Podcast appearances and mentions of Buzz Aldrin

American astronaut; second person to walk on the Moon

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Buzz Aldrin

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Best podcasts about Buzz Aldrin

Latest podcast episodes about Buzz Aldrin

Wow! I Didn't Know That! (or maybe I just forgot)
Oct 4th - American Greatness - w/Buzz Aldrin

Wow! I Didn't Know That! (or maybe I just forgot)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 2:40


Fred discusses the launch of Sputnik I by the Russians on this day in 1957. This triggered the space race and a new age of American innovation. www.rockysealemusic.com https://rockysealemusic.com/wow-i-didn-t-know-that-or-maybe-i-just-forgot https://www.facebook.com/150wordspodcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rocky-seale7/message

Ghosts of Arlington Podcast
#62: Go For Launch (The Apollo Program, Part VII)

Ghosts of Arlington Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 38:58 Transcription Available


Wernher von Braun is a brilliant rocket scientest whose name has come up multiple time in during the space race. This natuarlized American citizen is undoubtedly the reason the US beat the Soviets to the moon (and according to some experts, the reason the US got to the moon at all). He was also undoubtledly a member of the Nazi party and an SS officer. This week, we take a closer look at this morally ambiguous genius.Also, all of the Ts are crossed and the Is are dotted (and the Js are both crossed and dotted depending on if they are capital of lower case) and if this mission is going to launch in July 1969, it is now or never. But thanks to a new author named Michae Crichton, a lot of people are worried that the astronauts might bring back some sort of space bacteria that could end life as we know it on the plant. And yes, NASA has come up with a contingency plan to avoid that not-very-probably scenario. The Space Race series introduction music is Lift Off by kennysvoice.As always, a very special thanks to Mountain Up Cap Company for its continued help to spread the word about the podcast on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/MountainUpCapCompany Climb to Glory!For more information about the podcast visit: ·       The GoA website: https://www.ghostsofarlingtonpodcast.com    ·       Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ghostsofarlingtonpodcast·       Twitter: https://twitter.com/ArlingtonGhosts·       Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ghostsofarlington/

Kathy Sullivan Explores
How Do You Top That?

Kathy Sullivan Explores

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 6:06


In our celebrity-crazed world, the term “one-hit wonder” is commonly used to refer to an athlete, musician, or author who earned an Olympic gold, a Grammy, or a best-seller with their first work, and never repeated. Sometimes, I wonder what life was like after the games for a swimmer or gymnast who earned gold at the ripe age of 16 or 20. They had achieved something they had dreamed of for most of their lives—now what? Was that really their peak, the best thing that had ever happened to them?   I certainly had the same questions for myself. I got my first history book mention at 26 years old, after I  earned my Ph.D. and NASA flight suit, being one of the first six women in the American astronaut corps. Six years later, after earning another history book mention as the first American woman to walk in space, I started thinking about what this all meant in the broader sweep of my life. Did I need to start chasing another goal that would get me more accolades and greater fame? In this episode, I discuss facing the “what's next?” question and the theme that pervades our celebrity-crazed culture. I explore Buzz Aldrin's personal struggles after the Apollo 11 Moon Landing mission. You'll also learn about insights that have kept me grounded over the years and shaped my later career decisions and how headlines and adulations are rarely about purpose, meaning, and worth. “Nothing I could ever do was likely to give me a bigger, louder headline that I had gotten for joining the astronaut corps and walking in space, but that didn't mean there was nothing else of meaning and value to do with my life.” - Kathy Sullivan This week on Kathy Sullivan Explores: A common theme in our celebrity-crazed world Earning history book mentions and evaluating what I wanted my life to be about The press coverage around Buzz Aldrin's personal struggles after the Apollo 11 Moon Landing mission Insights that have kept me grounded Resources Mentioned: Book: Magnificent Desolation: The Long Journey Home from the Moon by Buzz Aldrin Our Favorite Quotes: “Headlines are normally picked for novelty, sizzle, or selling—they're rarely about purpose or worth.” - Kathy Sullivan “Realize that what's in your heart and soul is more important than what's on your resume. The bullets on your resume list what you've done, but what really matters is who you became by journeying through that achievement—that's what shines through your character and powers your works.” - Kathy Sullivan Spaceship Not Required I'm Kathy Sullivan, the only person to have walked in space and gone to the deepest point in the ocean. I'm an explorer, and that doesn't always have to involve going to some remote or exotic place. It simply requires a commitment to put curiosity into action. In this podcast, you can explore, reflecting on lessons learned from life so far and from my brilliant and ever-inquisitive guests. We explore together in this very moment from right where you are--spaceship not required. Welcome to Kathy Sullivan Explores. Visit my website at kathysullivanexplores.com to sign up for seven astronaut tips to improving your life on earth and be the first to discover future episodes and learn about more exciting adventures ahead! Don't forget to leave a rating and review wherever you get your podcasts! Spotify I Stitcher I Apple Podcasts I iHeart Radio I TuneIn I Google I Amazon Music.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dans l'intimité de l'Histoire
Quand l'Amérique voulait bombarder la Lune

Dans l'intimité de l'Histoire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 6:03


En mai 1958, l'US Air Force lance le projet secret A119. L'objectif ? Faire exploser une bombe nucléaire sur la Lune. Il s'agit de susciter un champignon atomique visible depuis la Terre et ainsi démontrer la puissance des forces armées américaines en pleine Guerre Froide. Mais le projet sera abandonné, laissant Neil Armstrong et Buzz Aldrin marcher sur la Lune le 21 juillet 1969.

Car Dogs
#168 Confessions of a dangerous mind

Car Dogs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 42:43


I ramble on about Buzz Aldrin, Tom Waits and ultramarathoners --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Tous Parano
Le Programme Apollo

Tous Parano

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 63:55


Un petit pas pour l'Homme, un bond de géant pour la duplicité. Promesse irréaliste, mensonges d'État, conspiration de la NASA, tournage secret en studio, assassinats de témoins, tout a été mis en œuvre pour nous persuader que l'Homme avait marché sur la Lune. Dans cet épisode, Gaël et Geoffroy voyagent à travers l'univers de cette théorie du complot qui met en doute l'authenticité du Programme Apollo. Quand la conquête spatiale de la bannière étoilée entre en collision avec la galaxie des lunosceptiques… Musique : Thibaud R. Habillage sonore / mixage : Alexandre Lechaux Contact: tousparano@gmail.com Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/Tous-Parano-106178481205195

DECIDING TO WIN
Space for a better world with Christina Korp

DECIDING TO WIN

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 32:32


On this episode, i am joined by the amazing Christina Korp, the president of purpose entertainment, astronaut manager and producer. For ten years she managed Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin and launched his education foundations – ShareSpace and the Aldrin Family Foundation. She produced the last five galas at Kennedy Space Center celebrating Apollo 11 and the Webby winning and Emmy nominated, “Cycling Pathways to Mars” VR experience. She is passionate about promoting ways space benefits the planet and people every day and promoting women's issues. She spearheaded projects in 2020 to celebrate the Women's Vote Centennial in the USA. She leads SPACE For a Better World producing events and experiences that raise money for partner charities. She currently works with Apollo 16 moon walker Charlie Duke and NASA astronaut and aquanaut Nicole Stott. Christina has traveled the world as a singer, producer, tour manager and as an Astronaut Wrangler. She produces ground breaking, mass participation experiential artworks and event that focus on inspiring people and giving back to the planet. This episode was produced by the amazing Justin Fiallo. Photocredit : David Christopher Lee

Ghosts of Arlington Podcast
#60: Introducing the Crew of Apollo 11 (The Apollo Program, Part V)

Ghosts of Arlington Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 29:23 Transcription Available


This week we will take a look at the crew of Apollo 11 and how each came to be selected as a member of the most ambitious mission undertaken in human history - the first attempt to land people on the moon.The Space Race series introduction music is Lift Off by kennysvoice.As always, a very special thanks to Mountain Up Cap Company for its continued help to spread the word about the podcast on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/MountainUpCapCompany Climb to Glory!For more information about the podcast visit: ·       The GoA website: https://www.ghostsofarlingtonpodcast.com    ·       Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ghostsofarlingtonpodcast·       Twitter: https://twitter.com/ArlingtonGhosts·       Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ghostsofarlington/

HausboTalk Petra Horkého
DUŠEK - HORKÝ: Hvězdoseriál 7/10 - Mimozemský život.

HausboTalk Petra Horkého

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 11:55


Možná to není tak velký zázrak, aby někde v kosmu vznikl život. Ale neudrží se a nevyvine do tak vysokého stupně jako na Zemi. Jak se my lidé pokoušíme s případnými jinými existencemi spojit? Kromě cílených pokusů vyslat do vesmíru vzkaz o naší existenci je tu celá řada dalších projevů civilizace, které jsou ve vesmíru „hlasité".Pusťte si další díl Hvězdoseriálu!Partnerem kanálu jsou Golden Gate  @Golden Gate a Bushman @BUSHMAN Česko ​Support the show

Fantom Facts Society
Moon landing....hoax?

Fantom Facts Society

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 107:52


Fantomfacts.comIn 1969 man's greatest achievement was realized as we took our first step onto the moon or did we? listen as the boys passionately fight over the moon landing authenticity and evidence for and against it! Call or text 605-868-8404 to share your thoughts.

NEO420's Podcast
NEO420 Talks - Lower Earth Orbit. NASA $53M per day. Con game of space. Buzz Aldrin we did not go. Elon scams again.

NEO420's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 20:21


There are scams and cons that have perpetuated for decades. And one is the con game of "space" and our planet. The criminal cabal is masters of deceit to control WE THE PEOPLE. The criminal cabal that is NASA has $53M per day to spend on whatever they want. And they spend a lot of money putting out computer generated images of space and outter space when we have never been beyond Lower Earth Orbit.  Even though that definition includes a lie about the moon missions, we provide it as evidence that no human has been beyond LEO. The rest is a lie. We included the audio from Buzz Aldrin answering a little school girl question about the moon and he could not lie to her like he has been paid to lie to WE THE PEOPLE for decades. The full video is on our video channel. So, if they are lying about space, why is Elon going along with it? I guess it is his greed and Asperger's (like psycho Gates). They pick these semi smart mental patients to go do their bidding while controlling them from within. It is the way of the criminal cabal pos.________________________NEO420 = Real News + Real Information for WE THE PEOPLEWE THE PEOPLE are at war with the deepstate criminal cabal!!!Turn off your tv, radio, and stop listening to paid professional liars spreading propaganda.***SUPPORT Independent Free Speech Reporting***- Here is our donate option belowhttps://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=URXRDL6AJ8H7GThank you for the SUPPORT & SHARING the TRUTH!!!Go to GOD for discernment and wisdom.Know the Truth as the Truth will make you free! (John 8:32)___________________________Listen and learn as we have an extensive coverage within our reporting and analysis.  The link is here http://neo420.com/talks-podcast/The link to our video channel is here. https://odysee.com/@NEO420TALKS:4The Viral Delusionhttp://www.theviraldelusion.com/IT IS TIME FOR WE THE PEOPLE OF THE WORLD TAKE DOWN the criminal cabal. WE know who they are, and now it is time to bring them to JUSTICE!!!_______________________________NEVER FORGET!!!9/11 was a day that global*cabal*conspired to take our freedoms!!!Rumsfeld admitted $2.3 Trillion missing from Pentagon.  https://odysee.com/@NEO420TALKS:4/rumsfeld-2.1Trillionunaccountedforb-ccriminalsstoleit:7Planes did NOT bring down the two towers.AE911Truth.orgGeorge Bush Sr was CIA director before being Vice President then President. MANY are a part of this crime against US.Towers that fell:-Building 1-Building 2-Building 7 (seldom reported even though BBC reporter reported building down before it happened) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0VFMqinkcsSupport the show

Wait, Whaaat Are You Watching!?
Ep 36 Aliens on the Moon With Vanessa

Wait, Whaaat Are You Watching!?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 67:59


In this episode, Elaine welcomes Vanessa, one of the co-founders of the online paranormal conference, PanParacon, and host of Personal Pans podcast. Elaine and Vanessa talk about the documentary, Aliens on the Moon. What's legit? What's fake? Is that an underground bunker inside the hollow moon? And hey, it's been five minutes, why hasn't Buzz Aldrin blinked? This show was sponsored by Magic Mind:Sponsored by: Magic MindGet 20% off Magic Mind when you enter the code: WHAAAT during checkoutmagicmind.co/whaaatWatch Aliens on the Moon:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ZIMBSr-yNIFollow Vanessa on:Twitter: @kalibutterflyInstagram: @kali_butterflykalibutterfly.com

Cosmic Sponge
NASA Coverup Uncovered

Cosmic Sponge

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 74:33


As mankind ventured into the vast unknown landscape of space, conspiracies would arise to challenge the moon landing, claim alien bases exist on the moon, and expose the existence of UFOs seen by the astronauts as they travelled to the moon and back.  In this episode, we look at claims made and the evidence to support or discredit them as we uncover the Apollo coverups. Support the show

Astrobitácora: astronomía con Álex Riveiro
Exploradores de las estrellas - Ep. 13 - La segunda mitad del Programa Gemini - Episodio exclusivo para mecenas

Astrobitácora: astronomía con Álex Riveiro

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 80:03


Agradece a este podcast tantas horas de entretenimiento y disfruta de episodios exclusivos como éste. ¡Apóyale en iVoox! Continuamos el repaso de las misiones tripuladas del programa Gemini. Desde la accidentada misión de Gemini 8, en la que Neil Armstrong demostró una capacidad fuera de lo común para reaccionar en situaciones de estrés, hasta Gemini 12, en la que Buzz Aldrin realizó tres paseos espaciales. Es una oportunidad magnífica para entender cómo se fue avanzando hasta lograr los objetivos necesarios para que el programa Apolo pudiese convertirse en una realidad. Música: Epidemic Sound Escucha el episodio completo en la app de iVoox, o descubre todo el catálogo de iVoox Originals

HausboTalk Petra Horkého
DUŠEK - HORKÝ: Hvězdoseriál 6/10 - Stroj času.

HausboTalk Petra Horkého

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 11:56


Když se člověk pohybuje v tak gigantických vzdálenostech vesmíru, že i světlo putuje dlouhé roky, najednou se z času stává relativní položka (já vím, je to klišé:-) a pozorovatel najednou může sledovat světlo hvězdy, která už neexistuje...anebo dokonce v reálném čase odraz událostí, která se stala už dávno...anebo...pusťte si další díl Hvězdoseriálu! Jirka Dušek a Petr Horký opět na Hvězdárně a planetáriu v Brně! 

EXOPOLITICS TODAY with Dr. Michael Salla
Jumproom to Mars - Training, participants and purpose

EXOPOLITICS TODAY with Dr. Michael Salla

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 107:33


Andrew Basiago, J.D., claims that from 1980 to 1984 he participated in a Mars teleportation project along with former President Barack Obama who was known at the time as Barry Soetaro. Basiago says that he was recruited into the Jump Room to Mars program by his father, Raymond Basiago who took him to Camp Siskiyous in Weed, California, where he met Obama and others including Regina Dugan (the future head of DARPA); Mary Jean Eisenhower (granddaughter of President Eisenhower); Admiral Stansfield Turner; and Buzz Aldrin. In this Exopolitics Today interview, Basiago explains the training at Camp Siskiyous, the role of Major Ed Dames, Obama's Muslim religious practice, and activities on Mars. He discusses others who have publicly come forward to confirm their participation in the Mar Jump Room program: William Brett Stillings, William Whitecrow, Bernard Mendez, and Ken Johnson. There is discussion over the ultimate goals of the Jump Room program and anomalies with what Basiago and others experienced. The number of supporting witnesses, CIA involvement, and anomalies raise three possibilities. First, Basiago, et al., were really on Mars to establish a foothold presence for a secret space program under development. Second, Mars jump room program was an elaborate CIA run simulation designed to trick participants into believing they were really on Mars. Third, the Mars jump room was an elaborate cover program to hide the real secret space program taking place on Mars. This is the third in a series of interviews with Andrew Basiago examining his participation in two teleportation programs, Project Pegasus (1969 to 1972) and Jump Room to Mars (1980 to 1984). Previous Interviews available on YouTube at: https://youtu.be/udmjTcwkfzw https://youtu.be/f8OImQaxQdM For a three part series of articles discussing Andrew Basiago visit: https://exopolitics.org/jump-room-to-... --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/exopolitics/support

Fourth Watch Files with Carl Crew
Was the Moon Landing a Hoax?

Fourth Watch Files with Carl Crew

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 115:03


In this episode we exhume many aspects of conspiracy theories that surround the ‘moon landings' beginning in the late 1960's, ranging from interviews with the astronauts to various pertinent pictures throughout NASA's PR campaign including actual broadcast footage from the original moon landing. Our technological timeline construction is weighed for its value. From Kubrick to Warner Von Brann, Buzz Aldrin to Jack Parsons, we travel down the crooked avenues of intrigue. We debunk and explain common misconstrued theories and many other examples that we report on which become superfluous in contrast to the enormous absence of technology back then. This two hour roller coaster ride will cause you to re-examine what you have been led to believe, or at least to step back and re-adjust your parameters! Join Carl and Brian for this whirlwind! Sign up for Freedom First TV to get access to Patriotism On Demand. Use code CARL for 25% off at https://freedomfirst.tv/subscribe

Berícid Sulfúric
EXTRA - Allunatge en diferit

Berícid Sulfúric

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 60:50


Actuació en directe i xerrada a la Universitat Pompeu Fabra feta el 15 de març de 2022. Escrit per Anna Ferrer Albertí, Laia Garcia, Vicent Ortega i Pau Pérez. Amb Anna Ferrer Albertí com a Lesley Cooper, Pau Pérez com a Neil Armstrong, Vicent Ortega com a Michael Collins, Laia Garcia com a Wendy Albertson i i la col·laboració estel·lar de Luis Torrelles com a Buzz Aldrin. Sintonia de Jordi Borrull.

逐工一幅天文圖 APOD Taigi
561. 鴟鴞號 起飛 ft. 阿錕 (20220730)

逐工一幅天文圖 APOD Taigi

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 2:08


Kā 你 ê 3D 目鏡 提來,咱來 ùi 月球軌道來看這个立體景色。這个 3D 浮雕影像是 ùi 兩張相片做出來--ê (編號是 AS11-44-6633 kah AS11-44-6634)。相片是 太空人 Michael Collins tī 1969 年 參加 阿波羅 11 號任務 ê 時陣翕--ê。阿波羅 11 號有配 peh 升節火箭,to̍h 叫做 鴟鴞號。伊紲落來會愈飛愈懸,tī 7 月 21 這工 kah 踅月球 ê 指揮艙會合。坐 tī 鴟鴞號 內底--ê 是 Neil Armstrong kah Buzz Aldrin,in 是頭一組 tī 月球面頂行路 ê 人。月球表面 較暗 較平彼區是 Smythii 海,伊是 tī 月球面對地球彼面 ê 上東爿,就 tī 月球赤道下底。Tī 月球地平線後壁彼粒,是 咱美麗 ê 地球。 ——— 這是 NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day ê 台語文 podcast 原文版:https://apod.nasa.gov/ 台文版:https://apod.tw/ 今仔日 ê 文章: https://apod.tw/daily/20220730/ 影像來源:Apollo 11, NASA 立體影像:John Kaufmann (ALSJ) 音樂:P!SCO - 鼎鼎 聲優:阿錕 翻譯:An-Li Tsai (NCU) 原文:https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap220730.html Powered by Firstory Hosting

K8lyn Cracks The Code
6. CRACKING: John Waters On Apollo 11

K8lyn Cracks The Code

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 3:20


This episode means so much to me because my guest, John Waters, or as I like to call him- Papa, talks about his time working at NASA as an engineer. His work contributed to the moon landing mission in 1969 with Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and all the other amazing men and women who were a part of Apollo 11. He worked in the simulator himself where he practiced docking in space and landing on the moon. Enjoy my favorite episode yet :)MY SOCIALS-KCTC:https://www.tiktok.com/@kctcpodhttps://www.instagram.com/kctcpod/?hl=enPersonal:https://www.tiktok.com/@k8lynandersonhttps://www.instagram.com/k8lynanderson/?hl=en

HausboTalk Petra Horkého
DUŠEK - HORKÝ: Hvězdoseriál 4/10 - Modří už vědí.

HausboTalk Petra Horkého

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 7:57


Přemýšleli jste někdy, proč slunce malujeme žlutou barvou, při západu je oranžové -a přitom svítí bíle? Ano, víme, že atmosféra je modrá, proto je daná i barva nebe - ale proč? Dokonce ani voda v oceánu není přirozeně modrá…Je tu další díl letního seriálu o hvězdách a vesmíru! Jiří Dušek, ředitel Hvězdárny a planetária Brno a cestovatel a režisér Petr Horký se setkávají u dalšího dílu Hvězdoseriálu. Vyjde čas i na obvyklý experiment.Jiří Dušek, ředitel Hvězdárny a planetária Brno společně s Petrem Horkým.

HausboTalk Petra Horkého
DUŠEK - HORKÝ: Hvězdoseriál 3/10 - Ze Země na Měsíc!

HausboTalk Petra Horkého

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 9:45


Jak to bylo s přistáním na Měsíci - skutečně se to stalo, anebo to byla všechno jenom habaďůra? :-) Jak to proběhlo, jak se kolem toho konspirovalo a co s o tom všem myslet. Další díl prázdninového seriálu o vesmíru a hvězdách je tady!Jiří Dušek, ředitel Hvězdárny a planetária Brno společně s Petrem Horkým.

Sheryl Underwood Radio
Lil Penny & GrandMaMa

Sheryl Underwood Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 13:52


The Squad talks Buzz Aldrin's memorabilia selling for top dollar, and the squad remembers some of the best Sports commercials of all-time.

L'info en intégrale - Europe 1
Apollo XI, un bond de géant pour l'humanité - L'intégrale

L'info en intégrale - Europe 1

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 39:30


Le 16 juillet 1969, les astronautes Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin et Mike Collins embarquent à bord de la fusée Saturne 5. 4 jours plus tard, Armstrong pose, le premier, le pied sur la Lune. Suivi, 19 minutes plus tard, par Aldrin.

Europe 1 - Hondelatte Raconte
Apollo XI, un bond de géant pour l'humanité - Le récit

Europe 1 - Hondelatte Raconte

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 24:45


Le 16 juillet 1969, les astronautes Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin et Mike Collins embarquent à bord de la fusée Saturne 5. 4 jours plus tard, Armstrong pose, le premier, le pied sur la Lune. Suivi, 19 minutes plus tard, par Aldrin.

Europe 1 - Hondelatte Raconte
Apollo XI, un bond de géant pour l'humanité - L'intégrale

Europe 1 - Hondelatte Raconte

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 39:30


Le 16 juillet 1969, les astronautes Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin et Mike Collins embarquent à bord de la fusée Saturne 5. 4 jours plus tard, Armstrong pose, le premier, le pied sur la Lune. Suivi, 19 minutes plus tard, par Aldrin.

L'info en intégrale - Europe 1
Apollo XI, un bond de géant pour l'humanité - Le récit

L'info en intégrale - Europe 1

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 24:45


Le 16 juillet 1969, les astronautes Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin et Mike Collins embarquent à bord de la fusée Saturne 5. 4 jours plus tard, Armstrong pose, le premier, le pied sur la Lune. Suivi, 19 minutes plus tard, par Aldrin.

You Are There
”Communion On The Moon”

You Are There

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 3:38


What happened before Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong actually took that historical walk is perhaps even more amazing, but so few ever knew it even happened. Take a listen to this story.

Robin Banks & The Worst of the Hi FM Morning Show
4 Aug - Complaining, going through bins and seeing aliens... yep Robin & Jonny are BACK!!

Robin Banks & The Worst of the Hi FM Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 47:55


the guys complain about how everything has changed in the studio after their break... how do you talk to babies?... why Jonny went through someone else's trash bin?... the number one home cleaning hack... why women are better at driving autonomous cars (and the obligatory Rachel Chew gag).. the guys did touristy stuff while they were on holiday in the UK... Robin drove on the wrong side of the road in the UK... Jonny's tips for being more attractive... temporarily it was hotter in the UK than here in Oman... how much Buzz Aldrin's jacket sold for at auction... the time the guys saw aliens... do you ever put on a fake voice?... the guys discuss the trouble Shakira is in... why Robin's wife and child were disgusted with him... are you eating food off the floor? You disgusting person!... Amber Heard news (remember her?)... Sprite is changing for good... a random woman tells Jonny his dog will die soon... it's time to put your devices down... a woman steals a whole load of Red Bull... Robin plays a trick on Jonny... the exploding Nintendo Switch... a guys terrible excuse for stealing backfired on him... prison guards will be given 'banter' lessons... the German city that has banned hot water... how a woman stopped her neighbour's noisy dog... things that will be standard by 2050 according to a futurologist... the guys try to wake each other up...

Cory Talks Podcast

Today: Tuesday 2 August 2022 CT0912 Prime Minister Anthony Albanese wants to take Australia to a referendum on enshrining a first nation peoples voice in the Australian Parliament. https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-07-31/anthony-albanese-referendum-uplift-whole-nation/101286038 Aboriginal singer and storyteller, Archie Roach has passed away at the age of 66. https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-07-31/tributes-for-legendary-songman-archie-roach/101285904 Victoria's newest COVID-19 wave may have peaked. A word or two on my COVID isolation extension. The federal government of Australia is looking at winding back some superannuation reforms. If you can, or perhaps can't make head nor tails about this, here's the story from ABC News that might fill in some gaps... https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-07-27/labor-winding-back-superannuation-reforms/101271562 Russia is set the leave the International Space Station programme in 2024. Buzz Aldrin's space jacket sold for record amount. There may be a break through in the case of a person who died in Adelaide many decades ago. It would become known as the case of the Somerton Man. https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-07-26/somerton-man-identified-melbourne-born-engineer-researcher-says/101272182 A creative way for the Japanese to keep their cats and dogs cool during their recent heatwave. https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-08-01/japanese-pets-beat-the-heat/101288662 I get personal and talk about my podcast logo. Resources in the podcast can include, The Daily Aus (https://linktr.ee/thedailyaus), ABC News Australia (https://abc.net.au/news), The Guardian Australia (https://www.theguardian.com/au), Morning Brew (https://morningbrew.com) Subscribe and turn notifications on so you can be alerted when new editions become available. The “Cory Talks Podcast” feed can be found on - on Anchor, Apple, Google, Spotify and other platforms. Thanks for listening! CORY O'CONNOR https://anchor.fm/corytalkspodcast https://cjnet.au --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/corytalkspodcast/message

Highlights from Moncrieff
Buzz Aldrin's Space Suit

Highlights from Moncrieff

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 15:46


The space jacket worn by Buzz Aldrin during the first successful landing on the Moon has been sold at auction in New York for 2.8 million dollars. Dan Kendall, Curator at the National Space Centre in Leicester in the UK joined Tom to discuss what goes into making a space suit and how they have evolved over time.

Sarah and Vinnie Full Show
6-7am- Norman Lear is 100 & the Metaverse

Sarah and Vinnie Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 35:45


Norman Lear is 100, an update on Hooman's movie, Tony Dow didn't die but he is in hospice, Buzz Aldrin's jacket that was worn on the way to the moon was auctioned off, Mark Zuckerberg has a a series coming out, the weather has been a little weird, being “hangry” is a real thing, some fast facts, and Rockefeller was the first billionaire!

Chicks on the Right Podcast
Buzz Aldrin's moon landing jacket sold at auction

Chicks on the Right Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 6:12


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

AP Audio Stories
Buzz Aldrin flight-to-moon jacket sells at auction for $2.8M

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 0:51


AP correspondent Lisa Dwyer reports on Auction Aldrin's jacket.

Ghosts of Arlington Podcast
#53: Project Gemini, Part V

Ghosts of Arlington Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 35:56


This week we take a look at NASA astronaut class 3 and then briefly overview the other 20 astronaut classes NASA has selected since then, but the meat of the episode is the nearly disasterous Gemini 8 misison that a clear thinking and quick acting Neil Armstrong brought back from the brink and the disaster that killed the Gemini 9 main crew and ultimatly put Buzz Aldrin on the Apollo 11 misison, making him the second man to walk on the moon.The Space Race series introduction is Lift Off by kennysvoice.As always, a very special thanks to Mountain Up Cap Company for its continued help to spread the word about the podcast on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/MountainUpCapCompany Climb to Glory!For more information about the podcast visit: ·       The GoA website: https://www.ghostsofarlingtonpodcast.com    ·       Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ghostsofarlingtonpodcast·       Twitter: https://twitter.com/ArlingtonGhosts·       Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ghostsofarlington/

NTD News Today
SCOTUS Says No to Biden Immigration Policies; TSA Allows Illegal Immigrants to Board Flights

NTD News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 50:29


1. Jan. 6 Panel Says Trump ‘Chose Not to Act' 2. Melania Trump Breaks Silence on Jan. 6 3. Bannon Defense Rests Case, Calls No Witnesses 4. Lee Smith, Author, Plot Against the President 5. Analysis: Why Steve Bannon Won't Testify 6. Analysis: Bannon Trial One of ‘last Chances' for DOJ, Dem Operatives to Go After Trump 7. Analysis: Bannon Justice Unlikely Given Outcome of Sussmann Trial Amid a Politicized D.C. 8. Rep. Lee Zeldin Correctly Predicts Attacker Would Be Released From Jail 9. $50k Reward for Evidence of Vote Buying 10. TSA Allows Illegal Immigrants to Use Arrest Warrants as ID to Board Flights 11. SCOTUS Says No to Biden Immigration Policies 12. Boat Carrying Over 150 Migrants Intercepted 13. Asst. HHS Secretary Promoting Trans Ideology 14. Preserving American Education on Liberty 15. First U.S. Polio Case in 10 Years Found in NY 16. Small Pet Turtles Linked to Outbreak 17. Back-to-school Shopping Amid Inflation 18. Alabama World Games Human Trafficking Sting 19. Passengers Flee Burning Train Near Boston 20. Iconic Central Park Boathouse Shutting Down 21. Fla. AG Presses Biden for Action on Fentanyl 22. DOJ Seeks Extradition of Mexican Drug Lord 23. Lawmakers Call for Boosting Taiwan Arms Sales 24. Gps Tracker Open to ‘Life-threatening' Hacks 25. Police Arrest Couple Over $1.4m Wine Theft 26. Wasted Water Adds to Italy's Drought Troubles 27. Indonesia Cattle Foot-and-mouth Spreads 28. Modern Zeppelin Set to Take Flight in 2026 29. Russian, Italian Team-up on Spacewalk 30. Buzz Aldrin's Apollo 11 Jacket Up for Auction 31. Rare Golden Tabby Tigress Gives Birth to Cubs 32. Endangered Antelope Calf Born at Illinois Zoo

Nightside With Dan Rea
20th Hour (11 p.m.)

Nightside With Dan Rea

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 41:12


Famed astronaut Buzz Aldrin is auctioning off his NASA jacket that he wore to the moon. The jacket has an estimated value between $1 million and $2 million. Dan asked, "if money was not an object, what is one piece of history that you would like to get your hands on?"

The 260 Journey
The Symbol Is to Remind Us

The 260 Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 6:01


Day 144 Today's Reading: 1 Corinthians 11 The generation you are from will determine which historical tragedy you will remember as an American. On Sunday morning, December 7, 1941, Japanese war planes bombed Pearl Harbor. Eighteen battleships were sunk or destroyed. Two hundred airplanes were put out of commission. And the servicemen who were either killed or wounded numbered 3,581. America's war cry as she entered World War II was, “Remember Pearl Harbor.” I grew up when that changed to “Remember 9/11.” That was the day—September 11, 2001, when the towers fell. The world does not need so much as to be informed as it needs to be reminded. The Bible tells us again and again to “remember.” That is what Communion is. And that is what Paul is challenging us to do in 1 Corinthians 11. Some churches participate in Communion every week, some do it once a month, and some churches a few times a year. Communion is a mini drama of salvation, using the props of bread and wine. Here's what Paul says about Communion in verse 26: “Whenever you eat this bread and drink this cup, you are retelling the story, proclaiming our Lord's death until he comes” (TPT). Here's how it reads in The Message translation: “What you must solemnly realize is that every time you eat this bread and every time you drink this cup, you reenact in your words and actions the death of the Master. You will be drawn back to this meal again and again until the Master returns. You must never let familiarity breed contempt.” Communion is one way we can express our love for Jesus, because it is a way we can say to Him, “We remember what you did for us.” Whenever we participate at the Lord's table, we too have a battle cry: “Remember Jesus Christ.” Remember the cross. And to help us remember, we get the bread and wine props. Props are important reminders. When we get married, an important prop is part of the wedding ceremony. When we get the prop, we say, “With this ring I thee wed.” When we say those words, we don't mean that the ring or putting the ring on the finger is what makes us married. It's a prop to remind us, and to show everyone around us, the commitment we have made. That's what the sacraments of the church are. Props to remind us. To make it anything more than a symbol is dangerous. It's like loving our wedding band, when we need to love our spouse. To cling to a symbol is what many try to do and they miss what God was trying to show us. What was God reminding us of with the bread and the cup? The bread means God came. We say the bread is His body—that's God in person. In his first epistle, John says that this Jesus came in bodily form: we touched Him, we saw Him, we heard Him. He did not write a message in the sky for us. He did not shout it audibly. He came to tell us that God loves us. God came in person for us. The cup reminds us that God cares. The blood means God cares. The cup of juice reminds us that it should have been us paying for our sins, but God cares so much for you and me that He took our place. He cares and He died for you and me on the cross. The juice means God cares and took our place. Did you know that some astronauts had Communion on the moon? On July 20, 1969, two human beings changed history by walking on the surface of the moon. But what happened before Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin and Neil Armstrong exited the Lunar Module is perhaps even more amazing. We know that Neil Armstrong was the first man to walk on the moon, but Buzz Aldrin took Communion on the surface of the moon. Some months after his return, he wrote about it in Guideposts. Aldrin knew he would soon be doing something unprecedented in human history and he felt he should mark the occasion somehow, so he took Communion elements with him out of the earth's orbit a

Stroke Alert
Stroke Alert July 2022

Stroke Alert

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 37:41


On Episode 18 of the Stroke Alert Podcast, host Dr. Negar Asdaghi highlights two articles from the July 2022 issue of Stroke: “Impact of Shunting Practice Patterns During Carotid Endarterectomy for Symptomatic Carotid Stenosis” and “Socioeconomic Inequalities in Reperfusion Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke.” She also interviews Dr. Magdy Selim about his article “Effect of Deferoxamine on Trajectory of Recovery After Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Post Hoc Analysis of the i-DEF Trial.” Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Let's start with some questions. 1) Is deferoxamine mesylate yet another failed agent for treatment of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage, or is deferoxamine getting us closer than ever to an approved therapy for this deadly form of stroke? 2) Are different strokes happening to different folks due to their disadvantaged socioeconomic status? 3) And finally, how does a surgeon's personal practice preference to either routinely or selectively use carotid shunting during carotid endarterectomy impact the recurrent risk of stroke or death in patients with symptomatic carotid disease? We'll tackle these questions and a lot more in today's podcast as we continue to cover the cerebrovascular world's latest and greatest because, without a doubt, this is the best in Stroke. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Welcome back to the July issue of the Stroke Alert Podcast. My name is Negar Asdaghi. I'm an Associate Professor of Neurology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and your host for the monthly Stroke Alert Podcast. The July 2022 issue of Stroke contains a range of really interesting papers that I'd like to highlight here. As part of our Cochrane Corner articles, giving us short summaries of the long systematic review of a given topic, we have two short articles, one on the issue of local versus general anesthesia for carotid endarterectomy, where we learn that based on the current evidence, there's no convincing difference between local versus general anesthesia in the risk of stroke and death within 30 days after the procedure. In the second Cochrane Corner article, titled "Information Provision for Stroke Survivors and Their Carers," we learn that stroke survivors and their caregivers routinely report dissatisfaction with information provided to them by their clinicians about their condition and how active approaches to information provision is superior to its passive forms in improving patients' involvement in their care, their satisfaction, and, ultimately and not surprisingly, their stroke outcome. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         As part of our original contributions in this issue of the journal, we have an important paper titled "The Risk of Early Versus Later Rebleeding From Dural AV Fistulas With Cortical Venous Drainage." We are reminded in this paper that cranial dural arteriovenous fistulas are classified based on their venous drainage into those with or those without cortical venous drainage, or CVD. Dural AV fistulas without CVD rarely cause intracranial bleeding, while those with CVD may cause hemorrhage. In this study, the authors show that the risk of rebleeding of dural AV fistulas with CVD presenting with hemorrhage is increased in the first two weeks after ICH, emphasizing the importance of early detection of these malformations by vascular imaging and early treatment of AV fistulas with cortical drainage. This paper is another analysis from the CONDOR registry. Our devoted Stroke Alert listeners recall that we covered this registry in more detail when we interviewed Dr. Amin-Hanjani last October on the outcomes of intracerebral hemorrhage patients found to have dural AV fistulas. I encourage you to review these articles in addition to listening to our podcast today. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Later in the podcast, I have the distinct honor of interviewing Dr. Magdy Selim from Harvard Medical School on a critical analysis from i-DEF trial to examine the long-term outcome of patients with ICH who were randomized to receive deferoxamine versus placebo. As an expert in the field of intracerebral hemorrhage and a member of the recently published American Heart Association Guidelines Committee, Dr. Selim was not fazed at all about the neutral results of the trial. "The future of ICH is bright," he says, and in the interview, he tells us why. But first, with these two articles. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Since its first reported successful surgery in 1953, carotid endarterectomy, or CEA, has become a common surgical procedure to prevent ischemic stroke in patients with carotid disease. CEA requires a temporary clamping of the carotid artery that is being worked on. During this time, the ipsilateral hemisphere is, of course, dependent on collateral flow from the posterior circulation or from the contralateral anterior circulation to maintain its perfusion pressure. Intraoperatively, various methods are used to monitor cerebral perfusion, and the risk of clamping-induced hypoperfusion is obviously variable for each patient depending on the patient's specific anatomy, their collateral status, and other risk factors. One way to protect the brain against possible clamp-induced ischemia is to do carotid shunting. The problem is that carotid shunting also comes with its own set of risks and problems. There's the risk of causing carotid dissection, embolization of pieces of the plaque during shunt insertion, or the risk of causing air embolism. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         There are also other shunt-related local complications that should be noted, such as possibility of causing injuries to the cranial nerves or development of neck hematoma related to the more extensive surgical exposure required for shunting. So, it's not surprising that the practice patterns with regards to shunting is quite variable amongst different surgeons. There are surgeons that are considered routine shunters, and those who are considered selective shunters, meaning that the shunt is inserted only in cases with a particular indication. The question is whether the surgeon's preference for shunting can impact the CEA outcomes. In the current issue of the journal, we have an interesting study led by Dr. Randall DeMartino from the Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, where the authors look at the impact of shunting practice patterns during carotid endarterectomy on the following post-CEA outcomes: number one, in-hospital stroke and in-hospital death rates, and number two, combined stroke and death in patients with a recent symptomatic carotid disease, that is, carotid stenosis associated with a history of either ipsilateral stroke or TIA within the past 14 days of endarterectomy. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, the data for the study came from the ongoing Vascular Quality Initiative database, which comprises a network of more than 600 North American academic and community hospitals, and collects data on 12 different vascular procedures, one of which is CEA. The study included over 13,000 carotid endarterectomies performed from 2010 to 2019 for symptomatic carotid patients. This number came after they applied their exclusion criteria to all CEAs performed in the database during this timeframe, importantly excluding any asymptomatic carotid surgeries or those in whom surgery was performed after the two-week mark post qualifying TIA or stroke. Now, before we go over the results, let's go over some definitions used in the study. They had to classify surgeons to be able to do the study into two categories of routine versus selective shunters. So, what they did was to analyze all consecutive CEAs, whether they were done on symptomatic or asymptomatic carotids, in this database, aggregated at the surgeon level. Surgeons routinely shunting in over 95% of their procedures were gauged as routine shunters. Otherwise, they were classified as selective shunters. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Now, coming to each case included in this study, each surgical case was, in turn, classified into four categories based on whether or not a shunt was actually used for that particular case: category one, no shunt used; category two, shunt used as a routine procedure; number three, shunt used for a preoperative, mostly anatomical indication; number four, shunt was used for an intraoperative indication, which, as we mentioned before, these are mostly intraoperative hemodynamic compromised situations. And here are the results: In total, 3,186 of surgeries, that is 24% of surgeries, were performed by routine shunters versus 76% by selective shunters. So, most surgeons were selective shunters in this study. The demographic of patients operated by the routine versus selective shunters were more or less similar with regards to the age of the patients, most of their vascular risk factors, and the degree of ipsilateral or contralateral carotid stenosis or occlusion, with a few notable exceptions, in that patients undergoing surgery by routine shunters were more likely White, more likely to have had a prior CABG, more likely to undergo the operation while taking a P2Y12 inhibitor antiplatelet agent, and these patients were more likely to have had a TIA rather than a stroke as their qualifying event, which probably explains why they were more likely to be operated on within 48 hours of symptom onset as well. So, the authors accounted for these differences when they did their multivariate analysis. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         The other thing to note was that overall, routine shunters used a shunt in 98.1% of their cases, whereas selective shunters used them in 46% of their cases. Now, in terms of their study outcomes, the shunting practice pattern did not impact the primary outcomes of in-hospital stroke or death, or a combination of these two outcomes, or even the odds of development of cranial nerve injuries or hemorrhage in the adjusted model, which is really good news here. But interestingly, in the final adjusted model, whether or not an actual shunt was placed during surgery did significantly increase the risk of postoperative stroke, with the odds ratio of 1.29, an effect that was entirely driven by the use of shunt by a surgeon classified as a selective shunter in this study. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, in simple terms, if a shunt was placed during CEA, it did increase the risk of stroke only if that surgeon was a selective shunter. Another interesting association was that amongst selective shunters, placing a shunt for a patient with a very recent ischemic event, that is, TIA or stroke within the past 48 hours prior to surgery, and placing a shunt for an intraoperative indication, meaning shunt placement was not pre-surgically planned, also significantly increased the risk of postoperative stroke. So, what we learned from the study is that, though a surgeon's shunting practice pattern did not have an impact on the overall postoperative risk of stroke or death, the placement of a shunt did indeed increase the risk of postoperative stroke only if it was placed by a surgeon who is a selective shunter, especially for an intraoperative indication in a patient with a recent ischemic event. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, shunts can be tricky, especially if they're done by a surgeon who doesn't place them routinely. So, my take-home message is that ultimately, like every other procedure in medicine, clinical outcomes are as much operator dependent as they are patient dependent, and for every procedure, it's fair to say that practice makes perfect. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         It is now more than 25 years since intravenous thrombolytic therapy has been approved for treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke and more than seven years since randomized control trials demonstrated the efficacy of mechanical thrombectomy to improve clinical outcome in ischemic stroke patients with large vessel occlusions. To date, reperfusion therapies are the only available acute treatments for select patients with ischemic stroke. What do we mean by "select"? "Select" meaning that not all patients will benefit from these therapies, making it absolutely necessary for clinicians to be up to date with various indications and contraindications to use these therapies. Needless to say that the criteria for reperfusion therapies do not and should not consider the socioeconomic status of patients, but sadly, socioeconomic inequalities seem to impact the use of reperfusion therapies. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         In this issue of the journal, in the study titled "Socioeconomic Inequalities in Reperfusion Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke," Dr. Øgendahl Buus from Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark and colleagues studied the impact of the socioeconomic status of stroke patients on the odds of receiving reperfusion therapies in the large nationwide Danish Stroke Registry, or DSR. Now a bit about the registry: DSR contains prospectively collected nationwide data on all stroke patients admitted to Danish hospitals. It's interesting to note that in Denmark, stroke patients are exclusively admitted to public hospitals, and all departments treating stroke patients are obligated to report data to DSR. Now, for this study, they included over 63,000 stroke patients from 2013 to 2018. After excluding hemorrhagic stroke, TIAs, and other exclusion criteria of the study, they arrived at their sample size of 37,187 patients that were included in this study. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Now, a few definitions. The socioeconomic status of each patient was determined based on three parameters. Parameter number one, their educational level. It was categorized into three levels of low, medium, or high levels of education. Category number two, income level. This was calculated based on the average family equivalent disposable income, or FED income, during five years prior to stroke onset, again classified into three categories of high, medium, or low income. And the third factor was the employment status of the patient during the calendar year prior to the stroke onset, also categorized into three categories of employed, unemployed, and retired. And, of course, the authors used various definitions to be able to fit special situations into these categories. For instance, a person who is temporarily unemployed due to illness or other special situation was still categorized under the employed category. So, that gave them, in total, nine groups to analyze across these three categories. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         And here are their findings. The median age of total stroke patients in the cohort was 73.2 years, 44.1% were women, 41% categorized under low educational level, 68% retired, and 33.3% had low income levels. Not surprisingly, patients and hospital characteristics varied tremendously across these nine groups of education, employment, and income, and a univariate analysis in general, low socioeconomic status was associated with more severe strokes, living alone, living at an assisted living residency, having had prior stroke, high comorbidity index score, hypertension, and late hospital arrival. So, they accounted for these differences in their multivariate analysis. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Now, overall, the treatment rates of IV thrombolysis was 17.6%, which is actually considered a very high percentage as compared to other registry-based studies, but the percentage of IV thrombolytic use dramatically varied based on the different socioeconomic designation. So, let's look at this. In the univariate analysis, for education, intravenous thrombolysis rates were 19.3% among patients with high educational level compared to 16.2% among patients with low educational level. Let's look at income. For income, IV thrombolytic treatment rates reach 20.7% for high-income patients compared to 14.8% for low-income patients. For employment status, thrombolytic rates were 23.7% among employed patients compared to 15.7% for unemployed patients. In their fully adjusted models, unemployed patients were less likely to receive IV lytics as compared to their employed counterparts. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Now, for thrombectomy, socioeconomic gradients were also noted for these three categories. For education, thrombectomy rates were 4.5% among patients with high education level compared to 3.6% among patients with low educational level. For income, treatment rates were 3.2% among low-income patients compared to 4.7% among high-income patients. But arguably, the most robust differences were noted again across the category of employment. Employed patients were nearly twice more likely to receive thrombectomy as compared to unemployed patients, rates being 5.1% versus 2.8%, respectively. Now, when they adjusted their analysis to only those patients presenting within the reperfusion time windows in the fully adjusted models, unemployment and low income remain significant negative predictors of receiving both of these reperfusion therapies. So, what we learned from this study is that stroke patients who were unemployed, earned a relatively low income, or had fewer years of formal education were less likely to receive life-saving reperfusion therapies despite potentially being eligible for these treatments. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Now, let's take a moment to really understand that data presented here are in the context of a tax-funded, universal healthcare offered across Denmark, where we can at least make the assumption that financial constraints potentially preventing access to therapies are likely minimized. There are many countries around the globe where patients or family members have to pay for these therapies before even receiving them. So, these findings from the current study from Denmark are alarming in that they point to possibly more robust inequalities across the globe in other healthcare systems. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Intracerebral hemorrhage, or ICH, is an aggressive form of stroke, typically carrying a higher morbidity and mortality than its ischemic counterpart. Yet much of the research in the field of intracerebral hemorrhage has followed the ischemic stroke footsteps, including defining the optimal primary outcome for the randomized trials of ICH. For ischemic stroke, the 90-day functional outcome, as measured by the modified Rankin Scale, is commonly used as a primary outcome in clinical trials. There are many reasons for this selection, including the ease of use and the fact that the majority of functional recovery post-ischemic stroke occurs during the first 90-day time period. But time to maximum recovery and, importantly, the trajectory of recovery may be different in hemorrhagic as compared to ischemic stroke. Defining the long-term outcomes and longitudinal trajectory of recovery in ICH is, therefore, important to better understand its prognosis and, of course, selecting the appropriate primary outcome measure for future randomized trials of ICH. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         In the recent years, the safety and efficacy of various agents to improve ICH outcomes have been tested. Deferoxamine mesylate, an iron-chelating agent, is one such agent that was recently studied as part of the i-DEF multicenter randomized trial, and the main results of the study were published in Lancet Neurology in 2019. In the current issue of the journal, in the study titled "Effect of Deferoxamine on Trajectory of Recovery After Intracerebral Hemorrhage," we learn about the results of a post hoc analysis of i-DEF that looks at the trajectory of functional outcome in patients enrolled in the trial with a special attention on their continued recovery after the 90-day post-ICH mark. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Joining me now is the senior author of this paper, Dr. Magdy Selim, who's also one of the primary investigators of i-DEF trial. Dr. Selim is a Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School and Chief of Stroke Division at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. He's a world renowned researcher in the field of cerebrovascular disorders with special focus on treatment of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Dr. Selim has led and currently leads multiple National Institutes of Health-funded clinical trials of intracerebral hemorrhage, including the ongoing SATURN trial. I'm delighted to welcome him to our podcast today. Good afternoon, Magdy. Thank you for joining us today. Dr. Magdy Selim:             Thank you, Dr. Asdaghi. It's really my pleasure to be here with you, and I'm certainly honored to do this today. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         That's great. Thank you. So, let's start with some background on deferoxamine and the literature supporting the use of deferoxamine before i-DEF. Dr. Magdy Selim:             So, as you mentioned, deferoxamine is an iron chelator; it binds to iron and removes excess iron from the body. The unique thing about it is that it has other neuroprotective properties, which are good for hemorrhagic stroke and ischemic stroke. It also has anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects. It even lowers the blood pressure, which we know sometimes is helpful in intracerebral hemorrhage. The rationale behind this or why this would be effective really comes from animal studies. After you have a hemorrhage, there is hemolysis of the red blood cells, there is a release of hemoglobin degradation products, in particular, iron, and the accumulation of iron in the hematoma and the surrounding tissue triggers a cascade of molecular and cellular events that lead to what we call secondary injury, characterized by inflammation, hydroxyl radical formation, and cell death. And many animal studies, animal models of intracerebral hemorrhage, whether in pigs or in rats, young or aged rats, have shown that treatment with deferoxamine can reduce iron in the brain after intracerebral hemorrhage and also results in improved performance on behavioral tests. And that was the reason why we moved into clinical testing. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, a lot of encouraging data before the trial. Can we hear a little bit about the trial, its design, and inclusion criteria, please? Dr. Magdy Selim:             Sure. So i-DEF was a phase 2 study, and actually it started as Hi-DEF, which was high dose deferoxamine, and then became i-DEF, which intermediate dose deferoxamine. So, it's a randomized, double blind, placebo control trial. We used something called futility design, which is actually sort of new in the stroke field. And we had 294 patients who had supratentorial hemorrhage that were randomized within 24 hours to either get placebo or deferoxamine. And deferoxamine initially was given at 62 mg per day for three days, but then we ran into some safety issues with this high dose, and that's why we lowered it to 32, and that became the intermediate dose, or the i-DEF. So, the only kind of thing unique about inclusion/exclusion criteria was that there was an age cutoff, patients had to be 80 or younger. They needed to have some deficit on the exam, so their NIH Stroke Scale had to be 6 or greater, and their GCS had to be greater than 6, and their modified Rankin before the onset of the hemorrhage had to be less than 1. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         And so, what were the primary and secondary outcomes in i-DEF? Dr. Magdy Selim:             The primary outcome was twofold actually. One of them was safety. One of the issues we ran into with the high dose is that the drug is associated with increased risk for adult respiratory distress syndrome, ARDS. So, we wanted to make sure that this lower dose was safe, and it does not increase the instance of ARDS. The second thing was, as I said, we used something called the futility design, and we wanted to compare the outcome of patients treated with deferoxamine versus placebo to determine whether it's futile to move to a large phase 3 trial or not. And what we were looking at is a difference in outcome and modified Rankin 0 to 2 at 90 days, and the difference would be at least 12% in favor of deferoxamine in order for us to move forward. You asked about the secondary outcomes as well? Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Yes. Dr. Magdy Selim:             So, actually, the secondary outcomes, they're relevant because they're relevant to the study that we just published. So, the secondary outcomes was also to look at modified Rankin 0 to 3, instead of 0 to 2, at 90 days and the difference between the two treatment groups. We wanted to look at the ordinal distribution of the Rankin at the same time point. And we also wanted to look at all the outcomes at six months, 180 days. And that came a little bit later in the course of the study because there was some evidence emerging at that time that maybe assessment of outcome later in intracerebral hemorrhage would be more accurate than assessing it early on. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, I want to come back to the secondary outcome, of course, that's sort of the topic of your current paper in this issue of the journal, but can you just briefly tell us, please, the primary outcome and the sort of results of what was published in 2019 with i-DEF before we move on to the current paper? Dr. Magdy Selim:             Yeah. So, as I said, the primary outcome was the difference in the proportion of patients that achieved modified Rankin 0 to 2 at 90 days, and what we wanted to see is a difference of around 12%. Unfortunately, the primary outcome was neutral, we did not see that. But what we saw actually, almost all the secondary outcomes were positive, except for the primary outcome. So, when we looked at the secondary outcome using modified Rankin 0 to 3, instead of 0 to 2, the difference was 12.1%. When we looked at the difference in the modified Rankin 0 to 2 at six months, the difference was 15.6% in favor of deferoxamine, but these were secondary outcomes and not the primary outcomes. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, the trial is almost positive. It just depends on how you define the primary outcome, which is really a nice segue to your current study. In the current study, you looked at this secondary outcome in a longitudinal way and looked at the mRS of 0 to 2 at six months from ICH. Can you please tell us about this current paper? Dr. Magdy Selim:             Yeah. So, one of the things that we did with i-DEF is that we were checking the modified Rankin at different time points for all the patients. So, we had it after one week, after one month, after two months, after three months, and after six months. And what we wanted really was a couple of things, just in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage without any treatment, what's the natural course of recovery? And the interesting thing we found out is that patients actually continue to improve over time, and that's what you expect, but what we didn't expect is that they even continue to improve after 90 days. Dr. Magdy Selim:             We always used to think that maximum recovery is around 90 days from ischemic stroke literature, but we saw a lot of patients getting better after 90 days. And this turns out to be also the case with deferoxamine, but the interesting thing is that the percentage of patients that had a good outcome, modified Rankin 0 to 2, was higher with deferoxamine at day seven, at day 30, at day 60, not at 90 days, but again at six months. So, actually, it was higher at all time points except our primary endpoint. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, Magdy, you've already answered my next question, which is exactly what you alluded to, deferoxamine seemed to have improved the outcomes at all of those time points, except for the 90 day, which was the primary outcome of your trial. Why do you think the magic was lost at 90 days? Dr. Magdy Selim:             This is really the million-dollar question. I think we obviously struggled over this. And we went back, we thought maybe there was misrating of the modified Rankin in some of the patients. We tried to correct for this. The difference was bigger, but still not significant. So, we don't really have a good reason to tell you why, at this particular time point, we didn't see the difference except bad luck, I think. But I mean, there are reasons, I think, the question that people actually ask me is the opposite, is why do you think a drug that you give for three days early on is going to make a difference after six months? And I think there are biological reasons to explain this. Dr. Magdy Selim:             So, what happened is that those hemorrhage patients have a lot of other problems. They have increased ICP, they have hydrocephalus, they have intraventricular hemorrhage, and actually iron has been implicated in the development of hydrocephalus in chronic white matter injury. So, my explanation is that you start early on with the treatment, it does help, but it takes a while for it to kick in and for this kind of medical complication to resolve until actually you see the true effect of the drug. And maybe that's why you see the unmasking at the end between the two groups. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Yeah, I think I want to recap this for our listeners. Very important to, again, think about those things that some of the acute therapies that we offer the patients may not have a measurable improvement outcome difference early on, certainly with intravenous thrombolysis, we saw that, whereas we saw measurable outcome difference at 90 days, or maybe in this case at six months, but not quite early on. So, it doesn't mean that they don't work. We just are unable to measure that difference and improvement early on. So, what do you think the future holds for deferoxamine? Are we going to see another trial? Dr. Magdy Selim:             Well, I certainly hope so. We're working on some few ideas for that. A lot of people think that maybe we should just do the same thing, but look at six months as the primary outcome. But I think we're actually, that's probably not our primary thinking at this point in time. So, we have published other papers, other analysis, to show that the effect of deferoxamine actually relates to the volume of the hemorrhage. So, if the hemorrhage is very small, there is very minimal benefit. If the hemorrhage is very large, also there is very minimal benefit. And that's really to get kind of the big bang for your buck. You really want people who have mild-to-moderate size hemorrhages. So, we're thinking of a couple of ways to go about deferoxamine with this, whether alone or in combination with other interventions. So, hopefully, we'll have some stuff to share with you in the coming few years, two or three. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         We'll definitely look forward to reading about those or being involved in the trials as a site, but there's a great way of just actually talking about my next question. It's just completely different than the current paper. I wanted to digress a bit and talk about the recently published intracerebral hemorrhage guidelines, which just published a few months ago. You were part of the guidelines committee. Can you give us a little bit of your point of view of what are the top two most important updates from the guidelines in ICH treatment? Dr. Magdy Selim:             Actually, the guidelines, for the first time this year, in the first page, they have the top 10 take-home messages or top 10 new ones. So, in my opinion, the most important ones, we usually tell you what to do, but here we tell you what not to do because we think it's not good for the patients. So, for example, using steroids just as a prophylactic therapy is actually not recommended. The same thing, we see a lot of people put patients with hemorrhage on hypertonic saline, hyperosmolar therapy, just prophylactically. I don't think there's any benefit that this helps as well, and the same thing for antiepileptic drugs. So, that was one important point. The second one was blood pressure lowering, and there is emphasis now that whatever you use to lower the blood pressure, you want to make sure that the blood pressure variability is very minimal and that there is a smooth kind of control over blood pressure that has been shown to be actually important in terms of help. I'm going to make them three, not two, because I think the third one is important. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Okay. I'll give you one more then. Dr. Magdy Selim:             Which is the first time we include this in the guideline, and with emphasis on the role of the home caregiver for hemorrhage patients and the psychological support, the education that they need, and the training that they need to actually care for these patients and how to improve their quality of life. So, I think that's an important aspect that we didn't touch upon before, and obviously very important. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Very important points. Let me just review them again for our listeners. So, don't do steroids, hypertonics, and preemptive antiepileptic therapies. They don't work. The second point that you raise is reduction of blood pressure, important to keep that in mind, but paying attention to blood pressure variability. And the third one, the importance of social aspect of care of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. That's great for us. Let me just end with one last question. Magdy, thank you so much for all of this wonderful take-home messages from the current study from i-DEF and also the guidelines. There's been a lot of excitement in the field of ischemic stroke with the success of reperfusion therapies, and yet not much for intracerebral hemorrhage. What is your hope in terms of future therapies for ICH? Dr. Magdy Selim:             So, I happen to be one of the people who is very optimistic about the future of ICH. I think it's just a matter of time. But I think we need to make some changes. We need to really treat ICH as an emergency, so time is really important. And I think right now, you see a hemorrhage patient, they just put them on the side because they think that there's nothing to do. But the way I see the future evolving, and probably the breaking point to be, is that we can diagnose ICH in the field. You immediately lower the blood pressure, reverse coagulopathy if you can, and even kind of use hemostatic agents, if the FASTEST trial shows evidence to support that, and then you take them to the hospital where there might be some role for hematoma reduction using minimally invasive therapy and some other treatments like deferoxamine, or there are a lot of other agents to target the secondary injury at the same time. So, I think it's going to be a combination of things, and they need to happen in tandem and continuously, but we need to start quickly on these patients. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Dr. Magdy Selim, it's been a pleasure interviewing you on the podcast. We look forward to having you back and covering more of your work. Thank you for joining us. Dr. Magdy Selim:             Thank you very much for having me. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         And this concludes our podcast for the July 2022 issue of Stroke. Please be sure to check out this month's table of contents for a full list of publications, including a series of Focus Updates on the very topic of, you guessed it, intracerebral hemorrhage. These updates are great complements to the newly published American Heart Association guidelines for the management of patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage in May 2022. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         And with this, we end our July podcast and draw inspiration from one particular July story, which unfolded on July 20. In 1969, on this day, Commander Neil Armstrong and lunar module pilot Buzz Aldrin landed on the moon, and Armstrong became the first person to walk on the moon. The crew of Apollo 11 changed the course of history, landing humanity on another celestial body for the first time and later safely returning everyone back to earth. Armstrong, an experienced naval aviator, a test pilot, a decorated veteran, astronaut, and university professor, passed away in 2012 from complications of coronary artery disease, reminding us that every step we take in understanding, diagnosing, and treating vascular disorders is truly part of that giant leap to save the mankind. And what better way to do this than to stay alert with Stroke Alert. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         This program is copyright of the American Heart Association, 2022. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more, visit AHAjournals.org.

Hawk & Tom Podcasts
THE HAWK & TOM SHOW: 7/20/22 - Part Two:

Hawk & Tom Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 26:15


Weird ways people have ended up in the ER..  We talk with Buzz Aldrin to discuss the anniversary of the moon walk..  Plus, American's thoughts on NASA's accomplishments, and the government conspiracies we believe.

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis
The Lesson From Biden's Presidency, Climate Change, Karine Jean-Pierre, Jill Biden's Low Approval, & More

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 46:10


Tonight's rundown: Bill breaks down why he was right about Biden's presidency We explore Climate Change, including Biden's policy and Europe's record heat Does White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre know what the Biden administration is up to? Why is First lady Jill Biden taking a hit in the polls? AOC's handcuff hoax Guest Crystal Paine, the money-saving mom This Day in History: Neil Armstong and "Buzz" Aldrin land on the Moon Final Thought: Things Happen In Case You Missed It: Don't miss the "Defending America" special, exclusive to Premium & Concierge Members, Wednesday, July 27. Get a BillOReilly.com Premium Membership today and get "Killing the Killers" free! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Scoot Show with Scoot
Remembering the 1969 moon landing and the biggest TV event of the century

The Scoot Show with Scoot

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 29:18


Scoot talks to WWL listeners about how and where they watched Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin land on the Moon

The Drew Mariani Show
Landing on the Moon

The Drew Mariani Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 51:05


Hour 1 of The Drew Mariani Show on 7-20-22 Paul Glader joins Drew to talk about the credibility (or lack there-of) in the news media Drew re-visits an interview he had with Buzz Aldrin a few years ago, about the experience of landing on the moon (today is the anniversary of that momentous occasion)

Rick & Bubba Show
AOC Arrested With Invisible Handcuffs | Daily Best of July 20 | Rick & Bubba

Rick & Bubba Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 76:07


Democratic lawmakers including Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez were arrested during an abortion rights protest in front of the Supreme Court. While being escorted away by police, AOC and Ilhan Omar held their hands behinds their backs to make it appear as if they were handcuffed. Oh, the pageantry of it all. In sports, SEC Media days brings some incredible quotes from Nick Saban. Buzz Aldrin auctions off a jacket he wore while on mission to the moon. And lastly, we investigate an explosion at the Hoover Dam. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Squiz Today
Wednesday, 20 July - New Covid advice from the Chief Medical Officer; Managing rising interest rates; Europe's heat wave; and saying it like a local...

Squiz Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 9:31


The Squiz is your shortcut to the news. More details and links to further reading for all of today's news can be found in The Squiz Today email. Sign up (it's free!) - www.thesquiz.com.au.LINKS: Most mispronounced place namesIt's the Anniversary of Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin becoming the first men to walk on the moon (1969) - the 13 Minutes to the Moon podcast is a good one.Other things we do:Politics Today - a weekday newsletter getting you across the latest in politics, both here and abroad.Sport Today - a sports news podcast designed to keep you ahead of the game. Or sign up to the newsletter here.Squiz Shortcuts - a weekly explainer on big news topicsSquiz Kids - a news podcast for curious kids. Age appropriate news without the nasties!

The Winding Stairs Freemasonry Podcast | Created by a Freemason for those interested in the Study of Freemasonry and the Art

Did you know that the first words uttered by Man from the surface of the moon were not the ones most people think? The first words, as documented by NASA's audio files, were “Contact Light”. These words were uttered by astronaut “Buzz” Aldrin.  The irony of these words is that, not only was this the first time humans contacted the surface of another heavenly body, but it was the first time Freemasonry made physical contact with the moon. Among the personal items that Buzz Aldrin brought with him on this historic flight, he brought a Masonic Flag. Yes, the second man to walk on the surface of the moon was a Freemason.  This episode features an exploration into the presence of Freemasonry on the moon through the efforts of Brother Edwin Buzz Aldrin and the subsequent presence of the moon in Freemasonry through the establishment of Tranquility Lodge No. 2000 and the various artifacts brought back from the moon.  Let's explore the connection between Freemasonry and the Moon and how these events set in motion the future establishment of the First Masonic Lodge on the surface of the moon. All that and more on this episode of The Winding Stairs These are exciting times for Science! For months, astronomy enthusiasts have been excitedly awaiting the release of the first photos from the James Webb Space Telescope. A $10 Billion Dollar project to put the largest and most capable telescope out in Space. There are two primary reasons why every Freemason in the world should be excited about this event. 1. As Masons we are encouraged to study Astronomy (We answer why in this episode) and 2. This telescope was named after Brother James Webb… A Freemason. Equipment used: Did you like the quality of our video, here are some of the tools and services we use and recommend*. Video Camera1: Canon EOS M50 https://amzn.to/3wUgrna Camera2: https://amzn.to/3zf5PSi Lenses: Canon EF-M 22mm https://amzn.to/3a88P8T Audio Microphone Main: Audio Technica ATR2100 https://amzn.to/3t41mxW Microphone (directional): Audio Technica AT875R https://amzn.to/38zNjcE Audio Interface: Behringer U-phoria UMC404HD https://amzn.to/3a25lod Lighting Key Lights: Neewer NL660 https://amzn.to/3t4CtlX Back Light: Neewer GL1 https://amzn.to/38vD20X *Affiliate links disclosure: Links to products or services included in this post may be affiliate links which may result in us receiving a small commission from your purchase. This will not affect the price you pay for said products/services. Know that this negligible compensation will never sway our opinion or integrity. Connect with The Winding Stairs here: Web- https://TheWindingStairs.com/ TikTok- https://www.tiktok.com/@thewindingstairs YouTube- https://www.youtube.com/thewindingstairs Instagram- https://www.instagram.com/thewindingstairs/ Facebook- https://www.facebook.com/TheWindingStairs/ Twitter- https://twitter.com/WindingStairs33 We hope we have earned your Subscription If you would like to support our efforts to help men become 21st century gentlemen, please consider supporting our work through Patreon. To unlock an exclusive selection of perks including early access to our content and your name in the credits of future videos, please visits: Patreon Thank you! Producers: Angel Rodriguez Thanks to our team: Alberto Mella Khristopher Rodriguez Tamesh Bahadour Jennifer Stephannie Muttaqi Supporters (Baron & Viscount Level) Andrew Rizzitello Angel Rodriguez Guillaume Durand Jaime Molinar Kris Kirby Marty Dagoberto Driggs Pat Watson Rick Kellinger Rusty Valle Tommy Abrahamsen Tyler Hall Wes Latchford

The Late Show Pod Show with Stephen Colbert
Astronaut Jessica Meir & Buzz Aldrin's "Moon Scoops" | Colbert Classic

The Late Show Pod Show with Stephen Colbert

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 14:38


To celebrate the 53rd anniversary of NASA's Apollo 11 mission this week, enjoy this special astronaut combo from The Late Show vault. First up, Stephen's talk with Astronaut Jessica Meir LIVE from The International Space Station: recorded in the early days of the coronavirus lockdown. Next, legendary Apollo astronaut Buzz Aldrin assures our audience that the moon landing was NOT faked, but dishes out some other spicy pieces of lunar gossip in "Moon Scoops." Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Opie Radio
Ep 537: You're alive because dad didn't hold out another pump

Opie Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 30:57


Hello Fresh - “Go to HelloFresh dot com slash opie16 and use code "opie16" for up to 16 free             meals AND 3 free gifts!” I'm in the drop zone!  Also, who wants dog poo raining down, strangling the life out of the thing, pot talk, the pic from the James Webb telescope, the ocean will pulverize it, he doesn't want to deal with anything, gaslighting bs, he got his perv on, the phone with the long cord, we have nothing for them, scary they walk among us, thank you thing and much more! Join the Private Facebook Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/203909694525714 Instagram and Tik Tok - OpieRadio Merch - www.opieradio.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Painkiller Already
PKA 603 W/ Josh Pillault: Halfway House Wedding, Kyle is A POC, Woody is a Cowgirl

Painkiller Already

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2022 245:55


Sponsors: Use Code “PKA” for 10% off your entire Lock and Load order! https://gorillamind.com/products/lock-and-load-pka-collaboration-1/?rfsn=6138256.b4345db  https://lucy.co/ Use Code “Painkiller” at Checkout! https://www.wonkyweeds.com/ Use Code “PKA20” for 20% off! Use Code “PKA” at Checkout for Blue!   Guest Social Medias: Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/jpillault  Twitter: https://twitter.com/JoshPillault    Support PKA on Patreon: https://www.Patreon.com/PKA Merch: http://PainkillerAlready.net PKA on iTunes: http://bit.ly/PKAOniTunes PKA Subreddit:  https://www.reddit.com/r/PKA/ PKA on Podbean: http://painkilleralready.podbean.com   0:00:00 - Woody introduces the show and guest, Taylor introduces sponsors 0:00:25 - Josh's wife is pregnant! Meanwhile… he's hooked on Rust! 0:03:06 - Venezuela's inflation crisis & Iraq's shoe statue dedicated to George Bush 0:07:12 - Shameless dog “lovers”& dads who go to get milk and never come back 0:13:18 - The hidden secrets and darkest scenes from Deliverance 0:16:48 - Game of Thrones' best and worst actors, Harry Potter & LoTR talk 0:26:59 - Kyle's sports betting hotstreak & why John Daly is a living legend 0:33:38 - UFC talk: Mike Perry, Israel Adesanya & Joe Lauzon's retirement? 0:39:58 - Josh's hilarious experience of living with an American criminal “janitor” 0:47:26 - Josh explains why being in a prison gang is more complex than you'd think 0:51:31 - PKA reacts to the destruction of the Georgia's Guidestones  0:56:30 - America's best Six Flags' & people who are too large for roller coasters 1:00:04 - Woody goes on a RANT explaining why Elon Musk is a charlatan  1:06:29 - Buzz Aldrin vs conspiracy theorists & why space technology is overrated  1:14:09 - Asteroid mining, Taylor's zero-calorie steaks & cows with window-holes 1:19:22 - Aliens, ant colony armies and sticky, freaky frog parties 1:28:09 - Why salt projectiles SUCK & the time Taylor got bit by a brown recluse  1:34:23 - Stitches, Joaquin Phoenix's dry mouth & hair-lip freakshows 1:39:50 - Taylor & Woody's hilarious experiences of attending/planning weddings 1:50:41 - Josh explains why he got hitched in a halfway house w/ fast food catering 1:57:19 - Kyle and Taylor talk automatic blinds, black mold & damaging apartments 2:01:15 - Does Taylor really live in America's most dangerous city? PKA investigates 2:07:03 - PKA discusses stealing dogs, sucking toes & the hard-r 2:12:58 - Ad reads: Lucy, Lock and Load & Blue 2:17:08 - If you like THC Gummy Bears, you'll LOVE Wonky Weeds! Try it NOW! 2:28:11 - Minnesota's legal weed “oopsie” & the PKA fan who stops retail thieves  2:33:23 - Maces vs flails, why boomerangs SUCK & Taylor's self-defense didgeridoo 2:41:06 - Cool Kaizer helmets, cowgirl hats & Taylor's hilarious WWII vet. cap 2:47:24 - Cotton candy grapes, sparrow extermination & Twitter communists  2:50:40 - Woody's farmers hats, sombreros & politically-biased restaurants  2:53:44 - Is gentrification really that bad? PKA doesn't think so 2:58:12 - Kyle's lockdown pantry hoarding & PKA's favorite dessert pies 3:02:10 - Taylor's smoked beer can chicken & Deep South chicken culture  3:08:58 - Kyle introduces Josh to Escape From Tarkov (Meta, strategies & more)  3:19:59 - Taylor comes out of the closest & Taco Bell's GIANT Cheez-It tostada  3:25:23 - PKA gets into a HEATED pizza debate: Crusts, dips & garlic butter 3:28:18 - Does Woody have a better physique at 50 than Sylvester Stallone?? 3:31:58 - Tom Cruise talk: Impossible solo stunts, Iron Man & scientology 3:39:40 - Game of Thrones spin-off series' & Lord of the Rings vs Marvel 3:47:40 - Politics talk: Trump 2024, Roe vs Wade fallout & Russia  3:55:40 - Movie talk: The Godfather, Goodfellas, Casino & Deliverance  4:04:37 - Josh shouts out his Social Medias, the guys call it a show

Good Heavens!  The Human Side of Astronomy
The Tenth Man - (Part 2 of 5) A Conversation with Apollo Astronaut Charlie Duke

Good Heavens! The Human Side of Astronomy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 16:16


In celebration of the Fourth of July and as 2022 is the year of the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 16 moon landing, Dan sits down  for a conversation with Apollo 16 astronaut, the tenth man to walk upon the lunar surface, Charlie Duke.    Duke is a retired Air Force Brigadier General and the CAPCOM "voice" of Houston for the historic Apollo 11 mission to the moon in July of 1969.    It was such an honor and delight to speak with Charlie. It was like talking to family. His delight in telling his remarkable story is evident. We spoke about his time working as CAPCOM for Apollo 11, his own trip to the moon on Apollo 16 and ultimately how the Lord Jesus Christ saved both Charlie and his family.    Here on part two Charlie looks back on his own landing on the moon with John Young, talks a little bit about Buzz Aldrin's communion on the moon after Apollo 11 had landed, remembers James Irwin of Apollo 15 quoting from Psalm 121 from the moon, and reflects on the Apollo 8 crew on Christmas Eve of 1968 reading from the first chapter of Genesis.    Watch the video of this episode!  https://youtu.be/9YpNFwbKTBA For more about Charlie's story, you can visit his website. https://charlieduke.com/  Charlie and Dotty Duke's book Moonwalker  https://www.amazon.com/Moonwalker-Astronaut-Enough-Satisfy-Success/dp/0840791062  Good Heavens! A Podcast about the Universe with Wayne and Dan https://www.patreon.com/GoodHeavens  Apologetics Profile  https://www.podomatic.com/podcasts/jwalker55293  https://www.watchman.org   Podbean enables our podcast to be on Apple Podcasts and other major podcast platforms.  To support Good Heavens! on Podbean as a patron, you can use the Podbean app, or go to https://patron.podbean.com/goodheavens.  This goes to Wayne Spencer. If you would like to give to the ministry of Watchman Fellowship or to Daniel Ray, you can donate at https://www.watchman.org/daniel. Donations to Watchman are tax deductible.