Coaching for Leaders

Follow Coaching for Leaders
Share on
Copy link to clipboard

Leaders aren't born, they're made. This Monday show helps you discover leadership wisdom through insightful conversations. Independently produced weekly since 2011, Dr. Dave Stachowiak brings perspective from a thriving, global leadership academy, plus more than 15 years of leadership at Dale Carnegie. Bestselling authors, expert researchers, deep conversation, and regular dialogue with listeners have attracted 15 million downloads and the #1 search result for coaching on Apple Podcasts. Activate your FREE membership to search the entire episode library by topic at CoachingforLeaders.com

Dave Stachowiak


    • Jun 27, 2022 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekly NEW EPISODES
    • 37m AVG DURATION
    • 597 EPISODES

    Listeners of Coaching for Leaders that love the show mention: coaching for leaders, dave and his guests, dave interviews, stachowiak, leaders podcast, dave's podcast, leadership and management, dave is an excellent, leadership coaching, dave also, great guests and conversations, leading others, leadership resource, new managers, dave provides, dave does a great job, leadership role, dave really, podcast on leadership, direct reports.



    Search for episodes from Coaching for Leaders with a specific topic:

    Latest episodes from Coaching for Leaders

    586: How to Involve Stakeholders in Decisions, with Eric Pliner

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 33:07

    Eric Pliner: Difficult Decisions Eric Pliner is chief executive officer of YSC Consulting. He has designed and implemented leadership strategy in partnership with some of the world's best-known CEOs and organizations. Eric's writing has been featured in Harvard Business Review, Fortune, Forbes, and Fast Company. A member of the Dramatists' Guild of America, Eric is co-author of the U.S. National Standards for Health Education and Spooky Dog & the Teen-Age Gang Mysteries (with Amy Rhodes), an Off-Broadway theatrical parody of television cartoons for adults. He is a board director with Hip Hop Public Health. He is also the author of Difficult Decisions: How Leaders Make the Right Call with Insight, Integrity, and Empathy*. In this conversation, Eric and I discuss the difficult and sometimes awkward moments when we engage other stakeholders in our decisions. We explore the language to use when discussing a stakeholder's role in a decision. Plus, Eric details how to establish clear expectations about involvement in decisions to avoid sending messages that we otherwise don't intend. Key Points Clarify who you will engage and how you intend to do so. Before discussing a decision with a stakeholder, explain how the decision is going to be made. Make it clear if you're offering them a views, a voice, a vote, or a veto. Standardize your individual and team processes for decision-making. Ask the stakeholder for input — and go deeper with a second or third question to appreciate what's behind what they've said. Remind stakeholders how the decision will be made when you conclude. Don't underestimated the importance of this step. Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Influence Many Stakeholders, with Andy Kaufman (episode 240) How to Deal with Opponents and Adversaries, with Peter Block (episode 328) The Way to Make Better Decisions, with Annie Duke (episode 499) Handling a Difficult Stakeholder, with Nick Timiraos (episode 581) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    585: How Top Leaders Influence Great Teamwork, with Scott Keller

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 39:46

    Scott Keller: CEO Excellence Scott is a senior partner in McKinsey's Southern California office. He co-leads the firm's global CEO Excellence service line and is the author of six books, including the bestseller Beyond Performance. Scott spent his early consulting years working on business strategy and operational topics until his life was turned upside down when his second child was born with profound special needs. After taking time off to attend to his family, Scott returned to McKinsey with the desire to bring the best of psychology, social science, and the study of human potential into the workplace. He is a cofounder of Digital Divide Data and one of a few hundred people in history known to have traveled to every country in the world. His most recent book written with Carolyn Dewar and Vikram Malhotra is titled CEO Excellence: The Six Mindsets That Distinguish the Best Leaders from the Rest*. In this conversation, Scott and I examine McKinsey's research on what the top CEOs do (and avoid) when building great teams. We look at a few of the key mindsets that the best CEOs bring to their organizations — and how teamwork plays into this. Plus, we explore some of the key questions top leaders should ask when determining if it's time to exit someone from the team. Key Points Top leaders staff for both aptitude and attitude. The have an eye to both the short and long term. The most successful CEOs have a mindset of “first team” and expect leaders in the organization to prioritize serving the whole team/organization over any functional area. New CEOs are often known for acting quickly on staffing, but the most successful leaders also temper this with fairness. They use the four questions below to act with both fairness and speed. Top leaders stay connected with people throughout the organization, but also keep some distance. There's a key distinction between being friendly and making friends. The best CEO's ensure that they have positively addressed all four questions below before removing somebody: Does the team member know exactly what's expected of them: i.e., what the agenda is and what jobs need to be done to drive that agenda? Have they been given the needed tools and resources, and a chance to build the necessary skills and confidence to use them effectively? Are they surrounded by others (including the CEO) who are aligned on a common direction and who display the desired mindsets and behaviors? Is it clear what the consequences are if they don't get on board and deliver? Resources Mentioned CEO Excellence: The Six Mindsets That Distinguish the Best Leaders from the Rest* by Carolyn Dewar, Scott Keller, and Vikram Malhotra The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate - Discoveries from a Secret World* by Peter Wohlleben Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Create Team Guidelines, with Susan Gerke (episode 192) How to Sell Your Vision, with Michael Hyatt (episode 482) Your Leadership Motive, with Patrick Lencioni (episode 505) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    584: The Starting Point for Inclusive Leadership, with Susan MacKenty Brady

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 38:03

    Susan MacKenty Brady: Arrive and Thrive Susan MacKenty Brady is the Deloitte Ellen Gabriel Chair for Women and Leadership at Simmons University and the first Chief Executive Officer of The Simmons University Institute for Inclusive Leadership. As a relationship expert, leadership wellbeing coach, author, and speaker, Susan educates leaders and executives globally on fostering self-awareness for optimal leadership. Susan advises executive teams on how to work together effectively and create inclusion and gender parity in organizations. She is the coauthor, along with Janet Foutty and Lynn Perry Wooten, of The Wall Street Journal bestselling book, Arrive and Thrive: 7 Impactful Practices for Women Navigating Leadership*. In this conversation, Susan and I discuss the reality that while we may intend well on inclusion, real change starts with us first. We explore how implicit bias assessments can be useful in discovering where they bias is that we don't see in ourselves. Plus, we examine some of the key actions we can take on relationship building and repair in order to get better. Key Points Most of us intend well, but we often miss the opportunity to move from being an ally (alignment) to being an upstander (taking action in the moment). Utilizing an assessment can help us understand where our implicit biases diverge from our conscious thoughts. Curiosity and relationship-building isn't just for the moment — it's the before, during, and after of conversations to discover how we get better. When we make a misstep, move quickly and purposefully to repair the relationship. Resources Mentioned Arrive and Thrive: 7 Impactful Practices for Women Navigating Leadership* by Susan MacKenty Brady, Janet Foutty, and Lynn Perry Wooten The Inclusive Leader's Playbook by Susan MacKenty Brady, Elisa van Dam, and Loe Lee Project Implicit: Implicit Association Tests Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes What You Gain By Sponsoring People, with Julia Taylor Kennedy (episode 398) How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404) How to Be More Inclusive, with Stefanie Johnson (episode 508) How to Reduce Bias in Feedback, with Therese Huston (episode 510) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    583: How to Give Feedback, with Russ Laraway

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 38:25

    Russ Laraway: When They Win, You Win Russ has had a diverse 28 year operational management career. He was a Company Commander in the Marine Corps before starting his first company, Pathfinders. From there, Russ went to the Wharton School, and then onto management roles at Google and Twitter. He then co-founded Candor, Inc., along with best selling author and past guest Kim Scott. Over the last several years, Russ served as the Chief People Officer at Qualtrics, and is now the Chief People Officer for the fast-growing venture capital firm, Goodwater Capital, where he is helping Goodwater and its portfolio companies to empower their people to do great work and be totally psyched while doing it. He's the author of the book When They Win, You Win: Being a Great Manager Is Simpler Than You Think*. It's the job of every leader to give feedback. In this episode, Russ and I discuss what to say and what to avoid when giving feedback. Plus, we explore how to think about truth and the most effective ways to start and close feedback conversations in order to help everybody move forward. Key Points Avoid spending too much time talking about the impending conversation and just have the conversation. Use language like this: “I think I'm seeing some behavior that I believe is getting in your way. Are you in a spot where you can hear that right now?” Use the framework of situation, behavior/work, and impact in order to organize your feedback. Invite dialogue by asking: “What are your thoughts about that?” Avoid framing feedback discussions around “the truth” — there are always multiple truths in every discussion like this. You are offering them what you see. Resources Mentioned When They Win, You Win: Being a Great Manager Is Simpler Than You Think* by Russ Laraway When They Win, You Win website Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Three Steps to Soliciting Feedback, with Tom Henschel (episode 107) Three Steps to Great Career Conversations, with Russ Laraway (episode 370) How to Balance Care and Accountability When Leading Remotely, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 464) How to Reduce Bias in Feedback, with Therese Huston (episode 510) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    582: How to Compare Yourself to Others, with Mollie West Duffy

    Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 38:54

    Mollie West Duffy: Big Feelings Mollie West Duffy is an expert in organizational design, development, and leadership coaching. She previously was an organizational design lead at global innovation firm IDEO. She's helped advise and coach leaders and founders at companies including Casper, Google, LinkedIn, Bungalow, and Slack. She's experienced in designing talent processes and systems, as well as organizational structures and behaviors, cultural values, and learning and development programs. She's written for Harvard Business Review, Fast Company, Entrepreneur, Quartz, and other digital outlets. She co-founded the Capital Good Fund, Rhode Island's first microfinance fund. She is the co-author with Liz Fosslien of the Wall Street Journal bestseller No Hard Feelings: The Secret Power of Embracing Emotions at Work and now their second book Big Feelings: How To Be Okay When Things Are Not Okay*. We've all heard the well-intended advice that we should not compare ourselves to others. In this conversation, Mollie and I explore why that almost impossible to do and how we can instead cooperate a bit more with the inevitable and make our comparisons more useful. We highlight some of the key ways that comparison and help us and where leaning in may actually be useful in your own happiness and development. Key Points It's a myth that the less you compare yourself to others, the better. Often, the opposite is true: we don't compare ourselves enough. We tend to compare our weaknesses to other people's strengths. Finding ways to curate our inputs is often much more useful. Shifting from malicious envy to benign envy is helpful. Thoughts such as “I'm inspired by what they've done…” or “I haven't done what they've done…yet,” can move us to a healthier place. We see the best of people on social media. It's helpful to piece together the missing footage by comparing some of the nitty gritty. Compare present you against past you. Resources Mentioned Big Feelings: How To Be Okay When Things Are Not Okay* by Liz Fosslien and Mollie West Duffy How to Manage Your Anger at Work by Liz Fosslien and Mollie West Duffy Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Four Steps to Get Unstuck and Embrace Change, with Susan David (episode 297) What to Do With Your Feelings, with Lori Gottlieb (episode 438) How to Reduce Burnout, with Jennifer Moss (episode 561) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    581: Handling a Difficult Stakeholder, with Nick Timiraos

    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 36:19

    Nick Timiraos: Trillion Dollar Triage Nick Timiraos has been the chief economics correspondent at The Wall Street Journal since 2017, where he is responsible for covering the Federal Reserve and other major developments in U.S. economic policy. He joined the Journal in 2006 and previously covered the 2008 presidential election. He wrote about U.S. housing markets and the mortgage industry as a reporter based in New York. His coverage included the government's response to the foreclosure crisis and the takeover of finance companies Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Nick is the author of Trillion Dollar Triage: How Jay Powell and the Fed Battled a President and a Pandemic -- and Prevented Economic Disaster*. Key Points Some of Federal Reserve Chair Jerome “Jay” Powell's core skills have helped him navigate difficult stakeholders: He's highly regarded as a good listener with excellent emotional intelligence. He's intentional about creating strong teams and espoused the value of teamwork regularly. He is mindful of daily events, but is always playing the long game. He speaks in plain language that makes sense to many people, regardless of their education level. Specifically, four unwritten rules of dealing with a difficult stakeholder like Donald Trump emerged in Nick's analysis of Jay Powell's public appearances: Don't talk about Trump. When provoked, don't return fire. Stick to the economy, not politics. Develop allies outside the Oval Office. Resources Mentioned Trillion Dollar Triage: How Jay Powell and the Fed Battled a President and a Pandemic -- and Prevented Economic Disaster* by Nick Timiraos Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Listen When Someone Is Venting, with Mark Goulston (episode 91) How to Handle a Boss Who's a Jerk, with Tom Henschel (episode 164) The Way Out of Major Conflict, with Amanda Ripley (episode 529) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    580: Help People Show Up as Themselves, with Frederic Laloux

    Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 37:47

    Frederic Laloux: Reinventing Organizations Frederic is the author of Reinventing Organizations: A Guide to Creating Organizations Inspired by the Next Stage of Human Consciousness*. The book is a global word-of-mouth bestseller with over 850,000 copies sold in 20 languages. Frederic's work has inspired the founders of Extinction Rebellion, the Sunrise Movement, and Project Drawdown, as well as countless corporate leaders and faith movements. In a past life, he was an associate principal with McKinsey & Company. He's also the creator of the Insights for the Journey video series. In this conversation, Frederic and I explore a place where almost every leader can have a meaningful impact: helping people show up as their whole selves. We discuss how critical it is for leaders to lead the way in doing this — and how storytelling can be an important entry point. We look at some of practical actions leaders can take to enter into a place of wholeness, including elevating beyond content, using everyday language, and integrating with the work at hand. Key Points As a leader, wholeness begins with you. Exploring wholeness yourself sets the stage for everyone else to be able to engage more fully. Rather than talking lots about wholeness, it's often helpful just to begin modeling it. When you do, everyday language us useful to help others engage. Your personal history, the history of the organization, and the organization's purpose are often helpful stories to share that open up a space for wholeness. You can turn any conversation into a moment of wholeness. One invitation for leaders is to stop talking about content and elevate the dialogue to “what's happening” overall. Resist any temptation to disconnect wholeness from the work at hand. Bringing these together helps people to show up at work more authentically. Resources Mentioned Reinventing Organizations: A Guide to Creating Organizations Inspired by the Next Stage of Human Consciousness* by Frederic Laloux Reinventing Organizations: An Illustrated Invitation to Join the Conversation on Next-Stage Organizations* by Frederic Laloux Insights for the Journey video series by Frederic Laloux Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Stay Grounded, with Parker Palmer (episode 378) How to Be More Inclusive, with Stefanie Johnson (episode 508) The Path Towards Trusting Relationships, with Edgar Schein and Peter Schein (episode 539) End Imposter Syndrome in Your Organization, with Jodi-Ann Burey (episode 556) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    579: How to Pitch Your Manager, with Tom Henschel

    Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 38:10

    Tom Henschel: The Look & Sound of Leadership Tom Henschel of Essential Communications grooms senior leaders and executive teams. As an internationally recognized expert in the field of workplace communications and self-presentation, he has helped thousands of leaders achieve excellence through his work as an executive coach and his top-rated podcast, The Look & Sound of Leadership. In this conversation, Tom and I explore the sometimes awkward moment of needing to get buy-in from your manager on a next step, proposal, or funding. We detail three considerations and how attention to them can help you frame this conversation better. Plus, we share tactics such as making the business case, telling a story, and past interactions — in order to help you get forward movement. Key Points Three lenses of consideration are helpful when considering how to pitch you manager: purpose, preference, and protocol. When framing your purpose in making a pitch, it's helpful to be able to change altitude. Consider “clicking out” on a map to frame the bigger picture. To be purposeful, make sure you are making the business case for whatever you are pitching. Anger and emotion can be sentinels that you might not have moved past thinking about it personally or framed the business context fully. Consider past interactions with your manager on how they prefer to receive information. The way you pitch them should begin with their preferences, not yours. Get intel in advance from other stakeholders, if practical. They can help you see the variables that might be clouding your judgement if you're too close to the situation. Clearly frame the problem and examples of it. Consider strutting your pitch in the framework of The Want, The Obstacle, and The Resolution (see PDF below). Resources Mentioned Storytelling: A Three-Part Model by Tom Henschel (PDF download) Related Episodes How to Start Managing Up, with Tom Henschel (episode 433) The Way to Influence Executives, with Nancy Duarte (episode 450) The Way to Make Sense to Others, with Tom Henschel (episode 518) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    578: Leadership When Others Know More Than You, with Bonni Stachowiak

    Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 37:16

    Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, Dean of Teaching and Learning and Professor of Business and Management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, she was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. Bonni is the author of The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide*. Listener Questions Allison asked for resources on how to lead others who are more knowledgeable than you in the field of work. Everett wondered how he can navigate a situation where accents make it difficult to understand interview candidates. Stephen asked about motivating people independent of incentives. Resources Mentioned The Empowered Manager: Positive Political Skills at Work* by Peter Block Drive* by Daniel Pink Effective Delegation of Authority: A (Really) Short Book for New Managers About How to Delegate Work Using a Simple Delegation Process* by Hassan Osman The Coaching Habit* by Michael Bungay Stanier Humble Leadership* by Edgar Schein and Peter Schein HBO Max Presents Brené Brown: Atlas of the Heart Leading with Dignity: How to Create a Culture That Brings Out the Best in People* by Donna Hicks On the folly of rewarding A while hoping for B by Steven Kerr Related Episodes How to Improve Your Coaching Skills, with Tom Henschel (episode 190) How to Motivate People, with Dan Ariely (episode 282) The Path of Humble Leadership, with Edgar Schein and Peter Schein (episode 363) Effective Delegation of Authority, with Hassan Osman (episode 413) Start Finding Overlooked Talent, with Johnny Taylor, Jr. (episode 544) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    577: The Path Towards Joy in Your Career, with David Novak

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 36:47

    David Novak: Take Charge of You David Novak is Co-Founder, retired Chairman and CEO of Yum! Brands, the world's largest restaurant company with over 45,000 restaurants in more than 135 countries and territories. During his tenure as CEO, Yum! Brands became a global powerhouse, growing from $4 billion in revenue to over $32 billion. After retiring in 2016, he became Founder and CEO of David Novak Leadership, dedicated to developing leaders at every stage of life. David is also the host of the top-ranked podcast, How Leaders Lead and founder of the leadership development platform of the same name. An expert on leadership and recognition culture, David is also a New York Times bestselling author. His books include Taking People With You: The Only Way to Make Big Things Happen, O GREAT ONE! A Little Story About the Awesome Power of Recognition, and his latest book with Jason Goldsmith, Take Charge of You: How Self Coaching Can Transform Your Life and Career*. In this conversation, David and I discuss the importance of finding joy in our careers. David highlights several of the key questions that he utilizes when helping others to uncover how joy can show up their work. He encourages us to surface the single biggest thing that's important right now in order to get immediate traction. Key Points Sometimes your best (and only) coach is yourself. Use joy as your destination finder. Find your joy blockers by asking yourself: what's getting in the way of my joy? Your worst days often provide insight on this. Discover your joy builders by asking yourself: what would grow your joy personal and professionally? Your most memorable days are starting points for answers here. Your goal is to surface your single biggest thing. This changes over time, but ideally is only one thing, one at a time. That's how you gain traction. Resources Mentioned Take Charge of You: How Self Coaching Can Transform Your Life and Career* by David Novak and Jason Goldsmith Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Find Your Calling, with Ken Coleman (episode 352) Align Your Work With Your Why, with Kwame Marfo (episode 542) How to Nail a Job Transition, with Sukhinder Singh Cassidy (episode 555) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    576: How to Help People Engage in Growth, with Whitney Johnson

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 38:06

    Whitney Johnson: Smart Growth Whitney Johnson is CEO of the tech-enabled talent development company Disruption Advisors, an Inc. 5000 fastest-growing private company in America. As one of the top ten business thinkers in the world as named by Thinkers50, Whitney is an expert at smart growth leadership. She has worked at FORTUNE 100 companies, and as an award-winning equity analyst on Wall Street. Whitney co-founded the Disruptive Innovation Fund with the late Clayton Christensen. She has coached alongside Marshall Goldsmith, selected by him in 2017 as a Top 15 Coach out of a pool of more than 17,000 candidates. She is the author of Disrupt Yourself and the host of the podcast of the same name. She is also the author of Smart Growth: How to Grow Your People to Grow Your Company*. In this conversation, Whitney and I explore a big reality of growth; it's often slow at the start. We discuss three practical steps that leaders can take for both themselves and others to stay engaging during the early stages of growth. Key Points Auditing some of your roles, secrets, beliefs, values, and boundaries will help you move forward along the growth path. Listen to the stories that others tell and help them link past experiences with what's important today. Images are a critical entry point to growth. Utilize them in addition to the new behavior itself to begin to frame your thinking and identity. Circle back after receiving feedback and show others what you've learned from it and how it's changed your behavior. That motivates them to stay invested. Use “I am” statements that have a noun rather than a verb. Instead of “I run,” consider saying, “I am a runner.” Resources Mentioned Smart Growth: How to Grow Your People to Grow Your Company* by Whitney Johnson Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Become the Person You Want to Be, with James Clear (episode 376) How to Motivate Leaders, with John Maxwell (episode 452) How to Win the Long Game When the Short-Term Seems Bleak, with Dorie Clark (episode 550) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    575: Make It Easier to Challenge Authority, with Richard Rierson

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 36:58

    Richard Rierson: Dose of Leadership Richard Rierson has over 30 years of real-world, practical leadership experience as a United States Marine Corps Officer, professional aviator, and corporate executive. His philosophy is that our leadership challenges should be met with the lifelong dedication and pursuit of becoming composed, confident, consistent, courageous, and compassionate. In addition to being a sought after speaker, coach, and consultant, he is the host of the highly acclaimed Dose of Leadership podcast. He's also a commercial airline pilot, currently flying as a first officer on the Boeing 787 Dreamliner. In this conversation, Richard and I explore how professional aviation emerged from the accidents of the 1970's to improve challenging authority inside the cockpit. We discuss the principles of crew resource management (CRM) and how more structure and intention between crew members vastly reduced the number of aviation accidents. We examine what leaders can do to use similar principles to support appropriately challenged authority inside their organizations. Key Points Almost every accident is a chain of events. The key is to have self awareness in the chain and to interrupt it. Making the invitation to challenge before the work begins makes it far more likely that another party will speak up when they see something. Pilots use green, yellow, and red as simple and immediate indicator to others in the cockpit how much stress they are holding. Three steps are use to pilots to escalate challenging a more senior pilot: ask a question, make a suggestion, take control i.e. “my aircraft.” Resources Mentioned Sully with Tom Hanks The Crash of Flight 401, and the Lessons for Your Company by Dave Yarin The Evolution of Airline Crew Resource Management by Jean Dennis Marcellin Related Episodes The Way to Turn Followers Into Leaders, with David Marquet (episode 241) How to Deal with Opponents and Adversaries, with Peter Block (episode 328) How to Talk to People Who Have Power, with Jordan Harbinger (episode 343) How to Use Power Responsibly, with Vanessa Bohns (episode 551) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    574: How to Reduce Frictions That Slow Good Intentions, with Deepa Purushothaman

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 40:00

    Deepa Purushothaman: The First, The Few, The Only Deepa is the co-founder of nFormation, a company which provides a brave, safe, and new space for professionals who are women of color. She spent more than twenty years at Deloitte and was a first herself: an Indian American woman and one of the youngest people to make partner in the company's history. In her time there, she helped grow Deloitte's Social Impact Practice, served as a National Managing Partner of Inclusion, and served as the Managing Partner of WIN—the firm's renowned program to recruit, retain, and advance women. Deepa speaks extensively on women and leadership. She has been featured at national conferences and in publications including Bloomberg BusinessWeek, The Huffington Post, and Harvard Business Review. She is the author of The First, The Few, The Only: How Women of Color can Redefine Power in Corporate America*. Key Points The corporate space has not fostered true equity. Often, many of us don't see the systemic examples each day of friction. “We can't find you,” is an often believed delusion when companies intend to attract more women of color. “I don't see color,” is often a well-intended belief, but in practice often marginalizes the lives experiences of women of color. “DEI will fix it all,” is an illusion. We all should be supporting peers in formal DEI roes to volunteer, show up, and be key partners in the work that benefits all of you. “You got white-manned,” reflects the belief that the world has to be a zero-sum competition. Resources Mentioned The First, The Few, The Only: How Women of Color can Redefine Power in Corporate America* by Deepa Purushothaman Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Start Finding Overlooked Talent, with Johnny Taylor, Jr. (episode 544) The Way Managers Can be Champions for Justice, with Minda Harts (episode 552) Overcome Resistance to New Ideas, with David Schonthal (episode 557) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    573: How to Protect Your Confidence, with Nate Zinsser

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 38:44

    Nate Zinsser: The Confident Mind Nate Zinsser is an expert in the psychology of human performance. He has been at the forefront of applied sport psychology for over thirty years. He has been a regular consultant to the Philadelphia Flyers and New York Giants as well as a consultant for the FBI Academy, the U.S. Army World Class Athlete Program, the U.S. Army Recruiting Command, and the U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit. Since 1992 he has directed a cutting edge applied sport psychology program at the United States Military Academy's Center for Enhanced Performance, personally conducting over seventeen thousand individual training sessions and seven hundred team training sessions for cadets seeking the mental edge for athletic, academic, and military performance. His most recent book is titled The Confident Mind: A Battle-Tested Guide for Unshakable Performance*. In this conversation, Nate and I explore the reality that almost every leader faces: continual challenges to our own confidence. We examine some of the misconceptions around confidence and how those misperceptions tend to limit us. Then, we discuss the most effective practices you can use to maintain — and improve — the confidence that you've already built. Key Points It's a misconception that once you become confident, you'll stay that way forever. Confidence has little to do with what happens to you and tons to do with how you think about what happens to you. For a more constructive attitude when bad things happen, use these three elements: decide that it's temporary, limited, and non-representative. To win the battle with your own negative thinking, acknowledge the negativity, silence it, and then replace it with something better to get the last word. Protecting your confidence is an ongoing practice. You'll never stop doing it — but the good news is that it will give you an edge if you can develop this practice. Resources Mentioned The Confident Mind: A Battle-Tested Guide for Unshakable Performance* by Nate Zinsser Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Make Sense to Others, with Tom Henschel (episode 518) How to Build Confidence, with Katy Milkman (episode 533) How to Speak Up, with Connson Locke (episode 546) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    572: The Key Indicators of Team Resilience, with Keith Ferrazzi

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 35:00

    Keith Ferrazzi: Competing in the New World of Work Keith Ferrazzi is the founder and chairman of Ferrazzi Greenlight, a management consulting and coaching company that works to transform many of the largest organizations and governments in the world. A graduate of Harvard Business School, Keith rose to become the youngest chief marketing officer of a Fortune 500 company during his career at Deloitte and later became CMO and head of sales at Starwood Hotels. He has contributed to Harvard Business Review, Forbes, Fortune, and The Wall Street Journal and is The New York Times number one bestselling author of Who's Got Your Back, Never Eat Alone, and Leading Without Authority. He is the co-author with Kian Gohar and Noel Weyrich of Competing in the New World of Work*. In this conversation, Keith and I discuss what his team and him have learned from the most resilient teams they've supported. We explore some of the most useful strategies to build a more resilient team and highlight key actions that will help leaders and teams through challenging times. Key Points Resilient teams have compassion and empathy for each other. They show care through both success and failure. Humility is the ability to ask for help. Resilient teams have a culture that supports and encourages this. Many leaders espouse candor for their teams, but far less actually have teams with candor. Resilient teams speak truth — and it's up to leaders to show them the way. Resourceful teams develop solutions at a higher velocity. They use systems and structures to move past challenges and doubts more quickly. Resources Mentioned Competing in the New World of Work* by Keith Ferrazzi, Kian Gohar, and Noel Weyrich 7 Strategies to Build a More Resilient Team* Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How Great Teams Find Purpose, with David Burkus (episode 481) Leadership Means You Go First, with Keith Ferrazzi (episode 488) How to Engage Remote Teams, with Tsedal Neeley (episode 537) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    Key Tactics for Leading Through Ambiguity (4 of 4)

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 10:43

    Lesson 4: How to Avoid Micromanaging We've all had a manager we didn't like — and often they did some form of micromanagement. In this lesson, you'll discover how expectations can help you avoid being a micromanager. Academy Applications Close Friday, March 18th The Academy is a year-long cohort of participant leaders who work personally with me to create movement in their leadership development and organizational results. Discover more and submit your application by Friday, March 18th. Related Episodes Effective Delegation of Authority, with Hassan Osman (episode 413) How to Balance Care and Accountability When Leading Remotely, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 464) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    Key Tactics for Leading Through Ambiguity (3 of 4)

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 5:42

    Lesson 3: Begin With Small, Noticeable Improvements We often feel like the only way to make meaningful change is to tackle a big challenge. However, many sustainable initiatives start with small changes that get noticed. Academy Applications Close Friday, March 18th The Academy is a year-long cohort of participant leaders who work personally with me to create movement in their leadership development and organizational results. Discover more and submit your application by Friday, March 18th. Related Episodes The Way to Conduct One-on-Ones, with Zvi Band (episode 246) How to Generate Quick Wins, with Andy Kaufman (episode 496) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    Key Tactics for Leading Through Ambiguity (2 of 4)

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 8:29

    Lesson 2: Get People Talking With These Questions Open-ended questions will help you gain clarity where ambiguity has taken over. Use the four questions in this lesson to open up dialogue that moves everybody forward. Academy Applications Close Friday, March 18th The Academy is a year-long cohort of participant leaders who work personally with me to create movement in their leadership development and organizational results. Discover more and submit your application by Friday, March 18th. Related Episodes These Coaching Questions Get Results, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 237) How to Ask Better Questions, with David Marquet (episode 454) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    Key Tactics for Leading Through Ambiguity (1 of 4)

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 11:37

    Lesson 1: Your First Steps When Inheriting a Bad Situation Almost every leader has been put into a less than ideal situation. When that's you, use the three steps in this lesson to get moving. Academy Applications Close Friday, March 18th The Academy is a year-long cohort of participant leaders who work personally with me to create movement in their leadership development and organizational results. Discover more and submit your application by Friday, March 18th. Related Episodes How to Start Managing Up, with Tom Henschel (episode 433) The Way to Influence Executives, with Nancy Duarte (episode 450) How to Sell Your Vision, with Michael Hyatt (episode 482) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    571: Engaging People Through Change, with Cassandra Worthy

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 37:54

    Cassandra Worthy: Change Enthusiasm Cassandra Worthy enables organizations and individuals to grow through major change and significant shift by harnessing the power of emotion. Whether undergoing a merger, acquisition, start-up, explosive growth, or significant contraction, the strategies and tools of Change Enthusiasm are motivating and energizing workforces worldwide. Her consulting firm was birthed from the pain and challenges she overcame as a corporate executive. Cassandra's client base spans the Fortune 500, including Procter & Gamble, Allstate, Jones Lang LaSalle, Centene Corporation, ConferenceDirect, and WeWork. She's a chemical engineer by training and also brings over a decade of M&A experience distilled down into the critical leadership traits required to lead with exception during times of change and trans-formation. She's the author of Change Enthusiasm: How to Harness the Power of Emotion for Leadership and Success*. In this conversation Cassandra and I explore the critical importance of emotion in the change process. We detail some of the critical places where leaders often miss opportunities to prioritize employee well-being. Then, Cassandra shares some practical steps leaders can take that will help employees better recognize signal emotions so they can eventually find opportunity and choice during the change process. Key Points Many leaders tend to diminish or ignore negative emotions during change. Actively doing that may prevent employees in getting to a place where they see opportunity — and eventually choice. Beware focusing too much attention on vision, roles, and responsibilities — and not enough on employee well-being and fulfillment. The change process is like driving in a car. The structure of the process is the vehicle itself and the people are their fuel. Have discussion about handling change a regular item in 1:1 agendas and team meetings. Leaders can enter into the opportunity that change provides by sharing their own emotions. One way to do this is to be explicit in conversation about what is genuinely inspiring you about the change. Resources Mentioned Change Enthusiasm: How to Harness the Power of Emotion for Leadership and Success* by Cassandra Worthy Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404) The Way Innovators Get Traction, with Tendayi Viki (episode 512) Overcome Resistance to New Ideas, with David Schonthal (episode 557) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    570: Effective Hybrid Team Management, with Hassan Osman

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 39:33

    Hassan Osman: Hybrid Work Management Hassan Osman is a director at Cisco Systems (his views are his own) where he leads a team of project and program managers on delivering complex projects across the world. He's also served as a management consultant at EY, where he led projects and programs for the largest enterprises. Hassan the author of several Amazon bestselling books about team management, including his most recent book, Hybrid Work Management: How to Manage a Hybrid Team in the New Workplace*. In this conversation, Hassan and I examine the new reality and popularity of the hybrid workforce. Many leaders are now managing teams that are both co-located and remote, with individual team members regularly migrating between the two. We explore useful practices that will help you support effective teamwork and progress, regardless of physical location. Key Points Recent statistics from many sources are indicating that a majority of employees desire (and are beginning to expect) some kind of hybrid work arrangement. Lead with a remote first culture so that there isn't a two-tier class of employees in your organization. Conduct all meetings online, regardless of the location of attendees. Use technology to provide a seamless experience whether somebody is co-located or remote. Batch meetings together and, if possible, align work days to allow from in person interactions, when ideal. Be cognizant of offline decisions. Involve remote employees in conversation that start offline and inform them about updates and decisions that might have occurred outside virtual interactions. Resources Mentioned Hybrid Work Management: How to Manage a Hybrid Team in the New Workplace* by Hassan Osman Hybrid Work Management: How to Manage a Hybrid Team (Udemy course) Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Effective Delegation of Authority, with Hassan Osman (episode 413) Transitioning to Remote Leadership, with Tammy Bjelland (episode 509) How to Engage Remote Teams, with Tsedal Neeley (episode 537) Hyflex Learning (Teaching in Higher Ed podcast) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    569: The Way to Make Struggles More Productive, with Sarah Stein Greenberg

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 28, 2022 37:39

    Sarah Stein Greenberg: Creative Acts for Curious People Sarah Stein Greenberg is the Executive Director of the Stanford d.school. She leads a community of designers, faculty, and other innovative thinkers who help people unlock their creative abilities and apply them to the world. She speaks regularly at universities and global conferences on design, business, and education. Sarah holds an MBA from Stanford's Graduate School of Business and also serves as a trustee for global conservation organization Rare. She is the author of the book Creative Acts for Curious People: How to Think, Create, and Lead in Unconventional Ways*. In this conversation, Sarah and I discuss the reality that all of us face with real learning: uncomfortable struggle. We detail some of the typical pattens that occur with struggle and how we can almost predict it at certain points. Plus, we discuss what Sarah and her colleagues have discovered on what we can all do to make the most of the struggles we regularly face. Key Points Part of the process of creativity almost always feels terrible. The “trough of despair” is hard, but also essential. Struggle helps us learn better. There's a sweet spot between what you already know well and what seems impossible. That middle zone is productive struggle. It's helpful to set expectations in advance when innovating or creating that discomfort is an indicator that you're moving forward. When people are in the midst of struggle, shifting the focus from thinking and talking to actually doing can often illuminate the best, next step. Productive struggle often comes at predictable moments. When it does, scaffolding and models can help move us along to get to where we need to go. Resources Mentioned Creative Acts for Curious People: How to Think, Create, and Lead in Unconventional Ways* by Sarah Stein Greenberg Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Growth Mindset Helps You Rise From the Ashes, with Jeff Hittenberger (episode 326) Help People Learn Through Powerful Teaching, with Pooja Agarwal (episode 421) The Value of Being Uncomfortable, with Neil Pasricha (episode 448) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    568: How to Attract Attention, with Michael F. Schein

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 36:33

    Michael F. Schein: The Hype Handbook Michael F. Schein is the founder and president of MicroFame Media, a marketing agency that specializes in making ideabased companies famous in their industries. His writing has appeared in Fortune, Forbes, Inc., Psychology Today, and Huffington Post, and he is a speaker for international audiences spanning from the US to China. He is also the creator of the popular Hype Book Club, which provides regular recommendations of books about hype artists and hype strategies. Michael is the author of The Hype Handbook: 12 Indispensable Success Secrets From the World's Greatest Propagandists, Self-Promoters, Cult Leaders, Mischief Makers, and Boundary Breakers*. In this conversation, Michael and I explore his research on hype and how we can benefit from the lessons throughout history of human influence. We examine at what we can learn from both positive and negative examples to discover how to brand ourselves better. Michael then invites us to frame the messaging about our own work to align with these human tendencies though a lens of genuine care and authenticity. Key Points We've evolved through history to seek guidance from those who appear miraculous. Surprise and worthiness are two indicators of what people perceive as miraculous vs. simply chance. The elements of your narrative are faders on a mixing board. Raise and lower different elements of the story to get the right mix. Make a list of strengths and weaknesses and don't mention your weaknesses for a week. Reframe how some of your weakness might be strengths. Develop your story using the elements of theatre. Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Four Critical Stories Leaders Need For Influence, with David Hutchens (episode 148) (who we are story) Get Noticed Without Selling Out, with Laura Huang (episode 480) How to Actually Get Traction From Leadership Books, with Nicol Verheem (episode 549) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    567: How to Lead and Retain High Performers, with Ruth Gotian

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2022 38:50

    Ruth Gotian: The Success Factor Ruth Gotian has been hailed by the journal Nature and Columbia University as an expert in mentorship and leadership development. In 2021, she was selected as one of 30 people worldwide to be named to the Thinkers50 Radar List, where she was described as a “Prolific mentor and educator, leading important research into the secrets of success.” She is a semi-finalist for the Forbes 50 Over 50 list and has coached and mentored hundreds of people throughout her career. In addition to being published in academic journals, Ruth is a contributor to Forbes and Psychology Today, where she writes about optimizing success. She is the Chief Learning Officer in Anesthesiology and former Assistant Dean of Mentoring and Executive Director of the Mentoring Academy at Weill Cornell Medicine, where she is a faculty member. Ruth is the author of The Success Factor: Developing the Mindset and Skillset for Peak Business Performance*. In this conversation, Ruth and I discuss how leaders can genuinely connect with (and retain) their top performers. We explore the difference these employees make in organizations and what's unique about how they approach work and their careers. Ruth then suggests a number of practical steps to engage high performers genuinely to development them well and benefit the entire organization. Key Points High achievers can produce up to 400 percent more than the average employee. Promotions, diplomas, and awards may be starting points for high performers, but they are not ending points. Leading high performers well requires you to align with their intrinsic motivation. Offer high performers opportunities for exposure with visibility to senior leadership, strengths assignments, and decision-making. Provide autonomy to high performers. For them, the chase is as exciting as the win. They fear not trying more than failing. Recognize that internal professional development programs may not be sufficient for the demands of high performers. Support external opportunities they identify and connect with them during and after those experiences to further their learning (and yours). Bonus Audio How to maximize the benefit of sending high achievers to conferences Resources Mentioned The Success Factor: Developing the Mindset and Skillset for Peak Business Performance* by Ruth Gotian Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Six Ways Teaching Adults is Different than Teaching Kids (episode 3) What High Performers Aren't Telling You, with Scott Anthony Barlow (episode 466) How to Multiply Your Impact, with Liz Wiseman (episode 554) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    566: Ways to Pay Attention Better, with Amishi Jha

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 7, 2022 38:56

    Amishi Jha: Peak Mind Amishi Jha is Director of Contemplative Neuroscience and Professor of Psychology at the University of Miami. With grants from the Department of Defense and several private foundations, she leads research on the neural bases of attention and the effects of mindfulness-based training programs on cognition, emotion, resilience, and performance in education, corporate, elite sports, first-responder, and military contexts. She launched the first-ever study to offer mindfulness training to active duty military service members as they prepared for deployment. Her work has been featured in many outlets including TED, NPR, and Mindful Magazine. In addition, she has been invited to present her work to NATO, the UK Parliament, the Pentagon, and at the World Economic Forum. She is the author of Peak Mind: Find Your Focus, Own Your Attention, Invest 12 Minutes a Day*. In this conversation, Amishi and I explore the importance of our attention and why harnessing it is essential for leaders. We dive into the neuroscience and how our brain is similar to a computer in how much we can hold at one time. Plus, Amishi provides us several practical starting points if we wish to do a better job of placing our attention in the most useful places. Key Points Attention is powerful, fragile, and trainable. Our working memory is like the RAM inside a computer — there's only so much we can hold at a time. You experience what's in your working memory, even if that doesn't correlate to what's right in front of you. If your working memory is full, it blocks the ability to encode or whatever you are trying to learn. A key tactic is to be aware of what's in your working memory — and what you choose not to rewrite. Mindfulness practice can provide the white space for the space in our working memory that we need. Resources Mentioned Peak Mind: Find Your Focus, Own Your Attention, Invest 12 Minutes a Day* by Amishi Jha Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Know What You Don't Know, with Art Markman (episode 437) How to Be Present, with Dave Crenshaw (episode 511) Help Your Brain Learn, with Lisa Feldman Barrett (episode 513) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    565: How to Discover What People Want, with Tiziana Casciaro

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2022 38:43

    Tiziana Casciaro: Power, for All Tiziana Casciaro is a professor of organizational behavior at the Rotman School of Management of the University of Toronto. Her research on interpersonal and organizational networks and power dynamics has received distinguished scientific achievement awards from the Academy of Management and has been covered in the New York Times, Washington Post, Financial Times, and many other outlets. Tiziana advises organizations and professionals across industries and has been recognized by Thinkers50 as a management thinker most likely to shape the future of how organizations are managed and led. She is the author with Julie Battilana of Power, for All: How It Really Works and Why It's Everyone's Business*. In this conversation, Tiziana and I explore the reality that many leaders face: the desire to discover what people want — but the challenge of actually determining this. Even when intentions are good, employees may not have the self-awareness to articulate what they what. We detail what the research shows us about what most people care about — and the practical steps we can all take in our organizations to surface this through familiarity and similarity. Key Points To be powerful in a relationship, it means having control over resources the other person values. Even if asked, people don't always tell you what they need — either because they don't trust you or because they aren't self-aware. Much of the research literature concludes that almost all people have two basic needs: safety and self-esteem. To discover what people want, you need to earn trust. Competence and warmth two ways this happens. When forced to choose between the two, most people prefer warmth. To build warmth (and trust) use two key sources of interpersonal liking: familiarity and similarity. The six resources that address our basic needs of safety and self-esteem: Material resources Morality Achievement Status Autonomy Affiliation Resources Mentioned Power, for All: How It Really Works and Why It's Everyone's Business* by Julie Battilana and Tiziana Casciaro Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Three Steps to Great Career Conversations, with Russ Laraway (episode 370) How to Use Power Responsibly, with Vanessa Bohns (episode 551) How to Reduce Burnout, with Jennifer Moss (episode 561) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    564: Make Your Reading More Meaningful, with Sönke Ahrens

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 36:54

    Sönke Ahrens: How to Take Smart Notes Sönke Ahrens is the creator of Take Smart Notes, a project dedicated to helping students, academics and nonfiction writers get more done - ideally with more fun and less effort. He has spent years researching and experimenting with different note-taking systems and his settled on a methodology called Zettlekasten. Sönke is a writer, coach, and academic -- and also the author of the bestselling book, How to Take Smart Notes: One Simple Technique to Boost Writing, Learning and Thinking - for Students, Academics and Nonfiction Book Writers*. In this conversation, Sönke and I discuss how to move past the practice of simply reading and highlighting by beginning to seek meaning. We explore how you might create a system for doing this and how external scaffolding can help. Plus, we explain what notes might look like and how you can use them for an ongoing conversation with yourself — and perhaps others. Key Points Move past details and look for meaning. As we become familiar with something, we may start believing we understand it. Real thinking requires external scaffolding. It's not so much about saving information, but in making connections between the information. Your notes need not be long or numerous, but should spark (and continue) future conversations with yourself. Resources Mentioned How to Take Smart Notes: One Simple Technique to Boost Writing, Learning and Thinking - for Students, Academics and Nonfiction Book Writers* by Sönke Ahrens Take Smart Notes Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How To Create a Personal Knowledge Management System, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 129) Help People Learn Through Powerful Teaching, with Pooja Agarwal (episode 421) How to Use Cognitive Psychology to Enhance Learning (Teaching in Higher Ed) How to Enhance Your Credibility (audio course) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    563: When You Need to Fire Someone, with Alisa Cohn

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 33:33

    Alisa Cohn: From Start-Up to Grown-Up Alisa Cohn has been named the Top Startup Coach in the World by the Thinkers50 Marshall Goldsmith Global Coaches Awards and has been coaching startup founders to grow into world-class CEOs for nearly 20 years. She was named the number one “Global Guru” of startups in 2021, and has worked with startup companies such as Venmo, Etsy, DraftKings, The Wirecutter, Mack Weldon, and Tory Burch. She has also coached CEOs and C-Suite executives at enterprise clients such as Dell, Hitachi, Sony, IBM, Google, and many more. Marshall Goldsmith selected Alisa as one of his Marshall Goldsmith 100 Coaches – a gathering of the top coaches in the world – and Inc. named Alisa one of the top 100 leadership speakers. Her articles have appeared in Harvard Business Review, Forbes, and Inc. and she has been featured as an expert on Bloomberg TV, the BBC World News and in The New York Times. She is the author of From Start-Up to Grown-Up: Grow Your Leadership to Grow Your Business*. In this conversation, Alisa and I discuss the difficult reality that most leaders need to face: saying goodbye to an employee. We detail the mindset you need in preparation for letting someone go. Alisa also helps us with specific language that will help you follow-though on a conversation and help everybody move on — and move forward. Key Points Our human tendency is often to side-step problems that we need to address. By the time you take action to fire somebody, you are likely months late. Just because someone was effective in the role previously (or in the last role) doesn't mean their role is right for them today. It's helpful to be prescriptive in conversations leading up to firing on exactly your expectations — and the actions the other party has agreed to. There's no way to fire someone without it being awkward and painful. You'll need to make peace with that before you take action. Resources Mentioned From Start-Up to Grown-Up: Grow Your Leadership to Grow Your Business* by Alisa Cohn Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Challenge Directly and Care Personally, with Kim Scott (episode 302) How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404) How to Balance Care and Accountability When Leading Remotely, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 464) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    562: How to Make Progress When Starting Something New, with Michael Bungay Stanier

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 37:59

    Michael Bungay Stanier: How to Begin Michael Bungay Stanier distills big, complex ideas into practical, accessible knowledge for everyday people so they can be a force for change. His books have sold over a million copies, and The Coaching Habit was a Wall Street Journal bestseller. His TEDx Talk on Taming Your Advice Monster has been viewed more than a million times. Michael is the founder of Box of Crayons, a learning and development company that helps organizations transform from advice-driven to curiosity-led action. His new book is titled How to Begin: Start Doing Something That Matters*. In this conversation, Michael and I discuss how to make progress when starting something new. We explore the value in looking back at what you've already done to support you on what's next. Plus, Michael highlights the key principles in running effective experiments that transition into new practices. Key Points Fire bullets at the start. Then, fire cannonballs. Discover what your history reveals about your future self. It will open up a window to who you are that will help you when moving on something new. When experimenting, don't make the experiment bigger or more complex than it needs to be. Avoid putting too much risk in the experiment or investing too much in its success. We have the most learning when we're struggling with something. Resources Mentioned How to Begin by Michael Bungay Stanier How to Begin overview Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Stop Rescuing People From Their Problems, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 284) How to Become the Person You Want to Be, with James Clear (episode 376) How to Nail a Job Transition, with Sukhinder Singh Cassidy (episode 555) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    561: How to Reduce Burnout, with Jennifer Moss

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 36:50

    Jennifer Moss: The Burnout Epidemic Jennifer Moss is an award-winning journalist, author, and international public speaker. She is a nationally syndicated radio columnist, reporting on topics related to happiness and workplace well-being. She is also a freelance writer whose articles have appeared in HuffPost, Forbes, the Society for Human Resource Management, Fortune, and Harvard Business Review. Jennifer's prior book, Unlocking Happiness at Work, received the distinguished UK Business Book of the Year Award. She also sits on the Global Happiness Council. She is the author of The Burnout Epidemic: The Rise of Chronic Stress and How We Can Fix It*. In this conversation, Jennifer and I explore a few misconceptions about burnout — and also how curiosity and empathy can help to reduce it. We discuss a few key questions leaders can ask to gain insight on how to help. Plus, we detail how to avoid confirmation bias through generic interactions. Key Points Self-care doesn't cure burnout. Curiosity increases empathy — and empathy from leaders is a fabulous antidote to burnout. There are two kinds of curiosity, epistemic and perceptual. True empathy comes from a focus on epistemic interactions. Go beyond the generic, “How are you?” and instead get more specific with a request like, “Name a high — and a low.” Doing these with a team can help surface how to help. Assume the best. It's ok to say, “Thank you for sharing this with me. I don't have any advice. I just want to listen and learn.” Resources Mentioned The Burnout Epidemic: The Rise of Chronic Stress and How We Can Fix It* by Jennifer Moss Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404) What to Do With Your Feelings, with Lori Gottlieb (episode 438) Leadership Means You Go First, with Keith Ferrazzi (episode 488) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    560: The Way to Get People Talking, with Andrew Warner

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 36:42

    Andrew Warner: Stop Asking Questions Andrew Warner is an entrepreneur and host of the Startup Stories podcast, where he uncovers the secrets of the world's best founders. Over the course of 2,000+ episodes, Andrew has interviewed everyone from Barbara Corcoran, to Gary Vaynerchuk, to the founders of Airbnb. After building two startups of his own—one successful and one that failed—Andrew started Mixergy as a way to learn from other entrepreneurs. Today, Mixergy is a place where successful people teach ambitious upstarts through interviews, courses, masterclasses, and events. He is the author of Stop Asking Questions: How to Lead High-Impact Interviews and Learn Anything from Anyone*. In this conversation, Andrew and I discuss what he's learned about getting people to talk from thousands of hours of interviews and research. We explore some of the key tactics that he uses to help people open up in a genuine way. Plus, we discuss some common questions to avoid that may work against your goal to connect well with the other party. Key Points Help others get comfortable talking about themselves by revealing something about yourself first. They may not reciprocate immediately, but it often opens the door for future depth. Just a word or two can open up an entire new level of a conversation. Try using “Because?” or “How so?” as ways to hear more. People expect leaders to show up and have a direction for the conversation. Not everything needs to be phrased as a question — you may consider making requests like, “Tell me more,” to direct to conversation. Avoid asking questions that try to get people to articulate “most” or “best” answers. People spend too much mental bandwidth trying to rank-order instead of just engaging with the dialogue. When potentially uncomfortable situations come up, allow people an easy way out by giving them two paths they can go down. Resources Mentioned Stop Asking Questions: How to Lead High-Impact Interviews and Learn Anything from Anyone* by Andrew Warner Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Have Conversations That Matter, with Celeste Headlee (episode 344) How to Ask Better Questions, with David Marquet (episode 454) Four Habits That Derail Listening, with Oscar Trimboli (episode 500) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    559: The Leadership Struggles We See, with Muriel Wilkins

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 39:36

    Muriel Wilkins: Coaching Real Leaders Muriel Wilkins is Managing Partner and Co-founder of Paravis Partners. She is a C-suite advisor and executive coach with a strong track record of helping already high performing senior leaders take their effectiveness to the next level. She is also the host of the Harvard Business Review podcast, Coaching Real Leaders and is the co-author, with Amy Su of Own the Room: Discover Your Signature Voice to Master Your Leadership Presence*. Prior to entrepreneurship, she served on the senior team of U.S. News & World Report and also did marketing and strategy work at Accenture and The Prudential. Muriel has been recognized by the Washington Business Journal as one of Metro-DC area's Top Minority Business Leaders. In this conversation, Muriel and I reflect on our recent client work in order to surface some of the current struggles leaders are facing. We discuss a few trends we're seeing in relation to diversity, the great resignation, binary thinking, and human relations. Plus, we make a few practical invitations to leaders in order to avoid some common missteps. Key Points Leaders are making the shift from explanation to inquiry in relations to diversity, equity, and inclusion. The next step for many leaders is to consider how they use their power to affect change to the system in the organization. Many leaders are considering the, “Should I stay or should I go?” question without the full context of impact and feeling. Begin by considering the impact you wish to have before making a major change. Beware the trap of binary thinking. Often leaders get fixated on “OR thinking” without considering the opportunity for “AND thinking.” If you catch yourself thinking in “ors” consider how you might bring in some “ands.” Leaders who inherently see value in people development can tend to write off other leaders who they see as only focused on the numbers. It's helpful to realize that the larger objective is often shared, but style is different. Meet people on their terms with their language. Resources Mentioned Own the Room: Discover Your Signature Voice to Master Your Leadership Presence* by Muriel Wilkins Coaching Real Leaders podcast Related Episodes Enhance Your Executive Presence, with Muriel Wilkins (episode 272) The Way Out of Major Conflict, with Amanda Ripley (episode 529) How to Win the Long Game When the Short-Term Seems Bleak, with Dorie Clark (episode 550) How to Use Power Responsibly, with Vanessa Bohns (episode 551) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    558: Drawing the Line Between Friend and Manager, with Bonni Stachowiak

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 36:49

    Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, Dean of Teaching and Learning and Professor of Business and Management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, she was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. Bonni is the author of The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide*. Listener Questions Lucus asked us for advice on his reading habits as he makes the transition to CEO. Elizabeth wondered the best way to address issues where experienced employees appear resentful about her giving them direction. Beth sent us a question about drawing the line between being a friend and a manager. Resources Mentioned 13 Crucial Books That Every Leader Should Know Drive* by Daniel Pink Readwise Day One Seven Principles for Leading People Older Than You, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 59) How to Manage Former Peers, with Tom Henschel (episode 257) Three Steps to Great Career Conversations, with Russ Laraway (episode 370) Related Episodes Three Steps to Soliciting Feedback, with Tom Henschel (episode 107) How to Make Deep Work Happen, with Cal Newport (episode 233) Tie Leadership Development to Business Results, with Mark Allen (episode 435) How to Help People Thrive, with Jim Harter (episode 532) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    557: Overcome Resistance to New Ideas, with David Schonthal

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 39:36

    David Schonthal: The Human Element David Schonthal is an award-winning Professor of Strategy, Innovation & Entrepreneurship at the Kellogg School of Management where he teaches courses on new venture creation, design thinking, healthcare innovation and creativity. In addition to his teaching, he also serves as the Director of Entrepreneurship Programs and the Faculty Director of the Zell Fellows Program. Along with his colleague Loran Nordgren, David is one of the originators of Friction Theory – a ground-breaking methodology that explains why even the most promising innovations and change initiatives often struggle to gain traction with their intended audiences – and what to do about it. He is the author with Loran of The Human Element: Overcoming the Resistance That Awaits New Ideas*. In this conversation, David and I discuss how leaders can do a better job at helping others overcome resistance to a new idea. We explore the distinction between friction and fuel — and why leaders tend to miss opportunities to reduce friction. David also shares several, practical strategies that almost all of us can use to reduce the weight of friction with those we are trying to influence. Key Points When introducing something new, we tend to think more about fuel than we do about friction. Both are essential for traction. Repetition is missed opportunity in most organizations. Leaders tend to want to perfect the details too much. Start small with a beacon project to prototype the value change may bring to the organization. Leaning in on making a new idea prototypical will help it be more familiar to those you are trying to influence. Emphasize what is similar — not just what is new. Analogies can help bridge the gap between the new and the familiar. Use an analogy the audience can relate to. Adding an extreme option and/or an undesirable can help transform inertia from a friction into a fuel. Resources Mentioned The Human Element: Overcoming the Resistance That Awaits New Ideas* by Loren Nordgren and David Schonthal Related Episodes How to Succeed with Leadership and Management, with John Kotter (episode 249) How to Pivot Quickly, with Steve Blank (episode 476) The Way Innovators Get Traction, with Tendayi Viki (episode 512) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    556: End Imposter Syndrome in Your Organization, with Jodi-Ann Burey

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 39:10

    Jodi-Ann Burey: End Imposter Syndrome in Your Workplace Jodi-Ann Burey is a sought-after speaker and writer who works at the intersections of race, culture, and health equity. Her TED talk, “The Myth of Bringing Your Full Authentic Self to Work,” embodies her disruption of traditional narratives about racism at work. Jodi-Ann is also the creator and host of Black Cancer, a podcast about the lives of people of color through their cancer journeys. She is the author, with Ruchika Tulshyan, of two recent Harvard Business Review articles: Stop Telling Women They Have Imposter Syndrome and End Imposter Syndrome in Your Workplace. In this conversation, Jodi-Ann and I challenge that notion that imposter syndrome is something that an individual should address alone. Instead, we invite managers and organizations to begin to consider their own contributions to “imposter syndrome” and how we can work together with employees to help everybody move forward. We highlight several key actions that managers can take to begin to end imposter syndrome inside of their organizations. Key Points Managers and organizations tend to address the symptoms of imposter syndrome, but not the source. Those who experience imposter syndrome often feel like it is “death by a thousand paper cuts.” Managers can help by reinforcing an employee's belief in their abilities and chances of success. Listen for what employees are asking for — and explore when they are silent. Managers should be transparent about an organization's locked doors — and demonstrate that they are also willing to be vulnerable. In private conversations, managers should redirect perceptions and language that do not accurately reflect the value of their employees. Resources Mentioned Stop Telling Women They Have Imposter Syndrome by Jodi-Ann Burey and Ruchika Tulshyan End Imposter Syndrome in Your Workplace by Jodi-Ann Burey and Ruchika Tulshyan Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Three Steps to Great Career Conversations, with Russ Laraway (episode 370) What You Gain By Sponsoring People, with Julia Taylor Kennedy (episode 398) The Way Managers Can be Champions for Justice, with Minda Harts (episode 552) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    555: How to Nail a Job Transition, with Sukhinder Singh Cassidy

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 31:45

    Sukhinder Singh Cassidy: Choose Possibility Sukhinder Singh Cassidy is a leading technology executive and entrepreneur, board member, and investor with twenty-five years of experience founding and helping to scale companies, including Google, Amazon, and Yodlee. Most recently, she served as president of StubHub, which thrived under her leadership and sold in 2020 right before the pandemic for $4+ billion. She is the founder and chairman of the Boardlist and has been profiled in Fortune, Forbes, The Wall Street Journal, Business Week, and The New York Times, among others. She has been named one of Elle's Power Women, one of the Most Creative People in Business by Fast Company, and one of the Top 100 People in the Valley by Business Insider. She is the author of Choose Possibility: Take Risks and Thrive (Even When You Fail)*. In this conversation, Sukhinder and I discuss how to handle a transition in a way that works for both you and the organization you're leaving. We discuss the value of proactive communication and clear timelines — plus some of the hidden costs of transitioning poorly. Finally, we made the invitation to consider transitions in the context of your long-term career goals. Key Points Don't leave before you leave. Putting in maximum effort until you're gone protects your reputation and the impact you've worked to achieve. Beware the cost of lingering. You likely know the right timeframe for your departure — use that to frame your transition. Leave opportunity in your wake. Use remaining time to set the team up for success, provide coaching and mentoring, and make it an easier transition for others. Tie up loose ends before you depart. Leave the team an organization in a place you would want to inherit if you were the new leader coming in. Take small steps, middle steps, and big steps. Avoid fixating on the myth of the single choice. Careers come together with many choices, over time. Resources Mentioned Choose Possibility: Take Risks and Thrive (Even When You Fail)* by Sukhinder Singh Cassidy Related Episodes How to Challenge Directly and Care Personally, with Kim Scott (episode 302) The Way to Make Better Decisions, with Annie Duke (episode 499) Making the Case for Your Promotion, with May Busch (episode 526) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    554: How to Multiply Your Impact, with Liz Wiseman

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 37:39

    Liz Wiseman: Impact Players Liz Wiseman is a researcher and executive advisor. She is the author of the New York Times bestseller Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter*, The Multiplier Effect: Tapping the Genius Inside Our Schools*, and Wall Street Journal bestseller Rookie Smarts*. She is the CEO of The Wiseman Group, a leadership research and development firm headquartered in Silicon Valley. Her clients include: Apple, Disney, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Tesla, Twitter, and many others. Liz has been listed on the Thinkers50 ranking and named one of the top 10 leadership thinkers in the world. She is a former Oracle executive, who worked over the course of 17 years as the Vice President of Oracle University and as the global leader for Human Resource Development. Liz is the author of Impact Players: How to Take the Lead, Play Bigger, and Multiply Your Impact*. In this conversation, Liz and I discuss the mindset that's most useful in making real traction in an organization. Plus, we explore practical steps that you can take to think bigger and get noticed for your work. Key Points The #1 thing managers appreciate: when employees do things that need doing without being asked. Upward empathy is the ability to consider what the bosses situation feels like — and what they need from you. Pursuing your passion sounds nice in a commencement speech, but can get in the way of what the organization actually needs. A job description might be a starting point, but it's almost never the ending point. Beware of becoming the foosball player that does hard work in one spot, but misses the bigger picture. Become a nimble midfielder who plays where they are most needed. Resources Mentioned Impact Players: How to Take the Lead, Play Bigger, and Multiply Your Impact* by Liz Wiseman The Wiseman Group Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Benefit of Being a Rookie, with Liz Wiseman (episode 340) Influence Through Overlapping Networks, with Sandie Morgan (episode 422) How to Motivate Leaders, with John Maxwell (episode 452) Keep Your Ideas From Being Stolen (Dave's Journal) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    553: The Four Storytelling Mistakes Leaders Make, with David Hutchens

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 40:18

    David Hutchens: Story Dash David Hutchens helps leaders find and tell their stories. He works with leaders around the world to find, craft, and tell their most urgent stories for the purpose of creating shared meaning, preserving culture, disseminating learning, and speeding change in organizations. He has taught the Storytelling Leader program at some of the most influential organizations — and he's written many books, including the Circle of the 9 Muses* and The Leadership Story Deck*. He is the co-creator with longtime friend of the show Susan Gerke of the GO Team program. He's also the author of the new book, Story Dash: Find, Develop, and Activate Your Most Valuable Business Stories...In Just a Few Hours*. In this conversation, David and I revisit the power of storytelling and highlight where many leaders go wrong. We explore the common mistakes that David sees in his work all over the world. Plus, we invite listeners into a few practical actions that will help stories land with better impact. Key Points Four mistakes that leaders make: They are not storytelling, sometimes because they don't see themselves as storytellers or feel like they are performing. They don't connect the story to the strategic intent but never clearly answering the “why am I telling this story?” question. They avoid emotional content of stories because they either don't want to be emotional or are presenting to a “numbers person.” They expect it to just happen, instead of making intentional effort to make it happen. Resources Mentioned To receive David Hutchen's Story Canvas, reach out to him at david@davidhutchens.com and tell him one valuable tip you gained from this episode. Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Four Critical Stories Leaders Need For Influence, with David Hutchens (episode 148) The Way to Influence Executives, with Nancy Duarte (episode 450) The Way to Earn Attention, with Raja Rajamannar (episode 521) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    552: The Way Managers Can be Champions for Justice, with Minda Harts

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 36:30

    Minda Harts: Right Within Minda Harts is the founder and CEO of The Memo and an advocate for women of color in the workplace. She is a sought-after speaker and thought-leader, frequently speaking on topics of advancing women of color, leadership, diversity, and entrepreneurship. She was named a LinkedIn Top Voice for Equity in the Workplace and was honored as one of BET's Future 40. She has been a featured speaker at TEDx Harlem, Nike, Levi's, Bloomberg, Google, SXSW, and many other places. She is an adjunct assistant professor of public service at NYU. She also hosts Secure the Seat, a career podcast for women of color. Minda is the author of the bestselling book The Memo* and now her new book Right Within: How to Heal From Racial Trauma in the Workplace*. In this conversation, Minda and I discuss the daily actions that managers can do to support inclusion in the workplace, especially for women of color. We explore the unfortunate realities of systemic racism that still show up in many workplaces and how we can all do better. Plus, Minda invites us to consider the Manager's Pledge and six key ways we can bring more equity into our organizations. Key Points The State of Black Women in Corporate America report finds that in 2020, Black women held 1.6 percent of vice president roles and 1.4 percent of executive suite positions. When someone says something racially charged, one of two things tend to happen: laugher or silence. We can do better. You don't need to be the hero, but you do have a responsibility to start. All of us will mess up. Take inspiration from the Japanese art of Kintsugi, where the broken pieces reassembled become more beautiful than the original. We often miss the opportunities that are right in front of us. Starting there is how each of us bring justice into the world. Resources Mentioned Right Within: How to Heal From Racial Trauma in the Workplace* by Minda Harts Minda's website Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404) How to Support Women of Color, with Minda Harts (episode 506) How to Reduce Bias in Feedback, with Therese Huston (episode 510) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    551: How to Use Power Responsibly, with Vanessa Bohns

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 37:37

    Vanessa Bohns: You Have More Influence Than You Think Vanessa Bohns is a social psychologist, an award-winning researcher and teacher, and a professor of organizational behavior at Cornell University. Her writing and research has been published in top academic journals in psychology, management, and law and has also been featured in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business Review, and NPR's Hidden Brain. Her book is titled You Have More Influence Than You Think: How We Underestimate Our Power of Persuasion, and Why It Matters*. In this conversation, Vanessa and I explore the conclusions of research: we often don't recognize our own power. We detail some of the common patterns that leaders should watch for in their work. Most importantly, we discuss the practical steps that almost anybody can take to use power more responsibly. Key Points Power can lead people to underestimate their words and actions. A powerful person's whisper can sound more like a shout to the person they have power over. Power tends to lead people to ignore the perspective of others and to feel freer to do whatever they want. The effects of power are not inevitable. You can do better for others by thinking about power as responsibility. Adopt the lens of a third party in order to see the impact of your actions on others. To feel your impact better, ask people what they aren thinking of feeling, rather than simply imagining or assuming. One way to experience your influence by taking action to give positive recognition and feedback. Resources Mentioned You Have More Influence Than You Think: How We Underestimate Our Power of Persuasion, and Why It Matters* by Vanessa Bohns Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Use Power for Good and Not Evil, with Dacher Keltner (episode 254) How to Create Meaningful Gatherings, with Priya Parker (episode 395) How to Negotiate When Others Have Power, with Kwame Christian (episode 416) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    550: How to Win the Long Game When the Short-Term Seems Bleak, with Dorie Clark

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 38:59

    Dorie Clark: The Long Game Dorie Clark has been named one of the Top 50 business thinkers in the world by Thinkers50, and was recognized as the #1 Communication Coach in the world by the Marshall Goldsmith Leading Global Coaches Awards. She is a consultant and keynote speaker and teaches executive education at Duke University's Fuqua School of Business and Columbia Business School. Dorie is the author of the bestselling books Entrepreneurial You, Reinventing You, and Stand Out which was named the #1 Leadership Book of the Year by Inc. Magazine. She has been described by the New York Times as an “expert at self-reinvention and helping others make changes in their lives.” She is a frequent contributor to Harvard Business Review and is now the author of her latest book, The Long Game: How to Be a Long-Term Thinker in a Short-Term World*. In this conversation, Dorie and I discuss how to win the long game, even when things look bleak today. We examine the typical timelines that most professional should expect in order to get traction on their work. Plus, we highlight three key questions to ask yourself during the toughest times. Key Points It's often 2-3 years of sustained work before you see noticeable progress. To become a recognized expert, you should expect at least five years of consistent effort. People revisit strategy too often when instead they should often continue to follow their action plan. Even if you end up “losing,” strategize up front end how the time and effort you put in is still a win. When times are toughest, ask three questions: Why am I doing this? How has it worked for others? What do my trusted advisors say? Resources Mentioned The Long Game: How to Be a Long-Term Thinker in a Short-Term World* by Dorie Clark Long Game Strategic Thinking Self-Assessment Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Value of Being Uncomfortable, with Neil Pasricha (episode 448) How to Find Helpful Advisors, with Ethan Kross (episode 516) Making the Case for Your Promotion, with May Busch (episode 526) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    549: How to Actually Get Traction From Leadership Books, with Nicol Verheem

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 35:31

    Nicol Verheem: Teradek Nicol Verheem is a globally recognized leader and innovator, senior business executive, serial entrepreneur, and prolific angel investor. He has been recognized for his impact in the film industry with a lifetime achievement award from the Society of Camera Operators and an Academy Award for Sciences and Engineering, also known as a Technical Oscar. He was also recently recognized with the Innovator of the Year Award from the leading business journal in Orange County, California. Nicol currently serves on the Executive Management Board of The Vitec Group, as the Divisional CEO of Creative Solutions, and as the CEO of Teradek. As a technology leader, his is responsible for the strategy, roadmap, and execution of Teradek's highly recognized high tech video products driving more than $100M annual revenue -- with dominant market share across the globe. He is also a member of the Coaching for Leaders Academy. In this conversation, Nicol and I discuss how to take the ideas you hear in books, presentations, and podcasts — and make them your own. Nicol shares many examples of how he has done this in his organization in order grow a team that was ultimately recognized with an Academy Award. Plus, we discuss some of his mindsets that have helped drive the success of Teradek over the years. Key Points Leadership models aren't always molded to your organization or situation. Adapt the idea to make it a better fit for you. Well intended language by an expert might not match the culture of your organization. Don't hesitate to change a word or phrase to make sense to your team. Build relationships today with the people who will grow with you throughout your career. That's “networking for commoners.” When interviewing, ask people about their hobbies or interests in order to discover if you can lead them to live out their passions. Resources Mentioned We'd Like to Thank the Academy by Teradek Related Episodes How to Know What You Don't Know, with Art Markman (episode 437) How to Build an Invincible Company, with Alex Osterwalder (episode 470) Start Finding Overlooked Talent, with Johnny Taylor, Jr. (episode 544) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    548: The Power in Empowering Differences, with Ashley Brundage

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 34:53

    Ashley Brundage: Empowering Differences Ashley Brundage is the Founder and President of Empowering Differences. She's overcame homelessness, harassment, and discrimination and then, while seeking employment at a major financial institution, she self-identified during the interview process as a male to female transgender woman and subsequently was hired. She was offered a position and started as a part time bank teller and worked in various lines of business before moving to VP of Diversity & Inclusion in less than 5 years. Since beginning transitioning in 2008, she has worked tirelessly to promote awareness and acceptance of gender identity and expression. She serves on the Corporate Advisory Council for the National LGBT Chamber of Commerce. In 2019, she was voted on the National Board of Directors for GLAAD and has also been named one of Florida's Most Powerful and Influential Women from the National Diversity Council. She is the author of Empowering Differences: Leveraging Differences to Impact Change*. In this conversation, Ashley and I discuss her experience in the working world as a transgender woman. We highlight key language the every leader should be aware of to support the differences of others. Plus, we discuss the initial steps that every leader can take in the workplace, especially related to gender identity. Key Points The harassment and discrimination that transgender people experience also finds its way into the workplace. Respect people's pronouns — and leaders can highlight their own in order to create a safe space for others. Comfort and ability to use the restroom is something that organizations should address. A helpful starting point is dialogue and conversation. Beware of binary thinking in relation to gender — and many other ways we identify ourselves. Expand your horizon on the gender continuum. Resources Mentioned Empowering Differences: Leveraging Differences to Impact Change* by Ashley Brundage Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes What You Gain By Sponsoring People, with Julia Taylor Kennedy (episode 398) How to Reduce Bias in Feedback, with Therese Huston (episode 510) Start Finding Overlooked Talent, with Johnny Taylor, Jr. (episode 544) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    547: How to Limit Time With the Wrong People, with Carey Nieuwhof

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 39:18

    Carey Nieuwhof: At Your Best Carey Nieuwhof is a former lawyer, a bestselling leadership author, a podcaster, and the CEO of Carey Nieuwhof Communications. He speaks to leaders around the world about leadership, change, and personal growth. He writes a widely read leadership blog at CareyNieuwhof.com and also hosts the top-rated Carey Nieuwhof Leadership podcast. He's the author of At Your Best: How to Get Time, Energy, and Priorities Working in Your Favor*. In this conversation, Carey and I explore the reality that so many of us face in both our personal and professional lives: spending time with the wrong kind of people. We discuss how to notice we're not helping, how to limit time, and what to do when a conversation needs to happen. Plus, we make the invitation to proactive do what often gets missed: spending time with the right people more consistently. Key Points The people who want your time are rarely the people who should have your time. Many leaders give too much time and attention away to people who aren't helped by the interaction. Having a frank conversation with a person who you're not helping is usually good for both of you. If you're not able to limit interactions with the wrong kind of person, line up those interactions outside of your key energy times. A key way to do better at limiting time with the wrong people is to affirmatively decide to spend time with the right people. Resources Mentioned Burnout Quiz At Your Best Today At Your Best: How to Get Time, Energy, and Priorities Working in Your Favor* by Carey Nieuwhof Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Make Deep Work Happen, with Cal Newport (episode 233) The Scientific Secrets of Daily Scheduling, with Daniel Pink (episode 332) How to Prepare for Conflict, with Amy Gallo (episode 530) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    546: How to Speak Up, with Connson Locke

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 36:06

    Connson Locke: Making Your Voice Heard Connson Locke is Professorial Lecturer in Management at the London School of Economics, where she teaches Leadership, Organizational Behaviour, and Negotiation and Decision Making. She has over 30 years experience as an educator, coach, and consultant working all around the world. Her highly popular Guardian Masterclass ‘Developing your presence, power and influence' regularly sells out. Connson is the recipient of a number of teaching awards from the London School of Economics. She's also the author of Making Your Voice Heard: How to Own Your Space, Access Your Inner Power, and Become Influential*. In this conversation, Connson and I explore the challenging situation that many professional experience: speaking up. We discuss several key tactics that Connson has surfaced in her research to do this more effectively. Plus, we highlight several of the lessons Connson has discovered in her own experience that will help us (and others) do this with more success. Key Points Managing your negative emotions can help create movement for you. Reflecting or journaling is a key starting point. Change your attitude about failure by framing a growth mindset. Move away from repetition and towards deliberate practice. Instead of focusing on power difference, zero in on the other person's role in helping you achieve a greater good. Plan free time around learning a new skill or helping others instead of watching Netflix or sitting on the beach. Resources Mentioned Making Your Voice Heard: How to Own Your Space, Access Your Inner Power, and Become Influential* by Connson Locke Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Use Power for Good and Not Evil, with Dacher Keltner (episode 254) Get Noticed Without Selling Out, with Laura Huang (episode 480) The Way to Make Sense to Others, with Tom Henschel (episode 518) Jumping In (Dave's Journal) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    545: How to Prioritize, with Christy Wright

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 39:28

    Christy Wright: Take Back Your Time Christy Wright is a #1 bestselling author, personal growth expert, and host of The Christy Wright Show. She's also the founder of Business Boutique, which equips women to make money doing what they love. She loves helping women chase their version of success. She's the author of Take Back Your Time: The Guilt-Free Guide to Life Balance*. In this conversation, Christy and I explore how to get practical about what's important, each day. We discuss effectives ways to use timeframes to establish priorities for ourselves — and how those same timeframes can help us turn off work. Key Points Establishing priorities moves you from a place of feeling like a failure to a place of feeling real success. Most of us are clear on our fixed priorities, but we're less intentional about the flexible priorities that tend to be more practical in daily life. Consider establishing priorities through the timeframes of seasons, weeks, and days. Having clear priorities helps you not only be productive — but makes it easier to turn it off when it's time to stop. Resources Mentioned Take Back Your Time: The Guilt-Free Guide to Life Balance* by Christy Wright Related Episodes The Way to Stop Spinning Your Wheels on Planning (episode 319) Align Your Calendar to What Matters, with Nir Eyal (episode 431) How to Be Present, with Dave Crenshaw (episode 511) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    544: Start Finding Overlooked Talent, with Johnny Taylor, Jr.

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 39:55

    Johnny Taylor, Jr.: Reset Johnny Taylor, Jr. is President and CEO of SHRM, the Society for Human Resource Management. Johnny is frequently asked to testify before Congress on critical workforce issues and authors a weekly column, "Ask HR," in USA Today. Johnny was chairman of the President's Advisory Board on Historically Black Colleges and Universities and served as a member of the White House American Workforce Policy Advisory Board during the Trump Administration. He is the author of the new book Reset: A Leader's Guide to Work in an Age of Upheaval*. In this conversation, Johnny and I highlight the current challenges in discovering talent and the populations that have been historically overlooked. We discuss what SHRM's research and experience are showing to help leaders make better decisions on finding talent. Plus, we explore how to best handle incentives, so that we create the kind of culture that we will value inside our organizations. Key Points Both line managers in organizations and human resource professionals agree: finding a deep enough talent pool is a big problem. Historically, attracting overlooked talent felt right, but may not have been essential to be competitive. Those times are ending for most organizations. Studies show that organizations who discover talent in older workers, differently abled workers, veterans, the formerly incarcerated, people of color, and LGBTQ populations see positive, long-term results. The incentives for finding overlooked talent often are transactional. To ensure sustainability, leaders must establish this as a value in their organizations. Resources Mentioned Reset: A Leader's Guide to Work in an Age of Upheaval* by Johnny Taylor, Jr. Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Get the Ideal Team Player, with Patrick Lencioni (episode 301) Hire the Formerly Incarcerated, with Shelley Winner (episode 447) How to Support Women of Color, with Minda Harts (episode 506) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    How to Engage Your Audience (5 of 5)

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 14:38

    Lesson 5: The Way to Handle Pushback Your system can be just for you, but it really shines if you share with others. In this lesson, how to bring it all together in order to share credible ideas. Academy Applications Close Friday, September 10th The Academy is a year-long cohort of participant leaders who work personally with me to create movement in their leadership development and organizational results. Discover more and submit your application by Friday, September 10th. Related Episodes The Way to Influence Executives, with Nancy Duarte (episode 450) That's a Great Question (Dave's Journal) How to Enhance Your Credibility (Audio course) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    How to Engage Your Audience (4 of 5)

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 15:08

    Lesson 4: Ensure You Are Heard The best presentation in world won't matter is people are struggling to hear you. In this lesson, you'll discover the tactics and equipment that will help you be heard. Academy Applications Close Friday, September 10th The Academy is a year-long cohort of participant leaders who work personally with me to create movement in their leadership development and organizational results. Discover more and submit your application by Friday, September 10th. Resources The Best Wireless and Wired Headsets The Best USB Microphone Related Episodes How to Run an Online Meeting, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 472) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    How to Engage Your Audience (3 of 5)

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 7:20

    Lesson 3: Build Your Credibility Who else other than you aligns with your message? Help your audience engage with you better by citing testimonials and evidence from third parties. Academy Applications Close Friday, September 10th The Academy is a year-long cohort of participant leaders who work personally with me to create movement in their leadership development and organizational results. Discover more and submit your application by Friday, September 10th. Related Episodes Who Says So Other Than You? (Dave's Journal) How to Enhance Your Credibility (Audio course) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    How to Engage Your Audience (2 of 5)

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 9:30

    Lesson 2: Make the Complex Simple Just about all of us find ourselves needing to explain something we know well to others who don't. In this lesson, you'll discover how to do this efficiently and effectively when presenting to others. Academy Applications Close Friday, September 10th The Academy is a year-long cohort of participant leaders who work personally with me to create movement in their leadership development and organizational results. Discover more and submit your application by Friday, September 10th. Related Episodes Say Less (Dave's Journal) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    Claim Coaching for Leaders

    In order to claim this podcast we'll send an email to with a verification link. Simply click the link and you will be able to edit tags, request a refresh, and other features to take control of your podcast page!

    Claim Cancel