests in Minneapolis. Followed by a reading from San Francisco author, Ingrid Rojas Contreras. And, today's local music features John R. Burr.

The Stacks
Ep. 227 Funny but Not F*cking Around with W. Kamau Bell and Kate Schatz

The Stacks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 62:20


Emmy Award winner W. Kamau Bell and bestselling author Kate Schatz visit The Stacks to discuss their joint effort Do the Work!: An Antiracist Activity Book. They break down how the process of co-writing, how they decided to write for white audiences, and explain why we need an adult activity book for antiracism in the first place. We also ask, what do we do when we mess up; what makes a good apology?You can find everything we discuss on today's show on The Stacks' Website: https://thestackspodcast.com/2022/08/10/ep-227-w-kamau-bell-and-kate-schatzThe Stacks Book Club selection for August is How To Write An Autobiographical Novel by Alexander Chee. We will discuss the book on August 31st with Ingrid Rojas Contreras.Connect with W. Kamau: Instagram | Twitter | WebsiteConnect with Kate: Instagram | Twitter | WebsiteConnect with The Stacks: Instagram | Twitter | Shop | Patreon | Goodreads | SubscribeSUPPORT THE STACKSJoin The Stacks Pack on PatreonCare/of – visit TakeCareOf.com and enter code stacks50 for 50% off your first order.Patreon - go to patreon.com/thestacks for insider access and pick the tier that works for you, for as little as $5 a month.Purchasing books through Bookshop.org or Amazon earns The Stacks a small commission. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Otherppl with Brad Listi
785. Ingrid Rojas Contreras

Otherppl with Brad Listi

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 79:31


Ingrid Rojas Contreras is the author of the memoir The Man Who Could Move Clouds, available from Doubleday. Contreras was born and raised in Bogotá, Colombia. Her debut novel Fruit of the Drunken Tree was the silver medal winner in First Fiction from the California Book Awards, and a New York Times editor's choice. Her essays and short stories have appeared in the New York Times Magazine, The Believer, and Zyzzyva, among others. She lives in California. *** Otherppl with Brad Listi is a weekly literary podcast featuring in-depth interviews with today's leading writers. Launched in 2011. Books. Literature. Writing. Publishing. Authors. Screenwriters. Etc. Available where podcasts are available: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, iHeart Radio, etc. Subscribe to Brad Listi's email newsletter. Support the show on Patreon Merch @otherppl Instagram  YouTube Email the show: letters [at] otherppl [dot] com The podcast is a proud affiliate partner of Bookshop, working to support local, independent bookstores. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

KQED’s Forum
Ingrid Rojas Contreras' New Memoir Explores Amnesia, Family History and Ghosts

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 55:36


In her new memoir, “The Man Who Could Move Clouds,” Ingrid Rojas Contreras tells the story of a journey she took with her mother to her native Colombia to exhume her grandfather's remains. She intricately weaves family histories involving her curandero grandfather, her mother who could appear in two places at once and her own magical inheritance sparked by a bout of amnesia. Rojas Contreras, who now calls the Bay Area home, joins us to talk about infusing magic into story telling and how memory is both a burden and a treasure. Guests: Ingrid Rojas Contreras, author, "The Man Who Could Move Clouds"

The Stacks
Ep. 226 A Literal Relationship with the Past with Ingrid Rojas Contreras

The Stacks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 58:02


We're joined today by novelist and essayist Ingrid Rojas Contreras, whose new book The Man Who Could Move Clouds combines memoir with rich storytelling and an excavation of family and Colombian history. We discuss magical realism as a nonfiction genre, why it's useful to believe in ghosts, and ask the question, what responsibility do we owe to our pasts?You can find everything we discuss on today's show on The Stacks' Website: https://thestackspodcast.com/2022/08/03/ep-226-ingrid-rojas-contrerasThe Stacks Book Club selection for August is How To Write An Autobiographical Novel by Alexander Chee. We will discuss the book on August 31st with Ingrid Rojas Contreras.Connect with Ingrid: Instagram | Twitter | WebsiteConnect with The Stacks: Instagram | Twitter | Shop | Patreon | Goodreads | SubscribeSUPPORT THE STACKSJoin The Stacks Pack on PatreonLibro.Fm – use promo code THESTACKS to get 2 audiobooks for the price of 1 and to support your favorite independent bookstore.Patreon - go to patreon.com/thestacks for insider access and pick the tier that works for you, for as little as $5 a month.Purchasing books through Bookshop.org or Amazon earns The Stacks a small commission. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

LIVE! From City Lights
Ingrid Rojas Contreras in Conversation with Esmé Weijun Wang

LIVE! From City Lights

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 41:47


Ingrid Rojas Contreras in conversation with Esmé Weijun Wang, celebrating the launch of "The Man Who Could Move Clouds: A Memoir," published by Doubleday. This live event took place in Kerouac Alley, between City Lights and Vesuvio Cafe, and was hosted by Peter Maravelis. You can purchase copies of "The Man Who Could Move Clouds: A Memoir" directly from City Lights here: https://citylights.com/new-nonfiction-in-hardcover/man-who-could-move-clouds/ Ingrid Rojas Contreras was born and raised in Bogotá, Colombia. Her first novel "Fruit of the Drunken Tree" was the silver medal winner in First Fiction from the California Book Awards, and a New York Times editor's choice. Her essays and short stories have appeared in the New York Times Magazine, The Believer, and Zyzzyva, among others. She lives in California. Esmé Weijun Wang is a novelist and essayist. She is the author of the New York Times-bestselling essay collection, "The Collected Schizophrenias"(2019), and a debut novel, "The Border of Paradise," which was called a Best Book of 2016 by NPR. She was named by Granta as one of the “Best of Young American Novelists” in 2017 and won the Whiting Award in 2018. Born in the Midwest to Taiwanese parents, she is the founder of The Unexpected Shape™ Writing Academy for ambitious writers living with limitations. She can be found at esmewang.com and on Twitter @esmewang. This event was made possible by support from the City Lights Foundation: citylights.com/foundation

Strong Sense of Place
LoLT: The Real 'Dirty Dancing' Hotel (?) & New Books

Strong Sense of Place

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 4:35


In this episode, we get excited about two new book releases: 'The Half Life of Valery K' by Natasha Pulley and 'The Man Who Could Move Clouds: A Memoir' by Ingrid Rojas Contreras. Then we go retro with 'Welcome to Kutsher's,' a documentary about the last surviving Jewish resort in the Catskills.  BOOKS The Half Life of Valery K by Natasha Pulley https://bit.ly/3PxuR4L The Man Who Could Move Clouds: A Memoir by Ingrid Rojas Contreras https://bit.ly/3z199Po DISTRACTION OF THE WEEK Welcome to Kutsher's https://bit.ly/3RWfR1M Watch the documentary online https://amzn.to/3J5La6d ABC News report on Kutsher's https://abcn.ws/3z6cOeX The Library of Lost Time is a Strong Sense of Place Production! https://strongsenseofplace.com Do you enjoy our show? Want access to fun bonus content? Please support our work on Patreon. Every little bit helps us keep the show going and makes us feel warm and fuzzy inside - https://www.patreon.com/strongsenseofplace

New Arrivals: A Socially-Distanced Book Tour
Ingrid Rojas Contreras writes a memoir of her curandero grandfather

New Arrivals: A Socially-Distanced Book Tour

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 2:00


San Francisco author Ingrid Rojas Contreras reads from her new book, "The Man Who Could Move Clouds." It's about memory and amnesia and about her grandfather, who people said could move clouds. It came out on July 12, 2022.

The Well Woman Show
279 Success in a Second Career with Laura Paskus

The Well Woman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 10, 2022 24:27


This month on the Well Woman Show, I interview Laura Paskus, a longtime environment reporter based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Currently, she is the environment reporter for New Mexico PBS, and produces the monthly series, “Our Land: New Mexico's Environmental Past, Present, and Future.” Laura Paskus has tracked the issues of climate change at both the state and federal levels. She shares the frightening truth, both in terms of what is happening in nature and what is not happening to counteract the mounting crisis. Her book “At the Precipice: New Mexico's Changing Climate,” was published in September 2020 by the University of New Mexico Press. On the show we'll discuss: The need for activism in journalism and finding success in a second career The frightening truth about climate change What we can do to help shape the future of our climate The books she recommended were: https://bookshop.org/books/fruit-of-the-drunken-tree/9780525434313 (Fruit of the Drunken Tree by Ingrid Rojas Contreras) https://bookshop.org/books/poet-warrior-a-memoir-9781324022015/9780393248524 (Poet Warrior by Joy Harjo) https://bookshop.org/books/an-american-sunrise-poems/9780393358483 (An American Sunrise by Joy Harjo) https://bookshop.org/books/the-outermost-house-a-year-of-life-on-the-great-beach-of-cape-cod/9780805073683 (Outermost House by Henry Beston) You can find notes from today's show at http://wellwomanlife.com/279show (wellwomanlife.com/279show). The Well Woman Show is thankful for the support from The Well Woman Academy™ at http://wellwomanlife.com/academy (wellwomanlife.com/academy). Join us in the Academy for community, mindfulness practices and practical support to live your Well Woman Life.

Page Turn the Largo Public Library Podcast
Viajero de Libros Episode 026

Page Turn the Largo Public Library Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 4:24


Bienvenidos a una nueva edicion de Viajero de Libros. Mi nombre es Victor y soy un bibliotecario en la Biblioteca Publica de Largo. Hoy les voy a hablar sobre un libro de ficcion que tenemos en la coleccion en español que se titula La Fruta del Borrachero por Ingrid Rojas Contreras. Sinopsis: En este cautivador debut, Ingrid Rojas se inspira en su propia vida para contraponer el paso de la infancia a la vida adulta de dos potentes voces narrativas. Un relato exuberante que, enmarcado en una de las épocas más convulsas de Colombia, arroja luz sobre los inesperados lazos que pueden nacer entre dos mujeres cuando se ven enfrentadas a la violencia más descarnada. Bogotá. Década de los noventa. La familia Santiago vive en una comunidad exclusiva y cerrada, a salvo de la agitación política que aterroriza el país. La pequeña de la familia, Chula, que tiene siete años, parece vivir en una burbuja, pero la amenaza de los secuestros, los coches bomba y los magnicidios se cierne fuera del barrio, donde el omnipotente Pablo Escobar sigue eludiendo a las autoridades y aterrorizando a la nación. Cuando su madre contrata a Petrona, una criada procedente de las barriadas ocupadas por la guerrilla, Chula intenta congeniar con ella. Pero Petrona, que trata de sustentar a su familia mientras el primer amor la lleva en la dirección equivocada, oculta más de lo que parece. Así, niña y criada se ven envueltas en una red de secretos que las obligará a elegir entre el sacrificio y la traición. Opinion: En La Fruta del Borrachero, la llegada de Petrona complica la vida de los Santiago, sacándoles de su burbuja de burgueses bogotanos, para lanzarlos dentro de la brutal realidad de su país cuando estaban en plena guerra contra el gobierno colombiano, el Cartel de Medellín y su líder, Pablo Escobar. Así describe la narradora de la novela, la pequeña Chula, al hombre omnipresente en la década de los años noventa: “era El Rey Midas de las palabras. Todo lo que tocaba, lo transformaba en narco seguido de un guión: narco-paramilitar, narco-guerra, narco-abogado, narco-congresista, narco-estado, narco-terrorismo, narco-dinero”. A la narración de Chula se une la voz también en primera persona de Petrona, una joven proveniente de uno de los sectores más pobres de la ciudad, la protagonista de una historia mucho peor y testimonio de la enorme iniquidad de la sociedad colombiana y de cómo la violencia también se reparte de forma desigual entre pobres y ricos. El argumento de la novela se edifica sobre la amistad entre Chula y Petrona; una historia de la solidaridad entre mujeres en el peor momento de una crisis que de tantas víctimas y victimarios dejó de tener inocentes o culpables. Lo más doloroso de La Fruta del Borrachero es que los acontecimientos más increíbles de su argumento ocurrieron de verdad. Enmarcada entre los convulsos años transcurridos entre 1989 y 1994, la narración comienza en tiempos del asesinato del candidato presidencial Luis Carlos Galán y continúa describiendo el largo período de sequía, así como los apagones y la falta de agua que resultaron, y la espectacular persecución de Pablo Escobar, además de su última entrevista y la oración hallada en el bolsillo de su camisa cuando lo mataron. La misma huella confesional de La Fruta del Borrachero que le otorga fuerza distintiva a la voz de Rojas Contreras representa una revolución en la literatura de Hispanoamérica. Porque La Fruta del Borrachero no es una novela mala entre narcos y policías; malos y buenos. La manera como es biográfica pero la historia que narra es ficticia es su más grande acierto. Outro: Es todo por hoy. Hasta la proxima edicion de Viajero de Libros. Adios.

Get Booked
E287: Supernaturally Cute

Get Booked

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2021 45:07


Amanda and Jenn discuss middle-grade read-alouds, atmospheric novels, snarky narrators, and more in this week's episode of Get Booked. Follow the podcast via RSS, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Stitcher. Feedback Dare to Disappoint: Growing Up in Turkey by Özge Samanci (rec'd by Jan) Notes on a Foreign Country: An American Abroad in a Post-American World by Suzy Hansen (rec'd by Sibyl) Anthony Horowitz's the Susan Ryeland series (first book: Magpie Murders) and the Hawthorne and Horowitz Mysteries (first book: The Word is Murder) (rec'd by Ann) Questions 1. My [niece] is 23 and just informed my sister, brother-in-law, and the family that [she] is transgender. (So she is now my niece). She is starting the process of taking hormones and the like. My sister was shocked and did not see it coming. She is very liberal and is coming around to the idea. I was hoping for book recommendations that would help us (especially my sister) understand what my niece has felt like being in the wrong body. In a quick search I found books involving young kids. I was hoping for books centered more on coming out as trans as a 20-something. I'm thinking maybe a biography or non-fiction. Also my whole family loves fantasy so if there's a book in that genre maybe we could read it together. -Klista 2. Love the show!   I'm looking for recommendations to read aloud to my 7 1/2 year old boy/girl twins that I will enjoy too.   We love well-written, funny middle grade books – preferably with animal characters.   They are still sensitive readers – we avoid books with any violence and try to avoid orphaned children or those with not great parents.   We're not scared of long books or intricate language.   Books we've loved (and read over and over) include: The True Blue Scouts of Sugarman Swamp  The Very Very Far North & it's sequel Winnie the Pooh Collected Stories Books we've liked a lot:  Flora & Ulysses  Ruby Lu Brave & True Gooseberry Park Books that I liked but they didn't: Wild Robot Books they love but I'm not as into:  Humphrey series Mrs Piggle Wiggle & Missy Piggle Wiggle We've read most books by Roald Dahl & most age appropriate ones by Kate DiCamillo. They are still too nervous to start Harry Potter. Thanks! -Marisa 3. Hi Jenn and Amanda! I'm finally coming back to Get Booked now that I can read again! (baby girl took all my free time hihi) In the last couple of months, I realised that I love atmospheric books, even if the plot is weak or nonexistent. Some other books I loved are Erin Morgenstern books (both!), The Invisible Life of Addie Larue and Piranesi.  Do you have other recommendations like it? If it's mixed with greek mythology it's even better. Thanks a lot! PS: love from Canada. -Emilie 4. I'd love recommendations for books set in or about Bogota, Colombia. Preferably, something like Chanel Cleeton's books about Cuba that help to understand the history and current impacts or nonfiction about the history. Any genre is fine! -Tracey 5. Two of my favorite books/series I read this year have been “A Deadly Education” by Naomi Novik and “The Murderbot Diaries” by Martha Wells. On the surface they might seem kind of different, but they both had such a great narrative voice, with the right amount of sarcasm/snark/humor, and a completely lovable main character, and they left me feeling warm and fuzzy inside. Also, my favorite genres are Fantasy and Sci Fi, so these were perfect. I'm so sad I have to wait until more comes out from these authors. Please tell me what I can read while I'm waiting! Thank you! -Lauren 6. I recently read Lost Roses and seriously loved A Gentleman in Moscow before that.   I've also just marathoned The Last Csars on Netflix — and I haven't had my fill!   Can you recommend some historical fiction set in late 19th, early 20th century Russia that will help me get my next Russian nobility fix?  Thank you! -Emily 7. Hello there – Trigger Warning: So this is a tough one since it deals with a sensitive topic – suicide. I'm looking for a book (fiction or non-fiction I suppose, YA or Adult) that deals with how to cope when a friend/family member attempts suicide BUT does not succeed/commit. I find that most books about suicide are dealing with the aftermath of someone's death, but what happens if they didn't die? No one ever seems to talk about that. A recommendation for this would be very helpful, as this past year has been rough and I'd like someone else's perspective of coping with this kind of situation. Sorry this one is a bit of a downer, but important given the need for mental health awareness. Thank you. -Sam Books Discussed Fairest by Meredith Talusan (tw: racism) Sorted by Jackson Bird Bright Lines by Tanwi Nandini Islam The One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate Where The Mountain Meets The Moon by Grace Lin Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller Travel Light by Naomi Mitchison The Sound of Things Falling by Juan Gabriel Vasquez, transl. by Anne McLean Fruit of the Drunken Tree by Ingrid Rojas Contreras (tw: rape & other violence towards women, harm to children including death, panic attacks & PTSD) Velocity Weapon by Megan E. O'Keefe Chilling Effect by Valerie Valdes The House of Special Purpose by John Boyne The Winter Palace by Eva Stachniak Suicide Prevention Lifeline: https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/  Prozac Nation by Elizabeth Wurtzel (tw: suicide attempts) Please Like Me S2, particularly Episode 7 Post: https://bookriot.com/6-novels-featuring-mental-illness-world-suicide-prevention-day/ Borderline by Mishell Baker See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Litquake's Lit Cast
An Evening with The Rumpus: Lit Cast Live Episode 131

Litquake's Lit Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2020 34:44


The Rumpus proudly presents our San Francisco Lit Crawl 2020 event, An Evening with The Rumpus! With readings from Tongo Eisen-Martin, Ingrid Rojas Contreras, and Monica Sok, and featuring comedy by Nato Green! Hosted by Christine Hyung-Oak Lee.

Page Turn the Largo Public Library Podcast

Hello and welcome to Episode Twenty Six of Page Turn: the Largo Public Library Podcast. After missing a month due to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic we're back and so happy to be! I'm your host, Hannah! If you enjoy the podcast subscribe, tell a friend, or write us a review! The Spanish Language Book Review begins at 17:42 and ends 21:43 at The English Language Transcript can be found below But as always we start with Reader's Advisory! The Reader's Advisory for Episode Twenty Six is Speak No Evil by Uzodinma Iweala. If you like Speak No Evil you should also check out: Happiness, Like Water by Chinelo Okparanta, Every Kind of Wanting by Gina Frangello, and Where We Come From by Oscar Casares. My personal favorite Goodreads list Speak No Evil is on is Oooh Shiny! March 2018. Today’s Library Tidbit is all about tabletop gaming and Dungeons & Dragons. Tabletop game covers a very wide array of types of games, including chess, shogi, backgammon, mahjong, and go. However, Dungeons & Dragons specifically developed out of wargames. Wargames started as military training tools. The Prussian were the first known people to use tabletop wargaming and they did so for military training. Once the Prussian beat the French in the Franco-Prussian war wargaming became a more widely used training strategy and also spread to be a fun hobby. One of the more well known early wargames players was author H. G. Wells who created a rule book for a game called Little Wars that used toy soldiers, a large open area like a living room floor or a lawn, and spring loaded cannon to attack opponents with. Gary Gygax, a well known wargaming enthusiast, developed Dungeons & Dragons with Dave Arneson by adapting wargames by adding in fantasy elements. Some fantasy authors that influences Dungeons & Dragons include, but are very not limited to, J. R. R. Tolkien, Poul Anderson, Jack Vance, Fritz Leiber, and Lewis Carroll. Dungeons & Dragons is set up and the narrative run by a person called a Dungeon Master. This person is responsible for creating the dungeons (maps that the players go through), writing a narrative the players will be following, guiding the players using the narrative along the story path, playing the non-player characters and monsters, and oh yeah, keeping the rules. Players before starting the game role up a character sheet. A character sheet is where a player keeps track of their characters stats and inventory. Although D&D is famous for being played in person and on a shared “tabletop”, the game has a devoted online game scene in the modern day. Online D&D groups function the same as their offline counterparts with a Dungeon Master and a handful of players except instead of sharing a table, the group members meet over voice and video chat programs like Discord, Google Hangouts, Skype, or Zoom. If you're interested in playing Dungeons & Dragons online you can see if any friends have a group you could join, check out social media, and online discussion boards. Groups looking for new members or Dungeon Masters could post on D&D Beyond or the Looking For Group sub-reddit. You can also check out Facebook groups too! Several library workers here enjoy a variety of different types of tabletop gaming and we hope that if you’re interested that you look into trying out one using an online service. And now it's time for Book Traveler, with Victor: Intro: Welcome to a new episode of Book Traveler. My name is Victor and I am a librarian at the Largo Public Library. Today I am going to talk to you about a fiction book that we have in the Spanish collection entitled La Fruta del Borrachero by Ingrid Rojas Contreras. Synopsis: In this captivating debut, Ingrid Rojas uses by her own life to talk about the passage from childhood to adulthood of two powerful narrative voices. An exuberant story that, framed in one of the most convulsive times of Colombia, sheds light on the unexpected ties that can be born...

Litquake's Lit Cast
Fiction Writing in a Time of Crisis: Lit Cast Live Episode 121

Litquake's Lit Cast

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2020 58:51


Fiction writers Nayomi Munaweera, R.O. Kwon, Ingrid Rojas Contreras, and host Lauren Markham discuss both the challenges and urgency of fiction writing at this moment in time. How do we write during bleak times, and into the bleakness? How does the loss and grief of our current moment impact what we are writing about, how we write, and who we are writing for? What works or writers are we turning to right now, and how are we finding sustenance there? And perhaps most importantly, where might we be finding joy and how are we cultivating it—and what role could this joy play in our writing? This event is the first in a series of 10 events running through April 10. All authors' books available from your favorite indie bookstores, order from bookshop.org!

Arts and Sciences
A Reading and Conversation with Ingrid Rojas Contreras

Arts and Sciences

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2020 31:21


The Sidney Harman Writer-In-Residence Program presents author Ingrid Rojas Contreras in a reading and conversation on her novel Fruit of the Drunken Tree.

Arts and Sciences
A Reading and Conversation with Ingrid Rojas Contreras

Arts and Sciences

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2020 31:21


The Sidney Harman Writer-In-Residence Program presents author Ingrid Rojas Contreras in a reading and conversation on her novel Fruit of the Drunken Tree.

Between The Covers : Conversations with Writers in Fiction, Nonfiction & Poetry
Tin House Live : Craft Talk : Power & Audience, On Not Writing for White People with Ingrid Rojas Contreras

Between The Covers : Conversations with Writers in Fiction, Nonfiction & Poetry

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2020 37:14


Ingrid Rojas Contreras’ talk “Power & Audience: On Not Writing for White People” was given at the 2019 Tin House Summer Workshop in Portland, Oregon. In this talk she references a 2019 Publishing Industry Survey and a series of pie charts showing the racial, gender, sexual orientation, and ability breakdown of various subsets of the […] The post Tin House Live : Craft Talk : Power & Audience, On Not Writing for White People with Ingrid Rojas Contreras appeared first on Tin House.

All Talk
On Beauty, Race, and Visualizing Justice

All Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2020 28:51


In each episode we talk about a variety of books, writing, and art. Below are a few mentioned in this one:The book On Beauty and Being Just by Elaine ScarryThe website Man Repeller (link)Toward A Hot Jew: Graphic Essays by Miriam Libicki (link)The exhibition “Veiled Meanings: Fashioning Jewish Dress,” at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco (link)The exhibition "Involuntary Archives. On the Theatre of Surveillance" by artist Miguel Fernández de Castro (link)Ellie’s film Birth on the Border (trailer link)The exhibition “Tyler Mitchell: I Can Make You Feel Good” at ICP (link)Aperture issue #223: Vision & Justice (link)The book The New Black Vanguard: Photography Between Art and Fashion by Antwaun Sargent (link)“Pendeja, You Ain’t Steinbeck: My Bronca with Fake-Ass Social Justice Literature” by Myriam Gurba (link)“There’s Nothing Thrilling About Trauma” by Ingrid Rojas Contreras (link) Tweet referenced by Ingrid Rojas Contreras (link)“Oceanic Feeling and Communist Affect” by Jackie Wang (link) Questions? Thoughts? Email us: alltalklisteners@gmail.com.About Us:Ellie Lobovits is a visual artist, educator, writer, and teacher of Jewish plant magic. ellielobovits.comLeora Fridman is a writer and educator, author of My Fault, Make an Effort, and other books of prose, poetry and translation. leorafridman.com

LIVE! From City Lights
ZYZZYVA Bay Area Issue Celebration

LIVE! From City Lights

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2020 55:03


ZYZZYVA celebrates their 117th issue, the Bay Area Issue with an all-star lineup (in order of appearance): Paul Wilner, Meg Hurtado Bloom, Rita Bullwinkel, Kevin Simmonds, Ingrid Rojas Contreras, and Chia-Chia Lin. Hosted by ZYZZYVA managing editor Oscar Villalon. Paul Wilner is a poet, critic, freelance journalist, and member of the National Book Critics Circle, and a frequent contributor to ZYZZYVA. Meg Hurtado Bloom received her MFA in Creative Writing from St Mary's College of California. Her writing has appeared in Calamity, Lumen, Split Lip, Yellow Chair Review, The Volta, the Columbia Poetry Review, and elsewhere. Rita Bullwinkel is the author of the story collection Belly Up, which won the 2018 Believer Book Award, and is currently being translated into Italian and Greek. Bullwinkel’s writing has been published in Tin House, Conjunctions, BOMB, Vice, NOON, and Guernica. Kevin Simmonds’s books include the poetry collection Bend to It (Salmon Poetry) and Mad for Meat (Salmon Poetry). His work has been published in American Scholar, FIELD, Poetry, and elsewhere. Ingrid Rojas Contreras’s first novel, Fruit of the Drunken Tree (Doubleday), is an Indie Next selection, a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection, and a New York Times editor's choice. Her essays and short stories have appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Buzzfeed, Nylon, and Guernica, among others. Chia-Chia Lin is the author of The Unpassing (FSG), a finalist for the 2019 Center for Fiction First Novel Prize. Her short stories and essays have appeared in The Paris Review, NewYorker.com, The New York Times, and elsewhere. ZYZZYVA was founded in 1985 in San Francisco with the goal of publishing a superb literary journal featuring West Coast poets, writers, and artists from a wide range of backgrounds. Since then, the journal has evolved into a nationally distributed, widely acclaimed publication also showcasing contributors from across the country and even from around the world. 2020 marks ZYZZYVA’s 35th anniversary.

The Bay
What ‘American Dirt’ Gets Wrong

The Bay

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2020 15:26


Many Latinx writers, including here in the Bay Area, have expressed frustration with American Dirt, a new book by Jeanine Cummins that has been called the next great American novel. Oprah even selected it for her book club. But it's also been criticized for an inaccurate, stereotypical depiction of migrants who are trying to cross the US-Mexico border. "If it had been published and kind of billed as, 'This is our romanticized view of the border and its just for entertainment,' there's room for that on the shelves for whoever wants to read that story," said Ingrid Rojas Contreras, author of Fruit of the Drunken Tree. "To call it the novel of Las Americas and to put this much attention on a book that is actually erasing the politics at the border, I think, does more harm than good," she said. And all the hype surrounding the novel's release - including a seven-figure advance for Cummins - has raised questions about which stories about migrants get attention, and which ones don't. "Look where we're at," said Oscar Villalon, managing editor of the journal Zyzzyva. "If it hasn't been driven into your skull by now, clearly, not all Americans are valued the same." Guests: Ingrid Rojas Contreras, author of Fruit of the Drunken Tree, and Oscar Villalon, managing editor of the journal Zyzzyva Oscar Villalon's Recommendations: "The Devil's Highway: A True Story" by Luis Alberto Urrea "The Beast: Riding the Rails and Dodging Narcos on the Migrant Trail" by Oscar Martinez "The Distance Between Us: A Memoir" by Reyna Grande "The Faraway Brothers: Two Young Migrants and the Making of an American Life" by Lauren Markham's "By the Lake of Sleeping Children: The Secret Life of the Mexican Border" by Luis Alberto Urrea "The Death and Life of Aida Hernandez: A Border Story" by Aaron Bobrow-Strain Ingrid Rojas Contreras' Recommendations: "Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions" by Valeria Luiselli "Retablos" by Octavio Solis "Unaccompanied" by Javier Zamora "Tears of the Trufflepig" by Francisco Flores "Signs Preceding the End of the World" by Yuri Herrera "Lost Children Archive" by Valeria Luiselli

Litquake's Lit Cast
Eureka! California's Best Authors Read by More of the Same: Lit Cast Live Episode 112

Litquake's Lit Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2019 103:32


Eureka! We did it! From this year’s 20th Litquake festival, we present some of our favorite Bay Area authors reading from THEIR favorite Californian wordsmiths live at the Swedish American Hall in San Francisco. Listen to this festival kick off with a raucous night of readings by Charlie Jane Anders, Natalie Baszile, Elaine Castillo, Ingrid Rojas Contreras, Daniel Handler, Adam Johnson, Chang-rae Lee, Beth Lisick, Ishmael Reed, and Tobias Wolff, presenting from the works of writers who inspired them -- from Dashiell Hammett to Daniel Alarcón. Hosted by Isaac Fitzgerald, with live music from the Patrick Wolff Quartet and a special appearance by Karl the Fog. It’s a literary overload you don’t want to skip.

Live Mic: the Best of TPL Conversations
Fruit of the Drunken Tree: Violence, Childhood and Escobar's Columbia

Live Mic: the Best of TPL Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2019 40:37


Related Books from TPL’s CollectionFruit of the Drunken Tree by Ingrid Rojas ContrerasLa fruta del borrachero by Ingrid Rojas Contreras (translation of Fruit of the Drunken Tree) Pablo Escobar: my Father by Sebastián MarroquínShort Walks from Bogotá: Journeys in the New Colombia by Tom FeilingThe Stone Thrower: a Daughter’s Lessons, a Father’s Life: a Memoir by Jael Richardson Other Related MaterialsFor Debut Novelist Ingrid Rojas Contreras Home is What You Carry With You (link opens Clever article from July 2018)How Women Survive the World: an Interview with Ingrid Rojas Contreras (link opens Long Reads article from August 2019)The National Center for Historical Memory (link to organization’s website) Live Mic: Best of TPL Conversations features curated discussions and interviews with some of today’s best-known and yet-to-be-known writers, thinkers and artists, recorded on stage at one of Toronto Public Library’s 100 branches.Episodes are produced by Natalie Kertes, Jorge Amigo, and Gregory McCormick. Technical support by Michelle De Marco and George Panayotou. AV support by Jennifer Kasper and Mesfin Bayssassew. Marketing support by Tanya Oleksuik. Music is by The Worst Pop Band Ever. 

Club Book
Club Book Episode 100 Ingrid Rojas Contreras

Club Book

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2019 56:14


Columbian-born Ingrid Rojas Contreras is author of Fruit of the Drunken Tree, one of 2018’s breakout fiction debuts. Based in part on the author’s own experiences growing up in factious […]

Club Book
Club Book Episode 100 Ingrid Rojas Contreras

Club Book

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2019 56:14


Columbian-born Ingrid Rojas Contreras is author of Fruit of the Drunken Tree, one of 2018’s breakout fiction debuts. Based in part on the author’s own experiences growing up in factious Bogotá, Contreras’s story is set against the backdrop of drug kingpin Pablo Escobar’s shadow reign over Columbia. This turmoil is explored through the eyes of […]

Club Book
Club Book Episode 100 Ingrid Rojas Contreras

Club Book

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2019 56:14


Columbian-born Ingrid Rojas Contreras is author of Fruit of the Drunken Tree, one of 2018’s breakout fiction debuts. Based in part on the author’s own experiences growing up in factious Bogotá, Contreras’s story is set against the backdrop of drug kingpin Pablo Escobar’s shadow reign over Columbia. This turmoil is explored through the eyes of Chula, a seven-year-old from a […]

Unabridged
Update on Our Recommendations to Each Other: A Love Story . . . and Also Not

Unabridged

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2019 26:01


Well, we have failed at reading all of our recommendations for each other, but we had a good time with some confessions, some reflection, and some reviews of how well we know each other. In general, I'd say that we did a pretty good job recommending books for each other . . . and a pretty bad job prioritizing our TBRs.Join us on social media to share your thoughts about these books, your recommendations for each of us, and your tips for TBR prioritization!   Missed out on the episode where we recommended books to each other? Listen here.    Ashley’s Update *Renee Watson’s Piecing Me Together  *Ingrid Rojas Contreras’s Fruit of the Drunken Tree *Hasn't read yet -  *Laurie Halse Anderson’s Chains (The Seeds of America Trilogy) *Sujata Massey’s The Widows of Malabar Hill​   Jen's Update ​ *A. Sivandan’s When Memory Dies  *Knox McCoy’s The Wondering Years *Louise Penny's Still Life *Still finishing - *Don Delillo’s White Noise ​​   Sara's Update  *Leigh Bardugo's Six of Crows and Crooked Kingdom *Stephanie Perkins’s Anna and the French Kiss *Laura Lippman’s Sunburn *Hasn't read yet -  *John Boyne’s The Heart’s Invisible Furies​   Check out what's coming up next.   want to support unabridged? Become a patron on Patreon.​ Follow us @unabridgedpod on Instagram. Like and follow our Facebook Page. Follow us @unabridgedpod on Twitter. Subscribe to our podcast and rate us on iTunes or on Stitcher. Check us out on Podbean.

30 Minutes
Undocumented: The Price of Admission Part 2

30 Minutes

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2019 34:34


In Undocumented: The Price of Admission acclaimed authors Reyna Grande, Jose Antonio Vargas, and Ingrid Rojas Contreras explore the unforeseen…

30 Minutes
Undocumented: The Price of Admission Part 1

30 Minutes

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2019 27:45


In Undocumented: The Price of Admission acclaimed authors Reyna Grande, Jose Antonio Vargas, and Ingrid Rojas Contreras explore the unforeseen…

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
88th Annual California Book Awards

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2019


This Year's Winners FIRST FICTION Gold Medal: There There, by Tommy Orange, Alfred A. Knopf Silver Medal: Fruit of the Drunken Tree, by Ingrid Rojas Contreras, Doubleday FICTION Gold Medal: The Mars Room, by Rachel Kushner, Scribner Silver Medal: Winter Kept Us Warm, by Anne Raeff, Counterpoint Press POETRY Gold Medal: Total Recall, by Samantha Giles, Krupskaya NONFICTION Gold Medal: The Library Book, by Susan Orlean, Simon & Schuster Silver Medal: American Prison, by Shane Bauer, Penguin Press CALIFORNIANA Gold Medal: The Browns of California, by Miriam Pawel, Bloomsbury Publishing JUVENILE Gold Medal: The Language of Spells, by Garret Weyr, Chronicle Books YOUNG ADULT Gold Medal: Picture Us In the Light, by Kelly Loy Gilbert, Disney-Hyperion CONTRIBUTION TO PUBLISHING Gold Medal: Carleton Watkins: Making the West American, by Tyler Green, University of California Press This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco on June 10th, 2019.

Book Squad Goals
BSG #26: Is Eggplant A Berry? / Fruit of the Drunken Tree

Book Squad Goals

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2019 94:31


The #BookSquad takes a shady trip to 1990s Colombia this week as we discuss "Fruit of the Drunken Tree" by Ingrid Rojas Contreras. We talk about the historical fiction genre, trauma and violence, womanhood, and the relationship between the book's two protagonists, Chula and Petrona. Plus, we talk more about "Captain Marvel" and get Susan’s thoughts on how awesome the movie is. There’s plenty of great content on the #BookSquadBlog, including TV recaps, movie reviews and more! LISTEN UP, GOALIES: Please send us listener feedback on any of our episodes or blogs to thesquad@booksquadgoals.com. We love hearing from you, and we missed you this week. :) **SPOILER WARNING!!**1:14 – Here we are! Icebreaker q: What plant do you associate with your childhood?6:51 – Goodreads summary 10:00 – What even is historical fiction??- NPR interview: https://www.npr.org/2018/07/28/632769085/a-thwarted-child-kidnapping-inspired-fruit-of-the-drunken-tree23:00 - The structure of the novel and how time works29:55 - Violence, trauma, and how it affects children 40:30 – The relationship between the two girls 49:30 – Womanhood and gender 1:03:09 – Why is the title the title?1:04:32 – Ratings!1:18:49 – What’s on the blog? What’s up next??Next Othersode 4/8: PET SEMATARY!!! Next Bookpisode 4/22: "Gingerbread" by Helen Oyeyemi

Book Squad Goals
BSG #26: Is Eggplant A Berry? / Fruit of the Drunken Tree

Book Squad Goals

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2019 94:31


The #BookSquad takes a shady trip to 1990s Colombia this week as we discuss "Fruit of the Drunken Tree" by Ingrid Rojas Contreras. We talk about the historical fiction genre, trauma and violence, womanhood, and the relationship between the book's two protagonists, Chula and Petrona. Plus, we talk more about "Captain Marvel" and get Susan’s thoughts on how awesome the movie is. There’s plenty of great content on the #BookSquadBlog, including TV recaps, movie reviews and more! LISTEN UP, GOALIES: Please send us listener feedback on any of our episodes or blogs to thesquad@booksquadgoals.com. We love hearing from you, and we missed you this week. :) **SPOILER WARNING!!**1:14 – Here we are! Icebreaker q: What plant do you associate with your childhood?6:51 – Goodreads summary 10:00 – What even is historical fiction??- NPR interview: https://www.npr.org/2018/07/28/632769085/a-thwarted-child-kidnapping-inspired-fruit-of-the-drunken-tree23:00 - The structure of the novel and how time works29:55 - Violence, trauma, and how it affects children 40:30 – The relationship between the two girls 49:30 – Womanhood and gender 1:03:09 – Why is the title the title?1:04:32 – Ratings!1:18:49 – What’s on the blog? What’s up next??Next Othersode 4/8: PET SEMATARY!!! Next Bookpisode 4/22: "Gingerbread" by Helen Oyeyemi

First Draft with Sarah Enni
Ep 182: Lilliam Rivera 2.0

First Draft with Sarah Enni

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2019 51:59


Lilliam Rivera, author of THE EDUCATION OF MARGOT SANCHEZ, is back with DEALING IN DREAMS, out now!  She talks about writing a Latinx future, entering a room with hope, and getting to meet Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor.   Lilliam Rivera 2.0 Show Notes Lilliam’s first interview on First Draft here Ingrid Rojas Contreras, author of FRUIT OF THE DRUNKEN TREE Amerie Zareen Jaffrey, executive editor at Simon & Schuster Anderson Cooper A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess A Clockwork Orange (movie) The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton The Warriors (movie) Mad Max Fury Road (movie) Ray Bradbury Justice Sonia Sotomayor Pablo Cartaya, author of MARCUS VEGA DOESN’T SPEAK SPANISH Veronica Roth (listen to her First Draft podcasts here and here) Meg Medina Matt de la Pena

Book Squad Goals
Othersode #25: What's a cat? / Captain Marvel!

Book Squad Goals

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2019 81:52


The #BookSquad crash lands on planet C-53, aka Earth in the mid-90s, to talk about "Captain Marvel," the newest origin story movie in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. We discuss where this movie fits in the MCU, how it works as trauma narrative, the film's feminist themes, how it compares to other superhero origin stories, and — of course — Goose the cat! Plus, we give you a rundown of what's on the #BookSquadBlog (it's a lot of recaps!) and what's up next on the pod. Read along with us for our next #bookpisode on "Fruit of the Drunken Tree" by Ingrid Rojas Contreras. Our next #othersode will be on the remake of "Pet Sematary," coming to theaters soon! Don't forget to rate, review and subscribe to the podcast, and send any listener feedback to us at thesquad@booksquadgoals.com. We want to hear from you!0:30 – Welcome to our weird voices/what’s your fave MCU movie?11:50 – Let’s get into the movie—a digression on race and aliens, and a history lesson!19:50 – Captain Marvel as a trauma story26:40 – Feminism themes29:45 – Nick Fury and young people make up 33:02 – The 90s setting37:37 – Sweet Goose (and Emily’s Australia corner) 44:20 – Captain Marvel v. other origin stories 54:35 – Representation matters!1:03:30 – Reviews1:07:00 – Sleepy Ben Opinions1:10:15 – What’s on the blog? What’s up next?Articles referenced:Dana Stevens' review: https://slate.com/culture/2019/03/captain-marvel-review-brie-larson-movie.htmlInternet trolls & Rotten Tomatoes: https://www.avclub.com/the-fight-against-trolls-goes-beyond-captain-marvel-yo-1833165390Friend-of-the-pod Gabriella's review for Express: https://www.express.co.uk/entertainment/films/1095785/Captain-Marvel-review-Brie-Larson-Carol-Danvers-feminism-marvel-movie

Book Squad Goals
Othersode #25: What's a cat? / Captain Marvel!

Book Squad Goals

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2019 81:52


The #BookSquad crash lands on planet C-53, aka Earth in the mid-90s, to talk about "Captain Marvel," the newest origin story movie in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. We discuss where this movie fits in the MCU, how it works as trauma narrative, the film's feminist themes, how it compares to other superhero origin stories, and — of course — Goose the cat! Plus, we give you a rundown of what's on the #BookSquadBlog (it's a lot of recaps!) and what's up next on the pod. Read along with us for our next #bookpisode on "Fruit of the Drunken Tree" by Ingrid Rojas Contreras. Our next #othersode will be on the remake of "Pet Sematary," coming to theaters soon! Don't forget to rate, review and subscribe to the podcast, and send any listener feedback to us at thesquad@booksquadgoals.com. We want to hear from you!0:30 – Welcome to our weird voices/what’s your fave MCU movie?11:50 – Let’s get into the movie—a digression on race and aliens, and a history lesson!19:50 – Captain Marvel as a trauma story26:40 – Feminism themes29:45 – Nick Fury and young people make up 33:02 – The 90s setting37:37 – Sweet Goose (and Emily’s Australia corner) 44:20 – Captain Marvel v. other origin stories 54:35 – Representation matters!1:03:30 – Reviews1:07:00 – Sleepy Ben Opinions1:10:15 – What’s on the blog? What’s up next?Articles referenced:Dana Stevens' review: https://slate.com/culture/2019/03/captain-marvel-review-brie-larson-movie.htmlInternet trolls & Rotten Tomatoes: https://www.avclub.com/the-fight-against-trolls-goes-beyond-captain-marvel-yo-1833165390Friend-of-the-pod Gabriella's review for Express: https://www.express.co.uk/entertainment/films/1095785/Captain-Marvel-review-Brie-Larson-Carol-Danvers-feminism-marvel-movie

Otherppl with Brad Listi
Episode 562 — Ingrid Rojas Contreras

Otherppl with Brad Listi

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2019 90:51


Ingrid Rojas Contreras is the guest. Her debut novel, FRUIT OF THE DRUNKEN TREE (Doubleday), is a national bestseller, an Indie Next selection, a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection, and a New York Times editor's choice. Born and raised in Bogotá, Colombia, Contreras' essays and short stories have appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Buzzfeed, Nylon, and Guernica, among others. She is the book columnist for KQED, the Bay Area's NPR affiliate, teaches writing at the University of San Francisco, and works with immigrant high school students as part of a San Francisco Arts Commission initiative bringing writers into public schools. She is working on a family memoir about her grandfather, a curandero from Colombia who it was said had the power to move clouds. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Skylight Books Author Reading Series
Ingrid Rojas Contreras, "FRUIT OF THE DRUNKEN TREE" w/ Lilliam Rivera

Skylight Books Author Reading Series

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2019 52:11


Seven-year-old Chula and her older sister Cassandra enjoy carefree lives thanks to their gated community in Bogotá, but the threat of kidnappings, car bombs, and assassinations hover just outside the neighborhood walls, where the godlike drug lord Pablo Escobar continues to elude authorities and capture the attention of the nation.  When their mother hires Petrona, a live-in-maid from the city's guerrilla-occupied slum, Chula makes it her mission to understand Petrona's mysterious ways. But Petrona's unusual behavior belies more than shyness. She is a young woman crumbling under the burden of providing for her family as the rip tide of first love pulls her in the opposite direction. As both girls' families scramble to maintain stability amidst the rapidly escalating conflict, Petrona and Chula find themselves entangled in a web of secrecy that will force them both to choose between sacrifice and betrayal.  Inspired by the author's own life, and told through the alternating perspectives of the willful Chula and the achingly hopeful Petrona, Fruit of the Drunken Tree contrasts two very different, but inextricably linked coming-of-age stories. In lush prose, Ingrid Rojas Contreras has written a powerful testament to the impossible choices women are often forced to make in the face of violence and the unexpected connections that can blossom out of desperation. Rojas Contreras is in conversation with Lilliam Rivera, an award-winning writer and author of The Education of Margot Sanchez and the upcoming YA novel Dealing in Dreams.

Book Nomad: Reading the World
Ep. 17. Colombia: Fruit of the Drunken Tree by Ingrid Rojas Contreras

Book Nomad: Reading the World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2018 38:42


On this journey: - Do we need background knowledge to read critically? - An exploration of childhood trauma. - Complex background characters. Book in focus: Fruit of the Drunken Tree by Ingrid Rojas Contreras (Colombia). Share your opinions, suggestions, counter-arguments - on Instagram: @booknomadpodcast - by email: booknomadpodcast@gmail.com  

Lori & Julia's Book Club
11/13 "Fruit of the Drunken Tree" by Ingrid Rojas Contreras

Lori & Julia's Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2018


info@podcastone.com6d53e4d3-3417-48cc-8b4f-d49e63aaedf3Wed, 14 Nov 2018 07:00:00 PSTLori & Julia00:00

Write About Now
Ep. 62. Novelist Ingrid Rojas Contreras On Coming of Age in War-Torn Colombia

Write About Now

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2018 61:06


Ingrid Rojas Contreras' best-selling debut novel, Fruit of the Drunken Tree, is a beautiful and tragic coming-of-age story set in Pablo Escobar's Colombia of the 90s. Based on her own experiences growing up, the book takes readers into the violent and complex world of drug lords, guerillas, kidnappings and car bombs, all told through the eyes of two girls from very different backgrounds. On the podcast, Ingrid talks about the harrowing real-life inspirations for the book, the nearly decade-long process of writing it, and what she learned about the craft and herself along the way. To learn more about Ingrid and the show, check out WriteAboutNowMedia.com. 

Reading Women
Interview with Ingrid Rojas Contreras

Reading Women

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2018 44:45


We talk with Ingrid Rojas Contreras, author of the Fruit of the Drunken Tree, which is out now from Doubleday! Some links are affiliate links. Find more details here. Books Mentioned Fruit of the Drunken Tree by Ingrid Rojas Contreras Ingrid Recommends Vida and Veins of the Ocean by Patricia Engel (Check our discussion episode about Veins of the Ocean here.) The Incendiaries by R.O. Kwon A River of Stars by Vanessa Hua If You Leave Me by Crystal Hana Kim (Check our Interview with Crystal Hana Kim here.) The Golden State by Lydia Kiesling All You Can Ever Know by Nicole Chung Author Bio Ingrid Rojas Contreras was born and raised in Bogotá, Colombia. Her essays and short stories have appeared in the Los Angeles Review of Books, Electric Literature, Guernica, and Huffington Post, among others. She has received fellowships and awards from The Missouri Review, Bread Loaf Writer's Conference, VONA, Hedgebrook, The Camargo Foundation, Djerassi Resident Artists Program, and the National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures. She is the book columnist for KQED Arts, the Bay Area's NPR affiliate.ram. Be sure to subscribe to our newsletter to be sure you don’t miss the latest news, reviews, and furchild photos. Support us on Patreon and get insider goodies! Music “Reading Women” Composed and Recorded by Isaac and Sarah Greene   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Late Night with Seth Meyers Podcast
Trump Lies About Puerto Rico Death Toll as GOP Braces for Midterms: A Closer Look | Ingrid Rojas Contreras

Late Night with Seth Meyers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2018 23:16


Seth takes a closer look at President Trump peddling another insane conspiracy theory about the death toll in Puerto Rico as Republicans brace themselves for the midterms.Then, author Ingrid Rojas Contreras talks about real-life inspiration for her book Fruit of the Drunken Tree, portraying fictional versions of her family members in the book and her mother's fortune-telling business she ran out of the family attic. She also takes a few more questions backstage at Studio 8G just for this podcast.LATE NIGHT ON SOCIALRate the Late Night Podcast on Apple Podcasts: applepodcasts.com/LateNightSethSubscribe to Late Night on YouTube: youtube.com/LateNightSethFollow Late Night on Twitter: twitter.com/LateNightSethLike Late Night on Facebook: www.facebook.com/LateNightSethLike Late Night on Instagram: www.instagram.com/LateNightSethFind Late Night on Snapchat: snapchat.com/add/LateNightSethGet more Late Night with Seth Meyers: www.nbc.com/late-night-with-seth-meyers/Watch Late Night with Seth Meyers weeknights 12:35/11:35c on NBC.

Millennials Meet World
Millennials Meet World - Ingrid Rojas Contreras

Millennials Meet World

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2018 30:00


In the vain of Latin American authors before, Ingrid Rojas Contreras comes in with a new modern approach to magical realism in her book, "Fruit of the Drunken Tree." Detailing the lives of four women as they survive the Pablo Escobar era Colombia, Contreras takes us into the world of the wealthy and poor of the 1990's. Cruz Castillo gets to know the amazing new author as she talks about her first book, a little about her origin story and approach to writing, and a few of her favorite influences.