Podcasts about hewlett packard

American information technology company

  • 1,398PODCASTS
  • 1,991EPISODES
  • 38mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 24, 2023LATEST
hewlett packard

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about hewlett packard

Show all podcasts related to hewlett packard

Latest podcast episodes about hewlett packard

The Remarkable Project
060: Turning Remarkable Experiences into Real Impact with Paul Dunn

The Remarkable Project

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 57:47


In this episode of The Remarkable Project Jay speaks with Entrepreneur, Author and Master Presenter, Paul Dunn, about why an abundant mindset benefits both sides of the impact exchange, how collective knowledge contributes to competitive advantage, and the idea that sharing your giving improves its cumulative impact on the world.Paul Dunn is a four-time TEDx speaker, entrepreneur, author and much more besides.He is a Senior Fellow in one of the World's Leading Think Tanks, consulting to and leading-edge businesses around the world, and was honoured as a Social Innovation Fellow in his new home of Singapore, something he shares with film-star and philanthropist Jet Li and former Walmart Chairman, Rob Walton.Paul was one of the first 10 people in Hewlett Packard in Australia, before going on to create one of the country's first computer companies and The Results Corporation, where he helped develop and grow 23,000 small and medium scale business enterprises. His programs are estimated to be used by almost a quarter-of-a-million companies around the world, but he continues to push boundaries, featuring in Forbes Magazine alongside Sir Richard Branson in a global piece on ‘disrupters' in business.Paul's books, ‘The Firm of the Future' and ‘Time's UP', co-written with Ron Baker, are best sellers. He is the co-founder of B1G1: Business for Good, the history-making Global Giving Initiative that's already enabled businesses to create over 312 Million giving impacts globally. He speaks passionately to audiences around the world about Purpose and how we now can (and almost certainly need to) move beyond being Purpose-Driven to becoming Impact-Driven.Remarkable TakeawaysWhy adopting an abundant mindset in business from the get-go benefits both sides of the impact exchange.How collective knowledge contributes to competitive advantage.The idea that sharing your giving improves its cumulative impact on the world.

SunCast
564: Can Steel Make Solar Panels Even Better - And Help 'Save The World'? with Gregg Patterson of Origami Solar

SunCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 75:11


Gregg Patterson is a former Hewlett Packard executive who ran multiple global businesses before jumping into renewables in 2006 — partly, he says, to help "save the world."In today's podcast, he explains how he parlayed a background in engineering, research and development and executive management into a solar career.After successfully leading two solar and energy startups to successful exits, Gregg accepted an offer to join Origami Solar, which intends to reverse the solar industry's reliance on aluminum through innovative, domestically-made steel module frames.Origami Solar gained attention in September by earning a grand prize in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) American-Made Solar Prize competition. The $500,000 award aims to advance the company's patent-pending steel frame for solar modules to lower costs, reduce carbon emissions, and improve performance and value.Today Gregg gives us a closer look at the company from the lens of his role as CEO.He says steel frames are less expensive, reduce production-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and facilitate domestic ramp-up of module production. As he sees it, those factors are crucial in making solar as green as possible.Join us to learn more about Gregg's career, the lessons he's learned along the way and the role he expects Origami Solar to play over the coming years.If you want to connect with today's guest, you'll find links to his contact info in the show notes on the blog.SunCast is presented by Sungrow, the world's most bankable inverter brand.You can learn more about all the sponsors who help make this show free for you at www.mysuncast.com/sponsors. Remember you can always find the resources and learn more about today's guest, recommendations, book links, and more than 563 other founder stories and startup advice at www.mysuncast.com.You can connect with me, Nico Johnson, on Twitter, LinkedIn or by email.

Inside Influence
POWERCUT: Colin Boyd - how to convert attention into action every time

Inside Influence

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 21:45


We are coming to the end of another eventful year, another 12 month bundle of opportunities, challenges, plenty of highlights and some definite unforeseen low lights. Hopefully you are about to embark on a well-deserved break. This is exactly what the inside influence team and myself will be doing. So over the next few weeks we are going to be taking a festive step back to rest up, recalibrate and re-inspire ourselves for 2022. However, if you need some inspiration to get you thinking and planning for next year, we have you covered. Our holiday season of power cuts or power minis are back. Our next power cut episode is with Colin Boyd.Colin Boyd is obsessed with helping experts and entrepreneurs present in a way that creates action -– or sell from stage - in a non pushy or sleazy way.He keynotes at conferences around the world on topics such as persuasive communication and selling ideas, clients include Coca Cola, Suncorp, Fuji Xero, and Hewlett Packard.He runs high-level mastermind programs for speakers and content creators. And delivers his signature program Sell From Stage Academy® which helps people turn every presentation into a conversion machine.In this conversation we cover A LOT of practical ground, including:Why identifying and learning to tell your signature story is the fastest route to creating action – for anyone, anywhere, on any topic.The biggest mistakes people make when it comes to telling their signature story and how to avoid them. Hint here… this is not your origin story.Colin has literally dedicated his whole career and business to decoding the stories that work - and more importantly – compel people to take action.If you enjoy this powercut episode and would like to hear my full conversation with Colin Boyd please head over to my website juliemasters.com or listen at all the usual places #itunes #spotify #googleplay #stitcher. For now sit back, relax and enjoy this powercut conversation with Colin Boyd. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Leader Assistant Podcast
#202: Cath Harrison - Virtual PA and Founder of Bee-Assisted Limited

The Leader Assistant Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 32:57


Cath Harrison has a 35 year career in PA, EA and administrative roles in various private and public sectors, including over 17 years working within the IT Industry for Hewlett-Packard.In this episode, Cath talks about being let go during a global pandemic, starting a new business, and the world's shift to remote work.Sponsor -> leaderassistant.com/goodyShow Notes -> leaderassistant.com/202--Join game-changing assistants for Leader Assistant Live: A Night in Orlando with Jeremy Burrows, Stormy Washington, and Bonnie Low-Kramen! Grab your seat for just $37 at leaderassistantlive.com/orlando--More from The Leader Assistant... Book, Audiobook, and Workbook -> leaderassistantbook.com Premium Membership -> leaderassistant.com/membership Events -> leaderassistantlive.com Free Community -> leaderassistant.com/community

Hamilton Perkins Collection
Episode 111: The Benefits of Upcycling Interview with Ted Baroody

Hamilton Perkins Collection

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 31:54


Ted Baroody is a graduate of North Carolina State University of Raleigh, North Carolina. After college he moved to Norfolk to start his own small sports marketing company, Victory Promotions. After a couple of years of power boat racing production under Victory Promotions, he served as Marketing Director for a group of local radio stations in Virginia Beach for 5 years. From 1996 to the present, he has worked for Norfolk Festevents, Ltd. which he now serves as CEO. Ted also works with many non-profit organizations as a volunteer, event coordinator and as a board member. - In 2014, Hamilton Perkins founded Hamilton Perkins Collection, an independent brand that designs and produces unique and award-winning bags and accessories made from upcycled materials. Each bag is made from pineapple leaf fiber, billboard vinyl, fabric banners, apparel, and other advertising waste. Perkins was awarded an equity-free grant as the winner of the Virginia Velocity Tour hosted by Village Capital and the Governor of Virginia. The non-profit B Lab honored Hamilton Perkins Collection as a "Best for the World Overall" B Corporation in 2017. Perkins was voted to Inside Business' 40 under 40 and Old Dominion University Alumni Association's 40 under 40 lists. Perkins has been mentioned in Forbes, Fast Company, The New York Times, Money Magazine, and The Washington Post. Select past client work includes Hewlett-Packard, Nordstrom, Target, S.C. Johnson and Son, Dow Chemical, Oracle, Salesforce, Barnes and Noble, West Elm, Holt Renfrew, C.F. Martin & Company, Imerys, Leesa Sleep, Zappos, Paramount Pictures, AMEX, Hanover Insurance, NYC Department of Sanitation and Ellen. The brand is currently offered in nearly 150 leading department stores and specialty stores in the United States, Canada, and Europe. Hamilton Perkins Collection has transformed 800,000 bottles into bags and over 40,000 pounds of old signs and into bags with the goal of 10 million bottles and over 500,000 pounds. Perkins has been a speaker for BNY Mellon, Faire, Mastercard and has provided research for Harvard Business School. Perkins serves on the executive advisory council board at Old Dominion University's Strome College of Business.

Dream Chasers Radio
Author Vicki Mizel on how to Retrieve, Enhance, Cherish: Reclaim Your Memories!

Dream Chasers Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 29:44


Love Remembers https://www.loveremembers.net/ Vicki Mizel was trained as an educator and public speaker. She began teaching the Brain Sprout's Memory Method in 1980 to school children in public high schools. Within a short time she trained executives in Fortune 500 corporations such as IBM, Rolm, Prudential, Hewlett Packard; taught through community college, both seniors and Alzheimer's patients; and gave public seminars nationally and internationally. She also produced a highly successful audio-tape/CD program on memory training.After 20 years of teaching and training, Mizel returned to graduate school to receive her Master's degree in psychology. She now offers her programs to therapists, heath care practitioners, medical facilities, spouses and caregivers of Alzheimer's patients and their loved ones. She also trains actors with learning scripts and characterization.Mizel also assists individuals, pre-retirees and companies through career transition with her program, “Passion Quest: Finding the Work You Love and Loving The Work You Do! “She is the author of the book, “Brain Sprouts: Love Remembers.” This book is the culmination of her knowledge and expertise, offered to the reader in her belief that we can all retrieve, enhance and cherish our memories. (A guide to help caregivers and spouses of Alzheimer's loved ones.)

The Industrial Real Estate Podcast
From Corporate Sales to Industrial Real Estate

The Industrial Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 56:34


An interview with David Dunaway. We'll be discussing the following: ✅ Moving from corporate sales to industrial real estate ✅ Texas vs the rest of the US ✅ Has experience and education been helpful? This will be a live interview so join in and ask any questions that come to mind! About David: David Dunaway is an agent for KW Commercial (Keller Williams) in Dallas. He grew up in Memphis and got an Elec Engr degree from Univ of Tenn, Knoxville. He got his MBA from Univ of TX at Dallas. He worked in sales for large technology companies (Cisco, Hewlett Packard, others) before changing into CRE in 2019. He has 2 kids, one in Dallas, one in Berlin, Germany. He is active with the Rotary Club. He has experience with industrial properties, RV parks, hospitality and land. Hobbies: working out, playing guitar, reading, travel Connect with David on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dadunaway -- ⚡ Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/ChadGriffit...

The Real Estate Syndication Show
WS1542: Telling Leadership Messages Through Effective Stories | Paul Smith

The Real Estate Syndication Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 24:05 Transcription Available


The ability to tell compelling stories can make or break a leader. When a leader is skilled in storytelling, it is easier to express your message to your team and to your clients, and build credibility for yourself, your ideas and your organization. But, how do you tell a compelling story? Is there a fail-safe formula or a structure that we all can follow?We continue our interview series with Paul Smith, one of the world's leading experts on organizational storytelling. In this episode, Paul teaches us how we can organize our thoughts and ideas and create a story structure that can refine our leadership message into an effective story. Listen now and learn how you can inspire and motivate your team and convert clients with your storytelling and lead your business to success.Key Points From This Episode: How can a story structure help craft a better story? Why leaders need a structure for stories they're going to tell.Types of story structureWhy the traditional presentation structure of introduction-body-structure will not work for storytelling.Eight questions to guide the leader when structuring a story.How the 8-question approach works for other types of stories as well. Why the order of storytelling is important.How does a leader prepare for storytelling?Tweetables:“Give your audience a reason to listen to you.”“Spend time cultivating your story so that they're ready to go when you need them.”“The worst time to tell a story is when you don't have a good story to tell.”Links Mentioned in Today's Episode:Lead With A Story websitePaul Smith on LinkedInLead With A Story by Paul SmithSell With A Story by Paul SmithParenting With A Story by Paul SmithThe 10 Stories Great Leaders Tell by Paul SmithAbout Paul SmithPaul Smith is one of the world's leading experts on organizational storytelling. He's one of Inc. Magazine's Top 100 Leadership Speakers of 2018, and the author of three Amazon #1 bestsellers: Lead with a Story (now in its 11th printing, and published in 7 languages around the world), Sell with a Story, and The 10 Stories Great Leaders Tell; in addition to Parenting with a Story and his newest work, Four Days with Kenny Tedford. He's a former executive at The Procter & Gamble Company and a consultant with Accenture prior to that.As part of his research on the effectiveness of storytelling, Paul has personally interviewed over 300 CEOs and executives in 25 countries and documented over 3,000 individual business stories. That's allowed him to reverse engineer what works in storytelling and what doesn't. His work has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Fast Company, Inc. Magazine, Time, Forbes, and Success Magazine, among others.Paul has trained executives at international giants like Google, Hewlett Packard, Ford Motor Company, Bayer Medical, Novartis, Abbott, Progressive Insurance, Luxottica, Walmart, and Kaiser Permanente, among dozens of others. A 20-year veteran of P&G, Paul worked most recently as director of consumer and communications research for the company's $6 billion global paper business where he led a research team across four continents. He also held leadership positions in corporate finance, manufacturing plants, and sales working closely with major global retailers like Walmart, Costco, Asda, and Sam's Club.Paul holds a bachelor's degree in economics and an MBA from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. He lives with his wife and two sons in the Cincinnati suburb of Mason, Ohio.

The Business of Intuition
Tom Hardison: How To Build Great Teams With Generative Leadership

The Business of Intuition

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 32:00


Tom Hardison helps leaders build great teams and organizations with a culture of collective leadership so they can scale from 200-1000+ employees. He led change and business growth initiatives at Hewlett-Packard for 28 years, a period when revenue grew from 5 billion to 127 billion. He now uses this extensive experience to guide leaders and their teams to leverage the generative power of people working together to achieve sustainable growth. In this episode, Dean Newlund and Tom Hardison discuss:Should you prioritize getting customers or capacity? Starting with clarity of purpose Inspiring accountability within your teamSetting a great purpose  Key Takeaways:Get more customers while building infrastructure to support that growth. If you start doing it and you don't have the capacity, you'll disappoint people. You need to develop the capacity as you are scaling to customers. Clarity of purpose will be the source of unity in an organization. Start with the purpose and the core values and build up your plans and strategies from that foundation. One of the things that could make teams most effective is by having a culture of people that can step forward with courageous authenticity and take responsibility for their actions. The purpose that every member of your organization embodies must be something that can't be fulfilled by one person alone, it has to transcend the individual. The purpose must be to change the world in a great way.  "Adding more people can add more complexity and what's most important is to get a well-functioning system with the people you have today. Get a collective leadership system in place so that you have a cohesive way of acting as one coherent organization." — Tom Hardison See Dean's TedTalk “Why Business Needs Intuition” here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EEq9IYvgV7I  Connect with Tom Hardison:  Website: www.generativeleadershipgroup.comLinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/tomhardison  Connect with Dean:YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgqRK8GC8jBIFYPmECUCMkwWebsite: https://www.mfileadership.com/The Mission Statement E-Newsletter: https://www.mfileadership.com/blog/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/deannewlund/Twitter: https://twitter.com/deannewlundFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/MissionFacilitators/Email: dean.newlund@mfileadership.comPhone: 1-800-926-7370  Show notes by Podcastologist: Justine Talla Audio production by Turnkey Podcast Productions. You're the expert. Your podcast will prove it. 

Maryland's Most Notorious Murders
Season Six (Robbery Related) Murders Episode 7 Dontay M. Carter & (UNSOLVED) Becky Elizabeth Crisp AKA Kelly

Maryland's Most Notorious Murders

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 46:23


This episode profiles the murder of Hewlett Packard engineer, 37-year-old Vitalis V. Pilius who was murdered by 18-year-old Dontay M. Carter inside of a vacant rowhome in East Baltimore on February 14, 1992. During court proceedings, Dontay managed to escape from a bathroom window and caused the biggest manhunt in Maryland's history since 1964. This episode also profiles the unsolved murder of 50-year-old Becky Elizabeth Crisp AKA Kelly who was found dead inside of a hotel room at a Holiday Inn Hotel in Laurel Maryland on December 23, 2001.

Progress, Potential, and Possibilities
Dr. Victoria Coleman, Ph.D. - Chief Scientist, United States Air Force - Innovation In Tactical Autonomy, AI, Hypersonics & More

Progress, Potential, and Possibilities

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 60:44


Dr. Victoria Coleman, Ph.D. is the Chief Scientist of the United States Air Force ( https://www.af.mil/About-Us/Biographies/Display/Article/2556343/dr-victoria-coleman/ ), where she serves as the Chief Scientific Adviser to the Secretary of the Air Force, Air Force Chief of Staff, and Chief of Space Operations, providing assessments on a wide range of scientific and technical issues affecting the department's mission. In this role, Dr. Coleman identifies and analyzes technical issues, bringing them to the attention of department leaders and interacts with other principals, operational commanders, combatant commands, acquisition, and science and technology communities to address cross-organizational issues and provide solutions. Dr. Coleman also interacts with other services and the Office of the Secretary of Defense on issues affecting the Department of the Air Force's technical enterprise. She serves on the Executive Committee of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board and is the Principal Science and Technology Representative of the Air Force to the civilian scientific and engineering community and to the public at large. Dr. Coleman is on leave from University of California, Berkeley where since 2016, she has held an academic research appointment at the Berkeley Center for Information Technology in the Interest of Society where she leads science and technology policy on microelectronics and efforts to develop tools for countering digital authoritarianism. Dr. Coleman has more than 35 years of experience in computer science and technology, including as both an academic leader and industry executive. Prior to accepting the role of Chief Scientist of the Air Force, Dr. Coleman served as the 22nd Director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) where she oversaw a large suite of disruptive and innovative programs as well as leadership of the Microsystems Exploratory Council. Before DARPA, she served as the Chief Executive Officer of Atlas AI P.B.C, a Silicon Valley start-up that brings world-class artificial intelligence solutions to sustainable development. By combining satellite data with other data sets, Atlas AI's proprietary deep-learning models create actionable insights for governments, non-governmental organizations and commercial companies. Dr. Coleman began her academic career in 1988 as a lecturer in computer science at Royal Holloway College, University of London, United Kingdom. She subsequently joined Queen Mary College, University of London, as a reader in computer science. There, she taught undergraduate and graduate courses in computer science, created a Master of Science program in Dependable Computer Systems and supervised Doctor of Philosophy students. In 1998, Dr. Coleman became the founding director of the System Design Laboratory at SRI International. The lab conducted research in trustworthy systems and cyber security. The programs she directed won support from DARPA. She also participated in the creation of the technologies leading to the spinout of Siri prior to its acquisition by Apple. She worked alongside the newly-formed Department of Homeland Security, creating the department's cyber security agenda and becoming the founding Director of the DHS Cyber Security Research and Development Center. In 2004, Dr. Coleman became the Director of the Trust and Manageability Lab in the Corporate Technology Group of Intel and began serving as a member of Santa Clara University's Computer Science and Engineering Department's Advisory Board. In 2006, she became the Vice President of the Computer Science Laboratory at Samsung. In 2010, she took the position of Vice President of Software Engineering at Hewlett-Packard. In 2011, she became Nokia's Vice President of Emerging Platforms. Dr. Coleman served as the Vice President of Engineering for Multi-Device UX Platforms for Yahoo in 2013.

TechTimeRadio
On TechTime with Nathan Mumm, TechTime's 2023 Prediction Show. How a facial recognition tool leads to a mistaken arrest, "CES" starts January 6th in Las Vegas, and a medical office sends patients the wrong text message. | Air Date: 1/1 - 1/7/20

TechTimeRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 55:54


Join us on TechTime Radio with Nathan Mumm, the show that makes you go "Hummmm" Technology news of the week for January 1st  – 7th, 2023.Today on TechTime with Nathan Mumm, Facial recognition tools lead to another mistaken arrest. This year's 2023 CES looks like the flashy CES over the past couple of decades, and we start the year with "TechTime's 2023 Prediction Show" all of this is going on as Twitter is in a data-protection probe after '400 million' user details are up for sale. In addition, we have our standard features, including "Mike's Mesmerizing Moment," "This Week in Technology," and a possible "Nathan Nugget." Episode 134: Starts at 0:31--- [Now on Today's Show]: Starts at 2:14--- [Top Stories in The First Five Minutes]: Starts at 4:02It's the largest trade show for consumer electronics and video game systems in the world. It is called CES and starts January 6th and runs until January 8th in LAS VegasFacial recognition tools lead to another mistaken arrest. - https://tinyurl.com/5cp97a2v Twitter has '400 million' user details up for sale on the Darkweb - https://tinyurl.com/5n6n6bm5 --- [Pick of the Day - Whiskey Tasting Reveal]: Starts at 20:53George Dickel Bourbon | 90 Proof |$33.95--- [TechTime's 2023 Prediction Show ]: Starts at 22:20We look back at how Mike and I did with our predictions for 2022. This year we ask crazy questions like whether Facebook will still be the social media market leader. Is Twitter still be owned by Elon Musk at the end of the year, or whether or not Nintendo is still the leader in handheld gaming? These are just some predictions we will make on our show today. --- [This Week in Technology]: Starts at 40:10January 4, 1972 – Hewlett-Packard introduces the first handheld scientific calculator, the HP-35.The precision of the calculator was greater than most mainframe computers of its time. For such a technological achievement, the name of the calculator is simply derived from the fact that it has 35 buttons. HP-35 calculators were carried on the Skylab 3 and Skylab 4 flights, between July 1973 and February 1974. The HP-35 was developed in two years, at a cost of approximately one million dollars with twenty engineers.--- [Marc's Whiskey Mumble]: Starts at 43:05--- [Technology Fail of the Week]: Starts at 45:37A U.K. medical office mistakenly sent patients a text message with a cancer diagnosis. Carl Chegwin was getting in the holiday spirit by watching the movie The Santa Clause on Christmas Eve when he says he got a text message from his U.K. doctor's office diagnosing him with "aggressive lung cancer."--- [Mike's Mesmerizing Moment brought to us by StoriCoffee®]: Starts at 49:13Do you think we will find creatures in the waters like "The Lockness Monster" or a Megalodon?  --- [Nathan Nugget]: Starts a 52:37Review of Gadgets and Gear Item of the year:  Loona Pet Robot  --- [Pick of the Day]: Starts at 54:02George Dickel Bourbon | 90 Proof |$33.95Mike: Thumbs UpNathan: Thumbs Up

Found In The Rockies
Katherine Wells (Serenity) \\ Revolutionizing Senior Care

Found In The Rockies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 58:09 Transcription Available


In today's episode, we are featuring an experienced startup founder who is on a mission to revolutionize communication and quality of life for families who are engaged with the entire continuum of senior care - Katherine Wells, who is the CEO and founder of Serenity.Here's a closer look at the episode:Growing up in Colorado Springs.Working at Hewlett-Packard in California.Working with the “father of the help desk industry” - Ron MunsWhat was it like to be in a startup during the dot.com bust?The emotions of laying off employees.Getting acquired by larger companies.Katherine's superpowerMoving to Denver.Starting a company with her husband about co-parenting.Serena's journey into startup land.Starting work in AIWorking on AI with Rolls RoyceKatherine's mother's Alzheimer's diagnosisMoving her parents into care facilitiesThe problem of communication across caregiversKatherine's husband Rob building her a prototypeDeciding to fundraise so Rob could focus on the businessThe cow in the ditchPost COVID growthMavericks of Senior Living video podcastTop Entrepreneur Finalist Colorado in 2022Partnership with World Cinema and the Thrive Innovation CenterKatherine's advice to people who are dealing with the challenges of family needing senior care.Resources:Website: https://serenityconnect.com/Katherine LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kathwells/ Serenity LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/serenityconnect/ Company Twitter: https://twitter.com/serenityengage Company Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/serenityengage

Average Joe Finances
152. The Power of a 30 Year Mortgage with Adiel Gorel

Average Joe Finances

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 43:36 Transcription Available


Join Mike Cavaggioni with Adiel Gorel on the 152nd episode of the Average Joe Finances Podcast. Adiel shares how he successfully assisted thousands of investors with purchasing U.S. properties since 1983.In this episode, you'll learn:Efficient methods that will make it possible for anyone to invest in real estateHow Inflation can be your best friendHow to retire earlyThe secrets of being debt freeAnd so much more!About Adiel Gorel:Adiel Gorel is the CEO of ICG, a prominent real estate investment firm located in the San Francisco Bay Area.Through ICG he has personally invested in hundreds of properties for his own portfolio and was involved in the purchase of over 10,000 properties for ICG's investors in Phoenix, Las Vegas, Orlando, Tampa, Jacksonville, Dallas, Houston, Austin, San Antonio, Atlanta, Nashville, Huntsville, Boise, Oklahoma City, Tulsa, Salt Lake City, to name just a few.Adiel holds a master's degree from Stanford University. His professional experience includes Management and Director Positions in firms including Hewlett- Packard, Excel Telecommunications, and biotechnology firms.Find Robert on:Website: https://adielgorel.com, https://adielgorel.com/speaking ICG Real Estate Investment: https://icgre.com, https://icgre.com/pressroom/Entrepreneur: https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/389304Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiz2UK9KjOWPeIwd48EWJJw, https://youtu.be/EbR81Q-7gYU  Average Joe Finances®All of our social media links and more: https://averagejoefinances.com/linksAbout Mike: https://themikecav.comREWBCON: Join me at the Real Estate Wealth Builders Conference. Use promo code “Mike” to save on tickets. https://averagejoefinances.com/rewbconImportant Tools and Resources that I UseFinancial Resources: www.averagejoefinances.com/resourcesCRM Tool: www.averagejoefinances.com/crmPay Off Your Mortgage in 5-7 Years:www.theshredmethod.com/averagejoefinancesFind a REALTOR® in any state: www.averagejoefinances.com/realtorMake Real Estate Investing Easier with DealMachine:www.averagejoefinances.com/dealmachinePodcast Hosting: www.averagejoefinances.com/buzzsproutPodcast Editing Services: www.editpods.com*DISCLAIMER* www.averagejoefinances.com/disclaimerSee our full episode transcripts here: www.averagejoefinancespod.com/episodesSupport the show

Entrepreneur's Enigma
Matt Bailey On How He Got His Start In Digital Marketing And Training

Entrepreneur's Enigma

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 23:11


Matt Bailey teaches Digital Marketing to the world's biggest brands and at the most recognized universities. Matt travels around the world teaching a wide range of digital marketing topics to teams within the world's most iconic brands. He's taught: • Google employees how to use Google Analytics, • Experian how to present data, and • Custom-developed digital marketing workshops for Microsoft, Disney, Nationwide, Orange, Hewlett Packard, Proctor & Gamble, and IBM. Matt's training curriculum is used at Duke University, Rutgers University, Purdue University, University of South Florida, George Washington University, Full Sail University, and many others. According to Microsoft, "Matt has an uncanny ability to simplify the complexity of digital marketing into concepts that are understandable, relatable, and ultimately do-able." From developing real-estate websites in 1996 to starting his own digital marketing agency, Matt has been at the forefront of entrepreneurship and digital marketing. In 2015, he pivoted from his agency business to focus full-time on training. In 2020, he earned his Master of Education in Instructional Design and Technology, and now offers coached digital marketing courses at Learn.Sitelogic.com. Matt teaches through New Media Academy in Dubai, UAE where he is the VP of Education, the ANA (Association of National Advertisers), LinkedIn Learning, and standards contributor for the OMCP (Online Marketing Certified Professional), the international standards certification and licensing program for digital marketing education. He's the author of: Internet Marketing: An Hour a Day (2011) Wired to be Wowed (2015) Teach New Dogs Old Tricks! (2017) Digital Marketing Fundamentals (2023 When he isn't immersed in the universe of marketing and technology, Matt spends most of his time being a husband and a dad (to four girls) and beekeeping. Whatever time is left is spent reading history, culture, or philosophy books. As a self-proclaimed coffee snob, he absolutely loves a good cup of joe—especially while reading. To learn more about Matt, visit www.sitelogic.com If you're enjoying Entrepreneur's Enigma, please give us a review on the podcast directory of your choice. We're on all of them and these reviews really help others find the show. Also, if you're getting value from the show and want to buy me a coffee, go to the show notes to get the link to get me a coffee to keep me awake, while I work on bringing you more great episodes to your ears. →  https://gmwd.us/buy-me-a-coffee Follow Seth Online: Seth Goldstein (@sethgoldstein): Twitter.com/sethgoldstein Seth | Digital Marketer (@s3th.me) • Instagram: Instagram.com/s3th.me Seth Goldstein | LinkedIn: LinkedIn.com/in/goldsteinmedia Seth on Mastodon: https://socl.bz/seth Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Doppelgänger Tech Talk

Frisch erholt aus der Winterpause haben wir zwei Podcast Empfehlungen für euch. Philipp möchte HP shorten. Braucht ein Start-up einen CEO? LastPass wurde gehackt. Wie profitiert ein Unternehmen konkret von seinem eigenen Aktienkurs? Twitter & Frank Thelens Weihnachtsgedicht. Philipp Glöckler (https://www.linkedin.com/in/philippgloeckler/) und Philipp Klöckner (https://twitter.com/pip_net) sprechen heute über: (00:00:00) Podcast Empfehlungen (00:09:15) HP shorten? (00:30:25) Wer wird CEO? (00:40:45) LastPass Hack (00:46:30) Einfluss als Aktionär (00:52:30) Twitter (01:01:00) Thelens Weihnachtsgedicht Shownotes: Spende an Mission Lifeline für Menschen in der Ukraine (https://mission-lifeline.de/ukraine/) Spotify: Alles auf Aktien (AAA) Podcast mit Philipp Westermeyer, Florian Adomeit, Holger Zschäpitz und Philipp Klöckner https://open.spotify.com/episode/1CEhR8O3tWRSd4bRc69szM?si=L9Efxbo9TD6A4zfSAttWmg Apple: Alles auf Aktien (AAA) Podcast mit Philipp Westermeyer, Florian Adomeit, Holger Zschäpitz und Philipp Klöckner https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/alles-auf-aktien/id1549709271?i=1000591166523 Spotify: Happy Bootstrapping! Podcast mit Andreas Lehr. Philipp Glöckler in Folge 2. Jetzt abonnieren! https://open.spotify.com/show/2rf8zucnnn8Vwjgc96nn4M?si=TYtxUYdZQ9K5Du5omReNew Apple: Happy Bootstrapping! Podcast mit Andreas Lehr. Philipp Glöckler in Folge 2. Jetzt abonnieren! https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/happy-bootstrapping/id1659211463 Hackers Had Access to LastPass Users' Password Vaults https://gizmodo.com/hackers-lastpass-users-password-vaults-change-now-1849926968 Frank Thelen Weihnachtsgedicht https://twitter.com/pip_net/status/1607311536426741760 **Doppelgänger Tech Talk Podcast** Sheet https://doppelgaenger.io/sheet/ Disclaimer https://www.doppelgaenger.io/disclaimer/ Passionfroot Storefront www.passionfroot.xyz/doppelgaenger Post Production by Jan Wagener https://twitter.com/JanAusDemOff Aktuelle Doppelgänger Werbepartner https://lollipod.de/sn/doppelgaenger-werbung

ICFSFL Coach's Corner
Episode 20: 50 Minutes with Reiner Lomb

ICFSFL Coach's Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 54:15


This week we sat down with a good friend, Reiner Lomb. Reiner is the founder of BoomerangCoach, an executive coaching firm specializing in leadership and career development, innovation, and transformational change. He is the author of two books, The Boomerang Approach: Return to Purpose, Ignite Your Passion and Aspire: Seven Essential Emotions for Leading Positive Change, No Matter Where You Are. Reiner recently joined us for our Meet the Author book club, and he will be the keynote presenter for the ICF Southeast Regional Webinar Series in January. For over 20 years at Hewlett-Packard, Reiner launched and led new software product businesses and helped grow HP Software into a multi-billion-dollar organization. Today, his mission is to mobilize and develop leaders to create a more sustainable and positive future for all.In our conversation today, we discuss the mixture of emotions, how to inspire others, and how being an emotional leader actually fosters a stronger leadership position. I so enjoyed our conversation, and I hope you do too. And now, my conversation with Reiner Lomb.You can learn more about Reiner and his work at https://reinerlomb.com/. Follow Josh on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/reinerlomb/.Learn more about ICF South Florida at: https://www.icfsouthflorida.org/.Check out the calendar of events to see what interests you and please join us as a guest with the promo code: PODCAST. ..#icf #icfsfl #icfsouthflorida #coaching #podcast #interview

WorldatWork's Work in Progress
Episode 34: A Fab Convo on Pay Equity with a Living Legend

WorldatWork's Work in Progress

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 9:49


We end the year with a special guest who we cannot believe – literally cannot believe – spoke to us for this podcast. He is by a significant margin the most famous person to have ever graced these microphones. He is the living half of a legendarily successful partnership – bigger than Hewlett Packard, Ben and Jerry's, Jobs and Wozniak, possibly combined, certainly from a cultural impact standpoint. I hope that you enjoy our conversation as much as we did. Cheers. 

Lead+Succeed Podcast
Episode 95: Interview Special: Reiner Lomb, author of Aspire: 7 Essential Emotions for Leading Positive Change

Lead+Succeed Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 53:16


This week I sat down with my good friend, Reiner Lomb. Reiner is the founder of BoomerangCoach, an executive coaching firm specializing in leadership and career development, innovation, and transformational change. He is the author of two books, The Boomerang Approach: Return to Purpose, Ignite Your Passion and Aspire: Seven Essential Emotions for Leading Positive Change, No Matter Where You Are. For over 20 years at Hewlett-Packard, Reiner launched and led new software product businesses and helped grow HP Software into a multi-billion-dollar organization. Today, his mission is to mobilize and develop leaders to create a more sustainable and positive future for all.In our conversation today, we discuss the mixture of emotions, how to inspire others, and how being an emotional leader actually fosters a stronger leadership position. You can learn more about Reiner and his work at https://reinerlomb.com/. Follow Josh on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/reinerlomb/....Learn more about Leadership and Mental Fitness Coaching: jimmyglenos.com#jimmyglenos #jglenos #unlocktheshortcut #leadnsucceed #leadershipcoaching #mentalfitnesscoaching #executivecoaching

National Day Calendar
December 15, 2022 - Cat Herders Day | Bill Of Rights Day

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 3:30


Welcome to December 15, 2022 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate impossible jobs and inalienable rights.  One of the most successful television commercials of all time featured a mockumentary depiction of cat herding. The tongue in cheek interviews of rugged cowboys and their errant kitties aired during the Big Game of 2000. This ad put Electronic Data Systems in the spotlight as it perfectly highlighted the difficulty of leading a team. The earned PR benefits and multiple ad awards put EDS on top. Since then, the company founded by Ross Perot in 1962 was acquired by Hewlett Packard and following its history since is a bit like, well, herding cats. If your job feels like a struggle to maintain order you may want to celebrate Cat Herders Day, by taking the day off. During the First Constitutional Convention of 1787, the Founding Fathers drafted the Constitution, though not everyone was satisfied with the results. Edmund Randolph, George Mason and Elbridge Gerry felt strongly that a separate document of individual rights should be made. James Madison of Virginia took up the cause and drafted such a list. These personal rights were trimmed down to 17 by the House and another 5 were removed by the Senate. Eventually 10 of the 12 were ratified by the States on December 15, 1791, and our Nation's Bill of Rights was formally adopted. This document holds even more relevance today and we celebrate Bill of Rights Day by remembering those who held firm to its creation.  I'm Anna Devere and I'm Marlo Anderson. Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every Day. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Tech&Co
L'intégrale de Tech & Co du mercredi 14 décembre

Tech&Co

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 70:58


Mercredi 14 décembre François Sorel a reçu Melinda Davan-Soulas, journaliste à la rédaction de Tech&Co, Jérôme Lecat, président et cofondateur de SCALITY, Élodie Géba, cofondatrice de Lilaea, Alexandre Embry, vice-président du Metaverse-Lab de Capgemini, Sabrina Quagliozzi, correspondante de BFM Business à New York, Luc Julia, directeur scientifique de Renault Group, ancien directeur technique chez Samsung Electronics et Hewlett-Packard, et co-créateur de Siri (Apple), Jérôme Monceaux, fondateur d'Enchanted Tools, Jean de Chambure, consultant en stratégies numériques au cabinet JDC Advisory, et Arthur Bataille, Président du groupe Pr0ph3cy, dans l'émission Tech & Co sur BFM Business. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au jeudi et réécoutez la en podcast.

The Burden of Command
232 - Generative Leadership W/ Tom Hardison

The Burden of Command

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 48:38


Tom Hardison helps leaders build great teams and organizations with a culture of collective leadership so they can scale from 200-1000+ employees. He led change and business growth initiatives at Hewlett Packard for 28 years, a period when revenue grew from 5 billion to 127 billion. He now uses this extensive experience to guide leaders and their teams to leverage the generative power of people working together to achieve sustainable growth. Find out more about Tom on the web at generativeleadershipgroup.com and on LinkedIn at linkedin.com/in/tomhardison Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Swan Dive
Rick Stone - "Telling Stories" - Renowned expert discusses the ancient art of storytelling and the power it holds in daily life

Swan Dive

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 50:02


All day, every day, we each tell stories about who we are and how we are. Collectively, we speak of “controlling the narrative,” both positively and negatively. Rick Stone tells stories for a living and is one of the world's foremost experts on the power of storytelling. He began in advertising and has dedicated the past 30 years to bringing back this ancient art form in service of teaching, learning and connecting people worldwide. As the CEO of StoryWork International, Rick uses story-telling based training programs to help fortify interpersonal relationships and for team building and leadership development, helping professionals add deeper purpose and meaning to their work and life at Disney, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Hewlett Packard and many more. His latest book, Story Intelligence, co-authored with Scott Livengood, helps each of us become a master of our story and amplify and unleash every aspect of our IQ and EQ (emotional intelligence). Learn more at Storyintelligence.comAnd check out TheCentralFire.net where you can bring the delight of storytelling to your own community and join other communities of amazing raconteurs. Share your Swan Dive at www.swandive.us

Win Win - An Entrepreneurial Community
129 - How Not to Fall Apart in a Business Growth Spurt - Adi Vaxman

Win Win - An Entrepreneurial Community

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 32:04


Bill Hewlett, co-founder of Hewlett Packard, is often quoted as saying that “More companies die of indigestion than starvation.” We learn from Adi Vaxman in this episode how to avoid falling apart when you experience a growth spurt. People's businesses often fail not because they never took off, but because they experienced a growth spurt they couldn't manage and fall apart or give up. Our guest, Adi Vaxman, is a Fractional COO through her firm Sheba Consulting (www.ShebaConsulting.com). Before this, she served as COO and General Manager at multiple international and VC-backed organizations. Adi explains how to recognize when you're in a growth spurt and three strategies you must use to avoid falling apart and "dying of indigestion." Listen to the show on Apple podcasts (https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/win-win-an-entrepreneurial-community/id1465488607), wherever you normally get your podcasts, or listen on the web at www.FractionalLeadership.io/Podcast.

Real Estate Espresso
More Labor Market Turmoil

Real Estate Espresso

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 6:30


On today's show we are talking about what impacting labor markets and how that can affect real estate. In the food and beverage industry we're seeing a massive shortage of workers. The question is, where did they all go? We saw in the most recent statistics for the past month a trend that has been underway for much of the past six months. In November, the US enterprise employment report shows that 263,000 new jobs were created and that unemployment remains at a low 3.7%. A large percentage of jobs hired were in the travel, leisure and hospitality industry. What does that mean? It means hotel staff, restaurant staff, retail staff, flight attendants have been hired in record numbers. While we have seen major job losses in the tech sector at with 10,000 google, 11,000 at Facebook, Twitter of course, and major layoffs at Amazon. In the past week alone some of the more notable announcements have been layoffs of 400 people at reverse mortgage funding, 1500 at H&M, Doordash, 1250, Global Foundries 800, Wireless Advocate, up to 1800 inside Costco Wholesale stores, Morgan Stanley, 1600, Blue Apron Holdings, 10% of corporate workforce. Intel corporation let go 300, 100 at corporate headquarters and 200 in Santa Clara. Hewlett Packard is expected to lay off 4000-6000. I've only listed a handful of more notable layoff announcements in the past week. There are certainly many, many more. But frankly, having me list layoffs for five minutes will get boring. I think you get the point. So are these people showing up as unemployed? Well no, they're not. Almost all of these will have received a severance package and they won't appear on the unemployment rolls for months. Many of the job losses are higher paying corporate jobs. Some of the job losses are in retail with H&M and Wireless Advocate. But most are high paying white collar jobs. The hiring is also happening in ways for restaurants to stay in business. We spoke with a hotel owner this week who said that applicants for the role of dishwasher in the hotel kitchen were asking for $30 per hour. ------------- Host: Victor Menasce email: podcast@victorjm.com

The Law Firm Leadership Podcast | We Interview Corp Defense Law Firm Leaders, Partners, General Counsel and Legal Consultants
The Future is Bright: Episode 02 Lloyd Johnson | Founder of Chief Legal Executive on Diversity and the Legal Profession

The Law Firm Leadership Podcast | We Interview Corp Defense Law Firm Leaders, Partners, General Counsel and Legal Consultants

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 6:17


Join Chris Batz on his second episode of The Future is Bright Podcast as he welcomes guest speaker Lloyd Johnson to learn more about how he has taken the hardships in life and turned them into motivation to be a legal industry leader, influencer, and advocate for women and attorneys of color. Chris Batz spends this week's episode talking to Lloyd Johnson, born and raised in Santa Rosa, CA, an all-American track and field athlete turned legal industry convener and influencer. Johnson speaks about his life being raised within a black-owned janitorial business and how the events he saw and the people he surrounded himself with motivated him to turn to the legal profession. His legal career started as Deputy District Attorney in San Francisco and in-house counsel for IBM and Hewlett-Packard. He was then founder and Executive Director for the Minority Corporate Counsel Association and Women In-House Counsel Leadership Association. He conducted numerous in-house counsel leadership development workshops and events. He also was the publisher of the Inside Counsel Magazine and created the Diversity and Bar Magazine. From there, Johnson founded Chief Legal Executive, where he continues his legacy of programs and career development initiatives for women and attorneys of color. Lloyd created the first DE&I best practices research for corporate legal departments back in 1999/2000. This September he is releasing an updated and new report bringing visibility and insights to the execution of DE&I within corporate legal departments. Quote: “The morale of the story is your most complex problems are going to be solved by your relationships with people not because you are smart.” Click on the following links to subscribe to The Future is Bright Podcast and to watch or listen to the entire episode: ChrisBatz.com Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQOXp7nOM9oj-BDHxwn2OAQ/featured Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-future-is-bright-podcast/id1645884673 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/5ljmN2aMnlMGeJ90HYD5jg Google: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy9iNTNkNGUyOC9wb2RjYXN0L3Jzcw  

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch
20 Product: Marty Cagan on The Four Questions of Great Product Management, Product Lessons from Marc Andreessen, Ben Horowitz and eBay's Pierre Omidyar & The Difference Between Truly Great Product Teams and the Rest

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 57:39


Marty Cagan is one of the OGs of Product and Product Management as the Founder of Silicon Valley Product Group. Before founding SVPG, Marty served as an executive responsible for defining and building products for some of the most successful companies in the world, including Hewlett-Packard, Netscape Communications, and eBay. He worked directly alongside Marc Andreesen and Ben Horowitz at Netscape and Pierre Omidyar at eBay. In Today's Episode with Marty Cagan We Discuss: 1. Entry into the World of Product From Engineering: How Marty first made his way into the world of product, having started life as an engineer? What does Marty know now that he wishes he had known when he started in product? What are Marty's biggest tips to anyone making the move from engineering to product? 2. Lessons from Marc and Ben at Netscape and Pierre @ eBay: What are the single biggest lessons Marty took from working side by side on product with Ben Horowitz and Marc Andreesen? What did Netscape do right? What did they do wrong? With hindsight, what would Marty have done differently? How did Marty break all of his rules by working with Pierre Omidyar? 3. Hiring a World Class Early Product Team: When is the right time to make your first product hire as a startup? What is the right profile for that first product hire? Senior or junior? If you go for the junior hire, how do you structure the rest of the team? If you go for the Senior hire, how do you structure the rest of the team? What are the single biggest mistakes startups make when hiring their first in product? Does Marty prefer someone with or without expertise in the domain you are in? 4. Mastering the Onboarding Process: What is the optimal onboarding process for all new product hires? How can leaders ensure that product hires see and understand all areas of the business? What can product leaders do to proactively impress in the first 30-60 days? What are clear red flags that a new product hire is not working out? How long do we give them?

Law Firm Marketing Catalyst
Episode 109: How Executive Coaching Can Breathe New Life into Your Legal Career with Andrew Elowitt, Managing Director & Founder of New Actions LLC

Law Firm Marketing Catalyst

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 53:35


What you'll learn in this episode: Why a growth mindset is the key to making effective change Andrew's tips for beating resistance and making changes stick Why lawyers need to adapt their professional approach to become effective coaches and mentors  How to choose the right executive coach What lawyers of all levels can expect to gain from coaching About Andrew Elowitt: Andrew Elowitt JD MBA PCC worked for over twenty years both in law firms and as the head of a corporate legal department before becoming a practice management consultant and professional certified coach. He is the Managing Director of New Actions LLC, a firm that specializes in talent, strategy and leadership development for law firms, businesses, and government agencies. His work focuses on the people side of legal practice: how lawyers manage, lead, thrive, change, and find satisfaction. He is regarded as an expert on the use of coaching and emotional, social and conversational intelligences in leading and managing legal organizations of all sizes. Andrew is a Fellow in the College of Law Practice Management, an International Coach Federation Professional Certified Coach, Vice Chair of the ABA Law Practice Division Publications Board, and founding member of its Lawyer Leadership and Management Board. He is the author of numerous articles and is regularly invited to conduct workshops and retreats for his clients and to present programs to bar associations. Additional Resources:  New Actions: www.newactions.com  Elowitt's LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/andrewelowitt  Transcript: Coaching is a powerful tool that can help lawyers in all stages of their careers become more effective leaders, mentors, and professionals. The legal industry has embraced coaching over the last 10 years, thanks in no small part to the work of Andrew Elowitt, founder of coaching firm New Actions and author of books “The Lawyer's Guide to Professional Coaching: Leadership, Mentoring, and Effectiveness” and “Lawyers as Managers: How to Be a Champion for Your Firm and Employees.” He joined the Law Firm Marketing Catalyst Podcast to talk about how lawyers can face and overcome their resistance to change; why a growth mindset is necessary for lasting transformation; and how lawyers should choose the right coach. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: Welcome to the Law Firm Marketing Catalyst Podcast. Today, my guest is Andrew Elowitt. Andrew is the managing director and founder of New Actions LLC. His firm provides high-level coaching, practice management consulting and retreat facilitation services to law firms and other professional service firms. He is a former lawyer and corporate executive. He's also an in-demand speaker. He is a very accomplished author who has been on the podcast before with one of this coauthors, Marcia Wasserman. We'll hear all about his journey today. Andrew, welcome to the program. Andrew: It's great to be back, Sharon. Sharon: It's great to have you. Thank you so much. Tell us about your journey. How did you get to where you are now? Andrew: I had been practicing law for 15 years, first in firms and then I went in-house. It wasn't something that hit me suddenly at 15 years. I realized I was a good lawyer and I was well-compensated, but my passion for the law, for legal practice, was ebbing. I wanted to do something more. I wasn't sure what it would be, but I definitely wanted to have a second act.  So, I got to that point 15 years in, like I said, and it was a matter of some awfully good luck. My best friend's weekend hiking buddy was a senior organizational development consultant who was putting on learning opportunities for an eclectic mix of people. I had known him socially, and I was introduced to him. I talked about what he was doing with the learning groups. He had a clinical psychologist, a college professor, an educational consultant, and a woman who did film editing and writing, so a lawyer in the mix made it all the more eclectic. Once I started that learning group, I was fascinated. It was like all the lights going on on the Christmas tree in Rockefeller Center. I went, “This is so interesting. I want to do this.” Then I started to train, and I probably read more in those first two or three years that I was training with my mentor than I had practicing law in the prior 10 years.  Then I made the transition into doing organizational development consulting. We were working with a lot of tech companies in Silicon Valley. Over time, slowly, I started to pick up more professional services firm clients, lawyers, accountants. A lot of my friends from the legal world were now in managerial positions. We'd get together and they'd say, “Andrew, we're having this problem,” and I'd give them advice. After about six months, they said, “You know what? We'll pay to have you go into the firms and help us with these things.” I went, “Oh my gosh, there's a niche here.” So, I started working with lawyers then.  At that time, which was the early 2000s, coaching in the legal world was not well understood. People thought I was a life coach. They had all kinds of misgivings, and I had to overcome that initially in making the transition. At this point, coaching is very well known and respected and utilized, not fully utilized, but utilized in the legal profession. Sharon: Do you think that's more in California? When I talk to people in other areas of the country, they don't really know what coaching is. They're going, “Coaching, what's that?”  Andrew: Yeah, occasionally I get that. I don't think there's a big geographic difference anymore. Maybe on the coasts there's more understanding of coaching. The legal community has followed the business community. The business community was a much earlier adapter and user of coaching. You certainly saw that in the tech companies. One of the reasons why was because you had a lot of younger, relatively inexperienced managers coming in, and they needed help. Brilliant people, great subject matter experts, but they didn't know how to manage, especially managing people. That's one of the reasons why there was a lot of traction for coaching in tech centers, both on the west coast and the east coast.  Law has followed that, and I think it's a matter of what the business models are for businesses versus professional services firms. As you know, partners or senior attorneys have their producer/manager dilemma. They're the ones that are on the factory floor grinding out the equipment or the product. At the same time, they need to manage, but do they have the time? There's a built-in tension there. Do I step away from billable hours to do the work? Do I step away from client development to do the managerial piece? It's a built-in dilemma. You don't see that on the business side. On the business side, with the executives I work with, which is anywhere from 40% to 60% of my practice, they are managers. Their job is to manage the people that report to them and to collaborate with the people in their organizations. It's different than in law firms. Sharon: Law firms are their own animal. One of the ways is exactly what you're talking about. You have tension. What do you tell people who come and say, “I love the business side and I like client development, but I don't like the law. I don't like to write briefs. I don't like to read them. What can I do?” Andrew: First of all, that resonates with me because that was my feeling about the law. I know I was a good technician, but I much rather would have been negotiating. I think that's one of the reasons why I was happy going in-house. I got to be the client, and I was more involved in the business affairs of my organization.  For those people, I think it's great that they have wider interests. The people who like client development, they're the future rainmakers in a firm. The people who like doing the managerial piece are really important. Now, there's a problem because they may be very good at it, but firms are still slow in rewarding and incentivizing people to take on those managerial roles.  One thing we've seen in big law, the largest law firms in North America and around the world, is the emergence of professional managers. People that may or may not be lawyers are now doing the administration and the leading of firms. There can be challenges to that. In a lot of jurisdictions, you can't have nonlawyers, people that are not certified as lawyers, being equity holders in a law firm. That makes the compensation and incentivizing issue a lot more complicated, but I think we'll see more of a continuation in that direction. It's great to have people in firms that are interested, passionate, experienced and competent in management. It makes a big difference in the bottom line. Sharon: I had forgotten how it's become so professionalized on the business side in many ways. I can't remember; it'll come to me later. I was trying to remember when I was at Arthur Andersen. There was such a big dichotomy between fee earners, non-revenue generators and revenue generators. I always felt like, “What are you talking about? We bring in this much.”  Anyway, you said you were doing training in organizational development or coaching. Andrew: It started out with organizational development. That was the focus of our learning group. It was great for me. I was with people more senior than I in terms of work experience, not necessarily in terms of age. We started with a couple of learning groups in Los Angeles. Then my mentor, Don Rossmoore, got invited to Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center, PARC, to lead learning groups there, so we had other professionals and executive coaches that were in-house for Xerox. We had people from Apple, Hewlett-Packard, Sun. It was the whole list of tech companies. This is back in the 1990s. It fast-tracked me to have all those people available to learn from.  Our last learning groups morphed into a consulting group that was a bit informal. Very different from law firms, where everything is very structured. This was, “Do you have the availability? O.K., we'll work together on this engagement.” I learned a tremendous amount there. We were usually dealing with larger issues throughout an organization.  What I found in doing that was I loved the strategic part, the systems part of that, but it really comes down to implementation. When it comes down to implementing the changes we're recommending, that goes back to the individual. Often the individual executives and managers were having difficulty implementing the changes they knew they needed to make, including changes in the organization, changes in the team they were leading, or changes in themselves. It's the individual. That's where I really began the transition into coaching. I didn't think I was very good at it initially. I still feel that way. I had to unlearn a lot of qualities and approaches that made me a good lawyer, but not necessarily a good coach. For example, as a lawyer, you need to be prescriptive and directed. You're there to provide a solution. A client comes to you with a problem, then, “O.K., well, this is what you should do.” That doesn't necessarily work well when you're coaching. It's better to work more collaboratively with your coach-ee to help them come to their ideas and figure out what they need to do. I had to stop myself. I had to restrain myself from jumping to solutions and saying “Here's the roadmap. Here are steps one through five. Do them.” That was me at the beginning. I had to sit on my hands and zip my mouth and go, “I have some ideas about this, but I'd like to hear from you first. What do you think would be a good approach?” It's bringing them more into the picture.  That was one of the biggest and hardest changes for me, but I found I really liked working with executives. There's something about working with people one-on-one I found very satisfying, far more satisfying than working with people one-on-one in the legal capacity. I went in that direction with executives and lawyers and a few other service professionals from time to time, but I wouldn't identify myself in those positions. That's pretty much the journey that I took. Sharon: Do you find that you have to put on a different hat when you're working with a lawyer, and then another hat when you're working with an executive? Andrew: That's a great question. It depends on the lawyer and the executive. Sometimes I have to put on a different hat with the same person from one session to the next depending on where they're at. With lawyers, Sharon, it's usually a matter of the issues we're dealing with. On the executive side, it's pretty much pure management and leadership skills. Lately with the pandemic, resilience and finding a healthy work/life integration are huge, huge issues. For the last two or three years, that has been a theme in almost all of the coaching I've done.  On the legal side, it's different. It's not pure management and leadership. At the younger levels of an attorney's career, we're more often focused on issues of productivity, time management, work-flow management. They are on the receiving end of delegation and feedback, so a lot of it is helping them learn how to receive delegation and feedback and how to help them make the people giving them the feedback and delegation even better.  It's a sweeping generalization, but I think it's true that lawyers don't have a lot of formal training in managerial skills. Some who came to the law after working in another area may have that. Some who took management classes in college or grad school, they may have some familiarity. But basically, when it comes to people management, lawyers don't know a lot. They are replicating the ways they were managed, which means they may be using managerial and leadership approaches that are two generations old, which are not great with millennials and Gen Z.  So, a lot of is helping people learn how to manage.  Now, I said I started with people at the lower level. As you get higher, then it is learning those managerial skills, delegating, giving feedback. How do you hold the people that work with you accountable? How do you collaborate with other people? As you go further up, it becomes more client-facing, so it's about developing those client relationships. Then we get into business development. I'm not a business development specialist, but I'm very good at helping attorneys that have support for client development within their firm and may even have dedicated client development people.  They know what they should be doing, but they're not doing it. It's the classical example of the knowing-doing gap. This is something that's not unique to lawyers. There's something we know we should do, but do we get around to doing it? No. That can be the case with a lot of lawyers when it comes to business development. I'm very good at helping them understand what's holding them back. Typically, it's nothing external; it's nothing in the firm or the environment. It's something in them. We acknowledge what the inner obstacle is and we work past it and through it. I have a good record of getting them into gear and getting them developing clients.  Finally, when we get to partner-level, practice area heads and executive committee members, then it's a lot about leadership and management. That's where there's the most similarity to the business side or the executive side of my practice. Sharon: Do you work with people at all different levels, depending on where they are when they contact you or the firm brings you in? How does it work? Andrew: For firms, it's virtually all levels. Large firms will bring me in. I'll work with their professional development or talent development people. Most often, they have a high-potential associate and there may be a couple of things that they're struggling with. As I think most of your listeners will know, it's expensive to find new people and onboard and train them. You don't want to lose that human capital. So, coaching can be very helpful and cost-effective in helping those people overcome the problems they may be having.  It may be something like time management. You have an associate who's starting to trend late on their deliverables. It's the work they need to get to partners. It's overly simple to say, “Oh, they need to work harder and faster,” or something like that. It may be an issue—it often is—where they're not doing a good job of pushing back against the people giving them work. There are lot of people all over the world and there are a lot of associates. They're hesitant to say no to a partner when a partner hands them a piece of work. What they end up doing is overloading themselves because they are overly optimistic about what they can achieve in a given amount of time. So, helping them learn how to push back is a way of dealing the time management issue. Sharon: I can see how it would be very hard to say, “I don't have time,” or “No,” to a partner. That must be very, very hard. Andrew: There's a skill and art to it, a lot of finesse. With some partners even more finesse. Sharon: Is there resistance? It seems like there would be. Maybe I have an old image of it, but it seems like there would be people who say, “I don't need coaching,” or “I've failed if I have coaching. Andrew: Happily, there's less and less of that. That sense of failure, I don't run into that much anymore. Usually with younger associates, they may feel like, “I should know this. This is a flaw in me. I'm not doing a good job of this.” Often, they're their most severe critics, so I make it very clear to people I coach that I'm not there to fix them. Seldom am I dealing with somebody who really has a risk of being fired from a firm. It's usually developmental. Usually, they're worth investing in, and the firm is spending money to help them become more productive and a tighter part of the firm.  The one thing you did mention is that some people think, “I don't need coaching.” I'll initially talk to a prospective coach-ee—and this works on the executive side or the legal side. I qualify them, which sounds like turning them into objects, but it's coach-speak for talking to them to see if they're coachable. Not all people are. Most are very earnestly interested. They want the help. They're stuck. They don't know what to do, but they know they need to do something. Occasionally, you'll find somebody who points the finger at everybody else. They say, “I'm not the problem. It's their problem, if you could just help them.” That's not going to be a good coach-ee.  The other thing you look for is a growth mindset versus a fixed mindset. People with a fixed mindset think, “This is all the intelligence I have, all the social skills I have. What you see is what you get. I'm not going to change. There's not a lot of room, if any room, for improvement.” Why spend time, energy, money on dealing with a person or trying to help a person who is saying, “This is where I am and I'm O.K. to be there”? There's no upside potential. You want people with a growth mindset who are curious, who are saying, “I want to learn how to do this.” It's a challenge. You want people who can say, “I've really messed up doing this. I can tell you about the last three failures I've had.” That level of self-awareness and candor makes for a great coach-ee. Sharon: I'm thinking there are some similarities. Sometimes a partner will say, “I know how to do it. I did it this way. They can learn how to do it this way.” Can that change? They may be resistant, or maybe they're not coachable. What do you think about that? Andrew: There's often a degree of resistance in making changes. There's a reason why we are the way are at a given moment. Often, it's because something has worked well for us in the past, and that's fine. It makes sense to me. It got you to where you are. Why change it? You don't want to take that risk. But that mindset ignores the fact that our world is changing really quickly.  Let's use the example of working virtually. There were people that said, “No, I only want to have face-to-face meetings.” This goes for coaches and their coaching sessions as well as clients and people in their firm. But the world changed, and all of a sudden, we got a lot better working virtually.  Sometimes you do run into people who are resistant. If you're coaching them, you can start to work with them on resistance. You can say, “I can see why this would work for you. I can see the track record. I'm curious. What do you imagine might happen if you tried doing this differently?” I will lay out a scenario of what different would look like. When you start to engage them in that conversation, that's where you listen and hear what their fears are, what their expectations are, why their fears may be justified. Often, they're not. They're thinking something horrible will happen, and you can say, “There is that risk, but here's the opportunity. What do you think?” So, you can subtly, gently shift them.  Sharon: It sounds like you have opened up people who were closed when you walked in. Andrew: Yes, all the time. Sharon: I know you went to the Institute of Management Coaching. Andrew: No, my training didn't include IMC. In terms of management training, I did get my MBA from Marshall School of Business at USC. The learning group supplemented a lot of that. A lot of it was self-study, but I also took workshops and got certified in Essential Facilitation. That was something I found extraordinarily helpful and is a big part of the work I do. There was also action science, which is, again, organizational development oriented. It helped me to understand the dynamics of organizations.  The other thing in terms of training was my coaching training. One thing about coaching that is very different from lawyering is how you become a lawyer. Typically, you're doing your undergraduate work; you're going to law school; you have to take the bar exam. There are a lot of steps, a lot of certifications, that help with quality control. On the complete other side of the picture, we have coaching. You want to be a coach? Go to your stationery store or big office supply place, get cards printed up that say “coach,” and you're a coach. There's very little in the way of, at least, governmental oversight. The last I checked, which was a few years ago, I think the only state that said anything about coaching in their laws was Colorado. It said that coaching is not considered a mental health profession, so it was excluding coaching. Nothing about what you have to do to be a coach.  So, it's incumbent upon coaches to get training. There are a few organizations that sanction training and offer certification. I'm an International Coach Federation Professional Certified Coach. Boy, is that a mouthful! ICF is probably the leading and most well-known organization for certifying coaches. It's not the only one anymore, but it is an effort to raise the standards of the profession and to make sure that people who are using coaches get somebody who knows what they're doing. Sharon: Did you have to take some training and go through at least one class? Or could you just send in your money? Andrew: That's a great question. There are some organizations where basically you're paying to be on an online list of certified coaches in the area. That exists. I shake my head in dismay about that. As far as I see it, you have to go through an approved training program. Mine was Newfield Network. It was a nine-month program. I think we met three times for three or four days in person. There was a lot of virtual work, albeit this was so long ago that it was by telephone in between. It was rigorous.  There are several good coaching programs. ICF approves them. They have lists of them. What we're seeing more of, both on the executive side and in law firms, is that they want people that are certified coaches. Certification of a coach doesn't necessarily mean they're the right coach for you or they're a great coach, but it does mean they've taken it seriously enough that they put time and effort into it. They know what they should be doing. Hopefully, they're also doing it.  Sharon: You've been a lawyer and an executive, but being a lawyer, I can see how that gives you so much of an advantage. I'm thinking about how many times we've had to write a press release and weren't exactly sure—we did know, but we're not lawyers. It gives you an advantage. Andrew: Yeah, it does help. Especially in the past, it helped a great deal. If you look at studies of lawyer personalities versus the general population, lawyers typically are slower to trust other people. It makes sense. It's not a bad quality to have considering how we need to protect our clients' interests. But I found that lawyers and administrators in law firms are very happy that I have a legal background.  There was this one moment relatively early in my career where I was sitting across a managing partner's desk. He was starting to explain to me realization rates, and I held up my hand and said, “It's O.K.” He stopped and went, “Oh, that's right. You've practiced.” His shoulders sank down a couple of inches, and he sat back in his chair and said, “That's so nice that I don't have to go through all that explanation.” Understanding the context of what goes on in a law firm helps a tremendous amount. So, that is good. With that said, not everybody has to have a legal background. But I think some of the most effective coaches I know do have that background. Sharon: I can see how that would make you very effective, especially being on the other side of the desk in any capacity. If you were a lawyer at one point, you know about doing the work and getting the work. There's a difference there. I love the name of your firm, New Actions. That's what all of this is about, right? Andrew: You nailed it, Sharon. Especially when I started the firm, there was, like I said, a limited understanding of what coaching was about. Coaching can be these wonderful dialogues and interesting conversations you have with a coach-ee. What you want to do is get results—at least, that's my philosophy—and the results are helping people make changes. Where they are doing is not satisfactory for some reason. They may be unclear about a direction. They may need new skills. They may have difficultly working with people in the system of their organization or getting past that knowing-doing gap we talked about. It could be all those things, but people have to start taking new actions to get new results, better results. That's where the name came from.  Sharon: Do you think results last? Maybe they try the new actions once or twice and say, “Oh, that's different,” but then they forget. Maybe I'm personalizing it. I'm thinking you forget.  Andrew: Yeah, as I said earlier, there's a reason why people do the things the way they do. It's easy for people to revert back. That's one of the problems we find with training in a business or a professional firm environment. I'm sure you experienced that in doing trainings with lawyers and seeing they've learned all this new stuff. They'll do it for a couple of months, but without reinforcement, people do start to revert back to old behaviors. The six-month mark is my ballpark estimate. I liken it to having taken a foreign language in high school. You don't take it in college. You don't go to that foreign country. You don't use the language. You lose it. It certainly happened with me. That is a problem.  The difference with coaching is there is a reinforcement. Sometimes we do spot coaching or laser coaching. It may be three sessions. When it's really short, we're probably dealing with a specific issue or problem, but most executive coaching goes for six months. That's our target area. Often, it may extend a little bit longer than that. In the first part of the coaching, you're understanding the person, why they're doing what they're doing. Then you move into what they could be doing differently. In the middle third—and this is very rough as to the time—they're practicing the new skills, the new behaviors. They're understanding what works for them and what doesn't. The last third is really more practice. It's integrating those skills so they become second nature, almost automatic. That's where what you learn in coaching can become sticky, if I can use that term. After you finish coaching, it's going to stick with you.  I was just thinking of this while on LinkedIn. A former coach-ee of mine posted that he got a promotion, and I sent him a congratulations. I got back a comment saying, “Thank you so much for your coaching. I'm still quoting you.” I coached him about four years ago. That was the kind of gratification I was talking about earlier, the difference between being a lawyer and being a coach. I don't remember what I said or what he's quoting, but it stuck with him. He's using it, and he's in a global world now. That made me very happy. I had a big smile for the rest of that day. Sharon: As a lawyer, when should I consider getting a coach? What would I be dealing with? What should I look for? Andrew: O.K., two different questions. Often, the lawyers I'm working with, their firms have contacted me or they've been instrumental. With that said, one positive trend I've seen is that younger lawyers are saying, “I would like a coach. I need a coach.” Lately a lot of them are saying, “I'm overwhelmed. I'm stressed. I have too much work for my ability to handle it. I need to get better organized.” They're initiating that. The first step for a lawyer at any stage of their career is that you're dissatisfied with the way things are. You may have a good idea of where that's coming from. You may sense, “I want to stop doing whatever I'm doing now,” but knowing what you want to stop doing is different from knowing what you need to be doing differently. The analogy or metaphor I use is think back to being on the playground. We had monkey bars, I think they were called. Those were the horizontal bars that went across. You grab one and then you swing to the next one. What you learned early on as a kid was that if you don't have some forward momentum, you get stuck. Then you would end up letting go and dropping to the ground. In making changes, you have to be able to release the hand that's on the back bar. Sometimes in coaching, it's unlearning what you were doing. If an attorney finds themselves in that position, that's where coaching might help. It's not a panacea. It's not perfect for everybody.  I'm a good coach, but I'm not the right coach for absolutely everybody. Rapport is very important. Fit is a very important thing. Typically, when I work with somebody, I qualify them and they're qualifying me. Do they want to work with me? It's important that you feel a degree of comfort with your coach. As I've gone on, I think you can be too comfortable with a coach. You want a coach who can challenge you and be honest with you and be able to say, “No, I'm not saying this,” or “No, I don't think is working for you,” or “Hey, it sounds like there's an internal contradiction in what you're saying to me.” A lot of coaching is helping people get past their blind spots. We all have blind spots. That's not a failure. I think it's wired into us. Having another person there, especially an experienced person who can help us see what those blind spots are once you recognize you have them, that opens up a lot of possibilities for taking new actions. Sharon: You mentioned in some writings that you've helped people with difficult conversations. There are a lot of difficult conversations. Can you give us some examples in law? Andrew: There are two conversations that come to mind. One I alluded to earlier, which is pushing back on partners. Just recently I co-presented at a professional development consortium summer conference. It was a program on helping passive and timid associates learn to push back and manage up. For all the talk about law firms being flat organizations—and it's true; they do have fewer layers than a lot of business organizations—they're still pretty hierarchical. Younger attorneys can be overly deferential and very uncomfortable in saying no or pushing back. It can be a lot of different things. I don't have the bandwidth to handle work, like I mentioned earlier. How do you say that?  This can especially be a problem if you have one associate who's getting work from multiple partners. Then it's like, “Well, I'd like to do your work, but I'm slammed.” That can be a difficult conversation for an associate. In helping them, one learns that they need to do that and it's O.K. for them to do that. Actually, if they're just a passive person who's not providing that information to the people who are giving them work, they're harming the firm, harming clients potentially, and definitely harming themselves. That is something that's come up a lot lately, at least enough that the presentation we did this summer was very well received and attended. It's something that professional development managers and directors in big law are hearing from their associates. That's one area.  The second difficult conversation is around feedback. This is difficult in a way because it's not done enough. Often, in the rush of doing tasks and taking care of client matters, lawyers don't hit the pause button and spend time with the people who report to them and give them feedback on how they did. I remember this when I was a lawyer. You would finish a transaction. Rarely did we have the time to do a debrief. What worked well? What didn't? “This was great what you did. It really moved us forward. This is what you could have done differently that would have helped. Next time, maybe you can do it.” Feedback conversations are often missing.  The other thing in feedback conversations is that they can be very top-down and done with a lack of curiosity about what was going on with the associate. Those conversations can take a more collaborative tone, become more of a dialogue, be less about the problem. “Here's the problem that came up on this case. We were slow in responding to every filing the opposition brought to us. Let's get curious about why that happened. What can we, not just associates, but all of us as a team do differently?” Those sorts of conversations.  The hardest ones, Sharon, are obviously the conversations between partners in terms of strategy, direction, and compensation. Those are given to be difficult, and I do get pulled in to help. I'm a facilitator in those. I don't have a dog in the fight. I'm just trying to help people understand one another's perspective. What facts they're looking at, what their rationale is based on, trying to change it from a legal argument with pros, cons and who's going to win to more, “Let's look at the whole business of the law firm. Let's see what's good short-term and long-term for all of us, not just part of us.” Sharon: Each of these are very interesting scenarios. I give you credit for even being able to endure them, especially the first one. Covid probably changed this, but I do remember a partner saying, “What do they think evenings and weekends are for?” I always think of how partners would say, “This guy didn't make it in terms of client development. It was clear they weren't going to become a partner. I coached them out.” I always think about, “What did you say? How did you do that? Andrew: I'm not sure what coaching somebody out necessarily means. Let's stop here and think about lawyers as coaches. This is one of the things in my first book that I went into in some detail in one of the chapters. The skills for being a good lawyer, when you line them up against being a good coach, there's not a lot of overlap. Lawyers, to be good managers and leaders, they need to take off their lawyer hat at times. If they're coaching, which is a very potent, effective way of managing your people, you have to not approach it as lawyers.  For an example, as lawyers, we often ask closed-ended questions. We're getting to the facts. In coaching, open-ended questions are much better. You want to see where the conversation is going to go. You want to learn more about what's going on with the other person. In coaching, you also have to be listening very attentively, not thinking about, “What am I going to say in response to this?” Again, I'm going back to one of the shifts I had to make when I made the transition. As a lawyer, I'm thinking, “This is what I'm hearing from opposition. Now, how am I going to counter that argument? What am I going to say next? How do I want to navigate this conversation?” It's more oppositional in that way. You really do have to take off the lawyer hat at times to be effective. Sharon: Your first book, “Lawyers as Managers,” talks about that. Am I remembering that correctly? Andrew: That's the second book with Marcia Wasserman. The first one was “The Lawyer's Guide to Professional Coaching: Leadership, Mentoring, and Effectiveness.” That was, I think, back in 2012. It's available now. I think you can find used copies on Amazon. The ABA still has it as an e-book. Coaching in the last 10 years has certainly changed within law firms. At the time it was written, it was to help lawyers and firm administrators understand the potential of coaching. I'm happy to say I think that potential is increasingly realized. I wouldn't say my book is responsible for that solely. Absolutely not, but it was one piece that helped. In “Lawyers as Managers,” Marcia and I look at the role that lawyers need to take as people managers. Lawyers are generally good managers when it comes to technical aspects. You give a lawyer a spreadsheet, they're probably pretty good at dealing with it. Things like budgets. When you come to the more interpersonal stuff, like client development, lawyers aren't as good. When it comes to people management, there really was a lack of understanding.  Marcia originated the idea. We were at a meeting, and she said, “I'm looking for some materials on leadership and management for lawyers. Do you have any?” I said, “I have a few articles I've written for bar associations, but most of the stuff out there is general management and leadership. It's tailored for the executive committee, the business community.” A couple of months later, we had the same conversation. I said, “Marcia, we're going to have to write the book,” and she agreed. Little did she know what she was getting herself into. That, I will say, is the definitive book on people management for lawyers. Sharon: To end, can you tell us about one of the difficult conversations you've had? I don't know how many times I've stopped myself and just said, “I can't do it,” or “I'll go around it.” Andrew: I'll speak in general terms. Again, I'm going back to when I was first making the transition to coaching. I found a great deal of difficulty in having uncomfortable conversations where I had to deliver bad news. I had to tell somebody what they were doing was not working at all. It wasn't even neutral. It was really harming them and other people. In short, they were really messing up.  I was very gentle. I was bypassing. I was softening, diluting, sugar-coating messages that needed to be heard. I realized that I was playing nice. I didn't want to upset the other person. I didn't want to feel my own upset in doing this, so I wasn't providing value and the proof that they were making the changes they needed to make. This was maybe in my first two or three years of coaching, and I started to realize this isn't good. I was stuck and working with my coach at that time. I realized I had to let go of my personal discomfort if I was going to be more helpful to my clients, and I started to make the change. Now, I am honest. Sometimes people will say, “Can you predict or guarantee any results?” and I go, “No, absolutely not. Coaching at heart is a partnership. We're working together. I can't fix you. I can't wave a magic wand. It's on both of us. I'm here to help you, but just like I can't wear your clothes, I can't do everything for you. We're going to work together.” I do make three promises. One, I listen. I listen very attentively to what my coach-ees say and what they're not saying. The second thing is I am honest. I am very honest. I will not hold back in terms of what I'm hearing or the impact it's having on me. If a coach-ee is saying something and I'm not believing them, I'll say that. I need to. If I think something is B.S., it's the same thing. If I think they're fooling themselves, same thing. There are times where I have to deliver tough feedback.  The third promise is I'm compassionate. I don't beat people up in the process. I won't sugar-coat, dilute, or bypass. I deliver the message, but I understand they have feelings. In giving them this feedback, it may affect their emotions and their own identity as a person and a professional. I'm aware of it and sensitive to that, but I still get the message across. I figure that in the first two or three years of my coaching, I was sugar-coating. For the last 22 years, I think I have a good record of being straight with people and getting results. Sharon: Andrew, I'm sure you do get results. Thank you so much for being with us today. Andrew: It's been a pleasure. I've enjoyed it immensely. Thank you, Sharon.

Inspiring Leadership with Jonathan Bowman-Perks MBE
#239: Mustafa Bartin - COO Migros Turkey

Inspiring Leadership with Jonathan Bowman-Perks MBE

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 60:45


Mustafa Bartın is a ‘first-generation Online Grocery Veteran' having spent more than 25 years in Retail and IT industries. He graduated from the Middle East Technical University, Department of Industrial Engineering. He started his professional life in Migros. He was the project manager of MİGROS Sanal Market (MİGROS online), the very first online grocery operation in Europe by October 1997. He left Migros in 2000 to move to the other side of the table, as a sales Professional in Hewlett-Packard. Between 2000 and 2009 he worked for Hewlett-Packard holding various different roles in Sales/Business Development/Consulting. He served as Country Manager of HP Consulting Business Unit before leaving HP. ‘Having never lost the passion for Retail', He rejoined Migros family in 2009 as the Chief Digital Officer of the company, ( responsible for IT, CRM and Migros Online ). Small note: Official title was never CDO. He was officially named as CIO by then. But years after, CDO position became very popular in enterprise World and he and his CEO recognised the fact that the role was literally a CDO role. He can be classified as a ‘professional convert from technology to business' triggered by his appointment to Chief ‘Alternative Sales Channels' Officer role in charge of MİGROS Online, Migros International and MİGROS Wholesale Operations. This role enabled his transition to business for his future assignments. From mid - 2018 till mid 2020, Bartın worked as Chief ‘Large Format & Online Retail' Officer ( another CXO role which nobody have heard anywhere else ) to realize company's Online-Offline Integration ( O2O ) mission. He has been Chief Retail Operations Officer since July 2020 in charge of 2700 stores and Online operations, which is one of the rare ‘reverse organisational takeovers' in the industry.He is married and has two children, having lost all of his hobbies after being a very late father at his 40's. He avoids using Instagram and the other social media tools ( other than LinkedIn ) even though he is a digital-native person and he is proud of this.He tries to divide his time between his family, business and his mountain-house near Istanbul. His magic Word in his everyday-life dictionary is ‘CANDOR' at all cost and at all frontiers. He always advices himself and his mentees ‘to listen other people just to understand' and to go into a ‘silent' mode whenever possible, even in very ‘noisy' environments. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

通勤學英語
回顧星期天LBS - 蘋果公司相關時事趣聞 All about Apple

通勤學英語

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 11:49


歡迎留言告訴我們你對這一集的想法: https://open.firstory.me/user/cl81kivnk00dn01wffhwxdg2s/comments Topic: Apple Feels the Sting From an Oscar Slap Apple has a Will Smith problem. 蘋果有個威爾史密斯的麻煩。 Smith is the star of “Emancipation,” a film set during the Civil War era that Apple envisioned as a surefire Oscar contender when it wrapped filming earlier this year. But that was before Smith strode onto the stage at the Academy Awards in March and slapped comedian Chris Rock, who had made a joke about Smith's wife, Jada Pinkett Smith. 史密斯是「解放」(暫譯)的主角,這部設定於南北戰爭期間的電影今年初拍攝殺青時,蘋果視為奧斯卡必勝參賽者,但那是在3月的奧斯卡頒獎典禮前。史密斯在典禮時走上舞台,掌摑喜劇演員克里斯洛克,因為他開了史密斯妻子、潔達蘋姬史密斯的玩笑。 Will Smith, who also won best actor that night, has since surrendered his membership in the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences and has been banned from attending any Academy-related events, including the Oscar telecast, for the next decade. 威爾史密斯那晚贏得最佳男主角獎,那之後他退回美國影藝學院會員資格,且被禁止未來十年參加所有學院相關活動,包括奧斯卡獎。 Now Apple finds itself left with a $120 million unreleased awards-style movie featuring a star no longer welcome at the biggest award show of them all and a big question: Can the film, even if it succeeds artistically, overcome the baggage that now accompanies Smith? 現在蘋果發現,它花1.2億美元拍攝這部符合奧斯卡得獎風格的未上映電影,片中明星在這個最大獎項會場卻已不再受歡迎。一個很大問題是:即使在藝術上成功了,這部電影如今能夠克服史密斯帶來的包袱嗎? According to three people involved with the film who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss the company's planning, there have been discussions inside Apple to release “Emancipation” by the end of the year, which would make it eligible for awards consideration. Variety reported in May, however, that the film's release would be pushed into 2023. 要求匿名談論蘋果公司計畫的三名參與電影人士說,蘋果內部曾討論在今年底前上映「解放」,好讓電影符合獎項考慮資格。然而,「綜藝」雜誌5月報導,電影上映可能推遲到2023年。 When asked for this article how and when it planned to release “Emancipation,” Apple declined to comment. 當被問到計畫如何及何時上映「解放」時,蘋果拒絕置評。 “Emancipation,” directed by Antoine Fuqua (“Training Day”) and with a script by William Collage, is based on the true story of a slave known as “Whipped Peter,”who joined the Union Army while still in the South. 「解放」由「震撼教育」導演安東尼法奎執導,編劇為比爾克爾吉,根據一名叫做「鞭傷彼得」的奴隸,在南方加入聯邦軍的真實故事改編。 Apple set up a general audience test screening of “Emancipation” in Chicago earlier this year, according to three people with knowledge of the event who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not permitted to discuss it publicly. They said it generated an overwhelmingly positive reaction, specifically for Smith's performance, which one of the people called “volcanic.” Audience members, during the after-screening feedback, said they were not turned off by Smith's recent public behavior. 根據三名知曉活動、但不被允許公開談論此事而匿名的人士表示,蘋果今年初在芝加哥進行一場針對一般大眾的「解放」試映。他們說,電影得到驚人的正面反應,特別是史密斯的演技,有人形容為「有如火山爆發」。在試映結束後的觀眾回饋中,有人說他們不會因為史密斯最近的公開行為而討厭他。 Smith largely disappeared from public view following the Oscars. But in July, he released a video on his YouTube channel in which he said he was “deeply remorseful” for his behavior and apologized directly to Rock and his family. 奧斯卡獎典禮後,史密斯幾乎自公眾目光中消失。但他7月在自己的YouTube頻道上傳一段影片,表示對自己的行為「深感悔恨」,並直接向洛克及其家人道歉。 Next Article Topic: Apple's Eye-Catching New Home Disrupts Silicon Valley Things change when a spaceship comes to town. Tourists stroll by, whipping out their iPhones to get a photo. New businesses move in. And real estate prices go up even more. 當太空船來到城裡,許多事情都變了。遊客在這裡流連,迅速拿出iPhone拍照。新商家進駐。房地產價格漲得更高。 Apple's new home in Cupertino — the centerpiece being a $5 billion, four-story, 2.8 million-square-foot ring that can be seen from space and that locals call the spaceship — is still getting some final touches, and employees have just started to trickle in. The full squadron, about 12,000 people, will arrive in several months. But the development of the headquarters, a 175-acre area officially called Apple Park, has already helped transform the surrounding area. 蘋果公司在加州古柏迪諾市的新家——核心是耗資50億美元(合台幣約1500億元),面積280萬平方英尺(約7萬9000坪)的4層樓環狀建物,能從太空中看到,當地人稱為太空船——仍處在最後裝修階段,員工才剛開始陸續遷入。總計1萬2000人將在數月內入駐。 不過,蘋果新總部修建已推動周邊地區的變化。新總部占地175英畝(約21萬坪),正式名稱是蘋果園區。 In Sunnyvale, a town just across the street, 95 development projects are in the planning stages. The city manager, Deanna J. Santana, said she had never seen such action before. In Cupertino, a Main Street Cupertino living and dining complex opened in early 2016. This downtown enclave includes the Lofts, a 120-unit apartment community opening this fall; small shops; and numerous restaurants and cafes. Other local businesses are also gearing up in anticipation. A Residence Inn at Main Street Cupertino, expected to open in September, has been slightly customized to meet the needs of Apple employees. Guests will have access to Macs and high-speed internet connections, said Mark Lynn, a partner with Sand Hill Hotel Management, which operates the hotel and consulted with Apple about what its employees need at a hotel. 在蘋果園區對街的桑尼維爾市,有95個開發案正規劃中。市經理迪安娜.桑塔納說,她未曾見過這樣的發展。在古柏迪諾,居住和餐飲綜合建築「古柏迪諾大街」在2016年初開幕。這個商業區包括有120戶公寓的社區Lofts,將於今秋推出;還有小商店、大量的餐廳和咖啡館。 其他本地企業也滿懷期待在做準備。古柏迪諾大街一間長住型飯店預計9月開幕,飯店稍微調整過,以滿足蘋果員工的需求。經營飯店的沙丘飯店管理公司向蘋果諮詢過其員工對飯店有什麼需求,公司合夥人林恩說,飯店客人有麥金塔電腦和高速網路可用。 “All the things we have, lined up with what they needed,” Lynn said. “They will represent a large part of our business.” Tech companies are nothing new for Cupertino. Apple has called the city home for decades, and Hewlett-Packard had a campus in Apple's new spot, employing 9,000 people. The surrounding towns have been remade as well in the last decade, as giant tech companies have transformed Silicon Valley's real estate into some of the most expensive in the country. 林恩說:「我們所有事物都配合蘋果員工的需求,他們會在我們業務中占很大比重。」 對古柏迪諾而言,科技公司並不新鮮。蘋果把這個城市當成家已有數十年,而蘋果新總部所在地曾是惠普一個雇用9000人的園區。過去10年,古柏迪諾周遭城鎮的風貌也翻新了,因為科技巨頭已使矽谷轉變為全美房地產最貴的地方之一。 But city officials and residents say this project is like nothing they've seen before. It is even bringing tourists. Onlookers snap pictures of the spaceship from the streets. TV helicopters circle above. Amateur photographers ask residents if they can stand on driveways to operate their drones, hoping to get a closer look at Apple Park. “I just say, ‘Hey, go ahead,'” said Ron Nielsen, who lives in Birdland, a Sunnyvale neighborhood across the street from the spaceship. “Why not?” 但城市官員和居民說,蘋果園區跟他們看過的其他開發案不一樣。園區甚至帶來了遊客。 遊客在街頭拍攝太空船的照片。電視台的直升機在它上方盤旋。業餘攝影師問居民可否站在他們的私家車道上操作無人機,以便更近一點看看蘋果園區。 尼爾森住在桑尼維爾市伯德蘭德地區,就在太空船對街,他說:「我就說,『好啊,行』,為什麼不可以呢?」 Source: https://paper.udn.com/udnpaper/POH0067/315730/web/ Next Article Topic: New Apple Watch heralds ‘smart healthcare' revolution for aging societies The new model iPhone was released mid-last month to a somewhat muted reaction from the market. However, at the same event Apple Inc also released an updated Apple Watch, called the Apple Watch Series 4, which showed that the company is working furiously behind the scenes to break into a new field, as it quietly builds an eco-system around “smart healthcare.” Due to the importance of safeguarding human life, the entry threshold into the healthcare market is high, but the potential rewards are significant. As humans live longer, we are becoming ever more reliant on technology and artificial intelligence as a means to look after our health. 新款iPhone在上個月中發表,市場反應是無甚驚奇。不過從同場發表的Apple Watch,可看出蘋果已在另一個領域鴨子划水,悄悄建起了生態系「智慧醫療」。因為人命關天,這是一個門檻極高的市場,但商機也很大,尤其在人類壽命愈來愈長的未來,勢必仰賴更多科技和人工智慧來照顧我們的健康。 The definition of “smart healthcare” is extremely broad. Starting with the da Vinci surgical robot, already on the market for over a decade, the area now includes specialist fields such as the automatic transfer of patient blood pressure monitoring data to hospitals and AI-assisted artificial gene synthesis (gene printing), which is able to rapidly compile DNA sequences and produce biopharmaceuticals. While attending a discussion forum by the Industrial Technology Research Institute in Taiwan last month, major pharmaceutical company Merck & Co predicted that revenue from AI-related health care alone — which currently stands at about US$600 million — will grow to around US$20 billion by 2026. Furthermore, AI constitutes just one small piece of the overall smart healthcare market. 智慧醫療的定義廣泛,從問世十幾年的達文西手術機器人、將數據自動回傳醫院的血壓機、到基因合成學借助AI及機器學習,能快速編寫DNA序列,製造生物藥劑來治療疾病等等。國際大藥廠默克上個月來台出席工研院產業創新論壇時就估計,目前光是與AI相關的醫療保健產值,全球約六億美元,二零二六年將達兩百億美元;而AI不過是智慧醫療的一小塊領域。 Humanity is on the cusp of an imminent medical care crisis. According to US research, there is a positive correlation between the patient-to-nurse ratio and patient mortality rate: For every additional patient that a nurse has to care for, the 30-day mortality rate for hospitalized patients increases by 7 percent. 人類面臨的醫療窘境,已迫在眉睫。美國研究指出,每位護理師照顧的病人數,和病人死亡率呈現正相關:護理師每多照顧一名病人,病人住院三十天的死亡風險增加百分之七。 As a result of various background factors, “smart healthcare” will be an unstoppable force in the future. As such, global manufacturers, whether involved in communications, machinery, pharmaceuticals or consumer technology, are all getting involved, and Apple naturally wants to claim a piece of the pie for itself. At last month's launch of the updated Apple Watch, Apple revealed that the device now supports a heart rate monitor and wrist sensor and represents a significant step forward for the wearable device. Previously, the watch was only able to record a wearer's heart rate, but the technology has been upgraded so that Apple Watch can now monitor a user's heart condition in a way that provides real medical value. 在種種背景下,智慧醫療是必然之勢;因此全球廠商不論其專長是通訊、機械、製藥或3C,都在積極投入,蘋果當然也不缺席。上個月發表的Apple Watch,能支援心律檢測及手腕感應,這讓穿戴裝置邁進了一大步,從以往只能記錄心跳幾下,升級到可監測具有醫療價值的心律狀況。 In addition to the above new hardware functionality, Apple is also building a health eco-system. Last year, Apple embarked on a partnership with Stanford University Medical Center to found the Apple Heart Study program, which uses Apple Watch to collect large amounts of data on heart rate activity from volunteers. This year Apple has signed agreements with more than 90 hospitals across the US so that patients can use their mobile phones to access their own medical records, making it possible for users to bring their medical history with them wherever they go. If the results are successful, it may well create a snowball effect and spread to other medical institutions. 蘋果不只推出上述的硬體新功能,也在建構生態系。去年它和史丹佛醫學中心合作啟動「Apple Heart Study」計畫,透過Apple Watch收集自願者的心律大數據。今年又與全美逾九十家醫院簽約,病人可透過手機看到自己的醫療紀錄,落實病歷帶著走。若成效良好,未來很可能產生滾雪球效應,擴及更多醫療機構。 Source article: http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/lang/archives/2018/10/09/2003701979/2 Powered by Firstory Hosting

Engel & Cabrera Present Boroughs & 'Burbs, the Real Estate Review
Boroughs & Burbs 67 || Everything's Bigger in Texas With Catherine Lee and Jacob Sudhoff

Engel & Cabrera Present Boroughs & 'Burbs, the Real Estate Review

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 59:32


We are in Texas for episode #67 of Boroughs & Burbs to talk with the leaders who built a dominant market share as the Sudhoff Companies before partnering with Douglas Elliman in 2019.      Why Texas? Texas has emerged as one of the most important, fast-growing markets in the country over the last decade so we want to know why and will it last? Some of the questions we'll ask these two guests:1. Growth. Texas represents 2 of the top 10 growing markets in the nation. Dallas moved up 5 spots to #2 and Austin is #4. The Texas housing price 1-year growth is 19.8%, 5-year growth is 63.9%. This is not a new phenomenon. 10-year growth is 123% and 20 year growth is 210%. How long will this growth continue and what could possibly derail it?2. Politics. When asked why he moved from California Joe Rogan said it was about "Freedom". Catherine, you said to me that Texas is "famously purple"  Certainly politics is a factor is why people choose to move but would you say its a major draw and why?​​​​​​​3. Businesses are moving. Chevron, Caterpillar, Hewlett Packard, Oracle and Amazon are just a few of the high-profile businesses moving their headquarters to Texas. It seems most of the migration is from California, and technology-related. I have to add that New York City is also proud to be welcoming Amazon, Google, Facebook and Apple. Those 4 companies took 3+ million feet in Manhattan in 2020.  Talk about the impact of these corporate moves on the real estate market and the impact of technology in particular.4. Cost of Living.  According to Nerdwallet the cost of living is 152% higher in New York City than it is in Austin, Texas. That means you'd have to make $125,964 in NYC to maintain what would be a $50,000 standard of living in Texas. Housing costs are 422% higher. The median home in Austin is $347,906 versus $2.2 million in Manhattan. Median rents? $1,520/mo in Austin versus $5500 in Manhattan. However, the cost of living is 12% lower in Nashville, Tennessee and 16% less in Charlotte, North Carolina. Is the Texas miracle dependent on remaining a low-cost place to live and do business? ​​​​​​​5. Future Growth. Dallas and Houston are long-established as centers for technology, finance and energy. Many think the Texas economy moves up and down with the price of oil. Does Austin grow because of the University of Texas? Is San Antonio next? Let's talk about what the future looks like for the Texas market and what is driving that phenomenon.

The KTS Success Factor™ (a Podcast for Women)
Burn Ladders, Build Bridges with Alan Patterson

The KTS Success Factor™ (a Podcast for Women)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 37:47


Are you stuck with a boss that you just can't bare? Are you struggling to try to prove your worth? Learn to let go and build better bridges for you, your growth, and your business. Dr. Alan M. Patterson is an organizational development consultant, specializing in executive and leadership development. Having led hundreds of clients for over four decades, Dr. Patterson continues to ignore standard coaching methods, opting to pursue and lead clients down the path of meaningful careers that are not only successful but also rewarding. He's worked with everyone from the Federal Reserve Bank to Hewlett Packard to Major League Baseball and the United States Navy. His latest book is Burn Ladders, Build Bridges, Pursuing Work with Meaning and Purpose. In this episode, Alan Patterson shares what it means to be a ladder burner, to build better relationships, to discover new paths, and to find greater opportunities for yourself.     What you will learn from this episode:      Find out what a ladder burner is and how to become one Dive into why you don't really need to become a pro in your business to make it great Learn how to define and find meaning and purpose in yourself and in your work   “You have to define and find meaning and purpose because nobody's going to give that to you.” - Dr. Alan M. Patterson      Valuable Free Resource:     Want to find out how to become a powerful woman leader by letting go and welcoming growth? Visit ladderburners.com    01:51 - The two sides on how Alan helps women business leaders achieve their potential   02:55 - The brand-new look of success: What is the standard coaching that Alan tends to ignore   04:22 - Alan explains the backstory of what is a ladder burner   06:31 - Burning ladders, building bridges: Alan shares what are the skills you'll be needing to be a ladder burner   11:53 - The powerful trio: What are the characteristic types of positions you should be recruiting for your team   17:46 - To greater heights: What kind of work environment should you strive to be in and what kind of environment should you leave   20:07 - Pandemic hits: Alan shares what made him decide to write a book and how it all started   22:38 - What should be the responsibilities of women business leaders?   24:04 - Want to find out how to become a powerful woman leader by letting go and welcoming growth? Visit ladderburners.com     Key Takeaways:   “It's a network to talk to people and to understand what's critical and important to them, which as I said earlier, helps define what's critical and important to you. You resonate.” -Dr. Sarah E. Brown   “Every conversation is an opportunity for a relationship.” -Dr. Sarah E. Brown   “What else are we doing in our lives if we're not making those kinds of heart-to-heart connections?” -Dr. Sarah E. Brown   “Your group, your context, includes people inside and outside the organization that gives you purpose in being.” -Dr. Sarah E. Brown   “You're worth more than working for an idiot.” -Dr. Sarah E. Brown   “Don't think that you're going to join an organization and that they're going to find out a purpose and meaning for you, you have to do it.” -Dr. Sarah E. Brown   Ways to Connect with Dr. Alan M. Patterson:    Website: ladderburners.com  Book: Burn Ladders, Build Bridges, Pursuing Work with Meaning and Purpose      Ways to Connect with Dr. Sarah E. Brown:    Website: https://www.sarahebrown.com/  Twitter: https://twitter.com/knowguides  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sarahebrownphd/     

The Melting Pot with Dominic Monkhouse
How Human Connection Can Help A Business Achieve Excellence With Tom Peters, Co-author Of “In Search Of Excellence”

The Melting Pot with Dominic Monkhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 56:36


A company's success is measured by the happiness of its employees, and that goes for any industry we can think of. This sounds like basic knowledge, but increasing happiness in the workplace is one of the most overlooked and at the same time essential changes a company can make in order to be more successful. Often times even simple acknowledgements like a handshake or a hello at the beginning of the day can really impact an employee's level of engagement and create a positive workplace culture.Today, on The Melting Pot, we are joined by Tom Peters, a business management pioneer and co-author of “In Search Of Excellence”, the book that, to this day, is recognized as one of the most influential books about business practices. Through this work, Tom's ultimate goal was to motivate business owners and entrepreneurs to focus more on their employees and the way their happiness directly affects productivity and to discover their products through the eyes of their customers.Twenty books and forty years later, Tom is still one of the leading management thinkers, preaching about the importance of human connection and creating business excellence through work culture.Listen and download this fascinating episode in which Tom shares the story behind his well-known bestseller, the legacy that leaders should really focus on leaving behind and his views on women as business leaders, remote leadership and building excellent culture in this “work from home” era. In today's episode: 40 years of “In Search Of Excellence”- the book that changed the way the world does businessWhy businesses need more women leadersA leader's job is to grow peopleRemote leadership and building excellent culture and business in the “work from home” eraTom's latest book, “The Compact Guide To Excellence” Links: Website - Tom Peters.comLinkedin- Tom PetersTwitter-@tom_petersYoutube- Tom PetersBlog- tompeters!Biography- Tom PetersPublications-Tom Peters- books and articlesTom's latest book- Tom Peters' Compact Guide to Excellence  How Human Connection Can Lead A Business To Excellence With Tom Peters, Co-author Of “In Search Of Excellence” Tom Peters is a well-renowned business management pioneer and co-author of “In Search of Excellence”, the book that even 40 years after its publication is still considered to be the book that changed the way the world does business. But as he himself declares, this is just one of the numerous ventures in his life and career. Tom attended Cornell University where he received a bachelor's degree in civil engineering and a master's degree and later on, earned an MBA and a PhD in Organizational Behaviourfrom the Stanford Graduate School of business. During the war in Vietnam, he served in the U.S. Navy, making two deployments as a Navy Seabee and also participated in an exchange program between the U.S. Navy and the Royal Navy (UK) which led to him serving as a midshipman on the HMS Tiger (a battlecruiser built for the Royal Navy during the 1910s). While working forMcKinsey & Company, he was inspired to develop different practices for business management that support the idea that productivity can be achieved through people that work for the company, and that businesses should not focus only on financial data. “I've spent my life trying to tell leaders to stand in the door in the morning and smile and say, glad to see you (but) the notion that the outcome in your organisation would be more affected by saying “good morning” than it would be by a business plan that could only be understood by Nobel laureates in mathematics, it just doesn't feel right to the business person. My little one-liner, one pager is business is people serving people, serving people. Leaders serving frontline employees, serving customers. It's all about that simple chain. That's the beginning, the middle, and the end.” 40 years of “In search of excellence”- the book that changed the way the world does business Almost 40 years after its original publication, “In Search of Excellence” remains a widely read classic and an influential book for leaders and managers. When Tom Peters and Robert Waterman were asked to do research on “culture” (or, as Tom translates it, “the way we do things around here”), they had the opportunity to meet John Young, the President of Hewlett Packard, one of the young companies that at the time was literally transforming the world. There, he got introduced to MBWA (management by wandering around) a style of business that offers managers the opportunity to connect directly with employees and collect information, deal with suggestions or complaints, and generally keep track of the organisation and increase productivity. “That hour in Hewlett Packard, in retrospect obviously, I wouldn't have a sense of it at the time, changed my life more than anything. What I learned from MBWA is that leadership is an intimate act. It is about human interaction, whether it's the founder of the company, uh, or whomever and the 26-year-old engineer. Today, we call it culture, but it's actually the humanity of the organization.” But, four decades later, Tom thinks that companies still have a hard time realising the importance of employees and how their happiness unequivocally affects productivity. “I find it as hard to sell today as it was years and years ago. People still wanna work on that hard stuff. They still wanna get the plan right. You know, my favourite quote of all is a general Omar Bradley quote: “Amateurs talk about strategy, professionals talk about logistics”. You can have the world's greatest strategy, but when you land on Omaha Beach on D-Day, unless the bullets are there to meet the guns, you know, all that other crap is immaterial.” A leader's legacy is to develop people Tom Peters remains to this day focused on putting people first and believes that training leaders to stay in intimate touch with the front-liners who do the real work is the best thing anyone can do for their company. “The role of a leader is to develop people. The leader is not supposed to be the best engineer. The leader is supposed to be the person who takes that group of 15 engineers and allows them to flourish and learn.”And most importantly, as Tom says, the true measure of a leader's legacy is not the amount of money he collected in his career, but the number of people whose lives he managed to transform and improve while they were under his command. “I did a lot of running around and speaking and I used PowerPoint slides. And my favourite one of all the millions had a tombstone on it, and on the tombstone said “$26,423,892 and 8 cents. Joe's net worth at the close of the market on the day he died”. And my comment is nobody's ever had a tombstone with their net worth on it.” Why businesses need more women leaders The stereotype that the business world is a male-dominated industry still exists. Companies need to renounce these old gender bias practices and realise that the perspective a woman brings into a business can breed creativity and innovative ideas that can push that organisation forward. Everything, from the way they evolved over time to the basic human characteristics that they possess, makes women better candidates to create and develop communities. There are even numerous studies that claim women are significantly “better-measured leaders than men”, says Tom, and the reticence regarding women's leadership is just another consequence of the fact that “we're still living in a boys' world.” Remote leadership and building excellent culture and business in the “work from home” era Despite his former beliefs, after these two years of Covid restrictions, Tom  is now convinced that there is as much humanity and interaction in a remote environment as there is in a normal in-office attendance. “I still believe in the value of getting together, it's not a matter of one or the other, but I really believe that you can have an intimate, caring, people-centric organization where 98% of what you do is done remotely.” It was also during that Covid period that Tom developed the “Covid 19 Seven Leadership Commandments” which summarised, reveal “the only thing that matters in the end”, which is “helping people grow, thrive and have better lives” because ultimately “the right thing to do is also the profitable thing to do”. “ The Compact Guide To Excellence” When asked about the book he prefers out of the 20 he's written so far, Tom admits that the latest always becomes his favourite. But he feels that “The Compact Guide To Excellence”, co-written with Nancy Green, is really the first one of his books he's fallen in love with. “I've been writing about and talking about design and the power of design for 25 years, but the power of this book is its look, feel, taste, touch, and smell as much as it is the words that are inside.” Book recommendations:Stephen Trzeciak, Anthony Mazzarelli- Compassionomics: The Revolutionary Scientific Evidence That Caring Makes a Difference Nicole Perlroth- This Is How They Tell Me The World Ends  Enjoyed the show?Leave Us A Review

Drop In CEO
Tom Hardison: Scaling Your Team to Reach Your Goals

Drop In CEO

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 30:45


On today's episode Tom Hardison shares how to assess and empower your team to find the right roles for optimized productivity. Listen in as Tom and Deborah discuss leadership strategies for building confidence within your team, how to help individuals understand their potential, and why it's important to ask what an employee really wants to accomplish before a promotion.   Tom Hardison helps leaders build great teams and organizations with a culture of collective leadership so they can scale from 200-1000+ employees. He led change and business growth initiatives at Hewlett Packard for 28 years, a period when revenue grew from 5 billion to 127 billion. He now uses this extensive experience to guide leaders and their teams to leverage the generative power of people working together to achieve sustainable growth.   You can connect with Tom via his website: https://generativeleadershipgroup.com/   Whether you are a C-Suite Leader of today or tomorrow, take charge of your career with confidence and leverage the insights of The CEO's Compass: Your Guide to Get Back on Track.  To learn more about The CEO's Compass, you can get your copy here: https://amzn.to/3AKiflR   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Ultimate Coach Podcast
Screens and Foundations of Being - Karen Davis

The Ultimate Coach Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 59:06 Transcription Available


You are so much more powerful than you know. yes, you have probably heard that a million times from motivational speakers and/ or coaches AND it's true. Listen as Karen Davis opens your eyes to the bigger life that you are really living once you solidify your ‘foundation and see the screen.' What if you opened yourself to possibilities that are by allowing them to be? It is very important to have a strong foundation otherwise you will deny yourself growth. It's time to create new possibilities, create new relationships, and create deep listening.About the Guest:Karen Davis, Executive Coach, Author & Speaker After 25 years in leadership roles in the business-to-business technology and services space, Karen changed her life by serving and guiding the transformation of others. She became a Professionally Certified Coach (PCC) through the International Coaching Federation. She's been coaching, consulting and facilitating leadership workshops for organizations such as Pfizer, Cisco Systems, Hewlett Packard, Medtronic as well as many other small businesses since 2008. Today, her practice focuses on one-on-one deep coaching with high-performing executives, entrepreneurs, and executive coaches who are committed to their success, ready to uncover their hidden potential and make their own unique difference in the world. Karen is the co-author of three books, How to Get the Most Out of Coaching, A Client's Guide for Optimizing the Coaching Experience, When All Boat Rise: 12 Coaches on Service as the Heart of a Thriving Practice, and Unconventional Wisdom: Stories Beyond the Mind to Awaken the Heart. Karen loves to travel, study people and learn about other cultures. You will often find her coaching with her clients at her studio near Boulder, CO or on a walk out in nature. Best of all, Karen has two fascinating adult children, Dustin and Alexa, a wonderful life partner, Alex Mill and an office dog, Jax—all of whom serve as her inspiration each and every day! Direct/Cell: 303.588.8935 Email: Karen@KarenDavisCoaching.com Website: www.KarenDavisCoaching.com Social Media Links: https://www.facebook.com/davis.karen https://www.linkedin.com/in/karendaviscoaching/ https://twitter.com/KarenDavisCoach About the Host:Cordelia Gaffar is the Ultimate Joy Monger. That means that she holds space for you to reveal your joy within. Joy Mongering is a word she created from several life experiences and based on her philosophy that self-nurturing is freedom. In fact she has created a process she calls Replenish Me ™ to help you transmute fear, rage and anger into Joy. In one of her eight books, Detached Love: Transforming Your Heart Do That You Transform Your Mind, she breaks down the Replenish Me ™ process through her research, client stories and her personal vulnerable shares. She is also the host of three host podcasts. She won Best Podcast Host for her solo show called Free to Be Show and collaborates as a co-host on Unlearning Labels and the Ultimate Coach Podcast. The multidimensional genius she is, is further demonstrated as the mother of six children whom I homeschooled for 17 years. In summary, she has won multiple awards: Best Podcast Host of 2019, Top National Influencer, Sexy Brilliant Leader, and inducted into the Global Library of Female Authors in 2020; and in 2021 nominated for Author of the Year and Health and Wellness Coach of the Year and in 2022...

FUTURATI PODCAST
Ep. 113: What's the state of artificial intelligence (and should we be afraid?) | Steve Kommrusch

FUTURATI PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 50:32


Before receiving his Ph.D. in 2022, Steve earned over 30 patents in the field of computer hardware design working on silicon chips for computer graphics, high-performance computing, and power-efficient CPUs at Hewlett-Packard and AMD. Steve's Ph.D. work focused on using sequence-to-sequence models for machine learning applied to computer-aided programming. He currently works as a Senior AI Scientist at Leela AI developing neurosymbolic systems for automatic understanding an Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Artificial Intelligence in Industry with Daniel Faggella
Making "AI Ethics" Productive - with Beena Ammanath of Deloitte

Artificial Intelligence in Industry with Daniel Faggella

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 23:16


Today's guest is Executive Director, Global Deloitte AI Institute & AI Ethics/Tech Ethics Leader, Beena Ammanath. Beena is the author of the book Trustworthy AI and previously served in tech leadership roles at Hewlett Packard, Bank of America, and General Electric before arriving at Deloitte in 2019. In her conversation with Emerj CEO Daniel Faggella, Beena pulls apart putting AI ethics in action at medium and large enterprises in ways that genuinely serve to solve business goals and customer problems. Beena also offers a measurable process for screening out downsides and advice on who needs to be in the room to have realistic conversations about AI ethics. If you've enjoyed or benefited from some of the insights of this episode, consider leaving us a five-star review on Apple Podcasts, and let us know what you learned, found helpful, or liked most about this show!

Le Gratin par Pauline Laigneau
#204 – Gérald Karsenti, PDG de SAP France – “L'art de bâtir une équipe”

Le Gratin par Pauline Laigneau

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 71:17


Aujourd'hui pour ce nouvel épisode du podcast, j'ai eu la chance d'accueillir Gérald Karsenti, président de SAP France.Gérald est vraiment une personnalité inspirante que j'avais rencontré il y a quelques années lorsque j'avais fait un talk au salon des Entrepreneurs.Gérald est professeur depuis maintenant 18 ans à HEC Paris. Il est d'ailleurs diplômé de l'université d'Oxford dans le domaine de la conduite et du changementSa passion, si je devais résumer c'est le leadership.C'est vraiment ce qui fait qu'il se lève le matin : comprendre ce qui fait que des êtres humains arrivent à donner envie à une multitude de personnes de les suivre et de faire suivre leur idée.Au-delà d'être professeur à HEC, Gérald a eu une carrière assez extraordinaire dans le monde professionnel, dans le monde corporate : il a été directeur général de Hewlett-Packard en France mais aussi directeur général d'Oracle puis il a rejoint SAP, le premier éditeur de logiciels en Europe, où il a encore un rôle de leader puisqu'il est PDG.Bref, on a parlé avec Gérald de leadership, on a essayé de comprendre les concepts qui se cachent derrière. Ce que j'ai avant tout aimé dans cet épisode, c'est qu'on a parlé d'humain, de comment tomber les masques, comment être soi même, se montrer vulnérable :)J'espère que cet épisode vous plaira, n'hésitez pas à contacter Gérald sur le groupe LinkedIn où il est très présent mais aussi à se procurer son ouvrage paru aux éditions Eyrolles “L'art de bâtir une équipe”Notes et références de l'épisode :Pour retrouver Gérald Karsenti :Sur LinkedInSur le podcast avec Franck Ferrand : “Grands Leaders, les leçons de l'Histoire”Avec son livre “L'art de bâtir une équipe”Livres cités dans l'épisode :Les livres d'Albert CamusLes Valeureux d'Albert CohenBelle du Seigneur d'Albert Cohen1. Faites vous coacher par moi !DEMIAN, un concentré de 10 ans d'expérience d'entrepreneur. Les formations DEMIAN vous apportent des outils et méthodes concrètes pour développer votre projet professionnel. Il s'agit d'un concentré maximal de valeur et d'expérience pour qu'en quelques heures vous gagniez l'équivalent d'années de travail. Découvrez DEMIAN !2. La NewsLa News du vendredi est une mini newsletter pour vous nourrir en plus du podcast. C'est une newsletter très courte, à lire en 5mn top chrono de ce qui m'a marqué dans les dernières semaines : livres à lire, réflexions, applis à télécharger, citations, films ou documentaires à voir etc. Pour la recevoir, il n'y a qu'à s'abonner à la newsletter sur mon site !3. Des conseils concrets sur ma chaîne YouTubeEnvie de lancer votre propre podcast ? De bénéficier de conseils sur quel matériel utiliser ? Ma nouvelle chaîne YouTube est faite pour vous !4.Contactez-moi ! Si le podcast vous plaît, le meilleur moyen de me le dire, ou de me faire vos feed-backs (et ce qui m'aide le plus à le faire connaître) c'est simplement de laisser un avis 5 étoiles ou un commentaire sur l'application iTunes. Ça m'aide vraiment, alors n'hésitez pas :)Pour me poser des questions ou suivre mes tribulations c'est par ici :Sur Instagram @paulinelaigneauSur LinkedIn @pauline laigneauSur YouTube Pauline LaigneauVous pouvez consulter notre politique de confidentialité sur https://art19.com/privacy ainsi que la notice de confidentialité de la Californie sur https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.