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  • 546PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about atms

Latest podcast episodes about atms

Two Smart Assets
Challenging Conventional ”Wisdom” with Non-Traditional Investment Alternatives with Jim Pfeifer

Two Smart Assets

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 32:17


Join Daniel Nickles with his guest Jim Pfeifer as they talk about what teaching finance taught him, his process of finding and screening sponsors, his take on the vitality of communication, and his thoughts on speculating vs. investing. As a rule of thumb, for Jim, 95% of any investor's resources should be invested in hard assets. As the discussion furthers, Jim also explains how diversification should be approached and how it is everyone's entry into the whole ecosystem of real estate investing. In this episode you will learn: From paper assets to hard assets Jim Pfeifer – on where you should be investing most of your resources Sponsors are crucial to your network You can still get involved even though its passive Jim's bad experiences with passive investments About Jim Pfeifer: Jim Pfeifer is one of the founders of Left Field Investors and the host of the Passive Investing from Left Field podcast. Left Field Investors is a group dedicated to educating and assisting like-minded investors negotiate the nuances of the passive investing landscape and world of syndications. Jim is a former financial advisor who became frustrated with the one-path-fits-all approach of the standard financial services industry. Jim now concentrates on investing in real assets that produce cash flow and is committed to sharing his knowledge with others who are interested in learning a different way to grow wealth. Jim not only advises and helps people get started in passive real estate syndications, he also invests alongside them in small groups to allow for diversification among multiple investments and syndication sponsors. Jim believes the most important factor in a successful syndication is finding a sponsor that he knows, likes, and trusts. He has invested in over 45 passive syndications including apartments, mobile homes, self-storage, private lending and notes, ATMs, commercial and industrial triple net leases, assisted living facilities, and international coffee farms and cacao producers. Jim is constantly looking for new investment ideas that match his philosophy of real assets producing cash flow as well as looking for new sponsors with whom he can build quality, long-term relationships. Connect with Jim Pfeifer on: Website:              http://www.leftfieldinvestors.com/ LinkedIn:             https://www.linkedin.com/in/jimpfeifer Connect with Two Smart Assets on: Website:              https://twosmartassets.com/ Facebook:           https://www.facebook.com/TwoSmartAssets/ Instagram:          https://www.instagram.com/twosmartassets/ YouTube:             https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5b8x2o3ByaPBcz5Lkev7uw   ✅ Check out our free apartment syndication sample deal: https://twosmartassets.com/sample-deal-form  

Your Brain on Facts
Voice Over The Moon, pt 2 (ep 179

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 31:34


How'd it go for the first BBC announcer with an accent?  How much work can you get if you "make it" in voiceover?  How much did the woman behind Siri make?  And what's a pencil got to do with any of this?  All this and more in part 2! Like what you hear?  Become a patron of the arts for as little as $2 a month!   Or buy the book or some merch.  Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs.  Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. 00:25 RP and Wilfred Pickles (voiced by Simon Jackson) 04:26 The cast of Futurama work a lot! 08:17 Voiceover is easy! (right?) 11:30 #moxiemillion 12:30 Trying to find a job 13:55 Props and accessories 15:55 AI (even worse than the movie) 18:24 Bev Standing vs TikTok 20:50 sponsors: Sly Fox Trivia, Sambucol 23:06 Susan Bennett, the voice of Siri 27:53 It's in the game Music: Kevin MacLeod, Track Tribe . Links to all the research resources are on the website.   Back when the BBC was first launched in 1922, the first General Manager of the corporation, Sir John Reith, insisted the BBC be as formal and quintessentially British as possible, and he created a number of rules towards this end.  One thing he stressed in particular was that the newscasters spoke the “King's English.“  He felt it was “a style or quality of English that would not be laughed at in any part of the country”.  He also assumed RP would be easier for people across the empire to understand versus a regional accent, of which the tiny land mass of the UK has dozens.  Reish wanted things to be ‘just so,' even ordering that any newscaster reading the news after 8PM had to wear a dinner jacket while on air, on the radio, where no one could see them.    The BBC didn't create Received Pronunciation, though.  We can trace the origins of RP back to the secondary schools and universities of nineteenth-century Britain, making it the accent of a certain social class, the one with money.  Their speech patterns - based loosely on the local accent of the south-east Midlands, roughly London, Oxford and Cambridge, soon came to be associated with ‘The Establishment.'   although one of Reith's goals in using RP was to appeal to the widest audience possible, many listeners still felt alienated by the broadcasts being beamed into their homes because of this “upper class” accent being used. Despite this, newscasters were required to use Received Pronunciation right up until World War 2.   Why change it during the war?  Didn't they have bigger things to worry about?  Well, the Ministry of Information was worried about the Nazis hijacking the radio waves.  During World War 2, Nazi Germany invested a lot of time and money to train spies and propagandists to speak using perfect Received Pronunciation so that they could pass as British.  If they pulled it off, the Nazis could potentially issue orders over the radio in a thoroughly convincing and official-sounding newscaster voice.  Therefor, the BBC hired several newscasters possessed of broad regional accents that would be more difficult for Nazis to perfectly copy, and as a bonus might also appeal to the “common man”.   The first person to read the news on the BBC with a regional accent was one Wilfred Pickles in 1941.  [sfx clip]  The public trusted that he was in fact British, but they didn't trust, or couldn't ignore his accent to pay attention to, a word he said.  Far from being popular, his mild Yorkshire accent offended many listeners so much that they wrote letters to the BBC, blasting them for having the audacity to sully the news that way.  Nonetheless, after the end of World War 2, the BBC continued to loosen its guidelines and began to hire more people who spoke with the respective accent of the region they were being broadcast.  That said, the BBC does continue to select newscasters with the most mild accents for international broadcasts.   You can't please everyone, but if you can get in good in the voicework industry, you can do a staggering number of roles.  How many?  Here are some examples, pulling only from the cast of one of my favorite shows, Futurama.  You might say my husband and I are fans; we had a Hypnotoad wedding cake.  Billy West, the voice of Fry, Prof. Farnsworth, and Zoidberg, as well as both Ren and Stimpy, has 266 acting credits on his IMDB page.  Maurice LaMarche, who did Calculon, Morbo and Kiff and is the go-to guy for Orson Welles impressions like Brain from Animaniacs, has 390 roles listed.  Tress MacNeille, who did basically every female who wasn't Amy or Leela, as well as Dot on Animaniacs and Agnes Skinner on The Simpsons has 398 roles to her name.  Bender's voice actor, John DiMaggio, without whom the Gears of War video games wouldn't be the same, has worked on some 424 projects.  The man who made Hermes Conrad Jamaican, and gave us Samurai Jack, Phil LaMarr, is the most prolific voice actor on that cast, with a whopping 495 credits to his name.  Still, he falls short of the resume of Rob Paulsen, who did the voices of Yakko and Pinky on Animaniacs, and other examples too numerous to list here, because his IMDB pages lists 541 voice acting credits.  And did I mention they're bringing Animaniacs back? [cheer]  Paulsen is trailing behind Tara Strong, though.  The actress who voiced Bubbles on Powerpuff Girls, Raven on Teen Titans, and Timmy on Fairly Oddparents has 609 roles in her 35 year career, or an average of 17 a year.  That may not sound impressive, but have you've ever tried getting *one acting job?  Strong can't hold a candle to a man whose voice I can identify from two rooms away, a man who will always be Spike Spiegel from Cowboy Bebop no matter who he's playing, Steve Blum, who has racked up 798 voice roles.  And those are just a sampling of voice actors I can name off the top of my head.  So when career day rolls around, maybe skip doctor and firefighter and suggest your kid become a voice actor.  Not everyone who does voice work has a face for radio, so I put pictures of all the actors up on the Vodacast app so you can se what Fry, Yakko, and Raven really look like ..   “Sure,” you say, “that sounds like a sweet gig.  Walk in, say a few things, and cash the check.”  Oh my sweet summer child.  If it was that easy, everyone would do it.  For starters, there is no “got it in one take” in voice acting.  Be prepared to do your lines over and over again, with different emphasis, different inflection, different pacing, or sometimes simply saying it over and over again until, even though each take sounds the same to you, the director gets the subtle difference they're looking for.  Bonus fact: the feeling you get when you say a word or phrase so many times that it stops sounding like a word and becomes a meaningless noise is called semantic satiation.   You may be standing in a little booth all day, but that doesn't mean it won't be physically taxing.  Actors dubbing anime in particular are required to do a lot of screaming.  Chris Sabat, who voices Vegeta in the Dragonball series, says that even with his background in opera and the vocal control that taught him, “I will literally be sick the next day. I will have flu-like symptoms. Because you have to use so much energy, and use up so much of your voice to put power into those scenes, that it will make you sick. That's not an exaggeration; I will be bedridden sometimes after screaming for too long.”   That is, if you can get a gig.  Remember how I rattled off actors who've had hundreds of roles each?  That's because, in rough figures, 5% of the actors get 95% of the work. So unless you're a Tara Strong or Phil LaMarr, noteworthy roles will be hard to come by.  One plus side is you get paid by the word, as well as by the tag.  A tag is part of a recording that can be swapped out, like recording a commercial, and recording the phrases “coming soon,” “opening this Monday,” and “open now.”  The clients gets three distinct commercials from one recording sessions, so you get more money.  Assuming the client actually orders the session.  You may find yourself on stand-by or “avail,” as it's called in the industry.  You may be asked to set aside a few hours or even consecutive days for a recording session.  The problem is, the client isn't actually obligated to use you during that time and no one else can book you during that time until they release you from it.    But it's a job you can do in your pj's, and I often do, and that's always a plus.  Even though no one can see the actors, voice work still uses props and accessories.  While computers can be used to speed up or slow down dialogue (which is more of a concern in dubbing Japanese animation, where the visuals are already done), certain vocal changes can easily be achieved using random items in the studio. “If the character is in a hollowed-out tree, I might stick my head in a wastebasket,” veteran voice actor Corey Burton told Mental Floss. “If it doesn't sound quite right, I can throw some wadded-up Kleenex in there for better acoustics.”  Burton, like Mel Blanc, prefers to eat real food when the moment calls for it. “They want you to sometimes just go, ‘Nom, nom, nom.' No! I want a carrot, a cookie. I don't want to make a dry slurping noise when I could be sipping a drink.”   Pencils also play an important role, not for making notes on the script or creating any sort of convincing sound effect.  The plague of these performers is plosives.  You've probably heard them on podcasts; they've definitely been on mine.  A plosive is the noise you get when a consonant that is produced by stopping the airflow using the lips, teeth, or palate, followed by a sudden release of air.  It's also called popping your p's, since that's the worst culprit.  A round mesh screen in front of the mic helps, but the old-school trick to stop plosives actually uses a pencil.  If they're getting p-pops on the recording, voice actors will hold a pencil or similar linear object upright against the lips.  This disrupts the air enough to avoid the giant, sharp spike in the soundwave.  Now if only there were some cheap and easy trick to get rid of mouth noises and lip smacks.  You may hear a few on this podcast, but for everyone you hear, I cut twenty out.   The most sure-fire way to avoid mouth noises and breathing when ordering a recording is to use a computer-generated or AI voice.  Now this is a sticky wicket in the VO community, a real burr under a lot of saddles.  Whenever it comes up in message groups, a third of people turn into South Park characters [sfx they took our jobs].  I won't get too Insider Baseball here, but here's the scoop.  AI voices are cheap, fast, and they're getting really good.  Have you ever gotten a robodialer call where it took you a moment to realize it was not a live person?  There are companies offering entire audiobooks in AI voices.  There is even an AI voice that can cry!  So why am I not bothered?  The way I see it, the people who will buy the cheapest possible option, in this case an AI voice, weren't going to pay even my Fiverr rate, and invariably, the cheaper a client is, the more working with them makes you regret ever starting this business in the first place.  It's an irony a lot of freelancers and business owners are familiar with -- the $5k client pays you the day you submit the invoice; the $50 client makes you hound them for six weeks and then they say they want you to do it over or come down on the price.  So I'm fine with letting those gigs go.  The other reason is that while AI applications and devices such as smart speakers and digital assistants like Siri are powered by computer-generated voices, those voices actually originate from real actors!  In fact, I just wrapped an AI-generation job this week.    In most cases, even computerized voices need a human voice as a foundation for the development of the vocal database. Nevertheless, AI is creating new work for a wide range of voice actors. Are these actors putting themselves out of a job in future?  Maybe. Maybe not.  It's definitely something I had to wrestle with before accepting the job.  But I figured, AI is coming whether we like it or not, so it's best to be involved to help steer the ship rather than be capsized by its wake.   When I took the AI-generation job, there were two questions I had for the client: what control do I have over how my voice is used, and what happens if you sell the company?  I asked these two questions for two good reasons, Bev Standing and Susan Bennett.  Bev Standing, a VO and coach from Canada, was surprised to hear her own voice being used on peoples' videos when friends and colleagues told her to log onto Tiktok.  For one, people could use her voice to say whatever they liked, no matter how vile, and she'd never worked with, been paid by, or given permission for use of her voice to TikTok.   According to Standing, who I've taken classes with and is a really nice lady, the audio in question was recorded as a job for the Chinese Institute of Acoustics four years ago, ostensibly for translations.  “The only people I've worked with are the people I was hired by, which was for translations... My agreement is not what it's being used for, and it's not with the company that's using my voice,” Standing said in an interview.   Standing files a lawsuit against TikTok's parent company ByteDance on the grounds of intellectual property theft.  She hasn't consented to her performance being used by TikTok, and had very real concerns that the content created using her audio would hurt her ability to get work in the future.  Imagine if Jan 6 insurrectionists and other such hateful wackaloons used your voice on their videos.  Good luck getting hired after that.  TikTok and ByteDance stayed pretty mum, both publicly and to Standing and her lawyer, also a VO, but they did change the AI voice, which certainly looks like they done wrong.  The lawsuit was settled a few months ago, but it's all sealed up in NDAs, so I can't tell you the details, but I'm calling it a win.   The other name I dropped was Susan Bennett, but that's not the name you'd recognize her as.  Though she was training to be a teacher, it soon became clear to Susan Bennet that her voice was destined for more than saying “eyes on your own paper.”  She acted in the theater, was a member of a jazz band, an a cappella group, and she was a backup singer for Burt Bacharac and Roy Orbison.  That background helped her land gigs doing VO and singing jingles for the likes of Coca-Cola, McDonald's, Macy's, Goodyear, Papa John's, IBM, and more.  In 1974, she became the voice of First National Bank of Atlanta's Tillie the All-Time Teller, one of the first bank ATMs.  Her voice made the new technology more user-friendly for a computer-unfamiliar public.     Bonus fact: one of the earliest ATMs in NYC printed the security picture of the user on their receipts.  According to the man who sold them to the bank, “The only people using the machines were prostitutes and gamblers who didn't want to deal with tellers face to face.”  Or it could be the hours they keep.  I can neither confirm nor deny this, but I like to think that sex workers are the underappreciated early-adopters that helped the rest of us to be able to hit the cash machine on the way out of town (or the Mac machine, as my mom called it well into the 90's).  Bennet also became the voice of Delta Airlines announcements, GPS's, and phone systems.   But even with all that, that's not where you know her voice from.  “Hey, Siri, how big is the Serengeti?” [sfx if Google was]  Susan Bennet was the original voice of Siri on the iphone, but she never actually worked for Apple.  In 2005, she recorded a wealth of words and wordy-sounding non-words for a company called ScanSoft or Nuance, I've been seeing either listed.   For four hours a day, every day, in July 2005, Bennett holed up in her home recording booth, saying thousands of phrases and sentences of mostly-to-completely nonsense, which the “ubergeeks” as she called them, could use for generating AI speech.  According to Bennet, “I was reading sentences like 'cow hoist in the tub hut today.' 'Militia oy hallucinate buckra okra ooze.' Then I would read these really tedious things that were the same word, but changing out the vowel. 'Say the shrayding again, say the shreeding again, say the shriding again, say the shredding again, say the shrudding again.' “  These snippets were then synthesized in a process called concatenation that builds words, sentences, paragraphs. And that is how voices like hers find their way into GPS and telephone systems.   The job was done, the check cleared, and life went on, then 2011 rolled around and Siri was unveiled as an integrated feature of the Apple iPhone 4S.  The actors who'd worked for Nuance had no idea until well after it happened.  Bennett found out that her voice is actually Siri after a friend emailed: ”Hey, we've been playing around with this new Apple phone. Isn't this you?'  Apple had bought SoftScan/Nuance and all of its assets.  “Apple bought our voices from Nuance without our knowing it.”  As a voiceactor, this turn of events was problematic for a few reasons.  Typecasting and stereotyping, for one.  The downside of being successful in a role can be that that's all people want you for after that, like Sean Bean and a character who dies.  So Bennett kept her identity close to her vest until 2013, when Apple switched voices.  “My voice was just the original voice on the 4s and the 5. But now it no longer sounds like Apple because [Siri] sounds like everyone else. The original Siri voice had a lot of character; she had a lot of attitude.   Bennet has never said how much she made from Nuance, but we know how much she's made from Apple.  In round figures, give or take for inflation, [sfx calculator] she made $0.  Her voice was on something like 17 million phones.  Even a penny per phone would have been a handsome payday, but no, no penny for you.  “We were paid for the amount of time we spent recording but not at all for usage. The only way I've been able to get any payment for it, really, is through my speaking events, but I'm very grateful to have been the voice of Siri. She's very iconic; it's led to a whole new career for me.”   Another widespread voice that didn't get commensurate royalties is known for a single phrase, barely a full sentence. [sfx clip]  From FIFA and Madden to UFC and NBA, Andrew Anthony's voice has opened EA Sports video games for 30 years now and let us all have a collective shiver of mortality at that fact.  Anthony had a friend who ran a small ad sales company, who had taken on the not-yet-industry-cornerstone Electronic Arts as a client.  "My friend then called me up in Toronto and said 'Hey will you do this thing... for free?' I said 'yeah, of course, I will! I don't even know what this is but I get a free trip down to see you, so for sure'.  So Anthony went to visit his friend, read the line, which was originally “If it's in the game, it's in the game,” and assumed he would never, ever hear anything about it again.  Call that an underestimation.  EA is valued at $37B, with the Sports being a big chunk of that.  And Anthony has seen exactly none of that money, and he's pretty okay with that.  Over the years, Anthony has met plenty of other gaming fans and happily agreed to do his EA Sports voice impression on camera.    Not every screen actor's able to do voice work successfully; we've all heard flat, lackluster performances from big name stars in animated features.  Looking at you, Sarah Michelle Gellar from the recent HeMan cartoon.  Not so with the person who arguably kicked off the trends of booking big names stars for voice work, Robin Williams in his role as Genie.  Williams recorded 30 hours of dialogue, most of it improvised, for the 90 minute movie.  He took the role for *9% of the fee he normally commanded with the condition that the recordings not be used to merchandise products.  He wanted to “leave something wonderful behind for this kids.”  Thanks for spending part of your day with me.   And that's where we run out of ideas, at least for today.  So a wife overheard her boss saying he wanted a voice to notify people when they received email and volunteered her husband. “I recorded it on a cassette deck in my living room,” Edwards told the New York Post on November 7.  “Most people think I'm retired and own an island.”  Instead, he works at WKYC-TV from 3:30 a.m. to noon, and drives an Uber from noon to 6 p.m.  In 2014, Edwards told CNBC that he pranks people by standing behind their computers and booming, “You've got mail!”  Explained the voice-over actor, “I have fun with it!”  He's not bothered by not getting royalties, so I guess we shouldn't be either. 

Passive Mobile Home Park Investing
Interview with Denis Shapiro of SIH Capital Group

Passive Mobile Home Park Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 32:08


Welcome back to the Passive Mobile Home Park Investing Podcast, hosted by Andrew Keel. On this episode of the Passive Mobile Home Park Investing Podcast, Andrew talks with Denis Shapiro of SIH Capital Group. Denis has a unique background that has enabled him to build the skills necessary to be successful throughout his investing career. Today, Denis shares his background and previous experiences with Passive Mobile Home Park Investing Podcast listeners. On this episode Denis Shapiro offers advice to limited partner investors as he discusses his thoughts on the economic future of the mobile home park industry, inflation and interest rates in the United States. Denis began investing in real estate in 2012 when the market was just beginning to recover from the global financial crisis. He built a cash flowing portfolio with alternative assets such as notes, ATMs, mobile home parks, tech startups, and commercial properties. He co-founded an investment club for accredited investors in 2019. Following the success of his investor club, he launched SIH Capital Group. SIH provides accredited investors with a simplified strategy to invest for passive income. Andrew Keel is the owner of Keel Team, LLC, a Top 100 Owner of Manufactured Housing Communities with over 2,000 lots under management. His team currently manages over 30 manufactured housing communities across more than ten states. His expertise is in turning around under-managed manufactured housing communities by utilizing proven systems to maximize the occupancy while reducing operating costs. He specializes in bringing in homes to fill vacant lots, implementing utility bill back programs, and improving overall management and operating efficiencies, all of which significantly boost the asset value and net operating income of the communities. Andrew has been featured on some of the Top Podcasts in the manufactured housing space, click here to listen to his most recent interviews: https://www.keelteam.com/podcast-links. In order to successfully implement his management strategy Andrew's team usually moves on location during the first several months of ownership. Find out more about Andrew's story at AndrewKeel.com. Talking Points: 00:21 - Welcome to the Passive Mobile Home Park Investing Podcast 01:32 - Denis Shapiro's background and journey 05:33 - Investing in a fund of fund with m

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast
E373 - MM - What KPI's Should You Track to Grow Your List

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 8:11


In this Monday Minutes, I discuss the KIPI's you should be focusing to grow your email list, and why it's important to focus on your email list as a real estate entrepreneur.  I also discuss our internal tracking system that you can use for your own business for free!  Interested in investing in ATMs? Check out our webinar.   Please note that investing in private placement securities entails a high degree of risk, including illiquidity of the investment and loss of principal. Please refer to the subscription agreement for a discussion of risk factors. Tired of scrambling for capital?  Check out our new FREE webinar -  How to Ensure You Never Scramble for Capital Again (The 3 Capital-Raising Secrets). Click Here to register. CFC Podcast Facebook Group

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast
E372 - How He Went From Broke 20 Year Old to Raising Millions

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 44:54


Our guest for today immigrated with his parents to the US when he was five years old.  He didn't speak English and he came from a financially disadvantaged background.  To be honest, a lot of the deck was stacked against him… …but he didn't let that impact his desire (or ability) to accomplish amazing things.  Today, we are joined by Daniel Kwak, who is the Founder of Miotti Partners Capital, a managed private equity real estate and development fund. He has traveled the US speaking at conferences to the next generation of real estate entrepreneurs. Daniel also produces The Kwak Brothers YouTube channel, which has over 200,000 subscribers.  In this episode today, we are going to discuss…  How Daniel when from -$187.65 in his bank account at the age of 20, to having an 8-figure portfolio by 27  Daniel's views on how hard work and economics tie in to each other, and why he feels blessed to be alive in the US during this incredible time human history  Why Daniel's most common response to people who don't think they're ready to raise capital is simply… “Good…You probably shouldn't!”  Daniel is not only an all-star entrepreneur, he is also a deep-thinker and action-taker. I think many of you will thoroughly enjoy his story  Take Control,  Hunter Thompson Resources mentioned in the podcast: 1. His Personal Email 2. His Website 3. His YouTube Channel Interested in investing in ATMs? Check out our webinar.   Please note that investing in private placement securities entails a high degree of risk, including illiquidity of the investment and loss of principal. Please refer to the subscription agreement for a discussion of risk factors. Tired of scrambling for capital?  Check out our new FREE webinar -  How to Ensure You Never Scramble for Capital Again (The 3 Capital-Raising Secrets). Click Here to register. CFC Podcast Facebook Group

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast
E371 - MM - The Key to Actually Accomplishing Your Goals for 2022

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 9:31


In this Monday Minutes, I discuss how to not only set SMART goals, but how to reverse engineer annual goals into weekly tasks (and where most people fall short.)  I also share with you one of my favorite quotes of 2022… Interested in investing in ATMs? Check out our webinar.   Please note that investing in private placement securities entails a high degree of risk, including illiquidity of the investment and loss of principal. Please refer to the subscription agreement for a discussion of risk factors. Tired of scrambling for capital?  Check out our new FREE webinar -  How to Ensure You Never Scramble for Capital Again (The 3 Capital-Raising Secrets). Click Here to register. CFC Podcast Facebook Group

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast
E370 - How to Get the Most Out of a Real Estate Conference

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 26:42


Given that there are several real estate conferences coming up (including the Intelligent Investors Real Estate Conference (IIREC)!), I thought it would be good to discuss this very topic with the host of one of the most popular real estate conferences in the US… Today, I'm joined by Ben Lapidus, CFO of Spartan Investment Group and the Host of the Best Ever Real Estate Conference ("Best Ever").  For those of you that don't know Best Ever is one of the few real estate conferences I try to attend each year. Both Ben and I know a thing or two about not only throwing a kick-butt event, but also what it takes to get the most out of in-person events as an attendee. Click Here to Listen Now If you are planning on attending IIREC 2022 or Best Ever Real Estate Conference this year, make sure to check this out! What are some of the key mistakes even producers make when setting their expectations for the event? What can attendees do to supercharge their experience, both from a networking standpoint, as well as their ability to get the most out of the How should event attendees and producers be contemplating the risks and uncertainty surrounding Covid-19? Whether you are attending an in-person event this year, or have an interest in throwing one, I'm sure you'll get a lot out of this episode. Click Here to Listen Now Resources mentioned in this podcast: 1. The Best Ever Conference 2. Spartan Investment Group Interested in investing in ATMs? Check out our webinar.   Please note that investing in private placement securities entails a high degree of risk, including illiquidity of the investment and loss of principal. Please refer to the subscription agreement for a discussion of risk factors. Tired of scrambling for capital?  Check out our new FREE webinar -  How to Ensure You Never Scramble for Capital Again (The 3 Capital-Raising Secrets). Click Here to register. CFC Podcast Facebook Group

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast
E369 - MM - What to Do About Fear and Critical Comments

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 10:02


In this episode, I discuss some of the steps you can take to avoid getting a lot of negative comments on social media, and what to do about the fear of getting them!  Resources mentioned in the podcast: 1. E238 - MM - How To Get Away with Saying Offensive Things Interested in investing in ATMs? Check out our webinar.   Please note that investing in private placement securities entails a high degree of risk, including illiquidity of the investment and loss of principal. Please refer to the subscription agreement for a discussion of risk factors. Tired of scrambling for capital?  Check out our new FREE webinar -  How to Ensure You Never Scramble for Capital Again (The 3 Capital-Raising Secrets). Click Here to register. CFC Podcast Facebook Group

Deadhead Cannabis Show
Only time the Dead played New Years shows outside of the Bay Area

Deadhead Cannabis Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 53:31


Grateful Dead Live at Fillmore East 01-03-1970 For years cannabis dispensaries have relied on cashless ATMs to protect their employees and customers. Larry Mishkin and Rob Hunt discuss Visa's incomprehensible plan that would prevent cannabis companies from using cashless ATMs.  They also discuss the one time that the Grateful Dead played their New Years shows on the east coast. Produced by PodConXDeadhead Cannabis Show - https://podconx.com/podcasts/deadhead-cannabis-showLarry Mishkin - https://podconx.com/guests/larry-mishkinRob Hunt - https://podconx.com/guests/rob-huntDeadhead Cyclist - https://deadheadcyclist.com/Photo courtesy of Jay Blakesberg

Travel Tales From the #nerdbirds
Travel Bingo: ATMs & Money (#135)

Travel Tales From the #nerdbirds

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 14:08


Season 7 starts with an offshoot from Travel Bites: Travel Bingo! #nerdbirds Rachel & Kai take one word and offer a tale and a tip. This week they talk about ATMs & money - how to get it when you're travelling and how to pay for things in this increasingly cashless society! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nerdbirds/support

The Wealth Without Wall Street Podcast
Our Passive Income Report - November 2021

The Wealth Without Wall Street Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 35:21


#222: It's the season of reflection, thanksgiving, and celebration. So as we wrap up the year, join us as we celebrate our wins of 2021 and set a compelling vision for 2022. Let's aim to live life ON purpose! As part of Russ and Joey's mission to educate and inspire people to live meaningful lives while working to achieve financial freedom, they continue to share their monthly passive income reports. They started doing this 18 months ago, and now we see how far they have come.  While we see a dip in their income for November, a $45K net passive income for one month is still impressive. With the majority of profits coming from the land business and short-term rentals. They also share exciting developments in unique investment opportunities like STACK Candles and possibly ATMs for BTC. So, continue following their journey to get inspiration. Better yet, why not start your own https://www.wealthwithoutwallstreet.com/passport (path to financial freedom)?  November 2021 Income At-A-Glance:   Gross Income for November: $114,702.92 Total Expenses for November: $69, 373.27 Total Net Profit for November: $45,329.65 Difference b/t September & November: ($22,236.99) % of net profit to overall gross revenue: 39.52%  Learn more about Real Estate Investing from The Land Geek:  https://www.thelandgeek.com/ (https://www.thelandgeek.com/) Visiting Birmingham? Find Your Perfect Stay: https://www.wakeupinbirmingham.com/ (https://www.wakeupinbirmingham.com/) Give the Gift of Fragrance:  https://www.stackcandles.com/ (https://www.stackcandles.com/) Rent or list a vehicle: https://overlandrentals.com/ (https://overlandrentals.com/) Join the Passive Income MasterMind: https://www.wealthwithoutwallstreet.com/wwws-passive-income-round-table (https://www.wealthwithoutwallstreet.com/wwws-passive-income-mastermind) Start your journey to Financial Freedom: https://www.wealthwithoutwallstreet.com/passport (https://www.wealthwithoutwallstreet.com/passport)

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast
E368 - How He Created a Tool for Passive Investors While Being a Doctor

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 35:12


One of the many benefits of the online education revolution that is taking place right now, is that someone can go into the space of real estate investing with very little background, and become a confident passive investor, with just a few months of dedication. This simply wasn't possible just a few short years ago. As the interest in passive investing continues to grow, more and more service providers are popping up to help facilitate these passive investors' growth curve and enhance their knowledge and expertise, as they work to review new investment opportunities. This interview is just one of many examples of this. Today, we are joined by Dr. Samuel Giordano, who is a full-time physician and founder of Passive Advantage, a software designed for passive investors. How our guest went from struggling to find access to quality education on the topic of passive investing, to being a very confident investor in just a few years (and some of the resources he used along the way!) Why our guest feels a bit bearish on a few sectors of the real estate sector, and what asset classes he is most bullish on from a passive investors' standpoint How our guest turned a simple Excel document into a robust software which helps passive investors vet opportunities Interested in being able to vet deals more quickly? Check out this interview to learn how he does it, and what tools he uses to help him along the way. Take Control, Hunter Thompson Resources mentioned in the podcast: 1. Passive Advantage Interested in investing in ATMs? Check out our webinar.   Please note that investing in private placement securities entails a high degree of risk, including illiquidity of the investment and loss of principal. Please refer to the subscription agreement for a discussion of risk factors. Tired of scrambling for capital?  Check out our new FREE webinar -  How to Ensure You Never Scramble for Capital Again (The 3 Capital-Raising Secrets). Click Here to register. CFC Podcast Facebook Group

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast
E367 - One Risk Passive Investors Never Think About (Part II)

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 5:18


A few weeks ago, I did a short Monday Minutes summarizing why the reduction of liability is a HUGE (and underrated) benefit of passive investments… This week, I have a follow up, that could be equally important (and also related).  Interested in being a non-collectable individual for creditors?  Click here to hear how… Interested in investing in ATMs? Check out our webinar.   Please note that investing in private placement securities entails a high degree of risk, including illiquidity of the investment and loss of principal. Please refer to the subscription agreement for a discussion of risk factors. Tired of scrambling for capital?  Check out our new FREE webinar -  How to Ensure You Never Scramble for Capital Again (The 3 Capital-Raising Secrets). Click Here to register. CFC Podcast Facebook Group

The Remote Real Estate Investor
Financial freedom from single-family rentals to multi-family to passive investing

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 31:21


Whitney Elkins-Hutten ended up investing in real estate by accident back in 2002. Starting off in single-family rentals, she quickly realized that she wanted to grow faster, bringing her to the multi-family space. From there she realized she wanted more time to spend with her family. This brought her to passive investing.  In this episode, Whitney shares her wealth of knowledge in these three sectors through the story of her investing journey. Download her free ebook here: https://ashwealth.com/, and learn more about passive investing with her here: https://www.passiveinvesting.com/whitney/     --- Transcript Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals.   Michael: What's going on everybody? Welcome to another episode of The Remote Real Estate Investor. I'm Michael Albaum. And today with me, I have Whitney Elkins-Hutton and she is the creator of Ash Wealth, and a just powerhouse of an investor with a really cool story and getting into some really cool investments. So she's gonna be talking to us today about her story, what she's doing, and how you might be able to get involved too. So let's get into it.   Whitney, thank you so much for taking the time and joining me here on the podcast. And I really appreciate you hanging out.   Whitney: Yeah, thank you so much for having me. This is gonna be awesome.   Michael: Oh yea, It going to be  a lot of fun. So you and I were just chatting before the recording a little bit about your background, where you are, who you are and what it is that you're doing with real estate. But can you give our listeners a little bit of key into that?   Whitney: Sure. Yeah. I'm a Leo. Oh, no, just kidding.   Michael: Super important!   Whitney: Super important to my passive in my investing journey, no, but I honestly I started off real estate investing in 2002 completely by accident, I purchased a house with a significant other and did a lot of things wrong. And a lot of things ended up working right for me. But the relationship fell apart about a month later. And I had a house. And I'm like, oh, like I would hadn't planned for that. And like we go,   Michael: Here we go.   Whitney: What do we do? So I I am you know, I was young. And I still you know, living with roommates was totally fine. So I stuffed it fully roommates, people who didn't mind living in construction zone. Because this house needed everything done to it. I mean, it had psychedelic flowers painted on the walls like 1960s style. So was fun and super fun to get rid of. Anyways, you know, I and I had I chose to do everything myself. And this is before YouTube. And so I went and bought the Home Depot 123 book and you know, rehab the property myself. Sold it about 11 Yeah, well, I mean, I, you know, when you screw up your plumbing, you go hire a plumber. I did that.   Michael: Yeah.   Whitney: I'm like, why can I get the hot and cold to come on? Right? Oh, cuz I haven't switched works. And so long story short, I sold it 11 minutes later, which was probably one of my bigger investing mistakes that I made. And it was at that point in time, I realized I had made more income in 11 months, through the capital gain on the sell of that house than I had made in my day job. And I hadn't been paying for my mortgage the whole entire time, my roommates had been paying for it. And I'm like, Oh my gosh, how many more of these deals can I do? And so that really launched my journey into investing.   But I you know, it, I had to grow from there, it took me years to realize that, you know, live in flipping and house hacking is just one strategy. And, you know, if I wanted to have passive income, and really unlock those golden handcuffs, I needed to figure out how to generate passive income. So it took, you know, my husband joined me in my antics, and it, you know, it took several years for us to kind of like slap ourselves in the head and go, Wow, we need to rent out property not sell it. And yeah, and then we dove in headfirst in that I scaled a portfolio of 30 properties that way, you know, leverage, Roofstock for uh, you know, reposition those properties. And then then I wanted to spend more time with my daughter at home and realized we had enough cash flow coming in to do that. In that's when I was just like, I don't know if I can do like 80 properties in order to get my husband at his job because all sudden, he wanted to join me.   I'm like, well, we gotta go multifamily. And so you know, I have, you know, began focusing on passive investing through multifamily and self storage, real estate investments. But I still love the single family asset because you can have it in your control and do so many different things with it.   Michael: Oh, my God, I love your story. It seems like I mean, it echoes I think so many investors seemingly organic progression of start somewhere and then you figure it out and then you start owning some rental properties and then you go multifamily and then you end up in passive. So talk to us a little bit about what that progression was going from single family to multifamily.   Whitney: Yeah, so really, it was a skill ability issue that we're having. So I, you know, I didn't know anything really different. Um, we had talked about kind of dabbling in multifamily. But really, you know, we had an inflection point When my husband when I wanted to stay home with our daughter, my husband was like,   Well, I want that too. And I'm like,   Michael: I would also like to not work, please.   Whitney: I'm like, Oh, hold on, I was like, we have 30 properties. And, you know, I was burning the candle at both ends, and five times in the middle just to make that happen. And I was using property management. And so I was like, wow, we've got to get to 80 properties for us to realistically both step away, and I'm like, Okay, we've got to get more properties with each transaction, we have to figure out a way to make this a lot smoother. And then, you know, when I started diving into the multifamily model, especially like, you know, you get up into, you know, 10 units, you know, 20-50 and larger, you know, the way they're evaluated is so much different than single family properties, you know, single family properties are evaluated based on comparable sales, you know, what did the guy sell his property for in the last six months? That's right next to you.   But with the multifamily asset, you're now a commercial business. And I just saw the huge power in that, because I'm like, wow, I can actually get rewarded for the work that I do, like, truly rewarded. If I take 50 units and rehab them and move them to market rent. Awesome, I get rewarded, if I, you know, make some small changes on the profit and loss statement to reduce the expenses, I get rewarded. And if I add additional streams of income, I get rewarded. And, you know, we call that value add strategy. And you know, in the multifamily world, really like you can't add additional streams of income very well to single family properties, or at all right, honestly, right. I tried trust me. Didn't go over so well. I tried to rent out a storage shed in the back of a property one time and they were like, the tenant was like, Nope, no, thanks. I don't want to use it. I'm like, Okay, fine. And then like, when they moved out, I realized they had stored everything. They broke in.   Michael: Sneaky tenants. Oh, man. So you realize that there's this there's this way that you can truly add value and get rewarded for it, not just today in terms of your cash flow, but down the road? And in terms of the value going the multifamily route? Yeah.   Whitney: Well, yeah, you get to control those levers a lot more readily than you do. And, you know, single family and small one to four real estate. Um, you know, you can add value. Absolutely. You go in and do a cosmetic rehab, which I you know, the large portion of my single family properties that I still have, I would do a cosmetic rehab, and I get rewarded with larger rents, I get rewarded with equity bumps on the properties. However, I can't control the market around that very well, you know, and I can't do that at scale. That's another big reason. Why, to consider switching asset classes.   Whitney: Love it. That's I mean, that's really why I made the jump to is I realized, Oh, my God, there are all these levers, I can pull. And I work out the math all the time with students I have in the academy, and I think it's like $100,000 at a five cap, or like a five unit, if you make a $15 incremental shift across every unit, and like the utility bill back, it adds like $18,000 in value at that same five cap. But it's like, it's mind blowing, how magnified these these changes can can become?   Whitney: Oh, absolutely, yeah, I'm working with one of my coaching clients right now, you know, he's working through an 11 unit property. And, you know, he was like, I don't know if I want to do rubs. And I'm like, why wouldn't you do that? You know, I was just like, you just do like five bucks here to you know, 10 bucks here. 15 bucks there. 30 bucks there. You know, by the, by the time we took a look at everything on the profit and loss statement, income, additional streams of income and everything. And I'm like, you know, you could push the value on this 11 unit property by 250 to $300,000 in six months. And have   Michael: That probably got their attention?   Whitney: Yeah, have zero of your refinance, zero your own money in it? Or like, you know, he was worried how do I go larger? Like or sell this property and go 1031 and go bigger? Why not?   Michael: Yeah, yeah. Oh, I love it. We get talked multifamily. All day long. I just get so so jazzed about it. But Woody, I'm curious to learn what you went into, or how you got involved with passive investing.   Whitney: Yeah, so at this inflection point, where my husband was like, hey, you know, I want to stay home as well or not stay home, he wants to go mountain biking a lot. And so   Michael: The truth comes out.   Whitney: I mean, it's all about lifestyle. Right. And I think that's something you know, you know, I really try to help people understand what are your investing goals? It's real estate is a tool, but you have to figure out a tool to what, and for us, you know, you know, great building passive income, but what does that actually get us it gets us our time back to do the things that we're most passionate about. And so when he, you know, we're we're, you know, at this inflection point, trying to figure out like, Okay, we're gonna go multifamily We had to blow apart every single system that we had in place, we needed new reality, we needed new lending, you know, you know, we needed to do property manager.   And I had two passive investments in my self directed IRA already. I was like, kind of like a mutual fund, you know, I'll worry about them later. I mean, I really, honestly, I hadn't really educated myself very fully on them. I, you know, somebody else had suggested that, that there would be good investments. I don't suggest doing this guys. In that way, don't do it. Do your due diligence. I'm super passionate.   Um, but when I started under kind of like reverse engineering, what these operators were doing with those investments and like, wow, like, Yeah, can I beat the returns, if I do this all myself? Sure. But my return on my time, I just, it just, I can't get back into you know, you have a small child at home, and I was still working full time. At that point in time, I was like, this is this is amazing. Like, where's my highest and best use of my time right now is with my family in earning an income and trying to figure out how to grow these other parts of my business.   And so that's really what launched us into passive investing. And, you know, we slowly, you know, had to add, like, you know, capital that we're getting from our day jobs and stuff like that, and invested in passive investing. But then we saw this opportunity to leverage those 30 single family homes, and kind of use them as like little mini ATMs in order to harvest out the income and equity out of those properties in order to continue to invest in scale passively.   Michael: Oh, my God, I love it. So what kinds of investments passive investments were you making? I know, you mentioned multifamily and self storage, is that really where you went, you jumped in both feet?   Whitney: Multifamily in news probably makes up the largest part of my portfolio, self study, self storage, the second largest, I do have other investments in residential assisted living and land and stuff like that. But I, you know, I come from public health, and I'm like, you know, you get down to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. For me, it was a no brainer, you know, you get down to first principles, right? Somebody is always going to need a roof over the head. Are they gonna need a self storage unit? I mean, technically, no, maybe the United States yes. But really you don't need it, but you will need that roof over your head. So that's where you really dug dug in.   That's why I love like, even single families still, like people are always going to need a place to live and a roof over their head. And we have such a housing shortage right now. So I mean, this is   Michael: Massively.   Whitney: I hear so many investors asked me, you know, all the time, like, Oh, do you think you know, things are topped out or you think the real estate's about to crash, you know, the hearkening back to 2008, but very different story. We're so under built by a wet, it's like 5 million homes, almost five and a half million homes like, no. Like, you know, even I don't even I think it's still gonna take like, you know, seven to 10 years, even with the pace of current building to catch up with the supply. I mean, this is a golden opportunity to to still get into the real estate space.   Michael: Yeah, I think so too. I think so, too. So I'm curious to know how, in your opinion, do you go about evaluating a passive investment opportunity?   Whitney: Well, it that's interesting, because I love working with investors on this, because you know, especially if you come from the single family or small, like one to four world, and you're so focused on the asset, and why, like, what makes a good deal? What is the cashflow? What is the return is going to be and when you translate that into passive investing, that can really land you in tons of hot water, because the model is different. It's not about the deal, right? We all are chasing returns, we all we all want great returns. But with passive investing, it's not about the return, it's about who's running the business, you're not investing in a deal. You're investing in an operating business.   So who is that operator? Who is that sponsor? And, you know, even before that, you need to understand what your goals are, you know, do you need cash flow? Do you need appreciation? Or do you need some balance blend of both, which is really where I help. I'm all about, like, let's try to hit you can get both you can get a cash flow, and you can get appreciation.   Once you kind of check that box, what's your risk tolerance? You know, are you wanting, you know, kind of a core asset that has no business plan risk to it, or you wanting you know, ground up development. There's a whole continuum in between there to have risk tolerance, and to check. And once you have that, check, now it's time to go find the operator that meets that strategy that you want to be in that risk tolerance set. You're you're willing to your band of risk tolerance you're willing to be in and then start learning how to vet that operator.   Michael: Okay, and what does what does that look like if someone's new ever done a passive investment? What does vetting an operator mean to them? Or what does it mean to you?   Whitney: Yeah. So So what is the operator doing there? You know, think of them, like if you're the CEO of your passive business, right? passive investment business, then the operator is your COO. Right? So you are you are essentially hiring out operations on a multifamily asset. So what do you look for in that COO? You want to know? Do they have a track record? Like, have they been doing this? Right? What is their investment strategy? does it align with what you need? Right? Like, you're not going to go talk to the operator, who's doing ground up development, if you if your view just can't tell it that type of risk? Right? Do you have an alignment in the business strategy in the investing thesis?   Then you're getting down to like, who's on their team? Right, I, you know, operators that are only working part time still maybe still working their day jobs? You know, that's fantastic. I mean, ever there are new operators coming into the market all the time for me, I want to invest with operators are doing this full time. They're taking care of my money, not as if it was theirs, is that that is if it's mine, right there. They're what have their eyes on it all the time. You know, again, you know, what is their background? And the investment strategy? You know, maybe they're pivoting from another industry, and they're bringing the skills in from another industry, that's totally fine, too. But, you know, somebody there needs to be have a background. First learn.   Yeah, and then, um, you know, just, you know, their track record, like what are you know, have they been able to perform with the assets? You know, how many have they gone through refinance? How many they've gone through sale? And then there's kind of the gut check. Right? Do you just know, love and trust them? At the end of the day? Yeah. Right. Your gut, I mean, call me female, I don't know. But like, I listen to my gut, right? Like, I'm, you know, I want to, I want to know that this is somebody who's gonna be my true partner, and and who is not put off if I like, reach out to them with, with, with maybe like, a seemingly silly question.   Now, it's on me to do my due diligence, and to, you know, educate, you know, educate myself, and, you know, everything. I don't expect the operator to educate me on everything. But you know, if I have a silly question, like about a tax question, you know, it should be Hey, great to hear from you. Like, you know, let's get your question answered. You know, you know, if you don't hear from them, like, their communication is, you know, lackluster or takes a really long time. That's challenging, you know, I would kind of put that, you know, in the not so cool category.   Michael: Yeah, absolutely. And that's, I mean, that's so you bring up a really great point. And a question that I wanted to follow up with is, most of these operators are providing an OM an offering memorandum to show showcase what the investment is, what their track record is, what the highlights of that particular investment are. And I think for so many newer investors, they're maybe overwhelmed with just that information itself, or definitely feeling overwhelmed with asking reaching out asking questions, but you're saying no, it should, we should kind of turn that on its head and say, okay, as the investor, we're the bosses, we should feel very comfortable to reach out to the person, the COO that we're hiring, and ask them some of our questions.   Whitney: Yeah, absolutely. I mean, I mean, it's not like, you know, they're your, your partners, new ones, a general partner, that's going to be running operations, you're the limited partner, right? And so your role is fairly limited. I mean, you're not going to be able to direct them and say, hey, now put this tenant in this property or do this on the property. But you definitely ask question, do you want to be in it? You know, think about this, like when you invest? You know, you're in that deal for 3-5-7 years, maybe even 10? Right? This should be something that you you've you see yourself getting along with, for that time period, and able to communicate with for that time period. So if you're just like, oh, wow, I got it on that deal. So I can get like a, you know, 12 or 12% cash on cash return, I hope I never have to talk to him. That's problem. That's a big red flag.   Michael: Now, that's so good to know. That's so good to know. So I'm curious to get your thoughts. I think there's two schools of thought around passive investing. One is that it could be really great for somebody that's newer and just getting started so that they can see how a successful operation runs. And then the other school of thought, I think is is kind of more traditionally and how you ended up in passive investing towards the end of an investment career, not the end, but after you've had some experience and built up some cash flow, because I think one of the issues with it is that you can't use leverage. You can't go to a bank and say, hey, I want to go invest in this person's deal. Will you loan me 80% of the money to do so? What are your thoughts around where in investors lifecycle they should pepper in or utilize leverage? Maybe not leverage is a bad word because you can't use leverage   But participate.   Whitney: Yeah, but well, by the way, you are using leverage as you're using, you know, leverage you get, we can cover that I have like a whole, like, I love going through all the different six points of leverage, you get an immense amount of leverage in syndication. So let's actually touch on that   Michael: Perfect,   Whitney: I get to leverage general partners time, knowledge and expertise, there's so true credit and lending and other investors money. So I, for me, let's, you know, I'll kind of like draw, you know, draw the little picture here is that I wanted to get into multifamily real estate, I had to re engineer all these systems, I could do it myself, or I can invest in somebody else's passive deal. And they already know about multifamily real estate, they already know all about the market, they already have their team in place, the realtors, the brokers, the lenders, okay, everybody's already in place legal accountants, I get to leverage all of that. And they have an investor base that they've already built up. So you know, if I want to access an $80 million asset, I don't have to go to the bank and get a loan for $20 million, I can actually put in $50,000, and access that asset, you know, you know, for far less than it would be to get to the bank, right?   Michael: Totally, totally.   Whitney: And I don't have to figure out, I don't have to bring the track record, in order to get the loan on that I don't have to, you know, pledge my assets to get that, um, my liability ends at the LLC level, right. So, you know, in an essence, my, I have way less risk on all 38 of my passive investments than I do on my small single family portfolio that I still hold. I'm far more exposed there, I'm way less exposed over here. And then the return, I have leveraged time, right? By the time I mean, I do have to put in time learning about passive investing and underwriting the operator, the market and the deal. But once I write the check, I mean, my responsibilities are generally done until the sell of the asset, and then even then, you know, I'm putting minimal time in just to re review account statements and such totally, and make my election if I want to do a 1031 exchange and go bigger, and they still get to access all of those different Wealth Generators, real estate, cash flow, you know, equity, you know, appreciation, equity, build all the different tax benefits, and I can, you know, and again, leverage can be on the use on the asset as well.   Now, we're in the lifecycle, should somebody consider this? And there's a couple of different questions, there's not really a clear cut, you know, suggestion on where I would say, somebody slides this into their investing thesis. But, you know, one, you know, if you only have $50,000, to your name, you know, I wouldn't you don't put the house on black, right, you don't pledge all your assets to one deal. Right. So, you know, you definitely want to, you know, skill up your ability to invest. That's why I really like, you know, for people that that are just starting out, and they want to build, you know, their asset and their investment base, their net worth, in a single family and small wonder for properties are an amazing way to do that. Okay, but once you have some assets behind you, now, you got to understand, like, what's your return on your time, that's where you might want to start pivoting into doing more syndication deals.   And, you know, kind of like what we did, and, you know, taking the cash flow, and whatever we were able to pull out from refinances and putting it into passive investing. Now, I still get cashflow off of this passive, passive investing deals, and I still get to take advantage of any refinances that occur on the property. So I get cash back to earn money in two places. And I just had five deals cycle out at the end of this year, and you know, I'm four of which are gonna go through a 1031 exchange, I still get to pull that massive lever in real estate.   Now, if somebody is like sitting on, you know, maybe a million dollars of investable cash right now, I would ask, the question is, do you how active Do you want to be in your investing portfolio? If they're like, I don't have the time to deal with this. I don't have the bandwidth to deal with the property manager. I think passive investing, you can skip buying single family homes go right to passively invest.   Michael: Totally, that makes so much sense. And that's so good that you pointed out, you know, you really do get leverage for all those points you mentioned, maybe less so in the sense of traditional leverage of I can't go borrow, I need to have the cash to invest in the deal. That 50,000 Whatever the minimum is, right?   Whitney: Yeah, the barrier to entry is a little bit higher. And that's by design. And you know, I have investors ask me this all the time. You know, why? Why 50,000 Like, can I just do 10 I'm like, well, if I'm raising $20 million, and I have all my investors put in $10,000 That's a lot of people to work.   Michael: Yeah, herding cats.   Whitney: Yeah, I on a good day, you know, even a $50,000 investment, that's still a lot of investors to work with, you're talking hundreds of investors to work with. And so that's why you see some of these operators eventually scale, they might start off, you know, you know, with a two or three or $4 million raise, and it might be $20,000, or $25,000. And then eventually, you see them scale up into, you know, larger minimum investments. I mean, Grant Cardon, I think I like talked to his group last year, and it was like, I think one deal was like seven or $50,000. And like, Oh, that's cool.   Michael: Put that on ice for a little bit later, maybe.   Whitney: I was like, they were like, we'll call you back in a week. And I'm like, awesome. Um, but, yeah, I mean, it's, it's, it also helps you, um, you know, we not weed out but, you know, understand if somebody's putting in their last dime. And that's a scary place, not only for the investor, BROSCO for the operator, you mean, the operator, really, you know, will there vetting the limited partner as well knew, you know, or what is their, you know, what are their investing goals? are we aligned? What is their ability to invest? Or, you know, maybe they even have, like, a rigid process of, like, you know, asking for accredited investor letters, where you're actually getting a third party to say, hey, I have net worth, or I have income to invest.   And that, you know, if you're working with, you know, smaller 506 B, B, as in boy, investor, you know, you know, we can take a sophisticated investor at that level, which, you know, there's really no visibility on the finances of that person. And so, you know, if you've set your minimum investment at, say, $50,000, the likelihood that somebody is taking all 50k in their savings account, investing, and investing is pretty minimal.   Michael: Okay, that makes total sense. Whitney, I want to shift gears here a little bit, and I'm very curious to get your thoughts on what it's like, and how you became so successful, being a female in the space, which seemingly is so dominated by males?   Whitney: That is, that is a very interesting question. I'm not sure that I've ever been asked that. Um, you know,   Michael: Yes first!   Whitney: I don't, firstly, you know, I think a couple of things that, you know, I, that stand out to me about it is, I really don't look at it as male versus female, you know, there, obviously, and I went to a conference, you know, probably three years ago now. And I was one of probably 15 women out of 600 people at the conference. I mean, it was the shortest bathroom line ever.   Michael: So good.   Whitney: And I, you know, but, um, that being aside, I met so many powerhouse women and that, that bathroom, like, literally, I have always been so supported by many of the males in the business as well. Now, that said, it's probably because I, that's what I seek out, right, you know, Seek and ye shall find I, you know, somebody is, you know, kind of, kind of a hardcore, you know, rough personality. That's mean, not me, I'm pretty laid back. I mean, you know, I'm not going to be attracted to that, and they're not going to be quite frankly, attracted to me, either. And so, I think, you know, it's what you look for is what you're you're going to find in the space as far as like, you know, how does, you know, being successful at it? I think it's just hard work and dedication. And, you know, if somebody tells me No, I don't mean really, I just say, Oh, that means not now. And then like a month later, I'm like, What about now? Yeah, they're like, no, oh, how about now?   Michael: So good.   Whitney: Persistence. So and those are really, you know, skills. You know, we have a nine year old and those are, you know, a daughter, and, you know, resilience and persistence are, you know, two things that we're really trying to instill in her and really not see quite a gender line there. needed that you can, you know, I think one of the things that we always tell her, you know, especially when she's feeling deprived of something, we're like, you know, you deserve the world. You just haven't earned it yet. And so it's, you figure out like, how you can earn your stripes.   Michael: Love it. That's so good. That's so good. One last gearshift here. Whitney, you created a business and website around real estate investing and you also wrote a book where can people find out about those and what should they expect to find once they get there?   Whitney: Yeah, I actually have a couple of different um, you know, places you know, for, you know, somebody who's just starting off, you know, more of a sophisticated investor and wants to build up those late single one to four units. You can find me an Ash Wealth. You can download my ebook there. Learning How to Build a Six Figure Business Without Losing Your Mind and Your Sanity.   Michael: So awesome very important things   Whitney: Yeah, it's very important but you know um you know we talked a lot about passive investing in you can also visit passiveinvestingwithwhitney.com. And there you can, you know, download just, you know, a quick little checklist that will help you get into, you know, check all those boxes to help you get into either your first or your next investment and make sure you got all your bases covered in. We can also hop on the phone there too.   Michael: Amazing. Amazing. Well, this was so much fun. Whitney, thank you so much for hanging out with me. I really appreciate you coming on.   Whitney: Yeah, absolutely. Thank you so much.   Michael: Thanks and enjoy your trip and you're headed down somewhere fun and doing some mountain biking.   Whitney: Oh, yeah. Yeah, some red rocks.   Michael: Awesome. Thanks again Whitney talk to you soon.   Whitney: Bye.   Michael: Okay, everyone, that was our episode a big big, big thank you to Whitney definitely want to have her back on do a deep dive into passive investments and talk about some other fun things going forward. So keep your eyes and ears peeled for that. As always, we look forward to seeing you on the next one. And Happy investing    

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast
E366 - How to 10x Your Deal Flow Through the Fund of Funds Model

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 31:17


As the real estate market evolves, more and more operators and investors are looking for new strategies to diversify their portfolios.  One of the best ways I've found to leverage the track record, relationships, geographic location, and deal flow of someone else's firm is through the concept of the “fund of funds” model - sometimes referred to as the “SPV” (Special Purpose Vehicle) model.  We are joined by Ariel Diaz, fellow RaiseMaster and founder of Trajan Real Estate. Ariel is here to discuss a recent paradigm shift he had on this topic, which allowed him to significantly increase his deal flow by utilizing this structure.    Today, we are going to discuss…  Why our guest felt like he was “stuck” in a low cap rate market, and how the fund of funds model helped solve that problem  How he was able to leverage his fund of fund's investment amount to get favorable terms for his entity  How to overcome challenges around your investors potentially circumventing you as a fund of funds manager   How the fund of funds structure allows you to get your foot in the door with just about any operator (regardless of how experienced they are)  This episode is extremely relevant for both savvy passive investors, as well as well-established operators. The power of this vehicle is only just beginning to be understood in the market today.  You'll see why during this interview!    Take Control,  Hunter Thompson Resources mentioned in this podcast: 1. His website Interested in investing in ATMs? Check out our webinar.   Please note that investing in private placement securities entails a high degree of risk, including illiquidity of the investment and loss of principal. Please refer to the subscription agreement for a discussion of risk factors. Tired of scrambling for capital?  Check out our new FREE webinar -  How to Ensure You Never Scramble for Capital Again (The 3 Capital-Raising Secrets). Click Here to register. CFC Podcast Facebook Group

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast
E365 - MM - Why You SHOULD Get A Lambo

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 9:00


In this Monday Minutes, I give my perspective on the question that you might have asked yourself if you're experiencing a certain level of success…    “Should you flex and get a Lamborghini, or do your best to limit your expenses and liabilities?” My answer may surprise you, but I mean it with all my heart.  Click below to hear my perspective… Interested in investing in ATMs? Check out our webinar.   Please note that investing in private placement securities entails a high degree of risk, including illiquidity of the investment and loss of principal. Please refer to the subscription agreement for a discussion of risk factors. Tired of scrambling for capital?  Check out our new FREE webinar -  How to Ensure You Never Scramble for Capital Again (The 3 Capital-Raising Secrets). Click Here to register. CFC Podcast Facebook Group

The Opperman Report
The Defiant Life of the Woman Who Wrote Scum (and Shot Andy Warhol)

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 60:05


The authoritative biography of the 60s countercultural icon who wrote SCUM Manifesto, shot Andy Warhol, and made an unforgettable mark on feminist history. Valerie Solanas is one of the most polarizing figures of 1960s counterculture. A cult hero to some and vehemently denounced by others, she has been dismissed but never forgotten. Known for shooting Andy Warhol in 1968 and for writing the infamous SCUM Manifesto, Solanas became one of the most famous women of her era. But she was also diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia and spent much of her life homeless or in mental hospitals. Solanas's SCUM Manifesto, a sui generis vision of radical gender dystopia, predicted ATMs, test-tube babies, the Internet, and artificial insemination long before they existed. It has sold more copies and been translated into more languages than nearly all other feminist texts of its time. And yet, shockingly little work has investigated the life of its author. This book is the first biography about Solanas, including original interviews with family, friends (and enemies), and numerous living Warhol associates. It reveals surprising details about Solanas's life: the children nearly no one knew she had, her drive for control over her own writing, and her elusive personal and professional relationships. Valerie Solanas reveals the tragic, remarkable life of an iconic figure. It is “not only a remarkable biographical feat but also a delicate navigation of an unwieldy, demanding, and complex life story” (BOMB Magazine).

The Opperman Report'
The Defiant Life of the Woman Who Wrote Scum (and Shot Andy Warhol)

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 60:05


The authoritative biography of the 60s countercultural icon who wrote SCUM Manifesto, shot Andy Warhol, and made an unforgettable mark on feminist history. Valerie Solanas is one of the most polarizing figures of 1960s counterculture. A cult hero to some and vehemently denounced by others, she has been dismissed but never forgotten. Known for shooting Andy Warhol in 1968 and for writing the infamous SCUM Manifesto, Solanas became one of the most famous women of her era. But she was also diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia and spent much of her life homeless or in mental hospitals. Solanas's SCUM Manifesto, a sui generis vision of radical gender dystopia, predicted ATMs, test-tube babies, the Internet, and artificial insemination long before they existed. It has sold more copies and been translated into more languages than nearly all other feminist texts of its time. And yet, shockingly little work has investigated the life of its author. This book is the first biography about Solanas, including original interviews with family, friends (and enemies), and numerous living Warhol associates. It reveals surprising details about Solanas's life: the children nearly no one knew she had, her drive for control over her own writing, and her elusive personal and professional relationships. Valerie Solanas reveals the tragic, remarkable life of an iconic figure. It is “not only a remarkable biographical feat but also a delicate navigation of an unwieldy, demanding, and complex life story” (BOMB Magazine).

Leaders in Customer Loyalty, Powered by Loyalty360
Bank of America Aims for Luxury with Preferred Rewards Program

Leaders in Customer Loyalty, Powered by Loyalty360

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 26:21


John Sellers is Head of Rewards at Bank of America, the second largest banking institution in the United States, and the eight-largest in the world, with over 4,600 retail financial centers & approximately 16,200 ATMS in existence. Loyalty360 CEO Mark Johnson talked with Sellers about Bank of America's Loyalty Expo experience, pushing their digital boundaries, and future engagement plans.

Marijuana Tomorrow
Episode 86 - The Maltese Legalization

Marijuana Tomorrow

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 74:19


This week we celebrate the Tin anniversary of the Global Commission on Drugs with a look at their new report “Time to End Prohibition” and then we'll look at an angry letter Visa sent to their merchant customers warning them against using so-called “cashless ATMs” as a workaround to process cannabis transactions that would otherwise be banned. And finally, we'll have Victor Pinho of the legendary Emerald Farm Tours here to talk about his weekend at the Emerald Cup and what's on the horizon for his pioneering cannabis tour business. We'll be discussing all these stories and more on the BEST cannabis podcast in the business... As we like to say around here, “Everyone knows what happened in marijuana today, but you need to know what's happening in Marijuana Tomorrow!”  ----more---- Segment 1 - Global Commission on Drugs Tinth Anniversary https://www.globalcommissionondrugs.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/Time_to_end_prohibition_EN_2021_report.pdf   https://www.marijuanamoment.net/malta-set-to-become-first-country-in-europe-to-legalize-marijuana-this-week/   https://twitter.com/SteveTransform/status/1469327125064863746 ----more---- Segment 2 - Visa, is it everywhere you want to be? https://www.marijuanamoment.net/visa-warns-against-misuse-of-cashless-atms-used-by-cannabis-retailers-to-skirt-restrictions/ ----more---- Segment 3 - Emerald Cup wrap up with Victor Pinho and the Emerald Farm Tours Buy Tickets to Wednesday 12/15 NCIA After Party hosted by Emerald Farm Tours here:  https://eventhi.io/event/beat-kitty--lady-ryan--monarch-sf--j-5406 ----more---- Big Finish links - Colorado Recall Announcement: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1zSTetiy8L-InR4K7r_2CITS5kqyNhyBR/view   My first Marijuana Moment Byline: https://www.marijuanamoment.net/allowing-legal-marijuana-dispensaries-boosts-employment-rates-in-colorado-counties-study-finds/   This episode of Marijuana Tomorrow is brought to you by Cannabeta Realty and the Emerald Farm Tours.

Helping You Tech
Watch out for booby-trapped ATMs when out shopping

Helping You Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 30:22


Look for the padlock in the URL bar when shopping online Cybersecurity tips to stay safe online this Christmas

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast
E364 - What He Learned After 1,200 Calls With Investors

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 38:31


“Oh…I'm actually not interested…” “I don't have any money to invest…” “I'm actually here to pitch YOU on a deal!”  Heard these things before?  If you're tired of having calls with unqualified and interested investors, this podcast will help you identify the mistakes you're making early on that are likely costing you when it's time to close the deal.     Today, we are joined by Bronson Hill, who is the Managing Partner at Bronson Equity, where he controls over $120MM of commercial real estate. He has raised over $20MM from investors, most of which he raised by relationships that he started by completing over 1,200 one-on-one investor phone calls.  He's here today to discuss some of the golden nuggets he learned during those calls.  In this episode today, we are going to discuss…  What specific questions should you be asking investors before diving into the details of the opportunity?  What exact phases has Brunson used to develop a deep relationship with potential investors, without requiring more than a 20-minute phone call?   Brunson also reveals two simple strategies that he implemented that raised his average investment amount from $75,000 to $122,000 (a 62% increase!)  This is a must-listen for capital raisers, operators, and real estate entrepreneurs. Take Control,  Hunter Thompson Resources mentioned in this podcast: 1. Bronson Equity 2. His Email 3. For Investors By Investors (FIBI) Pasadena  4. Hunter's book “Raising Capital for Real Estate” Interested in investing in ATMs? Check out our webinar.   Please note that investing in private placement securities entails a high degree of risk, including illiquidity of the investment and loss of principal. Please refer to the subscription agreement for a discussion of risk factors. Tired of scrambling for capital?  Check out our new FREE webinar -  How to Ensure You Never Scramble for Capital Again (The 3 Capital-Raising Secrets). Click Here to register. CFC Podcast Facebook Group

TRICHOMES Morning Buzz
New York Lawmaker Submits Proposal For State Cannabis Company Tax Deductions, Despite U.S. Federal Policies

TRICHOMES Morning Buzz

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 4:43


Today in cannabis news: Data reveals a record high for statewide monthly cannabis retail in Arizona; a New York lawmaker submits a proposal to permit state-authorized cannabis firms to deduct specific production costs from their state tax returns; and the payment processing corporation Visa alerts clients and cannabis companies on the use of cashless ATMs for regulatory workarounds. It's Tuesday, December 14 and TRICHOMES.com is bringing you the top cannabis news from around the web. You can also listen on YouTube, Apple Podcasts, or Spotify–search TRICHOMES and subscribe.

Travel Mug Podcast
Using ATMs Abroad & Avoiding Fees - Travel Tip Tuesday

Travel Mug Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 4:16


This week for Travel Tip Tuesday Meggan shares her tip for using ATMs abroad and tips for saving money on foreign transaction fees.GRAB OUR MASTER PACKING LIST HERE*****************************************We are travel enthusiasts who do not claim to be professionals! Instead we are two Halifax, NS natives with travel blogs who somehow found one another on the internet and now, we have a podcast!!Join us every two weeks as we talk about our favourite destinations, travel tips, travel fails and all things travel!We have a big passion for travelling and talking about travel so we hope you will listen and join the conversation.You can find us here:FacebookInstagramJenn's Travel Blog Jenn's YouTube channelMeggan's Travel BlogMeggan and husband Peter's YouTubeDisclaimer - all episodes are our opinions/experiences, always do your research and make travel plans based on your budget and comfort levels.

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast
E363 - One Trick for Finding Good Sponsors to Invest With

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 5:39


In this Monday Minutes, I discuss ONE simple trick that will allow you to identify sponsors that are likely in a perfect place in their growth trajectory, and who are eager to raise capital from accredited investors.  And the best part…  You can do this in 5-15 minutes from the comfort of your home!  Click below to learn more Resources mentioned in this podcast: 1. Intelligent Investors Real Estate Conference Interested in investing in ATMs? Check out our webinar.   Please note that investing in private placement securities entails a high degree of risk, including illiquidity of the investment and loss of principal. Please refer to the subscription agreement for a discussion of risk factors. Tired of scrambling for capital?  Check out our new FREE webinar -  How to Ensure You Never Scramble for Capital Again (The 3 Capital-Raising Secrets). Click Here to register. CFC Podcast Facebook Group

Cannabis Legalization News
Visa Warns Against Misuse Of ‘Cashless ATMs' Used By Cannabis Retailers To Skirt Restrictions

Cannabis Legalization News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 51:54


#cashlessATM #CannabisNewsVisa Warns Against Misuse Of ‘Cashless ATMs' Used By Cannabis Retailers To Skirt Restrictions

The Hacker Factory
LEO Turned Pentester | A Conversation With John Marrin | The Hacker Factory With Phillip Wylie

The Hacker Factory

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 36:20


LEO is not John Marrin's astrological sign, John was a former LA law enforcement officer. John shares his story of how he became a pentester.John shares his story of how he became a pentester. John spent long hours and dedicated over two years to learn the skill of pentesting. He went from zero experience to working as a consultant performing pentests including ATMs._______________________GuestJohn MarrinOn Linkedin | https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnmarrin/On Twitter | https://twitter.com/jtmarrin______________________HostPhillip WylieOn ITSPmagazine  

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast
E362 - What Are Centimillionaires Investing In?

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 36:53


Don't you wish you could be a fly on the wall as a centimillionaire (someone with $100MM+ net worth) creates their investment directive for 2022?  If so, you're in luck…  Today, we are joined by Richard Wilson, the founder of FamilyOffices.com, a private investor club that caters to investors with a significant net worth. For context, Richard recently closed a deal in which the investor agreed to invest $300MM of equity.  If you're interested in getting a deep look into how the 9-figure crew is planning on participating in the investment space in the upcoming year, this is an excellent episode for you.  In this episode, we discuss…  What is the deal with the tokenization of real estate and how will this impact the world of commercial real estate?  We also discuss Richard's strategy for networking and discuss some of the ways he has been able to rub shoulders with CEO's of publicly traded companies, billionaires, and well-known investors Should you “stay in your lane”, or, can you dominate multiple sectors?  In the interview, Richard also discusses his upcoming event The Family Office Super Summit, which is taking place in Ft. Lauderdale on Monday, December 13th. Several centimillionaires and at least one billionaire will be speaking at the event, so I'm sure the networking opportunities will be quite unique.  I'm going to be there, and I'd be quite excited to meet any of you at the summit.  Interested in attending Richard's upcoming event?  Click here to learn more about The Family Office Super Summit.  Please note the above is an affiliate link and we'll get a kickback if you grab a ticket.  Hope to see you there.  Take Control,  Hunter Thompson Interested in investing in ATMs? Check out our webinar.   Please note that investing in private placement securities entails a high degree of risk, including illiquidity of the investment and loss of principal. Please refer to the subscription agreement for a discussion of risk factors. Tired of scrambling for capital?  Check out our new FREE webinar -  How to Ensure You Never Scramble for Capital Again (The 3 Capital-Raising Secrets). Click Here to register. CFC Podcast Facebook Group

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast
E361 - MM - 7 Stages of Due Diligence for Passive Investors

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 17:08


In this Monday Minutes, I reveal my seven-stage process for conducting due diligence from the passive approach to investing. This is NOT your typical "high-level" review. This is the process that I've used to invest in over 35 syndications over the last decade. Even if you ask 2-3 questions about each topic, you'll be ahead of many of the passive investors out there. This MM episode is a summary from my keynote at IIREC a few years ago. If you listen carefully, I'll share with you how to get access to that presentation (along with the slides). Click below to listen now! Resources mentioned in the podcast: 1. Hunter's keynote presentation on Due Diligence from The Intelligent Investors' Real Estate Conference Interested in investing in ATMs? Check out our webinar.   Please note that investing in private placement securities entails a high degree of risk, including illiquidity of the investment and loss of principal. Please refer to the subscription agreement for a discussion of risk factors. Tired of scrambling for capital?  Check out our new FREE webinar -  How to Ensure You Never Scramble for Capital Again (The 3 Capital-Raising Secrets). Click Here to register. CFC Podcast Facebook Group

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast
E360 - Doug Casey on The Greater Depression

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 39:31


The world's most interesting man is back!   That's right… Doug Casey has returned to discuss his bleak view of the future, and where the opportunity might be created out of those bleak times.  For those of you that don't know, Doug Casey is well-known author, speaker, investor, and speculator. He has been featured across 100+ mainstream and alternative media sources, and is the author of several books, including his fictional book, Assassin.  In this episode, we're going to discuss…  Why the US is a uniquely favorable place for investors and entrepreneurs, but why the path we are on might lead us to ruin.  Why the whole idea of secession seems to be so obvious to a few people, and wildly outlandish to so many  What will the next correction look like, and where will the opportunities stem from it?  Whether you are a speculator, investor, or just a heretic in general, there is never a dull moment when Doug Casey is a guest on the Cash Flow Connections Real Estate Podcast.  Take Control,  Hunter Thompson Resources mentioned in this podcast: 1. E25 – Doug Casey: International Investing Strategies Of The Most Interesting Man In The World 2. E227 – Crisis & Lockdown Investing with Doug Casey 3. His books 4. His blog “Doug Casey's International Man” 5. The New York Times' “Is It Better to Rent or Buy?” Calculator Interested in investing in ATMs? Check out our webinar. Please note that investing in private placement securities entails a high degree of risk, including illiquidity of the investment and loss of principal. Please refer to the subscription agreement for a discussion of risk factors. Tired of scrambling for capital? Check out our new FREE webinar -  How to Ensure You Never Scramble for Capital Again (The 3 Capital-Raising Secrets). Click Here to register. CFC Podcast Facebook Group

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast
E359 - MM - One Risk Passive Investors Never Think About

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 6:45


In this Monday Minutes, I outline one of the MOST important risks that passive investors never think about when comparing active investments to passive investments.  From my perspective, this is one of the most compelling reasons to be a passive investor.  ❌ It's not diversification…  ❌ It's not the lack of time required to be a passive investor…  ❌ It's not the ability to participate in all stages of the cycle….   Tune in to hear more!  Interested in investing in ATMs? Check out our webinar.   Please note that investing in private placement securities entails a high degree of risk, including illiquidity of the investment and loss of principal. Please refer to the subscription agreement for a discussion of risk factors. Tired of scrambling for capital?  Check out our new FREE webinar -  How to Ensure You Never Scramble for Capital Again (The 3 Capital-Raising Secrets). Click Here to register. CFC Podcast Facebook Group

Go Full Crypto
86: Our 2 Week Experience in El Salvador

Go Full Crypto

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 36:39


When we interviewed Mike Peterson in Ep 16 of our podcast, it was then that we decided we were going to come visit El Zonte. A little over a year after recording that episode, we made it to El Salvador. Our experience here has been nothing short of amazing. In this episode, we recount a couple stories of witnessing how adopting bitcoin has been for the people of El Salvador.   Keegan's letter on Bitcoin City Keegan's private letter titled "My Week in El Salvador"   Timestamps: (00:00) - Introduction (01:34) - El Salvador - First Impression (05:52) - Experience spending Bitcoin in El Salvador (10:02) - The Chivo Wallet, and some difficulties faced as a result of it (15:38) - More Bitcoin experiences (27:09) - Could restaurants double up as ATMs? (30:01) - Assorted stories (35:00) - Wrapping up, and closing thoughts   Edited and Mixed by Kaushik Sethunath.   Go Full Crypto Social Links Website: https://GoFullCrypto.com Keegan Francis' Newsletter - http://keeganfrancis.substack.com/   Keegan Twitter - https://twitter.com/CryptoKeegan Mrugakshee Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/mrugakshee/  

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast
E358 - Unleashed: How Crowdfunding Changed CRE Forever

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 37:03


As surprising as it might seem…  The world of real estate crowdfunding wasn't truly invented until 2012/2013.  Sure… “Pooled investments” (syndications) have been around in the US for quite some time, but the ability to combine the online space with the ability to raise capital wasn't fully “unleashed” until the JOBS Act was ratified.   This Act certainly had a significant impact on the world of commercial real estate, but what are the implications of these changes, and how can we benefit from them?  What does this impact look like as this sector matures, and more and more people start participating in this incredible investment vehicle?  Will the recent popularization of 506(c), Reg A+ and Reg CF create a new stage in the story of crowdfunding real estate?  Today, we are joined by Adam Gower who is the author of Real Estate Crowdfunding: Unleashed. After conducting an incredible amount of research on the matter, Adam is here to provide some important updates that I am sure many listeners will be eager to lean, and incorporate into their thinking.  In this episode, we are going to discuss…  How are institutions reacting to the influx of accredited investors, and how is this reality shifting the investment space as a whole?  In which geographic locations are accredited investors most eager to invest, and does the data suggest that they should be investing there?  Are investors getting more accustomed to 506(c) offerings, or will 506(b)s continue to dominate the market?  From my perspective, those who are well-positioned in this space stand to create massive profits over the next few years, as the sector explodes with interest.  I intend on being one of those benefactors. Do you?  If so, tune in to hear what the data suggests about the future of crowdfunding.  Resources mentioned in this podcast: 1. His website 2. Subscribe to the Gower Crowd newsletter 3. His latest book “Real Estate Crowdfunding: An Insider's Guide to Investing Online" 4. Previous appearance - E171 – Adam Gower and the State of Crowdfunding Real Estate Previous episodes with Oren Klaff: 5. E48 – How To Get Investors' Attention, Keep It, and Pitch Anything with Oren Klaff 6. E155 – Learn to Flip the Script On Your Investors With Oren Klaff Interested in investing in ATMs? Check out our webinar.   Please note that investing in private placement securities entails a high degree of risk, including illiquidity of the investment and loss of principal. Please refer to the subscription agreement for a discussion of risk factors. Tired of scrambling for capital?  Check out our new FREE webinar -  How to Ensure You Never Scramble for Capital Again (The 3 Capital-Raising Secrets). Click Here to register. CFC Podcast Facebook Group

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast
E357 - MM - Two Lessons from the CEO of Realty Mogul

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 8:45


In this Monday Minutes, I discuss two lessons I learned from the CEO of Realty Mogul, one of the largest real estate crowdfunding portals in the world.  The first lesson is about YOU…Your journey. Your ability to expedite your growth curve, and refusing to settle for “just ok.”  The second lesson is all about your TEAM.  How can you attract top-tier talent?  How can you retain them?  I'll discuss two occasions where I learned a lot from someone who has done an incredible job of both at the highest of levels.  Tune in to hear more! Resources mentioned in this episode: 1. IIREC 2021 Interested in investing in ATMs? Check out our webinar.   Please note that investing in private placement securities entails a high degree of risk, including illiquidity of the investment and loss of principal. Please refer to the subscription agreement for a discussion of risk factors. Tired of scrambling for capital?  Check out our new FREE webinar -  How to Ensure You Never Scramble for Capital Again (The 3 Capital-Raising Secrets). Click Here to register.   CFC Podcast Facebook Group  

Off the Chain
#728 Increasing Bitcoin Adoption w/ Chris McAlary

Off the Chain

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 22:43


Chris McAlary was an early bitcoin miner and today serves as the founder and CEO of CoinCloud, the world's largest network of two-way digital currency kiosks. In this conversation, we discuss bitcoin, mining, ATMs, increasing adoption, and how Chris has built such a large company.  =======================

Founders Unfiltered
Ep44: Reimagining banking for millennials ft. Jupiter

Founders Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 33:10


When Pandemic struck in 2020, the banking industry was ready for disruption- the act of physical visits to bank or ATMs had to be done away with - which gave a golden opportunity to a new form of Banking to emerge- known as Neo Banking. Jitendra Gupta- our guest for today -is the one of the most known faces in the Fintech space – he is also the co-founder of Jupiter- a mobile first neo banking platform targeted at millennials. In todays podcast we discuss the Jitendra's journey so far- and get insights on how he managed to bring Jupiter from Ideation to reality. For more visit - https://ajuniorvc.com/podcast/

Power of Prepaid Podcast
Visa Brings Cash Deposits to Fintechs

Power of Prepaid Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 15:11


One challenge of banking with a digital-only bank is making cash deposits. With no branches, it can be tough on a consumer who wants to make cash available for digital spending. Visa has been doing this for years for prepaid card holders by allowing them to make cash deposits at retailers and ATMs through its ReadyLink Network. Now, the company has expanded that access to debit programs, providing an opportunity for neobanks, other fintechs, and even traditional financial institutions potentially to offer deposit capabilities at a broad range of locations. In this episode, Lauren Fulmer, the director of U.S. Prepaid Product at Visa, talks about how the network works and what the future might hold now that it has expanded beyond prepaid cards.

The Gentlemen of Crypto
@Gemini Exchange Going Public? | Bitcoin City ATMs

The Gentlemen of Crypto

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 54:19


The Gentlemen of Crypto EP - 840 ********************************** Connect with us online at the following places: KRBE Digital Assets Group • Website: https://thegentlemenofcrypto.com • TGoC YouTube: https://bit.ly/3dauQCo • Masterclass: https://krbe-digital-assets-masterclass.teachable.com/courses SOCIAL • KRBE Twitter: https://twitter.com/krbecrypto • KRBE Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/krbedigitalassets/ • KRBE Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thegentlemenofcrypto/ • King Twitter: https://twitter.com/KingBlessDotCom • Bitcoin Zay Twitter: https://twitter.com/bitcoinzay COOL CRYPTO GEAR • Amenhotep Designs: https://www.adesignuk.com/ • No Keys No Cheese Gear: https://www.bitcoinmovement.com   Business Inquiries: krbe@krbecrypto.com Support "The Gentlemen of Crypto" by using our referral link to download the Brave Browser. https://brave.com/krb666 Donations welcome, but not necessary! ********************************** **This is not financial advice. The expressed opinions in the video are of the speakers. You can lose all your money in the cryptocurrency market, so be sure to do your own research before investing.** The Gentleman of Crypto is a daily live broadcast that explores Bitcoin and cryptocurrency market. We discuss international topics, news updates, and future innovations in blockchain, digital currencies and assets, fintech, and more.

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast
E356 - How Can You Tell If A Sponsor Is Misleading You

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 28:42


Like many of you, I'm extremely bullish on the world of private real estate deals.  As people continue to have success investing in the space, it will continue to grow and grow. If this continues, it might be highly favorable for us as early investors. (Yes, we are still VERY early!) If this happens as I think it might, it'll likely mean more buyers and sellers in the space (more liquidity), lower exit cap rates, and generally, a more precise marketplace. Of course, it might get a little competitive as well!  However, one thing that can slow that growth is for passive investors to have poor investment experiences. Sure… Some deals simply have challenges. That's the nature of investing in real property which is occupied by real tenants.  But some of the challenges in the space are related to the operators themselves.  So, how can we limit the likelihood of investing in deals with poor operators?  Today, we are joined by Byran Ellis, who is an experienced real estate operator and who has raised tens of millions of dollars of private equity from investors. Over his decades in the industry, he has developed systems and processes to conduct accurate and efficient due diligence for passive investors.  In this episode, we are going to discuss…  Several tips and tricks for how passive investors can “trust but verify” without breaking the bank A wild horror story that could have easily been avoided!  How real estate sponsors can create a principle-based business, so that you are never concerned that you are going to be “found out” by your investors  If you are a passive investor who's looking to increase your level of sophistication, this is an excellent opportunity to learn from one of the best!  Take Control, Hunter Thompson Resources mentioned in this podcast: 1. SelfDirected.org 2. His Podcast “Self Directed Investor Talk: Alternative Asset Investing through Self-Directed IRA's & Solo 401k's" 3. His new magazine “Accredited IQ 4. For a free year's subscription to Accredited IQ text “COMP” to 678-888-4000 Interested in investing in ATMs? Check out our webinar.   Please note that investing in private placement securities entails a high degree of risk, including illiquidity of the investment and loss of principal. Please refer to the subscription agreement for a discussion of risk factors. Tired of scrambling for capital?  Check out our new FREE webinar -  How to Ensure You Never Scramble for Capital Again (The 3 Capital-Raising Secrets). Click Here to register.   CFC Podcast Facebook Group

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast
E355 - We Hit 1,000,000 Downloads! Here's What I Learned

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 10:43


Yes, its' true…  The Cash Flow Connections Real Estate Podcast hit 1,000,000 downloads! Thank you to all the listeners who supported us on this mission.  In this Monday Minutes, I discuss the 5 lessons learned as we went through this process, as well as a brief mention of some of my favorite guests on the show.  Don't forget to leave a review so I can ensure the show continues to grow.  Thank you again! Resources mentioned in this podcast: Previous episodes with Doug Casey: 1. E25 – Doug Casey: International Investing Strategies Of The Most Interesting Man In The World 2. E227 – Crisis & Lockdown Investing with Doug Casey 3. Previous episode with Steven Patterson - E199 – What Do We REALLY Know? – Objective Truth, Mathematics, and Science Previous episodes with Richard Duncan: 4. E69 - Macroeconomic Outlook From A Former IMF Consultant 5. E121 – The End of Quantitative Tightening and the Future of Monetary Policy 6. E191 – Did the Fed Just Save Us From A Depression? 7. E290 – [Richard Duncan is Back!] What Will the Tsunami of Liquidity Mean for Investors and the Economy? Previous episode with Grant Cardone: 8. E50 – How Grant Cardone Plays Real-Life Monopoly, Controls Time, and Dominates the Competition Interested in investing in ATMs? Check out our webinar.   Please note that investing in private placement securities entails a high degree of risk, including illiquidity of the investment and loss of principal. Please refer to the subscription agreement for a discussion of risk factors. Tired of scrambling for capital?  Check out our new FREE webinar -  How to Ensure You Never Scramble for Capital Again (The 3 Capital-Raising Secrets). Click Here to register.   CFC Podcast Facebook Group Artwork

Why Your Bank Sucks
Bank of America Is About To Desert The Navajo Nation + I Answer Some Reader Questions About My Book

Why Your Bank Sucks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 105:16


Very frustrating topic to discuss today. As I predicted last year in the height of the COVID-19 Pandemic, Bank of America was going to leave Gallup, NM. The city, entrenched within the Navajo Nation where hundreds of thousands of amazing folks live is losing the only BofA branch in their area. After the branch closes in February 2022, the nearest BofAs will be in Farmington, NM (100 miles), Flagstaff, AZ (185 miles), and Albuquerque, NM (138 miles). Although BofA claims in a handout given to customers at the branch (they don't even have the decency to mail the clients) that ATMs will be left at the branch, I can attest that at my former branch, they were gone in a matter of months. Thanks to @yazzie8chris on Twitter for the image of the flyer My first segment is dedicated to calling out BofA on this. Gallup has one of the busiest branches of BofA by volume, but BofA doesn't like that they are mostly service transactions for fixed income folks. In some parts of the Navajo Reservation, the median income is less than $20,000, and 18,000 homes still don't have electricity (!!!) and/or running water. I discuss how the lie that BofA usually says that migration to digital platforms for the clients doesn't make sense here, as so many Navajos live in areas with no cell service or high speed internet. A lot of the times, their only banking is the monthly visit to the branch. I break down everything about a story no one is talking about but me. Youtube Video here. Second segment, I discuss questions you had about my book, "Please Try Your Call Again Later". A lot of you asked why I was so nice to the people in charge of NM and NMDWS in the book. I give my explanation in a very James way. Plus I talk about how some of you believed that this book was the method I am using to force the state to pay me (lol). TNB Has recovered nearly $2 Million from big banks back to consumers, and about $500k of it was Zelle fraud! Buy My Book "PLEASE TRY YOUR CALL AGAIN LATER"!!! $1 of Net Proceeds will go to charity. TheNotoriousBanker.com (Links to YouTube, my book's page, podcast links, and how to contribute by Venmo/Cashapp and much more!!!) MY PATREON Page! For as little as $1, you can help James in his fight against big banks. http://patreon.com/NotoriousBanker --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thenotoriousbanker/support

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast
E354 - How Did We Get Here: The History of Taxation

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 40:39


In recent days, people in power have discussed proposals as ludicrous as taxing unrealized gains, banning the investments in private placements with tax-advantaged accounts, and implementing a federal 43.4% capital gains tax.  From my perspective, it always feels like these seemingly outlandish proposals are meant to get a pulse on how close the citizenry is to tolerating the new level of taxation and set the stage for what might be soon to come. Given the way this conversation is going in the media, I've found myself asking a question that I'm sure many of you have been asking as well…  How on earth did we get here, and why is this happening?  Today, we are joined by Domic Fisby, the author of several books, including Daylight Robbery: How Tax Shaped Our Past and Will Change Our Future. The book reveals many truths about taxation, as well as the implications of the actions central banks have taken in recent years.  In this episode, we are going to discuss…  What the history of central banks and taxation tells us about war, and why it's impossible to stop (despite being so unpopular)  Why the pronounced boom/bust cycles that we are taught are a result of “natural” capitalism, might in fact be directly related to central banks who control both the money supply, as well as the interest rates applies to that money  How the digital world has impacted taxation and created an opportunity for corporations to implement tax structures that the middle class can't  Like all significant historical events, both the Great Recession and Covid-19 have created wild and uncertain times.  These uncertain times create an opportunity for regulations, money printing, and taxation to be installed that will likely impact our world and economy for years to come.  Tune in to see how we got here and what it might mean for our future.  Resources mentioned in the podcast: 1. His Book “Daylight Robbery: How Tax Shaped Our Past and Will Change Our Future” Dominic Frisby's socials: 1. Website 2. Twitter Interested in investing in ATMs? Check out our webinar.   Please note that investing in private placement securities entails a high degree of risk, including illiquidity of the investment and loss of principal. Please refer to the subscription agreement for a discussion of risk factors. Tired of scrambling for capital?  Check out our new FREE webinar -  How to Ensure You Never Scramble for Capital Again (The 3 Capital-Raising Secrets). Click Here to register.   CFC Podcast Facebook Group

SuperFeast Podcast
#141 Herbalism; The Peoples Medicine with Erin Lovell Verinder

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 63:55


Today on the podcast, we are graced with the highly cultivated holistic healer; Erin Lovell Verinder for an intimate discussion around her devotion to the plant path, the world of herbalism, and why we are witnessing a timely resurgence of this revered profession of healing. A Herbalist, nutritionist, energetic healer, mentor, and author of two incredible bodies of work, Erin's the kind of woman that leaves you wondering; How does she do it all? Birthed consecutively amidst a pandemic, Erin's books, Plants For The People (Thames & Hudson 2020) and The Plant Clinic (Thames & Hudson 2021), are modern classic guides to the world of plant medicine and herbalism, endowed with elegant visual codes of your favourite coffee table book. This is the second time we've had Erin on the podcast, and we're so thrilled to have her back. Both versed in the love language of plant medicine, this conversation between Tahnee and Erin is a celebration of herbalism, filled with nuance and some progressive insights on not gendering herbs through their application. Erin discusses what she calls her pillars to thrive, supporting the immune system during the pandemic, and the profound effect of having a gentle approach to healing and detoxing. A remembering, a becoming, and unfolding of the world of holistic herbal healing; This episode is one for everyone. Tune in.      "You have to be a savvy business owner as well. I've had different iterations of having a healing space, my own multi-modality wellness space, which sold and successfully ran for many years. Then being a head-practitioner at a busy, busy clinic in Sydney, and then being digital and writing books. I've had all these different iterations, and it's given me a lot of perspectives. But there's a lot of things I wished that I knew when I came out, and if I can help people in that way, I'm really excited to do that because it's a big job".     - Erin Lovell Verinder      Tahnee and Erin discuss: Immunity protocols. Drop dosing for kids. Herbal remedies for kids. The gendering of herbs. Detox and cleansing culture. Viewing fear as a mental virus. Herbs as the people's medicine. The matriarchal lineage of herbalism. The process of healing and becoming. Knowing yours, and your child's constitution type. Healing the gut; An energetic core of our constitution.     Who is Erin Lovell Verinder? Erin is a fully qualified Herbalist, Nutritionist, and Energetic Healer who has worked in the healing realms for twenty-one years. Erin holds a Bachelor of Western Herbal Medicine, an Advanced Diploma of Nutritional Medicine, and a Diploma of Energetic Healing and is a member of the (ATMS) Australian Traditional Medicine Society. Walking the plant path, Erin is a woman in tune with the natural world. On a full-hearted mission to educate, assist, and up-level how we can all heal with the rhythms of nature. Marrying the wisdom and philosophy of naturopathic medicine as the golden compass to treat the whole- not just the symptom is the pure guiding force in Erin's practice. Getting to the roots of ill health is the solid intention and directive of her work. Through her practice, Erin addresses the drivers and encourages the body to gently return to balance, using food as medicine, medicinal plants, lifestyle changes, functional testing, and energetic healing; Delivering a wholesome, high vibrational experience. Erin has written two phenomenal books: Plants For The People (Thames & Hudson 2020. The Plant Clinic (Thames & Hudson 2021).   CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: Erin's Instagram  erinlovellverinder.com The Plant Clinic Book Plants For The People Book Plants For The People SuperFeast podcast   Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher, CastBox, iHeart RADIO:)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Tahnee: (00:00) Hi, everyone. Welcome back to the SuperFeast podcast. We have one of my favourite guests. You're Mr. Guest of the show now, Erin. Erin Lovell Verinder, who is a beautiful Herbalist, she's also an author, and we're here really today to talk about her new book, The Plant Clinic, which has already gotten pre-discussed in my house. It's, again, a stunning book, but also a really practical manual. Even for someone who's like trained in herbalism, I'm using it all the time because it captures all these protocols and concepts and ideas in this really beautiful and succinct way. I want to congratulate you on your new baby. Well done.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (00:39) Thank you so much. That's so sweet.   Tahnee: (00:42) Yeah, and welcome back to the show. It's great to have you.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (00:44) Thank you for having me.   Tahnee: (00:45) Yeah, I'm so happy to have you here. Your first podcast was one of the most popular, so it's really great to have you.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (00:51) Oh, that's so sweet.   Tahnee: (00:52) Yeah, I know. We're like aww. I think people just love... and that's something we've always been really passionate about is like, yeah, it's great to buy products and we love that you can buy SuperFeast from the shelf or whatever. But when you start to make your own herbal medicines, I think there's something, I don't know, that connects you to herbalism in a different way and connects you to the energy of the plants in a different way. I use pre-made stuff and I make my own stuff. I think it just depends on where I'm at in my life. But, yeah, I think having books like yours, especially, modernising herbalism because a lot of the old books can... like they're awesome, but they can be a bit retro [crosstalk 00:01:28]. How's it been going since publication? Have you been getting any positive feedback or?   Erin Lovell Verinder: (01:37) Yeah, it's been lovely. I've done two books now in the pandemic which has been like fairly wild and interesting. That they're being birthed at this time when actually I feel like they've been really needed and the spirit of plant medicine is like singing, I think, at this time within the pandemic and everything that we are moving through as a collective. Yeah, so Plants for the People came out in my March 2020 when the pandemic hit, and then The Plant Clinic just came out August 31st in Australia when we were all basically in lockdown. We were in the eye of it, so there were no stores open. Which was strange and I had to add a real block around that initially like, "Oh, I can't do in-person and people can't go see it at the stores."   Erin Lovell Verinder: (02:22) But I moved through that and it's actually, of course, it's been really well received and people are finding it and ordering it, and yeah, giving me such beautiful feedback. There's nothing more rewarding than that. Honestly, I get so much from those messages and emails about how the book has impacted their life or their little ones life or how they're working with their family in health and herbs and how they learn how to do this from the book, or I came at the right time. Like a lot of people say that I picked the book up and it's just at the most perfect time and that really thrills me. Yeah, it's been beautiful, it's been a beautiful exchange of putting the book out and what's coming back to me, which is beautiful.   Tahnee: (03:02) Yeah, it must be really rewarding, and how much work goes into these things. Yeah, incredible to see it in the flesh.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (03:13) So much work.   Tahnee: (03:13) Yes, so much work.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (03:13) Sorry, I was going to say this book really held us captive for over a year, and Noah, my husband, designed it so it was this real family effort and creation from our little family to you all. It was a major, so much work. So I'm so proud of it to see we did it, we did it, we made it.   Tahnee: (03:33) Yeah, well it's quite encyclopaedic in a way of like it really... I think Plants for the People was this amazing introduction to the world of plants. But then this is almost like working with a herbalist. It's got almost protocols and what a day would look like if you're working on a specific issue? And there's pillars of health that you might get introduced to working with a clinicians, so for me it felt a bit more actually going and seeing a practitioner. Like this book's almost like one in your house.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (04:05) Yes. No, really, that was truly my intention of writing it, for sure, was taking all of my years of clinical practise and knowledge, and as best as I could, distilling it down onto the paper to support and guide people with these daily protocols and how to work with plants as if you were working with the herbalist. Because the truth is like not everybody can access that one on one care and afford to weave that into their support team and whatnot, or access it. I just wanted to create a body of work that was super accessible and had all of those. Oh, so much in there, there's just so much in that book, for sure.   Tahnee: (04:44) Yeah, well, I think and I really appreciated like you have got a lot there for children and around dosing. I think that's stuff we get asked about a lot at SuperFeast. There's a lot of fear around working with herbs and children, and at different stages of pregnancy and postpartum and things. It's quite confusing on the internet. Like I saw you made a note in there around like you're going to read different things and they're going to conflict sometimes. Like I wonder do you have any overarching philosophies around working with kids and how do you approach that? You've got some dosing guidelines in here, but I'm just interested to flick that out a little bit.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (05:22) Yeah, for sure. I wanted to shed light on that because, yeah, you're right, I get asked all the time as well. When I started my practise as a herbalist, I was really specialising in paediatrics. And for years I really worked very closely with kids and their parents because you're always working with parents when you work with kids too. Which sometimes is the harder piece, to be honest. But so dosing was important and shedding light on working with children was important to me. I'd say that one of the biggest pieces around dosing with kids is that often less is more. So really even looking at drop dosing and working with more this energetic concept of dosing herbs, then these big wacky, not wacky, but big therapeutic dosing.   Tahnee: (06:10) Mamado herbs.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (06:10) Yeah, I had a whole section on drop dosing in the book, which I feel like can be really helpful. That more ease, using your intuition to start it just like these small little drops. You might start with five drops in a little bit of water for your little one, or instead of doing like a big meal dropper, it might just be like a few drops and see how your little one responds in that way. Drop dosing's a really good one to consider with kids because I feel like kids are so responsive often to herbs, to the plant world. Yeah, so I always start more with a drop dose approach, but there's a bunch of different rules in herbal medicine that you can calculate doses based on...   Erin Lovell Verinder: (06:52) So there's Clark's rule, but there's also Young's, and excuse me, so I would look at those and I've actually highlighted Clark's in the book because I feel like that's you're looking at... There's ones that look at age and weight and there's all these different methods that you can use. But I feel like Clark's is just really easy.   Tahnee: (07:12) Really simple.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (07:13) Yeah.   Tahnee: (07:14) Yeah, I've noticed that in my treating my daughter, because we've not really had much more than colds and she had a sore ear last night actually at 3:00 in the morning and gave her some immune herbs and put some Colloidal Silver in her ear and gave her a little limp massage and she woke up like, "Oh my ear's fine now, mommy." I'm like it's amazing to me how fast they heal, and I'm like, "If that was me, I'd probably still be in bed going ugh."   Erin Lovell Verinder: (07:42) Totally [crosstalk 00:07:43].   Tahnee: (07:42) She's like, "I'm good, I'm good. I'm ready to go to school and I love just..." Yeah, I hardly gave her, I probably gave her eight drops of this little immune tincture that we have. Which it's a bit stronger than the mushrooms like to give her sometimes things that pack a bit more of a punch if she's properly unwell. But, yeah, I really noticed that you just don't need much and homeopathics are so effective for them and those kinds of things.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (08:05) Yes, absolutely. Responsive, so responsive, and they shift really quickly, really quickly. Like a stupid charged shift with kids. I would say like really go low dose and just read a bit more about it. Like in the section of The Plant Clinic, get familiar with that, and then you do have to use your intuition a little bit knowing your little one like what's their constitution like? What do they respond from? Are they really... I've outlined the constitution piece in the book and there's only a little section on it.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (08:39) But I feel like it's so helpful to think about whether someone has a more robust constitution or a more sensitive constitution. Because it really changes how you approach dosing with plant medicine based on that. I would even implement that ethos into looking at your little one, are they quite robust? Are they sensitive and how would you dose them as well around that?   Tahnee: (09:00) I think that for adults too, it's something we speak about a lot when people come to us with dosing issues. Like they might take a quarter teaspoon and be like, "Are you sure these aren't psychedelic?" I'm like, "No, they're not. But you're obviously very sensitive, so for you, you're not going to need a very large dose at all. You can get away with like probably an eighth of a tea spoon or a pinch or something." That's great, good value, off you go. Then you're going to deal with people that are stronger, more robust, less sensitive to their energy body and they're going to be able to take much higher doses and not be affected by it. Yeah, I find that a lot that people miss that bio individuality piece of like you are going to behave and perform differently to everybody else.   Tahnee: (09:43) It's tricky like we were chatting before we came on with the compliance and regulations that we have to meet as herbalists. When working with a product like ours where we're selling it directly to the public, we have to state dosage and this isn't always aligned to what I believe to be true. I would actually prefer it to be a lot more nuanced, I suppose. But, yeah, just the way it is. Energy's kind of that was your first domain, I suppose, like working in that more subtle realm. How has that come into... has that been coming into clinic more for you lately with all this stuff going on? I imagine you probably need some protection yourself.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (10:29) I [inaudible 00:10:30]. Yeah, that's so interesting. On lots of levels, it's been coming in strongly. For my own practice because what has been presenting... so clients, what people are moving through and what we're moving through collectively, I really do believe it's a whole new paradigm and people are operating on a really different level than they were operating on pre-pandemic. As a practitioner, definitely it has impacted how I show up and what is needed? What's the demand on me to hold that space, and it's like I have to cast a bigger circle to hold it. That's been interesting in my own process and witnessing what that's bringing out in me and how I can show up. Yeah, for sure, that's been a whole thing.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (11:25) But in terms of what people are moving through and whether or not I have to call on those energetic parts, for sure. I'm always, in everything that I do as a practitioner, I'm always doing my best to honour the unseen forces and the subtle anatomy of it all. That means even if I'm working with somebody on their gut, I'm also honouring the emotions of the gut and the energy systems of the gut. I'm not just looking at it in a very black and white physiological anatomy and physiology, or like even the action of the herb or the action of the nutrient of food that we're working with, I'm more thinking about to the energy of it and the energy of what that person's moving through.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (12:13) Yeah, it's always a consideration and it's for sure a big consideration right now. Because what people are moving through is far... Like obviously people present with physical symptoms or imbalances that need support. But I really do believe that things are driven by our emotional bodies and spiritual bodies and our mental bodies too. I do believe that there's always involvement, right? I do believe that those aspects aren't... it's a lot going on right now. There's a lot of deep emotion that's tied into the physical right now. Yeah, I'm for sure working on those realms and levels always.   Tahnee: (12:51) I know you're seeing that in presentation more around adrenal type stuff or is it like... Personally, in myself, I can feel like a tendency to withdraw a lot more in a lot more sensitive just in general to people and energy. I'm also pregnant, so it's hard to know how much of that's pregnancy and how much of that's COVID. But, yeah, I've really noticed that in myself, like I just have a much smaller buffer between myself and the world and I'm having to be quite protective of that. Which was unusual for me because normally I'm quite comfortable with big groups and people, and now I'm like, "Oh, no, there's like 10 people [inaudible 00:13:33]." It's that stuff. I don't even know what you call that, like sensitivity and maybe anxiety and a bit of that.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (13:44) Yeah, I would say that there's... Like really what's coming forward, it's got a lot to do with the nervous system, and for sure, I would say that there's a lot more anxiety and a lot more deep fatigue. But like sensitivity, a lot of sensitivity, sensitivity to stimulation, depression, or low mood, low vitality. And just a lot of fear, there's a lot of fear that's going around, and I think fear can be a bit of a collective thought virus as well? There's like people are dealing with the fear and how that's cycling in their body, and fear of being unwell. There's just a lot of fear. I think that that's what I started talking about and referring to that new paradigm. Like everyone's just operating on a very different level right now.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (14:43) As a clinician, having been in practise now solid for like over 10 years, of course, I've never seen anything like it where everyone's experiencing the same thing in some way, in such a way. Obviously, we're experiencing similar things by being alive on the planet at the same time, but not like this.   Tahnee: (15:01) Acutely.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (15:03) Acutely, so people present with being maybe they want to talk about what they can do to support their immune systems, or their concerns about the vaccination, or which is very hard to navigate as a practitioner, for sure. Because actually this is a space that we are legally meant to step back from. There's just a lot of like what people are curious about and what they're worrying about. But the anxiety and the depression and the adrenal stuff, it's all like nervous system adrenal system, fight or flight survival mode stuff big time.   Tahnee: (15:48) Yeah, we're activating the sympathetic nervous system.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (15:50) Absolutely.   Tahnee: (15:51) Yeah, I can see that like we've got a team of about 30, so I can see different waves of things move through, and yeah, I've noticed those kinds of things in our team. I think I really... like that's one of the things I love about this book and would really recommend to people if you are thinking about immune protocols, you're thinking about anxiety and managing that with herbs. Like you've got calls for those listed out in here like whole chapters devoted to them. I think just having, I know for me, having things that I can lean on that support me, it's like a bomb.   Tahnee: (16:26) It's like you might be aware of that feeling and that sensitivity, but you don't have to lean into it too far because you've got these things to prop you up. It's where I think herbs can really store on all these beautiful, calming, gorgeous herbs that we have of access to reishi. I'm loving all these [inaudible 00:16:44] lately. I can just feel this real need to nourish that inner aspect.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (16:50) Absolutely. Yeah, and personally, it's funny, even oat staw are like I've got a little milky oats tincture on my table here, on my desk. Yep, and I've also been taking reishi myself as well. The two that you mentioned are very much like present in my field, in my body. Because I think the biggest thing is how can people shift from that sympathetic nervous system state to that parasympathetic rest and digest state? And how can I support them to do that? That's a lot of the work I'm doing right now, for sure. A lot of it is about our herbal helpers and how our plant medicines that calm the nervous system, and even can gently sedate the nervous system when you're in a really acute state of anxiety or panic or fear.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (17:42) It's I just feel for everyone. I feel for everyone so much right now. There's just so much of that going around, so that's why I actually... Obviously, I didn't... Well, I was writing, so I was writing the book in the depth of the pandemic. But, yeah, that was a part of why I wrote the emotions, mind spirit section, in The Plant Clinic. Because, as a clinician, even pre-pandemic, I was always treating lots of anxiety and working with people with anxiety, panic, depression. Just that low vitality as well, and all stemming from more of a mental, emotional place. Yeah, so I'm really proud of that section because I just really feel like it's rare to come across a body of work in herbalism that addresses that directly. I feel like often we're not talking so much about the spirit in, at all. Sometimes-   Tahnee: (18:39) I completely agree. It's all physical and often very... Like it's something I really love about your work is obviously you have the background of the energy medicine and then you've also got the more chemical constituents like biomedical background.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (18:54) Yeah, herbals and nutritional medicine.   Tahnee: (18:55) Yeah, and like this nice intersection of... which I think is where medicine really needs to go is like, and what has drawn me to Chinese medicine and Ayurveda and these things in my life is like we need to acknowledge that subtle realm and their unseen forces, as you call them. That's a really potent part of healing and a potent part of why we often have anxiety and things like that. We disconnect from what we really need or what we're really calling for in our deepest selves. Yeah, I think herbs really help with that, and I think even the action of preparing your own medicine and preparing your own tonics and things like there's something very nourishing and soothing in that.   Tahnee: (19:40) I don't know, just like it's a small, simple process that moved you toward maybe where you want to be. I think that was something I really noticed and loved about the book was it was that section, and you should be proud of yourself. It's important and I know it's hard to speak to those things as a practitioner sometimes because people can sound woo woo. It's something we struggle with a lot. Like we want to be woo woo.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (20:06) Totally. Yeah, girl, I'm just so at a point where I'm like, "This is what it is, guys. I'm not even worried if I sound woo woo."   Tahnee: (20:14) Totally.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (20:14) I'm just like, "This is my message. This is what's coming out. Receive it or don't."   Tahnee: (20:19) Well, I love it. You're a little bit more evolved than me. I'm still [crosstalk 00:20:24]-   Erin Lovell Verinder: (20:24) No, no, no.   Tahnee: (20:26) Bit, no. I think it takes some confidence though, and some like, probably, like you've had these 10 years in clinic. You're like it's this little experience of this is what I see and it's proven to me over and over again and I can't avoid it.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (20:40) Well, it's just that thing of like you can't compartmentalise health. It's like we're whole beings. If you're going to, like I said, just example of the gut that I'm circling back to that, if you're going to work on the gut, of course, you have to work on it from a very physical level. What's going on in the gut and how can we heal the gut? What are we eating? What are we feeding? But what are we thinking? What are we, actually, what are we absorbing from self-talk? What's our environment like that impacts our digestive systems? What are the roots of the gut dysbiosis? Is there trauma there? I think working on the gut, it's like the deepest seed of like our actual beginning of our root system. The beginning of us-   Tahnee: (21:23) Yeah, like our, what's the word, evolution in the womb as well-   Erin Lovell Verinder: (21:27) Absolutely, it's the beginning.   Tahnee: (21:28) ... with primal layers.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (21:30) Yeah, and it's like so I often feel like when people are working deeply on healing their guts, and I do a lot of digestive healing with clients, we're going back to the roots and it's so powerful. There's people always go through really big, almost like deep initiation and rebirth canals when they're working on the gut in a way. And I'm like, "Well, it would be like I'm going to get half of the results if I don't honour those other parts of what someone's going through and support them through that too." I know this from doing it for so many years, so yeah, I'm like I'm all in, I'm all in.   Tahnee: (22:04) Well, that's enough.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (22:06) I'm all in.   Tahnee: (22:06) Here I am and I noted that page in your book where you talk about on unfolding and healing isn't pretty, and I think that's something I often try and emphasise for people. It's like it's not just these detox reactions or herb reactions and things that we get. But it's like if you are... I know this personally, like my work around my gut was deeply connected to a lot of stuff from my childhood and it was not fun. It was not fun at all to start actually acknowledging the pain and the stuff that was brought forward from remembering and acknowledging those things. But the outcome being have a great digestive system in these days and it's like, yeah, it's worth it but it's not always nice.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (22:54) Absolutely. Yeah, that's really important in my process working with people, and I think my ethos is healing is not always pretty, it's not always straightforward. It takes time, you're unfolding and allowing that to be a process. It's the process of becoming. I think becoming is a real theme in my work, and when I mentor people too who want to walk the plant path it's like we're a little bit I'm geared towards like this a little, a lot. Geared towards instant culture, like this instant culture, instant gratification culture, and we just want to do the thing and then that's that. That's what we are, and I'm like, "Ah, there's a whole process."   Erin Lovell Verinder: (23:42) For me to show up who I am, I've walked these 20 something years now to get to this place where I can confidently say to you all, "Hey, take it or leave it. Like this is who I am and this is what I've got to say." I'm not saying I'm... I've got work to do still, I'm just saying this is who I am at this point. But-   Tahnee: (24:03) It's still unfolding.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (24:04) It's still unfolding. Like I've become to this point and healing is like that. It's a becoming and it's just an unfolding and it's gentle and it can be gentle, sometimes it's not. But you have to be gentle with yourself in that process.   Tahnee: (24:18) I was going to say, and I noticed a tendency toward gentleness in your work, which I like. There's not these extreme, like your detox protocols and things, they're not these extreme crazy things that we've all... Maybe not everyone's tried, but I've definitely tried some of it [inaudible 00:24:33]. Look, there's space for them in the world and I'm not trying to say they're wrong, but I think, especially in times like this, where people are so sensitive and there's so much collective for like angst and fear and stress. Like gentleness is probably the best medicine we could give ourselves at this point. I hope I'm not speaking for you, but that's-   Erin Lovell Verinder: (24:54) No, I totally agree. Yeah, for sure. Gentle is definitely my approach, and in writing a book that I know that is going to be accessed by all these different people and they're not going to be guided by me personally. As in they can just call me up and ask a question. I really wanted to write a book that I knew would be gentle for people and they could have a really soft pace with it, but also get results. I think that kind of concept, detoxification as well, because, yeah, there's a whole detoxification section in the book. I wanted to dispel a bit of myths around like this whole cleansing culture and detox culture.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (25:38) Yeah, the whole section explains it well around like your body's naturally detoxifying all the time, so how can we just, every minute, so how can we support those systems to just give them a little extra lift? But in a way that just actually flows with what they're already doing. So you might find that, "Oh, my liver is stagnated." Well, your liver is still doing its thing, it just needs a little bit of help. Yeah, that was my approach of like, "We're not going to do anything drastic. We're just going to be really gentle." But it can often be so profound when you are gentle in your approach.   Tahnee: (26:15) Yeah, I definitely like preconception with Ayo was pretty hectic, and this baby, I made a real effort to not be like that and I focused a lot more. I still did a bit of preparatory work that was very gentle, and then I focused a lot more on building and nourishing myself. Which I think I neglected that part a little bit with Ayo was a bit more like gung-ho with the cleansing. Like I didn't get any morning sickness at all this time. I did get a lot of rage, so maybe I did quite of both.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (26:50) [crosstalk 00:26:50] rage.   Tahnee: (26:53) But it was interesting having like just that really different first trimester experience of like with Ayo was like if it wasn't salty and crunchy, it wasn't going in my mouth. Whereas with this baby I was like, "I can eat pretty much everything." Yeah, it was a lot more gentle to navigate that first trimester, and yeah, except if you were Mason Taylor because you were not having a gentle time, but [inaudible 00:27:18] high oestrogen perhaps. Yeah, really I thought that was really interesting just personal anecdote. Yeah, and again, like you speak to hormones a lot in your book and it is a gentle approach.   Tahnee: (27:35) I think especially with women, we are cyclical beings and we are very sensitive and I think a lot of... and I've read a lot of books by male herbalists and that can be very gung-ho. It can come in hard and it can come in a little bit aggressive, and I think it's nice to bring some of that gentleness into that space as well.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (27:58) Yeah, I think, yeah, fully, and I think herbalism has been... I think there's a heavy matriarchal lineage running through herbalism. The OG lineage perhaps.   Tahnee: (28:10) Yeah.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (28:10) The OG lineage, exactly. So I think there's also a really different lens of perspective when you've been trained in that lineage as well. That's definitely been my lineage, and all my teachers were women, which women identified which felt correct learning with this softer... I mean not all soft but-   Tahnee: (28:35) Yes, I've had Susan Weed on the [inaudible 00:28:37]-   Erin Lovell Verinder: (28:37) Not soft, Susan, not all soft. But, yeah, the teachers I really resonated with were just very, very soft. So that really also expanded my path around how important that felt for me to have that gentleness as a teacher and a writer and a clinician as well. I just I really want people to feel held in whatever I do, and there's a softness to that, whatever that is. That matriarchal maternal instinct to want to be soft and to want to hold that space.   Tahnee: (29:16) Yeah, and I think that's really aligned to... One thing I think we both have like as a theme in our belief systems is this idea of herbs is people's medicine. If you think about like traditionally women are going to hold the kitchen, they're going to hold the garden, and they're going to be holding the medicine in a way. I think there's this real sense of something I've always said to Mason, like I want to be 60 and I want to be old and I want people to come and be like, "I've got this," and I always give them something. It's like a potion. I think there's this real beautiful ancestral line of women healers that I think we're seeing this resurgence in like...   Tahnee: (29:57) I just had Asia Suler on the podcast, and she's very feminine in how she works. Yeah, I can feel this, I don't know, this softening in the herbal world. When I started with Mase, it was guys doing tablespoons of mushrooms and it's bio hacky. It was really hectic, and I was like, "Whoa." I wasn't drawn into that, like I was drawn into working with the herbs and the mushrooms, for sure, but not in that way. Yeah, it's been interesting to watch that space change as well. It's a lot more feminine now and a lot more soft.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (30:29) Yeah, for sure. Then on the flip side of that too, I feel like what's fascinating is as we let go of these concepts of gender, and gender is a construct as well, how people, non-binary people, might be practising herbalism. And bringing it into this space that, they're definitely practising herbalism, but bringing it into this space that is like neither that nor that. As we upgrade our language and the love language of herbalism just keeps expanding from different voices who have different perspectives. I think that's also really interesting. And just also thinking about plants, not in their male or female plants. I think that's really limiting in terms of my idea of how I think about plants, and that's changing and growing, and as I grow. But, yeah, I've really been feeling more into that.   Tahnee: (31:36) I'm interested in this, because we come from a modulus tradition where there is a lot of genderizing of everything. I definitely had that bias, and I would obviously love to... I've done some workshops, actually, I did a really amazing workshop with a non-binary teacher in Oregon and she was like... Well, she wasn't a she, but she looked feminine to me, but I think she was a they, and they were speaking a lot about female bodied people and herbal abortions and working in that space around trauma to do with birth and miscarriage. Look, it was one of the best workshops and trainings I've ever done, and they spoke a little bit about the non-...   Tahnee: (32:26) Like this person's clinic really served that community, so they spoke a bit about issues in that community. But I don't see a lot of representation of that in the herbal world, maybe you do more because you might be a bit more exposed to it. But, yeah, I'd be interested in your experience. Like how are you now relating to plants through that energetic realm if you are not choosing binary terms?   Erin Lovell Verinder: (32:50) Yeah, look, it's really interesting because I think that, first of all, I think herbal culture in Australia is really... and we've talked about it. We went into this in the last podcast, which I really loved because I thought it was just a really interesting perspective for you and I to talk about that. Because we both have a lot of experience with American herbalism and that spirit of herbalism in the States. Having you train there and me spending so much time there, and because my husband's American and having such a kinship with America. But Australian herbalism is just so, so different because we have to study in these private colleges or university settings, and essentially, it's a health science degree, or whether you do a health science naturopathy degree or whatnot. And you're learning herbs or you become a herbalist at Western Herbal Medicine.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (33:39) So that in itself already puts herbalism in a really inaccesible place for a lot of people here in Australia. Because unless you've got... My debt from school is from training is insane, let alone what they're paying now and that mine was so long ago. I'm just saying that because it like casts an awareness on not all types of people would have access to doing this kind of training here in Australia. Obviously, you can learn herbs in different ways, but if you were to go out and practise and learn in a structured setting. Whereas in America, and this is what we went into on the last podcast, it's like it's the people's medicine. It's like essential to have that medicine in the system where there is no universal healthcare.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (34:28) Therefore, I think herbalism reaches a lot of different types of people, and not just privileged people. Not just people of privileged who can go and do those kind of degrees. There's a different spirit to it. I think that there's a lot of exciting things happening in the States with non-binary people who identify non-binary, but are herbalist and they're practising in ways that are undoing some of those structures, which I think is really fascinating. I'm still listening. I'll continue to listen and learn, and yeah, I'm curious. But the way that, for me, how it's impacted, I think I just always felt like those systems didn't feel super true and resonate with me.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (35:15) Some of the systems of like these are women's herbs and these are the men's herbs. I know these are ancient traditions, so I'm not saying that they don't have a place and there's not a lot of gold in all of that, of how we can treat female body people or male body people, or let's use those terms just to streamline this conversation. But I do feel that I didn't deeply resonate with that. So there's a section in The Plant Clinic that's Mums & Bubs, and there's a section that's hormone health. I was like, "How do I be more inclusive in those spaces?" But I'm trying to convey what I'm trying to convey. I had to use certain terminology like Mums & Bubs, or like this is first-   Tahnee: (36:01) [crosstalk 00:36:01] people and-   Erin Lovell Verinder: (36:01) ... Birthing people and mensturating people. Yeah, so that was a little tricky, but I wrote a little note in the book on gender terminology and I was like, "Oh, this is going to really shake it up, isn't it?" Maybe this is going to shake it a little bit up, but hey, I think that's what we're all here for as well to open conversations and to get people thinking about a different layer, a different perspective. And how boring if we all just felt like we all knew it all and it was the exact same way forever. The times are changing, and that means herbalism is changing too. I've witnessed it changed dramatically from when I started studying to now. There was really like it was so wacky, if you're a herbalist. It was like, "Oh, good luck. Like get onto the world, let's see what happens?"   Tahnee: (36:55) All in three months.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (36:58) Totally. Yeah, exactly. You might not have a job real soon or your clinic probably will fail because there's not that many people into this. It felt like that when I got out and now it's like it's in a totally different place where I feel like it's having this epic renaissance.   Tahnee: (37:15) I agree, yeah.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (37:16) Yeah, and it's just so rich. But so rich in action, in movement, in growth. I just feel like... Oh, so back to your question about how I'm practising it, it's more about the energy. It's just, honestly, it comes down to the energy and the presentation of what someone's going through and how I would meet them with herbs. It's like a herb like Shatavari, which is a very beautiful I think central herb that is very much linked in with a woman's herb. Because it has such an effect on the menstrual cycle, and it is a beautiful herb for women. But it's a beautiful herb for everyone in many different ways. Even like those really we think of them as really Yang ginseng like Panax ginseng or Korean ginseng.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (38:12) We think more to apply those to men. But, absolutely, I just do not think that is true in terms of how we can apply it to all people just in... If it suits, if the presentation's correct, if the energy's correct, if the dose is correct, it's just about listening. I think it's just about listening. Like I might think, yeah, a herb like Rose is just really feminine. We use that like soft, feminine, the unfolding, the petals of Rose. But I know a lot of people who could do with Rose, and it's just heart medicine. I just challenge that a little bit in The Plant Clinic, but it's just it's my own perspective.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (39:04) But it doesn't mean it has to be true for you, and I do think that aeons of information around herbs that would be supportive for our menstrual cycle, and say, supportive for sperm motility. Of course, I understand that they're applied to like this male identified person or this woman identified person. But, at the same time, I'm just challenging that idea of that actually isn't everybody as well. There's just this nuances, so we just need to open up space for nuance.   Tahnee: (39:36) Yeah, and I think it comes down to the intention of the person ingesting the herbs as to what kind of energy shifts they want to experience in their body? I can imagine if you're a male body person who identifies as female, you might not care about your sperm motility so much. So you might not be interested in working with those herbs. But then, again, I'm very clunky in this space, so anyone listening please feel free to write me an email about it. But I definitely have had like a personal experience of the universe having a binary, like two binary forces that are constantly in motion. It's hard to explain in words, but it's more of a visual or a felt sense that I have.   Tahnee: (40:26) I can understand that there's a spectrum between an extreme of each, whether you want to call it yin and yang or gender and male-Feminine, whatever, the Shiva-Shakti from the yoga traditions. Like I can feel this real truth in that sense of the binary is always in motion between one another, and that creates this experience that we live in. We're going very deep right now.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (40:51) Yes.   Tahnee: (40:53) But for me that-   Erin Lovell Verinder: (40:54) Unexpectedly deep into this area.   Tahnee: (40:57) [crosstalk 00:40:57] on the radar today. We haven't had enough sleep for this conversation, but yeah.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (41:01) Totally, forgive us if we're stumbling through this. But I think it's important to talk about it. It's important.   Tahnee: (41:09) It is, yeah. This has formed my, like cosmology, has formed my worldview. This sense of this dance between these two poles creating this manifest reality. That's literally how I've ended up explaining to myself how all this is here. I can understand that those like masculine and feminine terms aren't necessarily useful, but I think what you're pointing to, and I've had this experience in myself. Like postpartum, Deer Antler is not a herb I relate to normally. Postpartum, I'm like, "Give me that stuff." It's like I can see that I've gone through this big depletion of my yang of given birth. It's like a huge journey, and it's like to pull some of that masculine or yang energy or whatever you want to call it into my being is a really powerful medicine for me at that point.   Tahnee: (42:02) I don't keep doing it for long, it just it's a period of time and then I'm done with that again. I think I can relate to what you're saying there. It's also I think I often, for me, I've really related to ratio's a very feminine energy, but I would always expect men to take it because I think it can connect them to that softer part of themselves, like what you're saying with Rose. Yeah, and I remember you... I might not remember it word for word, but you said something to the effect of this book is for older people. There are some sections that are working toward women's reproductive stuff, and yes, they might not be useful for everybody. But, in general, herbalism is for everybody, like just about tuning into what's right for you in the moment.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (42:51) That's it, that's ultimately what it is. I think I'm just curious as well about out doing, undoing old paradigms. I think there must be something with that [crosstalk 00:43:08]. What's that?   Tahnee: (43:11) Just in like paradigm breaking mode right now.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (43:13) Yeah, make it all [inaudible 00:43:14]. No, I know, I'm just curious about these things that sometimes I think... Look, I know that that's even in writing these books, I felt like that was actually breaking down a bit of a paradigm in herbalism. Because, personally, my experience of, and I think most people would agree with this if you've got a big herb collection of books, you would know that most of your books are written by older people. There's a real sense of like, which is beautiful, of course, the elders in the community and these people that have lived all these years and all this experience to put it down in a book, what a gift. But being a younger person, and I'm nearly 40, I'm not super, super young, but being a younger person, writing a book about herbal... It was like breaking the boundary there a little, and I think I just maybe like doing that. I don't know.   Tahnee: (44:10) I think that's a theme in your work, and I think I also see a lot of courage in that. Like that you were able to so young guide yourself. If you haven't listened to our first podcast, Erin did a lot of really early training in energy work and things before training to be a herbalist. For a young person to have the courage to fuller those paths, I think that takes a lot of, I don't know, self belief or faith or whatever you want to call it. Is that something, you know, did you bump up against that in putting these books together? Was it like there's a self-worth thing here or like an imposter syndrome thing or were like, "No, I'm feeling strong and solid in there."   Erin Lovell Verinder: (44:52) I was really supported, so I think that feeling really cheered and supported was a huge piece of feeling like I've got this as well. Well, I just felt like someone had to do it. I felt a bit like, "Well, someone's got to do this, someone's got to do this."   Tahnee: (45:12) You're an Aries, aren't you?   Erin Lovell Verinder: (45:15) Yeah, [crosstalk 00:45:16].   Tahnee: (45:15) That's why.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (45:18) Yeah, I don't know.   Tahnee: (45:19) Aries runs a lot, "Yeah, of course, I can do it."   Erin Lovell Verinder: (45:21) Yeah, totally.   Tahnee: (45:22) Everybody else is like, Oh my God, it's so scary."   Erin Lovell Verinder: (45:25) Well, and like it's so classic me as well to just like... even when I enrolled in herbal medicine and nutritional medicine, which was like a double degree vibe is what I was doing at the same time. I didn't even read the syllabus, I was just like, "Yeah, I'm going to do this. I've got this." It was like, "I really want to be this. I wonder what's going to happen?" Then I got it and I was like, "This is a science degree."   Tahnee: (45:45) What am I doing?   Erin Lovell Verinder: (45:46) Yeah. What is this biochemistry and pharmacology? I really didn't know. I think, in a way, probably anyone doing their first book feels that way too. Like you're so excited about it, you sign up, you do it, and then you're like, "Oh my goodness, this is so much work. This is so demanding and hard." I think I did that with the first book, I just dove in and was really excited and eager. I was like, "Yeah, someone's going to do this. It's going to be great. I'm just going to tell the stories of the plants again and just introduce people back to that remembering." Then I got there and was like, "Oh, this is just this is hard." But I felt confident, and I was like... I sound like such an Aries right now.   Tahnee: (46:31) [crosstalk 00:46:31] a lot of it.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (46:35) I felt confident that I could pull it off, even though it also brought out other parts of myself. I'm a Liberian rising, and I think that I'm so such an aesthetic person and I really love things to look beautiful and be visually like visual eye candy and pull you in. That was actually really fun for me because both books, I got to strengthen that muscle in me of making things beautiful. I think too that has been missing in the modern herbalism space of bringing books to life that people want to put on their tables and the coffee tables and having the kitchen because it's beautiful.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (47:16) I think that there's just no denying that we're all very aesthetic creatures these days, and particularly, with Instagram and the social media channels where we're all pulled in from the visual of everything. Yeah, I just think it was timely to just bring a book to life that both books that are just visually pretty. But, yeah, for sure, that's definitely my nature just to be very much like just jump in.   Tahnee: (47:44) Yeah, I love it there. I think like you have brought it up, more than brought it up, and it's you're completely right in the visual. I think I've got your books at home, but I think we've also got both of them in the office and people just go straight to them. We have like, I don't know, I want to say thousands of books on herbalism and-   Erin Lovell Verinder: (48:04) You have lots of books [crosstalk 00:48:06]-   Tahnee: (48:08) I've got more even at our house, and people would just go straight for them and it's, to me, I'm like, "Oh, that's like the plants are being sung into people's hearts through the visual storytelling as well as your words." I think that's really powerful because images they connect us in a different way. Just I was looking into the moustache and picture in here and I'm like just that joy and that bright laugh that these sessions bring to a space. I think there's something really magical about that. I think what I really also liked about this one, I'm trying to remember your first book which I haven't read in a little while. But you talk about the pillars to thrive in this and I'm not sure that was in the first one. I don't think it was.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (48:55) No, it wasn't at all.   Tahnee: (48:55) Yeah, could you talk a little bit about that? Obviously, get the book for the in-depth look at it. But I'm just interested in right now we've talked a lot about where everyone's at, sensitivity, we're feeling a bit un-hinged [inaudible 00:49:10]. We've gone deep into the cosmos. We've tried to navigate gender issues in terms of some really practical stuff. Like not that none of that is practical, but-   Erin Lovell Verinder: (49:21) Not really.   Tahnee: (49:23) ... like how would you say to people like, "Yes, we've got herbs," but what are those lifestyle pieces that are non-negotiables for you that need to be honoured to be well in this time?   Erin Lovell Verinder: (49:34) Yeah, I think I feel like that's such a foundation of the book are those pillars. I wrote the book really with all of those elements in mind in every single daily planner.   Tahnee: (49:47) [crosstalk 00:49:47].   Erin Lovell Verinder: (49:47) Yeah, I wrote it around them and that's it. In my clinical practise, I've learnt that, like we talked about before, you can't compartmentalise a person's healing process and you can't pull them apart and say, "Just do this and you'll be great." What I've learned is that we've taken the herbs to really allow them to sink into a deeper state of received healing in the body. We need to do other elements and to take care of the body. We need to make sure that we are hydrated, we're eating good nourishing food that's healing for us, we're resting, we're connecting to nature. We're really mindful of what we're saying to ourselves. So our self-talk and we're moving our bodies. The pillars are just those elements, and the rest, the good food, moving your body, connected to nature, self-talk, body movement. No, I missed one.   Tahnee: (50:41) Yeah, I think you got them all.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (50:41) Drinking water.   Tahnee: (50:41) Diabetic.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (50:41) Diabetic.   Tahnee: (50:41) Connected with nature.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (50:48) Yeah, those pillars are super important. It's very naturopathic thinking about what are the elements that the body needs to, the body being, needs to be supported with to heal. You'll see in every protocol. Like let's say there's a protocol for an acute cold, it will say practise the pillars, and then it says which pillars to practise. You might want to do, obviously, like to do them all, but you really focus on rest and really focusing on hydration and eating good food. Then I suggest some foods that could be really helpful too. The book was really written around those because I really believe that to work with plant medicines, you need to also work with those elements. I felt like it was seriously negligible of me to write a book about healing with plant medicine without mentioning all those elements of how we can heal holistically and truly.   Tahnee: (51:36) It's something that comes up so much for us where someone will call and be like, "Oh, I run 50 kilometres a day and I work 80 hours away. Can I do this essentially at work? Can you give me for my adrenals?" I'm like, "Hmm." I just would like to say that I'm happy to help you and support you, but really that's not a sustainable way to live forever. These hormonal issues you're experiencing in this insomnia and all of these things that are coming up for you like we can't avoid looking at our lifestyles. I think, again, this gentleness, that was something that I've certainly learned and I felt in your... You're not preaching anything, you're not trying to say like there's a right way or a wrong way.   Tahnee: (52:21) It's just like, look, these are pretty basic foundations that we all need to acknowledge are essential to living. And you have to sleep at some point and you have to drink water. Yes, I think they just become... and it's nice to have them laid out in such a simple way, I think. I think it was really I liked that you had like say with the code immunity one, like rest is a priority now instead of maybe moving your body. I think it's important for people to remember that it's okay to not do your physical practise some days if your body needs to rest more than anything else.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (52:54) Absolutely. Yeah, they're just so fundamental to really working with healing your body and your being. It's just the simple reminders to return back to those practises and a gentle guide. That's really what it is, like those pillars to thrive when you read them and get to know them. But I can't tell you how many times in clinic I returned to those, and then constantly I'm just repeating myself around, "Let's drink more water, let's rest more, let's move the body more, let's eat these foods." It's amazing how simple it is, but we need to be reminded. I know, personally, I've got my big water bottle here and I fill it up and I'm going to really work to hit three of those a day and drink three of those a day.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (53:43) If I don't have my water bottle there, I forget. I'm just not an amazing natural water drinker. That really helps for me, and so I have to put my intention and energy towards weaving that in. Because I feel way better when I'm hydrated. It's just, yeah, it's always those elements, those little things in that book where it says, "There's a little tip on how to drink more water." I hope that really helps.   Tahnee: (54:07) That's what we get in clinic. Again, I remember being... I know we've both had adrenal crash in our lives and mine came I must've been about 23 or '4. I was pretty young. And I remember going to see this naturopath and she was like, "Okay, babe, you're going to put a bottle of water on the front seat of your car. You're going to put a bottle of water in your hand like this." Then she's like, "If you're stuck in traffic, you drink a sip of..." I had to be coached through, God it's embarrassing now, but like having enough water. Then she's like, "I know you're going to eat three meals a day and you're going to have some protein in everything."   Tahnee: (54:45) It was just this stuff that now obviously has become integrated and is stuff I'm trying to teach my kid, and constantly stay on top of it. But, yeah, I'm the same, I'm not someone that would go and reach for a glass of water unless I'm dehydrated, basically.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (55:01) Yes, to the point of dehydration.   Tahnee: (55:04) It's like, yeah, it's good. I'm like just have a jar, always there, refill it regularly. I've even had to have apps at points in my life, but it's just like that's how you get through it. Same with [inaudible 00:55:16], I was talking, a lot of moms can probably relate, you get to like 9:00 and your kid's asleep and you're like your house is clean and then you're like, "Ooh, me time." It's like-   Erin Lovell Verinder: (55:26) Yeah, and then you sit up and watch three hours of shows.   Tahnee: (55:29) [crosstalk 00:55:29] I've had to just be really tough and no fucking computers in the bedroom. Like, no, we don't have a TV, so it's like I have to be tight with that stuff or else one slip and I'm doomed. I appreciated having that, it was a good reminder even after all those years and all this money spent.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (55:55) That's the thing, these pillars really they're free. Obviously, we pay for our food, but a lot of them are super accessible and pretty much free. It's like that concept too that "wellness" is this big thing and it has to be expensive, and it's like that's actual bull. It's about coming back to these really foundational, fundamental practises that make our bodies and being seen and thrive and they are so simple. That's really what the pillars to thrive are, and yeah, you very much heavily referred to throughout the whole book to bring you back and keep reminding you how to practise them.   Tahnee: (56:41) Again, like you would have with Erin in face to face [crosstalk 00:56:44]-   Erin Lovell Verinder: (56:44) Exactly. Can you imagine me being like, "You can do it. Drink your water."   Tahnee: (56:49) Take care of yourself.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (56:50) What are you saying to yourself?   Tahnee: (56:53) You could record me a go to bed Tommy lullaby, that'd be good.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (56:59) I like that you like a-   Tahnee: (56:59) Got to sleep.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (57:01) ... little note, like a little alarm that just says, "Honey, switch off."   Tahnee: (57:05) Yeah. I've been good with pregnancy. I'm trying to really honour that I need about two more hours than I used to need at night. But, yeah, I know definitely it's an easy thing. Literally, every week at daycare pick up I chat with some mom and she's like, "Oh my God, I just started watching something I'm sure and I shouldn't have and now I had everybody..." I'm like, "I know, I've been there." I really like you're not taking clients at the moment, and you're in this liminal space. Obviously, you've had birth to book, it's not a minor thing, but I know you're still very busy with your clinic. But, obviously, don't have space for new clients. But you mentioned, is it okay if we talk about the mentoring things that are going to come? Yeah, could we talk through that one?   Erin Lovell Verinder: (57:50) Yeah, so I've got a wait list for clients, just for new clients. At this point, it's closed so we'll see when it will open up again. But, yeah, for the mentoring. So I've been doing mentoring one to one for, gosh, years and years and years, and I've loved it and I've learnt so much mentoring so many people. I really wanted to do that before writing a programme to just get this deep sense of what people are seeking, and they absolutely are themes that have come through to what I share and what people are going through. I'm in the midst of writing the mentoring programmes now in the hopes they'll be released. These things sometimes take time, but early 2022.   Tahnee: (58:36) Okay.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (58:37) Yeah, there'll be two different strains of mentoring and how you can mentor with me. It's really exciting because it's the first programmes I'll have done. Though I've taught many groups over the years, this is my first group digital offering and I think it's going to be really exciting and new ways for me to work with people and reach more people and be able to support more people and spread myself into those different spaces. It's exciting, yes.   Tahnee: (59:05) Yeah. Well, as a clinician, I could see a limited as to how many people you can see. But if you're teaching teachers and people that are working with people, then yeah, you're able to make a bigger impact.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (59:20) Sure, I mean... Oh, go ahead. Sorry.   Tahnee: (59:20) Well, I was just going to say that what are the qualifications? Is it for people who are trying to settle or studying or that what's your-   Erin Lovell Verinder: (59:23) There'll be two different streams, so one is more for people who are studying or graduated, and the other one is more people who are curious to step onto the plant path. Because they have two very different ways to teach and audiences to speak to. I'm really, really passionate about doing my very best as well to shape, or whatever I could do to help support and shape someone into feeling like a really capable and strong presence as a practitioner because it's a big job. I think that we come out of our studies, particularly here in Australia, and it's... I don't know. I was flabbergasted at how I didn't learn so much at school and I felt really unprepared. Then it's like, "Oh my God, I'm working with people. Is this right? How do I do this? And how do I set up these basics elements of my business?"   Erin Lovell Verinder: (01:00:22) You really have to be like a savvy business owner as well. I've had different iterations of having a big healing space like my own multi-modality wellness space for many years and selling that successfully and running it. Then being a head practitioner at a busy, busy clinic in Sydney, and then being digital and writing books. I've had all these different iterations and it's given me a lot of perspective. But there's a lot of things I wished that I knew when I came out, and if I can help people in that way, I'm really excited to do that because it's a big job.   Tahnee: (01:00:56) I guess like that, is that business aspect part of one of the streams? Like your-   Erin Lovell Verinder: (01:01:05) Yeah, we're definitely weaving that in and I'm so lucky to have my husband who's like-   Tahnee: (01:01:12) Mr. Noah.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (01:01:13) Mr. Noah, he's a virgo who is so amazing at... He really can show up with a skill set that I do not have and I am totally okay about not having that skillset. He's amazing at that. I sounded like I was talking myself out before, but I really I'm lacking much of that [crosstalk 01:01:31]. But, yeah, and he has a marketing background, so that's been really helpful to have his input into the course as well and how to run a business and the marketing aspect. It's huge, right? It is a huge element.   Tahnee: (01:01:48) Yeah, I only know it from yoga, but like similarly you do a teacher training and they're like, "Okay, you're a teacher now." And you like, "well, and like how do I go to class? What do I..." That worked for a studio, so I had a silver platter, like I was very fortunate. But a lot of my friends never ended up teaching because that jump from education to actual practise was really difficult.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (01:02:11) Really difficult and overwhelming.   Tahnee: (01:02:15) Yeah, and I was lucky to have worked and then managed other businesses so I had a bit of a business brain. Like I often think, God, if I didn't h

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast
E353 - MM - Should You Focus on Institutions or Accredited Investors?

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 9:51


In this Monday Minutes episode, I provide my perspective on the age-old question… Should you focus on institutional investors, or accredited investors?  We've all thought about it!  Wouldn't it be nice to receive a $10MM check from ONE investor?  Maybe!... But those check sizes usually come with strings, as well as some significant implications about how your lifestyle design.  Click the link in the comments to hear my thoughts…  Interested in investing in ATMs? Check out our webinar.   Please note that investing in private placement securities entails a high degree of risk, including illiquidity of the investment and loss of principal. Please refer to the subscription agreement for a discussion of risk factors. Tired of scrambling for capital?  Check out our new FREE webinar -  How to Ensure You Never Scramble for Capital Again (The 3 Capital-Raising Secrets). Click Here to register. CFC Podcast Facebook Group

The Tech Guy (MP3)
Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy: 1842

The Tech Guy (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 149:48


Kenny called in yesterday about his issues installing macOS Monteregy onto his external drive. He provides an update of what has happened since then. Todd is looking to backup his personal files on his work computer. Leo offers some easy solutions and software solutions to assist in this matter. Taylor found a video through TikTok of an ATM crashing and showing it running Windows 7. He wants to know if ATMs are indeed still running Windows 7. Larry has a hard drive of his friend's that died and is looking to pull some very important information off of it. Adam has a Pixel 4XL, but its battery started to become faulty. He sent it to Google to get it replaced, but the replacement phone's battery started to fail again as well. He wants to know if there's an easy way for him to replace the battery himself? Kip has a Samsung Galaxy S10 phone, and as of late, he's having issues with videos playing back with a distorted image. Also, talking with Sam Abuelsamid about Nvidia's upcoming keynote and a photo review assignment with Chris Marquardt! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid and Chris Marquardt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: UserWay.org/twit simplisafe.com/twit Codecademy.com promo code TECHGUY

The Tech Guy (Video HI)
Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy: 1842

The Tech Guy (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 150:31


Kenny called in yesterday about his issues installing macOS Monteregy onto his external drive. He provides an update of what has happened since then. Todd is looking to backup his personal files on his work computer. Leo offers some easy solutions and software solutions to assist in this matter. Taylor found a video through TikTok of an ATM crashing and showing it running Windows 7. He wants to know if ATMs are indeed still running Windows 7. Larry has a hard drive of his friend's that died and is looking to pull some very important information off of it. Adam has a Pixel 4XL, but its battery started to become faulty. He sent it to Google to get it replaced, but the replacement phone's battery started to fail again as well. He wants to know if there's an easy way for him to replace the battery himself? Kip has a Samsung Galaxy S10 phone, and as of late, he's having issues with videos playing back with a distorted image. Also, talking with Sam Abuelsamid about Nvidia's upcoming keynote and a photo review assignment with Chris Marquardt! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid and Chris Marquardt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: UserWay.org/twit simplisafe.com/twit Codecademy.com promo code TECHGUY

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
The Tech Guy 1842

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 149:48


Kenny called in yesterday about his issues installing macOS Monteregy onto his external drive. He provides an update of what has happened since then. Todd is looking to backup his personal files on his work computer. Leo offers some easy solutions and software solutions to assist in this matter. Taylor found a video through TikTok of an ATM crashing and showing it running Windows 7. He wants to know if ATMs are indeed still running Windows 7. Larry has a hard drive of his friend's that died and is looking to pull some very important information off of it. Adam has a Pixel 4XL, but its battery started to become faulty. He sent it to Google to get it replaced, but the replacement phone's battery started to fail again as well. He wants to know if there's an easy way for him to replace the battery himself? Kip has a Samsung Galaxy S10 phone, and as of late, he's having issues with videos playing back with a distorted image. Also, talking with Sam Abuelsamid about Nvidia's upcoming keynote and a photo review assignment with Chris Marquardt! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid and Chris Marquardt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: UserWay.org/twit simplisafe.com/twit Codecademy.com promo code TECHGUY

Radio Leo (Audio)
The Tech Guy 1842

Radio Leo (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 149:48


Kenny called in yesterday about his issues installing macOS Monteregy onto his external drive. He provides an update of what has happened since then. Todd is looking to backup his personal files on his work computer. Leo offers some easy solutions and software solutions to assist in this matter. Taylor found a video through TikTok of an ATM crashing and showing it running Windows 7. He wants to know if ATMs are indeed still running Windows 7. Larry has a hard drive of his friend's that died and is looking to pull some very important information off of it. Adam has a Pixel 4XL, but its battery started to become faulty. He sent it to Google to get it replaced, but the replacement phone's battery started to fail again as well. He wants to know if there's an easy way for him to replace the battery himself? Kip has a Samsung Galaxy S10 phone, and as of late, he's having issues with videos playing back with a distorted image. Also, talking with Sam Abuelsamid about Nvidia's upcoming keynote and a photo review assignment with Chris Marquardt! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid and Chris Marquardt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: UserWay.org/twit simplisafe.com/twit Codecademy.com promo code TECHGUY

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast
E352 - The Three Best Cash Flow Ninja Niches

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 37:35


Anyone interested in protecting and growing your investment portfolio would be wise to pay attention to the ebbs and flows of three significant pillars of the world of finance…  Money Banking Economics  If you are hyper-focused on your specific investment strategy and fail to recognize how money, banking, and economics can impact your investment strategy, you are likely to get blindsided by an event that “no one could have seen coming.”  Today, we are joined by one of my favorite podcast hosts, M. C. Laubscher, the host of the Cash Flow Ninja. After recording over 700 interviews on his podcast, he compiled his favorite 21 cash flow niches and put them into a new book titled The Best 21 Cashflow Niches.   In this interview, we are going to discuss the top three niches that you can quickly implement to protect and grow your portfolio in this economic climate.  In this episode, we are going to discuss…  One strategy that M.C. uses to prosper during this era money printing (and why he doesn't plan on selling anytime soon!)  How our guest remains liquid while still achieving 8%+ interest by investing in stablecoins – cryptocurrencies pegged to the US dollar  Why M.C. is such a big proponent of the infinite banking strategy, and how he uses it to create an ocean of cash flow that he controls  If you find yourself constantly being concerned about what will happen when the “music stops,” this conversation will provide some strategies for you to protect your financial life, while still creating an opportunity for lucrative returns.  Tune in and you'll see what I mean!    Take Control,  Hunter Thompson     Resources mentioned in the podcast: 1. Previous appearance - E57 2. Previous appearance - E280 3. His website 4. His book “The 21 Best Cashflow Niches: Creating Wealth In The Best Alternative Cashflow Investments"   M.C. Laubscher's Socials: 1. Instagram 2. LinkedIn Profile 3. LinkedIn Company Page   Interested in investing in ATMs? Check out our webinar.   Please note that investing in private placement securities entails a high degree of risk, including illiquidity of the investment and loss of principal. Please refer to the subscription agreement for a discussion of risk factors. Tired of scrambling for capital?  Check out our new FREE webinar -  How to Ensure You Never Scramble for Capital Again (The 3 Capital-Raising Secrets). Click Here to register. CFC Podcast Facebook Group

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast
E351 - MM - Great News Regarding Recent IRA Proposals

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 6:12


In today's Monday Minutes, I discuss an important update regarding ALL of the recent IRA proposals. Looks like we dodged a bullet…for now! But will this be the last time this topic comes up? Interested in investing in ATMs? Check out our webinar.   Please note that investing in private placement securities entails a high degree of risk, including illiquidity of the investment and loss of principal. Please refer to the subscription agreement for a discussion of risk factors. Tired of scrambling for capital?  Check out our new FREE webinar -  How to Ensure You Never Scramble for Capital Again (The 3 Capital-Raising Secrets). Click Here to register. CFC Podcast Facebook Group