Podcasts about DSM

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Best podcasts about DSM

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Latest podcast episodes about DSM

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast
Diagnosing and Treating Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 23:15


Nine years after DSM-5, Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) is still settling into clinical practice. Dr. Jennifer Thomas helps sort out the differential diagnosis between ARFID, anorexia, and other conditions and plan treatment in the context of comorbid conditions, such as anxiety disorders and Autism Spectrum Disorder.CME: Take the CME Post-Test for this episode  Published On: 07/25/2022Duration: 23 minutes, 15 secondsReferenced Article: “Diagnosing and Treating Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder,” The Carlat Child Psychiatry Report, July 2022Joshua Feder, MD, Mara Goverman, LCSW, and Jennifer J. Thomas, PhD, have disclosed no relevant financial or other interests in any commercial companies pertaining to this educational activity

UMento - Indépendants - Freelancing - Entrepreneuriat
Investir à #dubai avec Greenbull en #crowdfunding (@Yann Darwin ) - investdubai.com

UMento - Indépendants - Freelancing - Entrepreneuriat

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 17:47


Je vous explique comment et combien j'investi dans de l'#immobilier à #dubai via un club deal lancé par Greenbull en #crowdfunding (@Yann Darwin ) : - le marché, - horizon de temps, - ROI visé, - montant investi, - risques. Lien vers le site : https://www.investdubai.com/ CONTENU ÉDUCATIF, ce n'est pas du conseil en investissement.

UMento - Indépendants - Freelancing - Entrepreneuriat
#cryptos, #bitcoin et Institutionnels, manipulations de marchés : on en est où ?

UMento - Indépendants - Freelancing - Entrepreneuriat

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 9:15


Suite à une intervention au sein de ma communauté privée des fondateurs de Arquant Capital https://www.arquant.io/en/, je vous fais un retour sur la pénétration des institutionnels au sein du marché #cryptos / #bitcoin et sur les capacités de manipulations des edge funds. CONTENU ÉDUCATIF, ce n'est pas du conseil en investissement.

UMento - Indépendants - Freelancing - Entrepreneuriat
Faut-il acheter l'#action Smith & Wesson SWBI - Analyse value #bourse

UMento - Indépendants - Freelancing - Entrepreneuriat

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 19:51


Dans le cadre de la construction d'un portefeuille long terme, je vous partage l'analyse value de l'action Smith & Wesson. Les sources : https://investor.morningstar.com/quot... https://simplywall.st/stocks/us/consu... https://www.zonebourse.com/cours/acti... CONTENU ÉDUCATIF, ce n'est pas du conseil en investissement.

UMento - Indépendants - Freelancing - Entrepreneuriat
Faut-il acheter l'action META (facebook / instagram) ? Analyse value #bourse

UMento - Indépendants - Freelancing - Entrepreneuriat

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 11:50


Je vous livre mon analyse value et fondamentale de l'action en #bourse Meta (facebook / instagram) ainsi que ma stratégie de positionnement : - croissance du Chiffre d'affaire - PER - ROE - Marge nette / Marge brute - Dette - PCF Les sources : https://investor.morningstar.com/quot... https://simplywall.st/stocks/us/media... https://finance.yahoo.com/quote/META?... https://www.zonebourse.com/cours/acti... https://investor.fb.com/home/default.... https://www.finance-investissement.co... https://fr.statista.com/infographie/2... https://blog.digimind.com/fr/agences/... CONTENU ÉDUCATIF, ce n'est pas du conseil en investissement.

UMento - Indépendants - Freelancing - Entrepreneuriat
Liberland, Bitcoin, cryptos, géo politique, déclin de l'Europe - Avec @Cryptoparadise Consulting

UMento - Indépendants - Freelancing - Entrepreneuriat

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 52:54


Nouvelle vidéo en mode discussion décontractée avec Dimitri de @Cryptoparadise Consulting : nous parlons du Liberland, du Bitcoin, de géo politique, et du déclin affligeant de l'Europe... Le lien dont je parle avec les économies à forte croissance en 2022 : https://fr.statista.com/infographie/2... CONTENU ÉDUCATIF, ce n'est pas du conseil en investissement. 0:00 Introduction / Liberland 4:52 Bitcoin / Marché crypto / DCA 21:15 Macro économie / Déclin de l'Europe

Learn Smarter
220: ADHD and Girls with Dr. Kathleen Nadeau (Author Series)

Learn Smarter

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 45:17


Dr. Kathleen Nadeau is a clinical psychologist and Director of Chesapeake Center for ADHD, Learning & Behavioral Health as well as author of several books on ADHD and girls. She joins Rachel & Steph to talk about the history and trajectory of ADHD and shares how it is not a disorder of childhood. She shares how the DSM diagnostic criteria is derived from boys. She highlights how hyperactivity is not central to ADHD and that the core symptoms have to do with executive functioning stating that, “Executive functioning is heart and soul of ADHD”. ADHD is not a deficit of attention; it's a dysregulated attention system. She talks about the social interactions and impact of social problems on girls with ADHD, why girls get diagnosed when they hit puberty and the link between ADHD and estrogen. She shares how girls with ADHD live with anxiety and embarrassment as they try hard to avoid criticism. Finally she advocates for parental social engineering to mitigate the social impact of ADHD on girls. Connect with Dr. Kathleen Nadeau:  Chesapeakeadd.com Understanding Girls with ADHD Understanding Women with ADHD Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/learnsmarterpodcast How to connect with us: Join our FB Group Join our e-mail list Rachel's Kapp Educational Therapy Group website Steph's My Ed Therapist website  @learnsmarterpodcast, @kappedtherapy, @myedtherapist

Mental Health Training
What Is A Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Mental Health Training

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 7:02


What Is Narcissistic Personality Disorder? Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) is a condition marked by a pattern of grandiosity, fixation on power fantasies, desire for admiration, arrogance, lack of empathy, and envy. Individuals with NPD may be overly sensitive to criticism, though they may hide their fragile self-esteem behind a self-important exterior. NPD is the second most prevalent personality disorder, affecting about 6.2% of the population1. It is one of ten personality disorders listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). Along with histrionic, antisocial, and borderline personality disorders, NPD is a Cluster B disorder, which causes affected individuals to appear erratic, emotional, or dramatic. Narcissistic Personality Disorder: Symptoms Though symptoms may manifest in different ways, people with NPD experience at least five of the following: Inflated sense of self-importancePreoccupation with fantasies of power, beauty, or ideal loveThe belief that they are unique and should only associate with other special or high-status people and institutionsRequires admirationUnreasonable entitlementTakes advantage of othersLacks empathyEnvious of others, or believing that others are envious of themArrogant behaviours or attitudes Narcissistic Personality Disorder: Other Signs Though the DSM symptoms are used to diagnose NPD, the following associated features may help clinicians support a diagnosis. These can include: Low self-esteem. Despite their outwardly arrogant presentation, people with NPD often have low self-esteem. They are vulnerable to injuries to their egos and may become angry or humiliated.Unwillingness to engage in potentially humiliating tasks. Because of their low self-esteem, people with NPD are hesitant to struggle publicly.Eating disorders. Because some people with NPD rely on external validation, they are susceptible to developing eating disorders to increase their perceived self-worth.Substance abuse. Though there is an established link between substance use disorder and NPD, there is no consensus on a specific cause. There are likely varied reasons that people with NPD develop substance use disorders. Grandiose vs Vulnerable Narcissism Though both the DSM-5 and popular ideas of narcissism centre on open arrogance, NPD researchers identify two different subgroups: grandiose and vulnerable. Grandiose narcissism is the familiar self-important expression of narcissism. Grandiose narcissists will be more likely to display narcissistic traits such as: EntitlementManipulation of othersOvert arroganceAggressionAnger/Rage Vulnerable narcissism is a less understood aspect of narcissism, but one that research is beginning to consider. Vulnerable narcissism is covert narcissism, as many symptoms are not readily visible to outside observers. Vulnerable narcissists do not have grandiose self-esteem and are sensitive to rejection or criticism. Though vulnerable narcissists do still have grandiose fantasies and believe they are somehow “special,” they display different symptoms, such as: ShynessShameFew meaningful relationships due to fear of rejectionHyper-vigilanceNeed for outside approvalLow self-esteem

Coping With Ghosting
Who Ghosts and Why? Understanding Personality Disorders and Ghosting

Coping With Ghosting

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 46:17


Narcissists. Sociopaths. Psychopaths. In this episode, Denise M. Dudley, Ph.D., explains specific personality disorders as they relate to ghosting behavior. Gretta and Denise also touch on other possible reasons why people ghost, and how  personal issues can lead to ghosting. This episode answers the question, "How could someone ghost?" Aaaand, as a reminder, when you're ghosted, it's not your job to analyze your ghost. It's your job to take care of yourself. Knowledge is power, and this episode can help you identify unhealthy relationship dynamics.Connect with Denise:Denise's WebsiteFacebookLinkedInConnect with Gretta:Virtual Coping With Ghosting Support Group Private Coaching with GrettaFree Guide: What to Say To Your GhostFree Coping With Ghosting GuideFree Facebook Support Group |  Instagram | copingwithghosting.com Music: "Ghosted" by Gustavo RamosDisclaimer:  This information is designed to mentor and guide you to cope with Ghosting by cultivating a positive mindset and implementing self-care practices. It is for educational purposes only; it solely provides self-help tools for your use. Coping With Ghosting is not providing health care or psychological therapy services and is not diagnosing or treating any physical or mental ailment of the mind or body. The content is not a substitute for therapy or any advice given by a licensed psychologist or other licensed or other registered professionals. 

The Faster Than Normal Podcast: ADD | ADHD | Health
Simplifying Your Complexities w/ Impulsive Thinker Andre Brisson

The Faster Than Normal Podcast: ADD | ADHD | Health

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 18:51


André Brisson, P. Eng., is the host of The Impulsive Thinker Podcast, the podcast for the high-achieving ADHD entrepreneur. Andre owns an entrepreneurial consulting engineering company and recently started Tactical Breakthroughs where he is developing the ADHDTransformation Journey program. Diagnosed late in life with severe ADHD and mild Asperger's(ASD), the mechanisms and systems he created to overcome his undiagnosed ADHD havehelped him succeed. He credits his undiagnosed ADHD as key to his success and a factor in restricting success. Since discovering how to turn his ADHD into a strength, people havesought him out for help with using their ADHD as a strength to drive success. André Brisson has a special ability is devouring and learning complex information and simplifying for others to solve complex problems. Like most entrepreneurs, André has started multiple companies, the two of which failed for various reasons. Learning from those failures, André now operates three very successful companies, including a self-managing entrepreneurial engineering firm specializing in niche markets that require unique training, experience, and impulsive instinct to try new things. Enjoy! In this episode Peter and Andre discuss:   00:45 - Thank you so much for listening and for subscribing! 00:48 - Welcome Andre Brisson! 02:40 - What is your success key for imparting complex information to the neurotypical? Ref: Ringette 04:15 - Simplifying the complex 05:06 - On the differences between informing and teaching 05:30 - When did you get diagnosed and what brought all that about? 06:02 - On inventing a “character” for yourself to be perceived as “not abnormal”. 07:00 - On then importance of being unique  07:45 - You said you were beginning to scare your kids- can you go into details on that? Ref: emotional dysregulation 09:55 - Have you ever bought anything strictly on impulse? Tell us in the comments! ;-) 11:00 - Parenting with ADHD/mild Asperger's prior to a diagnosis 12:20 - So when you got diagnosed, what was the treatment plan? Ref: DBT, CBT Executive Function What is Time Blindness? 13:36 - On learning your strengths and maintaining, managing and delegating what's not best for you. Aka Peter's “life rules” 15:15 - A bit more on delegating and staying in the lane, on the road. 16:38 - How can people find more about you? Email:  andre@andreb.ca André Brisson Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/andre.brisson.1447/ LinkedIN: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrebrisson/ Twitter: @fatrol Website: www.andreb.ca Objective Engineering Inc. Website: www.objectiveeng.ca Tactical Breakthroughs Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TacticalBTs LinkedIN: https://www.linkedin.com/company/tactical-breakthroughs/ Twitter: @tacticalbts Website: www.tacticalbts.com The Impulsive Thinker Podcast Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/impulsivethinkerpodcast LinkedIN: https://www.linkedin.com/company/impulsive-thinker-podcast/ Twitter: @impulsivthinker Website: www.theimpulsivethinker.com 16:51 - Andre, thank you so much!  Ref: Faster Than Normal the book! 17:75 - Thank you. Guys, as always thanks so much for subscribing! Do you have a cool friend with a great story? We'd love to hear. I'm www.petershankman.com and you can reach out anytime via email at peter@shankman.com or @petershankman on all of the socials. You can also find us at @FasterNormal on all of the socials. It really helps when you drop us a review on iTunes and of course, subscribe to the podcast if you haven't already! As you know, the more reviews we get, the more people we can reach. Help us to show the world that ADHD is a gift, not a curse!  19:08 - Faster Than Normal Podcast info & credits  — TRANSCRIPT via Descript and then corrected.. somewhat: [00:00:38] Hey everyone, Peter. Shankman welcome to the episode of Faster Than Normal. I'm thrilled that you're here. It is great to have you again, we have a fun guest today. I'm gonna start with his tagline because his tagline pretty much says everything ;it's simplifying your complexities, which I think is just the best description I've ever heard of someone who works with people with A D D ADHD, people who are. ADHD. I love that. It's just so clear. Andre, Brisson and I, I screwed it up. I tried my was really hard to get. That was good. Was good's the host of the Impulsive Thinker podcast, very similar to FTN. Podcast for high achieving ADHD entrepreneurs. He owns an entrepreneur consulting engineering company, and recently started another company called Tactical Breakthroughs where he's developing an ADHD transformation journey program. He was diagnosed later in life with severe ADHD and mild Asperger's and the mechanisms and systems he created much like the stuff I did to overcome his undiagnosed ADHD have helped him succeed and he credits his undiagnosed as a key to his success and a factor in restricting success as well. So that's ING to discover, um, Since discovering how to turn his ADHD into a strength people have out for help using their ADHD as well. You talk in your bio about how you have special ability for taking complex information and simplifying for others and first thought, when I heard that was something that happened with me. And I think my mom, like five years ago when she got a new iPhone and she was having a problem doing like four things. And so I just went over there. The their, my parents' apartment. And I'm like, here, gimme the phone done. Dun dun dun. She's like, great, but I didn't learn how to do it. Right. Right. And I realized I'm terrible at taking complex information that I understand and teaching people how to understand it. I just want to do it and get it done. That's an ADHD thing. So let's, let's start there. What is, what is your sort of success key there where you actually have the ability and the, the patience or whatever it is to take that information and simplify it down so other people can learn it as opposed to just doing it for them.  [00:02:55] Andre: Well, the, to me, that's the key difference is I don't do it for them. I've always helped people understand, break down something complex into simple steps or layman terms so that they can act on it. And then they can think about it differently to act on it at a future time. Um, like for example, and on in Canada here, we have Ringette. It's a, it's a, it's a sport on ice for women. So basically they got a rubber ring with a spear, their stick. And I, I referee then I was in an evaluator and, uh, an officially evaluator. So what I actually did was I always asked them what's. The rule, like usually you guys say this occurred, this occurred that I call it right or not. So I go by and says, what's the rule. The rule says this. And then we break down the steps of what occurred and apply the actual rule to those steps. So I step it out for people so that they can understand it. And if you don't understand the first way, I tackle it at a different angle until they get it. And what I'm trying to teach them is stepping out the thought process to come with their own conclusions, with the facts that they know they already had. And didn't realize it. Okay.  [00:04:04] Peter: That makes sense. Yeah, it does. It does. It's interesting. Cause that, that takes patience and, and that's one of the few things that most people with ADHD simply don't have anywhere near half of. [00:04:15] Andre: Mm-hmm yeah. The thing is a lot of times I can simplify that complex information. So someone understands it and so that they can act on it and I can make it real. So usually I, I I'm able to connect something that's in their life or someone else's life or mine. And that's what I do a lot on the podcast is this is a snare that happened. It kind of happened to me. And then people, once you make it real people seem to click with it better.  [00:04:39] Peter: Yeah. Makes sense. And, and yeah, I mean, that's, that's a, a, you know, my keynote speaking trait, you tell stories that people have people who relate to and all of a sudden, it's not some guy on stage talking about something foreign, it's something. Oh yeah. I get that.  [00:04:51] Andre: Yeah. I. I had a chat today with two different people. We, I kind of, I blurted this out and I thought it was pretty smart now to think about it now, but I think there's a difference between informing to understand versus educating, to teach. So if, and for me, I was talking about advocacy as you know, I, I stopped educating people. I just tried to inform people so they can understand adult ADHD and the differences.  [00:05:17] Peter: That makes a lot of sense. I think that also the more informed they are, the more they feel like they can have a handle on it, as opposed to. I guess educating. Yeah. Yeah. They might not necessarily get, no. That makes sense. Tell us about, um, your background. You said you were late, you were late, uh, diagnosed how late?  [00:05:36] Andre: Uh, about four years ago when I was 44. Oh, wow. Um, and then that was a, that was all because of a life Tempest. As I've been calling had three perfect storms collide at once. Um, got into a bad business partnership. I got bored with my first company once it got successful. So I S sabatoged that. Things weren't going well at home. And my Sy symptoms overtook me and controlled me for a couple of years to the point where my kids are just looking at me scared. And I said, I gotta get help. Huh. And got the diagnosis. I went actually to get the diagnosis to prove it wasn't ADHD. Cause I thought there was something worse, wrong with me. Because that diagnosis, like it was too simple of a solution to explain my last 44 years and develop a character that I became so I can fit in and not be looked as abnormal. And then, so I got really good at playing this character. Now I'm learning how to be me and to differentiate the two, because it almost became, you know, I almost, I brainwashed myself to believe that that was the person I was or shouldn't be. [00:06:38] Peter: No, I get that. I mean, it's, it's, you know, fitting in and not being, uh, you know, and not sort of ever really fitting in with the crowd or with, with, uh, any group in, in school, you know, and that takes a toll. I don't think, I think we're just starting to realize what kind of toll that takes on people, um, and how much, uh, that that's re you know, those early forming, forming years are really responsible for sort of right. The kinda stuff you deal with.  [00:07:03] Andre: And then I was overlooked because I was doing well in school. Like I'm also gifted. Um, and so since you're successful and you're doing well in school, you can't have it. You're just not doing what you're supposed to. You're not trying to hard enough for, you know, stop being unique. That was my favorite word. You're too unique to be part of this and I've always fought the right to be unique. And I always thought we should all, we're all different. I understood why we were always trained to say we're everyone's alike, but we're not. We're all unique. [00:07:35] Peter: So what, when you get, I'm curious, you mentioned something, you said, um, you said you had symptoms that were starting to, uh, that were starting to scare your kids. Ex can you go into detail on that?  [00:07:47] Andre: Oh, emotional dysregulation times 2 million. Um, it didn't take much to spark me off. And then all I would do was I'd just be screaming at them for something silly. And when I started being cognizant of a screaming at them, for being silly, my brain was actually saying, Hey buddy, you're overreacting here. You should stop. And then I got the other part of my brain going, eh, forget it. Let's keep going. I'm already into it. Um, so when I saw those look in their eyes, it gave me a. It scared me cuz I saw myself. Um, there when I was a child and that's when I said no, no more, no more. So I went and got help. So the emotional dysregulation definitely took over, um, and enforced, uh, and then my impulsivity and the no filter uh, aspect of my brain having no filter, just my impulsivity, my ver my words would just come out and I just started not caring anymore. And that's when I said that, that, that the symptoms took over, um, impulsive bias, impulsive business partnerships, knowing that it was not going to be good. Um, and for me, I realized with time, since my diagnosis, I have a fear of being idle and when I get bored, that's when I could become dangerous. And that's when, so my physical hyperactivity, even at, as an adult kicks in, if I'm bored and then what happened was with my other company, once the startup phase was done and we're successful in maintaining success and having good gradual growth, I was bored. The, the entertainment, the interest was gone. So I created chaos. Impulsively trying this, trying that in muscle dysregulation, continuing. Um, and, and then just going on with the inattention, not caring, I had a really great point and it just escaped me. It'll come back to that's yeah. [00:09:46] Peter: I mean, that's that happens all the time. You, you go down the route, press rabbit, home, like, wait, my original point was like five feet away from that. Yeah. Um, I think that probably, I think every episode [00:09:55] Andre: and the impulsivity of buying stuff. You know, spending sling money, losing cash flow, all that type of stuff. That was it.  [00:10:03] Peter: It's interesting. I've never, I, I, I, I understand that. And I get that. I I'm fortunate. I don't think it ever, I never went down that rabbit hole too much, but I've certainly made impulse. I mean, you know, mm-hmm, virtually everything I've ever bought in my life has been impulse by, I, I do you wind up doing research on the product you bought after you bought it? [00:10:22] Andre: um, No. I usually do all the research ahead of time. So I know what I'm buying is good is just deciding to do it. Like the one was, Hey, we got a bunch of cash in the bank account. Um, I've been looking at building a server. This is quite a few years ago getting a server for the office. We got a big team, so I'm just gonna blow 40 grand right now, rather on a finance plan. Um, cuz at the same time I didn't care. Um, which was part of it, which was the interest part. Um, but the other thing too Peter. I think that I think a lot of people are getting diagnosed later in life. And for me, I never realized this about two years ago was. It really started to take control. My symptoms. When I had kids, when they disrupted my, my rhythm at home, my routine at home, that was my calm down time. When I got home, I could rejuvenate and now having being stuck, cuz you're scheduled being disrupted all the time. Cuz kids just want to be with you. They just wanna last minute try different things and no, no, I like, I just sat down, I'm ready to do a bunch of stuff and now you're disrupting me. So that's when I think it started to steamroll the effects of these symptoms.  [00:11:35] Peter: I totally totally get that. It's it's a, having a kid. I got diagnosed before I had my daughter, but it was Def it's definitely a, um, you know, you sort of, you get this vibe where it's like, okay, uh, dinner's over, you know, I have an hour till I have to put her to bed, I'm gonna, you know, I'm gonna sit down and breathe and just whatever. And then it's like, dad play with me. And of course I, I will, but it took a while to sort of, uh, be able to focus entirely. Right, right. And  [00:12:01] Andre: not oh, huge. You know? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And then you feel shitty as a, as a parent, cuz you can't give your full attention or you're always thinking, how can I get outta this? I , how can go back to what I was doing exactly. Cause I need to get that done. I gotta get it done. What's going on? Right?  [00:12:14] Peter: No question about it. So when, so when you got diagnosed, what, what was the, uh, what was the treatment plan? Was it medication? Was it, . [00:12:22] Andre: We, uh, tried medication, uh, I think I'm part of that 20% that doesn't work well. Um, but I think the, some of the medication I was on at that time, I needed it just to settle and almost had stopped my brain for a while so I can just catch my breath and take everything in. And then, um, Slowly got off of it. Um, but for me, the big thing is I just hyper-focused for a good year and a half on learning everything I could about ADHD interesting and simplifying it. And that's why I tell people like educating yourself the effects and then is huge. And then I was part of therapy group therapy. Now I'm just finishing up my dialectal behavioral therapy. I've done cognitive behavioral therapy, ah, even the group therapy on how to have fun. But it was a neurotypical direction, but anyways, um, a lot of talking with similar people helped. And then for me to simplify ADHD down to, I think it's its core, it's an executive functioning dysfunction and time blindness. Those two affects the, the, the, the DSM symptoms of inattention hyperactivity, impulsivity, and inattention. Um, that made a lot of sense to me. And then at the same time, shortly before my ADHD diagnosis, I got diagnosed with type two diabetes. And that's when I realized I can't get rid of it. Like I diabetes, I can't get rid of it. Nothing I can do can cure it, but I can manage it and extend my life. And that's what I saw with ADHD. .Manage the symptoms so I can work well. And I had a mantra my whole time for a long time saying your strengths can become your weaknesses. And when I put that together with my ADHD symptoms, as long as I can manage my symptoms, That's how, why I succeed as an entrepreneur and those are my strengths, but if I let them go be overutilized or underutilized and then become my strengths. And that's when I say ADHD can become a disorder, is when they're impeding your day to day. [00:14:23] Peter: I agree. I, I think it's another way of saying, you're saying the same thing that I say a different way, which is, you know, you have to have. These life rules that you can't deviate from because you know, you, your brain works a certain way. And so you put these right pro processes into place that allow you to utilize it to your best ability. Mm-hmm . And if you, if you deviate from that, you're gonna go off the road.  [00:14:42] Andre: Right. And, and then the other thing I discovered too, so for, I don't know, I can't do math. I'm an engineer. I need a calculator here. Um, so about a good 20 years, all I did was read all the self-help books. I've taken almost every assessment out there to identify strengths, but my therapist actually said you were doing all that to find out what was wrong with you to concentrate on what's not good enough to build on. So with my diagnosis, I took there's three good tools that I use that really identifies my talents and strengths. And. Take those. And I help people with these assessments too, to understand what's your unique strength and talent. So if we could just stay in those abilities, Then it's easy to hyperfocus and you're having a lot of fun and you're not, and don't waste your time on things you're not good at and you don't like doing that. So as an entrepreneur, it's handy, you, you got staff, you can have people, you delegate a lot of those, but I help people understand what their unique talents and strengths are, where they should be spending their time, where they can get a lot of energy and enjoyment every day, be creative and then have a team around you that just take care of the stuff you don't like. [00:15:50] Peter: That's a hundred percent given you, have you have someone or people to do the stuff that you're terrible at? I mean, that's, you know, for 14 years now, I've had, I've had my assistant, it's a game changer.  [00:16:00] Andre: Yep. Like we got a minimal limited brain mental brain, uh, energy, right. Every day. And I think ADHD, we just have a really good ability to effectively use it to run all day, or we have a really great efficient way to inefficiently use our mental energy and at the end of the day, it, so if we're starting to do things we don't like to do all day, then we're really, really burnt out at the end of the day. But if we can stay in that lane, man, you can do that seven days straight and not get, get tired. [00:16:29] Peter: It's a great way to put it. It's a great way to close too. I wanna keep us to our 20 minute mark. Uh, tell us how people could find you?  [00:16:36] Andre: Uh, you can find me at, uh, Andre, Andre, b.ca I'll take anyone's email. Um, but you can find me on LinkedIn. Our tactical bts.com is another source.  [00:16:47] Peter: We'll put all the, all the, all your links that you gave us. We'll put 'em in the, uh, in the podcast notes. Andre, thank you so much for taking the time. This was really, really informative. We're definitely gonna have you back, uh, at some point in the near future.  [00:16:57] Andre: Well, I appreciate you having me, Peter. And, um, like I said, like, I don't think I said this, but, uh, yet till now, um, you're Faster Than Normal book. I actually bought it five years ago, thinking it was one how I can work faster. then I bought it again, uh, and read it. And then I found the other book, but I think I really liked your aspect too, that, you know, it's not a disorder. It's our, it's a, it's a very unique ability of doing things and to not thinking as a negative. And, and make it work. And I really, a lot of stuff in there I re not reflected it hit me. I can, I understand exactly what was in there. And it was also comforting to know what I created in the past. Unknowingly. I was on the right track. So I thought it was a really good book and I do recommend it to a lot of people. [00:17:45] Peter: Thank you, man. That's a really, really kind of you. Guys as always, Faster Than Normal, We wanna hear what you're thinking. We wanna hear of any guests you might wanna hear from,  shoot us a, a email Peter@shankman.com. We're on all the socials. You know, our, our handles by now. Thank you for listening. We will see again next week with another guest, we appreciate you and know that ADHD and all forms of neurodiversity are gifts, not curses! We'll see you next week! [00:19:08]Credits: You've been listening to the Faster Than Normal podcast. We're available on iTunes, Stitcher and Google play and of course at www.FasterThanNormal.com I'm your host, Peter Shankman and you can find me at shankman.com and @petershankman on all of the socials. If you like what you've heard, why not head over to your favorite podcast platform of choice and leave us a review, come more people who leave positive reviews, the more the podcast has shown, and the more people we can help understand that ADHD is a gift, not a curse. Opening and closing themes were composed and produced by Steven Byrom who also produces this podcast, and the opening introduction was recorded by Bernie Wagenblast. Thank you so much for listening. We'll see you next week!

Mad in America: Science, Psychiatry and Social Justice
Kaori Wada - How Grief Became a Disorder and What This Means About Us

Mad in America: Science, Psychiatry and Social Justice

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 56:05


In March 2022, a new grief-related disorder was officially adopted into mainstream mental health diagnosis nomenclature. Prolonged Grief Disorder (PGD) is a recent addition to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual fifth edition text revision (DSM-5-TR). A PGD diagnosis is to be used when a person is grieving too long and too intensely. In this interview, Kaori Wada, Psychologist, grief researcher, and Associate Professor and Director of Training at the University of Calgary, builds upon her recent paper on the Medicalization of Grief in conversation with MIA Science News Writer and Psychologist Zenobia Morrill. Wada articulates a history of institutional tensions and financial conflicts behind the creation of this new PGD diagnosis. She also discusses the ways PGD could shape how we collectively understand and respond to those grieving. Wada's work demonstrates that the creation of PGD was not based on scientific findings but appears to be entangled in long-standing arguments between camps of mental health professionals with different stakes in whether the diagnosis became legitimized. Further, PGD, as with other diagnoses, represents elements of mainstream psychological theory that tend to render deviations from Western cultural norms as “unhealthy.” Is diagnosis needed to provide support and care? If so, those most likely to experience marginalization, violence, and unjust loss are also most likely to be classified as having PGD, a mental illness. At a time when the world is fraught with tragic loss—owing to causes ranging from political failures, state violence, and the COVID-19 pandemic—grieving has been transformed into a mental health disorder. But the complicated question of what a mental disorder is continues to be glossed over. The opportunity for psychiatric professionals to embrace humility seems to have reverted to the familiar “diagnose-and-treat” response. Will pharmacological intervention become the dominant “treat” response to a diagnosis of PGD? A new grief disorder is a clear departure, however, from the way grief used to be described in the field as an example of something that is clearly not a mental health disorder, Wada shared. She exclaims: “To me, the medicalization of grief is controversial because it may fundamentally shake up the concept of a mental disorder, [how it has] been defined and understood.” Wada and Morrill explore what this new PGD diagnosis may mean, reflecting on the ways the “diagnose-and-treat” logic seems to of experiences formerly considered part of the territory of being human. The need to pathologize experiences in order to address them represents a paradox. A new ethical and moral quandary befalls professionals tasked with determining when grief is an illness and when expressions of grief are inappropriate. Will the public embrace this new disorder? Will the medicalization of grief be resisted? Will a pandemic of PGD diagnoses follow a global pandemic? Wada speaks to the personal and professional influences that shaped these curiosities and her approach to researching how grief is being construed in the mental health field.

DR. ERIN | SOULCIÉTÉ
What is the Spiritual Meaning of Depression? | Spiritual Psychology Coach Series

DR. ERIN | SOULCIÉTÉ

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 22:35


Spiritual Healing Depression | Spiritual Psychology Coach Series Welcome to The Dr. Erin Podcast. This is a top spiritual psychology coach podcast to inspire and teach you how to transform your trauma, birth your soul's purpose, and manifest your dreams. Hi, I'm Dr. Erin, Doctor of Divinity D.D., I'm committed to bringing you the best coaching tips, spiritual advice, trauma healing, and metaphysical recovery secrets. I'm here to help you monetize your spiritual gifts and love your life.  I want you to know that I've been exactly where you are and I believe in you. Together, we are awakening the world.  Join our community for a 14-day trial for only $1! [Limited-Time Offer] www.soulciete.com  (Call or Text Questions) +1-323-538-ERIN (5646) Did you know that depression among adults in the United States tripled since the pandemic? Top trending news states ‘Depression is probably not caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain' Today I am going to breakdown the root cause of depression from a spiritual psychology coach perspective. If you are someone who cares about people or you are a coach and are ready to have a paradigm shift about depression, you definitely want to listen to this podcast Spirituality careers will boom in depression & recession    Resources:  1. Boston University: Depression among adults in the United States tripled in the early 2020 months of the global coronavirus pandemic—jumping from 8.5 percent before the pandemic to a staggering 27.8 percent. New research from Boston University School of Public Health reveals that the elevated rate of depression has persisted into 2021, and even worsened, climbing to 32.8 percent and affecting 1 in every 3 American adults. [health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/what-causes-depression] 2. The Conversation: ‘Depression is probably not caused by chemical imbalance' [theconversation.com/depression-is-probably-not-caused-by-a-chemical-imbalance-in-the-brain-new-study] 3. Harvard University - What causes depression? The onset of depression more complex than a brain chemical imbalance [health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/what-causes-depression] 3 Signs That Depression Was Trending in The Collective Consciousness:  1. My friend and master coach's son attempted suicide 2. One of my client's son is having suicidal ideation 3. Three practitioners were feeling the collective consciousness of ‘I don't want to live' DSM - Diagnostics and Statistics Manual - Sponsored by Big pharma   Spirituality vs. Science: Science - Looks from the outside in - Bandaid Spirituality - Looks from the inside out - Root of the problem From a spiritual psychology coach perspective, trauma causes personality disorders & mental health disorders Mental illness is NOT a just brain chemical imbalance Upsets >>> Sadness & Mental Health Issues (Engrams & Neurological Deformities & Brain Disorders >>> Depression   Transcriptions: Speaker 1 (00:00): Hi, my soul family. I am so incredibly excited to share this podcast with you. Did you know that depression has tripled since the pandemic? And did you know that top training news is stating that depression is probably not caused by chemical imbalances in the brain? We have been saying this for all of eternity, from the spiritual realm. So today I'm going to break down the root cause of depression from a spiritual psychology soul based perspective. I'm so excited if you are somebody who really cares about people, if you're somebody who coaches or somebody that really wants to make an impact in the world, you definitely want to listen to this podcast. My promise is for you to have a complete paradigm shift of understanding how depression has created, how we can recreate it to heal and reveal the truth of who we are. Let's go welcome to the Dr. Aaron podcast. This is a top spiritual psychology coach podcast to inspire and teach you how to transform your trauma birth, your soul's purpose, and manifest your dreams. Hi, I'm Dr. Aaron, Dr. Divinity. I'm committed to bringing you the best coaching tips, spiritual advice, trauma healing, and metaphysical recovery secrets. I'm here to help you monetize your spiritual gifts and love your life. I want you to know that I've been exactly where you are, and I believe in you together. We're awakening the world.  Speaker 1 (01:33): So there I was, it was four o'clock in the afternoon, and I decided to take a little CSTA nap and I laid down in my bed and I was just about to take my phone and place it over on my side table and turn it into airplane mode. When my phone began to show that one of my dear friends and master coaches was calling me, I debated in my mind, should I answer? Should I not? Okay. I'll answer. So answer and right away, her voice screeched on the other side of the phone, I need prayer. I need prayer. I need prayer. My son attempted suicide last night, my son attempted suicide. Last night, we went straight into prayer. We knew prayer for, I don't even know how long we were in there. We were in there, just my, the tears of compassion, the tears of the oneness all came through knowing the perfection of what her son had gone through, knowing that there was such a blessing of birthing truth, knowing right here, right now, that whatever he was experiencing, that this was the birthing pains of the new him, the new life aligning to his truth and his heart.  Speaker 1 (02:35): And of course through the prayer, we both became more and more empowered and we restored truth in mind. So the point is this is that that phone call made me realize that in the collective consciousness, that depression and suicidal ideation and even suicide attempts and suicide in itself is in the collective. I had had two other signs and for me, right, I don't necessarily go on Google trends to see what's happening in the world because we tap into truth and we know truth at all points in time. Boston university states that depression among adults in the United States tripled in the early 20, 20 months of the global coronavirus pandemic jumping to 8.5% before the pandemic to a staggering 27.8%. You guys get that almost one in a third of Americans is dealing with depression. You guys, this is no joke. Boston university states new research from the school of public health reveals that the elevated rate of depression has persisted into 2021 and even worse at climbing to 32.8% and affecting one in every American adults.  Speaker 1 (03:52): Obviously they don't have the stats on 20, 22 yet, but this is real. This is super real. So what happens for me is I don't need an article to come out, right? I don't need to see the Google trending or watch Twitter. I know what's happening from a spiritual perspective. And what happens is it comes through in three signs always, and this is part of it. So what happened, of course, that was the third incident that happened when my dear friend and master coach called about her son prior to that, within that same week, within the same last week, one of my clients in class was basically stating that her son was having suicidal ideation. And then in one of my practitioner classes three out of the, of course we have lots of practitioners in the class, but three of them were truly feeling the collective consciousness of the concept of I don't want to live.  Speaker 1 (04:47): And they were dealing with that. And these were three practitioners that are very stable and really know their mind it's that they were tapping into something beyond their individual consciousness. They were feeling the empathy, the empathy that we are, that we're impasse, right? That we feel the collective as well. So today I wanna break on down what is happening from a spiritual psychology perspective and break on down the trending top news about big pharma. Okay. We are spiritualists that believe that you have freedom of choice, whether you choose traditional doctors or pharmaceuticals or whatever, we believe that there's a time and place for whatever works for you. And we honor that. Okay. However, in the top training news right now, even in quote, the conversation is depression is probably not caused by chemical imbalance. Harvard university also had an article that says, basically talking about what causes depression, the onset of depression is more complex than brain chemical imbalance O M G.  Speaker 1 (05:49): This is huge news for the spiritual world, as far as a confirmation of what we have been saying the entire time. So we have to break this on down. And my commitment today is for you to have a paradigm shift for yourself. And if you are a coach to understand what is happening for your clients, disclosure, I am not a traditional doctor. I am a doctor of divinity. I am not a traditional psychologist. I am a spiritual psychologist coach. Okay. I am trained and developed in understanding our spiritual nature, how it impacts our entire life and how to restore the truth of who we are through E four trauma method, through spiritual psychology coaching and through all of the metaphysics that we teach. Universal law, everything, let's break this on down. I'm so honored to do this with you guys. First of all, I just wanna say, if you or someone, you know, is dealing with depression, please seek medical or professional help.  Speaker 1 (06:48): Okay? All the processes we work through absolutely can deal with depression. However, we cannot state that we cure, and we are mandated reporters, meaning that if we have a client that we are coaching and they have, they're having suicidal thoughts and they have a means to do it. We are mandated reporters and we need to report it. Okay. So having said that also, if you are a coach or somebody dealing with somebody, depression, and you really truly do not feel that you are equipped in your training, you absolutely have no business with dealing with someone, with depression. You need to refer them to a master coach or to a professional or a doctor who is dealing with depression. Okay? So let's go. So here's the paradigm shift. Science looks at depression from the outside end, right? They looking from a perspective of what we call the DSM.  Speaker 1 (07:43): Okay. There's a book. If you are, have any kind of mental illness, there is a book it's called DSM pharmaceutical perspective. It's called diagnostics and statistics manual. The DSM is it's based in diagnostics and statistics manual. And it's sponsored by big pharma. The truth is that someone does not have depression. They are experiencing depression. It is a creation. And I'm gonna break on down how it is created in mind. Okay? Doesn't mean it's real. It doesn't mean the effects aren't real, but how it gets created is imperative for us to understand how to heal it and how to restore the truth of who you or your clients are. Right? We're not the titles. We're not depressed. We're not bipolar. We're not an addict. We're not, you know, all these titles. I'm not even of course, on the title. I'm a doctor divinity, but I'm not a title.  Speaker 1 (08:42): I'm a spiritual being. I'm a creator. You are a creator. Your clients are creators. So we have to understand what this means. Exactly. Science looks from the outside world and puts a bandaid on it. Right? What causes this? Even, even psychology, traditional psychology does not even study the soul. Psychology is the study of the soul and psychology. Doesn't study the soul. That's why we're restoring it with spiritual psychology. And I bless all the psychologists out there. Okay. Because I know you guys are wanting to get more and more spiritual, and I'm not saying you bad, or the industry bad it's that we, as a collective need to restore the truth of psychology. It's the study of the soul. So traditional psychology looks at what the cause is, which is an outside source. And then it looks at the effect. So, so depression from a psychology perspective might look at, well, you grew up in this family and this happened.  Speaker 1 (09:39): And therefore here's the result over here from a spiritual psychology perspective, we take a look at what's actually happening at a soul level, right? So science looks from the outside in and spirituality looks from the inside, out the root of the problem. Science generally like big farm puts a bandaid on it. And spirituality, we get to the root of the core trauma that happened, right? So all personality disorders, all mental health disorders are all be, they all begin within the soul and we're going to teach you how I'm gonna teach you how it begins at a soul level. So mental illness is not just a brain chemical imbalance from a spiritual perspective. It is something that happens as a cause and effect of what's being created at a subconscious soul level. And this is how it goes. This is how it breaks down. Okay. So here are the personal story of mine.  Speaker 1 (10:37): I dealt with depression in my early twenties, my late teens and my early twenties. I had come from a, you know, a divorce family. I had really no structure growing up. My father had kind of gone off and had his, a different family. My mother was borderline alcoholic. She didn't really have much structure or principles in her life. And bless both of my parents. I'm very good with both of them now. Okay. We've done a lot of healing. I, uh, in junior high began to drink and try drugs. Luckily, I didn't like drugs, but when I was in high school, I was date raped. And then I began to spiral into an eating disorder, bulimia. And then I thought getting married would solve it all. And I had a full term stillborn and so on and so forth, meaning that I had a lot of traumatic incidences over the course of my life, some big, some mini, but the point is there was a lot of discord.  Speaker 1 (11:34): And when you take a look back into my past generations, my great grandfather committed suicide, died by suicide. As we're supposed to say, right? He jumped off what was called an is called suicide bridge in Pasadena, California. So needless to say that in my lineage and, and in my epigenetics and my DNA, there's already a lot of energetics of probably leaning towards having more sadness and more depression, potential. Okay. We have to know that we are our lineage. We are our parents, our grandparents, and all of our lineage. All the energetics comes down and science is even proving this. Now that through epigenetics, we are dealing with whatever we're dealing with. So collectively out there in the world, we are collectively traumatized. We know this through trauma informed work, and everyone is dealing with energetics, not to mention what's happening out in the world, right.  Speaker 1 (12:34): That, that amplifies the entire thing that we're going through. Okay. So what happens from a, from a mind, from a spiritual psychology, from a soul perspective, when we say mind, we're not talking about the mini mind, we're talking about the divine mind. We're talking about that part of us that is connected with everything. Okay? So let's break this down. Let's pretend that there was a, a new baby and the baby did not have a great grandfather that committed suicide. The baby actually came from a very healthy family. And basically they stumble into creating depression. How would this happen in this lifetime per se, from a spiritual perspective? So what happens is depression? It does not come on like over, over one incident per se. Depression is a culmination that happens over many creations generally. Okay. What happens at first, someone begins to get upset in their life.  Speaker 1 (13:30): Maybe something didn't happen that they want to happen. They want people places in life to be different. And they start getting upset about whatever happened, whether it be, you know, a breakup, whether it be whatever happens, someone doesn't show up to Christmas. So they always use that, that analogy, right? Whatever happens or doesn't happen, this person begins to get upset. And basically an upset is where you feel like you can't create what you wanna create in life. You're looking to the world to change instead of looking for yourself to change. So this begins an upset in mind, and this begins of course, energetic patterns. And it also creates, um, all different things at a soul level, upsets compound into sadness. Okay. When you're upset and you get upset long enough and you keep getting upset, then it compounds into sadness, really feeling like, wow, I'm sad.  Speaker 1 (14:20): I can't create what I really wanna create. Right? I'm the effect of life. And I am and feeling the effect. And I'm getting more and more sad that I can't create what I wanna create. Okay. This begins to have health issues, mental issues, so on and so forth. And it, and it impacts the neurological system. Next is sadness. When you feel like you're so sad and you still really can't create what you wanna create, you're feeling the effect of yourself. Maybe all the chemicals in your body now are, are aligning to what you've created in mind, right? And then it compounds into depression. So whether you wanna say you are prone to it in your biological system, the truth is that it was created in mind. Depression is created in mind and it begins with upset sadness and depression. It could, of course it can be from a zillion different things.  Speaker 1 (15:09): It doesn't matter if it's from war or from someone else, you know, passing away or big breakups. It doesn't matter. The cause of external. What matters is the cause of what happens in mind, what happens and what causes everything is first cause, which is spirit, which is the backing of all energy, which is you deciding and creating. Thomas shard is one of the masters in our industry. That was a lawyer over in the east, in India. And he began to break down universal law and understand the, the kind of cosmic Christ principles from a lawyer's perspective. How do we break this down of, of tangible things, right? So this is the deal. When somebody considers themself to not be the, I am pure potential and a creator, right? They instantaneously create the polarity of the entire universe into existence. So each, if you're dealing with a client, say you are a coach and, and you need to come and get accredited and certified in the work to actually do this.  Speaker 1 (16:16): Do not just work with somebody that's working with depression. You need to become a master coach and master this work front and back, make sure that you're doing this correctly. Okay. But if you're dealing with a client, say I'm dealing with a client with depression. Obviously, first of all, it would have to be one on one, because it would never put somebody dealing with depression in a group. And I would make sure they get signed off by a medical doctor so that I am actually making sure that there's not a chemical imbalance and they don't need kind of further help in a medical field. Okay. But let's reach Penn. They've been checked off by the traditional doctor. They're able to do trauma work and they're able to come in and do deep, deep, spiritual work. Okay. So what we're gonna deal with is we're going to begin to deal with all the upsets, all the sadness, all those things in our life.  Speaker 1 (17:02): We're gonna begin to slowly. It's like peeling away. The onion is what we call, right? So if you're getting to the core of the onion, right, you've gotta peel off all these layers. Sometimes it's red onion. Sometimes it's white onion and you peel off these layers, you peel off the layers and soon enough, you're all the way to the middle. And it's intense getting there, right? Your eyes, you're crying. You've got all this stuff going on. It's kind of like this with dealing with somebody, with depression, you've got to be able to peel away all the upsets, all the sadness, all the failed expectations, all their expectations of life and begin to restore the truth that they created. This that's a hard pill to swallow, right? But it's the truth. Depression is created in mind. It can happen in over a short period. It can happen over a lifetime.  Speaker 1 (17:55): It can happen over many, many lifetimes. But the truth is that you are not quote, quote, depression. Your client is not quote, quote, you or your client might be experiencing depression. But the truth is you are not depression. You have the ability to recreate your life. And this is what we know from so many masters. So many masters of being able to go to that point, Eckhart totally was one of them of the power of now, right? The new earth. He was in a moment where he is didn't wanna live anymore. And in that moment he heard the voice within that was deciding and saying, I don't wanna live. And he realized there was something, a, a mechanism, a witness within. And I know this for anybody that is thinking that they don't wanna live considering what is the point of all this? What's the meaning?  Speaker 1 (18:55): What are we doing here? Because I think we're all asking that at some level, maybe we may not be totally depressed, but maybe we kind of go, wow, what have we been doing? You guys, we're in the great awakening going through this shift right now. And these are the birthing pains. You guys, this is what it looks like to bur something new. We have to throw out what no longer Matt works for us. We have to take a quantum shift, a quantum leap. And we know energetically that nothing stays in the same field when it takes a quantum leap that this is what it looks like. So I'm saying, thank you, depression. Thank you, suicide. At whatever level, knowing that we never ever want anyone to die by suicide, but I know that collectively we are going through some serious pain. And I say, thank you.  Speaker 1 (19:40): I am so grateful for these dark times and moments that burs something new for each and every one of us. I'm. So I'm so happy for my son's friend who attempted suicide, who didn't, and then actually gets to have a second chance. It gets to re be reborn like the Phoenix rising. I am so grateful. And in this I say, these are the steps that need to happen. If you've got checked off by medical, by if you're ready to do spiritual work, that the answer is this. The answer always is to do your deep trauma work because in trauma work, the revelation is the, the, the revelation of understanding how you created your own limited beliefs that you created your own change, your own jail that you put yourself in that it doesn't matter what happened to you. That you always always have a new choice to create something new out of that.  Speaker 1 (20:34): So doing your deep trauma work is imperative for dealing with depression. Number one thing also to make sure you are in a healthy and stable environment. So if you are not, or if you are healing, please find a spiritual family. And number three is to know the truth. Every single day to get steeped in truth is imperative to no longer look to the world. The moment we hand ourselves over to the world, our source, over to the world, we will live in hell, okay. That's taking us out of the garden of Eden, right? We wanna always come back to the truth and never hand our power over to the world out there. Depression is probably not caused by chemical imbalance by the conversation. This is a big, big thing in the news and Harvard university. Really again, stating what causes depression onset of depression is more complex than brain chemical imbalance.  Speaker 1 (21:29): This is the truth we know and are so grateful for the truth to prevail right here. Right now, we are holding each and everyone. There are answers. This is the birthing of the new world right here, right now, maybe we know the truth of who we are. We are creators. We only create, and it is the only creative process. And we create through the mind through what is considered the subconscious mind, the one divine mind, that's connected with all of life, the collective and the cosmic. You are not an individual. You are the individual divine. You are the collective and you are the cosmic. We are together. And together we rise together. We stand divided. We fall, may we know the truth, you guys, and may you live your truth. So if you're somebody who is ready to get trained in spiritual psychology coaching, if you're ready to get trained in E four trauma method, if you're ready to really be in a community of likeminded, spiritual entrepreneurs, coaches, and leaders, practitioners, and so on, so forth, I invite you. I invite you to come into our incredible community. There's links below, have a beautiful day. And may you live your truth?    

Choice Mapping Makes You Mentally STRONGer
WHAT is OCD and HOW do we TREAT it? Obsessive Compulsive Disorder - Demystifying the DSM

Choice Mapping Makes You Mentally STRONGer

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 10:32


Have you ever wondered if you have OCD? Has your family or friends accused you of having this disorder because you like to clean? There's more to it than that! Watch this for the actual DSM criteria on obsessive compulsive disorder and how we treat it. Do you want to learn more about the Mentally STRONG Method and live in Colorado Springs? We have a live course!https://youtu.be/Nax62y0ym6oJoin our mailing list!http://eepurl.com/g2ya99--Dr. Cristi Bundukamara, Ed.D, PMHNP-BC --- A Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner and a Doctor of Healthcare Education has experienced unimaginable trials that have caused many feelings such as depression, anxiety, anger, & overwhelming stress. However, she has developed a new pathway to becoming Mentally Strong & Choosing to be Happy.  With purpose, Dr. B has developed the phases that were refined within the Mentally STRONG Method that she created and wants to share with you.https://www.facebook.com/Mentallystronginchttps://www.mentallystrong.comInstagram @drcristi_bhttps://www.youtube.com/c/drbmentallystronghttps://www.linkedin.com/company/mentallystrong

SelfWork with Dr. Margaret Rutherford | Mental Health | Depression | Perfectly Hidden Depression | Anxiety | Therapy
294 SelfWork: The Alarming Jungle of Mental Illness Misdiagnoses: A Conversation with Author and Activist Sarah Fay

SelfWork with Dr. Margaret Rutherford | Mental Health | Depression | Perfectly Hidden Depression | Anxiety | Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 52:24


If you've listened to SelfWork, or read my book Perfectly Hidden Depression, you know that I've cautioned about doctors and clinicians' overdependence on the DSM-V (The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition). In this riveting conversation with the author of Pathological: The True Story of Six Misdiagnoses and activist Sarah Fay, she tells her story of being labeled with six different diagnoses during three decade  of treatment, all accompanied by prescribed medications with, at times, very difficult side effects, and numerous therapy techniques. Until finally, one psychiatrist told her - after the typical 30 minute initial visit - "I don't know what you have." His humility and caution changed her life, and she began looking into exactly what this "DSM" was and learning how subjective mental health diagnoses can be. She's also quick to say that she's developed a healthy respect for mental health providers, as the field is a complex one to navigate. And as a provider myself, I know that there are many facets to "diagnosing" that have to be considered. That said, an accurate diagnosis takes more than 30 minutes to determine. So, in this episode sponsored by BetterHelp, I hope you'll learn more about how mental illness diagnoses are made - and how you can have a conversation with your provider or clinician to make sure that you are truly seen and understood, not "labeled." Vital Links: BetterHelp, the #1 online therapy provider, has a special offer for you now! You can hear more about this and many other topics by listening to my podcast, SelfWork with Dr. Margaret Rutherford. Subscribe to my website and receive my weekly newsletter including a blog post and podcast! If you'd like to join my FaceBook closed group, then click here and answer the membership questions! Welcome! My book entitled Perfectly Hidden Depression has been published and you can order here! Its message is specifically for those with a struggle with strong perfectionism which acts to mask underlying emotional pain. But the many self-help techniques described can be used by everyone who chooses to begin to address emotions long hidden away that are clouding and sabotaging your current life. And it's available in paperback, eBook or as an audiobook! And there's another way to send me a message! You can record by clicking below and ask your question or make a comment. You'll have 90 seconds to do so and that time goes quickly. By recording, you're giving SelfWork (and me) permission to use your voice on the podcast. I'll look forward to hearing from you!  

DSM 2 1/2 Mono
DSM 2 1/2 – Folge 045 – Urlaub

DSM 2 1/2 Mono

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 176:50


Irgendwie sind es immer wieder rund 90 DSM-Minuten, was immer wir auch machen und versuchen. Hoffentlich gefällt es euch. Show-Notes Project-GC, aktuelle Statistik Deutschland Spitzbergen, Waffen, LPCs #Porto der Post Rumburak auf Twitter Empfehlung von HoyaHH – GC8EXFN – Schaukasten … Weiterlesen →

BNR Boardroom | BNR
Boardroompanel over het op de rit krijgen van Credit Suisse

BNR Boardroom | BNR

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 24:09


Na drie noodlijdende kwartalen en flink wat schandalen moet de topman van Credit Suisse het veld ruimen. Hoe moet dit tij gekeerd worden? En: Onderzoek wijst uit dat het sentiment in de bestuurskamer hard naar beneden gaat. Panelleden Presentator Thomas van Zijl gaat in gesprek met het boardroompanel, dat deze keer bestaat uit:  - Ilona Haaijer (voormalig topvrouw bij DSM en commissaris bij Corbion) - Lieve Declercq (Directeur Spie Nederland) Abonneer je op de Podcast  Ga naar de pagina van het Boardroompanel en abonneer je op de podcast, ook te beluisteren via Apple Podcast, Spotify en elke donderdag live om 13:00 uur in BNR Zakendoen. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Zakendoen | BNR
Peter Hutten (Van Wijnen) over modulaire woningen als oplossing voor woningcrisis

Zakendoen | BNR

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 119:53


Dit jaar rollen er de eerste industrieel gefabriceerde huizen van de band in de Heerenveense fabriek van bouwbedrijf Van Wijnen. Die modulaire woningen zijn dan ook dé oplossing voor de huidige woningcrisis, stelt het bedrijf. Topman Peter Hutten is te gast in BNR Zakendoen. Macro Hoekje Elke dag, even over twaalf, bespreekt presentator Edwin Mooibroek met een macro-econoom de economische stand van zaken. Vandaag is dat Piet Rietman, econoom bij ABN AMRO. Boardroompanel Na drie noodlijdende kwartalen en flink wat schandalen moet de topman van Credit Suisse het veld ruimen, hoe moet dit tij gekeerd worden? En: Onderzoek wijst uit dat het sentiment in bestuurskamer hard naar beneden gaat. Dat en meer bespreken we om 13.00 in het boardroompanel met: - Ilona Haaijer (voormalig topvrouw bij DSM en commissaris bij Corbion) - Lieve Declercq (Directeur Spie Nederland) Luister l Boardroompanel Papiertekort Drukkerijen zien de papierprijs de pan uit rijzen, net nu de klantenstroom aantrekt en de coronamalaise vaarwel wordt gezwaaid. Ondertussen krimpt de markt voor drukkers al jaren gestaag. Hoe zorg je dat je overleeft als drukkerij? Te gast is Wouter Haan, oprichter van Reclameland. Zakenpartner Zij wilde als politicologie-studente de wereld debatterend veranderen, maar ze zag in dat dit niet de manier was om snel resultaat te boeken. Sindsdien stort zij zich op de impact-startupwereld, nu is zij directeur van Innofest, een organisatie die innovatieve prototypes van startups test op festivals. De zakenpartner van deze week is Linda Vermaat. Contact & Abonneren BNR Zakendoen zendt elke werkdag live uit van 12:00 tot 14:30 uur. Je kunt de redactie bereiken via e-mail en Twitter. Abonneren op de podcast van BNR Zakendoen kan via bnr.nl/zakendoen, of via Apple Podcast en Spotify.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Your Unconscious Is Showing
Mollie: The Truth About Borderline Personality Disorder

Your Unconscious Is Showing

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 64:51


In this episode of the HUMAN First podcast, Dr. Courtney gets real about her main mental health struggle, Borderline Personality Disorder, with a fellow person with BPD, Mollie. Mollie is the host of the wildly popular BPD-focused podcast, Back From The Borderline, and the creator of the companion Instagram account, @backfromtheborderline. Here is a list of the topics/questions they discuss: Mollie discusses her mission to become an emotional grown up (something so many of us need to do...) Realizing your parents are flawed humans like you (yikes!) Dr. Courtney discusses KARMA the group discussion at her old treatment center How BPD has been defined and how it is defined today by Mollie (so helpful!) Why Mollie created her podcast Back from the Borderline How many people have BPD and why you probably know someone who has it (spoiler: you do if you're listening to this podcast) The criteria for Borderline Personality Disorder from the DSM-5 Mollie discusses how the symptoms she experiences are universal but for those who struggle with BPD are chronic (YES) Why it's sometimes called "EUPD" vs "BPD" Molly shares her experience going to a psychiatrist and how that unfolded Hypersexuality and using sex as self-harm (one of Dr. Courtney's biggest self-harming techniques as well) Suicidal ideation as a result of undiagnosed BPD Medication vs Coping Skills Spirituality as a means of re-parenting and more of Molly's coping skills You can find Mollie on Instagram at: @backfromtheborderline You can also find her podcasts wherever podcasts are found. Here is a link to Spotify and a link to Apple! Dr. Courtney Tracy's additional offerings: Instagram: @the.truth.doctor TikTok: @the.truth.doctor Twitter: @_thetruthdoctor SNAP Discover Show: Therapist Reacts Exclusive YouTube Show: The Truth Doctor Show Healing texts: USA & Canada (424) 228-9525 (just shoot her a text!) Website: www.thetruthdoctor.com This podcast is not therapy and does not provide personalized clinical advice. The purpose of this podcast is to provide mental health based entertainment and psychoeducation.

UMento - Indépendants - Freelancing - Entrepreneuriat
Vision du marché #crypto et parcours - Interview de Jonathan Nowak @Fructify_io

UMento - Indépendants - Freelancing - Entrepreneuriat

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 57:26


Interview de Jonathan Nowak de la chaîne @Fructify_io , parle de : - Qui il est, son parcours. - Comment il est tombé dans les cryptos et comment il a gagné dans ce marché. - Quelles sont ses activités entrepreneuriales - Est-ce qu'il compte rester en France ? - Qu'est-ce qu'il pense du marché crypto actuellement et ses prévisions pour les années à venir ? - La diversification de son patrimoine. - Son prochain projet CONTENU ÉDUCATIF, ce n'est pas du conseil en investissement. Pour s'inscrire à sa lettre email et accéder à la formation gratuite de Jonathan : https://www.fructify.io/kdo

Let's Get Psyched
#139 - Prolonged Grief Disorder

Let's Get Psyched

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 29:39


Prolonged Grief Disorder has recently been formally added to the DSM-5-TR. But are mental health professionals pathologizing a normal part of the human experience? We invited psychiatrist, researcher, and Director of the Center for Prolonged Grief at Columbia University School of Social Work, Dr. Katherine Shear, to discuss the differences between grief as a disorder and grief as a normal reaction. Besides being at the forefront of the movement to include prolonged grief as a disorder, she has also developed a therapy to help those suffering from overwhelming, extended grieving. Hosts: Eyrn, Toshia, Joshua, Alan Guest: Katherine Shear, MD

The Talent Angle with Scott Engler
Fostering A Resilient and Relevant Workforce At Siemens With Judith Wiese

The Talent Angle with Scott Engler

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 40:43


The significance of understanding employee physical and mental health and wellbeing has increased substantially in the hybrid world. Organizations are rethinking the importance of trust and autonomy in the employee experience to develop healthy, resilient and productive workforces for the long-term. Judith Wiese, chief people and sustainability officer at Siemens, joins the Talent Angle to discuss employee wellbeing and its implications for organizations. She highlights how Siemens' commitment to wellbeing and empowerment drives positive talent outcomes and positions the organization for sustainable success. Judith Wiese has been a member of the Managing Board of Siemens AG since October 1, 2020. She is the Chief People and Sustainability Officer as well as Labor Director for Siemens AG. In addition, Judith is responsible for Global Business Services (GBS) at Siemens. Judith has more than two decades of international experience in various HR fields. From 2017 to 2020, she was Chief Human Resources Officer at DSM, a Dutch company specializing in health, nutrition, and sustainable living. Before that, she worked for the U.S. food company Mars Inc., most recently as Head of People & Organization.

Quicklink Cycling Podcast
570: 24th July 2022 (TDFF 1 / Le Tour 21)

Quicklink Cycling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 19:00


Topical Talkology
Episode 234- When Is Anxiety A Problem? Because We Need It To Survive

Topical Talkology

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 43:26


Coaching: Anxiety Disorder:We all have anxiety, not only is it normal it is essential for survival, in fact as a caveman themore anxiety you had the more likely you were to escape predators and achieve survivalneeds. The irony is that in todays society it these people that suffer the most as just like therest of us they are hard wired to continue escaping illusionary predators and acquireillusionary survival needs that marketing and social media imprison us with.We discussed stress last week which is mostly a normal response for an individual to asituation where they do not feel in controlHowever if severity of anxiety or duration exceeds what is reasonable then it may become aclinical disorder.Anxiety Disorder:33% life time prevalence of anxiety disorder often co morbid with depression or otheranxiety disorders, and 4% life time prevalence of GAD higher and more impairing in highincome countries. Females twice as likely as males.Generalised Anxiety Disorder: DSM V 300.02Generalised Anxiety Disorder: 8 studies of biological interventions:Current Psychiatry July 2022 Saeed MajarwitzGeneralised Anxiety Disorder usually starts in early adulthood and persists throughout life.Anxiety about a variety of events is excessive and unreasonable and causes distress andimpairs functioning.There is a big variability in the effectiveness of physical intervention for Generalised AnxietyDisorder.SSRI, SNRI, agomelatine (melatonin 1 and 2 R agonist and 5HT 2c R antagonist –antagonism increases noradrenaline and dopamine)- as effective as SSRI maybe with fewerside effects eg nausea and sexual side effects.Less used: Buspirone - 5HT 1a R agonist.Acute anxiety: Benzodiazepine.rTMS (FDA approval for Clinical depression 2008) right parietal cortex or right dorsolateralprefrontal cortex with reduced relapse after completion of treatment.CBT alone and improves response to medication.Plus:Diet exercise reduce alcohol and cigarettes, structure , self awareness , sleep with positivestudies for magnesium, chamomile extract and antioxidants.Cross-sectional Comparison of the Epidemiology of DSM-5 Generalized Anxiety DisorderAcross the GlobeAyelet Meron Ruscio, PhD1; Lauren S. Hallion, PhD2; Carmen C. W. Lim, MSc3; et alDialogues Clin Neurosci. 2015 Sep; 17(3): 327–335.Epidemiology of anxiety disorders in the 21st centuryBorwin Bandelow, MD, PhD*Ann Behav Med. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2016 Aug 1.Generalised Anxiety Disorder: 8 studies of biological interventions:Current Psychiatry July 2022 Saeed MajarwitzPublished in final edited form as:Ann Behav Med. 2015 Aug; 49(4): 542–556Exercise as Treatment for Anxiety: Systematic Review and Analysis

From the Bimah: Jewish Lessons for Life
Shabbat Sermon: Dr. Anonymous

From the Bimah: Jewish Lessons for Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 19:52


Dr. John Fryer was a man of uncommon brilliance. As a child, he learned so quickly and completely that his teachers called him a prodigy. He was just five years old when he started second grade, 15 when he graduated from high school, and 19 when he graduated college and enrolled at Vanderbilt University Medical School where he became one of the youngest students ever to study psychiatry. He graduated in 1962. Dr. John Fryer was also gay. Back then, homophobia was codified and enshrined by the medical world and criminalized by law, a legally sanctioned form of hate. It was legal to fire someone or refuse to rent to someone based on their sexual orientation. It was even legal to arrest someone simply for the “crime” of holding a lover's hand or for being served alcohol at a gay bar. Fryer was taunted on the playground and in the classroom, and even in medical school, he found no reprieve. The foundational diagnostic text used by all psychiatrists, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders or DSM, listed homosexuality as a mental illness. In other words, Fryer was literally taught that the way he felt, who he was attracted to, was a disease. Fryer wanted to be seen and loved for who he was.

Choice Mapping Makes You Mentally STRONGer
BODY DYSMORPHIC DISORDER: What is it? How can we treat it? Demystifying the DSM with Dr. B 2022

Choice Mapping Makes You Mentally STRONGer

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 9:09


Continuing on with our series on Demystifying the DSM with Body Dysmorphic Disorder. In this video, Dr. B goes over the criteria for body dysmorphic disorder and what it means. She also talks about differential diagnosis and comorbidity with anorexia nervosa. What can you do if you have things about your body or your physical appearance that you want to change? Do you think about these things literally all the time? If so, you may want to consider seeking professional mental health help for Body Dysmorphic Disorder. Do you want to learn more about the DSM? Here is a playlist of all of Dr. B's DSM V videos!https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLhbzZf3gqt8CdGDS8Q8UAsbrYC3KveiZkDo you want to learn more about the Mentally STRONG Method and live in Colorado Springs? We have a live course!https://youtu.be/Nax62y0ym6o--Dr. Cristi Bundukamara, Ed.D, PMHNP-BC --- A Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner and a Doctor of Healthcare Education has experienced unimaginable trials that have caused many feelings such as depression, anxiety, anger, & overwhelming stress. However, she has developed a new pathway to becoming Mentally Strong & Choosing to be Happy.  With purpose, Dr. B has developed the phases that were refined within the Mentally STRONG Method that she created and wants to share with you.https://www.facebook.com/Mentallystronginchttps://www.mentallystrong.comInstagram @drcristi_bhttps://www.youtube.com/c/drbmentallystronghttps://www.linkedin.com/company/mentallystrong

De Kopgroep wielerpodcast
#20 - Tour de France: Abandon, abandon monsieur Smeets! (S11)

De Kopgroep wielerpodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 29:11


Deze slopende Tour de France trekt ook haar wissel op de Kopgroep. Kopman Mart moest vandaag vanwege technische malheur afstappen maar Joost en Maxim trekken onverstoord verder.  De heren zijn onder de indruk van de overwinning van Hugo Houle en zijn bijzondere verhaal. Vorige week was hij monsieur 69 en vertelde Mart dat de broer van deze coureur jaren terug is doodgereden door een dronken chauffeur. Sindsdien was het zijn grote doel om een Touretappe voor zijn overleden broer Pierrik te winnen. Maxim gaf hem vorige week nog weinig kans op een etappe, maar Hugo Houle heeft echt iets heel speciaals gedaan door grote namens als Woods, Vlasov, Caruso Teuns achter zich te houden.  Verder was het een heel erg slechte dag voor Bardet, de kopman van team DSM. De Franse regie volgde zijn lijdensweg  nauwlettend. Joost denkt dat Mart zich hier vast en zeker over opgewonden had en trekt daarom een heel behoorlijke Mart-imitatie uit de kast. En Maxim heeft vannacht wakker gelegen. Niet alleen vanwege de hitte, maar ook omdat hij bleef twijfelen over de vraag wat voor etappe wij vandaag te zien krijgen. Wordt het een etappe voor de vluchters of gaan de klassementsmannen zelf voor winst? Hij twijfelt nog steeds over het antwoord, maar één ding weet hij wel: vandaag gaan we vuurwerk te zien krijgen.

Light After Trauma
Episode 103: Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD): End the Stigma with Alyssa Scolari, LPC

Light After Trauma

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 34:18


Borderline Personality Disorder, or BPD, is arguably the most misunderstood and widely stigmatized mental health disorder. Alyssa is here this week to set the record straight on what this disorder looks like, how it is related to trauma, and why we need to fight the stigma.  Check out the Light After Trauma website for transcripts, other episodes, Alyssa's guest appearances, and more at: www.lightaftertrauma.com Want to get more great content and interact with the show? Check us out on Instagram: @lightaftertrauma We need your help! We want to continue to make great content that can help countless trauma warriors on their journey to recovery. So, please help us in supporting the podcast by becoming a recurring patron of the show via Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/lightaftertrauma You can also check out Alyssa at www.alyssascolari.com Transcripts: Alyssa Scolari [00:23]: Hey everybody. Welcome back to another episode of The Light After Trauma podcast. I am your host, Alyssa Scolari. Alyssa Scolari [00:32]: Welcome back, settle in because we have another good episode for you today. I am trying to get settled in as well, trying to get ready to chat with you all about borderline personality disorder, but I hope that everybody is enjoying their summer. I feel like we're at that point in the summer where everything just flies by and make the most of it because I'm already hearing talk about fantasy football and I'm like, "Oh God already, please no." Now summer's not my favorite season by any stretch. I don't love the heat, but I'm also just not quite ready to talk about fall football and all things pumpkin spice flavored. I'm just not, I'm not ready for that at all. So just hold on to every second because summer is flying. Alyssa Scolari [01:34]: I feel like I've been working so much this summer and it's really just on a lot of like future things. I have a really exciting project that I am going to announce in just a few short weeks that we'll be launching in the fall. And then I've just been working on my website stuff and client stuff, and kind of mapping out the future of where I want my practice to go on the podcast. So I feel like it's just been a summer where I've been so busy, and when I'm not busy with work, I have been really busy with EMDR. As many of you know, I'm going through that process. And I know I've said in the past that it has been kicking my butt, but man, I mean it more than ever, I feel like I'm now really in the depths of it, of just going through my memories chronologically and reprocessing them. Alyssa Scolari [02:32]: And I think particularly the last week or so has been really, really difficult. My brain is, and this is what is to be expected, honestly, this just means that I'm doing it right. I mean, if you can do EMDR, right. But this is really what's been happening it feels like my brain is on fire and I'm hypersensitive to everything. So even more so than I was before, every noise, every sound, I'm almost overly reading people's emotions and their facial responses. And this is something that I used to do when I was little because I had a person in my life who was really hot and cold. I never knew what version of them that I was going to get. And so I find that I'm like that even more right now, as I'm reprocessing everything, Alyssa Scolari [03:28]: I'm looking at people like, who are you today? Are you safe today? Are you going to hurt me today? And none of that is even about the present, right? Because I don't have people in my life that are going to hurt me. So I'm really just kind of, not I'm disassociated, or maybe emotional flashbacks. And I'm also having a lot of new memories surface. In the car yesterday we were driving, something was said. And of course, what was said was harmless, but whatever, it did trigger something in me. And then I started having new memories and the memories were auditory. So I could hear things. And it was one of those just really bad PTSD episodes/attacks is what it feels like, where I'm just like, I almost want to put my hands over my ears to stop what I hear, but that's not going to work because the flashbacks are just, it's my brain. Alyssa Scolari [04:33]: And I found myself in EMDR this week while I was reprocessing a memory feeling so much dread because there's so much, I don't remember, but I know is in there. And I found myself almost feeling like, "Oh, this is a movie I don't want to watch." Almost like I was watching a horror movie. I hate horror movies and I will cover my eyes because I'm very scared of them. I have enough anxiety. I don't need a movie to give me more anxiety. So I will always put my hands over my face when I'm watching a horror movie. And this is what that felt like I wanted to just stop and I didn't want to see the rest of the movie. Alyssa Scolari [05:24]: But the movie is reality and there was just so much grief that came with it. And there was a lot of self-compassion, which I think is pretty new for me. I'm not used to having a lot of compassion. I'm used to intellectualizing things and I'm used to finding ways where I was at fault for what happened, but I'm just really developing a lot of compassion for myself. And it's been a beautiful, painful, agonizing thing. And it's also been exhausting. Alyssa Scolari [06:05]: So I'm definitely a little withdrawn. I'm a little isolated and it's really to protect myself. I don't even think it's a bad thing. I think that it's probably best right now if I don't have a ton of contact because I'm already so depleted from this process. So it's taking me a while to respond to people. And really all I want to do is read books because I get to escape that way and play really nontriggering video games and cook good food and do some really slow yoga. Alyssa Scolari [06:45]: That is kind of where I'm at. I'm at how can I do the bare minimum? And I think that's okay. I'm okay with that. I'm okay. I'm okay with that. You know, I say maybe I'm trying to convince myself I'm okay with it because I'm one of those over-functioners, so it is a little bit hard for me to be still in my grief, but I'm doing my best to just let it wash over me. And it is, and it's so random, right? Alyssa Scolari [07:16]: Sitting in the car yesterday, this was a completely separate incident. We're in the car. My husband runs into the store to grab something. I stay in the car and when he comes back in five minutes, I'm sobbing. I am hysterically crying and shaking. And he was like, "What is wrong?" And it was just like I got hit with this wave of grief. Alyssa Scolari [07:39]: And I have to say, I'm really proud of myself because I'm not running from it anymore. And normally I would run from it. I would pick up my phone and maybe go on social media to try to distract from feelings or turn on the radio. And, and I did for a second, I turned on the radio when I felt all those feelings creeping in. And I was like, "Nah, let me listen to music. I don't want to feel this." And then I was just like, "Alyssa, you don't have to run from this. It's not going to kill you." I actually said that out loud to myself and I just let the tears come and I sobbed and it moved through me and then I was able to manage the rest of the day. Alyssa Scolari [08:27]: So I'm hanging in there. This is, I think, one of the best things I've ever done for myself, as hard as it is I know it's exactly where I need to be right now. So I am so proud of myself for all of the work that I am doing. I'm just so proud. I'm really proud that's all I can say. I've worked so hard and it's going to make me a happier human being and it's going to make me an even better therapist and yeah, yeah. That's where I'm at. So that being said, we will close up the corner on my life updates and now let's just dive into what we're talking about today because we're talking about borderline personality disorder. Alyssa Scolari [09:16]: It's also often referred to as BPD, and maybe you have been diagnosed with this and if you haven't been diagnosed with it, then I'm sure you've heard of it because it's one of, well, I think it's the most highly stigmatized of the mental health disorders in existence to the point where a lot of therapists refuse to work with somebody if they even utter the words BPD or the acronym BPD or the words borderline personality disorder, not every therapist, but a lot of therapists. Alyssa Scolari [09:51]: And I can even recall so much stigmatization when I was learning about it, even as a grad school student. So the stigma is quite literally in the system, right? I was taught the stigma. I was taught to believe the stigma when I was a grad school student. And, I definitely had, again, not every professor. I had amazing professors where I went to school, but I did have one professor who I specifically remember was like, "You are going to really have a hard time ever having successful treatment with somebody who has this kind of disorder." And quite honestly, I know now that is not true. And I wish I could go back and tell that professor that they were just projecting their own frustrations. Perhaps they've been diagnosed with this disorder, or perhaps they worked with people in their practice who were diagnosed with this disorder and didn't have a good outcome, but I will continue to talk about that a little bit. Alyssa Scolari [10:53]: But first, you might notice the term personality disorder, right? And it's like, "What does that mean?" Because it's much more clear what anxiety disorders and depressive disorders are, but what does it mean to have a personality disorder? Basically, there are personality disorders, and then there's everything else. That's kind of how it's separated in the DSM, which is the book that has all of the mental health diagnoses. Alyssa Scolari [11:23]: What makes a personality disorder different is that this is thought to be like a lifelong long-term pattern of behaviors that cause distress and dysfunction. This person's behaviors deviate outside of the cultural norm and it's typically something that starts either in adolescence or very early adulthood. And it's kind of thought that personality disorders are much more difficult to treat because these patterns of behavior are much more inflexible. It's just deeply rooted in who somebody is. Alyssa Scolari [12:06]: So that is what kind of separates personality disorders versus mood disorders, anxiety disorders, what have you. Now borderline personality disorders specifically, because there are a few, right? Borderline's not the only one there's, narcissistic personality disorder, there's an obsessive-compulsive person of personality disorder, and OCD, basically obsessive-compulsive personality disorder, which this is just an interesting little fact is having OCD but not seeing a problem with the OCD and therefore not wanting to change. That is one of the biggest differences between somebody who has obsessive-compulsive personality disorder versus obsessive-compulsive disorder. So I find that very interesting and I don't know if I buy into that totally because I have people who technically meet the criteria for OCD or for obsessive-compulsive personality disorder, right? They have OCD tendencies but they don't really see a problem and don't want to fix it, but it's not really causing a whole lot of distress. Alyssa Scolari [13:23]: I don't know. I don't know. That's a topic for another time. We'll talk about it later. I have to give it some more thought, but going back to BPD. So BPD is basically characterized by having to meet at least five of the following requirements. So first we have chronic feelings of emptiness, and then there's emotional instability in the way that you react to regular day-to-day events, maybe having major episodes of sadness or rage or severe anxiety. Next is frantic efforts to avoid real or imagined abandonment. So you spend so much of your time trying to avoid feeling any feelings of possible abandonment, a disturbance in your identity or an unstable sense of self or an unstable self-image. Alyssa Scolari [14:26]: There's impulsive behavior in at least two areas that could be self-damaging. So this can include substance abuse, driving recklessly, binge eating, and having risky sex. I'm not, not just having sex, but, risky sex, maybe sex with multiple partners or having sex a lot with no protection. Spending lots of money. So if you're just living paycheck to paycheck, or maybe you're gathering a bunch of credit card debt, those kinds of impulsive behaviors. Alyssa Scolari [15:02]: Intense anger, anger that is so intense that it doesn't necessarily match the situation at hand or issues with controlling your anger, explosive anger, getting into fights a lot, whether physical or verbal. Having unstable interpersonal relationships. So unstable relationships with the people in your life. Difficulty keeping friendships. Difficulty with family members, difficulty with maintaining healthy relationships. Suicidal behavior, suicidal gestures, self-harming, threats, threats of suicide, and usually severe dissociative symptoms. So dissociation is a form of disconnection. It's a form of almost checking out mentally so that you don't have to be present. Alyssa Scolari [16:02]: Dissociation is typically a trauma response. And I know we talked about this a few episodes ago, how sometimes dissociation can be a healthy thing in very moderate amounts, but this is more like dissociative symptoms as a reaction to trauma, or as a reaction to something, some kind of intense situation. Alyssa Scolari [16:26]: Another thing that I think ties into all of that is folks who have borderline personality disorder will often engage in something called splitting. And basically what that means is you see the world in a very black and white manner. So it's things are kind of all or nothing. People are either amazing or they're absolutely horrible devils. An experience you had was either the best thing you've ever experienced in your entire life, or it was so bad it was absolutely the worst ever. And so there's really just no middle ground for people who experience borderline personality disorder. Alyssa Scolari [17:06]: So all of those symptoms that I just read off to you, right? You have to meet five of them in order to meet the criteria to be diagnosed with this disorder. Now, if you meet these criteria for two weeks, and then you no longer meet this criteria, you don't have borderline personality disorder. This is a pattern of behavior that stretches over a long period of time, if not lifelong. So in fact, borderline personality disorder and all of the personality disorders, you typically can't get diagnosed with one of them until you're about 18 years old because your personality is still developing. I kind of think that's a little bit of bullshit and I think that it should be at least 25 years old until you're diagnosed with a personality disorder because our brains haven't even fully developed until that age. So when you're diagnosing somebody at 18 years old with a personality disorder, know their brains aren't even fully developed. Alyssa Scolari [18:15]: So how do you know? How, how do you know, right? The criteria for BPD is, one of them is, impulsivity. Well, guess what? At 18 years old, your prefrontal cortex isn't fully developed and your prefrontal cortex is what governs impulsivity. It's what helps stop impulsivity. So I sort of feel like it's stupid, but what do I know? I'm just a low old therapist over here. But here is where I start to get really worked up about borderline personality disorder and it is because of the stigma. Alyssa Scolari [18:52]: You can Google this any day of the week and you will find several articles about how borderline personality disorder is one of the most stigmatized, misunderstood, mental health disorders in the profession. And it isn't just misunderstood among doctors and regular society. It is misunderstood by therapists and it is a diagnosis that is handed to people, very haphazardly by therapists and professionals who truly don't know much about this disorder at all. Alyssa Scolari [19:35]: And it infuriates me. And this has been my experience with BPD. So I'll talk a little bit about the stigma, just that I've experienced through my own journey of health. Alyssa Scolari [19:47]: So when I first started out in an eating disorder treatment center, I met with a psychiatrist. I met with him probably for 20 minutes, and it was my first time ever meeting with a psychiatrist. And he asked me a few things. And then he looked at me, he didn't make eye contact with me the entire time we were talking. And then at the end, he looked at me and he went, "You have borderline personality disorder and you need to be on this, this, and this medication. And do you have any questions?" Now I had no clue what he was talking about. I had loosely heard of the term, but I don't even think I was in grad school yet, or maybe I had just started grad school. So I really didn't know much at all. Alyssa Scolari [20:44]: So I kind of was labeled that. He didn't know me. He had no clue about my history of trauma. He was just like, "Oh, okay. This is what you have." And I didn't know then the stigma of that disorder. And honestly, I had just kind of forgotten about it. I hated where I went to treatment. So I just got through it. I kind of wrote the whole place off. Looking back at that now it infuriates me that somebody could talk to you for 20 minutes and give you a personality disorder. You have no clue what that person's patterns are, their behaviors. How could you diagnose somebody with that after 20 minutes? Alyssa Scolari [21:37]: But I do remember that there was one instance where I was with one of the employees who worked at this place and this person was talking about borderline personality disorder and this person said, very matter of fact, "There's no treatment for it. You can't get better. All you can really do is manage it. You'll have this forever. And it's really hard to ever have any kind of good relationships with this disorder." And she's just said it very flat. And so I remember thinking like, "Oh my God, if I really do have this, I'm going to be alone forever. I'm never going to be in a marriage. I'm never going to have friends. Holy crap, this is awful." And I kind of almost, not made it a self-fulfilling prophecy, because that didn't really happen for me. I was able to sort of see over time that was such a horrible thing and a very hurtful thing that she said, but it really brought me down. And it really made me question my future for a while. Alyssa Scolari [22:54]: So moving on, then eventually I graduate from treatment and I find a regular outpatient therapist and I am going to see her and I like her, and she's cool. And about a few months in, this therapist, I noticed, starts talking more about herself than me. And she talks about the other people that she sees and doesn't give me specifics but tells me way more than is actually appropriate. And she works with sex offenders and she's talking to me about them and how a lot of people can't do the work that she does. And then she goes, "But at least I don't have to work with the borderlines because as you'll see in grad school, they're a nightmare." And I was horrified that a therapist could say that about humans, absolutely horrified. First of all, the borderlines, like so nasty, just that language. It was awful. Alyssa Scolari [24:10]: So eventually I fell away from that therapist and I found myself with another therapist and this therapist and I had spoken extensively about the diagnosis of BPD. And this therapist had sort of like told me, "Yeah, I really don't see that in you. You really don't have any of that." And I was kind of like relieved because there was so much stigma that was surrounding this diagnosis, that it almost became this game of how can I not have this disorder as opposed to how can I fix my trauma? And so this therapist was like, "Yeah, you really don't have that." And one day I went in for my appointment and the person who was ahead of me, there was like a little waiting room, and the person who was ahead of me opened up the door, stormed out and slammed the door. Alyssa Scolari [25:17]: And my therapist at the time came out and pointed at that person and went, now that is a borderline, a borderline, first of all, like the level of inappropriateness, it makes my skin crawl. And then we kind of talked about it a little bit. And she was talking about how people who have borderline personality disorder are super treatment-resistant and they always fail in therapy. And they always drop out because they can't respect anybody's boundaries. And they're highly manipulative. And I really looked up to this therapist. So I'm just like, "Oh, oh, okay, I guess that's how people are then." So you can kind of see here this pattern, even from my own experiences, of hearing people talk about borderline, like they're the worst people on the face of the planet. First of all, they're people with borderline personality disorder, they're not borderlines. Alyssa Scolari [26:20]: And for people to talk about them like, "Oh, they never do well in treatment." It's such bullshit. And over time I had new therapists who really helped me see folks who have borderline personality disorder in a totally different light, right? I had different therapists. I had a supervisor, all of whom have been fantastic and who have truly helped me understand that this diagnosis is not something to be afraid of. Alyssa Scolari [26:56]: There are therapists that will outright reject people who have that diagnosis. Therapists will still talk about people with that diagnosis saying that they're impossible to treat. They are not impossible to treat. And as I've learned, I actually really enjoy working with people who have borderline personality disorder. People who have BPD are not fucking evil. And if you've ever been made to feel like you are, I am so sorry. And I am here to tell you that is fucked up and that is not about you. That is about your therapist's own projections of their own issues. If it was your therapist who said that, or who made you feel like that? Alyssa Scolari [27:43]: If you go back and you look at the diagnosis, the symptoms for BPD, so many of them, in fact, all of them can also be symptoms of complex trauma, hello. People who have BPD do not have issues with their brain. They have been fucking horribly traumatized. How can you expect somebody, right people, therapists love to say, "Ah, people with BPG they don't know any boundaries and they'll, they'll manipulate you all day." How could you expect somebody to know what boundaries look like if their whole childhood was full of their boundaries, being violated. If somebody comes into therapy and their whole lives, they've had to use manipulation as a tactic to get their needs met. Why would you think for two seconds that they won't try to manipulate you? Alyssa Scolari [28:49]: Manipulation in itself is not evil and we need to stop treating it like it is. People come to therapy with the same patterns and behaviors that they learned from their trauma. And if you want to call it a personality disorder, go right ahead. But I, for one, just feel like using that, almost just as "Hey, you're fucked up." Now don't get me wrong. For some people having this diagnosis is hugely validating. And for those folks, I'm like, "Yes, do it." If it's validating, then it's validating. And that's great. But for people who have battled with being diagnosed with this disorder over and over again and stigmatized as a result of it, if it doesn't feel like it fits you, it's okay to let that go. You don't have to say, "Oh, I have BPD, Oh I have BPD. This is going to be the rest of my life. I'm going to struggle for the rest of my life." No, you're fucking not. No, you're fucking not. Alyssa Scolari [29:55]: It infuriates me, as you can tell, because I have worked with people with BPD and I have watched them recover to the point where they don't meet the criteria for that disorder anymore. BPD is a result so often of complex trauma. And if we start treating the trauma, right, there's a treatment for borderline personality disorder. It's called DBT or Dialectical Behavioral Therapy. And it's really something that was created for people with borderline personality disorder. And it's great. It teaches so many wonderful skills. If we use that and we treat the trauma that is underneath it, I have seen people that no longer meet the criteria for that diagnosis. And more importantly, I have seen people that are successful and live happy and healthy lives, and they can be self-harm free and they no longer feel suicidal. And they are in functioning relationships. It doesn't mean all their problems have gone away. Absolutely not, but it can happen. Alyssa Scolari [31:08]: There is so much hope if you have BPD. And again, if you've ever been made to feel like your mental health is hopeless because of this diagnosis. I'm so sorry. And that is part of why I wanted to talk about this today is because I wanted to fight the stigma because this stigma, I've experienced the stigma firsthand, I've been thrown out that diagnosis. And what I know now about myself is no, I don't have BPD. I have trauma. I have a crap load of complex trauma that I have been working through. And I have gotten to a place where it's just like, yeah, no. For me, that diagnosis felt more harmful than validating and I think that's because I'm so acutely aware of the stigma. Alyssa Scolari [32:04]: Now, again, if this is something that feels good for you, if it helps you to have this diagnosis, please don't let me talk you out of that. Because despite the stigma that I'm talking about for every bad therapist out there, there are a million great therapists who would never stigmatize people. And there are a million people out there who have this diagnosis and have found it super validating and helpful. Alyssa Scolari [32:34]: But I've also talked with plenty of people who have had this diagnosis used against them, haphazardly given to them. I've had 10-year-olds that have come to me and told me that previous therapists have given them a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder. Their parents come to me in disarray, frantic about what this is going to mean for the future of their child. And it's just not like that. There is hope. There is hope. No matter how you feel about the diagnosis, there is, there is hope. And that's my message today. You have hope. I believe in you. I know you can do it. I love you. And I am holding you in the light. Alyssa Scolari [33:19]: Thanks for listening everyone. For more information, please head over to lightaftertrauma.com or you can also follow us on social media. On Instagram we are @lightaftertrauma and on Twitter it is @lightafterpod. Alyssa Scolari [33:36]: Lastly, please head over to patreon.com/lightaftertrauma to support our show. We are asking for $5 a month, which is the equivalent to a cup of coffee at Starbucks. So please head on over again. That's patreon.com/lightaftertrauma. Thank you. And we appreciate your support.

Asinine Radio
Dane and the Death Machine - DSM-5 or Vices & Devices

Asinine Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 207:21


We have Dane from Dane and the Death Machine on to get into his new album DSM-5 or Vices & Devices. This one was a lot of fun. Check below for links to his new album, and spread the good word. Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/album/3BrpaHZPVVclBGbKLde48I?si=GKPsg9fOQbOqSxA6qXkpdQ Apple Music: https://music.apple.com/us/album/dsm-5-or-vices-devices/1624761088 Don't forget to rate, review and subscribe on iTunes. Leave a comment on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter or AsinineRadio.com. Email us at AsinineRadio@gmail.com. We're even on Spotify! Apple Podcasts: podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/asin…io/id1130289553 Spotify: open.spotify.com/show/60pYwZVJoOm2NvmmQHcks7 Twitter: www.twitter.com/AsinineRadio Instagram: www.Instagram.com/asinineradio/ Facebook: www.facebook.com/asinineradio/

Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Psychiatric Outcomes, Functioning, and Participation in Extremely Low Gestational Age Newborns at Age 15 Years: JAACAP July 2022

Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 22:18


JAACAP July 2022: Contributing Editor Dr. Desiree Shapiro interviews Dr. Jean A. Frazier on evaluating the prevalence, co-occurrence, sex differences, and functional correlates of DSM-5 psychiatric disorders in 15-year-old adolescents born extremely preterm.

Therapy4Dads
Postpartum Depression and Men (feat. Pierre @braver.man)

Therapy4Dads

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 58:46


In EPISODE 42 I am joined by Dr. Pierre Azzam; he is a psychiatrist turned professional coach and founder of Braver Man (@braver.man), which is a platform for coaching men at times of big life change, and for building awareness of topics related to men's personal development and mental health.  Our conversation focuses masculine traits and how those can be a barrier in seeking help around mental health issues, how not just women but men can also experience PPD (Postpartum depression), and how our diagnostic criteria, namely the DSM 5, needs a massive overhaul, and finally some ideas around change.SUPPORT THE SHOW:CLICK HERE: BuyMeACoffee/Therapy4DadsJoin Mailing List & Get Involved!CLICK HERE: MAILING LISTSupport and follow Pierre:Instagram: @braver.manConnect and Support Travis:YouTube: Travis GoodmanCheck out the Website: Therapy4Dads.comInstagram: @Therapy4Dads

Choice Mapping Makes You Mentally STRONGer
ANXIETY - What if it's Medical or Substance Induced? Demystifying the DSM with Dr. B

Choice Mapping Makes You Mentally STRONGer

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 6:00


Continuing our series on Demystifying the DSM in the anxiety category. What happens if the anxiety is medical, or substance induced?  Listen to learn more. --Dr. Cristi Bundukamara, Ed.D, PMHNP-BC --- A Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner and a Doctor of Healthcare Education has experienced unimaginable trials that have caused many feelings such as depression, anxiety, anger, & overwhelming stress. However, she has developed a new pathway to becoming Mentally Strong & Choosing to be Happy.  With purpose, Dr. B has developed the phases that were refined within the Mentally STRONG Method that she created and wants to share with you.https://www.facebook.com/Mentallystronginchttps://www.mentallystrong.com@drcristi_bhttps://www.youtube.com/c/drbmentallystronghttps://www.linkedin.com/company/mentallystrong

Pulling The Thread with Elise Loehnen
The Map of Loss (Mary-Frances O'Connor, PhD)

Pulling The Thread with Elise Loehnen

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 46:43 Very Popular


“I think I find great comfort in this idea that when you form that bond, when you fall in love, your neurons are actually changed the way that the electrical firing patterns happen in your brain, the way that proteins are folded are changed because of this one and only person that you have spent time with. And from that perspective, when my dad died, he is still here literally right in my physical brain. He's physically in my brain. Now. That's not, I mean, that's data on the one hand, but I also find it comforting on the other hand that he is still with me. And because it's with the brain that I perceive the whole world, he's also in a sense with me as I experience everything.” So says neuroscientist and professor Mary-Frances O'Connor, author of THE GRIEVING BRAIN. In her work, O'Connor studies the ways in which grief, loss, and bereavement imprint on the way we process the world—unable to physically map and locate the person who is now missing from our interpersonal landscapes, we must find new ways to navigate our lives, working around holes that feel, quite frankly, unbridgeable. I loved our conversation, because we explored both science and faith, as well as the enduring reality of grief: Those who have experienced loss understand that grief never goes away, even when you move past the stage of unrelenting grieving. We also talked about the new DSM-5 diagnosis of prolonged grief disorder, the pitfalls of rumination, and the essential nature of patience—both for ourselves and each other. At a time in our culture where we're coping with massive loss—from the personal, to the cultural, to the environmental, O'Connor's framework and language feels critical for understanding where we're at. Particularly, as she points out, because the oscillations of grief work—moving from pain and anguish to moments of laughter and joy—is actually the framework for true mental health. Mental health is not maintaining happiness as status quo, she notes, it's the flexibility to move through all emotions, including the most difficult ones. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Minnesota Matters
MN Matters 07-08-22

Minnesota Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 27:59


This week: New bonuses for post-9/11 Vets, new DSM grief diagnosis, STDs up sharply in MN, everything Ag!

The Off The Dome Podcast
Episode 25 ”Qaurter Century”

The Off The Dome Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 124:23


Yerrr! On this week's episode of the Off The Dome Podcast, it's hard not being outside!  As per usual, the weekly segments such as Pickups, Sleeper Hats of the Week, "What's Your Fit???", and "Look into the Past" get covered. OUR PIN IS COMING In Sneakers & Streetwear: Denim Tears is releasing an exclusive T-shirt in honor of the 4th of July Tremaine Emory and Denim Tears are releasing a rhinestone capsule exclusively at Dover Street Market. The capsule will release at DSM stores and websites globally. The “Dark Iris” Air Jordan 3 will release on August 24th, 2022 for $200 USD Stüssy and Cactus Plant Flea Market are collaborating once again on a capsule collection including clothing and accessories such as water bottles. Belts, hoodies, shorts, and tees. The Stüssy and CPFM collection released on July 2nd, 2022 worldwide.  In Fitteds and Pins: 4UCaps's Glizzy Fitteds are the worst of the week  The “Heroes Pack” Cleveland Indians fitted was the PANIC! Hat of the Week ECap City's latest six releases all come in as the Sleepers of the Week. The fitteds included come from the following teams The Arizona Diamondbacks The Baltimore Orioles The Houston Astros The Pittsburgh Pirates The Philadelphia Phillies The Texas Rangers We've got some Green Eggs and Ham 2.0's to show you! Hat Club has got some variety pack HEAT coming. Crown Legends has a Cape Cod inspired pack coming ProImage has some white dome fitteds on the way Pins of the Week come from Caps ‘n Curls Mizduck Pin Eddie Respect New Pvtchwork coming soon! Follow the “Off The Dome Podcast” on Instagram!!! Follow Yesus on Instagram!!! Follow Jelani on Instagram!!!      

The Fox and the Phoenix
096 - Kinky Boots

The Fox and the Phoenix

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 60:24


In this episode, Julie brings a juicy and scandalous topic to the podcast table, asking Savannah what the difference is between crossdressing as a kink versus as a way of life. After a great diatribe about snoring and a shared love for music--and Savannah's explanation of how DSM-5 defines transvestic disorder--Julie and Savannah get into the nitty gritty of how sensuality is not just a component of the kink scenes but also a normal part of tapping into the divine feminine spirit as a human being. While we can point at others and say that what they are doing must be a kink, unless we have had a conversation or "walked a mile in their shoes", it is only our specific narrow and uninformed moral viewpoints that tell us something is a kink or not. ------ SAVANNAH HAUK is the author of “Living with Crossdressing: Defining a New Normal” and “Living with Crossdressing: Discovering your True Identity“. While both focus on the male-to-female (mtf) crossdresser, “Defining a New Normal” delves into crossdressing and relationships and “Discovering Your True Identity” looks at the individual crossdressing journey. Her latest achievements are two TEDx Talks, one entitled "Demystifying the Crossdressing Experience" and the other "13 Milliseconds: First Impressions of Gender Expression". Savannah is a male-to-female dual-gender crossdresser who is visible in the Upstate of South Carolina, active in local groups and advocating as a public speaker at LGBTQ+ conferences and workshops across the United States. At the moment, Savannah is working on more books, blogs, and projects focused on letting every crossdresser–young and mature–find their own confidence, expression, identity and voice. IG @savannahhauk | FB @savannahhauk | FB @livingwithcrossdressing | web @livingwithcrossdressing.com ------ JULIE RUBENSTEIN is a dedicated ally to transgender community and the certified image consultant and co-owner of Fox and Hanger. F&H is a unique service for transgender women and male-to-female crossdressers that creates customized virtual fashion and style “lookbooks”. Julie intuitively connects with each client to find them appropriate clothes, makeup, hair, and shape wear all in alignment with their budget, body type, authentic style and unique personality. Julie also provides enfemme coaching and wardrobe support. Julie has made it her life's work to help MTF individuals feel safe and confident when it comes to their female persona, expression and identity. IG @Juliemtfstyle | FB @foxandhanger | web @FoxandHanger.com

Wellness While Walking
129. Being Our Own Advocate: We Can't Take a Backseat in Our Wellness Care, with Sarah Fay

Wellness While Walking

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 34:24


Sarah Fay and I wrap up our conversation about her mental health misdiagnoses, and what's happened since her book, Pathological: The True Story of Six Diagnoses, was published. I'll then share a story of my questionable medical diagnosis. If you've totally relinquished the reins of your care, or you feel uncomfortable asserting yourself or asking numerous questions as it pertains to your mental or physical health, please listen in. The topic is heavy, but we have a lot of fun as well!   LET'S TALK THE WALK! Wellness While Walking Facebook page Wellness While Walking on Instagram Wellness While Walking on Twitter Wellness While Walking website for show notes and other information Coach Carolyn on Clubhouse: @stepstowellness wellnesswhilewalking@gmail.com   RESOURCES AND SOURCES (some links may be affiliate links) SARAH FAY, PhD. Pathological: The True Story of Six Misdiagnoses, Sarah Fay Pathological, The Movement (non-profit organization for public awareness and information) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, DMT-5-TR ICD-11 – WHO Website Link(NOTE: Increasingly, non-US countries are relying on the DSM) The Book of Woe: The DSM and the Unmaking of Psychiatry, Gary Greenberg Saving Normal: An Insider's Revolt Against Out-of-Control Psychiatric Diagnosis, DSM-5, Big Pharma and the Medicalization of Normal Life, Allen Frances If you need suicide or mental health-related crisis support, or are worried about someone else, please call or text 1-800-273-8255 or visit the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline's chat to connect with a trained crisis counselor. OTHER RESOURCES Heart Transplant Patient/Care Team Miscommunication Amy Silverstein's Story on Voices in Bioethics Podcast Sick Girl, Amy Silverstein My Glory Was I Had Such Friends, Amy Silverstein Stew Leonards - The Customer is Always Right   HOW TO SHARE WELLNESS WHILE WALKING Wellness While Walking on Apple  Wellness While Walking on Spotify Link for any podcast app: pod.link/walking Wellness While Walking website Or screenshot a favorite episode playing on your phone and share to social media or to a friend via text or email! Thanks for sharing! : )       DISCLAIMER Neither I nor many of my podcast guests are doctors or healthcare professionals of any kind, and nothing on this podcast or associated content should be considered medical advice. The information provided by Wellness While Walking Podcast and associated material, by Whole Life Workshop and by Bermuda Road Wellness LLC is for informational and entertainment purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment, and before undertaking a new health care regimen, including walking.     Thanks for listening to Wellness While Walking, a walking podcast and a "best podcast for walking"!  

Say The Things
066: Let Me Clear My Throat: Stop Labeling Everything

Say The Things

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 10:34


Not every behavior needs a diagnosis or title from the DSM-5. I see and hear people calling every selfish person a narcissist.  Join me today as I discuss a few differences between selfish, self-centered, self-absorbed and narcissists.   Episode links and resources: https://www.instagram.com/nicolehagman_writes/ “There's a reason narcissist don't learn from mistakes and that's because they never get past the first step which is admitting that they made one.”  Jeffrey Kluger

探索大腦的會談地圖
神經內科醫師需要的精神醫學訓練(JAMA Neurol. 2022;79(2):113-114.)

探索大腦的會談地圖

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 21:17


《美國醫學會神經學期刊》(JAMA Neurology)的短文介紹美國的神經內科醫師訓練過程中,必須要有1個月的時間全職到精神科外訓;而精神科醫師的訓練過程中,也有2個月的神經內科訓練。台灣住院醫師訓練也是類似的時程。 神經內科醫師來到精神科的短短一個月中,哪些是可以優先學習的重點呢?這篇短文提到了一個可能是全世界的醫院外訓都常見的現象 — 不要把外訓醫師作為人力考量,是外訓能夠有好的學習環境最重要的一項條件。例如這篇論文認為神經內科醫師的精神醫學訓練中,門診可能是比照顧住院病患還要更重要的環節,如果在病房人力不足的情況下,這項門診的學習很可能就會因此被犧牲了。 更多的內容,歡迎參考本集的podcast!

Wellness While Walking
128. Something We Need to Know About Mental Health with Sarah Fay, author of Pathological: The True Story of Six Misdiagnoses

Wellness While Walking

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 33:35


Sarah Fay, author of Pathological: The True Story of Six Misdiagnoses, shares with us her decades-long struggle with mental health, which started with her diagnosis of anorexia nervosa as a teen. With age, her list of diagnoses grew. Sarah shares with us what she experienced – her memoir of these years – and what she learned in her assumed role as an investigative journalist about the system that at least partially failed her. With mental illness diagnoses on the rise, this is a story we all need to hear.   LET'S TALK THE WALK! Wellness While Walking Facebook page Wellness While Walking on Instagram Wellness While Walking on Twitter Wellness While Walking website for show notes and other information Coach Carolyn on Clubhouse: @stepstowellness wellnesswhilewalking@gmail.com   RESOURCES AND SOURCES (some links may be affiliate links) SARAH FAY, PhD. Pathological: The True Story of Six Misdiagnoses, Sarah Fay Pathological, The Movement (non-profit organization for public awareness and information) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, DMT-5-TR ICD-11 – WHO Website Link(NOTE: Increasingly, non-US countries are relying on the DSM) The Book of Woe: The DSM and the Unmaking of Psychiatry, Gary Greenberg Saving Normal: An Insider's Revolt Against Out-of-Control Psychiatric Diagnosis, DSM-5, Big Pharma and the Medicalization of Normal Life, Allen Frances OTHER RESOURCES Heart Transplant Patient/Care Team Miscommunication Amy Silverstein's Story on Voices in Bioethics Podcast Sick Girl, Amy Silverstein My Glory Was I Had Such Friends, Amy Silverstein Stew Leonards - The Customer is Always Right   HOW TO SHARE WELLNESS WHILE WALKING Wellness While Walking on Apple  Wellness While Walking on Spotify Link for any podcast app: pod.link/walking Wellness While Walking website Or screenshot a favorite episode playing on your phone and share to social media or to a friend via text or email! Thanks for sharing! : )       DISCLAIMER Neither I nor many of my podcast guests are doctors or healthcare professionals of any kind, and nothing on this podcast or associated content should be considered medical advice. The information provided by Wellness While Walking Podcast and associated material, by Whole Life Workshop and by Bermuda Road Wellness LLC is for informational and entertainment purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment, and before undertaking a new health care regimen, including walking.     Thanks for listening to Wellness While Walking, a walking podcast and a "best podcast for walking"!          

Passion Struck with John R. Miles
Katy Milkman on Creating Lasting Behavior Change for Good EP 155

Passion Struck with John R. Miles

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 59:32


Katy Milkman - Creating Lasting Behavior Change for Good.  | Brought to you by AppSumo and Gusto. The first 100 people to click https://social.appsumo.com/passion will get 10% off of their first purchase with AppSumo! Gusto is offering our listeners three months free https://www.gusto.com/passionstruck.  Dr. Katy Milkman is the James G. Dinan Endowed Chair at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, host of Charles Schwab's popular behavioral economics podcast Choiceology, and the former president of the International Society for Judgment and Decision Making. She is also the co-founder and co-director of the Behavior Change for Good Initiative, a research center with the mission of advancing the science of lasting behavior change. Her bestselling book How to Change: The Science of Getting From Where You Are to Where You Want to Be was named one of the eight best books for healthy living in 2021 by the New York Times, and Katy was also named one of the world's top 50 Management thinkers by Thinkers50 in 2021. --► Buy Katy's Book How to Change: https://amzn.to/3bpqSb3  --► Get the full show notes: https://passionstruck.com/katy-milkman-behavior-change-for-good/  --► Subscribe to My Channel Here: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnRMiles --► Subscribe to the podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/passion-struck-with-john-r-miles/id1553279283 *Our Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/passionstruck. Thank You Gusto for Sponsoring. This episode of Passion Struck with John R. Miles is brought to you by Gusto. Gusto offers all-in-one payroll and HR for growing businesses. From full-service payroll and benefits to team management tools and more, Gusto makes it easy to support your hardworking team in one intuitive platform. Gusto is offering our listeners three months free https://www.gusto.com/passionstruck. Thank you AppSumo for Sponsoring. This episode is also sponsored by AppSumo. Over 1 million entrepreneurs and creators trust AppSumo to help them discover, buy, and sell the products they need to grow their business and audience. As a special bonus, AppSumo is giving 10% off the already discounted price to the first 100 people who click the link in the show notes: https://social.appsumo.com/passion.   What I discuss with Katy Milkman In this episode of the Passion Struck Podcast Katy Milkman joins us to discuss how she is advancing the science of behavior change to understand which strategies work best overall, what works best for whom, and how to most effectively use behavioral science to help people transform their lives for the better.  We go into why she created the largest interdisciplinary effort in history to solve the problem of enduring behavior change. 0:00 Announcements 2:36 Introducing Katy Milkman 4:47 Better Change for Good Initiative 11:35 Using a megastudy approach 12:21 Importance of intentionality in behavior change 14:54 How to master behavior change 23:09 We think we will change far less than we actually do 26:55 The micro-choices determine our lives 29:34 Internal barriers to change 35:20 Fresh start effect 42:43 The psychology of persuasion 44:34 Effortless perfection 50:02 How we live matches our goals 54:43 Why we chose immediate gratification 57:09 Wrap-Up and Synthesis Where you can find Katy Milkman: * Website: https://www.katymilkman.com/ * Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/katymilkman/ * Choiceology Podcast: https://www.katymilkman.com/podcast  * Twitter: https://twitter.com/katy_milkman * LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/katy-milkman/ * Behavior Change for Good Initiative: https://bcfg.wharton.upenn.edu/  Links from the show * My interview with David Yaden on self-transcendence, psychedelics, and behavior change: https://passionstruck.com/david-yaden-on-self-transcendence-experiences/  * My solo episode on why you must feel to heal: https://passionstruck.com/why-you-must-feel-to-find-emotional-healing/ * My interview with Cathy Heller: https://passionstruck.com/cathy-heller-how-do-you-find-your-lifes-passion/ * My interview with Michael Slepian:  https://passionstruck.com/michael-slepian-the-secret-life-of-secrets/ * My interview with Jordan Harbinger on Why Legacy is Greater Than Currency:  https://passionstruck.com/jordan-harbinger-on-why-building-your-legacy-is-greater-than-currency/ * My interview with Sarah Fay on the fallacies of the DSM: https://passionstruck.com/sarah-fay-pathological/  -- Welcome to Passion Struck podcast, a show where you get to join me in exploring the mindset and philosophy of the world's most inspiring everyday heroes to learn their lessons to living intentionally. Passion Struck aspires to speak to the humanity of people in a way that makes them want to live better, be better and impact. Learn more about me: https://johnrmiles.com. Stay tuned for my latest project, my upcoming book, which will be published in summer 2022. ===== FOLLOW JOHN ON THE SOCIALS ===== * Twitter: https://twitter.com/Milesjohnr * Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/johnrmiles.c0m * Medium: https://medium.com/@JohnRMiles​ * Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/john_r_miles * LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/milesjohn/ * Blog: https://johnrmiles.com/blog/ * Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/passion_struck_podcast * Gear: https://www.zazzle.com/store/passion_sruck_podcast

Drama-Free Healthy Living With Jess Cording
Episode 142: A Conversation with Author and Mental Health Advocate Sarah Fay

Drama-Free Healthy Living With Jess Cording

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 43:17


In this podcast episode I chat with the inspiring advocate and author, Sarah Fay to discuss her amazing book, Pathological: The True Story of Six Misdiagnoses- a must-read about mental health. It is not only a manifesto on the issues with our national healthcare system, but also exposes the faults of supposed “strategic” documents like the DSM and other traditional avenues for mental health diagnoses.    In addition to discussing the patient experience, in this conversation, Sarah also discusses what is necessary to evolve the discussion on mental health and health as a whole. You will also get guidance on how you can best discuss mental health with your medical provider and what you can do to be your own medical advocate.  She also will give you tips on being your own medical provider with some daily check-in's you can do yourself. This is a really important conversation I hope you'll tune into.    Order Pathological on Amazon Pathological, the Movement: https://www.pathological.us     To support The Drama-Free Healthy Living podcast, share with family, friends, and colleagues.   If you like what you hear, leave a 5-star review on apple podcasts HERE.  Host: https://www.instagram.com/jesscording/

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy
What is Parental Alienation and How Can Therapists Successfully Treat it?

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 73:43


What is Parental Alienation and How Can Therapists Successfully Treat it? Curt and Katie chat about a controversial topic: Parental Alienation. We look at what parental alienation is, the controversies and complexities surrounding this process, how to assess for parental alienation, and how to effectively treat the family system. We talk about how traditional therapy methods are inadequate and potentially harmful in these cases and what to do instead.  This is a continuing education podcourse. Transcripts for this episode will be available at mtsgpodcast.com! In this podcast episode we explore Parental Alienation We both have worked with families that   What is Parental Alienation? The impact a parent/guardian has over how a child interacts with another parent/guardian Complex dynamic within a family where conflict is present Breakdown of relationship based on behavior of alienating parent toward targeted parent The Four Factor Model from Baker (2020) How do you assess for Parental Alienation? Challenges with correctly identifying this process/dynamic Controversies and lack of recognition of Parental Alienation as a separate diagnosis from Parent-Child Relational Problem Identifying what Parental Alienation is not Clues that stories from kids are manufactured versus authentic stories of child abuse The need for access to the full family system to obtain sufficient information Exploring: What is alienating behavior? How does it work? Effective Case Conceptualization and Treatment for Parental Alienation “Research actually shows [for parental alienation] that only working with one part of the system and in a very isolated way, can sometimes create more harm in the system.” – Curt Widhalm, LMFT The importance of a family systems approach Involvement of government systems Uncovering the generational or individual trauma for all members of the system How to engage the tools available to advocate for important treatment elements to be in place The importance of understanding scope and how to write recommendations to court Preventing therapist shopping and treatment avoidance Harmful recommendations that can hinder progress within these systems “Don't be alone with these cases. Don't keep your observations to yourself – I think whether it's with a treatment team or your own consultation or your own therapy - these things can bring so much up in therapists because of their own stories, their own history and the just the intensity of what's happening in these systems.” – Katie Vernoy, LMFT Treatment teaming and avoiding isolation Educating about Parental Alienation Supporting the targeted parent to improve the relationship with the child Working with alienating parent to prepare for improvement in child's relationship with targeted parenting Co-parenting and conflict resolution Therapist communication with all members of the system   Our Generous Sponsors for this episode of the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide: GreenOak Accounting  At GreenOak Accounting, they believe that every private practice should be profitable. They've worked with hundreds of practice owners across the country to have the financial confidence and information to make data-driven decisions. We want our client's businesses to be profitable so they can focus on fulfilling their mission. GreenOak Accounting specializes in working with therapists in private practice, and they have helped hundreds of therapists across the country reach their financial goals. They offer a number of monthly packages to fit a growing practice's needs - from bookkeeping to CFO services. Other specialized services include Profit First Support, compensation planning, and customized KPI Dashboards. They help therapists achieve their clinical goals by making sure they have a profitable practice, and offer unsurpassed support along the way. If you're interested in scheduling a complimentary consultation, please visit their website at www.GreenOakAccounting.com/consultation to learn more. Thrizer Thrizer is a new modern billing platform for therapists that was built on the belief that therapy should be accessible AND clinicians should earn what they are worth. Their platform automatically gets clients reimbursed by their insurance after every session. Just by billing your clients through Thrizer, you can potentially save them hundreds every month, with no extra work on your end. Every time you bill a client through Thrizer, an insurance claim is automatically generated and sent directly to the client's insurance. From there, Thrizer provides concierge support to ensure clients get their reimbursement quickly, directly into their bank account. By eliminating reimbursement by check, confusion around benefits, and obscurity with reimbursement status, they allow your clients to focus on what actually matters rather than worrying about their money. It is very quick to get set up and it works great in completement with EHR systems. Their team is super helpful and responsive, and the founder is actually a long-time therapy client who grew frustrated with his reimbursement times The best part is you don't need to give up your rate. They charge a standard 3% payment processing fee! Thrizer lets you become more accessible while remaining in complete control of your practice. A better experience for your clients during therapy means higher retention. Money won't be the reason they quit on therapy. Sign up using bit.ly/moderntherapists if you want to test Thrizer completely risk free! Sign up for Thrizer with code 'moderntherapists' for 1 month of no credit card fees or payment processing fees! That's right - you will get one month of no payment processing fees, meaning you earn 100% of your cash rate during that time. Receive Continuing Education for this Episode of the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide Hey modern therapists, we're so excited to offer the opportunity for 1 unit of continuing education for this podcast episode – Therapy Reimagined is bringing you the Modern Therapist Learning Community!  Once you've listened to this episode, to get CE credit you just need to go to moderntherapistcommunity.com/podcourse, register for your free profile, purchase this course, pass the post-test, and complete the evaluation! Once that's all completed - you'll get a CE certificate in your profile or you can download it for your records. For our current list of CE approvals, check out moderntherapistcommunity.com. You can find this full course (including handouts and resources) here: https://moderntherapistcommunity.com/podcourse/ Continuing Education Approvals: When we are airing this podcast episode, we have the following CE approval. Please check back as we add other approval bodies: Continuing Education Information CAMFT CEPA: Therapy Reimagined is approved by the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists to sponsor continuing education for LMFTs, LPCCs, LCSWs, and LEPs (CAMFT CEPA provider #132270). Therapy Reimagined maintains responsibility for this program and its content. Courses meet the qualifications for the listed hours of continuing education credit for LMFTs, LCSWs, LPCCs, and/or LEPs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences. We are working on additional provider approvals, but solely are able to provide CAMFT CEs at this time. Please check with your licensing body to ensure that they will accept this as an equivalent learning credit. Resources for Modern Therapists mentioned in this Podcast Episode: We've pulled together resources mentioned in this episode and put together some handy-dandy links. Please note that some of the links below may be affiliate links, so if you purchase after clicking below, we may get a little bit of cash in our pockets. We thank you in advance! References mentioned in this continuing education podcast: Baker, A. J. (2010). Adult children of parental alienation syndrome: Breaking the ties that bind. WW Norton & Company. Baker, A. (2020). Reliability and validity of the four‐factor model of parental alienation. Journal of family therapy, 42(1), 100-118. Garber, B. D. (2011). Parental alienation and the dynamics of the enmeshed parent–child dyad: Adultification, parentification, and infantilization. Family Court Review, 49(2), 322-335. Templer, K., Matthewson, M., Haines, J., & Cox, G. (2017). Recommendations for best practice in response to parental alienation: Findings from a systematic review. Journal of Family Therapy, 39(1), 103-122. *The full reference list can be found in the course on our learning platform.   Relevant Episodes of MTSG Podcast: What's New in the DSM-5-TR? An interview with Dr. Michael B First The Risks and Consequences of Failing to Report Child Abuse CYA for Court: An interview with Nicol Stolar-Peterson, LCSW   Who we are: Curt Widhalm, LMFT Curt Widhalm is in private practice in the Los Angeles area. He is the cofounder of the Therapy Reimagined conference, an Adjunct Professor at Pepperdine University and CSUN, a former Subject Matter Expert for the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, former CFO of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, and a loving husband and father. He is 1/2 great person, 1/2 provocateur, and 1/2 geek, in that order. He dabbles in the dark art of making "dad jokes" and usually has a half-empty cup of coffee somewhere nearby. Learn more at: www.curtwidhalm.com Katie Vernoy, LMFT Katie Vernoy is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, coach, and consultant supporting leaders, visionaries, executives, and helping professionals to create sustainable careers. Katie, with Curt, has developed workshops and a conference, Therapy Reimagined, to support therapists navigating through the modern challenges of this profession. Katie is also a former President of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists. In her spare time, Katie is secretly siphoning off Curt's youthful energy, so that she can take over the world. Learn more at: www.katievernoy.com A Quick Note: Our opinions are our own. We are only speaking for ourselves – except when we speak for each other, or over each other. We're working on it. Our guests are also only speaking for themselves and have their own opinions. We aren't trying to take their voice, and no one speaks for us either. Mostly because they don't want to, but hey. Stay in Touch with Curt, Katie, and the whole Therapy Reimagined #TherapyMovement: Patreon Buy Me A Coffee Podcast Homepage Therapy Reimagined Homepage Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube   Consultation services with Curt Widhalm or Katie Vernoy: The Fifty-Minute Hour Connect with the Modern Therapist Community: Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapists Group Modern Therapist's Survival Guide Creative Credits: Voice Over by DW McCann https://www.facebook.com/McCannDW/ Music by Crystal Grooms Mangano https://groomsymusic.com/

Gender: A Wider Lens Podcast
75 - Borderline Personality: Distorted Attempts to Integrate - A Conversation w/ Lisa Duval

Gender: A Wider Lens Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 69:23 Very Popular


Lisa Duval is a licensed clinical psychologist who has worked with children, teens, and families for over 30 years. She is also the mother of a "fiercely gender questioning" 18 year-old daughter, who has been male-identified for the last 5 years. She works with ROGD teens in an exploratory, empowering, feminist, and body positive way, affirming their beatiful, complicated selves but not simply their trans identities.      We start with Lisa describing the old DSM multi-axial system, which was actually discarded in the current version, version 5. In Axis 2 we had cognitive and personality disorders, including borderline personality disorder. Listeners often ask me and Stella about potential links between borderline personality constellations and gender issues, so we were really excited to speak with Lisa about this. For starters, Lisa shares why borderline personality disorder should rarely ever be diagnosed in teens, though sometimes you might hear psychiatrists say a child has some “borderline traits”. We delve into how common, and almost quintessential, these traits are as a part of normal adolescent development.     Lisa then explains a fascinating theory: not only are kids with these traits perhaps more vulnerable to ROGD, but also that aspects of gender identity ideology iatrogenically create borderline dynamics in dysphoric kids. In other words, gender ideology and a dogmatic affirmation approach could be causing and exacerbating these borderline traits. We also have a chance to explore the overlap between expressions of Autism and Borderline, and Lisa comments on a previous discussion we had about this with Dr Susan Bradley in EP 65. At the end of the episode, Lisa shares a really interesting way she that and her clients have been able to circumvent the issue of picking a new cross-sex name while exploring gender identity. 

Passion Struck with John R. Miles
Erin Diehl on Why Every Day of Our Lives Is an Improv Scene EP 153

Passion Struck with John R. Miles

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 62:36


Erin Diehl - Why every day of our lives is an improv scene. Brought to you by Zocdoc. Go to https://www.zocdoc.com/passionstruck and download the Zocdoc app for FREE. Then start your search for a top-rated doctor today. Erin “Big” Diehl is a Business Improv Edutainer, Failfluencer, and Professional Zoombie. Through a series of unrelated dares, Erin created improve it!, a unique professional development company that pushes others to laugh, learn, play, and grow.  Erin is a graduate of Clemson University, and a former experiential marketing and recruiting professional as well as a veteran improviser. She is the proud host of The improve it! Podcast, which helps develop leaders and teams through play, improv, and experiential learning. -► Get the full show notes here: https://passionstruck.com/erin-diehl-every-day-is-an-improv-scene/ --► Watch the interview here: https://youtu.be/lmkreZEQo_8  --► Subscribe to My Channel Here: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnRMiles --► Subscribe to the podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/passion-struck-with-john-r-miles/id1553279283 *Our Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/passionstruck. Thank You Zocdoc for Sponsoring. This episode of Passion Struck with John R. Miles is brought to you by Zocdoc which is the start of a better health care journey for you. Find and book top-rated local doctors, on-demand. Visit them in their offices, or video chat with them from home. Go to https://www.zocdoc.com/passionstruck. Download the Zocdoc app for FREE and start your search for a top-rated doctor today. Thank you for listening to this podcast. I hope you keep up with the weekly videos I post on the YouTube channel, subscribe to, and share your learnings with those who need to hear them. Your comments are my oxygen, so please take a second and say 'Hey' ;). What I discuss with Erin Diehl In this episode of the Passion Struck Podcast Erin Diehl joins us to discuss how improvisational training can enhance professional development, team building, effective communication, networking, presentation skills, leadership capabilities, the act of thinking quickly on your feet, and everything in between.  0:00 Announcements 2:40 Introducing Erin Diehl 4:35 Dancing with the Clemson Rally Cats 7:13 Life lessons from dancing 9:40 Wanting to be Oprah 12:10 Why Bill Murray is the man of Charleston 14:57 Learning improv at the Second City 20:14 The five basic rules of improv 25:44 No open-ended questions 27:02 Improv on steroids 31:54 How Improv changed Erin's life 34:58 How improv helps with imposter syndrome 42:59 Failfluencing 49:24 Why Passion Struck is a state of being 50:20 John Miles and Erin Diehl Improvise 56:51 Rapid round of questions 1:00:16 Wrap-Up and Synthesis Where you can find Erin Diehl: * Website: https://www.learntoimproveit.com/ * Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/keepinitrealdiehl/ * Twitter: https://twitter.com/keepitrealdiehl * LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/erindiehl/ Links from the show * Rules of Improv: https://www.pantheater.com/rules-of-improv.html  * The Second City: https://www.secondcity.com/ * Rules of Improv: https://www.pantheater.com/rules-of-improv.html  * My interview with David Yaden on self-transcendence, psychedelics, and behavior change: https://passionstruck.com/david-yaden-on-self-transcendence-experiences/  * My solo episode on why you must feel to heal: https://passionstruck.com/why-you-must-feel-to-find-emotional-healing/ * My interview with Cathy Heller: https://passionstruck.com/cathy-heller-how-do-you-find-your-lifes-passion/ * My interview with Michael Slepian: https://passionstruck.com/michael-slepian-the-secret-life-of-secrets/ * My interview with Tricia Manning: https://passionstruck.com/tricia-manning-on-how-to-lead-with-heart/  * My interview with Jordan Harbinger on Why Legacy is Greater Than Currency:  https://passionstruck.com/jordan-harbinger-on-why-building-your-legacy-is-greater-than-currency/ * My interview with Sarah Fay on the fallacies of the DSM: https://passionstruck.com/sarah-fay-pathological/  -- Welcome to Passion Struck podcast, a show where you get to join me in exploring the mindset and philosophy of the world's most inspiring everyday heroes to learn their lessons to living intentionally. Passion Struck aspires to speak to the humanity of people in a way that makes them want to live better, be better and impact. Learn more about me: https://johnrmiles.com. Stay tuned for my latest project, my upcoming book, which will be published in summer 2022. ===== FOLLOW JOHN ON THE SOCIALS ===== * Twitter: https://twitter.com/Milesjohnr * Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/johnrmiles.c0m * Medium: https://medium.com/@JohnRMiles​ * Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/john_r_miles * LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/milesjohn/ * Blog: https://johnrmiles.com/blog/ * Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/passion_struck_podcast * Gear: https://www.zazzle.com/store/passion_sruck_podcast  

Business Talks
Building a Lasting Legacy in Business with Darren Magarro

Business Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 34:46


Darren Magarro is the Founder & President of DSM - A full-service digital marketing agency in Northern New Jersey. The mission of DSM is to bring together talented professionals in all aspects of media and communications to create a "one-stop" destination for all its clients' advertising, marketing and public relations needs.  Darren joins the podcast to share the experiences & insights gained from running an award-winning digital marketing agency for over 15 years. We had an extensive conversation touching on sales & networking, hiring and leading employees, and the most important things entrepreneurs must do to grow their company.  Some of The Topics Discussed Include: How DSM got started The Key Growth Drivers for DSM Over The Years Niching Your Company's Services vs. Being Industry Agnostic  How Darren Approaches Networking & Sales  What It Takes To Build & Lead An Effective Team  Running a Business Yourself vs. Having Partners  Figuring Out What You Want From Your Company  Links & Resources DSM  Connect with Darren on LinkedIn Review & Subscribe Thanks for joining us this week! Want to subscribe to our podcast and leave some feedback by posting a review? You can do so by checking us out on Apple Podcasts. The show is also available on Spotify, Google Podcasts, and anywhere else you listen to podcasts.   Prefer watching these discussions? Check us out on YouTube and subscribe to our channel for the video version of each podcast.  Need Digital Marketing Help? Then book a Strategy Call with me to discuss your company's marketing challenges. In less than 30 minutes, I'll help you brainstorm solutions to improve your company's marketing performance and provide you with actionable next steps to turn things around. Use the link below to schedule a time to chat with me.  Book a Strategy Call

Passion Struck with John R. Miles
David Yaden on Self-Transcendence, Psychedelics, and Behavior Change EP 152

Passion Struck with John R. Miles

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 61:35


David Yaden - Self-Transcendence, Psychedelics, and Behavior Change | Brought to you by Zocdoc. Go to https://www.zocdoc.com/passionstruck and download the Zocdoc app for FREE. Then start your search for a top-rated doctor today. --►Purchase David's book The Varieties of Spiritual Experiences: 21st Century Research and Perspectives with Oxford University Press: https://amzn.to/3n3BXkN  David B. Yaden, Ph.D. obtained his Ph.D. at the University of Pennsylvania and is currently an Assistant Professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His work in The Center for Psychedelic and Consciousness Research focuses on the psychology, neuroscience, and psychopharmacology of so-called spiritual, self-transcendent, and other positively transformative experiences. His scientific and scholarly work has been covered by outlets such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and NPR. --► Get the full show notes here: https://passionstruck.com/ --► Subscribe to My Channel Here: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnRMiles --► Subscribe to the podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/passion-struck-with-john-r-miles/id1553279283 *Our Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/passionstruck. Thank You Zocdoc for Sponsoring. This episode of Passion Struck with John R. Miles is brought to you by Zocdoc which is the start of a better health care journey for you. Find and book top-rated local doctors, on-demand. Visit them in their offices, or video chat with them from home. Go to https://www.zocdoc.com/passionstruck. Download the Zocdoc app for FREE and start your search for a top-rated doctor today. Thank you for listening to this podcast. I hope you keep up with the weekly videos I post on the YouTube channel, subscribe to, and share your learnings with those who need to hear them. Your comments are my oxygen, so please take a second and say 'Hey' ;). What I discuss with David Yaden In this episode of the Passion Struck Podcast David Yaden joins us to discuss self-transcendence and the varieties of spiritual experiences. Specifically, he is interested in understanding how these kinds of altered states of consciousness can result in long-term changes to well-being, mental health, and prosocial behavior - while also studying their risks. 0:00 Announcements 2:12 Introducing David Yaden 4:33 The self-transcendent experience that changed his life 8:16 The overview effect 10:21 Understanding altered states of consciousness 11:53 Research on peak and mystical-type experiences 14:53 The influence of Andrew Newberg, Marty Seligman, and Roland Griffiths 21:27  Using fMRI to understand self-transcendent experiences 24:17 How meditation vs psychedelic self-transcendent experiences differ 26:31 Wow do you map the self-transcendent mind? 30:50 How can we make time malleable? 36:33 The Johns Hopkins Behavioral Pharmacology Research Unit 41:00 Why the Dali Lama is interested in neuroscience research  47:10 David discusses his new book The Varieties of Spiritual Experiences 50:25 Why Sigmund Freud was wrong and William James was correct 55:30 How 30% of people feel a sense of calling to their work 59:35 Wrap-Up and Synthesis Where you can find David Yaden: * Website: https://hopkinspsychedelic.org/yaden * Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dbyaden/ * Twitter: https://twitter.com/ExistWell * LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidbyaden/ Links from the show * * Yaden, D. B., J. Haidt, R. W. Hood, D. R. Vago, and A. B. Newberg (2017). "The Varieties of Self-Transcendent Experience." Review of General Psychology 21(2): 143-160. [Link] * My interview with David Vago Ph.D. on Meditation in Self-Transcendent states: https://passionstruck.com/dr-david-vago-on-self-transcendence/  * * My solo episode on why you must feel to heal: https://passionstruck.com/why-you-must-feel-to-find-emotional-healing/ * My interview with Cathy Heller: https://passionstruck.com/cathy-heller-how-do-you-find-your-lifes-passion/ * My interview with Michael Slepian: https://passionstruck.com/michael-slepian-the-secret-life-of-secrets/ * My interview with Tricia Manning: https://passionstruck.com/tricia-manning-on-how-to-lead-with-heart/  * My interview with Jordan Harbinger on Why Legacy is Greater Than Currency:  https://passionstruck.com/jordan-harbinger-on-why-building-your-legacy-is-greater-than-currency/ * My interview with Sarah Fay on the fallacies of the DSM: https://passionstruck.com/sarah-fay-pathological/  -- Welcome to Passion Struck podcast, a show where you get to join me in exploring the mindset and philosophy of the world's most inspiring everyday heroes to learn their lessons to living intentionally. Passion Struck aspires to speak to the humanity of people in a way that makes them want to live better, be better and impact. Learn more about me: https://johnrmiles.com. Stay tuned for my latest project, my upcoming book, which will be published in summer 2022. ===== FOLLOW JOHN ON THE SOCIALS ===== * Twitter: https://twitter.com/Milesjohnr * Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/johnrmiles.c0m * Medium: https://medium.com/@JohnRMiles​ * Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/john_r_miles * LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/milesjohn/ * Blog: https://johnrmiles.com/blog/ * Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/passion_struck_podcast * Gear: https://www.zazzle.com/store/passion_sruck_podcast    

Color of Success
What is OCD and How is it Treated?

Color of Success

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 40:20


OCD is a term often thrown around in every day language for people who have a strong preference for cleanliness and order.  However, this does not necessarily indicate a clinical diagnosis. In this episode, Brianna Calderón: Defines Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) according to DSM 5 criteria Differentiates a preference for cleanliness from a clinical diagnosis How the pandemic has impacted the presentation of symptoms Exposure Therapy as an effective treatment for OCD Provides resources for OCD & treatment ===================================== Brianna's Bio: Brianna is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor in the state. She is a native New Yorker from the Bronx and started out working in community mental health and group homes/residential settings. After becoming licensed, she made the switch to work at NOCD (No Compulsive Disorders), becoming an OCD specialist working via tele-health. Her personal and professional mission is to provide education on this misrepresented and misdiagnosed disorder to communities that may not have access to resources, and have generational/cultural stigmas regarding mental health.

Your Anxiety Toolkit
Ep. 289- Whack a Mole Obsessions

Your Anxiety Toolkit

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 20:06


In This Episode: What is whack-a-mole obsessions?  Why do my obsessions keep changing?  What is the treatment for fears that keep changing?  Episode Sponsor: This episode of Your Anxiety Toolkit is brought to you by CBTschool.com.  CBTschool.com is a psychoeducation platform that provides courses and other online resources for people with anxiety, OCD, and Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors.  Go to cbtschool.com to learn more.  Spread the love! Everyone needs tools for anxiety... If you like Your Anxiety Toolkit Podcast, visit YOUR ANXIETY TOOLKIT PODCAST to subscribe free and you'll never miss an episode. And if you really like Your Anxiety Toolkit, I'd appreciate you telling a friend (maybe even two). EPISODE TRANSCRIPTION  This is Your Anxiety Toolkit - Episode 289.  Welcome back, everybody. I am so happy to be with you again. I won't lie. I'm still on a high (that rhymed) from the managing mental compulsion series. Oh my gosh, you guys, I am so proud of that series, that six-part series. If you didn't listen to it, please do go back. I'll probably tell you that for the next several podcasts, just because I am really still floating on the coattails of how amazingly, so wonderful that was. And it really seemed to help a ton of people, which is so fulfilling.  I do love-- it's not because of the ego piece of it, I just do love when I know I'm making an impact. It's really quite helpful to feel like you're making an impact. And sometimes when I'm putting out episodes, I really don't know whether they're helpful or not. That's the thing about podcasts compared to social media, is with social media, if you follow me on Instagram @youranxietytoolkit or Facebook, I can get a feel based on how many comments or how many likes or how many shares. But with podcast, it's hard to know how helpful it is. And the feedback has been amazing. Thank you, everyone who's left reviews. What a joy, what a joy.  What the cool thing is, since then, it's actually created this really wonderful conversation between me and my therapist. So, for those of you who don't know, in addition to me owning CBT School, I also own a private practice where myself and nine of my therapists were actually, now 10 extra therapists, in the process of hiring a new person. We meet once a week or more to discuss cases. And the cool thing about the mental compulsion series is it brought the coolest questions and conversations and pondering, what would this help this client? How would it help that client? These are the struggles my clients are having. Because as I kept saying, not every tool is for everybody. Some you'll be like, “Yes, this is exactly what I needed,” and there'll be other things where they might not resonate with you. And that's totally fine. It doesn't mean anything is wrong. That's because we're all different. But it's really brought up a lot of questions. And so, now I'm actually going to hopefully answer some of those questions in the upcoming podcasts.  Today, we're actually talking about what to do when your obsessions keep changing. Because we're talking about mental compulsions and reducing those, and that's actually the response prevention part of treatment, what's hard to know, like what exposures do you do for somebody whose obsessions keep changing or their fears keep flip flopping from one to the other? One week, it's this. Next week, it's that. And then it's funny because a lot of clients will say, “What was a 10 out of 10 for me last week is nothing now. And now all I can think about is this other thing. I was really worried about what I said to this one person. Now, all I can think about is this rash on my arm. And the week before that, I was really upset that maybe I had sinned,” or there was another obsession. Again, it's just what we call Whack-A-Mole. We're going to talk about that today.  But before we do that, we are going to do the “I did a hard thing” segment. This one is from Marisa. And Marisa is at the @renewpodcast. I think that might be her Instagram or their Instagram. Marisa said: “Last week I submitted my dietetic internship applications. It was a long, stressful process and anxiety definitely came up during it. And I was able to move through and do the hard thing. I kept reminding myself that the short-term discomfort of submitting the application was worth the long-term reward of hopefully getting a step closer to my goal of becoming a registered dietician through completing the internship. Even though there is still uncertainty and the outcome that I have to sit with while I wait to find out the results of my application, I have learned through my ERP work that I can sit with the discomfort and uncertainty. Thank you, Kimberley, for reminding me that it is a beautiful day to do hard things.” Marisa, I hope that you get in. I hope that you get all of the things that you're applying for. This is so exciting. And yeah, you really walked the walk. This is exactly what we're talking about when we do the “I did a hard thing” segment. It doesn't have to be OCD-related or anxiety-related. It could be just hard things because life is hard for everyone. I love this. Thank you so much, Marisa.  If you want to submit your “I did a hard thing,” you may go to my-- it's actually my private practice website where I host the podcast. If you go to KimberleyQuinlan-lmft.com and you go to the podcast link, right there, there is a link that says “I did a hard thing.” It's actually KimberleyQuinlan-lmft.com/i-did-a-hard-thing/ okay? But it's easier just to go, and I will try to remember to put this in a link in the podcast.  All right. One more piece of housekeeping before we get going is, let's do the review of the week. This is from Sass, and Sass said: “I have had an eating disorder for many years and I spent my adult life trying to understand my compulsions and obsessions. When I found your podcast last summer, everything started to make sense to me. You have given me an understanding and acceptance I couldn't get anywhere else. I look forward to your weekly podcast and enjoy going back and listening to the earlier podcasts as well. Thank you for all you do.” Sass, I get you. I was exactly in that position when I had my eating disorder. I didn't understand it. I didn't feel like people explained it in a way that made sense to me. And the obsessive and compulsive cycle really made sense to me. So, I am so grateful to have you, and I'm so grateful to be on this journey with you. Really, really, I am. Thank you for leaving that review.    Okay, let's do it. Today, we are talking about Whack-A-Mole obsessions. Now, Whack-A-Mole obsessions is not a clinical term. Let's just get that out of the way. There is nothing in the DSM or there's no-- it's not a clinical scientific term, but it is a term we use in the OCD community. But I think it's true of the anxiety disorder community. Maybe even the eating disorder community as well, where the fears flip flop from one thing to the other. This may be true too if you have health anxiety. It might be true if you have generalized anxiety, social anxiety, where one day everything, it just feels like this fear is so intense and it's so important and it must be solved today. It's so painful. And then for no reason, it goes. And then it gets overshadowed by a different fear or obsession or topic.  And what can happen in treatment is you can start to treat one, doing exposure. This was actually one of the questions that came up through ERP School, which is our online course that teaches you how to create a plan for yourself to manage OCD. Some people will say, “Oh, I created a hierarchy. I followed the steps in ERP School. I started working on it and I did a few exposures and I did a few marginals. And boom, it just went away and then a new one came or the volume got turned down.” It could be that you addressed it a small amount, and then it went away and got replaced by another. Or it could be that you didn't even get time to address it and it just went to a different topic. And this is really, really distressing for people, I'm not going to lie, because you're just constantly whack-a-moling. You know the Whack-A-Mole game? You're whack-a-moling things that feel super important, super scary, super urgent.  And so, what I want to do first is just validate and recognize this is not an uncommon situation. If this is happening for you, you are definitely not alone. And it doesn't mean in any respect that you can't get better. In fact, there's a really cool tool, and I'm going to teach it to you here in a second, that you can use. We use it with any obsession. This is not special to Whack-A-Mole obsessions, but you can use it with any exceptions or if things keep changing. But first of all, I just want to recognize it is normal and it's still treatable.  What do you do? The thing to remember here is, when you zoom out, and this is what we do as clinicians, our job as clinicians, and I say this to my staff all the time, is to find trends in the person's behaviors and thinking. And what you will find is, when you're having Whack-A-Mole obsessions, while the content may be different, when you zoom out, the process is exactly the same. You have a thought, a feeling, a sensation, or an urge that is repetitive, that is uncomfortable, that creates a lot of distress in your life. And of course, naturally, you don't want that distress. That's scary. And so, what you do is you do a compulsion to make it go away. It doesn't matter what the content is. It doesn't matter what the specific theory is. This is the same trend. And so, when we zoom out, we can see the trend, and then we can go, “Aha. Even though the content is the same, I can still intervene at the same point.” When we talk about this in ERP School, is the intervention point is at the compulsion.  And so, the work here is the content doesn't matter. Your job is to catch and be aware, like we've talked a lot about mindfulness, is to be aware and identify, “Oh, I'm in the trend. I'm in the cycle.” While the one content has changed, the same behaviors are playing out. So, you catch that. You then practice being willing to be uncomfortable and uncertain about the content, because that's the same too. The same cycle is happening. The thought and the fear create some anxiety, some sensations, and so forth.  And then we have an aversion to that. And then our job is to work at not engaging in that compulsion. So, that compulsion might be mental rumination. It might be doing certain behaviors, physical behaviors. It might be reassurance seeking. It might be avoidance. It might be self-punishment. It might be self-criticism. And your job is actually to go, “Okay, it really doesn't matter.” And I really want to keep saying that to you. If the fear is, what if I have cancer? What if I'm going to hurt someone? What if I'm aroused by this? What if I have sinned? What if things are asymmetrical? What if I got some contaminant? What if I don't love him enough? It doesn't matter. What if it is not perfect? What if I fail? It doesn't matter. I've just listed some, but if I didn't list your obsession, please don't worry. It's for every one of these. The content for all of them are equally as important.  Sometimes what we do is we go, “Oh, that one is okay. But this one is really serious, and we have to pay attention to it.” And so, we have to catch that and go, “No, it's all content. It's all--” you could say, some people say it's all spam, like the spam folder. Because when we get an email, we have emails that we really need to see – events, meetings coming up. And then we always have spam, the stuff that's like, “Please send me money for Bitcoin,” or something. So, we put that in the spam folder. And so, your job is to catch the trends here, the patterns, and learn how to put those obsessions in the spam folder, no matter what the content. Now, this does require, and here's the caveat, or I would say this is the deal-breaker, is it does require a degree of mindfulness in your part to be aware of what's going on. And this is a practice, like a muscle that you grow. So, what it requires is you have to be able to catch that you are in the content. You have to be able to catch that you are in the cycle that keeps you stuck. And that does require you to be mindful again. And I get it. I'm not saying that you'll ever be perfect at this because I don't know anyone who is. There will be times when you're so caught up in the content and you've been doing compulsions for an hour, two hours, two days, two months and you haven't caught it. And you're like, “Oops, wait. Oops, I didn't catch that one.” That's okay. We don't beat ourselves up. Then we just go, “All right, I'm at the point where at least I've caught it. I'm aware that I'm in the content. I'm aware how this is playing out exactly the way that it played out yesterday, but with a different obsession.” And then you just move on from there. Don't beat yourself up. But it does require you to strengthen the muscle of being able to catch that you're in the content. And it's what we call insight. It's having the insight to recognize. Now, insight is something we can strengthen with practice. It's not just one and done. It's practice. It's repetition. I have to do this all the time for myself. While I don't have OCD, I do have anxiety and I will catch myself going down the rabbit hole with something until I'm like, “Wait, wait, wait, wait, wait, you've been here before. It looks exactly like what you did on Tuesday where you're trying to figure out something that's not in your control. Kimberley, this is not in your control. You're trying to control something that isn't even your business.” And I've seen that trend in me. And so, my job is to catch it. Once I can catch it, then I know the steps. I know, “Okay, I got to let this one go. I got to accept the discomfort on this one. I'm going to have to ride this wave of discomfort. I'm going to have to radically be kind to myself.” We know the steps. And once we can get those steps down, it's about catching it. But this is what we do when the obsessions do keep changing.  Now, I'm not going to say this is easy because it's not. And if you require help doing this, reach out to an OCD therapist or an anxiety specialist who knows ERP. Remember here, and I'm telling you this with the deepest, most absolute degree of love, is CBT School, the whole mission of CBT School is to provide you tools and resources for those who don't have tools and resources. So, if you haven't got a therapist and you're finding this really, really helpful, but you're still struggling, don't be afraid. It doesn't mean anything is wrong with you. It just means maybe you need some more professional help. Maybe you have a therapist and you're listening into this just to get extra tools. Great. Take what you learn and then take what struggles you have and figure that out.  I really want to stress here, and the reason I bring that up is, when I say this, it isn't as easy as it sounds and it does require sometimes having somebody else, this is why I go to therapy myself, is even though I know the tools, it's really nice to have a second set of ears just going, “Wait a second. Sounds like you're caught up in the content.” If it's not a therapist, maybe you could have a loved one or even journaling I have found is really helpful in that when you journal it down, and I do this regularly, I then read it, not to judge it, but just to see what trends. And I get a highlighter and I just highlight like, where are the trends? Where am I seeing the same patterns playing out? And that's where we intervene.  So, that's Whack-A-Mole obsessions. That is what to do when your obsessions keep changing. I do hope that that was helpful, not just to validate you, but to give you some skills moving forward. I am so grateful to have you here. Don't be afraid to let me know what you think. I love, again, getting your feedback via reviews. I urge you to join the newsletter. That will then allow you to reply and give me feedback that way. I love hearing from you all.  All right. I'm going to sign off and I'll talk to you very, very soon.

The Dishcast with Andrew Sullivan
Jamie Kirchick On Gay Washington

The Dishcast with Andrew Sullivan

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 72:10 Very Popular


We took the podcast on the road this week — to Provincetown for a live chat with Jamie Kirchick, whose new book, Secret City: The Hidden History of Gay Washington, I reviewed last week. We were able to discuss much more than could be covered in pixels — with questions from the audience as well.You can listen to the episode right away in the audio player above (or click the dropdown menu to add the Dishcast to your podcast feed). For two clips of my convo with Jamie — on the similarities between anti-Semitism and homophobia, and on whether J. Edgar Hoover was gay — head over to our YouTube page. Also: new week, new transcript — this time with Charles Murray. It was one of the most popular episodes last year, and if you never listened to it, now’s your chance to read it as well.Looking back to our episode with Kathleen Stock (who has since moved to Substack!), we still have many unaired emails from listeners. The first writes:I just wanted to email to say thank you for the work you’re doing on the (potential) threat of trans ideology to cis gays. I’m a 33-year-old cis gay in Australia, and I was a bit confused by trans stuff at first, because I felt I was supposed to implicitly understand trans issues, existing in that “LGBT” bloc. Back around 2013, any trans-related conversation amounted to laughing about the silliness of the “xe/xir” stuff, while still acknowledging that it’s simple human decency to use whatever pronouns someone asks me to use.As Kathleen Stock said on your podcast, respecting trans people through their struggle always seemed “costless.” Clearly, that is no longer true. Something has changed for the worse; the most visible, loud and most obnoxious segment of the LGBT community are the “queer fascists.” I’m called a bigot for simply acknowledging that there exist people who detransition (without even mentioning whether transgenderism might be a form of gay conversion therapy, in some cases). I could go on and on, obviously, but again: thank you.P.S. I adored your point on Brendan O’Neill’s show about how the queer community used to be the resistance, but has transitioned into being the censorious puritans.Here’s a clip from the Stock pod:From another listener who “LOVED the conversation with Kathleen Stock”:I’m an intersex person and can say with authority that human bodies are weird. Mine doesn’t produce enough sex hormone. I tried testosterone and developed anxiety, depression, and depersonalization, so I’m now going in the other direction and I’m much happier. My pronouns are “whatever you want,” and I’m fully aware that I’m atypical. I don’t care for the “trans” label because of how ridiculous it has become. That makes my heart hurt for those who have battled very hard to be recognized only to watch their identity subverted into something meaningless by a vicious and thoughtless mob. I hate what was done to Kathleen or anyone else who says, “Hey, wait a minute, we should talk about this.” I don’t know when talking about our differences became so damn dangerous. It’s intellectually dishonest. Weren’t universities supposed to be the places to halt this kind of thing, where ideas could be debated and reasoned through? But if the universities are all businesses now, and their incentives are about how to get more paying students, then where else can the debate be had? Where are the incentives more closely aligned with the public good rather than the almighty dollar? I don’t know. I worry that place doesn’t exist here in the US.One thing that was truly horrifying was when you mentioned that gay kids are being told they’re trans because they’re gay. That’s evil. I don’t know what else to call it. Human brains aren’t done forming until what, our 20s? There’s a reason peer pressure is so pernicious for teenagers, and it seems strange that many adults seem to have forgotten it and blithely go along with kids (rare exceptions aside) who want to block their own puberty or have a double mastectomy before they can legally vote.Anyways, I enjoyed every minute of your conversation with Kathleen, even the part where you went on about how “I don’t even know what non-binary IS,” because that’s how I feel as a non-binary person! I’m not comfortable with either of given options, nor am I comfortable in any same-sex space (but I manage in airports). Again, I’m atypical on the chromosomal level, so while I can’t speak to everyone’s experience, I can say mine is a bit more existential than the random 16 year old who’s decided, along with their entire social circle, that they’re suddenly non-binary and have all dyed their hair blue. Sometimes it feels like I’m riding around in a clown car, to be honest.From another fan of the episode, a medical doctor:I admire both you and Kathleen Stock. The more I learn about what is being done to children who don’t conform to stereotypes, the more horrified I’ve become.  During my lifetime, much has been done to accept people, including children as they are. We’ve come to recognize that there’s a great deal of variance of normal around the mean. But when it comes to subjecting children to dangerous medical interventions, we no longer need to worry about causing real harm? To me it appears that some physicians have no qualms about experimenting on healthy children. Malicious intent is all that’s missing for this to be criminal misuse of medical science.I have no platform to use to try to stop this. I appreciate that you and Dr. Stock are making an effort to put the brakes on this madness. Another medical doctor who sounded off on the trans debate was the great Dana Beyer:Listen to the whole episode here. Another listener reflects on the trans debate more broadly:Though I find the entire trans/gender battle beyond exhausting, the recent events surrounding the swimmer at Penn brought it front and center for me. Partly because I was a competitive swimmer in HS, but mostly because my girlfriend’s daughter is a championship-level swimmer with a scholarship to a top-tier program after HS. (By the way, the daughter is not okay with the Penn swimmer.)I have a degree in English, and I’m fortunate to have a lifelong best friend whose father is a linguist. And there were two linguistic tools recently designed to serve one group’s agenda while doing a terrible disservice to the one that should matter. The first was to change the term transsexual to “transgender,” shifting from a term defining the biology of gender dysphoria to one that is intentionally far more vague. The second was to create the shorthand term “trans,” which acts a vehicle for the first by turning something that affects .03% of the population into something broader and far more inclusive.It’s these subtle yet effective shifts in language that facilitate the gender vs biological sex movements, and accepting that someone who still has a penis can be defined as a woman. Now, “trans” is a definition designed to cover any permutation of gender non-conformity instead of actual gender dysphoria, as defined in the DSM-5. And it has opened the door to well-meaning (I assume) adults making terrible decisions regarding child development.Growing up as a boy, all my closest relatives — sister, cousins, an aunt three years older than me — were girls. I ended up playing with them often, regardless of the game or what items were involved (dolls, etc). I followed their lead and even thought I was supposed to pee sitting down. None of this was driven by a desire to be a girl, but rather just to be included. And like many boys, my first forays into my own genitalia involved other boys, as we learned about our bodies. But by the time I neared puberty, it was clear that I was both male and heterosexual. Yet, I fear that children growing up today in similar circumstances will find themselves in a world of confusion, brought on by adults, not their playmates.Speaking of confused kids, another listener:I’ve heard you express frustration and/or disbelief at the rate of depression among gay youth today, despite how much easier things are for them compared to the ‘70s and ‘80s. I just wanted to point out that many young people seem to believe that gay means same-gender attraction, not same-sex. This seems to be part of the Queer umbrella where heterosexual people can identify as another gender and so claim a gay identity. This makes no sense to me (I also find it homophobic), and I wonder if the whole mess contributes to the rates of depression among Millennials and Gen Z.One of those confused kids was Helena Kerschner, a young woman who transitioned and then detransitioned:Listen to her whole story, along with the inimitable Buck Angel’s, here. Another good point comes from this listener:I see the current kerfuffle about trans identities as reflecting the inability to experience complexity without anxiety and a desire to simplify things. That a person can have what are seen as conflicting senses of themselves — as a man, as a man/woman, woman/man, or somewhere in-between — is too complex for some people. Some I expect do find the idea anxiety-provoking — leading to questions about themselves, in a Freudian way — and they are trying to solve their problems by forcing others into boxes.Circling back to the Stock episode, another listener:I do want to push back on, and encourage you to revisit in depth, your point of disagreement with Kathleen over the use of puberty blockers and hormone treatments in transgender youth. While the issues are surely different in the case of adults who have reached the age of consent (though even here there is a strong reason for limiting what can be done in the name of medicine in the strict sense, with consequences for what insurance policies should have to cover), the idea that a child could be given permanently life-altering treatments on the basis of a diagnosis for which, as Kathleen observed, there are simply no rigorous criteria, and to treat a psychological condition that could very well turn out not to be lasting, seems utterly abhorrent. What serious arguments are there in defense of this? What are the responses to the obvious objections? Finally, what should liberal people, who are opposed to these treatments but nevertheless prize individual autonomy and fear governmental overreach, think about the various legislative strategies that are on offer to forbid or restrict access to them? I hope that this is a conversation you’ll be able to keep on having.For more debate on this ongoing issue, check out the Dishcast episode with Mara Keisling, the founding executive director of the National Center for Transgender Equality. A clip of our constructive disagreement:Lastly, a listener looks ahead:I’m writing to suggest a guest (though I am not sure she accepts podcast invitations). There’s a point of view on trans issues I haven’t really heard adequately represented on your podcasts or in your blog posts. I think the person who best articulates it is Natalie Wynn, aka Contrapoints. I recently watched her YouTube episode on J.K. Rowling (and TERFs in general). It was brilliant, and opened my mind to many of the tropes and biases we hear all the time that I wasn’t fully hearing. Natalie is extremely smart, articulate, funny, and not afraid to say things that piss off her tribe. Thanks so much for the suggestion. Keep them coming — along with your dissents, assents and personal stories: dish@andrewsullivan.com. And you can browse the entire Dishcast archive for an episode you might enjoy. Get full access to The Weekly Dish at andrewsullivan.substack.com/subscribe