Podcasts about Bhopal

Metropolis and state capital in Madhya Pradesh, India

  • 282PODCASTS
  • 364EPISODES
  • 40mAVG DURATION
  • 1WEEKLY EPISODE
  • Dec 21, 2022LATEST
Bhopal

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Bhopal

Latest podcast episodes about Bhopal

Audiogyan
How mini can be miniature art with Srijan Jha

Audiogyan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 58:07


“One man is equivalent to all Creation. One man is a World in miniature.” ~ Albert Pike. Even in Indian spirituality, these words are commonly used and understood that the macrocosm is the reflection of our body which is the microcosm. Today we have a guest who deals with really intricate artwork which need a lot of focus, attention and precision. We are talking about miniature art. Srijan Jha joins us on Audiogyan. Srijan is a miniature artist, traveller, writers, storyteller and also engages in heritage restoration. He is from Bhopal and we'll be talking all about miniature art. Questions What's you definition of patience and art? How do you see them both in the kind of art you produce? What's miniature art? Why was it called limning? Can you share any brief history of it's origin and travel? Why was it done, when was it first thought of etc…? Where do you see it in India? Can you give us a peek into the mythology and folklore associated with this art form? I started of with the microcosm and macrocosm. It seems like in miniature art you try fit in the universe. What excites you about this form? What's so special about Miniature art? Why do people predominantly draw portraits? Even your work is mostly portraits? What is the creative satisfaction in doing it? How mini can a miniature painting be? What are typically the subjects? How important is the subject? What surfaces are suitable for this form of art? With digital age and technology, what are the new challenges for miniature artists (at least in your kind of work). Can artists zoom 20x and achieve the desired output? What is the future of miniature art? Reference reading https://www.instagram.com/jaadugarbysrijan/?hl=en https://www.facebook.com/studiojaadugar https://twitter.com/srijanjha8 https://www.artofwildlife.com/miniature_art_history.html https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miniature_art https://uncoverimages.com/2016/05/18/review-the-history-of-miniature-painting-in-my-name-is-red/

The Compass
Bhopal: Part one

The Compass

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 27:35


When one of journalist Rajkumar Keswani's friends dies at the Union Carbide plant after exposure to toxic gas, he decides to investigate. Local government officials dismiss him, but safety reports smuggled to him open his eyes to the potential for disaster. Rajkumar Keswani wrote his first article 40 years ago, warning of the dangers posed by safety lapses and poor maintenance at the chemical plant. During a dogged investigation pitting him against political power, corporate money and the indifference of the media and public opinion, he never gave up. This cinematic documentary - narrated by Narinder Samra and featuring key witnesses - tells Keswani's courageous story for the first time. Producer: Neil McCarthy (Death in Ice Valley podcast)

SBS French - SBS en français
C'est arrivé un 3 décembre : 1984 - la catastrophe industrielle de Bhopal en Inde

SBS French - SBS en français

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 6:23


Il y a 38 ans, à Bhopal, en Inde, se produisait la catastrophe chimique la plus mortelle de l'histoire. Une explosion à l'usine américaine de pesticides Union Carbide libérait un nuage toxique qui allait provoquer la mort de plus de 20.000 personnes. Retour sur ce drame industriel, dont les conséquences se répercutent encore aujourd'hui en Inde.

U n' I with Rashmi Shetty
U n'I with Rashmi Shetty- Sudhanshu and Susmita- Jaivik Jeevan

U n' I with Rashmi Shetty

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 74:13


Our guests today are Susmita & Sudhanshu who are entrepreneurs and a first-generation farming couple who knew nothing about growing anything. Sustainability & inclusivity are what they consciously combined in their simple lifestyle today as their purpose They founded Jaivik Jeevan in the year 2020 with a focus on making available authentic organic pro-nature produce directly from the farms to the connoisseurs of nature and food. While Sudhanshu studied finance at Leeds University Business School and joined the financial sector initially. Susmita completed her Masters' degree from Tata Institute of Social sciences and joined the workforce. Today she is a dedicated female farmer at Jaivik Jeevan, Bhopal, and an avid fitness coach. • After living in metros for 15 years and becoming a part of the problem, they decided to become part of the solution providers. With an innate ever-growing desire to work out scalable, nature-positive profitable models built around nature they founded Kalp Vriksha Integrated Organic Farm and forward integrated and founded Jaivik Jeevan. With over 4 years of on-the-ground experience in organic farming and 2 years of successful organic food retailing, they have developed in-depth expertise in building a pro-nature scalable and profitable business. Having established a network of organic farmers and processes to establish authentic organic food traceability and regular organic food clientele, they aspire to continue to work on profitable sustainable organic farming and rural economy model with an established front-end demand and also help move 5000+ marginal conventional farmers back to regenerative and profitable methods of agriculture and pure food. For more details, you can visit their website www.jaivikjeevan.farm --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-third-eye1/message

Banarasi Babu
The call of the train journey

Banarasi Babu

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 30:04


In this episode I am taking you on a train journey from Hazrat Nizamuddin (Delhi) to Bhopal. We listen to the nostalgic sound of Indian Railway station and will talk to a fellow traveler Sunil kumar. You want to say something- https://anchor.fm/ravi-shekhar6/message

The Music Authority LIVE STREAM Show
October 25, 2022 Tuesday Hour 1

The Music Authority LIVE STREAM Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 60:24


Today, some grocery shopping after the show.  Lori LOVES Salmon…and we're out!  So, I need to correct that.  Salmon and roasted asparagus for her, shrimp and the same veggie for me, it's what's for dinner!  The Music Authority LIVE STREAM Show & Podcast... listen, like, comment, download, share, repeat…heard daily on Podchaser, Deezer, Amazon Music, Audible, Listen Notes, Google Podcast Manager, Mixcloud, Player FM, Stitcher, Tune In, Podcast Addict, Cast Box, Radio Public, and Pocket Cast, and APPLE iTunes!  Follow the show on TWITTER JimPrell@TMusicAuthority!  Please, are you listening? Please, are you sharing the show & podcast?  Please, has a show & podcast mention been placed into your social media?  How does and can one listen in? Let me list the ways...*Listen LIVE here - https://fastcast4u.com/player/jamprell/ *Podcast - https://themusicauthority.transistor.fm/   The Music Authority LIVE STREAM Show & Podcast!  Special Recorded Network Shows, too!  Different than my daily show! *Radio Candy Radio Monday Wednesday, & Friday 7PM ET, 4PM PT*Rockin' The KOR Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday at 7PM UK time, 2PM ET, 11AM PT  www.koradio.rocks*Pop Radio UK Friday, Saturday, & Sunday 6PM UK, 1PM ET, 10AM PT!  October 25, 2022, Tuesday, page one…Orbis 2.0 - TMA SHOW OPEN THEMEDavid Mead Jr. - 01 Where Are the Living (Big Stir Records)Richard X. Heyman - 67,000 Miles Per Hour [67,000 Miles An Album] (@Turn -Up Records)Red Cabin - 07 Sing [Oracle Trade]David Woodard - 11 - Beach Song (Happy place) [Stupid Kid] (koolkatmusk.com)The Spooky Guests - It's HalloweenThe smallest Creature - Let Burn [Magic Beans]@Clara Tracey - (e) Black Forest [Black Forest]Richard Öhrn - 06 Love And Friendship [Sounds In English] (Big Stir Records)Lisa Mychols & SUPER 8 - Trap Door!JOHNNY CASINO - 01 - I Scare Myself [Vibrations, Yours And Mine] (Beluga Records)Morning Midnight - Easy [Happy Hour] (faction_records)Bhopal's Flowers - B4_Pick Up A Walnut [Joy Of The 4th]@The Skyhooks - Horror Movie@Watts - 02 - She Wants To Rock [Rum Bar Records ROCKTOBER] (Rum Bar Records)Eric Barao - 01 Whoever You Are [From My Planet To Your Star - EP]Dancing On Tables - 08 So What [Color In The Grey] (Enci Records)A-Bombs - 02 - Just Like You! [And Just Constantly Rotating] (Beluga Records)Stadler - Brown Eyes [Stadler]

Crunchy Allergist Podcast
Sleep Well and Live Well with Nishi Bhopal, MD

Crunchy Allergist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 30:56


One of the real big pillars of anti-inflammatory living is making sure that our bodies have ample time and space and energy to recharge our batteries. The main way we do that is through the gift of sleep. Dr. Kara met Dr. Bhopal through Aila Health‘s Autoimmune Warrior Conference where she delivered an AWESOME talk on sleep. Join me and Dr. Nishi Bhopal as we talk about the importance of sleep to our overall well-being and then hop over to the FREE Aila Health App to watch her talk from the conference too. =============================== About Dr. Nishi Bhopal Dr. Bhopal is board certified in Psychiatry, Sleep Medicine, and Integrative Holistic Medicine, and is the founder of Pacific Integrative Psychiatry, serving patients across California. She brings various disciplines into her practice to offer a comprehensive approach to mental health, including nutrition, mindset coaching, psychotherapy, yoga and meditation, and Ayurveda. She also has a YouTube channel for clinicians where she shares holistic strategies to optimize sleep and mental health. =============================== CONNECT WITH DR. BHOPAL LinkedIn: https://linkedin.com/in/nishibhopal Instagram: @pacificintegrativepsych @intrabalance YouTube: https://youtube.com/c/intrabalance =============================== If you're committed to optimizing your sleep health this year, Dr. Bhopal is inviting you to join her FREE MASTERCLASS Get Your Best Sleep! 3 Mistakes That are Ruining Your Slumber (And what to do about them) Reserve Your Seat Here: https://members.intrabalance.com/sleepmasterclass =============================== For people who are wired and tired, or bedtime procrastinators who just don't have enough hours in the day... The Holistic Sleep Reset by IntraBalance Learn how to Uplevel your sleep, naturally. Click Here: intrabalance.com/enroll =============================== To learn more about All things Allergy, Autoimmunity, and Anti-inflammatory Living. Subscribe to our Newsletter: www.crunchyallergist.com

The Jaipur Dialogues
MBBS in Hindi Indian Education System Reform Sankrant Sanu and Sanjay Dixit

The Jaipur Dialogues

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 36:36


Starting with the Gandhi Medical College of Bhopal, all Govt. Medical Colleges of MP are going to introduce text books in Hindi for its MBBS Course. Text books were launched yesterday by Home MInister Amit Shah. Sankrant Sanu talks to Sanjay Dixit about the move, specially because a large number among the medical community are opposing it.

Feminist Food Stories
The Sexualization of Servitude

Feminist Food Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 22:08


In an interesting twist, this is an in-house interview with FFJ's founding editors. Isabela talks to Zoë about her master's thesis research on bunabéts, otherwise known as coffee houses, in Ethiopia and the links between serving coffee feminization and the sexualization of feminized labour. Zoë's research went on to be published in the Journal of Gender and Research. You can read it here.This podcast features writing, research, and sound editing by Isabela Vera and Zoë Johnson and original music from the Electric Muffin Research Kitchen. You can also listen to it on Apple Podcasts and Google Podcasts.Further reading* Bhopal, K. (2010). 'Gender, Identity and Experience: Researching Marginalised Groups.' Women's Studies International Forum, (33, 3: 188-195).* Campbell, R., & Wasco, S. M. (2000). 'Feminist Approaches to Social Science: Epistemological and Methodological Tenets.' American Journal of Community Psychology, (28, 6: 773-791).* Cornwall, A., & Anyidoho, N. A. (2010). 'Introduction: Women's Empowerment: Contentions and Contestations.' Development, (53, 2: 144-149).* Cornwall, A., Harrison, E., & Whitehead, A. (2008). 'Gender Myths and Feminist Fables: The Struggle for Interpretive Power in Gender and Development.' In A. Cornwall, E. Harrison, & A. Whitehead,(Eds: pp. 1-19 ). Gender Myths and Feminist Fables. Malden. MA: Blackwell Publishing.* Devault, M. L. (1990). 'Talking and Listening from Women's Standpoint: Feminist Strategies for Interviewing and Analysis.' Social Problems, (37, 1: 96-116).* Gregson, N., & Rose, G. (2000). 'Taking Butler Elsewhere: Performativities, Spatialities and Subjectivities.' Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, (18, 4: 433-452).* Hoppe, K. (1993). 'Whose Life Is It, Anyway?: Issues of Representation in Life Narrative Texts of African Women.' The International Journal of African Historical Studies, (26, 3: 623-636).* McRobbie, A. (2009). The Aftermath of Feminism: Gender, Culture and Social Change. London: SAGE.* Peacock, J. L., & Holland, D. C. (1993). 'The Narrated Self: Life Stories in Process.' Ethos, (21, 4: 367-383).* Shain, F. (2012). '"The Girl Effect": Exploring Narratives of Gendered Impacts and Opportunities in Neoliberal Development.' Sociological Research Online, (18, 2: 181-191).* van Stapele, N. (2014 March). 'Intersubjectivity, Self-Reflexivity and Agency: Narrating About "Self" and "Other" in Feminist Research.' Women's Studies International Forum, (43: 13-21). This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit feministfoodjournal.substack.com/subscribe

SSPI
Better Satellite World: Making Space for New Space with TMT Law's Abhishek Malhotra

SSPI

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 35:48


The risk of start up in an industry as complex as commercial space and satellite is made even more intense by the challenges that are part of our business. Yet all around the world, people are looking at the opportunities, the new space of space and making the leap. These are our innovators, and this podcast series has brought them to you. The eighth and final episode of this series features a conversation with Abhishek Malhotra, Managing Partner at TMT Law Practice. Abhishek Malhotra is the Founding Partner of TMT Law Practice. He graduated from National Law School India University, Bangalore and went on to earn an LL.M. degree from the Franklin Pierce School of Law, USA. He is admitted to the State Bar of California and Delhi. Abhishek has nearly two decades of experience, with strong expertise in Intellectual Property, Technology, Media and Telecoms, as well as Commercial Disputes. He has advised Clients in minimizing legal risks and devising strategies for safeguarding against criminal and civil liability. Abhishek also advises several think-tanks and associations in the field of Technology, Media & Telecommunications. He has counseled the Government of India on issues of copyright, data privacy and satellite communications and is also a guest lecturer at the Indian Institute of Information Technology. Abhishek has spoken at the National Judicial Academy, Bhopal on Enforcement of Trademark Rights – Civil and Criminal Remedies, Indo-America Chambers of Commerce conference on Doing Business in India from an IP perspective and Indo-America Chambers of Commerce conference on Leveraging Intellectual Property Rights for Business.

Backstage with Millionaires
India's UPI Goes Global, ONDC Launches Beta Testing - Indian Startup News 141

Backstage with Millionaires

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 6:55


This week in Indian Startup News: UPI is off to International markets, ONDC launches its Beta tests!, Meesho crosses Amazon in festive sale orders. UPI is off to International markets: 1. On 3rd of April, 2020, the NPCI registered a subsidiary company called NPCI International Payments Limited (NIPL) with a motive to make UPI an internationally accepted and used payments service. The NIPL's primary focus is to make UPI and RuPay as widely accepted as possible and it seems like they are on the right track in doing so. 2. A lot of countries across the globe have already adopted UPI as an accepted form of payment in their country. These include Singapore, France, UAE, The UK, Russia, Nepal, and all of the other countries that you are seeing on your screen. And on top of this, NPCI International is also in talks with 30 more countries for the adoption of UPI in which 3 have already signed MoU regarding the same. ONDC launches beta tests!: 1. ONDC's is not yet available in every city or pan-India as it is still in its pilot stage but the beta tests which launched on 30th September, 2022 are currently live in 86 cities which include cities like Bengaluru, Delhi, Bhopal and Lucknow. 2. The first app that went live on ONDC was Paytm Mall. This also means that almost all Bengaluru-based users can now order products online from various sellers that are listed on the ONDC via the Paytm app. Funding this week: This week at least 6 Indian Startups raised more than $1 Million, in total raising $328 Mn. These are the top three- 1. Meesho raised $192 Million 2. Euler motors raised $60 Mn 3. Byju's raised $49 Million Quick Update: Meesho beats Amazon in festive order volumes! 1. Flipkart continues to lead the festive season sale with an order sale share of whopping 49%. But, for a change the second spot is now held by Meesho instead of Amazon with a sale share of 21%. 2. Now, this data is only for the first week so there's a chance that Amazon can catch up in the coming weeks but it's interesting to see that what has always been an Amazon vs Flipkart fight is now witnessing a third player, Meesho.

Community Conversations on Vaccines
Community Conversations on Vaccines Season 4 Trailer

Community Conversations on Vaccines

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 2:58


What drives decision-making on vaccines in low- and middle-income countries? How have professionals closest to communities fostered trust?  What challenges do they have to overcome to maintain that confidence and build vaccine equity? How has the covid-19 pandemic changed vaccine acceptance and demand?   Welcome to Community Conversations on Vaccines. In this podcast, we speak to the professionals closest to vaccine delivery and decision-making, across low- and middle income countries. We will be joined by guests like Rashid Mang'anda, a nurse at the Phalombe District in Southern Malawi, reporter and media trainer Esther Nakkazi, Founder of the Health Journalists Network in Uganda and Dr. Anant Bhan, mentor and principal investigator at Sangath in Bhopal, India. Season Four of Community Conversations on Vaccines is coming soon. Find Community Conversations on Vaccines at immunizationadvocates.org/podcasts or wherever you find your podcasts. Subscribe to be the first to hear future episodes.

The Chills at Will Podcast
Episode 143 with Neema Avashia, Dedicated Educator, Mentor and Chronicler of Moving, Heartbreaking, and Reflective Stories in Another Appalachia: Coming Up Queer and Indian in a Mountain Place

The Chills at Will Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 77:40


Episode 143 Notes and Links to Neema Avashia's Work       On Episode 143 of The Chills at Will Podcast, Pete welcomes Neema Avashia, and the two discuss, among other topics, her lifelong love of words, books as sources of comfort and disappointment, formative writers like Abraham Verghese and Salman Rushdie, her own writing and its strengthening through workshops and writers' groups and through her work as an educator and activist, her book as a direct response to uneven and often wrong depictions of South Asians and more diverse Appalachian communities, the ways in which the book's diverse chapters coalesce, and salient ideas of home and belonging.       Neema Avashia was born and raised in southern West Virginia to Indian immigrant parents, and she has been a civics and history teacher in the Boston Public Schools since 2003. She is the author of Another Appalachia: Coming Up Queer and Indian in a Mountain Place, published in March 2022. Neema Avashia's Website   Buy Another Appalachia: Coming Up Queer and Indian in a Mountain Place   Neema is Profiled for CNN by Harmeet Kaur-“What it was like to grow up in Appalachia for a child of Indian immigrants” from July 14, 2022   Neema's Article for Lithub from Jan. 2021- “The Deep Connection of West Virginia's Indian Community”           At about 1:55, Neema sets Pete straight on the correct pronunciation of    At about 2:15, Neema discusses her childhood relationship with words-with Gujarati and English, her favorite books, etc.-and she    At about 6:10, Neema discusses reading as a way of exploring life outside of her small town, and highlights a seminal moment recently with hometown librarians    At about 8:05-10:20, Neema responds to Pete's question about representation; she cites racist and factually-wrong references to South Asian people in pop culture    At about 10:20, Neema describes moments in which writing became a love and a possible profession for her   At about 11:15, Neema talks about writers and writing that gave (and gives) her “chills at will,” including the formative Salman Rushdie   At about 13:05, Neema is asked how teaching informs her writing, and vice versa, and she gives background on how her writing career has had stops and recent starts    At about 14:35, Neema explains how a lot of her inspiration for her book, Another Appalachia, is in direct response to the book and hoopla from JD Vance's    At about 16:35, Neema further expands on how she has learned “clarity” through teaching    At about 18:45, Neema responds to Pete's question about Neema's school community's reactions to her book publication   At about 20:15, Neema answers Pete's questions about books that have resonated with her students over the years-she highlights Jason Reynolds and Elizabeth Azevedo's work   At about 21:20, Pete and Neema discuss contextualizing works that resonate with young readers when    At about 23:55, Neema explains how her essays were found to have a “throughline” and how Grub Street Writers and Kenyon Writer's Workshop (and mentors like Geeta Kothari) help the book crystallize    At about 26:20, Pete compliments the book's opening and asks about Neema's rationale for its second person usage   At about 28:30, The two discuss a pivotal early passage about patriotism and “returning home”   At about 30:30, Neema discusses Appalachian tropes and how she balanced what people previously thought they knew about the region with counter examples    At about 34:30, Neema discusses the wonderful CNN documentary done by W. Kamau Bell and how she was profiled for the CNN website   At about 36:10, The two discuss the book's second chapter/essay and her parents' move to the United States and the two discuss connections to the great Abraham Verghese's work   At about 38:10, Neema speaks glowingly of the “masterpiece of a book,” Cutting for Stone, as well as Anthony Doerr's All the Light We Cannot See   At about 38:40, Pete references Chaya Bhuvaneswar's fictional account of the 1984 Bhopal explosion in discussing with Neema the horrific tragedy and her father's working for Union Carbide    At about 42:30, Pete highlights the juxtapositions and comparisons between mother and daughter and mother and father that make the book stellar   At about 43:50, Pete and Neema discuss the “moment-in-time” essence of the profile of Neema's Indian “aunties” in the third chapter   At about 45:15, Pete and Neema discuss the salient chapter regarding Neema's connections to Wilt Chamberlain (and underhanded free throws) and the importance of supportive mentorship   At about 49:20, Pete asks Neema about how she sees any distinctions between “less than” and “different”   At about 50:10, The two discuss the painful chapter that deals with the wonderful relationship with “Mr. B.” and his family and the implications of the ensuing and ongoing hateful narratives that have coupled with the growing influence of social media   At about 55:30, The two discuss ideas of “coming home” in the essay that deals with Neema's bringing her partner Laura to Neema's various homes; also, the two talk about a cool connection and memories attached to Kenny Rogers and Dolly Parton's “Islands in the Stream”    At about 57:30, Neema gives background on her ritual enacted to remember her beloved cousin after his death    At about 1:00:25, Neema explains hireath and its connection to a chapter in the book; the conversation moves to saudade, the Portuguese concept that informs much of the book   At about 1:02:20, Neema delves into the ideas connected to sharam and links between her writing and her cousin's social media livelihood   At about 1:05:00, Pete and Neema discuss ideas of shame on Sept 12, 2001 from Hasan Minhaj's Homecoming King   At about 1:07:05, The two discuss the book's last chapter with the quote, “ ‘I am from here, but no of here' ” as a launch pad   At about 1:10:30, Neems talks about upcoming projects-(“Be Like Wilt” as a children's book? Yes, please!)   At about 1:13:30, Neema gives out her contact info and social media info while shouting out independent bookstores    You can now subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, and leave me a five-star review. You can also ask for the podcast by name using Alexa, and find the pod on Stitcher, Spotify, and on Amazon Music. Follow me on IG, where I'm @chillsatwillpodcast, or on Twitter, where I'm @chillsatwillpo1. You can watch other episodes on YouTube-watch and subscribe to The Chills at Will Podcast Channel. Please subscribe to both my YouTube Channel and my podcast while you're checking out this episode.  This is a passion project of mine, a DIY operation, and I'd love for your help in promoting what I'm convinced is a unique and spirited look at an often-ignored art form. The intro song for The Chills at Will Podcast is “Wind Down” (Instrumental Version), and the other song played on this episode was “Hoops” (Instrumental)” by Matt Weidauer, and both songs are used through ArchesAudio.com.    The Chills at Will Podcast is joining Patreon in October! Pete will be spreading the word-sharing links and discussing the perks that come with Patreon membership during next week's episode with Gustavo Barahona-Lopez. Keep your ears and eyes out as we unveil Chills at Will merch like refrigerator magnets and t shirts and unlock bonus episodes.     Please tune in for Episode 144 with Gustavo Barahona-Lopez. He is a writer and educator from Richmond, California. In his writing, Barahona-López draws from his experience growing up as the son of Mexican immigrants. His poetry chapbook, "Loss and Other Rivers That Devour," was published by Nomadic Press in February 2022.     The episode will air on October 4.

Ståpäls
Gasolyckan i Bhopal

Ståpäls

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 68:46


I veckans avsnittet är det Lucas tur att berätta om gasolyckan i Bhopal, Indien. Det som kom att bli den värsta industriolyckan i världen. Har ni tips på ämnen eller olika fall ni vill att vi tar upp får ni mer än gärna kontakta oss på stapalspodcast@gmail.com eller på Instagram via Stapalspodcast eller via lucasternestal och utt3rclou. Glöm inte att prenumerera på podden så ni får notiser om när nya avsnitt läggs ut och ge oss gärna betyg! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Jughead's Basement
Episode 140: Episode 140: Larry Damore of Pegboy and Bhopal Stiffs on LoFi Interviews with HiFi Guests

Jughead's Basement

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 73:17


Episode 140: Larry Damore of Pegboy and Bhopal Stiffs talks to us about Larry's Father And His Days As A Football Player For The Bears, Stopped At The Canadian Border, Transition From Bhopal Stiffs To Pegboy, Producers Albini And Burgess, A Eulogy For Pierre Kedzie, Damore Admits He Is A Meathead, Chicago Blue Collar Music And The Punk Bar Culture plus much much Larry Damore more.with special Co-Host: Mike Byrnewww.jugheadsbasementpodcast.com

Love thy Lawyer
Kenneth McCallion - Yale

Love thy Lawyer

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 23:46 Transcription Available


lovethylawyer.comA transcript of this podcast is available at lovethylawyer.com.Kenneth McCallionhttps://www.mccallionlaw.com/about-usKenneth F. McCallion has more than 40 years of experience in a wide range of legal practice areas. As a federal prosecutor with the U.S. Department of Justice, he prosecuted organized crime, white collar crime and labor racketeering cases. While in private practice, he has successfully litigated many complex civil litigation cases involving civil RICO, environmental justice, and the deprivation of civil and human rights. He is a graduate of Yale University and Fordham Law School. He is also an adjunct professor at Cardozo Law School and teaches in the political science department at Fairfield University.Mr. McCallion represents the Ovaherero and Nama indigenous peoples of Namibia in their genocide case against the Federal Republic of Germany currently pending in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York. He previously represented Native Alaskan corporations regarding their claims arising from the Exxon Valdez oil spill disaster, and he also represented the victims of the Bhopal, India gas disaster. In addition, he represented thousands of World War II victims of forced and slave labor in their successful settlement claims against the German government and German industries, as well as the Holocaust Claims against the French Banks.Mr. McCallion was also lead counsel in the class action litigation brought on behalf of utility ratepayers against the Long Island Lighting Company (LILCO) relating to the Shoreham Nuclear Power Plant. He also represented the families of victims of the 9/11 World Trade Center terrorist attack, as well as Yulia Tymoshenko, the former Prime Minister of Ukraine, in a federal civil RICO case involving wrongful imprisonment and other human rights violations against Viktor Yanukovich, the former President of Ukraine, and Paul Manafort, the former Trump Campaign Chairman. Information gathered by Mr. McCallion and his team regarding Paul Manafort's money laundering and other racketeering activities helped trigger the federal investigation of Mr. Manafort by the U.S. Attorneys' Office for the Southern District of New York and, later, the Special Counsel's Office.Mr. McCallion is a regular contributor to USA Today, the New York Daily News and the Daily Beast, and has served as an expert and commentator on CNN, MSNBC and other news programs.Link to Books:https://www.amazon.com/Kenneth-Foard-McCallion/e/B0B26RTGT1%3Fref=dbs_a_mng_rwt_scns_share  Louis Goodman www.louisgoodman.comhttps://www.lovethylawyer.com/ 510.582.9090  Musical theme by Joel Katz, Seaside Recording, Maui Technical support: Bryan Matheson, Skyline Studios, OaklandAudiograms & Transcripts: Paul Roberts    We'd love to hear from you.  Send me an email at louis@lovethylawyer.com. Please subscribe and listen. Then tell us who you want to hear and what areas of interest you'd like us to cover.  Please rate us and review us on Apple Podcasts.    

Cyrus Says
CnB ft. Aakash, Shreyas & Antariksh | Bill Gates Toilets & Divorce Celebrations

Cyrus Says

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 58:04


Welcome to Cyrus Says - CnB presented by Volvo Car India!On Cock & Bull today, we are joined by Aakash, Shreyas & Antariksh. Today, Cyrus is talking about why & how he wants to switch to electric vehicles. In the show: Aakash has a bone to pick with Silverie & Cyrus, as both of them did not attend his wedding functions, the guys discuss rich people & biryani, and they talk about what it is like being newly married. Topics discussed: Invite for 'divorce celebration' in Bhopal goes viral, and Bill Gates joins Samsung to create waterless toilets that burn solid waste into ash. Tune in for this and much more!Today's sustainability story powered by Volvo XC40 Recharge is about a new study from the United States that has resulted in the development of a computational model that tells the locations for the optimal location for charging electric vehicles. Connect with Volvo Car India on:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/volvocarsin…Twitter: https://twitter.com/volvocarsinYouTube: https://youtube.com/c/VolvoCarsIndiaCheck out Cyrus Says merch:ivm.today/3PLKo1mYou can follow Aakash on Instagram at @kuchbhimehtaYou can follow Shreyas on Instagram at @shreyas_manoharYou can follow Antariksh on Instagram at @antarikshtStream the podcast on major platforms like Spotify, Apple Podcasts, & Google PodcastsDo send in AMA questions for Cyrus by tweeting them to @cyrussaysin or emailing them at whatcyrussays@gmail.comDon't forget to follow Cyrus Broacha on Instagram @cyrus_broacha (https://www.instagram.com/cyrus_broacha)In case you're late to the party and want to catch up on previous episodes of Cyrus Says you can do so at: www.ivmpodcasts.com/cyrussaysYou can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the new and improved IVM Podcasts App on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS:https://ivm.today/ios

Seriously…
5.The Fatal Night

Seriously…

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 15:06


The Bhopal gas tragedy was the world's worst industrial accident. Tens of thousands of people died and many more suffered long term illnesses when lethal methyl isocyanate gas leaked from the Union Carbide plant in the city in central India on 2nd December 1984. For the previous two years one man had been predicting that Bhopal was an accident waiting to happen. Forty years ago this month the Bhopali journalist Rajkumar Keswani wrote his first article warning of the dangers posed by safety lapses at the plant. During a dogged investigation pitting him against political power, corporate money and the indifference of the media and public opinion, he never gave up. This cinematic documentary series tells his story for the first time. Episode 5. The Fatal Night As the city slept on the night of the 2nd December 1984, a huge leak of lethal methyl isocyanate escaped from the Bhopal Union Carbide chemical plant. Keswani realises his worst fears have come to pass. All his warnings have been ignored and now people are dying in their thousands before him. Union Carbide refuses to divulge what gas has been released and hospital doctors are helpless, not knowing what treatment to administer desperate patients. After the tragedy, Rajkumar Keswani is honoured with India's most prestigious award for journalism. In his acceptance speech he said he was receiving this award for his greatest journalistic failure. Narrator Narinder Samra Written and researched by Anubha Yadav and Radhika Kapur Music and Sound Design by Shreyan Chatterjee Studio Mix Donald McDonald Producer Neil McCarthy

Seriously…
1. A Friend Dies

Seriously…

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 15:22


The Bhopal gas tragedy was the worlds worst industrial accident. Tens of thousands of people died and many more suffered long term illnesses when lethal methyl isocyanate gas leaked from the Union Carbide plant in the city in central India on 2nd December 1984. For the previous two years one man had been predicting that Bhopal was an accident waiting to happen. Forty years ago this month the Bhopali journalist Rajkumar Keswani wrote his first article warning of the dangers posed by safety lapses at the plant. During a dogged investigation pitting him against political power, corporate money and the indifference of the media and public opinion, he never gave up. This cinematic documentary series tells his story for the first time. Episode 1. A Friend Dies Keswani is the kind of journalist who finds his stories on the ground, talking to people in his native Bhopal. One evening he learns from his friend Ashraf, a worker at the Union Carbide chemical plant, that there are regular safety lapses and leaks. Shortly afterwards, Ashraf dies when he's exposed to lethal gases. A grief stricken Keswani decides he must find the truth behind safety concerns at the plant. But when questioning government officials he finds nothing but support for the multinational company that had chosen Bhopal as its base. He hears more worrying accounts from local union officials and when they are published in a small article, retribution follows. Keswani feels sure that something troubling is going on behind the scenes. Narrator Narinder Samra Written and researched by Anubha Yadav and Radhika Kapur Music and Sound Design by Shreyan Chatterjee Studio Mix by Donald McDonald Producer Neil McCarthy With thanks to Down To Earth

Seriously…
2. The Smell of Grass

Seriously…

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 14:15


The Bhopal gas tragedy was the worlds worst industrial accident. Tens of thousands of people died and many more suffered long term illnesses when lethal methyl isocyanate gas leaked from the Union Carbide plant in the city in central India on 2nd December 1984. For the previous two years one man had been predicting that Bhopal was an accident waiting to happen. Forty years ago this month the Bhopali journalist Rajkumar Keswani wrote his first article warning of the dangers posed by safety lapses at the plant. During a dogged investigation pitting him against political power, corporate money and the indifference of the media and public opinion, he never gave up. This cinematic documentary series tells his story for the first time. Episode 2. The Smell of Grass Keswani digs deeper and discovers that a town planning order to relocate the chemical plant to an industrial zone, away from densely populated areas, was ignored. Union leaders smuggle him into the factory where he sees first hand the lack of safety controls and general disrepair. He learns more about the chemicals being manufactured as pesticides inside Union Carbide and understands the danger if they were to leak. He sits down to write his first 'Rapat' newspaper article under the headline 'Save, Please Save this City', and waits for a response. Narrator Narinder Samra Written and researched by Anubha Yadav and Radhika Kapur Music and Sound Design by Shreyan Chatterjee Studio Mix by Donald McDonald Producer Neil McCarthy

Seriously…
4. Bhopal on the Brink of Disaster

Seriously…

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 14:09


The Bhopal gas tragedy was the worlds worst industrial accident. Tens of thousands of people died and many more suffered long term illnesses when lethal methyl isocyanate gas leaked from the Union Carbide plant in the city in central India on 2nd December 1984. For the previous two years one man had been predicting that Bhopal was an accident waiting to happen. Forty years ago this month the Bhopali journalist Rajkumar Keswani wrote his first article warning of the dangers posed by safety lapses at the plant. During a dogged investigation pitting him against political power, corporate money and the indifference of the media and public opinion, he never gave up. This cinematic documentary series tells his story for the first time. Episode 4. Bhopal on the Brink of Disaster Keswani decides he must get the attention of law makers and show them his evidence. His safety concerns are raised in the State Assembly but the labour minister at the time bats them away giving Keswani the sense that Union Carbide is unimpeachable. He then petitions the Supreme Court of India, but gets no reply. Feeling somewhat defeated and with increasing financial woes, Keswani decides to take a steady job at a newspaper in a nearby city. But soon enough his conscience drags him back to Bhopal where he writes to the editors of national newspapers. He gets a big break, publishing a comprehensive account of his findings in a leading national daily. He waits for a response. Narrator Narinder Samra Written and researched by Anubha Yadav and Radhika Kapur Music and Sound Design by Shreyan Chatterjee Studio Mix by Donald McDonald Producer Neil McCarthy

Seriously…
3. Friendly Business

Seriously…

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 14:15


The Bhopal gas tragedy was the worlds worst industrial accident. Tens of thousands of people died and many more suffered long term illnesses when lethal methyl isocyanate gas leaked from the Union Carbide plant in the city in central India on 2nd December 1984. For the previous two years one man had been predicting that Bhopal was an accident waiting to happen. Forty years ago this month the Bhopali journalist Rajkumar Keswani wrote his first article warning of the dangers posed by safety lapses at the plant. During a dogged investigation pitting him against political power, corporate money and the indifference of the media and public opinion, he never gave up. This cinematic documentary series tells his story for the first time. Episode 3. Friendly Business The more Keswani investigates the more he finds a cosy relationship between Union Carbide and local politicians and journalists. He's determined to expose the nepotism he uncovers but yet again, his written warning to the city falls on deaf ears. His friends and family don't believe him either, apart from his wife. Money troubles don't help. But Keswani is sure he has truth on his side, and sets his sights on the highest court in the land. Narrator Narinder Samra Written and researched by Anubha Yadav and Radhika Kapur Music and Sound Design by Shreyan Chatterjee Studio Mix by Donald McDonald Producer Neil McCarthy

Grounds for Conversation
5| Apoorva Dixit: The Power of Remembrance

Grounds for Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 65:54


In episode five of Grounds for Conversation, Apoorva Dixit and I discuss her journey creating the podcast They Knew Which Way To Run. Created and hosted by Apoorva Dixit and Molly Mulroy, the limited podcast series is a recount of the Bhopal gas tragedy from the perspective of local survivors. We speak on the lessons she learned about developing relationships, perspectives on goal-setting, and the power of remembrance.If you enjoy Grounds for Conversation, are piqued by a particular segment of the conversation, or simply want to discuss any of the topics further, feel free to reach out to email provided below.If you feel compelled to donate: https://donate.bhopal.org/Podcast: https://theyknewwhichwaytorun.com/Contact Us: gfcpodcast@gmail.comContact the They Knew Which Way To Run Team: theyknewwhichwaytorun@gmail.com

The Suno India Show
In our opinion: Was offering remission to the culprits involved in Bilkis Bano's case an exception?

The Suno India Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 42:30


On August 15, 11 convicts in the case relating to Bilkis Bano during the 2002 Gujarat Riots were released. The 11 convicts were serving life sentences, and the jail time was commuted. Bilkis was 21 years old and five months pregnant when she was gang-raped while fleeing riots. In this incident, her three-year-old daughter along with six others were killed.Menaka and Padmapriya DVL discuss the stringent remission policy, its fairness in the context of Bilkis Bano convicts, and remission and other reformative practices that should be available to more prisoners. We spoke to Anup Surendranath, Nikita Sonavane, and Mrinalini Ravindranath. Anup Surendranath teaches law at the National Law University, Delhi and is the executive director of Project 39 A- a criminal justice programme which works with death penalty convicts, and others. Nikita is the co-founder of the Criminal Justice and Police Accountability Project in Bhopal, while Mrinalini works as a research assistant there. References Special Remission Azadi Ka Amrit Mahotsav (AKAM) (Module in ePrisons) Ministry of Home AffairsSection 435 in The Code Of Criminal Procedure, 1973Convicts in Bilkis Bano case came out on frequent parole as witnesses cited threats | Cities News,The Indian Express‘There is fear': Muslim families flee village, take shelter in relief colony | Cities News,The Indian ExpressBilkis Bano Case : Supreme Court Erred In Holding That Gujarat Govt Has Power To Decide Remission - Sr Adv Rebecca JohnFrom Segregation to Labour, Manu's Caste Law Governs the Indian Prison SystemSpecial Remission Azadi Ka Amrit Mahotsav (AKAM) (Module in ePrisons) Ministry of Home AffairsSee sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.

Anticipating The Unintended
#181 We Shall Overcome

Anticipating The Unintended

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 54:59


Happy Independence Day!- Pranay Kotasthane and RSJThis newsletter can often seem pessimistic about India. That isn’t true, though. Every year, on Independence Day, we remind ourselves and our readers why we write this newsletter. This is how we ended the Independence Day edition of 2020:“What we have achieved so far is precious. That’s worth reminding ourselves today. We will go back to writing future editions lamenting our state of affairs.We will do so because we know it’s worth it.”  This year we thought it would be fun (?) to run through every year since 1947 and ask ourselves what happened in the year that had long-term repercussions for our nation. This kind of thing runs a serious risk. It can get tedious and all too familiar. Most of us know the landmark events of recent history and what they meant for the nation. Maybe. Maybe not. We’ve given an honest try (of over 8000 words) to see if there’s a different way of looking at these familiar events and their impact on us. Here we go.1947 - 1960: Sense Of A Beginning 1947Perhaps the most significant “What, if?” question for independent India surfaced on 17th August 1947 when the Radcliffe Line was announced. The partition of the Indian subcontinent has cast a long shadow. What if it had never happened? What if Nehru-Jinnah-Gandhi were able to strike a modus vivendi within a one-federation framework? These questions surface every year around independence.The indelible human tragedy of the partition aside, would an Akhand Bharat have served its citizens better? We don’t think so. We agree with Ambedkar’s assessment of this question. In Pakistan or the Partition of India, he approaches the question with detachment and realism, concluding that the forces of “communal malaise” had progressed to such an extent that resisting a political division would have led to a civil war, making everyone worse off. The partition must have been handled better without the accompanying humanitarian disaster. But on the whole, the partition was inevitable by 1947.“That the Muslim case for Pakistan is founded on sentiment is far from being a matter of weakness; it is really its strong point. It does not need deep understanding of politics to know that the workability of a constitution is not a matter of theory. It is a matter of sentiment. A constitution, like clothes, must suit as well as please. If a constitution does not please, then however perfect it may be, it will not work. To have a constitution which runs counter to the strong sentiments of a determined section is to court disaster if not to invite rebellion.” [Read the entire book here]1948What if Mahatma Gandhi wasn’t killed that year? How would the course of our history change? Gandhi spoke like an idealist and worked like a realist. He was possibly the most aware of the gap between the lofty ideals of our constitution and the reality of the Indian minds then. He knew the adoption of the constitution was only half the work done. He’d likely have devoted the rest of his life to building a liberal India at the grassroots level. His death pushed a particular stream of right-wing Hindu consciousness underground. We still carry the burden of that unfinished work.1949The Constituent Assembly met for the first time in December 1946. By November 26th 1949, this assembly adopted a constitution for India. Even a half-constructed flyover in Koramangala has taken us five years. For more context, Pakistan’s Constituent Assembly began work on 10th August 1947, and their first constitution came into force in March 1956, only to be abrogated two years later. India’s founding fathers and mothers were acutely aware that they were elite, unelected, and unrepresentative of the median Indian. They dared to imagine a new nation-state while grappling with that period's harsh economic, social, and political realities. Their work should inspire us to strengthen, improve, and rebuild—but never to give up on—the Republic of India.For more, check out the miracle that is India’s Constitution in our Republic Day 2021 special edition.1950We have written about our Constitution a number of times. It is an inspiring and audacious document in its ambition to shape a modern nation. It has its flaws. Some consider it too liberal; others think it makes the State overbearing. Some find it too long; others feel it comes up short. This may all be true. However, there is no doubt our constitution has strengthened our democracy, protected the weak and continues to act as a tool for social change. It is our North Star. And a damn good one at that. 1951Few post-independence institutions have stood the test of time as the Finance Commission (FC), first established in 1951. In federal systems, horizontal and vertical imbalances in revenue generation and expenditure functions are commonplace. Closing the gap requires an impartial institution that is well-regarded by various levels of government and the people. The Finance Commission is that institution.It’s not as if it didn’t face any challenges. As a constitutional body established under article 280 of the Constitution, it was sidelined by an extra-constitutional and powerful Planning Commission until 2014. But we have had 15 FCs in total, and each key tax revenue-sharing recommendation has become government policy.1952Our Constitution adopted a universal adult franchise as the basis for elections. Every citizen was to be part of the democratic project. There was to be no bar on age, sex, caste or education. And this was to be done in one of the most unequal societies in the world. The ambition was breathtaking. To put this in context, women were allowed to vote in Switzerland only in 1971. Not only did we aim for this, but we also moved heaven and earth to achieve it in 1952. In his book India After Gandhi, Ram Guha describes the efforts of the government officials led by the first Election Commissioner, Sukumar Sen, to reach the last man or woman for their ballot. The elites may lament vote bank politics or cash for votes scams and question the wisdom of universal franchise. But we shouldn’t have had it any other way. And, for the record, our people have voted with remarkable sophistication in our short independent history. 1953 For a new nation-state, the Republic of India punched above its weight in bringing hostilities on the Korean peninsula to an end. Not only did the Indian government’s work shape the Armistice Agreement, but it also chaired a Neutral Nations Repatriation Commission (NNRC) that was set up to decide the future of nearly 20,000 prisoners of war from both sides. This experience during the Cold War strengthened India’s advocacy of the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM).  1954Article 25 guaranteed the freedom of conscience and the freedom to profess, practice, and propagate religion to all citizens. But how does one define a religious practice? And can a practice under the garb of religion breach the boundary of individual rights or public morality? This is a familiar conflict zone in secular States and would inevitably show up in India because everything in India can be construed as a religious practice. Like Ambedkar said during the constituent assembly debates:“The religious conceptions in this country are so vast that they cover every aspect of life from birth to death…there is nothing extraordinary in saying that we ought to strive hereafter to limit the definition of religion in such a manner that we shall not extend it beyond beliefs and such rituals as may be connected with ceremonials which are essentially religious..."In 1954, the Supreme Court gave a landmark judgment on what constitutes a religious practice in what’s known as the Shirur Math case. It held that the term religion would cover all practices integral to that religion. Further, the Court will determine what practice will be deemed essential with reference to doctrines within that religion itself.This test of ‘essentiality’ in religion has kept the public, the legislature and the courts busy since (entry of women in Sabarimala, headscarf in Islam, to name two). The outcome has bent towards individual liberty in most contexts, but the ambiguity in the definition of essential means it could go the other way too.1955Another wild "What, if” moment that we like to recall relates to Milton Friedman’s visit to the Indian finance ministry in 1955. What shape would India’s economy have taken had his seminal document “A Memorandum to the Government of India 1955” been heeded?In this note, Friedman gets to the root of India’s macroeconomic problems—an overburdened investment policy, restrictive policies towards the private sector, erratic monetary policy, and a counterproductive exchange control regime. Being bullish about India’s prospects was courageous when most observers wrote epitaphs about the grand Indian experiment. But Friedman was hopeful and critical both.The Indian government, for its part, was humble enough to seek the advice of foreigners from opposing schools of thought. At the same time, it was too enamoured by the Soviet command and control model. In fact, many items from Friedman’s note can be repurposed as economic reforms even today.Here’re our points from Friedman’s note.1956The idea of One Nation, One ‘X’ (language, election, song, tax, choose any other) is both powerful and seductive. It is not new, however. Back in the 50s, there was a view that we must not strengthen any identity that divides us. So when the question of reorganisation of the colonial provinces into new states came up, an argument was made that it must be done on factors other than language. Nehru, ever the modernist, thought the creation of language-based states would lead us down the path of ethnic strife. The example of nation-states in Europe built on language in the 19th century and the two devastating world wars thereafter were too recent then. So, he demurred.Agitation, hunger strikes and deaths followed before we chose language as the primary basis for reorganising the states. It was perhaps the best decision taken by us in the 50s. As the years since have shown, only a polity assured of its heritage and identity will voluntarily accept diversity. The melding of our diversity into a single identity cannot be a top-down imposition. We should never forget this.1957India’s economic strategy of state-led industrialisation through deficit financing in pursuit of import substitution took off with the Second Five-Year Plan. Heavy industries needed imported machinery, inflating India’s import bill. Since the exchange rate was pegged to the British pound, it meant that Indian exports became pricier. This imbalance between rising imports and flagging exports was financed by running down the foreign exchange reserves. By 1957, India witnessed its first foreign exchange crisis. This event had a significant effect on India’s economy. Instead of devaluing the rupee, the government opted for foreign exchange budgeting - every investment in a project needed government approval for the foreign exchange required to buy foreign inputs. The immediate crisis in 1957 led to controls that worsened India’s economic prospects over the next 35 years.1958The government nationalised all insurance companies a couple of years earlier. India hadn’t gotten into a socialist hell yet, so this was a bit of a surprise. The proximate cause was a fraud that few private life insurers had committed by misusing the policyholders’ funds to help their industrialist friends. A run-of-the-mill white-collar crime that should have been dealt with by the criminal justice system. But the government viewed it as a market failure and moved to nationalise the entire industry. It would take another 45 years for private players to come back to insurance. Insurance penetration in India meanwhile remained among the lowest in the world.  Also, in 1958, Feroze Gandhi took to the floor of Lok Sabha to expose how LIC, the state insurer, had diverted its funds to help Haridas Mundhra, a Calcutta-based businessman. The same crime that private insurers had done.The government would repeat this pattern of getting involved where there was no market failure. The outcomes would inevitably turn out to be worse. Seven decades later, we remain instinctively socialist and wary of capital. Our first reaction to something as trifling as a surge price by Ola or a service charge levied by restaurants is to ask the State to interfere.1959“The longest guest of the Indian government”, the 14th Dalai Lama pre-empted the Chinese government’s plans for his arrest and escaped to India. Not only did India provide asylum, but it also became home to more than a hundred thousand Tibetans. Because of the bold move by the Indian government in 1959, the Central Tibetan Administration continues its struggle as a Nation and a State in search of regaining control over their Country to this day. This event also changed India-China relations for the decades to come.1960Search as hard as we might; we hardly got anything worth discussing for this year. Maybe we were all sitting smugly waiting for an avalanche of crisis to come our way. Steel plants, dams and other heavy industries were being opened. The budget outlay for agriculture was reduced. We were talking big on the international stage about peace and non-alignment. But if you had looked closer, things were turning pear-shaped. The many dreams of our independence were turning sour.The 60s: Souring Of The Dream1961The Indian Army marched into Goa in December 1961. The 450-year Portuguese colonial rule ended, and the last colonial vestige in India was eliminated. It took this long because Portugal’s dictator Antonio Salazar stuck to his guns on controlling Portuguese colonies in the subcontinent, unlike the British and the French. Portugal’s membership in NATO further made it difficult for the Indian government to repeat the operations in Hyderabad and Junagadh. Nevertheless, that moment eventually arrived in 1961. This was also the year when India’s first indigenous aircraft, the HAL HF-24 Marut, took its first flight. Made in Bengaluru by German designer Kurt Tank, the aircraft was one of the first fighter jets made outside the developed world. The aircraft served well in the war that came a decade later. It never lived up to its promises, but it became a matter of immense pride and confidence for a young nation-state.1962Among the lowest points in the history of independent India. We’ve written about our relationship with China many times in the past editions. The 1962 war left a deep impact on our psyche. We didn’t recover for the rest of the decade. The only good thing out of it was the tempering of idealism in our approach to international relations. That we take a more realist stance these days owes its origins to the ‘betrayal’ of 1962.1963ISRO launched the first sounding rocket in November 1963. Over the years, this modest beginning blossomed into a programme with multiple launch vehicles. The satellite programmes also took off a few years later, making India a mighty player in the space sector. 1964If you told anyone alive in 1964 that less than 60 years later, Nehru would be blamed for all that was wrong with India by a substantial segment of its population, they would have laughed you out of the room. But here we are in 2022, and there’s never a day that passes without a WhatsApp forward that talks about Nehru’s faults. It seems inevitable that by the time we celebrate the centenary of our independence, he would be a borderline reviled figure in our history. But that would be an aberration. In the long arc of history, he will find his due as a flawed idealist who laid the foundation of modern India. 1964 was the end of an era.1965As the day when Hindi would become the sole official language of the Indian Union approached, the anti-Hindi agitation in the Madras presidency morphed into riots. Many people died in the protests, and it led to the current equilibrium on language policy. The “one State, one language” project moved to the back burner, even as Hindi became an important link language across the country. The lesson was the same as in the case of the 1956 states reorganisation: melding our diversity into a single identity cannot be a top-down imposition.1966The two wars in the decade's first half, the inefficient allocation of capital driven by the second and third five-year plans, and the consecutive monsoon failure meant India was on the brink in 1966. The overnight devaluation of the Rupee by over 50 per cent, the timely help with food grains from the US and some providence pulled us back from it. The green revolution followed, and we have remained self-sufficient in food since.The experience of being on the brink taught us nothing. We still believe in the Pigouvian theory of market failure, where government policies are expected to deliver optimality.  Strangely, the idea that we reform only in crisis has only strengthened. There cannot be worse ways to change oneself than under the shadow of a crisis. But we have made a virtue out of it.1967This was the year when the Green Revolution took baby steps, and the Ehlrichian prediction about India’s impending doom was put to rest. But it was also the year when the Indian government made a self-goal by adopting a policy called items reserved for manufacture exclusively by the small-scale sector. By reserving whole product lines for manufacturing by small industries, this policy kept Indian firms small and uncompetitive. And like all bad ideas, it had a long life. The last 20 items on this list were removed only in April 2015. We wrote about this policy here. 1968In the past 75 years, we have reserved some of our worst public policies for the education sector. We have an inverted pyramid. A handful of tertiary educational institutions produce world-class graduates at the top. On the other end, we have a total failure to provide quality primary education to the masses. It is not because of a lack of intent. The National Education Policy (NEP) that first came up in 1968 is full of ideas, philosophy and a desire to take a long-term view about education in India. But it was unmoored from the economic or social reality of the nation. We often say here that we shouldn’t judge a policy based on its intentions. That there’s no such thing as a good policy but bad implementation because thinking about what can work is part of policy itself. NEP is Exhibit A in favour of this argument.1969 The nationalisation of 14 private-sector banks was a terrible assault on economic freedom under the garb of serving the public interest. The sudden announcement of a change in ownership of these banks was challenged in the courts, but the government managed to thwart it with an ordinance. Fifty years later, we still have low credit uptake even as governments continue to recapitalise loss-making banks with taxpayer money.1970The dominant economic thinking at the beginning of the 70s in India placed the State at the centre of everything. But that wasn’t how the world was moving. There was a serious re-examination of the relationship between the State and the market happening elsewhere. The eventual shift to a deregulated, small government economic model would happen by the decade's end. This shift mostly passed India by. But there were a few voices who questioned the state orthodoxy and, in some ways, sowed the intellectual seeds for liberalisation in future. In 1970, Jagdish Bhagwati and Padma Desai published their monograph, India: Planning for Industrialisation, which argued that our economic policies since independence had crippled us. It showed with data how central planning, import substitution, public sector-led industrial policy and license raj have failed. But it found no takers. In fact, we doubled down on these failed policies for the rest of the decade. It was a tragedy foretold. What if someone had gone against the consensus and paid attention to that paper? That dissent could perhaps have been the greatest service to the nation. It is useful to remember this today when any scepticism about government policies is met with scorn. Dissent is good. The feeblest of the voice might just be right.The 70s: Losing The Plot1971Kissinger visited China in July 1971 via Pakistan. Responding to the changing world order, India and the USSR signed an Indo–Soviet Treaty of Peace, Friendship and Cooperation in August of that year. India had become an ally of the USSR. Four months later, the India-Pakistan war pitted India and the USSR against Pakistan, China, and the US. The Indian strategic community came to internalise USSR as a super-reliable partner and the West as a supporter of India’s foes. It took another three decades, and the collapse of the USSR, for a change in this thinking. Even today, Russia finds massive support in the Indian strategic establishment. We had problematised this love for Russia here. 1972India won the 1972 war with Pakistan and liberated Bangladesh. India’s unilateral action stopped a humanitarian disaster. The victory was decisive, and the two parties met in Simla to agree on the way forward. This should have been a slam dunk for India in resolving festering issues on the international boundary, Kashmir and the role of the third parties. But international diplomacy is a two-level game, and Bhutto played that to his advantage. We explained this in edition 30. We paid a high price for giving away that win to Bhutto.1973The Kesavananda Bharti verdict of the Supreme Court rescued the Republic of India from a rampaging authoritarian. The basic structure doctrine found a nice balance to resolve the tension between constitutional immutability and legislative authority to amend the constitution. Bibhu Pani discussed this case in more detail here. 1974You are the State. Here are your crimes. You force import substitution, you regulate the currency, you misallocate capital, you let the public sector and a handful of licensed private players produce inferior quality products at a high cost, you raise the marginal tax rate at the highest level to 97 per cent, you run a large current account deficit, and you cannot control Rupee depreciation.Result?People find illegal ways to bring in foreign goods, currency and gold. And so was born the villain of every urban Bollywood film of the 70s. And a career option for a capitalist-minded kid like me. The Smuggler.But the State isn’t the criminal here. The smuggler is. And the State responded with a draconian law to beat all others. An act the knowledge of whose expanded form would serve kids well in those school quizzes of the 80s. COFEPOSA — The Conservation of Foreign Exchange and Prevention of Smuggling Act. A predatory state's defining feature is how it forces ordinary citizens to do unlawful activities. COFEPOSA was the mother of such laws. It has spawned many children. 1975This blank editorial by the Indian Express says it all. 1976We view our population as a core problem. The politicians, the public servants and the ordinary citizens share this view. We don’t want to acknowledge our governance deficit. Calling population a problem allows us to shirk the responsibility of running a functioning State. We have written about the flaw in thinking about the population as a problem on many occasions.How far could we go to control the population? Well, in 1976, during the peak of the Emergency, the State decided to sterilise male citizens against their wishes. This madness ended when the Emergency was lifted. But even today calls for population control keep coming back. 1977The first non-Congress union government was an important milestone for the Indian Republic. While Morarji Desai’s government did reverse the worst excesses of the Emergency rule, its economic policies were less successful. This period went on to witness a demonetisation in search of black money (2016 from the future says Hi!), and the same old counter-productive policies in search of self-reliance.1978Despite all available evidence that statist socialism was an abject failure, the Janata government that came to power decided to double down on it. One of the great ideas of the time was to force MNCs to reduce their stake in their Indian subsidiaries to below 40 per cent. A handful agreed, but the large corporations quit India. One of those who left was IBM in 1978. The many existing installations of IBM computers needed services and maintenance. In a delightful case of unintended consequences, this led to the nationalisation of IBM’s services division (later called CMC). Domestic companies started to serve this niche. Soon there were the likes of Infosys, Wipro and HCL building a business on this. CMC provided a good training ground for young engineers. And so, the Indian IT services industry got underway. It would change the lives of educated Indians forever.1979In a classic case of violating the Tinbergen rule, the Mandal Commission recommended that the reservation policy should be used to address relative deprivation. While the earlier reservations for oppressed castes stood on firm ground as a means for addressing unconscionable historical wrongs, the Mandal Commission stretched the logic too far. Its recommendation would eventually make reservation policy the go-to solution for any group that could flex its political muscles. We wrote about it here. 1980After ditching the Janata experiment and running out of ideas to keep Jan Sangh going, the BJP was formed. It wasn’t a momentous political occasion of any sort then. A party constitution that aimed for Gandhian socialism and offered vague promises of a uniform civil code and nationalism didn’t excite many. Everything else that would propel the party in later years was to be opportunistic add-ons to the ideology. The founding leaders, Advani and Vajpayee, would have been shocked if you told them what the party would be like, four decades later.The 80s: A Million Mutinies Now1981This year witnessed a gradual shift away from doctrinaire socialism in economic policymaking. “The Indira Gandhi government lifted restrictions on the expansion of production, permitted new private borrowing abroad, and continued the liberalisation of import controls,” wrote Walter Anderson. The government also “allowed” some price rises, leading to increased production of key input materials. The government also permitted foreign companies to compete in drilling rights in India. All in all, a year that witnessed changes for the better. 1982The great textile strike of Bombay in 1982 was inevitable. The trade unions had gotten so powerful that there was a competitive race to the bottom on who could be more militant. Datta Samant emerged intent on breaking the monopoly of RMMS on the city's workers. And he did this with ever spiralling demands from mill owners in a sector that was already bloated with overheads and facing competition from far eastern economies. There was no way to meet these demands. The owners locked the mills and left. Never to come back. The old, abandoned mills remained. The workers remained. Without jobs, without prospects and with kids who grew up angry and unemployed. The rise of Shiv Sena, political goondaism and a malevolent form of underworld followed. Bombay changed forever. It was all inevitable.1983The Nellie massacre in Assam and the Dhilwan bus massacre in Punjab represent the year 1983. Things seemed really dark back then. It seemed that the doomsayers would be proved right about India. Eventually, though, the Indian Republic prevailed. 1984Her Sikh bodyguards assassinated India Gandhi. The botched Punjab policy of the previous five years came a full circle with it. An unforgivable backlash against innocent Sikhs followed. A month later, deadly gas leaked out of a Union Carbide factory in Bhopal, killing and paralysing thousands. 1984 will rank among the worst years of our republic. There were two silver linings in retrospect. One, we would learn to manage secessionist movements better from the harrowing Punjab experience. Two, had Indira continued, would we have had 1991? Our guess is no.1985This was an eventful year in retrospect. Texas Instruments set up shop in Bangalore. It was to begin one of modern India’s true success stories on the world stage. This was also the year when the Anti-defection law transformed the relationship between the voter and her representative. Political parties became all-powerful, and people’s representatives were reduced to political party agents. We have written about this changing dynamic here. This was also the year when the then commerce minister, VP Singh, visited Malaysia. The visit was significant for India because it served as a reference point for Singh when he visited that country again in 1990, now as the Prime minister. Surprised by Malaysia’s transformation in five years, he asked his team to prepare a strategy paper for economic reforms. This culminated in the “M” document, which became a blueprint for reforms when the time for the idea eventually came in 1991.1986Who is a citizen of India?  This vexing question roiled Assam in the early 80s. The student union protests against the widespread immigration of Bangladeshis turned violent, and things had turned ugly by 1985. The Assam accord of 1985 sought to settle the state's outstanding issues,, including deporting those who arrived after 1971 and a promise to amend the Citizenship Act. The amended Citizenship Act of 1986 restricted the citizenship of India to those born before 1987 only if either of their parents were born in India. That meant children of couples who were illegal immigrants couldn’t be citizens of India simply by virtue of their birth in India. That was that, or so we thought.But once you’ve amended the definition of who can be a citizen of India, you have let the genie out. The events of 2019 will attest to that.1987Rajiv Gandhi’s ill-fated attempt to replicate Indira Gandhi’s success through military intervention in another country began in 1987. In contrast to the 1971 involvement, where Indian forces had the mass support of the local populace, the Indian Peacekeeping Force (IPKF) got itself embroiled in a bitter Sri Lankan civil war. Not only did this involvement end in a failure, it eventually led to Rajiv Gandhi’s brutal murder in a terrorist attack. The policy lesson internalised by the strategic community was that India must stay far away from developing and deploying forces overseas.1988Most government communication is propaganda in disguise. However, there are those rare occasions when government messaging transcends the ordinary. In 1988, we saw that rare bird during the peak era of a single government channel running on millions of black and white TV sets across India. A government ad that meant something to all of us and that would remain with us forever. Mile Sur Mera Tumhara got everything right - the song, the singers, the storyline and that ineffable thing called the idea of India. No jingoism, no chest beating about being the best country in the world and no soppy sentimentalism. Just a simple message - we might all sing our own tunes, but we are better together. This is a timeless truth. No nation in history has become better by muting the voice of a section of their own people. Mile Sur Mera Tumhara, Toh Sur Bane Hamara, indeed.  19891989 will be remembered as the year when the Indian government capitulated to the demands of Kashmiri terrorists in the Rubaiya Sayeed abduction case. It would spark off a series of kidnappings and act as a shot in the arm of radicals. 1990VP Singh dusted off the decade-long copy of the Mandal Commission report and decided to implement it. This wasn’t an ideological revolution. It was naked political opportunism. However, three decades later, the dual impact of economic reforms and social engineering has increased social mobility than ever before. Merit is still a matter of debate in India. But two generations of affirmative action in many of the progressive states have shown the fears of merit being compromised were overblown. The task is far from finished, but Mandal showed that sometimes you need a big bang to get things going, even if your intentions were flawed.1990 also saw the exodus of Kashmiri Pandits (KPs) from the valley. A tragedy that would bookend a decade of strife and violence in India. The only lesson one should draw from the sad plight of KPs is that the State and the people must protect minority rights. We’re not sure that’s what we have taken away from it. And that’s sad.The 90s: Correcting The Course1991With the benefit of hindsight, the 1991 economic reforms seem inevitable. But things could well have been different. In the minority government, powerful voices advocated in favour of debt restructuring instead of wholesale reforms. In the end, the narrative that these changes were merely a continuation—and not abandonment—of Nehru and Indira Gandhi’s vision for India carried the day. This political chicanery deserves some credit for transforming the life of a billion Indians. 1992Harshad Mehta scammed the stock markets. It wasn’t a huge scam. Nor did it hurt the ordinary Indians. Fewer than 1% invested in markets back then. Yet, the scam did something important. It set in motion a series of reforms that made our capital markets stronger and safer for ordinary investors. Notably, over the years, Mehta came to be seen as some kind of robber baron figure. Capitalism needed an anti-hero to catch the imagination of people. Someone who could reprise in the 90s the Bachchan-esque angry young man roles of the 70s. Mehta might not have been that figure exactly, but he helped a generation transition to the idea that greed could indeed be good.Also, Babri Masjid was brought down by a mob of kar sevaks in 1992. It will remain a watershed moment in our history. The Supreme Court judgement of 2019 might be the final judicial word on it. But we will carry the scars for a long time.1993The tremors of the demolition of the Babri Masjid were felt in 1993. Twelve bombs went off in Bombay on one fateful day. The involvement of the city’s mafia groups was established. The tragic event finally led to the government rescuing the city from the underworld. Not to forget, the Bombay underworld directly resulted from government policies such as prohibition and gold controls. 1994One of the great acts of perversion in our democracy was the blatant abuse of Section 356 of the constitution that allowed the union to dismiss a state government at the slightest pretext. Indira Gandhi turned this into an art form. S. R. Bommai, whose government in Karnataka was dismissed in this manner in 1988, took his case up to the Supreme Court. In 1994, the court delivered a verdict that laid out the guidelines to prevent the abuse of Section 356. It is one of the landmark judgments of the court and restored some parity in Union and state relationship.Article 356 has been used sparingly since. We are a better democracy because of it.1995India joined the WTO, and the first-ever mobile phone call was made this year. But 1995 will forever be remembered as the year when Ganesha idols started drinking milk. This event was a precursor to the many memes, information cascades, and social proofs that have become routine in the information age. 1996Union budgets in India are occasions for dramatic policy announcements. It is a mystery why a regular exercise of presenting the government's accounts should become a policy event. But that’s the way we roll. In 1996 and 1997, P. Chidambaram presented them as the FM of a weak ragtag coalition called the United Front. But he presented two budgets for the ages. The rationalisation of income tax slabs and the deregulation of interest rates created a credit culture that led to the eventual consumption boom in the next decade. We still carry that consumption momentum.1997The creation of the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) is an important public policy milestone for India. By no means perfect, the setting up of TRAI helped overturn a norm where government departments were both players and umpires. TRAI made the separation of “steering” and “rowing” functions a new normal. That template has been copied in several sectors thereafter, most recently in the liberalisation of the space sector. 1998India did Pokhran 2, which gave it the capability to build thermonuclear weapons. We faced sanctions and global condemnation. But the growing economy and a sizeable middle class meant those were soon forgotten. Economic might can let you get away with a lot. We have seen it happen to us, but it is a lesson we don’t understand fully.Also, in 1998, Sonia Gandhi jumped into active politics. The Congress that was ambling towards some sort of internal democracy decided to jettison it all and threw its weight behind the dynasty. It worked out for them for a decade or so. But where are they now? Here’s a question. What if Sonia didn’t join politics then? Congress might have split. But who knows, maybe those splinters might have coalesced in the future with a leader chosen by the workers. And we would have had a proper opposition today with a credible leader.1999This was a landmark year for public policy. For the first time, a union government-run company was privatised wholly. We wrote about the three narratives of disinvestment here. 2000We have a weak, extended and over-centralised state. And to go with it, we have large, unwieldy states and districts that make the devolution of power difficult. In 2000, we created three new states to facilitate administrative convenience. On balance, it has worked well. Despite the evidence, we have managed to create only one more state since. The formation of Telangana was such a political disaster that it will take a long time before we make the right policy move of having smaller states. It is a pity.The 2000s: The Best Of Times2001Not only was the Agra Summit between Musharraf and Vajpayee a dud, but it was followed by a terrorist attack on the Indian parliament. It confirmed a pattern: PM-level bilateral meetings made the Pakistani military-jihadi complex jittery, and it invariably managed to spike such moves with terrorist attacks. 2002There was Godhra and the riots that followed. What else is there to say?2003The Fiscal Responsibility and Budget Management (FRBM) Act and the Civil Services Pension Reform are two policy successes with many lessons for future policymakers. We have discussed these on many occasions. 2004The NDA government called for an early election, confident about its prospects. India Shining, its campaign about how good things were, wasn’t too far from the truth. It is how many of us felt during that time. The NDA government had sustained the reform momentum of the 90s with some of the best minds running the key departments. Its loss was unexpected. Chandrababu Naidu, a politician who fashioned himself like a CEO, was taken to the cleaners in Andhra Pradesh. Apparently, economic reforms didn’t get you votes. The real India living in villages was angry at being left out. That was the lesson for politicians from 2004. Or, so we were told.Such broad narratives with minimal factual analysis backing them have flourished in the public policy space. There is no basis for them. The loss of NDA in 2004 came down to two states. Anti-incumbency in Andhra Pradesh where a resurgent Congress under YS Reddy beat TDP, a constituent of NDA. TDP lost by similar margins (in vote share %) across the state in all demographics in both rural and urban areas. There was no rural uprising against Naidu because of his tech-savvy, urban reformist image. Naidu lost because the other party ran a better campaign. Nothing else. The other mistake of the NDA was in choosing to partner with the ruling AIADMK in Tamil Nadu (TN) over DMK. TN was famous for not giving split verdicts. It swung to extremes between these two parties in every election. And that’s what happened as AIADMK drew a blank.Yet, the false lesson of 2004 has played on the minds of politicians since. We haven’t gotten back on track on reforms in the true sense. 2005The Right to Information Act and the National Rural Employment Guarantee Act came into force in 2005. The “right to X” model of governance took root.2006In March 2006, George W Bush visited India and signed the Civil Nuclear Cooperation Agreement with Manmohan Singh. From facing sanctions in 1998 for Pokhran 2 to the 123 Agreement, this was a victory for Indian diplomacy and its rising status in the world. You would think this would have had bipartisan support among the political class in India. Well, the Left that was part of UPA and the BJP that worked on the deal when it was in power, opposed it. Many shenanigans later, the deal was passed in the parliament in 2008. It is often said there’s no real ideological divide among parties in India. This view can be contested on various grounds. But events like the opposition to the nuclear deal make you wonder if there are genuine ideological positions on key policy issues in India. Many sound policy decisions are opposed merely for the sake of it. Ideology doesn’t figure anywhere. 2007It was the year when the Left parties were out-lefted. In Singur and Nandigram, protests erupted over land acquisition for industrial projects. The crucible of the resulting violence created a new political force. As for the investment, the capital took a flight to other places. The tax on capital ended up being a tax on labour. Businesses stayed away from West Bengal. The citadel of Left turned into its mausoleum.2008Puja Mehra in her book The Lost Decade traces the origin of India losing its way following the global financial crisis to the Mumbai terror attack of 2008. Shivraj Patil, the home minister, quit following the attack and Chidambaram was shifted from finance to fill in. For reasons unknown, Pranab Mukherjee, a politician steeped in the 70s-style-Indira-Gandhi socialism, was made the FM. Mehra makes a compelling case of how that one decision stalled reforms, increased deficit and led to runaway inflation over the next three years. Till Chidambaram was brought back to get the house in order, it was too late, and we were halfway into a lost decade. It is remarkable how bad policies always seem easy to implement while good policies take ages to get off the blocks.2009The Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI) was established in January 2009 to architect a unique digital identity for persons in a country where low rates of death and birth registrations made fake and duplicate identities a means for corruption and denial of service. Under the Modi government, the digital identity — Aadhaar — became the fulcrum of several government services. This project also set the stage for later projects such as the Unified Payments Interface (UPI) and Abha (Health ID).2010There’s petty corruption everywhere in India. It is pervasive. Not surprisingly, it is one political issue leading to mass movements in India. The anti-corruption mood gripped India in 2010 on the back of the 2G spectrum scam, where the chief accountant of the government claimed a notional loss of about Rs. 1.8 trillion to the exchequer. Auctioning of natural resources wasn’t exactly a transparent process then. It was evident there was a scam in the allotment of the 2G spectrum. But the 1.8 trillion number was a wild exaggeration that anyone with a semblance of business understanding could see through. It didn’t matter. That number caught the imagination. UPA 2 never recovered from it. More importantly, the auction policy for resources was distorted forever. We still suffer the consequences.The 2010s: Missed Opportunity2011India’s last case of wild poliovirus was detected in 2011. Until about the early 1990s, an average of 500 to 1000 children got paralysed daily in India. The original target for eradication was the year 2000. Nevertheless, we got there eleven years later. India’s pulse polio campaign has since become a source of confidence for public policy execution in India. We internalised the lesson that the Indian government can sometimes deliver through mission mode projects. 2012If you cannot solve a vexing public policy issue, turn it into a Right. It won’t work, but it will seem like you’ve done everything. After years of trying to get the national education policy right, the government decided it was best to make education a fundamental right in the Constitution. Maybe that will make the problem go away. A decade later, nothing has changed, but we have an additional right to feel good about.2013This year saw the emergence of AAP as a political force via the anti-corruption movement. AAP combines the classic elements of what makes a political party successful in India - statist instincts, focus on aam aadmi issues, populism and ideological flexibility. Importantly, it is good at telling its own version of some future utopia rather than questioning the utopia of others. 2014The BJP came to power with many promises; the most alluring of them was ‘minimum government, maximum governance’. Over the past eight years it has claimed success in meeting many of its promises, but even its ardent supporters won’t claim any success on minimum government. In fact, it has gone the other way. That a party with an immensely popular PM, election machinery that rivals the best in the world, and virtually no opposition cannot shake us off our instinctive belief in the State's power never ceases to surprise us.2015The murder of a person by a mob on the charges of eating beef was the first clear indication of the upsurge of a new violent, majoritarian polity. It was also one of the early incidents in India of radically networked communities using social media for self-organisation. Meanwhile, 2015 also witnessed the signing of a landmark boundary agreement between India and Bangladesh, which ended the abomination called the third-order enclave. The two States exchanged land peacefully, upholding the principle that citizen well-being trumps hardline interpretations of territorial integrity. 2016There will be many case studies written in future about demonetisation. Each one of them will end with a single conclusion. Public policy requires discussion and consensus, not stealth and surprise. We hope we have learnt our lesson from it.2017Until 2017, many in India still held the hope of a modus vivendi with China. Some others were enamoured by the Chinese model of governance. However, the Doklam crisis in 2017, and the Galwan clashes in 2020, changed all that. Through this miscalculation, China alienated a full generation of Indians, led to better India-US relations, and energised India to shift focus away from merely managing a weak Pakistan, and toward raising its game for competing with a stronger adversary. For this reason, we wrote a thank you note to Xi Jinping here. 2018It took years of efforts by the LGBTQ community to get Section 377 scrapped. In 2018, they partially won when the Supreme Court diluted Section 377 to exclude all kinds of adult consensual sexual behaviour. The community could now claim equal constitutional status as others. There’s still some distance to go for the State to acknowledge non-heterosexual unions and provide for other civil rights to the community. But the gradual acceptance of the community because of decriminalisation is a sign that our society doesn’t need moral policing or lectures to judge what’s good for it.2019The J&K Reorganisation Act changed the long-standing political status quo in Kashmir. Three years on, the return to political normalcy and full statehood still awaits. While a response by Pakistan was expected, it was China that fomented trouble in Ladakh, leading to the border clashes in 2020. 2020We have written multiple pieces on farm laws in the past year. The repeal of these laws, which were fundamentally sound because of a vocal minority, is the story of public policy in India. Good policies are scuttled because of the absence of consultation, an unclear narrative, opportunistic politicking or plain old hubris. We write this newsletter in the hope of changing this. 2021The second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic left behind many bereaved families. People are still trying to pick up the pieces. The sadness was also interrupted by frustration because of the delays in getting the vaccination programme going. India benefited immensely from domestic vaccine manufacturing capability in the private sector. Despite many twists and turns in vaccine pricing and procurements, the year ended with over 1 billion administered doses. In challenging times, the Indian State, markets, and society did come together to fight the pandemic. So, here we are. In the 75th independent year of this beautiful, fascinating and often exasperating nation. We are a work in progress. We might walk slowly, but we must not walk backwards. May we all live in a happy, prosperous and equal society. Thanks for reading Anticipating the Unintended! Subscribe for free to receive new posts and support our work. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit publicpolicy.substack.com

covid-19 tv ceo europe china peace state british french west russia chinese government friendship german lgbtq left public congress indian political supreme court court overcome union states portugal muslims businesses whatsapp islam emergency switzerland insurance economic responding korean prevention republic constitution pakistan tn prime independence day ibm capitalism twelve steel cold war nato malaysia conservation domestic indians soviet portuguese result george w bush fifty singh agreement bangladesh surprised hindu mumbai dalai lama bollywood gandhi hindi xi jinping north star friedman cooperation ideology ussr rs pakistani merit tibetans bangalore anticipating kashmir modi importantly notably dissent bombay lic calcutta nda mehta mahatma gandhi strangely goa fcs sri lankan indo punjab cmc wto happy independence day trai one nation hyderabad partition 2g milton friedman aap bangladeshi smuggler unintended assam information act memorandum bjp bengaluru karnataka ganesha sikhs foreign exchange agitation nep texas instruments west bengal infosys madras ladakh green revolution upa planning commission bhopal hcl india pakistan india china rupee kashmiri nehru wipro andhra pradesh mehra united front republic day indira gandhi naidu mncs mandal telangana ambedkar tdp indian express aadhaar bhutto lost decade lok sabha industrialisation auctioning gandhian advani dmk india us constituent assembly kps indian it shiv sena rajiv gandhi bachchan manmohan singh chidambaram sonia gandhi union carbide citizenship act indian state babri masjid musharraf janata sabarimala aiadmk doklam vajpayee tinbergen walter anderson ram guha chandrababu naidu jagdish bhagwati pranay kotasthane
ThePrint
ThePrintPod: ‘WhatsApp beheading warning, crypto debt, body cut' — many pieces in Bhopal student death puzzle

ThePrint

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 7:56


Nishank Rathore, 20, was found dead on railway tracks soon after a post about 'beheading' as punishment for insulting Prophet appeared on his Instagram profile. Police deny foul play. ----more---- https://theprint.in/india/whatsapp-beheading-warning-crypto-debt-body-cut-many-pieces-in-bhopal-student-death-puzzle/1059668/ 

Daily Dose
Daily Dose Ep 1091: FIR against Mahua Moitra, UK government crisis

Daily Dose

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 8:59


Tanishka Sodhi brings you the news from the Supreme Court, Rajasthan, Bhopal, and the UK. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

They Knew Which Way to Run
Episode 6: We're Not Flowers - We're Fire

They Knew Which Way to Run

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 42:18


In Episode 6, we discuss how Bhopal may be today if the Tragedy had not happened, how the survivor-activists have changed since then, and the unbelievable heights they've reached present-day.

Glass Half Healthy
Do Not Disturb: Your Sleep in Modern Times with Dr. Nishi Bhopal, MD

Glass Half Healthy

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 40:11


Are modern times getting in your way of a good night's rest? If so, Dr. Nishi Bhopal is here to help! Dr. Bhopal is triple board certified in Psychiatry, Sleep Medicine, and Integrative Holistic Medicine. She is the founder of IntraBalance Integrative Psychiatry & Sleep in San Francisco and is a founding member of the SameHere Psych Alliance, a global initiative to reduce the stigma around mental health. Her passion is making mental wellness and the science of sleep easy to understand and accessible to all. In this episode, we discuss all things sleep. Dr. Bhopal goes over why sleep is so crucial for your overall health. From there, we explore the problems caused by modern life that make the quality of our sleep so difficult to successfully achieve in the present day, like the usage of smart phones before bedtime. Dr. Bhopal also talks about the concept of revenge bedtime procrastination and why it causes so many problems for us getting to bed. We then delve into the problem of insomnia, and the utility of sleep medicines. Lastly, Dr. Bhopal offers practical tips for quality sleep, like the importance of dimming lights at night, avoiding social jetleg and the fundamental levers of sleep. I hope that our discussion helps inspire you to get quality sleep tonight and every night!Show Notes:Connect with Dr. Nishi Bhopal, MD:InstagramWebsiteFree Holistic Sleep GuideYoutubeConnect with Dr. Jonar, MD: Website Instagram Facebook Linkedin TwitterRelated Podcast Episodes You Will Enjoy:015. Your Health Rests on Sleep by Dr. Andrea Matsumura, MD029. Moving Forward with Dr. Jonar de Guzman, MD024. How the Pandemic Enabled Addiction with Dr. Efosa Airuehia, MD025. Positive Change Begins from Within: How One Man Overcame Addiction, Chronic Disease and Near Suicide with Plant Based Addict Adam Sud (Part 1 of 2)026. Positive Change Begins from Within: How One Man Overcame Addiction, Chronic Disease and Near Suicide with Plant Based Addict Adam Sud (Part 2 of 2)020. What's Missing From Your Health with Dr. Saray Stancic, MD001. The Lives that Saved Mine with Dr. Jonar de Guzman, MDHOW CAN I SUPPORT THIS PODCAST?Download, Listen, Subscribe, Rate & Review: Glass Half Healthy on Apple Podcast Tell Your Friends & Share Online!Thanks to my intern, the wonderful and smart Amelia Liu, to Jacob Ferrer for their production help, and to StockSounds for the music. And to YOU! Thank you for listening!Disclaimer:This podcast is intended for educational purposes only and isn't medical advice so please talk to your primary physician for that. In addition, the views and opinions expressed by me are my own and not that of my former, current or future employer. This also applies to my guests. Finally, we do our best to make every effort to relay correct information, but don't guarantee its accuracy. Thank you for listening.

They Knew Which Way to Run
Episode V: "Mot Ka Silsila Abhi Bhi Jaari Hai" - The Ongoing Season of Death

They Knew Which Way to Run

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 37:46


In this episode, we learn about what's happening in Bhopal today: a parallel crisis that was brewing under Bhopal at the same time as the gas tragedy, also the direct result of the Union Carbide factory.

I'M NOT A BARISTA
S2E5: Meet The Bhopal Brewing Club

I'M NOT A BARISTA

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 41:35


How did a sailor, photographer and strategy consultant team up to make a positive impact in the Indian coffee community?Recently we had a special interview with the three founders of Bhopal Brewing Club, Navneet Tiwari, Arun Thomas and Neeraj Pathak. In this episode, these three gentlemen shared how they created a local coffee club to help new coffee drinkers learn about coffee. You can read their story on our website herehttps://notabarista.org/bhopal-brewing-club/If you like our podcast, make sure to subscribe and share our podcast with your friends. Thank you for your support. Support the show

The Health Me Podcast
Episode #58: Integrative Psychiatry and Sleep with Nishi Bhopal, MD

The Health Me Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 68:06


PsychHoes
Episode 50: It's not the ménages à it's the folies à

PsychHoes

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 96:59


The HrishiKay Sessions
Pablo Bartholomew with Hrishi K - Bhopal Gas Tragedy World Press Photo Award & The Nagas

The HrishiKay Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 30:23


Business Standard Podcast
Can open networks for digital commerce take on Amazon & Walmart?

Business Standard Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 10:15


According to Arvind Gupta, the head of Digital India Foundation, a public platform is something that is built around the concept of openness, standard and trust. It is backed by the government and not by any private entity. There are about nine platforms with billion plus users each across the world. Five of them are in the US and four in China. And none of them are government backed. With Aadhaar, India built the world's first and largest public digital platform. It is now being used in banking, KYC and several other fields. It led to some sort of digital revolution, like the birth of UPI which ended the duopoly of two international operators in India. It allows you to send or receive money irrespective of the payment platforms on which you are registered. And now, Nandan Nilekani -- who helped the government create the biometric identification for almost 1.4 billion people after co-founding Infosys -- believes that Open Network for Digital Commerce or ONDC meets all the criteria for the next revolution and disruption in India. It has the government's commitment, the market condition is rife and there is a massive shift to e-commerce after the pandemic. ONDC seeks to level the playing field for small merchants in the country's fragmented but fast-growing $1 trillion retail market. While addressing a conference, Nilekani recently said that ONDC is very similar to National Payments Corporation of India (NPCI) -- which is also a non-profit section 8 company. Giving some details, Nilekani said that ONDC will put in place the ground rules, the network participation rules, the obligation and dispute resolution. It will have set of top class protocols to govern the online trade. It will lead the country towards transaction-led internet from the western model of advertisement-led internet. The small-scale implementation of ONDC kicked off on Friday last week. This pilot is being conducted across Delhi, Bengaluru, Coimbatore, Bhopal and Shillong. It will be later launched in 100 cities over a period of six months. ONDC will set protocols in critical areas like price discovery, vendor match, and cataloguing, ostensibly in open source. So, you ideally get an open network with open specifications and protocols. Clearly, there's a lot of stress on the ‘open' part. Although, not everyone agrees on calling ONDC a public good either. All of this is in the service of one goal -- to change the e-commerce market's fundamental structure by moving from the current platform-centric model to an open-network model. For instance, leather jacket seller Karan is only registered on Amazon. Meanwhile, Arjun, a prospective buyer who has heard of Karan's quality jackets, is registered on Flipkart alone. Arjun will first look for Karan on Flipkart. After failing to find him there, Arjun will have to register for an Amazon account. However, once ONDC is implemented, Arjun can directly purchase Karan's leather jackets without registering on Amazon.       Why is this such a big deal, though? There's no prohibition on Karan also registering as a Flipkart seller. Meanwhile, buyers shop across platforms as a matter of routine. With an account only on one e-commerce site, Arjun is probably an outlier.     Clearly, the real benefit would come in the form of future offerings that could be built on top of this platform-agnostic approach.     Once ONDC gets implemented, all e-commerce companies and online businesses in India will have to operate using the same processes and standards, as in the case of android-based mobile devices from different brands. According to reports, this could mean a complete revamp of systems for e-commerce players. They could end up losing control over their user interface, and, even more importantly, consumer behaviour insights. Basically, their competitive advantages. All of this amounts to a far-reaching and difficult reconfiguration. ONDC's may also erode Amazon and Wa

Sofa King Podcast
Episode 653: Bhopal: Poison Clouds and Contemptable Corporations

Sofa King Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 93:42


On this episode of the Sofa King Podcast, we look at one of the worst environmental catastrophes of the modern era, the Bhopal Disaster. The Indian city of Bhopal was home to a Union Carbide Corporation chemical company. They made pesticides using a very lethal substance called MIC gas. On December 2nd, 1984, 40 tons of this deadly concoction burst into the air over the city of a million people. It killed between 3,000 and 15,000 people and has led to massive long-term health issues for the victims and their children. Of course the corporation ducks its head and tries to blame someone else, as does the Indian Government. If you want to hear about a heartbreaking tale of corporate laziness leading to what one court considered mass homicide, this is the one for you!   Visit Our Sources: https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2019/dec/08/bhopals-tragedy-has-not-stopped-the-urban-disaster-still-claiming-lives-35-years-on https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhopal_disaster https://www.theatlantic.com/photo/2014/12/bhopal-the-worlds-worst-industrial-disaster-30-years-later/100864/ https://ehjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1476-069X-4-6 https://www.bhopal.org/continuing-disaster/the-bhopal-gas-disaster/union-carbides-disaster/

Disruptors for GOOD
Providing High-Quality, Affordable Internet That Helps Move Communities Forward - Chet Kanojia // Co-founder and CEO of Starry

Disruptors for GOOD

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 36:39


---> Subscribe to the Causeartist Newsletter here.Check out Cool Points Club - They create scaleable climate initiatives that generate funds to help scale emerging carbon removal technologies. Their current initiatives include Cool Gram and Islands of Cool. Check them out when you get a chance. ---> Check out more Causeartist Partners here.In episode 137 of the Disruptors for GOOD podcast I speak with with Chaitanya “Chet” Kanojia, co-founder and CEO of Starry Inc, on providing high-quality, affordable internet that helps move communities forward.Chaitanya “Chet” Kanojia is co-founder and CEO of Starry Inc., a wideband hybrid fiber wireless technology company focused on building competitive, affordable, high-quality broadband across the United States.Prior to Starry, Chet was founder and CEO of Aereo, Inc., the groundbreaking online television platform that enabled consumers to record and watch live HD broadcast television on virtually any type of Internet-connected device via a cloud-based OTA antenna and DVR.Previously, Chet was the founder and CEO of Navic Networks. Like Aereo, Navic Networks addressed the challenges of today's highly fragmented media landscape. Under Chet's leadership, Navic Networks grew to be the undisputed industry leader in advanced television advertising and was acquired by Microsoft in 2008.Chet holds more than 31 patents in fields ranging from robotics to data communications systems and is an innovative leader known for pushing beyond the conventional and developing breakthrough solutions.He has been noted as part of Vanity Fair's 2013 "Next Establishment List” and named one of Inc. Magazine's 2013 “Entrepreneurs of the Year.”  Aereo's technology was also named one of TIME magazine's Top 50 Best Websites (2012) and a Top 50 Technology (2013) by MIT Technology Review.In 2019, Chet was honored with Public Knowledge's IP3 Award for Internet Protocol for his years of work developing technology in the interest of competition and consumer choice.Chet holds a master's degree in Computer Systems Engineering from Northeastern University in Boston and a bachelor's degree in Mechanical Engineering from the National Institute of Technology in Bhopal, India.About StarryStarry was recently named to the second annual TIME100 Most Influential Companies list.Starry is a next generation licensed fixed wireless technology developer and internet service provider on a mission to connect as many people as possible to affordable, high-quality home broadband. The company believes that connectivity is a social good and therefore should be both affordable and ubiquitous.Starry's goal is to provide competitive, high-quality, low-cost broadband options for residents in every community they serve. They currently serve subscribers in six major U.S. cities today - Boston, Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, New York City, Denver and Columbus, OH - and have an expansion roadmap to cover more than 40 million households nationwide.---> Check out the Causeartist Partners here.Check out Cool Points Club - They create scaleable climate initiatives that generate funds to help scale emerging carbon removal technologies. Their current initiatives include Cool Gram and Islands of Cool. Check them out when you get a chance.---> Subscribe to the Causeartist Newsletter here.Listen to more Causeartist podcast shows hereFollow Grant on Twitter and LinkedInFollow Causeartist on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Instagram

The Trout Show
Bollywood? No Way! Jazz Music From India? You Bet!

The Trout Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 44:34


The Trout interviews Bhopal, India musician, producer, songwriter and recording engineer, Pratyush Upadhyay about his career in music and how he doesn't produce typical Bollywood music. Upadhyay is founder and owner of 432hz Music Studio that provides a myriad of services to his clients including -'Music Composing, Arrangement, Music Direction, Lyricist, Guitarist, Producer, Vocalist, Recording Engineer, Sound Designer,  Vocal Tuning, Orchestration, Drum Programming and more. The Trout once again proves music is what makes the world go around and touches our hearts and souls.  Follow the links below to visit and listen to Praytyush's music  https://linktr.ee/Pratyushhq  For more information about KT and The Trout visit our website https://ktandthetrout.com/ Podcast here - https://ktandthetrout.podbean.com/

They Knew Which Way to Run
Episode 3: Hosla

They Knew Which Way to Run

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 36:54


In Episode 3, we hear from one of Bhopal's most famous activists, Rasheeda Bi. She tells the story of how the world failed to take care of her fellow survivors after the tragedy, and how they, in turn, took their destiny into their own hands.

They Knew Which Way to Run
Episode 2: The World Will Never Really Know

They Knew Which Way to Run

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 45:49


Episode 2 tells the story of the scene in Bhopal the next morning for the survivors, how the Union Carbide factory and gas leak came to be, and the many controversies surrounding the tragedy -- starting with the death toll.

Destination Disaster
Episode 9: The Bhopal Disaster

Destination Disaster

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 16:46


This week we discuss what is arguably the worst industrial disaster in the world. With between 3,700 and 16,000 deaths reported and nearly 600,000 injured, it's evident that the Indian government did not do enough. Be sure to follow the socials: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/destination.disaster/Twitter: https://twitter.com/DestDisasterSources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhopal_disasterhttps://www.theatlantic.com/photo/2014/12/bhopal-the-worlds-worst-industrial-disaster-30-years-later/100864/Music Intro/Outro: Siren Intro by: NaturesEye - https://pixabay.com/music/introoutro-siren-intro-3705/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Hades Base Channeling Network
Carrie In Person and Stealing Nostradamus- Part 1

Hades Base Channeling Network

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2022 35:09


Greetings in love, light, and wisdom as one.    The channeling session for March is notable in that we have only our main four speakers and a very special guest in the form of our good friend Carrie. In all other channeling sessions in the archives where Carrie has been a part of the group asking questions, it has always been through a phone call and not in person. This is recorded prior to her leaving Lake Tahoe when she was still living and working here before moving back east. Also attending was her boyfriend at the time who is now her husband, Mike. Before moving on to the full summary of the session, here are a few outstanding notes that clear up those things heard without visual references. Now when this was recorded, Mark and I threw around a lot of different ideas to see what might work. Our plans to use Mark's son Alex to help with a project of ours was not a good one. It should also be noted that Carrie and I were practically brother and sister in our interactions which can be heard throughout the tape. Lastly, the toy I am referring to is a laptop I had the time. The notes from Karra's time talking is that car has always been on her bout Carrie's smoking, a real pet peeve of hers. This was also prior to Carrie's healing via a meta-concert from the base organized by Omal. Speaking of Omal, the notes from his discussion was that the gas leak discussed was a famous incident in Bhopal. The name mentioned of Virgil Armstrong is of a Army intelligence officer who was part of the first capture of a UFO. The final note is that what isn't said by Omal is that Sananda's time on earth as Jesus was all part of an assist on our ascension path. The only note from Tia's time talking is that it's been well documented in the archives that Carrie was being helped in her astral travel by Tia who could also dive into Carrie's dreams at night. Now, onto the full summary.     March is a time of joy as Spring begins to turn things green and the snows of winter here in Tahoe begin to recede. In honor of all that joy we have a channeling session from May 1995 that includes our most joyful of guest, Carrie Chen not yet left back east and so we had the pleasure of her company at a number of sessions prior to her leaving. Now the sound is not ideal and our engineers did the best they could but some of the words being said had to be guessed. Something else that stands out is Kiri as ring mistress with Tia Sommer on the base being searched for by the staff. Another guest on hand is she Carrie's boyfriend Mike whose initial channeling session was the current one taking place. Mark and I had come up with an idea to have his and Kiri's son Alex help with some manifestation in the place hard to get to down here through an astral travel trip Mark would make happen. Kiri was able to make the argument that this was a completely bad idea. She reminds me of my other bad idea in her opinion to show our kids on the base "Mary Poppins". Her reaction has always been that it corrupted their poor minds. Our conversation turns to Nostradamus and the predictions he came up with and whether one of them predicted the end of the world. With the search party still going to place to place looking for Tia, Kiri's sister Karra comes on as the next speaker to take us over to the second side. We have to preface this next part with Karra's pet peeve with Carrie has always been about her smoking. With Mike also being a smoker, Karra is able to make some suggestions related to that habit at the end of her time speaking. Before that, Karra focuses on an ongoing concern with Carrie's health. We know already that she had a cancer developing being that had been misdiagnosed and another doctor visit had been scheduled. While it would threaten her ability to have children, a meta-concert organized by Omal healed her and she went on to have a daughter years later. At this time in her life though, clues were happening that was starting to point to the real problem. Karra used the opportunity to give those of us in the room and healing lesson on a cat who was having a problem. To do so, she teamed up with her sister to initiate the healing. Kiri's ability to manipulate Mark's body was crucial in making the cat stay in one place long enough for the healing to commence. Afterwards, we reflect on a crystal healing arrangement that Carrie had been a part of and I wasn't. The key component mentioned is a healing Crystal inside of a Tibetan singing bowl which should be explained for anyone wanting to replicate the arrangement. Now, for those who remember in a recent channeling session where the question was asked how come the sky is blue? This is a channeling session where Karra provides the answer. In that same session, a device I was creating with Karra's help was discussed that involved two crystals at either end of a copper to connected with a copper wire. That is the Psionic device discussed as we get closer to the end of side one. What gets us there is Karra's advice to Carrie and Mike on how to stop smoking. While the tape may end, Kara spends a more minutes on the second side finishing up suggestion any smoker might find helpful in quitting.    For full transcripts of this session and more information about Hades Base and the 6th dimension, please visit our website:  http://hadesbasenews.com    The sessions lasted from 1992 to 2001 with this one being taped on 05/19/1995. Side one includes:    1.)(0:00)- Kiri is the session's ring mistress so it's a lot of fun as we discuss manifestation, Mary Poppins and the end of the world as predicted by Nostradamus. We also find she can't coerce from Mars to Earth.   2.)13:22)- Karra gives our guests a friendly reminder of the dangers of smoking and advice on how they could be gradually stopped. She provides as well a healing demonstration on one of the house cats.

They Knew Which Way to Run
Episode 1: One Winter Night

They Knew Which Way to Run

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2022 32:33


Episode 1 tells the story of the night of the Bhopal Gas Tragedy -- what life was like in Bhopal before the gas leak, and how everything changed on one winter night.

Cuarto Milenio (Oficial)
Cuarto Milenio: La tragedia de Bhopal

Cuarto Milenio (Oficial)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 23:07


Es uno de los peores desastres industriales del mundo. Dejó 25.000 muertos y más de 500.000 heridos. Se produjo entre el 2 y 3 de diciembre de 1984 en la región india de Bhopal y se originó tras una fuga al aire libre de isocianato de metilo en una fábrica de plaguicidas. Han pasado más de 35 años y todavía continúa habiendo víctimas. La tragedia de Bhopal sigue viva 37 años después en la tercera generación de supervivientes que llegan al mundo con problemas congénitos. ¿Por qué? Nos lo cuenta esta noche el escritor Javier Moro. Escucha el episodio completo en la app de iVoox, o descubre todo el catálogo de iVoox Originals

The Toxic Avengers
Interview with Ken Geiser, founder of the Toxics Use Reduction Institute

The Toxic Avengers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 85:54


Throughout his career of teaching, writing and organizing, Ken Geiser has been one of the most important theoreticians of the Toxics movement, as well as a Johnny Appleseed, having a hand in the creation, development and sustenance of more than two dozen organizations, while mentoring many other Toxic Avengers. Among many accomplishments, Ken was one of the authors of the landmark Toxics Use Reduction Act in Massachusetts. Ken served as the Director of the https://www.turi.org/ (Toxics Use Reduction Institute) from 1990 to 2003 and in 2001 published his first book, “https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/materials-matter (Materials Matter),” while teaching as a professor of Work Environment at the University of Massachusetts at Lowell. I spoke with Ken from his farmhouse in Maine. In the interview, Ken offers a couple of stage-setting stories about his childhood in Scottsdale, Arizona and early experiences as an undergrad studying architecture at U.C. Berkeley. He describes the parallel paths of his graduate studies at MIT and his work organizing to protect neighborhoods from highway projects and waste dumps, to the creation of the National Toxics Campaign with John O'Connor. Key events discussed in Ken's evolution of understanding and engagement in the Toxics movement include the contaminated drinking water in Woburn, Massachusetts, the fight over a PCB dump in Warren County, North Carolina, and the death of thousands caused by the gas leak from the Union Carbide plant in Bhopal, India. Ken describes the process leading to the passage of the Toxics Use Reduction Act in 1989, and his work following the law's enactment, including his leadership of the Toxic Use Reduction Institute (TURI). He recounts some of his extensive work with colleagues and allies across the country, building organizations to tackle various aspects of the Toxic Chemicals problem.

Occupied Thoughts
Episode 25: What Went Wrong?

Occupied Thoughts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 72:17


Content warning: this episode contains mentions of human and animal death and the events of disasters. We get spooky in a different way this ep! Today Jess and I discuss 6 different disasters; 5 man made and 1 natural. The disasters we cover are the Bhopal disaster, Mayak disaster, Chernobyl, Sri Lanka tsunami-rail disaster, the Campfire of 2018, and the Seveso disaster. Check out the images described as well as sources at octhopod.wordpress.com.

Planet Policy Pals Podcast
EP 22 Bhopal- The Worst Industrial Disaster (Story time)

Planet Policy Pals Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 50:11


This week we unpack the entirely avoidable tragedy that has come to be known as the world's worst industrial disaster. In the night of December 2, 1984, chemical, methyl isocyanate (MIC) spilt out from Union Carbide India Ltd's (UCIL's) pesticide factory turned the city of Bhopal into a colossal gas chamber. It was India's first major industrial disaster. At least 30 tonnes of methyl isocyanate gas killed between 15,000 and 20,000 people and affected over 600,000 workers. The Bhopal gas tragedy is dear to our hearts as it is the perfect example of how innocent people and the environment suffer, when we ignore safety for profit. Follow the link for show notes and references https://docs.google.com/document/d/1ETJBQKUljJzPfdWDjhtD39kIQ9q1OTEWqlDS3f8EzWM/edit?usp=sharing Captions available on our YouTube channel

Planet Policy Pals Podcast
UPDATE: Series 3 is coming!!!

Planet Policy Pals Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 4:59


It's a new series and a new topic. Until the end of the year, we will focus on some of the environmental tragedies that have been caused by humans and impacted communities severely in the last few decades. Topics like the Bhopal disaster, Chernobyl and the oil spill that gave us Earth day are on the list. We want to learn how these things happened and how people recovered. Listen for more details and learn with us every Monday starting September 13th. Captions of transcript available on our Youtube Page

A Brothers' Creed
#37- Man-made Disasters Part 1 - Bhopal and Chernobyl Disasters

A Brothers' Creed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 51:44


On this episode of A Brothers' Creed Podcast we talk through some of the most destructive and tragic disasters in history that were caused by human. We take a deep look into the Bhopal India Gas Disaster that killed thousands after a toxic chemical leaked out of a pesticide factory into a large city. Next, we talk about what happened at Chernobyl nuclear facility where one of the nuclear reactors exploded dude to negligence and faulty equipment. We discuss the lack of ownership, pride, and disregard for safeguards that let to a chain of catastrophic events that changed the world. The lessons learned here can be applied not only to corporations and countries to personal lives as well. If you enjoyed this episode of A Brothers' Creed Podcast and want hear two additional (members only) episodes a month, please subscribe on Patreon. You can find our Patreon page here: www.patreon.com/abrotherscreed Follow us on Instagram @a.brothers.creed Follow us on YouTube here Follow us on TikTok @a.brothers.creed

The Chills at Will Podcast
Episode 57, with the Brilliant, Reflective, and Thoughtful Writer and Craftswoman of White Dancing Elephants: Chaya Bhuvaneswar

The Chills at Will Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2021 99:52


Show Notes and Links to Chaya Bhuvaneswar's Work and Allusions/Texts from Episode 57 On Episode 57, Pete welcomes Chaya Bhuvaneswar, the brilliant craftswoman of White Dancing Elephants, the award-winning short story collection. Pete and Chaya talk about inspiring writers, Chaya's influences and great mentorship from legendary writers, her diverse and not-so diverse experiences growing up in Queens, the ways in which her writing has been informed by her knowledge of religious texts, themes in her short story collection, the power of second-person narration, and much more.   Chaya Bhuvaneswar is a practicing physician and writer whose story collection WHITE DANCING ELEPHANTS was a 2019 finalist for the PEN/ American Bingham Debut Fiction Prize. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Narrative Magazine, Tin House, Electric Lit, The Rumpus, The Millions, Michigan Quarterly Review, and elsewhere. Her poetry and prose juxtapose Hindu epics, other myths and histories, and the survival of sexual harassment and racialized sexual violence by diverse women of color. Her book received coverage on the LA Times books section front page, NPR and other national outlets, and is available for purchase at bookshop.org, Amazon,org or your local indie bookstore!   Buy Chaya Bhuvaneswar's White Dancing Elephants (Bookshop) Buy Chaya Bhuvaneswar's White Dancing Elephants (Amazon) NPR Article Reviewing Chaya's White Dancing Elephants Chaya Bhuvaneswar's Website Starred Review in Kirkus for White Dancing Elephants   At around 3:00, Chaya talks about her influences growing up-including her upbringing in Flushing, Queens, and its racial diversity that was in contrast to her high school's lack thereof;  she also talks about how growing up in an environment rich with exposure to Buddhism and Hinduism shaped her   At around 9:00, talks about the writers, including Min Jin Lee and Victor LaValle, who have explored the “distance” between growing up in racially and ethnically-diverse neighborhoods and attending schools lacking that diversity    At around 10:50, Chaya talks about how the religious texts she was exposed to as a kid informed her writing and worldview, and how the Amar Chitra Katha series of comics was influential in her future storytelling    At around 15:30, Chaya talks about the balance between enjoying the wonderful epics and tales of India, such as Kathasaritsagara, and avoiding them being used for nationalistic and discriminatory purposes   At around 17:10, Chaya talks about Edward Said's Orientalism and its connection to the caste system of India, especially with regards to how the British “gave weight to ancient ideas” about India   At around 22:30, Chaya talks about her “ideal reader” as one of conscience and awareness   At around 23:25, Chaya talks about being multilingual and how her ability to read and/or write other languages have informed her reading and writing styles   At around 25:25, Chaya talks about her study of Sanskrit, and its connection to discussions around    At around 28:40, talks about the texts and writers who have given her “chills at will,” including Toni Morrison, Louise Erdrich, Italo Calvino, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Jericho Brown, Diana Khoi Nguyen, Evie Shockley, Vanessa Angelica Villarreal, Nicole Sealey, and Maggie Smith (particularly for her “Good Bones”)   At around 34:00, Chaya reads an excerpt from “Good Bones”   At around 34:45, Chaya talks about her appreciation for Seamus Heaney   At around 36:45, Pete and Chaya exchange Louise Erdrich recommendations, including “The Painted Drum” and “The Red Convertible”    At around 38:45, Chaya talks about her medical background and how her outlook has changed through working as a psychiatrist, especially during this pandemic; she references another brilliant writer/medical professional, Nawal El Saadawi, and how her treatment in the press is emblematic of clumsiness in treatment of non-white women who are doctors and writers   At around 44:30, we have an ad from friends of The Chills at Will Podcast,Get Lit Podcast   At around 47:40, Chaya talks about how she caught the writing bug and how she learned that she was a skilled writer; she also talks about inspiration from the great Ved Mehta, whom she recently wrote about for LitHub, Seamus Heaney, Salman Rushdie, and Wole Soyinka   At around 54:00, Chaya talks about “to agent” or “not to agent” and the success of Deeshaw Philyaw as a possible harbinger of change in the pub world's view of small presses; Philyaw's debut short story collection, The Secret Lives of Church Ladies, won the 2021 PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction   At around 55:30, Chaya talks about her short-story collection, White Dancing Elephants, and the ordering of the 17 stories, with great help from her wonderful editor, Michelle Dotter   At around 58:00, Chaya talks about the significance and genesis of the title of her title story from White Dancing Elephants, including its connection to the Buddha and his mother   At around 1:04:40, Pete and Chaya discuss stories within stories from her collection, and Chaya describes her thought process in writing “The Story of the Woman Who Fell in Love with Death"   At around 1:07:15, Chaya discusses the story “Talinda,” including some self-doubt that crept up when she was writing it   At around 1:15:00, Chaya reads from “Talinda”   At around 1:21:00, Chaya talks about how aftermath comes into play in her story collection and the importance of “twisty endings” and “sticking the ending”-”Heitor” and “Talinda” are used as examples   At around 1:22:40, Chaya discusses the story “Bhopal, 1984” and its historical basis    At around 1:25:00, Chaya discusses her use of second-person in some of her writing   At around 1:26:40, Pete highlights some standout writing from Chaya, and Chaya describes “invisible prose”   At around 1:29:35, Chaya discusses the story “Adristakama” and its connection to multiple meanings that can be derived    At around 1:33:00, Chaya reads another excerpt from “Talinda”   At around 1:35:00, Chaya discusses upcoming projects, including an adult novel, a young adult novel, and a memoir that she is working on   You can now subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, and leave me a five-star review. You can also ask for the podcast by name using Alexa, and find the pod on Spotify and on Amazon Music. Follow me on IG, where I'm @chillsatwillpodcast, or on Twitter, where I'm @chillsatwillpo1. You can also subscribe to The Chills at Will Podcast YouTube Channel. This is a passion project of mine, a DIY operation, and I'd love for your help in promoting what I'm convinced is a unique and spirited look at an often-ignored art form. The intro song for The Chills at Will Podcast is “Wind Down” (Instrumental Version), and the other song played on this episode was “Hoops” (Instrumental)” by Matt Weidauer, and both songs are used through ArchesAudio.com.