Podcast appearances and mentions of Neil Armstrong

American astronaut; first human to walk on the Moon

  • 1,534PODCASTS
  • 1,957EPISODES
  • 42mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Sep 30, 2022LATEST
Neil Armstrong

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about Neil Armstrong

Latest podcast episodes about Neil Armstrong

Escuchando Documentales
Apollo. La Cara Oculta de la luna 2- La UIltima Misión #ciencia #tecnologia #documental #podcast

Escuchando Documentales

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 43:39


El 20 de julio de 1969, Neil Armstrong pisó por primera vez en la historia nuestro satélite natural, la Luna, gracias a la misión espacial estadounidense Apolo 11. Una hazaña técnica inimaginable en ese momento, lograda en apenas ocho años a partir de la apuesta de un presidente visionario, J.F. Kennedy. A pesar de los muchos obstáculos, el costo escandaloso y los trágicos accidentes, nada detendrá a la agencia espacial estadounidense, la NASA, en esta carrera espacial. Con casi 400 000 personas involucradas y $170 000 millones invertidos, sería casi imposible replicar el programa Apollo hoy.

Dans l'intimité de l'Histoire
Quand l'Amérique voulait bombarder la Lune

Dans l'intimité de l'Histoire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 6:03


En mai 1958, l'US Air Force lance le projet secret A119. L'objectif ? Faire exploser une bombe nucléaire sur la Lune. Il s'agit de susciter un champignon atomique visible depuis la Terre et ainsi démontrer la puissance des forces armées américaines en pleine Guerre Froide. Mais le projet sera abandonné, laissant Neil Armstrong et Buzz Aldrin marcher sur la Lune le 21 juillet 1969.

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 61 – Unstoppable Polymath with Pat Daily

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 65:24


So what is a “polymath”? Come on in and listen to this week's episode to find out from our guest, Pat Daily. After hearing my conversation with Pat, not only will you know the definition of the word, but you will see why Pat fits the Polymath mold.   In his life, Pat has served as a pilot in the military, a pilot for a commercial airline, a successful employee at Honeywell, participated in starting a company and he is now even a successful science fiction author.   I very much enjoyed reminiscing with Pat about some of my and his early days around aircraft as we both have similar experiences in a lot of ways.   By any standard you can invoke, Pat is not only inspirational, but he also is easy to talk with and he is easy on the ears as well. I hope you like this episode and that you will please reach out and tell me what you think. As always, please feel free to email me at michaelhi@accessibe.com. Also, I hope you will give this episode a 5 rating after hearing it. Thanks for listening.   About the Guest:   Pat Daily is a polymath, serial entrepreneur, gamer, and the author of SPARK, a near future science fiction novel. Pat began his professional career as an engineer and Air Force test pilot. After leaving the military, Pat worked at NASA's Johnson Space Center on both the Space Shuttle and International Space Station programs before launching his first company. He has worked globally as a human performance and safety consultant.     When not writing or trying to bring new airplane designs to life, Pat can be found gaming. He is a fan of role-playing games – particularly open worlds with engaging storylines where actions have consequences. Pat and his wife live in Houston.   Social media links:   Website: https://thepatdaily.com Blog: https://feraldaughters.wordpress.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/patdailyauthor Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/patdailypics/ Twitter: @patdailyauthor Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/21521042.Pat_Daily   About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is an Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes* Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Hi, wherever you happen to be, and welcome to another edition of unstoppable mindset. Today, we get to chat with Pat Daily, who describes himself as a polymath. He is also an author, and entrepreneur. And specifically, he's the author of a book called spark. And we're gonna get into that, but I'm gonna start with tell me what is a polymath? Because some people won't quite probably know that.   Pat Daily  01:47 That's a good question, Mike. And I appreciate the opportunity to be here and talk about that. The I fell in love with this word when I discovered it just a couple of years ago. And really all it is is somebody that's polymath is someone who's had professional success in different lines. So not all sales, not all leadership, not all engineering. Cool.   Michael Hingson  02:15 So where have you had success? Well, I've   Pat Daily  02:18 been an Air Force Test Pilot. I've been an engineer at NASA. I've started my own business. I've been a safety consultant. I've been   Michael Hingson  02:30 now an author. There you go. Well, tell us a little bit about you maybe growing up just to learn about you and your background and stuff. And we'll go from there.   Pat Daily  02:38 Sure, sure. I grew up in Seattle, Washington up in the rainy northwest corner of the country. From there, I graduate from high school, went into the Air Force Academy, graduated from there and started pilot training in the Air Force flew was a pilot in the Air Force for about 13 years and then decided that my, my life lay in commercial aviation. And so I went to went to work for American Airlines. And they agreed with me up until about the one year point, and then they decided that they had too many pilots and furloughed, me. And at that point, I thought, maybe I need to rethink this, this whole pilot as a career thing. So I went off and did some other things.   Michael Hingson  03:29 So you when you went to the Air Force Academy, did you miss Pike's fish market?   Pat Daily  03:38 Yeah, yeah, I actually worked there a little bit when I was in high school at a restaurant whose name I can't even remember right now. But But yeah, that's a place that's got a lot of interesting energy.   Michael Hingson  03:51 It does. I've been there just once. And I know someone who worked there in in one of the places in the market, but it does have a lot of interesting and somewhat unusual energy.   Pat Daily  04:04 That's certainly true. So   Michael Hingson  04:07 you, you worked for American, why did you go off and do after American?   Pat Daily  04:11 Well, after American, I went to work for Honeywell and ended up working for Honeywell, Defense and Space electronic systems. And we did guidance, navigation control stuff for the space station and the space shuttle down at Johnson Space.   Michael Hingson  04:30 So what what did you do there? Can   Pat Daily  04:31 you talk a bunch about it? Oh, yeah. And then there's, we didn't do anything classified there. I mean, the whole human space thing, at least as far as NASA is concerned, is pretty much an open book. The probably my favorite project that I worked on was a thing that was supposed to be a lifeboat for the space station and it was the x 38 project. And it was kind of a lifting body. So it had some have swept back and swept up wings that that became well we ended up calling a rudder Vader because it was a combination of an elevator and rudder, although it was way more rudder than it was elevator. And, and it was a lot of fun. Got to actually watch it do a few drop tests from NASA aircraft. And then of course, somewhere along the way, it was decided that we were going to use Sputnik capsules and Soyuz capsules to to get us back from orbit so we no longer pursue that project. So it was a sad day when they shut that down but still a lot of fun to work on.   Michael Hingson  05:43 I grew up and near Edwards Air Force Base. So my father worked out there as the supervisor, the head of the precision measurements equipment lab, so he was in charge of calibrating all test equipment and things like that. So worked with Joe Walker, of course, who was famous with the x 15. Going back a long way from the x 38. And, and was there actually at the time of the m two lifting body which was kind of probably the precursor of all of that   Pat Daily  06:10 down. Were bounced because I spent a bunch of years at Edwards. Whereabouts Did you live?   Michael Hingson  06:15 We lived in Palmdale. Okay, and one of my favorite memories, boy I don't know about today, but was when my dad would come home from work and tell us that he left our street, which was Stan rich Avenue in Palmdale, California, and drove all the way to Edwards without stopping once, which was, which was definitely amazing back in those days, just in terms of no traffic, no cars to interfere. And he oftentimes did it both ways. And in the evening, when he was coming home, I would talk with him, we both got our ham radio licenses. When I was 14, he waited for me because he could have gotten at any time. And we would chat as he was coming home from work and had a lot of fun just talking up on the two meter band a lot. And he would just keep going and going and never stop until we got to our street and there was stop signs. So we had to stop.   Pat Daily  07:09 That is really neat. That was a great memory to have your dad.   Michael Hingson  07:13 It was and you know, there were a lot of things that happen that he couldn't talk about a couple times we went out and visited him. And we would go to his lab and he said, Well, I can't let you in quite yet. We have to hide things that you can't see. Well, that really didn't matter to me a whole lot. But I guess my mom and my brother were there. So they had to do that. But it was it was fascinating going there. And he introduced me to Joe Walker. He knew Neil Armstrong, but I never got to meet Neil. But did spend some time with Joe Walker, which was a lot of fun. Of course. Yeah. He was one of the first real astronauts taking the x 15, up above 50 miles. What an airplane that was oh, and we actually would occasionally sit on our roof at home. And watch as the B 52. Took it up and dropped it. And they they didn't have anything on the radio that we could listen to. But he would he told us where to look. And so we actually looked and and watched it drop and then fly and do the things that it did. It was pretty fascinating.   Pat Daily  08:17 Could you hear the sonic booms? down upon do?   Michael Hingson  08:19 That is a really good question that I'm glad you asked when we first moved to Palmdale in 1955. We heard sonic booms all the time. Never thought about it didn't bother us that they were there. And I remember once we knew that we're going to be playing war games between us and a couple of the other bases in Southern California. And the way you scored, especially when they did it at night was to see how close you could get to the other bases General's house without being detected. And break a sonic boom. So I gather we at Edwards were pretty successful at getting getting close to the generals house. But yeah, we heard a lot of sonic booms. And then one day, they just weren't there anymore.   Pat Daily  09:06 Yeah, I wasn't there during that. That era. But but when I was we had a we had a corridor, we actually had a low altitude and a high altitude supersonic corridor. And that's where if we were going to intentionally go supersonic, that's where they wanted us to be. And that ran mostly east west. Yeah. So so that Sonic Boom would have had to propagate quite a ways for folks down in Palmdale to hear it. But yeah, don't ever do. We heard them all the time.   Michael Hingson  09:39 Well, yeah. And I would I would expect that. And the reason that they disappeared from us was because I guess too many people started complaining but you know, GE, it never bothered me. I guess, however, that they decided that they could be somewhat destructive, especially if they were close enough or loud enough to buildings and so on. So they had to do it. And then I didn't hear any until actually, we were down near Cape Kennedy once when the shuttle was coming back in for a landing, and we got to hear the sonic booms, which was fun to hear.   Pat Daily  10:15 Yeah, yeah. Yeah, I've   Michael Hingson  10:16 heard them loud enough to be startling. But the ones like the shuttle threw off. It was always like, Ah, good. They're home. Boom, boom, the double sonic boom, yeah, which was great. We were at a number of Armed Forces Day, events doubted it out at Edwards. And it was really fun when the Thunderbirds were there. Other people were flying the jets, and they would come almost right down on the deck, past us. And we were we were all together. So my dad said, well, here they are. And I said, I don't hear anything all of a sudden boom, and you hear the whole sound, because they had already gotten faster than the speed of sound. So the plane was there about two seconds before the sound of the engine, which was kind of fascinating. Yep. But we, we enjoyed it. And it was part of growing up. Never thought about it. And then all of a sudden, one day, I haven't heard sonic booms in quite a while. And it was I know, because people were complaining about the noise. Oh, what a world war two world. You know, the sonic booms were there before they were but nevertheless, as I said, probably there were some complaints about the noise. And I've read in recent articles that they they did decide that some of the the sonic booms could be destructive to structure. So   Pat Daily  11:35 I know they've they've broken windows before. And I know that sometimes livestock react poorly. And now NASA and industry are working on a thing called Quiet spike, which was programmed to reduce the the intensity of the sonic boom, so that an airliner for example, that would be traveling supersonic. To hear them Passover would be no more loud than the sound of a car door closing.   Michael Hingson  12:05 Right? There was I think something on 60 minutes about that either earlier this year, or late last year, which is where I first heard about it. So far. I guess it's still somewhat theory, because they haven't built the airliner yet that they believe will be able to have that low level of noise. But it'll be pretty fascinating if they can make that happen.   Pat Daily  12:26 It will be because it it seems like we've been stuck, essentially traveling around the world at about point eight Mach. Yeah, for for 50 years, and forever, longer now forever.   Michael Hingson  12:38 And it will be I think it will be great if we can really do that. And also have it on an aircraft that's small enough that we could even do supersonic inside the United States that will speed up a lot of air travel.   Pat Daily  12:52 It will. It will no it'd be wonderful.   Michael Hingson  12:54 But if I recall, right, they said they were going to have the first generation of that aircraft sometime later this year. Do you know anything about that? I know they've got the   Pat Daily  13:03 flying testbeds already. In fact, one of them is flying out of Palmdale.   Michael Hingson  13:08 Oh, okay. Well, we are now living in Victorville, so maybe we'll hear it on Victorville.   Pat Daily  13:15 I used to live in Victorville when I was able to George Air Force Base.   Michael Hingson  13:19 There you go well, and when I was growing up, compared to Palmdale Victorville was hardly a blip on the radar scope. And now, we have over 120,000 people in Victorville. And in the whole Victor Valley area here we have over 600,000 People go the heck and figure it out.   Pat Daily  13:37 I had no idea that it had grown that much.   Michael Hingson  13:39 And continues to we just learned that there is a new housing development, about two miles from here that will have 15,000 new homes, low cost housing, but still 15,000 new homes. Oh, my gosh, I know, go figure. Now. It'll be interesting to see how more how many more come along, but they're building a lot of stuff up here. And at the same time we see open stores that is vacant stores that don't understand why they're doing the building that they're doing when they got all this vacancy. And where are those people going to work? Are they are they commuting down into the LA basin? I work? Yes, that's I guess that's what's happening. And there is of course, a lot of that but I hope that they come up with something other than just going down I 15 Because already the traffic on Interstate 15 going from Victorville down through Cajon Pass and down the other side is horrible. Almost 24 hours a day. I've gone to Ontario airport early in the morning like at four and still take an hour and 20 or minutes or an hour and a half or longer to get to Ontario.   Pat Daily  14:52 And Ontario has got to be getting busier and busier too because I remember that that was when I first moved out to that area. It was the like the secret gym that the airport nobody knew about and had very little traffic and and you didn't have any jet bridges you just walked walked out to the aircraft and up the stairs. But still it was so much easier to navigate than lax,   Michael Hingson  15:18 sort of like Burbank airport. I don't think that they've gotten totally into jet bridges. At least the last time I flew into Burbank they hadn't. And the value of that is that they have people exit the aircraft from both the front and the back. So it hardly takes any time at all to evacuate an airport. Not evacuate, but get people off a plane when they land. Yeah. Which is kind of cool. Much faster. So as a test pilot, what kinds of of aircraft Did you test? What was kind of maybe the most unusual one? No flying saucers, I assume are   Pat Daily  15:52 flying saucers. Got to fly a bunch of different things. Most of my test time was in variants of the F 16. But probably the most unusual aircraft that I got to fly was the Goodyear blimp. There you go. Yeah. And I mean, did going through a test pilot school. And it felt an awful lot like climbing into someone's minivan because the gondola was that spacious that that roomy had plenty elbow room, plenty of people could sit around. It certainly wasn't, was a passenger compartment back in the days of the Hindenburg or anything, but it was, it was still pretty roomy for a modern aircraft cockpit. And we we went in and got to fly out over Long Beach and that whole area and I was the only airplane I've ever flown that only had one wheel. And I know because they tie the nose of the blimp to a big mast. And it just has one large wheel that casters around and as the wind blows it, it can weathervane into the wind and just pivot around on that little wheel.   Michael Hingson  17:09 Did you ever have any involvement with the flying wing? No, no at the time was probably before, well,   Pat Daily  17:17 well before but then the b two is a streamline wind design. And other than watching it, you know seeing it fly around. I never had any any interplay with it or never got to fly it. I do remember having to go out to their facility for something, a meeting or a test mission. And if you weren't cleared into the program, they had to turn on a beeper and a flashing light to let everybody know that that uncleared scum were entering the area and hide all the secret stuff,   Michael Hingson  17:54 tell people what the flying wing is a   Pat Daily  17:56 flying wing is if you can imagine, and airliner with its left and a right wing. And now take away the fuselage where all the people sit and where most of the gas is and the luggage, and then just join those two halves of the wing together. Now you're gonna have to beef it up a little bit, scale everything up. But it turns out that the flying wing design can be incredibly efficient. But it also comes with some pretty scary instabilities that you have to have to be ready to deal with. And so the earlier version, I think the XB 49 was the original flying wing. And it had small rudders to to help it maintain its directional stability. But the b two comes out at completely differently by using kind of differential speed brakes and spoilers. And, you know, that gave us differential thrust, I guess, but it's, it's a much more efficient and much more UFO like looking aircraft than we're used to seeing.   Michael Hingson  19:11 Yeah, well, it will. It will be interesting to see, well, I don't know whether they'll ever use that and probably not for an airliner or anything like that, because there's just not room for much in the way of passengers is there?   Pat Daily  19:23 No, although I've seen the whole design Yeah, and the whole design every once in a while when you see something in Popular Mechanics or something like that, where it's a hugely scaled up flying wing design. And of course, the downside of that maybe it's an upside is that everybody is now stuffed in the middle and and very few people get window seats, but the the times I've found recently hardly anybody is looking out the window anyway. And they tend to close the window shades and just get on their electronic entertainment devices   Michael Hingson  20:00 he up and it has its pluses and minuses to do that. But you know, I put on my earphones but I do try to listen to what's going on around me and try to stay aware. But you have people do that. And, of course, lights are brighter or when you're 30,000 feet or more. You're you're dealing with a lot of things. And as you said, people just want to get on their entertainment devices and escape. And so so that happens and then there you go. I'm still waiting for flying saucers and jetpacks, I'm ready for my jetpack. Yeah, that would be fun. I'm not sure how well I do with a jet pack. We need to get more information that comes in an auditory way rather than visually, but we can get there. Down. Yeah. Or tactically? Well ordered and tactically tactically. Yeah. Which would be both. There's an experiment that the National Federation of the Blind did actually now it's it started. Well, it started in 2001. Soon after September 11, I was at an event in Baltimore when a new building for the National Federation of blind was started called the Jernigan Institute. But one of the things that the President of the National Federation of the Blind back then did was to challenge private industry and the school systems, the college technical college systems to build a car that a blind person could drive. And in 2011, what they created was between Virginia Tech and some companies that worked with Virginia Tech came up with this device, they actually modified a Ford Escape. And what they did is they put a number of different kinds of radar and sonar devices on it. Other technologies that they felt would ultimately not even cost very much. But then the driver sat in the car and had some very long gloves on that would go up their arms, that had haptic or tactile devices that would vibrate, there was also a pad that he sat back against. And there were also something similar to the gloves that would would go around their legs so that there are a number of different kinds of vibrating things that were available to them. And a person was able to drive a car successfully. In fact, there's a demonstration of it's still on the National Federation of the Blind website or a subdomain. It's called www dot blind driver challenge.org. And what you see if you go to that website is a video where the now president of the National Federation of the Blind Mark Riccobono, gets in this device and drives around the Daytona Speedway right before the January 2011 Rolex 24 race, going through obstacle courses, driving past grandstands, and people cheering and all that driving behind a van that is throwing up boxes that he has to avoid, and then passing the van and eventually getting back to homebase. But no one's giving him directions. It's all from the information that the car is transmitting to him. And the reality is that, that it is doable. And he was driving at something like 30 miles an hour, so he wasn't going slow, and had no problem doing any of that. So the reality is, I think it's possible to develop the technology that would make it possible for a blind person to have a safe and good driving experience. And especially as we get into the era of autonomous vehicles, where things are not necessarily totally as failsafe oriented as we would like. And as perfect as we would like, I see legislatures already saying, well, even if you're going to have an autonomous vehicle, someone has to be in the driver's seat who can drive the car, and there should be no reason why that can't be a blind person as well.   Pat Daily  23:51 No, absolutely not. I mean, it's, it's all just a matter of data and input channel, right? I mean, right, whether it comes tactically or haptically, or auditorily, or we could have olfactory cues, maybe, but that that starts sounding a little messier,   Michael Hingson  24:09 probably a lot less efficient to do that. But but the fact is that Mark did this. And I think that car has been driven a number of times, I think he drove it around the streets of Baltimore as well. But the fact is that, that it is possible, which is another way of saying that eyesight isn't the only way to do stuff. But unfortunately, it is the main way that most people use and I understand that but the fact is not using some of your other senses, I think limits drivers a lot. I'm still surprised that for example, with Apple who has constructed all of its technologies to be accessible. So VoiceOver is built into every device that it releases. I'm surprised I haven't done more to make voiceover involved with interactions in automobiles. And there's an android version of, of all of that called TalkBack. But I'm surprised that with cell phones in cars, that they don't use more auditory output. And then like, you've got the Tesla where everything is driven by a touchscreen, which means no matter what you do you still have to look at the touchscreen. Why aren't they doing more with audio?   Pat Daily  25:20 Yeah, that's, that's a great question. And it, I think it gets to something I've heard you say on some of your interviews about sighted people have a disability in that we are light dependent, and you take away the light from us and and the world by and large becomes a navigable right to most of us. And that's just because we haven't tuned our other senses in the way that   Michael Hingson  25:49 you have. And there's no reason that we can't make it possible for people to use more of their senses. But the the automotive industry doesn't tend to do that. I think there's probably although it's still more emergency oriented. In aircraft, there's a lot of information that comes out auditorily, but probably a lot more could as well.   Pat Daily  26:12 Oh, absolutely. Absolutely. And so much in aviation now is, is really autonomous, that the biggest problem that aircraft like the the Boeing purple seven have is, how do we make sure that on a 16 hour flight, the crews are still awake? Yeah. And so they they build checklists to require them every so often to actually physically do something that the aircraft is perfectly capable of doing on its own. But we we want, it seems to still have that that pilot in the loop that pilot and control, do we get alarms or something that makes the pilot pay attention then to do whatever it is they need to do? Yeah, yep, get chart chimes, you get verbal cues, where the aircraft is actually talking to you.   Michael Hingson  27:05 Yeah, it makes perfect sense to to do that. And I've seen times where aircraft have flown, although pilots are still there, completely autonomously landed themselves gone right up to the, to the hangar or to the place where they let off passengers and so on. And all of that technology is accurate enough to do that today. Absolutely. There are several of us that are talking about the concept of trying to use some of the same technology I described with the the car that a blind person could drive to create, or build it into an airplane and have a blind person, fly the plane. And there's one person actually who wants to see this happen, and then be the first person to fly the same route Lindbergh did across the Atlantic, but be a totally blind person doing the flight.   Pat Daily  27:56 Well, that would be one heck of the demonstration of concept. But I'm with you. I don't think there's any reason they couldn't do that. There shouldn't be   Michael Hingson  28:07 any reason why we do have the technology today. It's the usual thing of a matter of finding a matter of will on the part of enough people to to make that happen. But I see no reason why with the technology we have today. We can't do that. Yeah, I think it all comes down to what you said. It's   Pat Daily  28:26 desire and funding. Sounds like a lot of fun down.   Michael Hingson  28:29 We'll see it be a fun project. Well, maybe you can help us. But oh, I have to ask this. In all your flying. Of course, you I'm sure you have flown in like the plane that everybody calls the vomit comment and had your experiences of weightlessness. Absolutely. And but you haven't gone yet fully into space?   Pat Daily  28:52 I have not. That's that's been one of my major disappointments. I always wanted to be an astronaut. And got a shot, got interviewed got to go down to NASA and then try to plead my case. And, and unfortunately, I was not selected, had a lot of friends that were selected, but I was not among them. You know,   Michael Hingson  29:16 Scott Parazynski? I do, we interviewed Scott, not too long ago. So he was talking to us about a number of the space station events and thought things that he has done. He wrote his book with the help of the same person who assisted me with underdogs. Susie Florrie. So that's how we got very good, which is which is kind of fun. So you went off and did Honeywell and and all that and got to work. I've never been to the Johnson Space Center. I'd love to do that sometime. I think it'd be a lot of fun. I have spent some time at NASA Goddard. And of course a little bit at the Kennedy Space Center but nothing really too involved in some didn't really get a chance to look at much of it but it'd be fun to go to the Johnson Space Center sometimes. So we'll have to come down and visit you and go there.   Pat Daily  30:05 Yeah, come on down, we'll take you.   Michael Hingson  30:07 But what did you do after Honeywell and all of that? After Honeywell, I,   Pat Daily  30:12 I launched a consulting company where we did safety consulting, and training and professionalism, professional development. And I really loved them, I really enjoyed the work. But after about 15 years doing that I was kind of done. So I left that behind, sold my share of the company to my partners, and wish them all well and, and move back into the flight test world. And so what did you go off and do? I went up to Moses, Lake Washington to work for Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation. And at the time, we were trying to build and certify a thing called the originally was called the MRJ, for Mitsubishi regional jet. And then they rebranded it, and called it the space jet, which, which, I don't know, I probably would have picked a different name, but hey, I'm not in marketing. And the thought behind the name was that they had reconceived reconceptualized, the way an airliner is built, traditionally, all the all the luggage, and everything goes in the belly. And that moves the floor of the aircraft up into the aluminum tube. And so you start losing head room and overhead, luggage space. And Mitsubishi had the idea, well, what if we just put all the luggage in the back, and then we have more room in the tube, and even fairly tall guys could stand upright in the in the aisle without having to duck. And that gave us the opportunity to build to build bigger luggage, overhead luggage compartments, and things like that. Unfortunately, that, you know, we, we got to flight test we built maybe seven of them that actually flew me see for here too, there are six that actually flew and then some that were just being used for structure testing. And then and then COVID happened and Mitsubishi decided that the program was far enough behind schedule and far enough over budget, that they needed to really rethink it. And so they they put it on what they call an extended pause. So extended that personally, I don't think it's ever coming back coming   Michael Hingson  32:39 back. It's yeah, permanently pause. So that kind of didn't help your job any?   Pat Daily  32:44 No, no, I got I got laid off from there. And thought that well, you know, I'm not I'm not working when I want to try writing. And so I'd already been playing around with the whole writing thing when COVID hit, and then just took it to the next level and got really serious about it finished the novel. And then, you know, long Behold, found somebody that actually wanted to publish it. You know, Michael, I don't know if you have this problem. But But I have a bit of an ego problem. I think that what I do is pretty doggone good. And so I wrote this book and draft one I thought, okay, it's no, it's no Of Mice and Men. It's it's not great literature, but it's a good book. And so I started sending it out. And and then I joined some writing groups, and the writing groups. It turns out, it's a little harder to get honest feedback than one would hope. Because everybody's worried that they're going to hurt your feelings and offend you. Yeah. And when they tell you you've got an ugly baby. But I had, I had a hideous baby. And it wasn't until well, she's become a friend of mine, another author, Alex Perry, who wrote a wonderful children's book, not children mid grade book, called pig hearted that she finally told me she said, Pat, it's boring. She said, your writing all makes sense. You can put a sentence together but it's like watching somebody else. watch somebody else play. A video came. And, and it hurt. But but it was exactly what I needed to hear. Yeah. And so I joined another writing group. And then I guess after about four or five revisions and 22 queries later, that Inklings publishing, said, Hey, you know, we think you got something here. So, you know, why don't we pair you up with a developmental editor and we'll see you We can do and they paired me up with a wonderful woman named Steph Mathias son. And she shepherded me through three more revisions of the book. And every time it got better, and largely because of the people that were willing to give me that honest feedback people like stuff, so that it you know, it got published and and now I've submitted book to to Inklings, and that should be coming out in December. And I've started on Book Three. So it's been, it's been a lot   Michael Hingson  35:34 of fun. And sequel is booked to a sequel, Book Two as a sequel. Yeah, great. Well, you know, there's nothing like a good editor, they're, they're worth their weight in gold and more. They're editing, right. And I learned that, not the hard way. But I learned it in a great way when we were doing fender dawg, because Thomas Nelson paired us with an editor who said, My job isn't to rewrite this in my own style. And to tell you how to write my job is to help you make this something that people will want to read, and to fine tune what you do. And and he did. We had, for example, I don't know whether you read thunder dog, but one of the parts about thunder dog is that it starts every chapter with something that was occurring on that day in the World Trade Center for me are around it. Then we went back to things I learned in my life. And then we came back and ended each chapter kind of continuing on in the World Trade Center. And what what our editor said was that your transitions lose me there, you're not doing great transitions from one scene to the other. And you got to fix that. And that was all he said. So I volunteered to do the transition examinations and try to deal with that, because it just clicked when he said that. I know exactly what he's saying. And I never thought about it. And and Susie says the same thing, you know, we hadn't really thought that they were as much of a problem as they are. But now that you mentioned it. So literally over a weekend, I've just went through and created transitions for every chapter. And I think that's one of the strong points of the book. And others have have said the same thing that the transitions absolutely take you where you want the reader to go. And it all came about because of the editor. Yeah, and I'm with you there. I   Pat Daily  37:31 think transitions are key. And I largely ignored them as well, in my in my early writing, that that of reading or consuming a book is actually requires work on both ends. And it's easier for the reader, if you pull them along as the writer if you seamlessly pull them into the next scene or seamlessly transition them. So yeah, transitions are huge.   Michael Hingson  38:00 They are and as soon as I heard that it made perfect sense. And the thing about it is I know now that I knew it, then I just never thought about it. So it's it's great to have a wonderful editor who can guide you. Well, your first book is called spark tell us about it, if you would. Spark is a near future science fiction novel, it.   Pat Daily  38:26 It takes place, mostly in Southern California, because when I was flying out there, I remember there being a solar power facility called solar one. And you could see it from probably 100 miles away during the daytime because it was one of these solar facilities where it relied on mirrors to reflect the solar energy up to a central collecting vessel that that normally has some sort of molten salt in it because it turns out that's really good for retaining heat. And then then they use that to transfer the heat to water turn that into steam to power a turbine and voila, electricity, by all always was fascinated by the whole solar power idea. And so spark itself is an acronym. It stands for Solar prime augmented reality Park. And, and as one of my readers pointed out, will pat that should be spark than not Spark as well. Yeah, but but spark doesn't exactly roll off the tongue. So I took a little license there. And the spark is a theme park for gamers. And it is an augmented reality theme park that makes use of both haptic technology as well as auditory cue News and visual cues in a thing I call augmented reality glasses that present the the player with a blended version of the real and the virtual. It's close enough in time to us that most people recognize a lot of the technology. But it posits some pretty impressive changes in artificial intelligence and solar power. And of course, it's it's got action adventure, there are good guys bad guys. The hero of the story a young man named wil Kwan shows up at the park, as you know, after his parents passed away, is his father dies in the second Korean War, which when I wrote it, wrote the book seemed much farther away than it does today. And, and that his his mom suffered mightily from the loss for her husband. And she ends up dying just few years later, and will is left as an orphan and things don't go well for him in foster care. And he ends up running away his goal is to run out to spark where his parents took him when he was younger. And he figures he's gonna get a job and just live there forever. Except that spark won't hire miners. And so he's got to figure out another way around it. And as he does, he realizes that there are far more layers to the game, and to spark itself than are normally perceived by others. And so he starts, he starts hunting a little bit, trying to learn more, he, he meets a young woman that or he has a disastrous first encounter with like, by the end of the novel, even though they still butt heads, they're now holding hands. And so you get a little little action, a little adventure, little romance, little mystery, and it ends up I think, just being kind of a fun novel.   Michael Hingson  42:12 So I would gather from augmented reality and everything else that, that there must be a lot of adventures and quests, and so on in the book. So if somebody were to buy the rights for the book, what quest would you like to see them convert into real life?   Pat Daily  42:29 That's a good question. That's a good question. I think my favorite and I D, detail a couple of the quests pretty deeply in the book, and one is called war on Mars. And I think it would be the most fun because it is the most expansive it, it takes place in mostly in Mariner Valley on Mars, which is so much larger than the Grand Canyon, in the United States. It is seven kilometers deep, that's four and a half miles deep. And it's it's nearly as wide as the United States is or long as the United States is east to west. And so I thought there were some cool things you could do with that out elevation change and, and of course, then there's got to be aliens involved in there, too.   Michael Hingson  43:28 I was just going to ask.   Pat Daily  43:32 Yeah, so So there are some aliens who don't take kindly to us being on Mars, and there's combat but but will is the kind of guy that he would rather think his way through things and fight his way through things. So he's, he's hung up on trying to find a more peaceful solution to our conflict with the aliens and I think that ends up being a lot of fun and wouldn't be a lot of fun to play out in real life.   Michael Hingson  44:03 Hopefully he figures out a way to get some peace and make some new friends.   Pat Daily  44:08 He does. Oh, good.   Michael Hingson  44:09 What character given that you're you're doing this a little bit future mystic kind of where what character was the hardest to develop   Pat Daily  44:18 the the young woman whose name is Shay Cree Patel, but her avatar name is feral daughter, and, and that name came out of something. My own daughter said that I misunderstood. We were on a on a vacation and they were in in shopping and I'd had enough of shopping in that particular store. So I just wanted to go stand outside for a little bit. Enjoy the fresh air. And she came out and she said something that I misunderstood as feral daughter. And I jumped all over that I said, that would be a great name for kind of a counter culture. clothing line, or, or you know, a boutique for women's clothes at a university or something like that. And she goes, Dad, what are you talking about? I said, Well, feral daughter isn't that we such no I and I don't even to this day, I don't remember what she actually said that it was not Farrell daughter. And it turns out that while I think I am a good husband, and good father, I am not very good at writing female characters. And again, my writing groups came in and were tremendously helpful. You know, some painful feedback, but also very good feedback to help me develop the female characters make them more authentic, so that, that neither of my daughters or my wife were embarrassed by the by them at the end   Michael Hingson  45:51 of the day, you mean, your daughter didn't help you? Right? She gave me   Pat Daily  45:55 one daughter, God bless her read all the way through one of the early drafts and gave me a lot of good feedback. The second one, the second daughter was far more interested after the book came out. And she was better at answering specific questions about well, you know, would this would this girl do this? Or? Or what do you think about this? Or how should he or she approached this? So they both been helpful in very different ways? Like, yeah, I, I was embarrassed enough by my writing that I put them through too many revisions of the of the novel   Michael Hingson  46:36 well, but if they, if they looked at it, and really helped unless you just were way too graphic with the sex scenes?   Pat Daily  46:44 No, no. And, and honestly, them that factored into it, I wanted to write a book that I wouldn't be embarrassed for my goats to read any of eventually, their children to read a call. They're calling you now. They're calling me now Dad, what are you saying? So, you know, interestingly, when I got the idea for the book, I was pitching it to my wife when we were out to dinner one night, and she's a fourth grade school teacher. And she started asking me all these questions, what about this, and this and this and this, and it would not be an understatement to say that I reacted poorly to the feedback. And at the end of the night, we ended up still married and still loving each other. But she told me that she was not going to read it until it was published. And so I lost my opportunity to have my first best writer critiquer   Michael Hingson  47:45 How about now with future books and the book you're working on now?   Pat Daily  47:49 Now, I think she is much more open to it.   Michael Hingson  47:52 And are you more open to Yes,   Pat Daily  47:55 yes. And I I'm better at taking feedback. And that helps tremendously. Because now I can I can discuss it a little more dispassionately and talk about what works what doesn't work in a scene and, and how characters might actually react. How old are your daughter's daughter number one is 36. Donner number two will be 33. The end of this year?   Michael Hingson  48:27 Do you have any sons? Nope.   Pat Daily  48:29 Just daughters.   Michael Hingson  48:30 So you've got two daughters, and they still and your wife still has some time to read and comment on your writings. Indeed,   Pat Daily  48:40 although my I'm probably not her favorite genre. Now she she loves historical fiction. So she'll, she'll jump on one of those books more eagerly than a science fiction book.   Michael Hingson  48:56 Well, okay, science fiction book. I guess we have to get to some other questions about that. So if we're dealing with science fiction today, Star Wars or Star Trek?   Pat Daily  49:07 Oh, gotta say I love them both. But I was born and raised on trek. And so I'll always be a Trekkie, even though I am a little disgruntled with some of the decisions they've made and some of the recent movies.   Michael Hingson  49:21 Yeah, yeah, my I hear you. But I like them both. I, especially the earlier Star Wars movies. I think, again, they've they've lost something in some of the translated translations later on. But they're fun. There are a lot of really nice Star Wars and Star Trek books, however, that are fun to read.   Pat Daily  49:44 Yeah. Yeah. And I actually, I actually tried to write a Star Trek book years ago, and I thought it was it was going to be good but it never I never finished it and The series move beyond one of my central characters I made Lieutenant Saavik a central character and, and things just move beyond her.   Michael Hingson  50:11 Mm hmm. Things happen. Yep. Well, and I was, you know, I like all of the Star Wars movies and I guess they they dealt with it but like the the last well of the original Nine with Luke Skywalker I guess in a little in a sense I was a little disappointed of course, I was disappointed that that Han Solo son killed him and what was that number? That would have been what number seven? But nevertheless, they're they're, they're fun. They're great adventure scores. So was Indiana Jones.   Pat Daily  50:46 Yes, yes. Indiana Jones that Raiders of the Lost Ark was actually the first movie I took my wife to go see   Michael Hingson  50:56 her you go down and how she liked it. She loved it.   Pat Daily  51:01 She loved it. I knew nothing about it other night heard other people say great things about it. And so I was delighted that it turned out to be such a good movie. I think it made a positive impact.   Michael Hingson  51:13 And were you afraid of snakes? I had to ask.   Pat Daily  51:16 I hate snakes.   Michael Hingson  51:21 Then as far as more I guess you could say science fiction, probably more fantasy, but something that I think has had a major impact on the lives of a lot of people, especially kids and helping them read is Harry Potter.   Pat Daily  51:33 Yes. That completely hooked. My daughter's my my first daughter got hooked on the red wall series. Brian jocks but then as soon as the Harry Potter's came out, she started devouring those and that is what really turned my second daughter into a reader was all the Harry Potter books. So II and that's the point, right? Yep. Yep,   Michael Hingson  52:01 I think we discovered Harry Potter with the third one in the series, prisoner basket band, we heard about it, and saw some new things about it. And at that time, there was still this company books on tape and we went in and we got copies, we got a copy and started reading the first one. And we got hooked. It was a little while getting into it. But it was a little boring at first, but we got hooked on it. And so we read the Sorcerer's Stone. And then we were hooked and couldn't wait for each of them the rest of the books to come out. So we read the first three pretty quickly because we were already on the Prisoner of Azkaban when we learned about it, but then we grabbed books as soon as we can. We got the audio books because my wife liked to listen to them as well, although we also got a print copy of all of the books, but we enjoyed listening to them. Jim Dale was such a great reader. And one of my favorite stories about all of that is that he was scheduled to read part of the fourth book in the series. I think that was the one published in 2001. When September 11 happened and he was supposed to be in Manhattan and was in Manhattan. He was supposed to do a reading outside of scholastic publishing, publishing. And so when the Goblet of Fire was published, he was going to be there doing a reading at Scholastic because they're the publisher of it. And of course, it was on September 11 And September 11 happened so he didn't get to read it. And we didn't get to go up and listen. But I remember that that was supposed to all happen on September 11.   Pat Daily  53:41 Oh my goodness, I never knew that. So she was going to be an evening thing. We're going to have to take off work, go play a little hooky to listen to the reading Oh,   Michael Hingson  53:50 we we could have gone up there without any difficulty during the day because we were working with scholastic publishing and sold them tape backup products. So it's not even a hard problem to go off and deal with going up there. Ah, okay. And when only going from the World Trade Center up to Scholastic, which is Midtown Manhattan, so was likely we'd be up in that area. Anyway. My favorite though thing about scholastic was we went in once I and a couple of wire other people. And one of the elevators was out of order, and they had a sign on the one that worked that said, this is for muggle use. And then the one that was out of order for wizard use only, which was really cute. I like that. Yeah, it was kind of fun. But you know, I really admire authors and books that promote reading and encourage people to read and I'm glad that that Harry Potter has done that and, you know, I'm looking forward to reading spar have gotta figure out a way to get access to it. I assume it may not be in audio format yet or is it?   Pat Daily  54:53 It is not. But I just started conversations with someone who could be the the narrator and I I've just learned that there's a huge difference between narrators and voice actors. And so I may need someone with voice acting skills, rather than just narration. Because I've got a lot of characters and some drama, and I want somebody that that can do more than simply read the words off the page. But I don't know how long it takes from day one to final release of an audio book. But I will let you know when it happens.   Michael Hingson  55:30 It you do have to get somebody who can read it. Well, I enjoy books where the reader is a as an actor and puts different voices into it. I've been reading talking books from the library of congress, of course, my whole life and early on, especially, they sought actors to do the reading. One of my favorite series has always been the wreck stop series near wolf, the private detective. Yeah, in the in the reader who did the best job was a radio actor named Carl Webber, who I never heard much of in radio, although I clicked radio shows, he did do a show called Dr. Six Gun. And I've discovered that and listened to him. And it does sound like our a Weber. But he read the neuro wolf books, and they were absolutely incredibly well done. So it does make a difference to have someone who's a good actor reading it, as opposed to just somebody who reads the lines, because they will help draw you in. Yeah, yeah. And I actually   Pat Daily  56:35 just downloaded thunder dog. I still do a fair amount of driving and I like to listen to books while I'm driving. So I'm I'm looking forward to hearing that. Well, Christopher   Michael Hingson  56:48 prince did a did a good job with it. I, I don't know how he would be at well, actually, I take that back. I have heard another book of that he read where he did. It was a fiction book. And I'm trying to remember the name of it, I'd have to go back and find it. But he did a pretty good job. He did this for Oasis audio. But there are some good actors out there. And so I hope that you have some success. Let me know. And if you need somebody ever to listen, I'd be glad to help.   Pat Daily  57:17 Oh, excellent. Thank you. I'll take care on that.   Michael Hingson  57:20 I have one last question I've been thinking about not book related. But talking about aircraft. Again, the 747 I keep hearing is probably the most stable passenger airliner that has ever been really produced. What do you think about that? Why is it so stable? Oh, I've   Pat Daily  57:38 got to agree with that a real champion of design. And it's got a couple things in his favor. One is one is the wings are Anhedral, which means that they can't up a little bit and especially when, when they get a little lift on him, they they get pulled up as all their aircraft wings do. And then the enormous vertical stabilizer lends a lot of a lot of stability to the aircraft. And then finally, I think Boeing just did an absolutely spectacular job of, of harmonizing the flight controls and putting everything together to make it a very docile airplane, certainly for something of its size. I mean, it carries so much fuel that he uses fuel for structural integrity when it's more full. And so we have that 747 is a spectacular airplane. And, and unfortunately, it's it's kind of aging   Michael Hingson  58:38 out. But how come they haven't done other things with that same level of design and stability? At least? I haven't heard that they have. But yeah, I   Pat Daily  58:48 think I think the triple seven is close to it. There have been very very few mishaps with the with the triple seven. And it's it's another marvelous airplane. I don't think they got exactly what they're hoping for with the 787. They did have some design issues, some manufacturability issues, but it's it's certainly a highly efficient and remarkably quiet appointment. So   Michael Hingson  59:20 what prompted the question was when you were talking about the Mitsubishi aircraft and so on, and putting the luggage at the backs of taller people could stand up. It reminded me of the 747 with the upper level for first class, the lounge where the pilots and so on were so it almost was to a degree at least a double decker aircraft.   Pat Daily  59:38 Yeah. Yeah. And of course Airbus has made the a 380 which is a true double decker full length. But that's that's another aircraft that hasn't exactly lived up to its hype. Well,   Michael Hingson  59:51 still holding on for flying saucers. There you go. Well, Pat, I want to thank you for being on unstoppable mindset. How do people reach out and maybe learn more about you? Where can they get the book? You know, love all your contact information and so on.   Pat Daily  1:00:08 Okay, probably the easiest way is the website, which is thepatdaily.com. And it's t h e. P a t d a i l y.com. And that has links to to my blog to the bio to all my other socials. I'm on, of course on on Facebook at Pat Daily, author and on Instagram at Pat daily pics and then Twitter at at Pat Daily, or I think it's at Pat Daily author, but easiest way, just the website, everything is there. Down. Cool.   Michael Hingson  1:00:48 Well, I know I'm looking forward to finding a way to read spark and your other books as they come out. That will be fun being a science fiction fan, of course. And I think we talked about it before we were doing this particular episode. But we've talked about science fiction and some of my favorite authors, I would still like to see somebody take Robert Heinlein to the Moon is a Harsh Mistress, and make it into a radio series. Talking about actors. I just think that do. I think you're right. I loved that book.   Pat Daily  1:01:19 I loved so much of what Heinlein wrote, you know, one of the one a great masters of the genre.   Michael Hingson  1:01:25 Yeah, yeah. And I think that's his best book. A lot of people say Stranger in a Strange Land was and it was very unique, and so on. But the Moon is a Harsh Mistress is so clever. And there's so much to it. And of course, then there are books that follow on from it, where some of the world's the same characters are involved. Heinlein created a whole universe, which was fun, did it just sort of like as I did with the foundation series? Well, thanks, again, for being here. We need to do this again. Especially when you get more books out, when you get your next book out, we got to come back and talk about it. I'd love to.   Pat Daily  1:02:02 And and thank you so much for having me on your show, Mike, I really appreciate it.   Michael Hingson  1:02:05 Well, I really appreciate you taking the time to be here. This has been fun. So people go find the Pat daily.com and contact Pat reach out and enjoy the book. And let me know what you think of it. I'm going to get to it as well, I'm just going to find a way to be able to read it. So we'll get there. But for all of you who listened in today, thanks very much for being here. If you'd like to reach out to me, please do so. My email address is Michaelhi@accessibility.com. That's M I C H A E L H I  at A C C E S S I B E.com. Where you can go to www dot Michael hingson.com/podcast where you can reach out to us as well. I hope you'll give us a five star rating. And Pat, we didn't talk about it. Well, we should probably at some point, talk about how accessible your website is and get you in touch with people in accessibe.   Pat Daily  1:03:01  Absolutely. I did check out accessibe and it looks like something that once I get the website fully developed, we'll be in contact.   Michael Hingson  1:03:09 Well, we'd love to help you with that. But again, everyone thanks for being here. Please give us a five star rating and we hope that you'll be back again next week for unstoppable mindset. And again, Pat, thank you for being here as well.   Pat Daily  1:03:20 Thank you, Mike.Take care,   Michael Hingson  1:03:22 you too.   Michael Hingson  1:03:26 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

The Sekulow Brothers Podcast
Is this Armageddon? Newsom Not Running For President!

The Sekulow Brothers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 48:32


Happy Monday! Today on the show, the guys go into way too much detail about Logan's weekend (which included roller skating,) they break down a major announcement from the very humble California Governor Gavin Newsom as well as the arrest of a pro-life Catholic activist by the FBI and how NASA is about to go full Armageddon. For more information on Lear Capital visit LearBros.comTopics Discussed:- Logan's weekend (concerts, roller rink skating, Fortnite)- College football- Newsom says he won't be running for president- Unhoused vs Homeless?- Car steak- Roller skating escapades- Inflation deja vu- NASA blowing up an asteroid- Neil Armstrong conspiracy theory/Buzz Aldren- Aliens- Pro-life Catholic activist shackled by FBI in front of kids- FBI too scared to deal with real crisisSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Oh My Goff
85. The Remarkable 'One Small Visit' for Mankind

Oh My Goff

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 31:03


It's 1969, the year of America's historic moon landing. It's also a time of transition for the country with the civil rights movement in full swing. During a road trip the Abraham's family ends up on the doorstep of Neil Armstrong's family home. It was a small visit that would end up having incredible impact still being felt more than 50 years later. Dr. Anisha Abraham joins Angie to share her family's remarkable immigrant story. It is a story that gives you a glimpse into race relations during that time in America. It also shows the power of connection in a world that's truly smaller than anyone could imagine-- just ask Mr. Armstrong. 'One Small Visit' is a short film by directed by Jo Chim. Anisha Abraham is an executive producer. The film is being shown on the short film festival circuit and was recently screened at NASA Headquarters in Washington DC.  For more information: https://onesmallvisit.com Or follow @onesmallvisit on Facebook and Instagram Watch the podcast: https://youtu.be/mw4lkPU_IZs Connect with Angie:  https://facebook.com/ohmygoff https://instagram.com/ohmygoff 

Ghosts of Arlington Podcast
#60: Introducing the Crew of Apollo 11 (The Apollo Program, Part V)

Ghosts of Arlington Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 29:23 Transcription Available


This week we will take a look at the crew of Apollo 11 and how each came to be selected as a member of the most ambitious mission undertaken in human history - the first attempt to land people on the moon.The Space Race series introduction music is Lift Off by kennysvoice.As always, a very special thanks to Mountain Up Cap Company for its continued help to spread the word about the podcast on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/MountainUpCapCompany Climb to Glory!For more information about the podcast visit: ·       The GoA website: https://www.ghostsofarlingtonpodcast.com    ·       Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ghostsofarlingtonpodcast·       Twitter: https://twitter.com/ArlingtonGhosts·       Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ghostsofarlington/

HausboTalk Petra Horkého
DUŠEK - HORKÝ: Hvězdoseriál 7/10 - Mimozemský život.

HausboTalk Petra Horkého

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 11:55


Možná to není tak velký zázrak, aby někde v kosmu vznikl život. Ale neudrží se a nevyvine do tak vysokého stupně jako na Zemi. Jak se my lidé pokoušíme s případnými jinými existencemi spojit? Kromě cílených pokusů vyslat do vesmíru vzkaz o naší existenci je tu celá řada dalších projevů civilizace, které jsou ve vesmíru „hlasité".Pusťte si další díl Hvězdoseriálu!Partnerem kanálu jsou Golden Gate  @Golden Gate a Bushman @BUSHMAN Česko ​Support the show

Sterling Cooper David Steve
Episode 92 - Is This Steve and Dave's Waterloo?

Sterling Cooper David Steve

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022


I wonder, should that be Steve's and Dave's, or, does the possessive on 'Dave' include Steve?  I mean it seems like it should, it feels right etc.You know what else feels right? THIS EPISODE.This is a good one, it is one of my favourites.  It actually started me on a From the Earth to the Moon rewatch.I'm probably just at the cusp of the age where kids loved astronauts.Oh Bert, you right wing, reactionary maniac, you were a hell of a dancer/singer.'That's one small step for man' was a flubbed line, but it still works.Neil Armstrong was an honest to goodness hero.Peggy's pitch is pitch perfect.Harry gets screwed again, ha ha.'It's a lot of money' and 'over Dresden, I wanted to live Ted!' are Jim's two best lines of the series.mp3 download

Perspective
'Apollo Remastered': Lunar missions like you've never seen them before

Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 7:32


You've no doubt seen footage of the first Moon landing, the moment when US astronaut Neil Armstrong made "one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind". But have you ever seen photos of the major milestone? If so, they were probably grainy or blurry; simply underwhelming for such a landmark event. Thanks to the work of Andy Saunders, that's no longer the case. His book "Apollo Remastered" includes hundreds of restored images of the Moon landings. He joined us for Perspective.

Entrez sans frapper
Emmanuel Villin pour son roman "La Fugue Thérémine" - Entrez sans frapper

Entrez sans frapper

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 16:20


L'auteur français Emmanuel Villin pour son roman "La Fugue Thérémine" (Asphalte Éditions). Né sous le tsar, mort en 1993, Lev Thérémine a été soldat de l'Armée rouge, a rencontré Lénine, est parti à la conquête des États-Unis, a connu la fortune… et le goulag. En 1920, cet ingénieur russe de génie a conçu un instrument de musique avant-gardiste, le seul dont on joue sans le toucher : le thérémine. Au seul mouvement des mains, l'électricité se met à chanter, produisant un son étrange, comme venu d'ailleurs. De Hitchcock aux Beach Boys, de la musique électronique à Neil Armstrong, c'est tout un pan de la culture populaire du XXe siècle qui va succomber au charme envoûtant du thérémine.

Entrez sans frapper
Entrez sans frapper 14/09/2022 - Emmanuel Villin sur le Thérémine/Éric Russon/Jpëlle Scoriels/Sébastien Ministru

Entrez sans frapper

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 28:43


"Paroles, Paroles" de Sébastien Ministru : "L'année la plus chaude de tous les temps" de Raphaël. L'auteur français Emmanuel Villin pour son roman "La Fugue Thérémine" (Asphalte Éditions). Né sous le tsar, mort en 1993, Lev Thérémine a été soldat de l'Armée rouge, a rencontré Lénine, est parti à la conquête des États-Unis, a connu la fortune… et le goulag. En 1920, cet ingénieur russe de génie a conçu un instrument de musique avant-gardiste, le seul dont on joue sans le toucher : le thérémine. Au seul mouvement des mains, l'électricité se met à chanter, produisant un son étrange, comme venu d'ailleurs. De Hitchcock aux Beach Boys, de la musique électronique à Neil Armstrong, c'est tout un pan de la culture populaire du XXe siècle qui va succomber au charme envoûtant du thérémine. "La La Langue" de Joëlle Scoriels : La Grande Trouille des liaisons après les chiffres (et surtout, pourquoi) ! Les sorties cinéma et les nouveautés sur les plateformes de streaming avec Éric Russon : - Revoir Paris avec Virginie Efira - Three thousands years of longing avec Tilda Swinton - Chronique d'une liaison passagère avec Sandrine Kiberlain - Pinocchio de Robert Zemeckis

El Viajero de la Ciencia - Carlos Alameda
¿China está superando a Estados Unidos en la carrera espacial? - Acceso anticipado

El Viajero de la Ciencia - Carlos Alameda

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 6:28


Agradece a este podcast tantas horas de entretenimiento y disfruta de episodios exclusivos como éste. ¡Apóyale en iVoox! Acceso anticipado para Fans - El 20 de julio de 1969 Neil Armstrong se convirtió en el primer hombre en pisar la Luna. Su “gran paso para la humanidad» lo era también para Estados Unidos. Acababan de ganar la carrera espacial a Rusia. Sin embargo, desde ese momento, han pasado muchos años. Existen nuevos poderes que emergen para competir contra los norteamericanos. China podría estar superando a Estados Unidos en muchos aspectos. Un factor que no deja de sentirse en Washington como una amenaza a su hegemonía en el espacio. Para seguir nuestros contenidos no olvides que estamos en redes sociales como Facebook, si buscas «El Viajero de la Ciencia», en Twitter: @ViajeroCiencia, en CapitalRadio.es y en tus aplicaciones favoritas para descargar podcast. Escucha este episodio completo y accede a todo el contenido exclusivo de El Viajero de la Ciencia - Carlos Alameda. Descubre antes que nadie los nuevos episodios, y participa en la comunidad exclusiva de oyentes en https://go.ivoox.com/sq/430635

Cosmic Sponge
NASA Coverup Uncovered

Cosmic Sponge

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 74:33


As mankind ventured into the vast unknown landscape of space, conspiracies would arise to challenge the moon landing, claim alien bases exist on the moon, and expose the existence of UFOs seen by the astronauts as they travelled to the moon and back.  In this episode, we look at claims made and the evidence to support or discredit them as we uncover the Apollo coverups. Support the show

Les Contes du soir
#73 Conte de l'Espace : Ils ont marché sur la lune

Les Contes du soir

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 17:32


Troisième épisode d'une série consacrée aux Contes de l'Espace. Et plus précisément à la Conquête de l'Espace, pour raconter une grande première, celle du 21 juillet 1969, où l'homme posa pour la première fois un pied sur la lune. Neil Armstrong, Edwin Aldrin et Michael Collins… voilà le trio qui va nous emmener loin… très loin jusqu'à la surface du bel astre blanc. Histoire tirée de "De la Conquête du Ciel et de l'Espace" de Christian Grenier. Musique illustrative de Vanguelis (1943-1922), Conquest of Paradise. Un grand merci aux personnes qui me suivent et m'encouragent ! N'hésitez pas à découvrir du contenu inédit sur ma page Tipeee : https://fr.tipeee.com/les-contes-du-soir/ Les Contes du soir est à écouter sur les principales plateformes de podcast :   iTunes : http://apple.co/36pTf4B  Spotify : http://spoti.fi/3kY5k4T  Deezer : http://bit.ly/2LK3PLz  Et à suivre sur les réseaux sociaux :  YouTube : https://bit.ly/325dUau  Instagram https://bit.ly/3n3DrKz  Facebook : https://bit.ly/31cOyHJ

Astrobitácora: astronomía con Álex Riveiro
Exploradores de las estrellas - Ep. 13 - La segunda mitad del Programa Gemini - Episodio exclusivo para mecenas

Astrobitácora: astronomía con Álex Riveiro

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 80:03


Agradece a este podcast tantas horas de entretenimiento y disfruta de episodios exclusivos como éste. ¡Apóyale en iVoox! Continuamos el repaso de las misiones tripuladas del programa Gemini. Desde la accidentada misión de Gemini 8, en la que Neil Armstrong demostró una capacidad fuera de lo común para reaccionar en situaciones de estrés, hasta Gemini 12, en la que Buzz Aldrin realizó tres paseos espaciales. Es una oportunidad magnífica para entender cómo se fue avanzando hasta lograr los objetivos necesarios para que el programa Apolo pudiese convertirse en una realidad. Música: Epidemic Sound Escucha el episodio completo en la app de iVoox, o descubre todo el catálogo de iVoox Originals

HausboTalk Petra Horkého
DUŠEK - HORKÝ: Hvězdoseriál 6/10 - Stroj času.

HausboTalk Petra Horkého

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 11:56


Když se člověk pohybuje v tak gigantických vzdálenostech vesmíru, že i světlo putuje dlouhé roky, najednou se z času stává relativní položka (já vím, je to klišé:-) a pozorovatel najednou může sledovat světlo hvězdy, která už neexistuje...anebo dokonce v reálném čase odraz událostí, která se stala už dávno...anebo...pusťte si další díl Hvězdoseriálu! Jirka Dušek a Petr Horký opět na Hvězdárně a planetáriu v Brně! 

Berícid Sulfúric
EXTRA - Allunatge en diferit

Berícid Sulfúric

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 60:50


Actuació en directe i xerrada a la Universitat Pompeu Fabra feta el 15 de març de 2022. Escrit per Anna Ferrer Albertí, Laia Garcia, Vicent Ortega i Pau Pérez. Amb Anna Ferrer Albertí com a Lesley Cooper, Pau Pérez com a Neil Armstrong, Vicent Ortega com a Michael Collins, Laia Garcia com a Wendy Albertson i i la col·laboració estel·lar de Luis Torrelles com a Buzz Aldrin. Sintonia de Jordi Borrull.

Purpose and Profit with Kathy Varol
37. Nicole Anderson on Bridging the Digital Divide Through Aligned Corporate Purpose

Purpose and Profit with Kathy Varol

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 57:06


Nicole Anderson is the President of the AT&T Foundation and the Assistant Vice President of Corporate Social Responsibility at AT&T.   AT&T's purpose is to “create connection—with each other, with what people need to thrive in their everyday lives and with the stories and experiences that matter” and their company ambition is to become the best broadband provider. In this episode, we dive into key focus areas of AT&T's Environment, Social, and Governance (or ESG) strategy that support the company's purpose—from their science-based climate targets to the $2 billion commitment through 2024 to help address the digital divide.   AT&T has received a number of third-party awards for its Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion culture including: DiversityInc's “Top 50 companies for diversity” list, Bloomberg's 2022 “Gender-Equality Index”, the Human Rights Campaign's “Best Places to work for LGBTQ+ equality” with a 100% corporate equality index rating, and is ranked a top 10 Military Friendly employer with a longstanding commitment to supporting active military personnel, their families and veterans. AT&T surpassed its 2020 goal to hire 20,000 veterans.   In this episode we discuss: An innovative tool AT&T developed to mitigate climate risk for their company Lessons learned from the global pandemic that have informed AT&T's ESG efforts A thoughtful example of using systems thinking to solve the digital divide The role that transparent ESG reporting plays in building trust and facilitating strategic partnerships   Key Takeaways: The importance of a focused ESG strategy that supports your corporate purpose and is integrated into your business strategy. Not only does this simplify the work that's being done and enable greater impact, but this also helps create credibility around your efforts and the long-term commitment of the company. When employees and consumers can clearly see that the change you are trying to create makes sense from a business standpoint and compliments your business strategy, that change no longer comes across as an afterthought that might lose support over time. How critical it is to have science-based targets for sustainability efforts. Unfortunately, many companies' targets are not science-based, which means even if their targets are achieved, they won't hit the carbon reductions required to curtail our collective climate disaster. As you evaluate your company's sustainability initiatives or the initiatives of the brands you support, check that their targets are science-based. If they aren't, ask why, and how that can change. The importance of clearly defined ambitions, collaboration, and humility in creating what's never been done before. Putting a man on the moon is a great example of the power of these 3 elements. When President JFK announced the ambition to land a man on the moon in 1962, he set the ambitious vision stating, “I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the Moon and returning him safely to the Earth. No single space project…will be more exciting, or more impressive to mankind, or more important…and none will be so difficult or expensive to accomplish”. It was this ambitious goal that captured the nation's imagination. Through humility and collaboration, in 1969, just 7 years after JFK's speech, Neil Armstrong took his giant leap for mankind on the moon's surface. So ask yourself, what are the moonshots in your industry that will spark collective imagination, passionate engagement, and lasting change?   References: Connect with Nicole on LinkedIn AT&T's corporate social responsibility (CSR) page AT&T press release on the Connected Climate Initiative Read more about AT&T's climate resilience program and Climate Change Analysis Tool (CCAT) here   Connected Nation Affordable Connectivity Program The Achievery Argonne National Laboratory SBP disaster recovery organization SBP's Equip App Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB) Task Force on Climate Related Financial Disclosures (TCFD)   Connect & Share: If you enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts/iTunes? It takes less than 60 seconds, and it really makes a difference in helping to convince hard-to-get guests. I also love reading them!   If this episode resonated with you, I ask you to send it to a friend. Help bring even more visibility to these leaders that are using business as a force for good!   Subscribe to the Purpose and Profit newsletter to make sure you don't miss future episodes.   This podcast is for you, the listener. I'd love to hear what resonated with you, or if you have a suggestion on who would be a great guest for this show. Please send me a note at info@KathyVarol.com.  

逐工一幅天文圖 APOD Taigi
561. 鴟鴞號 起飛 ft. 阿錕 (20220730)

逐工一幅天文圖 APOD Taigi

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 2:08


Kā 你 ê 3D 目鏡 提來,咱來 ùi 月球軌道來看這个立體景色。這个 3D 浮雕影像是 ùi 兩張相片做出來--ê (編號是 AS11-44-6633 kah AS11-44-6634)。相片是 太空人 Michael Collins tī 1969 年 參加 阿波羅 11 號任務 ê 時陣翕--ê。阿波羅 11 號有配 peh 升節火箭,to̍h 叫做 鴟鴞號。伊紲落來會愈飛愈懸,tī 7 月 21 這工 kah 踅月球 ê 指揮艙會合。坐 tī 鴟鴞號 內底--ê 是 Neil Armstrong kah Buzz Aldrin,in 是頭一組 tī 月球面頂行路 ê 人。月球表面 較暗 較平彼區是 Smythii 海,伊是 tī 月球面對地球彼面 ê 上東爿,就 tī 月球赤道下底。Tī 月球地平線後壁彼粒,是 咱美麗 ê 地球。 ——— 這是 NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day ê 台語文 podcast 原文版:https://apod.nasa.gov/ 台文版:https://apod.tw/ 今仔日 ê 文章: https://apod.tw/daily/20220730/ 影像來源:Apollo 11, NASA 立體影像:John Kaufmann (ALSJ) 音樂:P!SCO - 鼎鼎 聲優:阿錕 翻譯:An-Li Tsai (NCU) 原文:https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap220730.html Powered by Firstory Hosting

What The F*** Is Going On...? With Mark Steel
What The F*** Is Going On...? With Mark Steel Episode 47

What The F*** Is Going On...? With Mark Steel

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 46:17


Mark is joined by comedian and writer Nick Revell and Elliot Steel as he tries to make sense of soaring energy prices, boring Tory leadership contests - and a true story involving Nelson Mandela, Jeremy Clarkson and Neil Armstrong!  Plus Mike Concrete interviewing a Yorkshire farmer who makes vegan sausages - and a woman on a phone-in show complaining about workers going on strike.Get ad-free extended episodes, early access and exclusive content on Patreon:https://www.patreon.com/wtfisgoingonpodFollow What The F*** Is Going On? with Mark Steel on Twitter @wtfisgoingonpodFollow Nick Revell @TheNickRevellFollow Elliot Steel @elliotsteelcomAnd visit our website www.whatthefisgoingonpodcast.co.uk for more information. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Get bonus content on Patreon Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists
Apollo Remastered

Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 60:50 Very Popular


In a brave move, the Space Boffins attempt a podcast about pictures without any pictures! Joining them are science writer Andy Saunders, who's spent years remastering images from the Apollo missions to reveal details never seen before, Oxford astrophysicist and podcast host Becky Smethurst about the first images from the James Webb Space Telescope, and space artist Jackie Burns. It's an (audio) visual feast! Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

Space Boffins Podcast, from the Naked Scientists

In a brave move, the Space Boffins attempt a podcast about pictures without any pictures! Joining them are science writer Andy Saunders, who's spent years remastering images from the Apollo missions to reveal details never seen before, Oxford astrophysicist and podcast host Becky Smethurst about the first images from the James Webb Space Telescope, and space artist Jackie Burns. It's an (audio) visual feast! Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

Squelch! Another Hearthstone Podcast!
“HEARTHSTONE IS FUN” - NEIL ARMSTRONG ON THE MOON

Squelch! Another Hearthstone Podcast!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 54:39


We're back with another "oops, all goods" episode! We think the meta is fun, and you can't stop us! We've got the definitive Sire Denathrius lore. This episode was recorded in front of a live studio audience. Support the show

K8lyn Cracks The Code
6. CRACKING: John Waters On Apollo 11

K8lyn Cracks The Code

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 3:20


This episode means so much to me because my guest, John Waters, or as I like to call him- Papa, talks about his time working at NASA as an engineer. His work contributed to the moon landing mission in 1969 with Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and all the other amazing men and women who were a part of Apollo 11. He worked in the simulator himself where he practiced docking in space and landing on the moon. Enjoy my favorite episode yet :)MY SOCIALS-KCTC:https://www.tiktok.com/@kctcpodhttps://www.instagram.com/kctcpod/?hl=enPersonal:https://www.tiktok.com/@k8lynandersonhttps://www.instagram.com/k8lynanderson/?hl=en

逐工一幅天文圖 APOD Taigi
551. 阿波羅 11 號 登陸月球 ê 全景圖 ft. 阿錕 (20220723)

逐工一幅天文圖 APOD Taigi

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 2:08


毋知你最近敢捌看過別个世界 ê 全景圖?這張是阿波羅 11 號 ê 登陸地點,就 tī 彼个壯麗閣青荒 ê 月海,寧靜海 遐。是原始相片 ê 高解析度掃描相片 鬥出來 ê 全景圖。相片是 Neil Armstrong tī 1969 年 7 月 20 鴟鴞號登月小艇 登陸月球了後無偌久,ùi 窗仔翕出去 ê 景色。全景圖 上倒爿彼張 (編號 AS11-37-5449),是人類頭一擺 tī 地球以外 ê 世界翕 ê 相片。倒爿 ê 前景有一个推進器 ê 煙筒管,是 tī 南方。正爿有鴟鴞號 ê 烏影,出現 tī 西爿。予你做一个參考,正爿彼个較大較淺 ê 隕石坑,伊 ê 直徑差不多是 12 公尺闊。相片是登陸月球了後差不多點半鐘,太空人 踏 tī 月球塗跤 進前,ùi 登月小艇 ê 窗仔翕--ê。翕相 ê 目的是欲紀錄登陸地點用--ê,若是欲提早離開 ê 時陣就用會著矣。 ——— 這是 NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day ê 台語文 podcast 原文版:https://apod.nasa.gov/ 台文版:https://apod.tw/ 今仔日 ê 文章: https://apod.tw/daily/20220723/ 影像:Neil Armstrong, Apollo 11, NASA 音樂:P!SCO - 鼎鼎 聲優:阿錕 翻譯:An-Li Tsai (NCU) 原文:https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap220723.html Powered by Firstory Hosting

HausboTalk Petra Horkého
DUŠEK - HORKÝ: Hvězdoseriál 4/10 - Modří už vědí.

HausboTalk Petra Horkého

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 7:57


Přemýšleli jste někdy, proč slunce malujeme žlutou barvou, při západu je oranžové -a přitom svítí bíle? Ano, víme, že atmosféra je modrá, proto je daná i barva nebe - ale proč? Dokonce ani voda v oceánu není přirozeně modrá…Je tu další díl letního seriálu o hvězdách a vesmíru! Jiří Dušek, ředitel Hvězdárny a planetária Brno a cestovatel a režisér Petr Horký se setkávají u dalšího dílu Hvězdoseriálu. Vyjde čas i na obvyklý experiment.Jiří Dušek, ředitel Hvězdárny a planetária Brno společně s Petrem Horkým.

レアジョブ英会話 Daily News Article Podcast
New lunar rover in the works as NASA moon mission advances

レアジョブ英会話 Daily News Article Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 2:02


A new lunar rover is under development by Lockheed Martin and Goodyear as NASA gears up for a return to the moon. Unlike the rover first used during the Apollo 15 mission in 1971, built to last only a few days and for short trips, the new lunar vehicle is being built for extended use. And this time, it's not just for NASA. “We're developing this new generation of lunar mobility vehicle to be available to NASA and for commercial companies and even other space agencies to support science and human exploration,” said Kirk Shireman, vice president of Lunar Exploration at Lockheed Martin. "This approach exemplifies NASA's desire for industry to take the lead with commercial efforts that enable the agency to be one of many customers.” Neil Armstrong became the first person to step onto the moon's surface in 1969 as part of the Apollo 11 mission. Goodyear, which was also involved in NASA's Apollo missions, will employ the airless tire technology it uses here for autonomous shuttles and other passenger vehicles. Lockheed Martin, based in Fort Worth, Texas, has worked with NASA for more than 50 years, including NASA's Orion exploration-class spaceship for Artemis and numerous Mars planetary spacecraft. The lunar vehicles will need to withstand extreme conditions on the moon's surface, where temperatures drop to -250 degrees Fahrenheit (-156.67 degrees Celsius) at night and rise to over 250 degrees Fahrenheit (121.11 degrees Celsius) during the day. Aside from Goodyear, based in Akron, Ohio, and Lockheed Martin, MDA of Canada will provide its commercial robotic arm technology for the vehicles. The companies anticipate having their first vehicle on the moon's surface at the same time as NASA's mission, planned for 2025. This article was provided by The Associated Press.

Recomendados de la semana en iVoox.com Semana del 5 al 11 de julio del 2021

LA OTRA LUNA, escrito por Jorge Campos seudónimo de Jorge Renales Fernández, escritor, crítico e historiador de la literatura nacido en Madrid. Licenciado en Filosofía y Letras, dio clases de Historia de la Literatura en la Real Escuela de Arte Dramático y en los cursos para extranjeros de varios centros de enseñanza de los Estados Unidos. Sus publicaciones de tema literario se han orientado preferentemente hacia dos grandes temas, el romanticismo español del siglo XIX y la literatura hispanoamericana. Entre sus obras principales de crítica y ensayo destacan, Historia Universal de la Literatura (1946) y prólogos a las Obras de Espronceda, Alcalá Galiano, Estébanez Calderón y Duque de Rivas. Entre sus últimas obras publicadas figuran Introducción a Pío Baroja y dos antologías de los poetas Antonio y Manuel Machado. Entre sus trabajos dedicados a la narración pueden citarse, Seis mentiras en novela (1940), En nada de tiempo (1947), Vichori (1951), Pasarse de bueno (1950), El atentado (1951), El hombre y lo demás (1953) y Tiempo pasado, obra con la que consiguió en 1955 el Premio Nacional de Literatura. También dentro de la sección de crítica figuran sus obras Conversaciones con Azorín (1964) y Teatro y Sociedad (1970). Fue también redactor de la parte hispanoamericana del Diccionario de Literatura Española, editado por Revista de Occidente. Su estado de salud en los últimos años fue delicado puesto que perdió la vista casi por completo, lo que no le impedía seguir dictando artículos y trabajos que publicaba en revistas de literatura. Quienes conocían de cerca a Jorge Campos, Buero Vallejo, Leopoldo de Luis, Ramón de Garciasol, Elena Soriano y José Luis Cano, entre otros, reconocen que fue un hombre que después de la guerra eligió el exilio interior desde el que continuó analizando la literatura de su tiempo y la anterior a él. Aún así no pudo librarse de una temporada en un campo de concentración después de la guerra. Jorge Campos, murió en el año 1983 en Segovia, como consecuencia de una hemorragia cerebral. 🌗🌗 Sound By courtesy of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Centre Scientific Visualization Studio.🌙 La Luna se formó aprox. Hace 4.500 millones de años. La Luna es el quinto satélite natural más grande del Sistema Solar. La luna orbita la Tierra a una velocidad media de 3.700 kilómetros por hora. La Luna está en rotación sincrónica con la Tierra; siempre muestra a la Tierra del mismo lado. La superficie de la Luna es oscura. El lado oscuro de la Luna se enfría a unos -169 grados centígrados. Durante el día lunar que dura aproximadamente un mes, la superficie de la Luna se hornea al sol a una temperatura de hasta 117 grados centígrados. La Luna se está alejando de la Tierra aprox. 3,8 cm cada año. La Luna tiene terremotos llamados Moonquakes. Hay agua en la Luna. El programa Luna de la Unión Soviética presentó el primer aterrizaje exitoso de una nave espacial no tripulada en la superficie de la Luna en 1966. La misión Apolo 11 de la NASA de los EE.UU. en 1969 fue el primer aterrizaje tripulado en la Luna. La primera persona en pisar la Luna fue Neil Armstrong. Un eclipse lunar ocurre cuando la Tierra está entre el Sol y la Luna. The Moons es en realidad más de una forma ovalada. La Luna es propiedad internacional. Los astronautas han traído 842 libras de material lunar a la Tierra. 🌙 Las manchas oscuras de la luna se llaman María. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 📌Síguenos en nuestro canal informativo de Telegram: https://t.me/historiasparaserleidas Suscríbete a nuestra Newsletter: https://www.getrevue.co/profile/historiasparaserleidas 🛑BIO Olga Paraíso: https://instabio.cc/Hleidas 📌Twitter https://twitter.com/HLeidas

Historias para ser leídas
LA OTRA LUNA, Jorge Campos (Ciencia Ficción)

Historias para ser leídas

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 17:25


LA OTRA LUNA, escrito por Jorge Campos seudónimo de Jorge Renales Fernández, escritor, crítico e historiador de la literatura nacido en Madrid. Licenciado en Filosofía y Letras, dio clases de Historia de la Literatura en la Real Escuela de Arte Dramático y en los cursos para extranjeros de varios centros de enseñanza de los Estados Unidos. Sus publicaciones de tema literario se han orientado preferentemente hacia dos grandes temas, el romanticismo español del siglo XIX y la literatura hispanoamericana. Entre sus obras principales de crítica y ensayo destacan, Historia Universal de la Literatura (1946) y prólogos a las Obras de Espronceda, Alcalá Galiano, Estébanez Calderón y Duque de Rivas. Entre sus últimas obras publicadas figuran Introducción a Pío Baroja y dos antologías de los poetas Antonio y Manuel Machado. Entre sus trabajos dedicados a la narración pueden citarse, Seis mentiras en novela (1940), En nada de tiempo (1947), Vichori (1951), Pasarse de bueno (1950), El atentado (1951), El hombre y lo demás (1953) y Tiempo pasado, obra con la que consiguió en 1955 el Premio Nacional de Literatura. También dentro de la sección de crítica figuran sus obras Conversaciones con Azorín (1964) y Teatro y Sociedad (1970). Fue también redactor de la parte hispanoamericana del Diccionario de Literatura Española, editado por Revista de Occidente. Su estado de salud en los últimos años fue delicado puesto que perdió la vista casi por completo, lo que no le impedía seguir dictando artículos y trabajos que publicaba en revistas de literatura. Quienes conocían de cerca a Jorge Campos, Buero Vallejo, Leopoldo de Luis, Ramón de Garciasol, Elena Soriano y José Luis Cano, entre otros, reconocen que fue un hombre que después de la guerra eligió el exilio interior desde el que continuó analizando la literatura de su tiempo y la anterior a él. Aún así no pudo librarse de una temporada en un campo de concentración después de la guerra. Jorge Campos, murió en el año 1983 en Segovia, como consecuencia de una hemorragia cerebral. 🌗🌗 Sound By courtesy of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Centre Scientific Visualization Studio.🌙 La Luna se formó aprox. Hace 4.500 millones de años. La Luna es el quinto satélite natural más grande del Sistema Solar. La luna orbita la Tierra a una velocidad media de 3.700 kilómetros por hora. La Luna está en rotación sincrónica con la Tierra; siempre muestra a la Tierra del mismo lado. La superficie de la Luna es oscura. El lado oscuro de la Luna se enfría a unos -169 grados centígrados. Durante el día lunar que dura aproximadamente un mes, la superficie de la Luna se hornea al sol a una temperatura de hasta 117 grados centígrados. La Luna se está alejando de la Tierra aprox. 3,8 cm cada año. La Luna tiene terremotos llamados Moonquakes. Hay agua en la Luna. El programa Luna de la Unión Soviética presentó el primer aterrizaje exitoso de una nave espacial no tripulada en la superficie de la Luna en 1966. La misión Apolo 11 de la NASA de los EE.UU. en 1969 fue el primer aterrizaje tripulado en la Luna. La primera persona en pisar la Luna fue Neil Armstrong. Un eclipse lunar ocurre cuando la Tierra está entre el Sol y la Luna. The Moons es en realidad más de una forma ovalada. La Luna es propiedad internacional. Los astronautas han traído 842 libras de material lunar a la Tierra. 🌙 Las manchas oscuras de la luna se llaman María. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 📌Síguenos en nuestro canal informativo de Telegram: https://t.me/historiasparaserleidas Suscríbete a nuestra Newsletter: https://www.getrevue.co/profile/historiasparaserleidas 🛑BIO Olga Paraíso: https://instabio.cc/Hleidas 📌Twitter https://twitter.com/HLeidas Escucha el episodio completo en la app de iVoox, o descubre todo el catálogo de iVoox Originals

HausboTalk Petra Horkého
DUŠEK - HORKÝ: Hvězdoseriál 3/10 - Ze Země na Měsíc!

HausboTalk Petra Horkého

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 9:45


Jak to bylo s přistáním na Měsíci - skutečně se to stalo, anebo to byla všechno jenom habaďůra? :-) Jak to proběhlo, jak se kolem toho konspirovalo a co s o tom všem myslet. Další díl prázdninového seriálu o vesmíru a hvězdách je tady!Jiří Dušek, ředitel Hvězdárny a planetária Brno společně s Petrem Horkým.

Planet Porky
263: One giant leap

Planet Porky

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 48:33


The latest Planet Porky podcast is now in orbit as Mike Parry and Lesley-Ann Jones lift off for another episode. Today's topics include: the sad death of Olivia Newton-John, Judith Durham, the BBC's decision to cut their football results service, change for the sake of change, Vanessa Feltz, crowdfunding for your divorce payments, Neil Armstrong and his famous quote, colonising the moon, the upcoming anniversary of the death of Princess Diana, where in the UK Eurovision should be held, hosepipe bans and water consumption, 'quiet quitting', Nicole Sealey, resentment in the workplace, the Great Train Robbery, and the man who is missing millions in Bitcoin. It's the podcast which gives much more than it takes, it's Life on Planet Porky.  Follow the show on Twitter: @PlanetPorky or Mike is: @MikeParry8 while you can find Lesley-Ann: @LAJwriter. Or you can email us questions or comments to: planetporkypod@gmail.com. We'd love to hear from you!

The Douglas Coleman Show
The Douglas Coleman Show w_ David M Kelly and Richard Stephens

The Douglas Coleman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 28:29


David M. Kelly writes fast-paced, near-future sci-fi thrillers with engaging characters, cynical humor, and plausible science. He is the author of the Joe Ballen series, Logan's World series, and the Hyperia Jones series, and has been published in Canadian SF magazine Neo-opsis.David's interest in science and technology began early. At the age of six his parents allowed him to stay up late into the night to watch the television broadcast of Neil Armstrong stepping on to the surface of the moon. From that day he was hooked on everything related to science and space.An avid reader, he worked his way through the contents of the mobile library that visited his street, progressing through YA titles (or ‘juveniles' as they were known back then) on to the classics of Robert Heinlein, Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke, and Harry Harrison.David worked for many years in project management and software development. Along the way his interests have included IPSC combat (target) pistol shooting, crew chief on a drag racing team, and several years as bass player/vocalist in a heavy rock band. He also managed to fit in some real work in manual jobs from digging ditches and assembly lines jobs to loading trucks in a haulage company.http://davidmkelly.comBorn in Simcoe, Ontario, in 1965, I was raised and still reside in Cambridge, Ontario. I began writing circa 1974, a bored child looking for something to while away the long, summertime days. My penchant for reading, 'The Hardy Boys,' led to an inspiration one sweltering summer afternoon, when my best friend and I thought, ‘We could write one of those.' And so, I did.As my reading horizons broadened, so did my writing. 'Star Wars' inspired me to write a 600-page novel about outer space that caught the attention of a special teacher, Mr. Woodley, who encouraged me to keep on writing.A trip to a local book store saw the proprietor introduce me to Stephen R. Donaldson and Terry Brooks. My writing life was forever changed.At 17, I left high school to join the working world to support my first son. For the next twenty-two years I worked as a shipper at a local bakery. At the age of 36, I went back to high school to complete my education. After graduating with honors at the age of thirty-nine, I became a member of our local Police Service, and worked for 12 years in the provincial court system.In early 2017, I resigned from the Police Service to pursue my love of writing full-time. With the help and support of my lovely wife Caroline and our 5 children, I have now realized my boyhood dream. http://richardhstephens.comThe Douglas Coleman Show now offers audio and video promotional packages for music artists as well as video promotional packages for authors. We also offer advertising. Please see our website for complete details. http://douglascolemanshow.comIf you have a comment about this episode or any other, please click the link below.https://ratethispodcast.com/douglascolemanshow

Europe 1 - Hondelatte Raconte
Apollo XI, un bond de géant pour l'humanité - L'intégrale

Europe 1 - Hondelatte Raconte

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 39:30


Le 16 juillet 1969, les astronautes Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin et Mike Collins embarquent à bord de la fusée Saturne 5. 4 jours plus tard, Armstrong pose, le premier, le pied sur la Lune. Suivi, 19 minutes plus tard, par Aldrin.

L'info en intégrale - Europe 1
Apollo XI, un bond de géant pour l'humanité - Le récit

L'info en intégrale - Europe 1

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 24:45


Le 16 juillet 1969, les astronautes Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin et Mike Collins embarquent à bord de la fusée Saturne 5. 4 jours plus tard, Armstrong pose, le premier, le pied sur la Lune. Suivi, 19 minutes plus tard, par Aldrin.

L'info en intégrale - Europe 1
Apollo XI, un bond de géant pour l'humanité - L'intégrale

L'info en intégrale - Europe 1

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 39:30


Le 16 juillet 1969, les astronautes Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin et Mike Collins embarquent à bord de la fusée Saturne 5. 4 jours plus tard, Armstrong pose, le premier, le pied sur la Lune. Suivi, 19 minutes plus tard, par Aldrin.

Europe 1 - Hondelatte Raconte
Apollo XI, un bond de géant pour l'humanité - Le récit

Europe 1 - Hondelatte Raconte

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 24:45


Le 16 juillet 1969, les astronautes Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin et Mike Collins embarquent à bord de la fusée Saturne 5. 4 jours plus tard, Armstrong pose, le premier, le pied sur la Lune. Suivi, 19 minutes plus tard, par Aldrin.

You Are There
”Communion On The Moon”

You Are There

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 3:38


What happened before Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong actually took that historical walk is perhaps even more amazing, but so few ever knew it even happened. Take a listen to this story.

Let It Be Easy with Susie Moore
Neil Armstrong Had Imposter Syndrome?!

Let It Be Easy with Susie Moore

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 5:58


This story made we wanna scream, "Seeeee?! It affects all of us!" The first man on the moon felt unimpressive at a gathering - you want to hear these exact words. But, hey - you're doing just fine!Please consider rating and reviewing the podcast on Apple Podcasts if you enjoyed this episode! This helps to get the message out to more people just like you. And be sure to click the "Follow" button to get notified of updates.Also, I'm hosting a free workshop that'll show you how to further coach yourself through any of life's challenges. Check it out here.

Ghosts of Arlington Podcast
#53: Project Gemini, Part V

Ghosts of Arlington Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 35:56


This week we take a look at NASA astronaut class 3 and then briefly overview the other 20 astronaut classes NASA has selected since then, but the meat of the episode is the nearly disasterous Gemini 8 misison that a clear thinking and quick acting Neil Armstrong brought back from the brink and the disaster that killed the Gemini 9 main crew and ultimatly put Buzz Aldrin on the Apollo 11 misison, making him the second man to walk on the moon.The Space Race series introduction is Lift Off by kennysvoice.As always, a very special thanks to Mountain Up Cap Company for its continued help to spread the word about the podcast on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/MountainUpCapCompany Climb to Glory!For more information about the podcast visit: ·       The GoA website: https://www.ghostsofarlingtonpodcast.com    ·       Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ghostsofarlingtonpodcast·       Twitter: https://twitter.com/ArlingtonGhosts·       Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ghostsofarlington/

Wow! I Didn't Know That! (or maybe I just forgot)
July 24th - One Small Step - w/Neil Armstrong

Wow! I Didn't Know That! (or maybe I just forgot)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 2:44


Fred discusses the Apollo 11 mission, which safely returned to Earth on this day in 1969. www.rockysealemusic.com https://rockysealemusic.com/wow-i-didn-t-know-that-or-maybe-i-just-forgot https://www.facebook.com/150wordspodcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rocky-seale7/message

Real Ass Podcast
DCCCLXXII. Texachusetts (Xia Anderson And Robbie Goodwin)

Real Ass Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 81:03


Xia Anderson and Robbie Goodwin join Luis J. Gomez and Zac Amico and discuss trying to beat what happened on this day in 1969 - Neil Armstrong walking on the moon, what flat-earthers believe, Hunstville facts, Xia's panic attacks, Arnold Schwarzenegger farting in the face of an actress, the Ohio bill that would allow pregnant women to sue men who impregnate them, parents suing Sesame Place for "Rosita" ignoring black children, the DA dropping murder charges against the bodega worker, the family Pitbull who attacked it's owner and why Pitbulls should be banned, the plus-sized teacher who posts mean things her students say about her weight and so much more!(Air Date: July 20th, 2022)Support our sponsors!NevenEyeWear.com - Buy 1 pair get 2 pairs free! No code needed!YoDelta.com - Use promo code: GaS to get 25% off!Submit your artwork via postal mail to:GaS Digital Networkc/o Real Ass Podcast151 1st Ave, #311New York, NY 10003Submit to be Luis' sparring partner by sending a video and your information to RealAssOfficial@gmail.com!Real Ass Podcast merchandise is available at https://podcastmerch.com/collections/real-ass-podcastYou can watch Real Ass Podcast LIVE for FREE every Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 11am ET at GaSDigitalNetwork.com/LIVEOnce you're there you can sign up at GaSDigitalNetwork.com with promo code: RAP for a 7-day FREE trial with access to every Real Ass Podcast show ever recorded! On top of that you'll also have the same access to ALL the shows that GaS Digital Network has to offer!Follow the whole show on social media!Xia AndersonTwitter: https://twitter.com/xia_landInstagram: https://instagram.com/xia_landOnlyFans: https://onlyfans.com/xialandRobbie GoodwinTwitter: https://twitter.com/robbiegoodwinInstagram: https://instagram.com/robbiegoodwinPatreon: https://patreon.com/loudboysLuis J. GomezTwitter: https://twitter.com/luisjgomezInstagram: https://instagram.com/gomezcomedyYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/LuisJGomezComedyTwitch: https://www.twitch.tv/prrattlesnakeWebsite: https://www.luisofskanks.comZac AmicoInstagram: https://instagram.com/zacisnotfunnyGaS Digital NetworkTwitter: https://twitter.com/gasdigitalInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/gasdigital/See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

History Daily
Neil Armstrong Walks On the Moon

History Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 21:49 Very Popular


July 21, 1969. American astronaut Neil Armstrong becomes the first person to walk on the moon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The 260 Journey
The Symbol Is to Remind Us

The 260 Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 6:01


Day 144 Today's Reading: 1 Corinthians 11 The generation you are from will determine which historical tragedy you will remember as an American. On Sunday morning, December 7, 1941, Japanese war planes bombed Pearl Harbor. Eighteen battleships were sunk or destroyed. Two hundred airplanes were put out of commission. And the servicemen who were either killed or wounded numbered 3,581. America's war cry as she entered World War II was, “Remember Pearl Harbor.” I grew up when that changed to “Remember 9/11.” That was the day—September 11, 2001, when the towers fell. The world does not need so much as to be informed as it needs to be reminded. The Bible tells us again and again to “remember.” That is what Communion is. And that is what Paul is challenging us to do in 1 Corinthians 11. Some churches participate in Communion every week, some do it once a month, and some churches a few times a year. Communion is a mini drama of salvation, using the props of bread and wine. Here's what Paul says about Communion in verse 26: “Whenever you eat this bread and drink this cup, you are retelling the story, proclaiming our Lord's death until he comes” (TPT). Here's how it reads in The Message translation: “What you must solemnly realize is that every time you eat this bread and every time you drink this cup, you reenact in your words and actions the death of the Master. You will be drawn back to this meal again and again until the Master returns. You must never let familiarity breed contempt.” Communion is one way we can express our love for Jesus, because it is a way we can say to Him, “We remember what you did for us.” Whenever we participate at the Lord's table, we too have a battle cry: “Remember Jesus Christ.” Remember the cross. And to help us remember, we get the bread and wine props. Props are important reminders. When we get married, an important prop is part of the wedding ceremony. When we get the prop, we say, “With this ring I thee wed.” When we say those words, we don't mean that the ring or putting the ring on the finger is what makes us married. It's a prop to remind us, and to show everyone around us, the commitment we have made. That's what the sacraments of the church are. Props to remind us. To make it anything more than a symbol is dangerous. It's like loving our wedding band, when we need to love our spouse. To cling to a symbol is what many try to do and they miss what God was trying to show us. What was God reminding us of with the bread and the cup? The bread means God came. We say the bread is His body—that's God in person. In his first epistle, John says that this Jesus came in bodily form: we touched Him, we saw Him, we heard Him. He did not write a message in the sky for us. He did not shout it audibly. He came to tell us that God loves us. God came in person for us. The cup reminds us that God cares. The blood means God cares. The cup of juice reminds us that it should have been us paying for our sins, but God cares so much for you and me that He took our place. He cares and He died for you and me on the cross. The juice means God cares and took our place. Did you know that some astronauts had Communion on the moon? On July 20, 1969, two human beings changed history by walking on the surface of the moon. But what happened before Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin and Neil Armstrong exited the Lunar Module is perhaps even more amazing. We know that Neil Armstrong was the first man to walk on the moon, but Buzz Aldrin took Communion on the surface of the moon. Some months after his return, he wrote about it in Guideposts. Aldrin knew he would soon be doing something unprecedented in human history and he felt he should mark the occasion somehow, so he took Communion elements with him out of the earth's orbit a

Famous & Gravy
Best of Coffee Cocktail Cannabis

Famous & Gravy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 15:28


Today we celebrate our 25th episode by spotlighting a fan-favorite category: Coffee, Cocktail or Cannabis. In this category, we ask which one of these three substances would you most want to do with the featured dead celebrity - either to provide access to some aspect you are curious about, or which sounds like the most fun. All clips are from actual episodes of Famous & Gravy, which means all featured celebrities have died within the last 10 years, and each has a full episode dedicated to a review of their quality of life, as we see it. There are 24 full episodes of Famous & Gravy that precede this special, so go back and listen if you like what you hear. Famous & Gravy is created and co-hosted by Amit Kapoor and Michael Osborne. You are free to speculate which substance you would choose to do with either of the hosts. This episode was produced by Jacob Weiss. Links: Transcript of this episode Famous & Gravy official website Follow us on Twitter Yes, we're on  Facebook Talk business with us on LinkedIn

On This Day In History
Neil Armstrong Walks On The Moon

On This Day In History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 1:32


Download the Volley.FM app for more short daily shows!

This Day in History
This Day in History - July 20, 2022

This Day in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 1:02


Neil Armstrong made a giant leap for mankind on this day in 1969.

Frank Buckley Interviews
Re-release: Charles Duke, Astronaut/Apollo 11 CAPCOM

Frank Buckley Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 29:31


53 years ago on July 20th, 1969, Neil Armstrong became the first man on the moon. He was the first of only 12 human beings to ever step on the surface of the moon. Among those 12 men is Charles Duke. Duke was an astronaut on Apollo 16, and the youngest person to ever walk on the lunar surface at the age of 36. During the first mission to the moon, Apollo 11, Charlie Duke was the voice of Houston's Mission Control, serving as CAPCOM. His was the first voice from earth to reach the moon after the Eagle had landed at Tranquility Base. Charlie shares the tense moments leading up to that first moon landing, and also recalls his own experiences on the lunar surface for Apollo 16.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Daily Article
How Armstrong and Aldrin were nearly stranded on the moon

The Daily Article

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 8:43


On July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong became the first person to walk on the moon. Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin Jr. soon joined him. But there's a perilous part of the story you may not know. In The Daily Article for July 20, 2022, Dr. Jim Denison shares how the astronauts were almost stranded on the moon, why Putin thinks he's winning the war in Ukraine, and why Christians should "not grow weary of doing good" (Galatians 6:9).  Author: Dr. Jim Denison Narrator: Chris Elkins Subscribe: http://www.denisonforum.org/subscribe

Squiz Today
Wednesday, 20 July - New Covid advice from the Chief Medical Officer; Managing rising interest rates; Europe's heat wave; and saying it like a local...

Squiz Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 9:31


The Squiz is your shortcut to the news. More details and links to further reading for all of today's news can be found in The Squiz Today email. Sign up (it's free!) - www.thesquiz.com.au.LINKS: Most mispronounced place namesIt's the Anniversary of Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin becoming the first men to walk on the moon (1969) - the 13 Minutes to the Moon podcast is a good one.Other things we do:Politics Today - a weekday newsletter getting you across the latest in politics, both here and abroad.Sport Today - a sports news podcast designed to keep you ahead of the game. Or sign up to the newsletter here.Squiz Shortcuts - a weekly explainer on big news topicsSquiz Kids - a news podcast for curious kids. Age appropriate news without the nasties!

Ronda Deportiva
85: El misterio de la cueva de los Tayos.

Ronda Deportiva

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 46:32 Very Popular


El misterio de la cueva de los Tayos.Esta semana en Código Misterio platicaremos de El misterio de la cueva de los Tayos.Nuestra investigación comienza cuando Juan Moricz encontró signos de una civilización antigua extremadamente desarrollada dentro de la Cueva, dejando testimonios en una biblioteca hecha de oro.Además el sacerdote salesiano italiano Carlos Crespi coleccionó centenares de piezas y planchas metálicas que misteriosamente desaparecieron después de un incendio y aparentemente fueron robadas por el Vaticano.Una de las cosas más extrañas es que durante una de las expediciones al lugar, participo el ex astronauta Neil Armstrong y otra cosa que añade misterio a la historia es que al parecer se sacaron 4 cajas con contenido desconocido de este lugar.Todo esto y más en este episodio de Código Misterio, búscanos en Facebook e Instagram como Código misterio y descarga el podcast en tu plataforma de audio favorita y pasa la voz.