Podcasts about Franklin Institute

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard
  • 111PODCASTS
  • 175EPISODES
  • 47mAVG DURATION
  • 1MONTHLY NEW EPISODE
  • Jul 22, 2022LATEST
Franklin Institute

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Franklin Institute

Latest podcast episodes about Franklin Institute

Jenn & Bill Daily
Bee Positive | Things to Do This Weekend 7.22-7.24

Jenn & Bill Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 2:47


Jenn & Bill share ideas of fun things to do around the Delaware Valley this weekend, July 22-24, 2022, including the Pirate Rum Challenge at Independence Seaport Museum, the start of University City's Dining Days and some indoor activities to stay cool like the Harry Potter Exhibit at the Franklin Institute and 'To Kill A Mockingbird' at the Academy of Music.

Stuff You Missed in History Class
Sir Sandford Fleming and the Creation of Time Zones

Stuff You Missed in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 42:26 Very Popular


Humans have understood how to calculate the length of a day pretty accurately for a long time. But there wasn't a standard way to approach time on a global scale until the late 19th century, and happened because of railroads. Research: “INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE HELD AT WASHINGTON FOR THE PURPOSE OF FIXING A PRIME MERIDIAN AND A UNIVERSAL DAY.” (Protocols of the Proceedings.” October 1884. https://www.gutenberg.org/files/17759/17759-h/17759-h.htm Fleming, Sandford. “Terrestrial time: a memoir.” 1876. Digitized: https://archive.org/details/cihm_06112/page/n17/mode/2up Fleming, Sandford. “Papers on time-reckoning and the selection of a prime meridian to be common to all nations.” 1879. Digitized: https://archive.org/details/cihm_03135/page/n17/mode/2up Creet, Mario. “FLEMING , Sir SANDFORD.” Dictionary of Canadian Biography. http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio.php?id_nbr=7370 Creet, Mario. “Sandford Fleming and Universal Time.” Scientia Canadensis. Volume 14, numéro 1-2 (38-39). https://www.erudit.org/fr/revues/scientia/1990-v14-n1-2-scientia3118/800302ar.pdf Shepardson, David. “U.S. Senate approves bill to make daylight saving time permanent.” Reuters. March 16, 2022. https://www.reuters.com/world/us/us-senate-approves-bill-that-would-make-daylight-savings-time-permanent-2023-2022-03-15/ “What Shall Be the Prime Meridian for the World?” International institute for preserving and perfecting weights and measures. Committee on standard time.  Cleveland, O., 1884. https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015019895203&view=1up&seq=8 Biggerstaff, Valerie. “Opinion: When Georgia had two time zones.” Appen Media. April 14, 2021. https://www.appenmedia.com/opinion/opinion-when-georgia-had-two-time-zones/article_0bb3e6c4-9c84-11eb-a1f5-6b1a42a8e61a.html Lange, Katie. “Daylight Saving Time Once Known As 'War Time.'” U.S. Department of Defense. March 8, 2019. https://www.defense.gov/News/Feature-Stories/story/Article/1779177/daylight-saving-time-once-known-as-war-time/ “DID BEN FRANKLIN INVENT DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME?” The Franklin Institute. https://www.fi.edu/benjamin-franklin/daylight-savings-time “United States Congressional Serial Set.” U.S. Government Printing Office. Volume 2296. 1885. Accessed online: https://play.google.com/store/books/details?id=_1JHAQAAIAAJ&rdid=book-_1JHAQAAIAAJ&rdot=1 Rosenberg, Matt. "The History and Use of Time Zones." ThoughtCo, Aug. 27, 2020, thoughtco.com/what-are-time-zones-1435358. “The New Railroad Time.” New York Times. Oct. 12, 1883. https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1883/10/12/106260579.pdf?pdf_redirect=true&ip=0 Glass, Andrew. “President Wilson signs Standard Time Act, March 19, 1918.” Politico. March 19, 2018. https://www.politico.com/story/2018/03/19/wilson-signs-standard-time-act-march-19-1918-467550 Britannica, The Editors of Encyclopaedia. "Sir Sandford Fleming". Encyclopedia Britannica, 3 Jan. 2022, https://www.britannica.com/biography/Sandford-Fleming “History of Time Zones.” Bureau of Transportation Statistics. Feb. 21, 2021. https://www.bts.gov/geospatial/time-zones Gordon, Nicholas. “The Senate wants to make daylight saving time permanent—but that could leave Americans with less sleep and worse health.” Fortune. March 16, 2022. https://fortune.com/2022/03/16/daylight-saving-time-sleep-senate-protecting-sunshine-act/ “Public Law 89-387 – An ACT To promote the observance of a uniform system of time throughout the United States.” April 13, 1966. https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/STATUTE-80/pdf/STATUTE-80-Pg107.pdf See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Conrad Life Report
Episode 87

Conrad Life Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 23:30


Topics: Trip to Philadelphia, Franklin Institute, Liberty Bell, Princeton, Princeton Record Exchange, Golden Touch, stoop visits, roof hangs, Fragole on Court Street, Walter's in Fort Greene, The History of Bones by John Lurie, Obi-Wan Kenobi on Disney+, 'Flicted by Bruce Hornsby, Harry's House by Harry Styles, Sitting Off the Edge of the World by The Yeah Yeah Yeah's, Big Time by Angel Olsen, Versions of Modern Performance by Horse Girl, From Capelton Hill by Stars, We've Been Going About This All Wrong by Sharon Van Etten, Roscoe's Dream by Mapache, Old and in the Way, Imperial Bedroom by Elvis Costello.

This Date in Weather History
1752: Benjamin Franklin famously flies kite in thunderstorm

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 3:13


Benjamin Franklin, inventor of bifocal glasses, the Franklin stove, one of those that wrote the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, ambassador, Governor of Pennsylvania, on June 10 1752 in Philadelphia, flew a kite during a thunderstorm and collected an ambient electrical charge in a Leyden jar, enabling him to demonstrate the connection between lightning and electricity. According to the Franklin Institute, Franklin had been waiting for an opportunity like this. He wanted to demonstrate the electrical nature of lightning, and to do so, he needed a thunderstorm. He had his materials at the ready: a simple kite made with a large silk handkerchief, a hemp string, and a silk string. He also had a house key, a Leyden jar (a device that could store an electrical charge for later use), and a sharp length of wire. His son William assisted him. Franklin had originally planned to conduct the experiment atop a Philadelphia church spire, according to his contemporary, British scientist Joseph Priestley (who, incidentally, is credited with discovering oxygen), but he changed his plans when he realized he could achieve the same goal by using a kite. Franklin and his son “took the opportunity of the first approaching thunder storm to take a walk into a field,” Priestley wrote in his account. “To demonstrate, in the completest manner possible, the sameness of the electric fluid with the matter of lightning, Dr. Franklin, astonishing as it must have appeared, contrived actually to bring lightning from the heavens, by means of an electrical kite, which he raised when a storm of thunder was perceived to be coming on.” Despite a common misconception, Benjamin Franklin did not discover electricity during this experiment—or at all, for that matter. Electrical forces had been recognized for more than a thousand years, and scientists had worked extensively with static electricity. Franklin's experiment demonstrated the connection between lightning and electricity. To dispel another myth, Franklin's kite was not struck by lightning. If it had been, he probably would have been electrocuted. Franklin became interested in electricity in the mid-1740s, a time when much was still unknown on the topic, and spent almost a decade conducting electrical experiments. He coined a number of terms used today, including battery, conductor and electrician. He also invented the lightning rod, used to protect buildings and ships. By the time he died in 1790 he was arguably the most famous man in the world. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Goodniks
Like a Lifeboat Connection

Goodniks

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 19:37


In episode 7, we talk to our Goodniks about who keeps them going. We hear stories about the people who light their way and give them strength. For more information visit www.goodniks.org

Swish and Flick: A Harry Potter Podcast
Episode 283 - Heck Hath No Fury Like a Woman & Her Canaries

Swish and Flick: A Harry Potter Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 20, 2022 92:05


A not so nice Hufflepuff is commentating the match today between Gryffindor and Slytherin and Harry is not pleased by this, nor is Ginny, but she fixes it.....Sort of. Ron discovers that he has in fact, not had any Liquid Luck and he is actually a talented dude. Lastly, this bit of information reignites his fight with Hermione and it only intensifies by way of bird. Weekly Prophet: We chat about our adventure at Harry Potter: The Exhibition at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Check out our website for all of our latest news, merchandise, FAQs, and more! www.swishflickcast.com We have a mailbox! If you ever have the inclination to send us anything please address mail to the following: Swish and Flick Podcast PO Box 690697 Orlando, FL 32869 Our voicemail number is: 330-552-7043 Welcome to Swish and Flick! We post weekly podcasts and vlogs for you that are all about The Wizarding World of Harry Potter. We hope you will subscribe to us and follow us on our adventures! Support the podcast and become part of the pod as a patron and receive exclusive podcast perks! Gain access to our exclusive felix files episodes, discord channel, live recordings, trivia games, swish swag boxes, live hangouts & more here: www.patreon.com/swishflickcast Thank you so much for all of your support! You can find us at the handles below: Instagram: @SwishFlickCast Twitter: @SwishFlickCast Facebook: www.facebook.com/swishflickcast Your hosts can be found on: Twitter: @thepetrasfamily Instagram: @thepetrasfamily @ohhhmalley @tiffswish_flick Thank you so much for listening and don't let the muggles get you down... Thanks so much for listening and don't let the muggles get you down...

The Incubator
#047 - Dr. Paul Offit MD - Scientific Progress, Public Health and mentorship

The Incubator

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2022 58:45


Dr. Paul Offit is a pediatrician specializing in infectious diseases and an expert on vaccines, immunology, and virology. He is the co-inventor of a rotavirus vaccine that has been credited with saving hundreds of lives every day. Dr. Offit is the Maurice R. Hilleman professor of vaccinology, professor of pediatrics at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and director of The Vaccine Education Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). Offit is currently a member of National Institutes of Health (NIH) working group on vaccines, a subgroup of the "Accelerating COVID-19 Therapeutic Interventions and Vaccines" (ACTIV) comprised of experts to combat COVID-19. He is also a member of the FDA's Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee (VRBPAC). Previously, he was a member of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. Offit is a board member of Vaccinate Your Family, The Franklin Institute, and Autism Science Foundation.  "You Bet Your Life" is his 12th book.Find out more about Dr. Offit and this episode at: https://www.nicupodcast.com________________________________________________________________________________________As always, feel free to send us questions, comments or suggestions to our email: nicupodcast@gmail.com. You can also contact the show through instagram or twitter, @nicupodcast. Or contact Ben and Daphna directly via their twitter profiles: @drnicu and @doctordaphnamd. enjoy!This podcast is proudly sponsored by Chiesi.

Our Delaware Valley Podcast
Enter the Wizarding World at The Franklin Institute

Our Delaware Valley Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 29:55


Larry Dubinski, President & CEO of The Franklin Institute, returns to discuss the institute's new blockbuster exhibition, Harry Potter and the Wizarding World, The Exhibition, a celebration of the artistry and craftsmanship behind the blockbuster films; the places, characters and creatures found in the Potter universe.  In this world premiere exhibit best-in-class immersive design and technology will allow visitors to experience the mysteries of Hogwarts™ castle, Gringotts™ and the Ministry of Magic, with creatures found in the series' films and the Fantasist Beasts. Larry promises visitors will get an exclusive, up-close look at authentic props and original costumes from the Harry Potter and Fantastic Beasts films in the most comprehensive touring exhibition ever presented about the Wizarding World.   He explains the importance of these blockbuster exhibits, they draw people, visitors who will not only stay to see and enjoy the rest of the venerable institution, but also reserve hotel rooms, dine in local restaurants and shop, but also visit other cultural venues in Philadelphia. We discussed the importance of door traffic to our museums, tickets are a major source of revenue in a city and state that does not financially support these institutions.  ‘Harry' has already proved to be the most anticipated and purchased exhibit since Tut. We also discussed new features for adults, The Franklin Institute has new podcasts and videos at their new digital portal, beyond.fi.edu , a twelve episode bioscience-themed podcast series, “So Curious!” and an 8 episode new astronomy-themed video series “A Practical Guide to the Cosmos.”   Both available where you catch your podcasts and videos with subscribers receiving bonus content. Look for the next installment of Science After Hours, a quarterly evening event series exclusively for the 21and up that offers grown-ups opportunities to explore The Franklin Institute's hands-on exhibit spaces, with live performances, surprising challenges and a cash bar! For more information visit the Franklin online at FI.EDU

The Pulse
How We Process Information

The Pulse

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2022 47:43


The human brain has an incredible capacity for processing information, from sensory data, to casual conversations, to everything we hear and read — in fractions of seconds. Not only that, our brains make sense of it all, allowing us to learn, work, form relationships, and navigate the world. On this episode, we take a closer look at how this all works — and why it sometimes doesn't. We hear stories about listening instead of reading — and test the limits of speed listening; we'll find out why reading comprehension tests in schools may be misguided; and why some people who think they're hard of hearing might actually have a different issue going on. Also heard on this week’s episode: Jayatri Das, Chief Bioscientist at The Franklin Institute in Philadelphia, gives us the lowdown on how our brains process information, and the databases we all keep in our heads. Reporter Jad Sleiman talks to Michael Mena, a PhD candidate who found a hack for all his reading — and in the process, discovered a personal superpower: speed listening. Find the main idea, define words, spot the synonym — kids in U.S. elementary and middle schools spend a lot of time learning how to extract meaning from what they're reading, and get tested on these skills frequently. Education journalist Natalie Wexler explains why she thinks comprehension tests in schools are not measuring “a skill or any skills at all” and what would make for better instruction. Wexler is the author of “The Knowledge Gap: The hidden cause of America’s broken education system — and how to fix it.”

Underground Sports Philadelphia
Underground PHI Episode 405: All-Star Weekend, The Dunk Contest Stinks, & Go See The HP Exhibit

Underground Sports Philadelphia

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 35:25


KB is back and recaps NBA All-Star Weekend, his readiness for the Embiid x Harden era of Sixers basketball, the dunk contest being a shell of itself, and his visit to the Harry Potter Exhibit at the Franklin Institute! Follow Us! Twitter: @UndergroundPHI Kyle: @KBizzl311 Matt: @mattcastorina Website: undergroundsportsphiladelphia.com Watch LIVE: YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCXTLztI5KsYQLH0WptJaL-Q FB: facebook.com/UndergroundSportsPHI Twitch: twitch.tv/undergroundsportsPHI Instagram: @undergroundphi Merch & Apparel: NEW MERCH STORE COMING SOON tomahawkshades.com | Promo Code: "USP" for 25% off at checkout! Biñho Board Referral Link: binhoboard.com/?ref=Underground manscaped.com | Promo Code: "USP" for 20% off AND free shipping statesidevodka.com | Promo Code: "USP" for 10% off the 1L Vodka Bottle (Must be 21+ to purchase. Please drink responsibly) Intro Music: Arkells "People's Champ" Outro Music: Arkells "People's Champ"

For our Love of Science
STEMLand Future of Science - The Journey

For our Love of Science

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2022 34:59


As we continue our conversation with David, he shares how he came to enjoy working in science and informal education. He reflects on the early influence the Franklin Institute had on shaping his understanding of who can be a scientist and how science could be fun. From caring mentors to his first job, the people and experiences at the Franklin really were a positive influence for David during his teenage years to early adulthood. Currently, David is really looking forward to creating unique and impactful STEM education experiences in Philadelphia, especially for Black communities. When he is not serving the community as a non-profit STEM education leader, David dedicates his time to his family and is developing a sneaker cleaner, inspired by his days in the lab. Click the link and listen to David's career journey!Please subscribe through Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, your favorite podcast app or copy the RSS Feed, and be sure to turn on new episode notifications!Reach out to David:david.buckholtz@stemlandscience.orghttps://www.linkedin.com/in/david-a-b-04902866/ STEMLand Science Foundation: https://stemlandscience.orgSubscribe to the newsletter and request a workshopSTEMLand Science on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/stemlandfoundation/?utm_medium=copy_link Reach out to Fatu: https://www.linkedin.com/in/fatubmTwitter: @fatu_bm and LoveSciencePodcast@gmail.comReach out to Shekerah: www.linkedin.com/in/shekerah-primus and LoveSciencePodcast@gmail.comMusic by TimMoor from Pixabay: Future Artificial Intelligence Technology 130Music by ScottHolmesMusic https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Scott_Holmes: Hotshot

Middle Grade Ninja
148 Author Tina Wells

Middle Grade Ninja

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 43:52


Tina Wells and I discuss the first book in her newest series, HONEST JUNE, as well as how she arranged for an exclusive distribution period through Target Stores. We talk about how she founded her first company at age 16 and built a successful career as a marketer before she became a writer. She shares specifics about how this has allowed her to research her demographic and incorporate reader feedback to ensure future books will resonate with tween readers. We also talk about series planning, being one of six children, the importance of authentic representation, and so much more. Tina Wells is a business strategist, advisor, author, and the founder of RLVNT Media, a multimedia content venture serving entrepreneurs, tweens and culturists with authentic representation. Tina has been recognized by Fast Company's 100 Most Creative People in Business, Essence's 40 Under 40, and more. For over two decades she led Buzz Marketing Group, an agency she founded at age 16 with clients like Dell, The Oprah Winfrey Network, Kroger, Apple, P+G, Johnson & Johnson, and American Eagle that Tina connected with her network of 30,000 buzzSpotters® and 7,000 “momSpotters”, all influential millennials and passionate end-consumers. Tina is also the author of seven books, including the best-selling tween fiction series Mackenzie Blue, its new spinoff series, The Zee Files, and the marketing handbook, Chasing Youth Culture and Getting It Right. Tina's board positions have included THINX, the United Nations Foundation's Global Entrepreneurs Council, The Franklin Institute and Young Entrepreneur's Council. She has also served as the Academic Director for Wharton's Leadership in the Business World Program at the University of Pennsylvania and is a member of the 2017 Class of Henry Crown Fellows within the Aspen Global Leadership Network at the Aspen Institute.

SpeakBeasty: A Fantastic Beasts Podcast by MuggleNet.com
Episode 139: This Is Dragon Country

SpeakBeasty: A Fantastic Beasts Podcast by MuggleNet.com

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 72:41


Aureo and Marjolaine are #squadgoals Phoenix Register: Scorbus is canon?? Twitter thread here. The subtext is finally text! As one game falls, another rises. The Harry Potter Exhibition is returning to the Franklin Institute in February 2022. Owl Post: All the owls in the whole world have disappeared. Help us find them by sending us your thoughts at speakbeasty@gmail.com! What's Theseus and Leta's ship name? Main Discussion: Bhutan! Bhutan is NOT Brazil. The flag is also very rad. A secret, isolated place is the perfect place for a magical adventure! More raven symbolism! What does it mean? Amy demands a real-life Battle of the Beasts. No-Maj Movie Magic: Fae Hammond, hair and makeup design! Makeup is both a technical and psychological job. Kowalski's Half-Baked Theories: Is Queenie Snape's grandmother? There are a lot of surprising links between them! Queenie is one-of-a-kind ❤ “A scene of Snape standing there staring at Harry would be very boring.” “...and awkward.” Podcast Question: What kind of adventure would you like to see Newt get up to in Bhutan? Theme Music: "Swing Has Swung," by Shane Ivers (https://www.silvermansound.com)

The Pulse
How We Process Information

The Pulse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 48:10


The human brain has an incredible capacity for processing information, from sensory data, to casual conversations, to everything we hear and read — in fractions of seconds. Not only that, our brains make sense of it all, allowing us to learn, work, form relationships, and navigate the world. On this episode, we take a closer look at how this all works — and why it sometimes doesn't. We hear stories about listening instead of reading — and test the limits of speed listening; we'll find out why reading comprehension tests in schools may be misguided; and why some people who think they're hard of hearing might actually have a different issue going on. Also heard on this week’s episode: Jayatri Das, Chief Bioscientist at The Franklin Institute in Philadelphia, gives us the lowdown on how our brains process information, and the databases we all keep in our heads. Reporter Jad Sleiman talks to Michael Mena, a PhD candidate who found a hack for all his reading — and in the process, discovered a personal superpower: speed listening. Find the main idea, define words, spot the synonym — kids in U.S. elementary and middle schools spend a lot of time learning how to extract meaning from what they're reading, and get tested on these skills frequently. Education journalist Natalie Wexler explains why she thinks comprehension tests in schools are not measuring “a skill or any skills at all” and what would make for better instruction. Wexler is the author of “The Knowledge Gap: The hidden cause of America’s broken education system — and how to fix it.”

The Pop Punk Project
S2E13 - Dashboard Confessional: A Mark, a Mission, a Brand, a Scar

The Pop Punk Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 105:53


Episode Notes You've been very naughty pop punk posse! But fortunately this week we have a confessional, a Dashboard Confessional! Grab your tissues and let the tears stream as we discuss A Mark, a Mission, a Brand, a Scar with longtime friend of the show and devoted patron TOMMY LINDEMAN. Tommy was kind enough to bring both his unique wit and also our show's first sponsors. Who you ask? Smash that play button to find out! Favorite Songs: Keanan - Several Ways to Die Trying Mike - Ghost of a Good Thing Tommy - As Lovers Go Tommy Lindeman Insta: https://www.instagram.com/tommylindeman/?hl=en Minifig, Big World Insta: https://www.instagram.com/minifig_bigworld/?hl=en Ronaldo statue: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OLl6xGJr654 Body Worlds exhibit - Franklin Institute: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JQkGJwEgluI "Hands Down" Music Video: http://www.nzinghastewart.com/portfolio-items/dashboard-confessional-hands/ "Rapid Hope Loss" Music Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ep_22hDFx2E Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/poppunkproject IG: https://www.instagram.com/poppunkproject/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/poppunkproject Merch: https://teespring.com/stores/the-pop-punk-project Support The Pop Punk Project by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/tppp

Into The Wild
94. How to Market to Gen Z Consumers with Tina Wells

Into The Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 32:28


Tina Wells is a business strategist, advisor, author, and the founder of RLVNT Media, a multimedia content venture serving entrepreneurs, tweens and culturists with authentic representation.  She has been recognized by Fast Company's 100 Most Creative People in Business, Essence's 40 Under 40 and more. For over two decades, Tina has led Buzz Marketing Group, an agency she founded at age 16 with clients like Dell, The Oprah Winfrey Network, Kroger, Apple, P+G, Johnson & Johnson, and American Eagle.  She is also the author of seven books, including the best-selling tween fiction series Mackenzie Blue, its 2020 spinoff series, The Zee Files, and the marketing handbook, Chasing Youth Culture and Getting It Right. Tina's board positions have included THINX, the United Nations Foundation's Global Entrepreneurs Council, The Franklin Institute and Young Entrepreneur's Council. She has also served as the Academic Director for Wharton's Leadership in the Business World Program at the University of Pennsylvania and is a member of the 2017 Class of Henry Crown Fellows within the Aspen Global Leadership Network at the Aspen Institute. Grab something hot and listen in to hear what you need to focus on when marketing to Gen Z consumers.  In this episode you will learn about: What prompted Tina to start her business at 16 year old Building on foundations  What it's like to write middle-grade fiction What compelled Tina to write books for middle-grade fiction Where the idea of the book series came from  The keys to marketing to Gen Z The importance of authenticity and creativity when marketing to Gen Z The Gen Z mindset and what we need to know  What it means to be a wild woman: "Existing on my own terms, and not letting anyone define for me what that means." ------------- Got a minute? Would love a review! Click here, scroll to the bottom, tap, and give me 5-stars. Then select "Write a Review." Make sure to highlight your favorite take aways. Subscribe to level up your businessSubscribe here. ------------- Connect with Tina Wells Tina Wells RLVNT Media @tinawells_ Facebook LinkedIn @tinacwells Connect with Renée Warren @renee_warren @we.wild.women www.wewildwomen.com  

The Pulse
Destination: Mars

The Pulse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 49:28


For thousands of years, humans have obsessed over Mars from afar. At first, maybe it was the fact that Mars stands out in the night sky because of its reddish color. But as we learned more about Mars and the conditions there, it was the possibility of life on this distant planet that captured our collective imagination. At its closest, Mars is nearly 40 million miles away from Earth — and we've tried for centuries to bridge that distance, using everything from telescopes to flybys and probes. Mars has inspired wild fantasies about distant civilizations and little green men. It's put a spell on many observers, who hope to unlock its mysteries. On this special episode of The Pulse, we explore what we are learning about Mars, and when we can expect to actually see humans set foot on the red planet. Also heard on this week’s episode: Derrick Pitts, chief astronomer at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia, talks about our attempts to get closer and closer to the red planet, the important work that's being done by the Mars rovers, and what it would take to land humans on Mars. Some people called it the next great leap in space exploration — others, a suicide mission. But for Dan Carey and Leila Zucker, Mars One was a dream come true. Spearheaded by a Dutch company, Mars One aimed to land ordinary people on Mars by the year 2023, where they'd start the red planet's first human colony. There was just one catch — it was a one-way trip … and survival was not guaranteed. Reporter Liz Tung talks with Carey and Zucker about what made them want to leave their lives on Earth, and start new ones on Mars. We talk with science historian Jordan Bimm about “Mars jars” and the group of exobiologists — scientists who study extraterrestrial biology — who spearheaded early research about life on Mars.

This Week in America with Ric Bratton
Episode 2307: Author Wilbur Shapiro

This Week in America with Ric Bratton

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 23:16


AUTHOR WILBUR SHAPIROWilbur Shapiro always had a penchant for writing. He has produced over 58 publications in the technical literature, and 10 patents.  Regardless of advance age he is still sharp as a tack.  After his retirement from Engineering he began a writing career including poetry and fiction.  Now, he has 8 promising books on Amazon and passionately continues to write as his new mission in life.Wilbur is a retiree from an engineering career that had spanned over 50 years. He's an Undergraduate of Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn with a Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering in 1951 and graduated from Colombia University in 1959 with a master's degree of Mechanical Engineering.  In 1953 until 1957 he served in the US Navy as Boiler Division Officer on the Aircraft Carrier USS Hornet.  He later worked at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia, PA and Mechanical Technology Incorporated, in Albany, NY on rotating Machinery research.  In 1995 he left corporate employment for private consulting until retirement in 2005.Wilbur always had a penchant for writing. He has produced over 58 publications in the technical literature, and 10 patents.  Regardless of advance age he is still sharp as a tack.  After his retirement from Engineering he began a writing career including poetry and fiction.  Now, he has 8 promising books on Amazon and passionately continues to write as his new mission in life.In 1958 he married the love of his life Muriel. They had been happily together for 57 years until her passing in April 2016.  Wilbur's son Geoffrey Shapiro is a Cancer Doctor at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston.  Currently, Mr. Shapiro resides in Albany, NY as an esteemed resident of Avila, a premier independent retirement community for seniors. https://wilburshapirobook.com/https://www.amazon.com/s?i=digital-text&rh=p_27%3AWilbur+Shapiro&s=relevancerank&text=Wilbur+Shapiro&ref=dp_byline_sr_ebooks_1http://www.bluefunkbroadcasting.com/root/twia/wshapiroghp.mp3   

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 601 (10-31-21): Halloween, Water, and the Human Body

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:53).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Image Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-29-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for Halloween 2021.  Besides focusing on autumn's festival of fun and fright, this episode is part of a series this fall about water connections to the human body and human biology. SOUND – ~9 sec That eerie sound of a tree creaking in October wind sets a seasonal stage for a Halloween challenge: exploring how Halloween, water, and human biology all connect.  Sound like quite a trick?  Well, have a listen to some Halloween music for about 50 seconds, and then we'll treat you to some examples. MUSIC - ~50 sec – instrumental You've been listening to “A Little Fright Music,” by Torrin Hallett, a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  And here are six matches of Halloween creatures or images with water in the human body. 1.  Skeleton images rattle around everywhere for Halloween, and in living skeletons water is a significant component of bones and cartilage.  2.  Pretend blood covers many-a Halloween costume, and over half of the volume of blood is plasma, which in turn is over 90 percent water, and water is also a major component of blood cells. 3.  A muscular costume is part of pretending to be a super-strong character like Wonder Woman or Superman; and water plays a significant role in muscle structure and function; in turn, muscle is an important water-storage area for the body. 4.  The monster in movie versions of “Frankenstein” was brought to life by electricity, and the cells of our nervous system transmit messages though electrochemical impulses, using sodium and potassium ions in a water-based solution. 5.  If fiery or icy creatures need some temperature regulation, water's the body fluid that does it. And 6.  Flashing and watching from many creatures on Halloween night are eyes, either scary, suspenseful, or super-powered; and eyes have chambers containing aqueous humor and vitreous humour, two fluids that consist mostly of water and that maintain the shape of the eyes. This Halloween, imagine being a creature that's about 60 percent composed of an amazing substance with unique powers to dissolve other substances, absorb and release heat, and withstand being compressed.  What would you be?  Why, the water-based human being that you are! Thanks to Torrin Hallett for composing this week's music for Virginia Water Radio, and we close with another listen to the last few seconds of “A Little Fright Music.” MUSIC - ~13 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The wind and creaking tree sounds were recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on October 5, 2014.  “A Little Fright Music” is copyright 2020 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was previously used in Episode 548, 10-26-20. Following are other music pieces composed by Torrin Hallett for Virginia Water Radio, with episodes featuring the music. “Beetle Ballet” – used in Episode 525, 5-18-20, on aquatic beetles.“Chesapeake Bay Ballad” – used in Episode 537, 8-10-20, on conditions in the Chesapeake Bay.“Corona Cue” – used in Episode 517, 3-23-20, on the coronavirus pandemic.“Flow Stopper – used in Episode 599, 10-28-21, on the “Imagine a Day Without Water” campaign.“Geese Piece” – used most recently in Episode 440, 10-1-18, on E-bird. “Ice Dance” – used in Episode 556, 12-21-20, on how organisms survive freezing temperatures.“Lizard Lied” – used in Episode 514, 3-2-20, on lizards.“New Year's Water” – used in Episode 349, 1-2-17, on the New Year. “Rain Refrain” – used most recently Episode 559, 1-11-21, on record rainfall in 2020.“Runoff” – in Episode 585, 7-12-21 – on middle-school students calling out stormwater-related water words.“Spider Strike” – used in Episode 523, 5-4-20, on fishing spiders.“Tropical Tantrum” – used most recently in Episode 580, 6-7-21, on the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season preview.“Tundra Swan Song – used in Episode 554, 12-7-20, on Tundra Swans.“Turkey Tune” – used in Episode 343, 11-21-16, on the Wild Turkey.  Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGE Water uses in the human body.  Illustration from the U.S. Geological Survey, “The Water in You: Water and the Human Body,”  https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/water-you-water-and-human-body?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. SOURCES Used for Audio Peter Abrahams, ed., How the Body Works: A Comprehensive, Illustrated Encyclopedia of Anatomy, Metro Books, New York, 2007. American Red Cross, “Blood Components,” online at https://www.redcrossblood.org/donate-blood/how-to-donate/types-of-blood-donations/blood-components.html. Erin Blakemore, “How Twitching Frog Legs Helped Inspire ‘Frankenstein,'” Smithsonian Magazine, December 4, 2015, online at https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/how-twitching-frog-legs-helped-inspire-frankenstein-180957457/. Fandom, “Monster Wiki/Frankenstein's Monster,” online at https://monster.fandom.com/wiki/Frankenstein%27s_Monster. Mayo Clinic Health System, “Water: Essential to your body,” online at https://www.mayoclinichealthsystem.org/hometown-health/speaking-of-health/water-essential-to-your-body. Science Direct:“Aqueous Humor,” online at https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/aqueous-humor;“Vitreous Humour,” online at https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/veterinary-science-and-veterinary-medicine/vitreous-humour. University of Michigan Health, “Eye Anatomy and Function,” as of August 31, 2020, online at https://www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/hw121946. U.S. Geological Survey, “The Water in You: Water and the Human Body,” https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/water-you-water-and-human-body?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. U.S. National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Modules:“Composition of the Blood,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/leukemia/anatomy/composition.html;“Skeletal System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/skeletal/. For More Information about Human Biology, Including Water Aspects American Society of Hematology, “Blood Basics,” online at https://www.hematology.org/education/patients/blood-basics.Cleveland [Ohio] Clinic:“Heart & Blood Vessels: How Does Blood Travel Through Your Body,” online at https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/heart-blood-vessels-blood-flow-body;“Lymphatic System,” online at https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/21199-lymphatic-system. Eric Cudler, “Neuroscience for Kids,” online at https://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/neurok.html. The Franklin Institute of Philadelphia, Penn., “Blood Vessels,” online at https://www.fi.edu/heart/blood-vessels. Isabel Lorenzo et al., “The Role of Water Homeostasis in Muscle Function and Frailty: A Review,” Nutrients, Vol. 11, No. 8 (August 2019, accessed online at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6723611/(subscription may be required for access). Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, “Facts About Blood and Blood Cells,” online at https://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/patient-education/facts-about-blood-and-blood-cells. Science Direct, “Synovial Fluid: Structure and Function,” excerpted from Textbook of Pediatric Rheumatology, 5th Edition, Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2005; accessed online at https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/synovial-fluid(subscription may be required for access). University of Bristol (England), School of Medical Sciences, “Brain Basics: The Fundamentals of Neuroscience,” online at http://www.bris.ac.uk/synaptic/basics/basics-0.html. U.S. National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Modules:“Blood, Heart and Circulation,” online at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/bloodheartandcirculation.html;“Muscular System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/muscular/;“Nervous System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/nervous/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Science” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on connections of water to human biology (much of the information in this week's episode was taken from these previous episodes). Overview of water's roles in the body – Episode 592, 8-30-21.Disease: COVID-19 – Episode 517, 3-23-20 and Episode 519, 4-6-20.Disease: influenza – Episode 393, 11-6-17.Disease: viruses – Episode 600, 10-25-21.Circulatory system connections to water – Episode 593, 9-6-21.Muscular system connections to water – Episode 596, 9-27-21.Neurological system connections to water – Episode 594, 9-13-21.Skeleton system connections to water (with a Halloween theme) – Episode 595, 9-20-21.Water intake and exercise – Episode 466, 4-1-19.Water thermodynamics – Episode 195, 1-6-14. Following are links to other Halloween-themed episodes. Episode 238, 10-31-14 – focusing on the plant Witch-hazel.Episode 548, 10-26-20 – focusing on water-related readings that are supernatural, mysterious, or imaginative. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: MatterK.4 – Water is important in our daily lives and has properties.3.3 – Materials interact with water. Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes4.2 – Plants and animals h

music new york university new year halloween kids school science education college water state zoom sound research tech blood government heart philadelphia ohio environment normal dark monster superman web natural va rain disease ocean atlantic snow netherlands wonder woman amsterdam citizens witch agency stream anatomy priority plants vol biology environmental frankenstein neuroscience bay grade bio national institutes function index fandom processes penn materials pond chemical signature american society virginia tech cells illustration pretend composition accent atlantic ocean life sciences skeleton natural resources nervous system yale school textbooks nutrients compatibility msonormal colorful american red cross ls times new roman human body sections circulation runoff watershed muscular neurological medical science chesapeake flashing oberlin college policymakers conservatory chesapeake bay wild turkey shenandoah blacksburg acknowledgment smithsonian magazine hematology memorial sloan kettering cancer center cosgrove elsevier oberlin cambria math style definitions worddocument manhattan school human biology saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent stormwater punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit blood vessels trackmoves trackformatting lidthemeother snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules virginia department lidthemeasian x none geological survey mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate msonormaltable centergroup latentstylecount donotpromoteqf subsup undovr brkbin brkbinsub mathfont smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc wrapindent sols intlim narylim defunhidewhenused defqformat defpriority defsemihidden lsdexception locked qformat lymphatic system semihidden unhidewhenused latentstyles table normal bmp franklin institute name title name normal name strong name emphasis name intense quote name light shading name dark list accent name light list name colorful shading accent name light grid name colorful list accent name medium shading name colorful grid accent name medium list name subtle emphasis name medium grid name intense emphasis name dark list name subtle reference name colorful shading name intense reference name colorful list name colorful grid name book title name default paragraph font name light shading accent name bibliography name subtitle name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name revision name table grid name list paragraph name placeholder text name quote name no spacing living systems grades k name e msohyperlink cumberland gap light accent dark accent colorful accent circulatory name list name date name plain text name salutation name table list name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name normal indent name table web name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name list number name normal table name plain table name closing name no list name grid table light name signature name outline list name grid table name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name list table name message header name table columns michigan health bristol england blood cells torrin mayo clinic health system peter abrahams ben cosgrove audio notes erin blakemore water center tmdl donotshowrevisions virginia standards
Review That Review with Chelsey Donn & Trey Gerrald
Episode 19: Lizard's Thicket / The Franklin Institute

Review That Review with Chelsey Donn & Trey Gerrald

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 60:34


In a Special HOME STATE Themed Episode, The Review Queens inspect 1 Star Reviews for beloved places from their childhood.  The Queens tackle a 1 Star Yelp review for Lizard's Thicket restaurant in Columbia, South Carolina, and a 1 dot TripAdvisor review for The Franklin Institute children's museum in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  Chelsey takes over, Trey dresses in all black, and thankfully you can press pause. https://reviewthatreview.us1.list-manage.com/subscribe/post?u=f8634011bef332e917e868253&id=a65c8f7884 (Click Here) to Join the Queendom Mailing List for your chance to win a Newsletter Exclusive Raffle! (06:39) Lodge a Complaint! (11:25) Lizard's Thicket Review (30:18) Meryl-Go-Round (35:47) Franklin Institute Review (52:15) My Royal Highness (58:49) Exclusive Review Queen Offer: https://www.superchewer.com/queen   ***** Leave us a voicemail at 1-850-REVIEW-0 WATCH CLIPS onhttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfhCAcirZKQb9E2NxI5BiJg ( YouTube)! Visit our website for more:http://www.reviewthatreview.com/ ( www.ReviewThatReview.com) @TheReviewQueens | @ChelseyBD | @TreyGerrald   --- Review That Review is an independent podcast.  Executive Produced by Trey Gerrald and Chelsey Donn with editing and sound design by Trey Gerrald.  Cover art designed by LogoVora, voiceover talents by Eva Kaminsky, and our theme song was written by Joe Kinosian and sung by Natalie Weiss. Support this podcast

Startup Life Show with Ande Lyons
EP 149 How to Successfully Transition from Employee to Entrepreneur

Startup Life Show with Ande Lyons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 64:31


Over 4 million businesses were launched last year – a 24% increase from the year before and the biggest increase on record.However, many of these newly minted founders struggled with the transition from being an employee to being an entrepreneur.Our guest, Tina Wells, is an entrepreneur, business strategist, advisor, best-selling author, and the founder of RLVNT Media, a multimedia content venture serving entrepreneurs, tweens and culturists with authentic representation.Tina dove into entrepreneurship at the tender age of 16 when she founded Buzz Marketing Group. For over two decades she built and led the brand with clients like Dell, The Oprah Winfrey Network, Kroger, Apple, P+G, Johnson & Johnson, and American Eagle.She connected these large brands with her network of 30,000 buzzSpotters® and 7,000 “momSpotters,” all influential millennials and passionate end-consumers.Throughout her entrepreneurial journey, Tina has always been committed to helping other entrepreneurs succeed. She's been recognized by Fast Company's 100 Most Creative People in Business, Essence's 40 Under 40 and more.Tina's board positions have included THINX, the United Nations Foundation's Global Entrepreneurs Council, The Franklin Institute and Young Entrepreneur's Council. She has also served as the Academic Director for Wharton's Leadership in the Business World Program at the University of Pennsylvania.Tina has authored seven books, including the best-selling tween fiction series Mackenzie Blue, its 2020 spinoff series, The Zee Files, and the marketing handbook, Chasing Youth Culture and Getting It Right.Learn more about Tina's remarkable work in the world here: Join Tina's Elevation Tribe here: https://elevationtribe.com/RLVNT Media: https://rlvntmedia.com/Tina's tween fiction books at Target: Zee Files: https://www.target.com/p/the-zee-files-target-exclusive-edition-by-tina-wells-hardcover/-/A-80880845Honest June: https://www.target.com/p/honest-june-target-exclusive-edition-by-tina-wells-hardcover/-/A-82754654McKenzie Blue: https://www.target.com/p/mackenzie-blue-by-tina-wells-paperback/-/A-81529108Follow Tina everywhere she glows on social:LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tinawells/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/twells17 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tinawells_/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/tinacwellsBuy The Art of Less Doing: https://amzn.to/2WVmmKx00:00 - Meet Tina!06:20 - launching a business at the tender age of 1614:00 - becoming an advisor to 167 students forming 16 companies26:25 - outstanding marketing advice for startup founders29:00 - Tina's artistpreneur journey - she's the author of tween books Zee Files, Honest June and McKenzie Blue and she used her marketing brilliance to create the best stories for her "reader" segment32:00 - a features and benefits exercise for your startup35:25 - the best project management productivity tool for your startupTina's Elevation "4 seasons" approach to launching and bringing things to fruition: preparation, inspiration, recreation and transformation37:15 - why Tina launched Elevation Tribe for Women of Color Founders41:10 - the exciting news for women of color founders46:15 - we need FRIENDTORS - Stitch that on a Pillow!!55:31 - what compelled Tina to launch RLVNT Media58:20 - best advice for shifting out of founder doubtThank you for carving out time to improve your Founder Game - when you do better, your business will do better - cheers!Ande Lyonshttp://andelyons.com#howtotransitiontoentrepreneur #tinawells ANDELICIOUS RESOURCES:JOIN STARTUP LIFE LIVE MEETUP GROUPGet an alert whenever I post a new show!https://bit.ly/StartupLifeLIVESTARTUP DOX Do you need attorney reviewed legal documents for your startup? I'm a proud community partner of Startup Dox, a new service provided by Selvarajah Law PC which helps you draw out all the essential paperwork needed to kickstart your business in a super cost-effective way. All the legal you're looking for… only without confusion or frustration. EVERY filing and document comes with an attorney review. You will never do it alone. Visit https://www.thestartupdox.com/ and use my discount code ANDE10 to receive 10% off your order.STREAMYARD OVERLAYS AND GRAPHIC DESIGNNicky Pasquierhttps://www.virtuosoassistant.co.uk/Visit Nicky's CANVA Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLhUDgDHkkma3YhOf7uy8TAbt7HdkXhSjONicky's Canva Presentation Playlist: http://bit.ly/Canva_Present_PlaylistGET VIDEO/AUDIO TRANSCRIBED WITH OTTER.AIhttps://bit.ly/StartupLifeOtter CONNECT WITH ME ONLINE: https://andelyons.com https://twitter.com/AndeLyonshttps://www.facebook.com/StartupLifew... https://www.linkedin.com/in/andelyons/ https://www.instagram.com/ande_lyons/ https://www.pinterest.com/andelyons/ https://angel.co/andelyons TikTok: @andelyonsAnde ♥

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 596 (9-27-21): Water and Muscles

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:09).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImageExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 9-24-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of September 27, 2021.  This episode is part of a series this fall on water connections to the human body and human biology.  This week, we start with some mystery sounds.  Have a listen for about 25 seconds, and see if you know the body system you can hear at work in all of these sounds.  And here's a hint: it'll be a show of strength if you guess this. SOUNDS  - ~23 sec If you guessed the muscular system, you're right!  Walking, dribbling a basketball, lifting weights, and jumping rope all involve some of the over 600 skeletal muscles in the human body.  Skeletal muscles, also called striated or voluntary muscles, are one of three muscle types in the body.  The other two are smooth, or involuntary muscles, found in internal organs; and cardiac muscle in the heart.  Whatever their location or function, muscles have several important connections to water, including the following six. First, water is a major component of muscles, making up over 70 percent of muscle mass. Second, cell volume, that is, the space within cells, is affected by the amount of water that cells contain, or the cells' hydration state.  This is believed to be related to muscle strength and contraction capacity by affecting the shape and function of muscle proteins. Third, water is the medium containing all the dissolved biochemicals that the body needs to function, including those involved in muscular contraction and in nourishing muscle cells. Fourth, water is involved in reactions that release energy from the molecule ATP, and water is associated with the important energy-storage molecule glycogen. Fifth, water helps regulate body temperature, including the heat generated by muscular activity. And sixth, water helps lubricate moveable joints, the structures upon which skeletal muscles act to move parts of the body. Overall, water plays a significant role in muscle strength and function, and muscle, in turn, is an important area of water storage for the body. We close with some music whose title speaks of one of the most common uses of our muscles.  Here's the closing 25 seconds of “Walk This Way For Awhile,” by the Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels. MUSIC - ~25 sec – Lyrics: “…you walk this way for awhile; will you walk this way for awhile?  I think you will, I know you still, I hope you will.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The sounds heard in this episode were recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on September 23, 2021. “Walk This Way for Awhile,” by The Steel Wheels, is from the album “Live at Goose Creek,” recorded October 14, 2010, at Franklin Park Performing Arts Center, Purcellville, Va., and produced by Goose Creek Music; used with permission of The Steel Wheels.  The song is also on The Steel Wheel's 2010 album, “Red Wing.”  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at http://www.thesteelwheels.com/.  More information about Goose Creek Music is available online at http://www.goosecreekmusic.com/.  More information about the Franklin Park Arts Center is available online at http://www.franklinparkartscenter.org/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 286, 10-19-15. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGE Structure of a representative human skeletal muscle.  Illustration from National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Module, “Muscular System/Structure of Skeletal Muscle,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/muscular/structure.html. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE HUMAN MUSCULAR SYSTEM The following information is quoted from the National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Module, “Muscular System/Introduction” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/muscular/. “The muscular system is composed of specialized cells called muscle fibers.  Their predominant function is contractibility.  Muscles, attached to bones or internal organs and blood vessels, are responsible for movement.  Nearly all movement in the body is the result of muscle contraction.  Exceptions to this are the action of cilia, the flagellum on sperm cells, and amoeboid movement of some white blood cells. “The integrated action of joints, bones, and skeletal muscles produces obvious movements such as walking and running.  Skeletal muscles also produce more subtle movements that result in various facial expressions, eye movements, and respiration. “In addition to movement, muscle contraction also fulfills some other important functions in the body, such as posture, joint stability, and heat production.  Posture, such as sitting and standing, is maintained as a result of muscle contraction.  The skeletal muscles are continually making fine adjustments that hold the body in stationary positions.  The tendons of many muscles extend over joints and in this way contribute to joint stability.  This is particularly evident in the knee and shoulder joints, where muscle tendons are a major factor in stabilizing the joint.  Heat production, to maintain body temperature, is an important by-product of muscle metabolism.  Nearly 85 percent of the heat produced in the body is the result of muscle contraction.” SOURCES Used for Audio Ann Baggaley, ed., Human Body, Dorling Kindersley Publishing, New York, N.Y, 2001. Cedric Bryant and Daniel Green, eds., Essentials of Exercise Science, American Council on Exercise, San Diego, Calif., 2017. Michael Houston, Biochemistry Primer for Exercise Science, 3rd Edition, Human Kinetics, Champaign, Ill., 2006. Isabel Lorenzo et al., “The Role of Water Homeostasis in Muscle Function and Frailty: A Review,” Nutrients, Vol. 11, No. 8 (August 2019, accessed online at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6723611/(subscription may be required for access).  National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Modules, “Muscular System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/muscular/. Science Direct, “Synovial Fluid: Structure and Function,” excerpted from Textbook of Pediatric Rheumatology, 5th Edition, Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2005; accessed online at https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/synovial-fluid(subscription may be required for access). Scott Powers and Edward Howley, Exercise Physiology: Theory and Application to Fitness and Performance, 8th Edition, McGraw-Hill, New York, N.Y., 2012.U.S. Geological Survey, “The Water in You: Water and the Human Body, online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/water-you-water-and-human-body?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. For More Information about Water and the Human Body American Society of Hematology, “Blood Basics,” online at https://www.hematology.org/education/patients/blood-basics. Cleveland [Ohio] Clinic, “Heart & Blood Vessels: How Does Blood Travel Through Your Body,” online at https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/heart-blood-vessels-blood-flow-body. Cleveland [Ohio] Clinic, “Lymphatic System,” online at https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/21199-lymphatic-system.Eric Cudler, “Neuroscience for Kids,” online at https://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/neurok.html. Franklin Institute of Philadelphia, Penn., “Blood Vessels,” online at https://www.fi.edu/heart/blood-vessels. Mayo Clinic Health System, “Water: Essential to your body,” online at https://www.mayoclinichealthsystem.org/hometown-health/speaking-of-health/water-essential-to-your-body. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, “Facts About Blood and Blood Cells,” online at https://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/patient-education/facts-about-blood-and-blood-cells. National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Modules, “Nervous System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/nervous/. National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Module, “Skeletal System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/skeletal/.National Institutes of Health/National Library of Medicine, “Blood, Heart and Circulation,” online at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/bloodheartandcirculation.html. University of Bristol (England), School of Medical Sciences, “Brain Basics: The Fundamentals of Neuroscience,” online at http://www.bris.ac.uk/synaptic/basics/basics-0.html. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Science” subject category. Another episode related to human exercise is Episode 483, 7-29-19.  It focuses on buoyancy and drag in the water and is designed for middle school and high school students. Following are links to other episodes on connections of water to human biology.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in fall 2021; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes.  Episode 195, 1-6-14 – Water thermodynamics.Episode 393, 11-6-17 – Disease: Influenza.Episode 466, 4-1-19 – Water intake and sports.Episode 517, 3-23-20 and Episode 519, 4-6-20 – Disease: Water connections to COVID-19.Episode 592, 8-30-21 – Overview of water's roles in the body.Episode 593, 9-6-21 – Circulatory system connections to water.Episode 594, 9-13-21 – Neurological system connections to water.Episode 595, 9-20-21 – Skeletal system connections to water. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: Force, Motion, and Energy5.2 – Energy can take many forms.5.3 – There is a relationship between force and energy of moving objects. Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes4.2 – Plants and animals have structures that distinguish them from one another and play vital roles in their ability to survive. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment. Life ScienceLS.2 – All living things are composed of one or more cells that support life processes, as described by the cell theory.LS.4 – There are chemical processes of energy transfer which are important for life. BiologyBIO.2 – Chemical and biochemical processes are essential for life.BIO.3 – Cells have structure and function. Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rdgrade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16

covid-19 music new york university live kids school science education college water state zoom energy research tech blood government fitness heart philadelphia performance walking medicine san diego environment exercise normal dark web natural heat va force rain ocean snow netherlands amsterdam citizens agency stream structure priority plants vol biology motion environmental application neuroscience essentials bay grade bio national institutes function index lyrics processes penn posture pond chemical signature american society virginia tech muscles cells ill illustration scales calif accent atlantic ocean life sciences atp natural resources nervous system exercise science textbooks nutrients compatibility msonormal colorful ls times new roman human body sections circulation watershed walk this way neurological medical science american council exceptions calibri chesapeake mcgraw hill champaign policymakers awhile new standard blacksburg acknowledgment hematology memorial sloan kettering cancer center elsevier cambria math skeletal red wing style definitions worddocument saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent stormwater punctuationkerning harrisonburg breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit blood vessels trackmoves trackformatting lidthemeother snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules lidthemeasian geological survey x none mathpr virginia department latentstyles deflockedstate msonormaltable centergroup donotpromoteqf subsup undovr latentstylecount ar sa mathfont brkbin brkbinsub dispdef lmargin smallfrac rmargin defjc wrapindent sols intlim narylim defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority qformat lsdexception locked semihidden lymphatic system unhidewhenused latentstyles table normal bmp human kinetics franklin institute name title name normal name strong name emphasis name medium list name colorful grid accent name medium grid name subtle emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference name colorful list name intense reference name default paragraph font name colorful grid name book title name subtitle name light shading accent name bibliography name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name light grid name colorful shading accent name medium shading name colorful list accent cripple creek daniel green skeletal muscle living systems grades k name e msohyperlink scott powers steel wheels cumberland gap light accent dark accent colorful accent name list circulatory purcellville goose creek name plain text name date name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name normal indent name table web name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name list number name normal table name plain table name closing name no list name grid table light name signature name outline list name grid table name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name message header name table columns name list table name salutation name table list name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant rockingham county bristol england blood cells mayo clinic health system audio notes msobodytext water center tmdl donotshowrevisions virginia standards
This Week in America with Ric Bratton
Episode 2262: THE LIFE AND STORY OF ONE-EYED JOE ED SMITH: AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY

This Week in America with Ric Bratton

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 21:32


THE LIFE AND STORY OF ONE-EYED JOE ED SMITH: AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY by Joe Edward SmithI am writing this book to tell the story of a kid from Everett who joined the Army in the early 1960s and served in Korea, Asia, and West Germany. As a young man, I believed then as I do now about service above self. I hope that this story will be meaningful to the reader. I am inspired by my experiences with the Army; the US Postal Service; the Franklin Institute of Boston; the University of Lowell; the Massachusetts Department of Public Works; Saint Michael Parish; the town of North Andover, Massachusetts; and numerous other institutions. I've had my share of life's ups and downs, but the downs have been few, so I guess you can say I've been lucky and will add that it's all because of you, the people I have known. As I write this, my life's story, between each line of pain and glory, I want you to know: the town of North Andover-you are the best thing that ever happened to me!The Life and Story of One-Eyed Joe Ed Smith: An Autobiography: Smith, Joe Edward: 9781662437090: Amazon.com: Bookshttp://www.bluefunkbroadcasting.com/root/twia/jedsmith.mp3

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 593 (9-6-21): Water's at the Heart of Blood

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:19).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 9-3-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of September 6, 2021.  This revised episode from October 2017 is part of a series this fall of episodes on water connections to the human body and human biology. SOUND - ~3 secHow is a human heartbeat part of a water story?  Have a listen for about 25 seconds to the following mystery sounds, and see if you can guess the heart-and-water connections they represent.  And here's a hint: if you have the energy, you could follow many branches to this solution.SOUNDS - ~21 secYou've been listening to sounds from a platelets donation at the American Red Cross' New River Valley Donor Center in Blacksburg, Virginia.  The sounds—a blood-pressure measurement, a needle stick into an arm vein, and the machine separating blood components and recirculating fluid to the patient—illustrate three connections between the human circulatory system and water.First, the heart provides a force—measured by blood pressure—to keep blood circulating around the body, like the sun's energy powers evaporation and winds that help keep water circulating around the earth.  Second, arm veins are part of an intricately branched system of arteries, veins, and capillaries, resembling a watershed's branching pattern as one travels uphill from ocean to river to headwater streams.   Humans have an estimated 60,000 to 100,000 miles of blood vessels, compared to Virginia's approximately 100,000 miles of rivers and streams.  Finally, blood's components are mostly water: blood plasma is a solution of water and many biochemicals, mixed with water-based red and white blood cells and with platelets.  As a result, blood in the human system has water's physical and chemical properties for transporting materials and regulating heat.Cells and transported substances make blood “thicker” than water, just as the saying goes.  But the water we borrow temporarily from the global water cycle is at the chemical and physical heart of blood and the circulatory system's vital functions.Thanks to staff at the New River Valley Donor Center for participating in this episode, and thanks to Soundbible.com for the heartbeat sound. We close with some music inspired by the action of the human heart.  Here's about 20 seconds of “Heartbeat,” by the Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels. MUSIC - ~23 sec –Lyrics - “Feel my heartbeat comin' in next to you; heartbeat, yes you do.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 392, 10-30-17, and Episode 236, 10-20-14. The human heartbeat sound was recorded by Mike Koenig and made available (9/14/09 upload) online at the Soundbible.com Web site, http://soundbible.com/1001-Heartbeat.html, for public use under the Creative Commons license “Attribution 3.0”; for more information on Creative Commons licenses, please see https://creativecommons.org/licenses/; information on the Attribution License specifically is online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/. Other sounds heard in this episode were recorded at the American Red Cross New River Donor Center in Blacksburg, Virginia, during an October 19, 2014, platelet donation by Virginia Water Radio host Alan Raflo.  Thanks to the staff at the Donor Center for their help and for allowing the sound recording.  For information about blood and platelet donations, please visit the American Red Cross' “Donating Blood” Web site at http://www.redcrossblood.org/donating-blood.