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Best podcasts about ratings reviews

Latest podcast episodes about ratings reviews

Fast To Heal Stories
Episode 63- Do You Need to Go Low-Carb to Lose Weight?

Fast To Heal Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 28:27


While I am not completely against eating carbohydrates, I do believe that lowering overall intake to a therapeutic level is helpful for just about anyone. In this episode I discuss: Why we should think about lowering carbs to burn body fat Which level of carbohydrate is appropriate for you Glycogen storage Populations that may benefit from even lower levels of carb in their eating plan and why LINKS/RESOURCES MENTIONED: My website: https://www.fasttoheal.info/ Why You're Not Losing Weight Starting Guides: https://www.subscribepage.com/fasttoheal Enroll in Finding Nutritional PEACE Learn more about my mini course, Fat Burning Unlocked, to start transitioning from a sugar burner to a fat burner: https://www.fasttoheal.info/fatburningunlocked Need help with carb recommendations? Take my FREE QUIZ: https://www.fasttoheal.info/carbquiz I would LOVE for you to leave a review on Apple Podcasts! This helps more people like you find the podcast, and start their healing journey. How to leave a review on Apple Podcasts Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. Navigate to the Fast To Heal Stories podcast. Scroll down to find the subhead titled “Ratings & Reviews.” Under one of the highlighted reviews, select “Write a Review.” 

Fast To Heal Stories
Episode 62- Do Men Lose Weight Faster Than Women?

Fast To Heal Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 26:52


This isn't really a black or white kind of answer, but I'll do my best! There are many factors that come into play, and I discuss several. Men do tend to lose weight more quickly in the beginning, but it levels out and over the long haul, women will catch up. Here are other factors to think about: Bringing insulin levels down first and foremost Women's hormonal fluctuations Past "diet" or calorie deficit centered programs and how much weight you have to lose Overall nutrition plan and approach LINKS/RESOURCES MENTIONED: My website: https://www.fasttoheal.info/ Why You're Not Losing Weight Starting Guides: https://www.subscribepage.com/fasttoheal Fasting Insulin/Fasting Blood Sugar Lab Guide Enroll in Finding Nutritional PEACE Learn more about my mini course, Fat Burning Unlocked, to start transitioning from a sugar burner to a fat burner: https://www.fasttoheal.info/fatburningunlocked Need help with carb recommendations? Take my FREE QUIZ: https://www.fasttoheal.info/carbquiz I would LOVE for you to leave a review on Apple Podcasts! This helps more people like you find the podcast, and start their healing journey. How to leave a review on Apple Podcasts Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. Navigate to the Fast To Heal Stories podcast. Scroll down to find the subhead titled “Ratings & Reviews.” Under one of the highlighted reviews, select “Write a Review.” 

MoneyBall Medicine
What Exponential Change Really Means in Healthcare, with Azeem Azhar

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 57:25


As we say here on The Harry Glorikian Show, technology is changing everything about healthcare works—and the reason we keep talking about it month after month is that the changes are coming much faster than they ever did in the past. Each leap in innovation enables an even bigger leap just one step down the road. Another way of saying this is that technological change today feels exponential. And there's nobody who can explain exponential change better than today's guest, Azeem Azhar.Azeem produces a widely followed newsletter about technology called Exponential View. And last year he published a book called The Exponential Age: How Accelerating Technology is Transforming Business, Politics, and Society. He has spent his whole career as an entrepreneur, investor, and writer trying to help people understand what's driving the acceleration of technology — and how we can get better at adapting to it. Azeem argues that most of our social, business, and political institutions evolved for a period of much slower change—so we need to think about how to adapt these institutions to be more nimble. If we do that right, then maybe we can apply the enormous potential of all these new technologies, from computing to genomics, in ways that improve life for everyone.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.So, when you step back and think about it, why is it that people like me write books or make podcasts about technology and healthcare?Well, like I just said, it's because tech is changing everything about healthcare works—and the changes are coming much faster than they ever did in the past.In fact, the change feels like it's accelerating. Each leap in innovation enables an even bigger leap just one step down the road.Another way of saying this is that technological change today feels exponential.And there's nobody who can explain exponential change better than today's guest, Azeem Azhar.Azeem produces a widely followed newsletter about technology called Exponential View.And last year he published a book called The Exponential Age: How Accelerating Technology is Transforming Business, Politics, and Society.He has spent his whole career as an entrepreneur, investor, and writer trying to help people understand what's driving the acceleration of technology — and how we can get better at adapting to it.Azeem argues that most of our social, business, and political institutions evolved for a period of much slower change. So we need to think about how to adapt these institutions to be more nimble.If we do that right, then maybe we can apply the enormous potential of all these new technologies, from computing to genomics, in ways that improve life for everyone.Azeem and I focus on different corners of the innovation world. But our ideas about things like the power of data are very much in sync. So this was a really fun conversation. Here's Azeem Azhar.Harry Glorikian: Azeem, welcome to the show.Azeem Azhar: Harry, what a pleasure to be here.Harry Glorikian: I definitely want to give you a chance to sort of talk about your work and your background, so we really get a sense of who you are. But I'd first like to ask a couple of, you know, big picture questions to set the stage for everybody who's listening. You like this, your word and you use it, "exponential," in your branding and almost everything you're doing across your platform, which is what we're going to talk about. But just for people who don't, aren't maybe familiar with that word exponential. What does that word mean to you? Why do you think that that's the right word, word to explain how technology and markets are evolving today?Azeem Azhar: Such a great question. I love the way you started with the easy questions. I'm just kidding because it's it's hard. It's hard to summarize short, but in a brief brief statement. So, you know, exponential is this idea that comes out of math. It is the idea that something grows by a fixed proportion in any given time period. An interest-bearing savings account, 3 percent growth or in the old days, we'd get 3 percent per annum, three percent compounded. And compound interest is really powerful. It's what your mom and your dad told you. Start saving early so that when you're a bit older, you'll have a huge nest egg, and it never made sense to us. And the idea behind an exponential is that these are processes which, you know, grow by that certain fixed percentage every year. And so the amount they grow grows every time. It's not like going from the age of 12 to 13 to 14 to 15 were actually proportionately—you get less older every year because when you go from 15 to 16, you get older by one fifteenth of your previous age. And when you go from 50 to fifty one, it's by one 50th, which is a smaller proportion. Someone who is growing in age exponentially would be growing by, say, 10 percent every year. So you go from 10 to 11 and that's by one year. From 20, you go to 22, two years. From 30 to 33. So that's the idea of an exponential process. It's kind of compound interest. But why I use the phrase today to describe what's going on in the economy and in the technologies that drive the economy, is that many of the key technologies that we currently rely on and will rely on as they replace old industrial processes are improving at exponential rates on a price-performance basis.Azeem Azhar: That means that every year you get more of them for less, or every year what you got for the the same dollar you get much more. And I specifically use a threshold, and that threshold is to say essentially it's an exponential technology if it's improving by double digits, 10 percent or more every year on a compounding basis for decades. And many of the technologies that I look at increased by improve by 30, 40, 50, 60 percent or more every year, which is pretty remarkable. The reverse of that, of course, is deflation, right? These capabilities are getting much cheaper. And I think the reason that's important and the reason it describes the heartbeat of our economies is that we're at a point in development of, you know, sort of economic and technological development where these improvements can be felt. They're viscerally felt across a business cycle. Across a few years, in fact. And that isn't something that we have reliably and regularly seen in any previous point in history. The idea that this pace of change can be as fast as it as it is. And on the cover of my book The Exponential Age, which I'm holding up to you, Harry. The thing about the curve is is that it starts off really flat and a little bit boring, and you would trade that curve for a nice, straight, sharp line at 45 degrees. And then there's an inflection point when it goes suddenly goes kind of crazy and out of control. And my argument is that we are now past that inflection point and we are in that that sort of vertical moment and we're going to have to contend with it.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, we are mentally aligned. And I try to talk to people about this. I mean, when we were doing the genome project that Applied Biosystems, you know, when we had finished, I think it was 2 percent or 4 percent of the genome, everybody's like, Oh, you have like ninety something [to go], and they couldn't see the exponential curve. And then we were done like five years later. And so it's it's this inability of the human mind. You know, it's really not designed to do that, but we're not designed to see exponential shift. We're sort of looking around that corner from an evolutionary perspective to see what's happening. But, you know? Exponential growth is not a new concept, if you think about, you know, really, I think the person that brought it to the forefront was Gordon Moore, right? With, you know, how semiconductor chips were going to keep doubling every two years and cost was going to stay flat. And you know, how do you see it playing out? Today, what is so different right now, or say, in the past two, three, four, five years. What you can see going forward that. May not have been as obvious 10 or 15 years ago.Azeem Azhar: I mean, it is an idea that's been around with us for a long time. You know, arguably Thomas Malthus, the British scholar in the 18th century who worried about the exponential growth of the population destroying the land's carrying capacity and ability to produce crops. And of course, we have the sort of ancient Persian and Hindu stories about the vizier and the chessboard, who, you know, puts a grain of rice and doubles on each square and doubles at each time. So it's an idea that's been around for a while. The thing that I think has happened is that it's back to its back to that point, the kink, the inflection in the curve. The point at which in the story of the chess, the king gets so angry with his vizier that he chops off his head. The point with the semiconductors, where the chips get so powerful and so cheap that computing is everything, and then every way in which we live our lives is mediated through these devices. And that wasn't always the way. I mean, you and I, Harry, are men of a certain age, and we remember posting letters and receiving mail through the letterbox in the morning. And there was then, some 15 years later, there were, or 20 years later, there was a fax, right? I mean, that's what it looked like.Azeem Azhar: And the thing that's different now from the time of Gordon Moore is that that what he predicted and sort of saw out as his clock speed, turns out to be a process that occurs in many, many different technology fields, not just in computing. And the one that you talked about as well, genome sequencing. And in other areas like renewable energy. And so it becomes a little bit like...the clock speed of this modern economy. But the second thing that is really important is to ask that question: Where is the bend in the curve? And the math purists amongst your listeners will know that an exponential curve has no bend. It depends on where you zoom in. Whatever however you zoom, when you're really close up, you're really far away. You'll always see a band and it will always be in a different place. But the bend that we see today is the moment where we feel there is a new world now. Not an old world. There are things that generally behave differently, that what happens to these things that are connected to exponential processes are not kind of geeks and computer enthusiasts are in Silicon Valley building. They're happening all over the world. And for me, that turning point happens some point between 2011, 2012 and 2015, 2016. Because in 2009, America's largest companies wereAzeem Azhar: not in this order, Exxon, Phillips, Wal-Mart, Conoco... Sorry, Exxon Mobil, Wal-Mart, ConocoPhillips, Chevron, General Motors, General Electric, Ford, AT&T, Valero. What do all of them have in common? They are all old companies are all built on three technologies that emerged in the late 19th century. The car or the internal combustion engine, the telephone and electricity. And with the exception of Wal-Mart, every one of those big companies was founded between about 1870 and sort of 1915. And Wal-Mart is dependent on the car because you needed suburbs and you needed large cars with big trunks to haul away 40 rolls of toilet paper. So, so and that was a century long shift. And then if you look out four years after 2009, America's largest firms, in fact, the world's largest firms are all Exponential Age firms like the Tencent and the Facebooks of this world. But it's not just that at that period of time. That's the moment where solar power became for generating electricity became cheaper than generating electricity from oil or gas in in most of the world. It's the point at which the price to sequence the human genome, which you know is so much better than I do, diminished below $1000 per sequence. So all these things came together and they presented a new way of doing things, which I call the Exponential Age.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, in my last book. I, you know, I do state that the difference between evolution and revolution is time, right? If you wait long enough, things happen evolutionarily, but at the speed that things are changing, it feels revolutionary and in how it's affecting everybody. So let's rewind and talk about your background. You've been active as a business columnist, as a journalist, a startup founder, a CEO, a leader of corporate innovation, incubators at Reuters and a venture capital partner. Lately you've built what eems like a very busy career around books and talks and podcasts and all around this theme of accelerating technologies, I'd love to hear how you how you first got interested in all these themes about technological change. You know, how society can manage this change? I know you were in Oxford. You got your master's degree in the famous PPE program. The politics, philosophy and economics. You know, was it soon after that that you went down this road? Or is Oxford where it all started?Azeem Azhar: It started well before then in, in a weird way. So, so you know, my interest really is between sits between technology and an economic institutions and society. And I, I was born, like most of us are, to two parents, and my parents were working in in Zambia in the early 70s, and my dad was working on helping this newly independent country develop economic institutions. It didn't have them and it needed them to go through that sort of good institutions, make for healthy economies, make for social welfare and sort of civil politics. That's the argument. So he was out there doing all of that. And I was born the year after Intel released its 4004 chip, which is widely regarded as the sort of the chip that kicked off the personal computing revolution. And so, so in the backdrop of people talking about development and development economics and being curious about my own personal story, I was exposed to these ideas. I mean, you don't understand them when you're eight or 10 and you know, but you're exposed to them and you have an affiliation to them and so on. And at the same time, computers were entering into the popular consciousness.Azeem Azhar: You know, you had C-3PO, the robot and computers in Star Trek, and I saw a computer in 1979 and I had one from 1981. And so my interest in these things, these two tracks was start set off quite early on and I really, really loved the computing. And I did, you did notice, but you don't necessarily understand that, why computers are getting more and more powerful. My first computer only had one color. Well, it had two, white and black. And my second could manage 16 at some time, probably not 16. Eight out of a palette of 16 at any given time. And they get better and better. And so alongside my life were computers getting faster. I'm learning to program them and discovering the internet and that, I think, has always sat alongside me against this kind of family curiosity. I suspect if my parents had been, I don't know, doctors, I would have been in your field in the field of bioinformatics and applying exponential technologies to health care. And if my parents had been engineers, I would have been doing something that intersected engineering and computing.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, no, it's you know, it's interesting, I remember when we got our first chip, when I was first learning about, you know, computers like it was, you know, eight bits, right? And then 16 bits and oh my god, what can we do with them? And we were building them, and I actually have to get you a copy of my new book because I think if you read the first chapter and what you just said, you'll be like, Oh my God, we have more in common than we may think, even though you know you're where you are and I'm in the health care field to. But you were co-founder and CEO of a company, I believe that was called PeerIndex, which was a startup in the late 2000s. And even back then, you were trying to quantify people's influence on different social media platforms. And I'm trying to remember like, do I even know what the social media platform was back in 2000? It seems like so long ago, and you successfully sold it to Brandwatch in, like, 2014. What did that experience sort of teach you about, you know, the bigger issues and how technology impacts society and vice versa? Because I have to believe that you know your hands on experience and what you were seeing has to have changed the way that you thought about how fast this was going and what it was going to do.Azeem Azhar: Oh, that is an absolutely fantastic, fantastic question. And. You know, you really get to the heart of all of the different things that you learn as a founder. When we when I started PeerIndex, the idea was really that people were going on to the internet with profiles that they maintained for themselves. So up until that point, apart from people who had been really early on the internet, like you and I who used Usenet and then early web pages for ourselves, no one really had a presence. And these social apps like MySpace and Twitter and LinkedIn and Facebook show up and they start to give people a presence. And we felt that initially there would be a clear problem around trying to discover people because at the time the internet was an open network. You could look at anyone's page on Facebook. There weren't these walled gardens. And we looked down on them. So we thought initially that there would be a an opportunity to build some kind of expertise system where I could say, "Listen, find me something that someone who knows something about, you know, sushi restaurants in Berlin." And it would help me find that person. I could connect their profile and talk to them because it was the really early, naive days before Facebook or LinkedIn had advertising on them. And we could we kind of got the technology to work, but actually the market was moving and we couldn't land that.Azeem Azhar: And so we had to kind of pivot, as you do several times, ultimately, until we became this kind of influence analytics for marketers. But the few things that I learned. So the first one was how quickly new players in a market will go from being open to being closed. So it was 2011 when Facebook started to put the shutters down on its data and become a closed garden. And they realized that the network effect and data is what drove them forward. And the second thing was the speed with which what we did changed. So when we were getting going and doing all of this kind of analytics on Twitter and Facebook. They didn't really have data science teams. In fact, Twitter's first data scientists couldn't get a US visa and ended up helping, working with us for several months. And I think back to the fact that we used five or six different core technologies for our data stores in a seven-year period. And in that time, what we did became so much more powerful. So when we started, we had maybe like 50,000 people in this thing, it was really hard to get it to work. The entire company's resources went on it. At one point we were we had about 100 million people in the data in our dataset, or 100 million profiles in the data.Azeem Azhar: They were all public, by the way. I should say this is all public data and it was just like a search engine in a way. And in order to update the index, we would need to run processes on thousands of computers and it would take a big, big, big servers, right? And it would take a day. Yeah. By the time we sold the company, a couple more iterations of Moore's Law, some improvements in software architecture, we were updating 400 million user profiles in real time on a couple of computers. Yep, so not only do we quadrupled the dataset, we had increased its, sort of decreased its latency. It was pretty much real time and we had reduced the amount of computers we needed by a factor of about 400. And it was a really remarkable evolution. And that gets me to the third lesson. So the second lesson is really all about that pace of change in the power of Moore's law. And then the third lesson was really that my engineers learned by doing. They figured out how to do this themselves. And whereas I was sort of roughly involved in the first design, by the time we got to the fifth iteration this was something of a process that was entirely run by some brilliant young members of the team.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, you've got to actually cook something to understand how to do it and taste it and understand how it's going to come out. So your new book, The Exponential Age, came out this fall. You know, in the first chapter, you sort of identify two main problems, right? One is how do we perceive technology and then or the way we relate to technology and. Can you describe the two problems as you see them and maybe, maybe even hint a little? I don't want I don't want if people want to buy the book, I want them to buy it, but maybe hint that the solution?Azeem Azhar: Yeah. Well, I mean, there are there are a couple of issues here, right, in the Exponential Age. The first is that technology creates all sorts of new potentials and we live them. We're doing this over Zoom, for example. Right. And there are. But the arrival of new potentials always means that there's an old system that is going to be partially or entirely replaced. And so I describe that process as the exponential gap. It is the gap between the potentials of the new and the way in which most of us live our lives. And the thing is, the reason I say "the way most of us live our lives" is because our lives, even in America, which doesn't like its sort of government, are governed by institutions and by regulations. You know, when you when you start to cook, you wash your hands, right? There's no law. That's just an institution, its common habit. If you have teenage kids like I do, you're battling with the fact that people are meant to talk over dinner, not stare at their phones. In the UK there is an institution that says on a red light traffic signal, you never turn. You wait. It's not like the US where you can do that. Now some of these institutions are codified like our traffic laws, and some are not.Azeem Azhar: There are then more formal institutions of different types like, you know, the Fed or NATO or the Supreme Court. And the purpose of institutions, social, formal, legal, informal is to make life easier to live, right? Right, you don't have to remember to put our pants on. I will read a rule that says, put your pants on before you leave the house. It's like you just put them on and everybody kind of knows it. And there's no law that says you should or shouldn't, right. So they become very valuable. But the thing is that the institutions in general, by their nature, don't adapt to at the speed with which these new technologies do adapt. And even slower moving technologies like the printing press really upended institutions. I mean, Europe went into centuries of war just after the printing press emerged. So, so the central heart of the challenge is, on the one hand, we have these slightly magical technologies that do amazing things, but they somewhat break our institutions and we have to figure out how we get our institutions to adapt better. But there's a second complication to all of this, which is that which is, I think, more one that's about historical context. And that complication is that the way we have talked about technology, especially in the West in the last 40 or 50 years, has been to suggest that technology is deterministic.Azeem Azhar: We're a bit like people in a pre-med, pre-science era who just say the child got the pox and the child died. We say the technology arrived and now we must use it. The iPhone arrived and we must use it. TheFacebook arrived, and we must use it. We've gotten into this worldview that technology is this sort of unceasing deterministic force that arrives from nowhere and that a few men and women in Silicon Valley control, can harness it. We've lost sight of the fact that technology is something that we as members of society, as business people, as innovators, as academics, as parents get to shape because it is something that we build ourselves. And that for me was a second challenge. And what I sought to do in the book, as I was describing, the Exponential Age is not only persuade people that we are in the Exponential Age, but also describe how it confuses our institutions broadly defined and also explain why our response has sometimes been a bit poor. Some a large part of which I think is connected to putting technology on a particular pedestal where we don't ask questions of it. And then hopefully at the end of this, I do give some suggestions.Harry Glorikian: Well, it's interesting, right, I've had the pleasure of giving talks to different policy makers, and I always tell them like, you need to move faster, you need to implement policy. It's good to be a little wrong and then fix it. But don't be so far behind the curve that you, you know, some of these things need corralling otherwise, they do get a lot of, you know, get out of hand. Now in health care, we have almost the opposite. We're trying to break the silos of data so that we can improve health care, improve diagnosis, improve outcomes for patients, find new drugs. Harry Glorikian: So I'm going to, I'm going to pivot there a little bit and sort of dive a little deeper into life sciences and health care, right, which is the focus of the show, right? And in the book, you you say that our age is defined by the emergence of several general-purpose technologies, which I'm totally aligned with, and that they are all advancing exponentially. And you actually say biology is one of them. So first, what are the most dramatic examples in your mind of exponential change in life sciences? And how do you believe they're affecting people's health?Azeem Azhar: Well, I mean, if you got the Moderna or BioNTech vaccination, you're a lucky recipient of that technology and it's affecting people's health because it's putting a little nanobots controlled by Bill Gates in your bloodstream to get you to hand over all your bitcoin to him, is the other side of the problem. But I mean, you know, I mean, more seriously, the Moderna vaccine is an example that I give at the at the end of the book comes about so remarkably quickly by a combination of these exponential technologies. I'm just going to look up the dates. So on the 6th of January 2020, there's a release of the sequence of a coronavirus genome from from a respiratory disease in Wuhan. Yeah, and the the genome is just a string of letters, and it's put on GenBank, which is a bit like an open-source story storage for gene sequences. People started to download it, and synthetic genes were rapidly led to more than 200 different vaccines being developed. Moderna, by February the 7th, had its first vials of its vaccine. That was 31 days after the initial release of the sequence and another six days they finalized the sequence of the vaccine and 25 more days to manufacture it. And within a year of the virus sequence being made public, 24 million people had had one dose of it.Azeem Azhar: Now that's really remarkable because in the old days, by which I mean February 2020, experts were telling us it would take at least 18 months to figure out what a vaccine might even look like, let alone tested and in place. So you see this dramatic time compression. Now what were the aspects at play? So one aspect at play was a declining cost of genome sequencing, which the machines are much cheaper. It's much cheaper to sequence these samples. That means that the entire supply chain of RNA amplifiers and so on a more widely available. This then gets shared on a website that can be run at very few dollars. It can get access to millions of people. The companies who are doing the work are using synthetic genes, which means basically writing out new bases, which is another core technology that's going through an exponential cost decline. And they're using a lot of machine learning and big data in order to explore the phenomenally complex biological space to zero in on potential candidates. So that the whole thing knits together a set of these different technologies in a very, very powerful and quite distributed combination.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer. It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in Kindle format. Just go to Amazon and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's step back here for just a minute. So I wonder if you have a thesis—from a fundamental technology perspective, what's really driving the exponential technological change, right? Do you think that that, is there a force maybe outside of semiconductors that are driving biology forward? What's your view? I mean, if you took the computational tools away from life sciences and drug developers, would we still see the same rapid advances in that area, and the answer could be no, because I can tell you my thoughts after you tell me yours.Azeem Azhar: Well, we wouldn't see the same advances, but we would still see significant advances and it's hard to unpack one from another. But if you look at the I mean, you worked on the genome sequencing stuff. So you know that there's a lot of interesting aspects to do with the reagents that are used the electrochemistry, the arrays and making little ongoing improvements in those areas. There are also key improvements in the actual kind of automation of the processes between each to each step, and some of those automations are not, they're not kind of generalized robots, soft robots, they are trays that are being moved at the right time from one spot to another, stop on a kind of lab bench. So you'd still see the improvements, but you wouldn't see the same pace that we have seen from computing. And for two reasons. So one is that kind of the core ability to store lots of this data, which runs into the exabytes and then sift through it, is closely connected to storage capacity and computation capability. But also even the CAD package that the person used to redraw the designs for the new laboratory bench to handle the new vials of reagents required a computer. But yes, but you know, so what? What's your understanding as someone who is on the inside and, note to listener, that was a bit cruel because Harry is the expert on this one!Harry Glorikian: And oh no, no, no, no. I, you know, it's interesting, right… I believe that now that information is more readily available, which again drives back to sensors, technology, computation, speed as well as storage is changing what we do. Because the information feeds our ability to generate that next idea. And most of this was really hard to get. I mean, back in the day, I mean, if you know, now I wear a medical device on my on my wrist. I mean, you know this, I look as a as a data storage device, right? Data aggregation device. And this I look at it more as a coach, right? And but the information that it's getting, you know, from me on a momentary basis is, I mean, one of the companies I helped start, I mean, we have trillions of heartbeats, trillions. Can you imagine the analytics from a machine learning and, you know, A.I. perspective that I can do on that to look for? Is there a signal of a disease? Can I see sleep apnea or one of the I could never have done that 10 years ago.Azeem Azhar: I mean, even 10, how about I mean, five maybe, right? I mean, the thing that I find remarkable about about all of this is what it's told me. So I went from I used to check my bloods every year and so I would get a glucose reading or an insulin reading every year. I then put a CGM on continuous glucose monitor and I wore it for 16 to 18 weeks and it gave me a reading every 15 months minutes. So I literally went from once a year, which is 365 times 96, 15 minute intervals. So it's like a 40,000-fold improvement. I went to from to that every 15 minutes, and it was incredible and amazing and changed my life in so many good ways, which I'm happy to go into later. But the moment I put the 15 minute on, I kid you not, within an hour I was looking for the streaming cGMPs that give you real time feed. No 15-minute delay. And there is one that Abbott makes through a company, sells through a company called Super Sapiens. But because suddenly I was like a pilot whose altimeter doesn't just tell them you're in the air or you've hit the ground, which is what happened when I used to go once a year, I've gone to getting an altitude reading every minute, which is great, but still not brilliant for landing the plane to where I could get this every second. And this would be incredible. And I find that really amazing. I just I just and what we can then do with that across longitudinal data is just something else.Harry Glorikian: We're totally aligned. And, you know, jumping back to the deflationary force of all this. Is. What we can do near-patient, what we can do at home, what we can do at, you know, I'll call it CVS, I think by you, it would be Boots. But what these technologies bring to us and how it helps a person manage themselves more accurately or, you know, more insightfully, I think, brings us not to chronic health, but we will be able to keep people healthier, longer and at a much, much lower cost than we did before because. As you know, every time we go to the hospital, it's usually big machines, very expensive, somebody to do the interpretation. And now if we can get that information to the patient themselves and AI and machine learning can make that information easier for them to interpret. They can actually do something actionable that that that makes a difference.Azeem Azhar: I mean, I think it's a really remarkable opportunity with a big caveat that where we can look at look historically, so you know, we're big fans of the Hamilton musical in my household. And if you go back to that time, which is only a couple of hundred years ago and you said to them, this is the kind of magic medicine they'll have in the US by 2020. I mean, it's space tech. It's alien space tech. You know, you can go in and we measure things they didn't even know could be measured, right, like the level of antibodies in the bloodstream. And you can get that done in an hour almost anywhere, right? Yeah. And it's really quite cheap because GDP per capita in the per head in the US is like $60,000 a year. And I can go and get my blood run. A full panel run for $300 in London, one of the most expensive cities in the world. 60 grand a year. $300. Well, surely everybody's getting that done. And yet and you know this better than me. Right. You know this better than me that despite that, we don't have everyone getting their bloods done because it's just so cheap, right, there are other structural things that go on about who gets access, and I think America is a great example of this because for all the people who read, we are aware of Whoop, and have, you know, biological ages that are 10 years younger than their chronological age, you've also got like a much, much larger incidence of deaths by drug overdose and chronic obesity and sort of diseases of inflammation and so on. And that's despite having magical the magical space technology of the 2020s. So the question I think we have to have is why would we feel that next year's optoelectronic sensors from Rockly or the Series 7 or Series 8 Apple Watch will make the blindest bit of difference to health outcomes for the average American.Harry Glorikian: Now, I totally agree with you, I mean, I think half of it is education, communication. You know, there's a lot of social and political and policy and communication issues that exist, and actually that was going to be my next, one of my next questions for you, which is: What are some of the ways that exponential change challenges our existing social and political structures? And you know, do you see any—based on all the people that you've talked to, you know, writing the book, et cetera—insights of how we're going, what those are and maybe some ideas about how we can move beyond them.Azeem Azhar: Hmm. Well, I mean, on the health care side, I think one of the most important issues is and this is I mean, look, you've got an American audience and your health system is very different to, let's just say everyone.Harry Glorikian: Actually, the audience is global. So everybody, I have people that all over the world that listen to this.Azeem Azhar: Fair enough. Okay. Even better, so the rest of the world will understand this point, perhaps more, which is that, you know, in many place parts of the world, health care is treated as not, you know, it's treated differently to I take a vacation or a mutual bond that you buy, right or a car, it's not seen purely as a kind of profit vehicle. It's seen as something that serves the individual and serves a community and public health and so on matters. And I think one of the opportunities that we have is to think out for it, look out for is how do we get the benefits of aggregated health data, which is what you need. You need aggregate population wide data that connects a genotype to a phenotype. In other words, what the gene says to how it gets expressed to me physically to my biomarkers, you know, my, what's in my microbiota, what my blood pressure is on a minute by minute basis and my glucose levels and so on. And to whatever illnesses and diseases and conditions I seem to have, right, the more of that that we have, the more we can build predictive models that allow for the right kind of interventions and pre-habilitation right rather than rehabilitation. But in order to do that at the heart of that, yes, there's some technology. But at the heart of that is how do we get people's data in such a way that they are willing to provide that in a way that is not forced on them through the duress of the state or the duress of our sort of financial servitude? And so that, I think, is something that we really, really need to think about the trouble that we've had as the companies have done really well out of consumer data recently.Azeem Azhar: And I don't just mean Google and Facebook, but even all the marketing companies before that did so through a kind of abusive use of that data where it wasn't really done for our benefit. You know, I used to get a lot of spam letters through my front door. Physical ones. I was never delighted for it, ever. And so I think that one of the things we have to think, think about is how are we going to be able to build common structures that protect our data but still create the opportunities to develop new and novel therapeutic diagnosis, early warning systems? And that's not to say there shouldn't be profit making companies on there that absolutely should be. But the trouble is, the moment that you allow the data resource to be impinged upon, then you either head down this way of kind of the sort of dominance that Facebook has, or you head down away the root of that kind of abuse of spam, junk email and so on, and junk physical mail.Azeem Azhar: So I think there is this one idea that that emerges as an answer, which is the idea of the data commons or the data collective. Yeah. We actually have a couple of them working in health care in in the U.K., roughly. So there's one around CT scans of COVID patients. So there's lots and lots of CT scans and other kind of lung imaging of COVID patients. And that's maintained in a repository, the sort of national COVID lung imaging databank or something. And if you're if you're an approved researcher, you can get access to that and it's done on a non-commercial basis, but you could build something commercially over the top of it. Now the question is why would I give that scan over? Well, I gave give it over because I've been given a cast-iron guarantee about how it's going to be used and how my personal data will be, may or may not be used within that. I would never consider giving that kind of data to a company run by Mark Zuckerberg or, you know, anyone else. And that, I think, is the the cross-over point, which is in order to access this, the benefits of this aggregate data from all these sensors, we need to have a sort of human-centric approach to ensure that the exploitation can happen profitably, but for our benefit in the long run.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I'm looking at some interesting encryption technologies where nothing is ever unencrypted, but you can, you know, the algorithm can learn from the data, right? And you're not opening it up. And so there, I believe that there are some solutions that can make give the side that needs the data what they need, but protect the other side. I still think we need to policymakers and regulators to step up. That would cause that shift to happen faster. But you know, I think some of those people that are making those policies don't even understand the phone they're holding in their hands most of the time and the power that they're holding. So. You know, last set of questions is. Do you think it's possible for society to adapt to exponential change and learn how to manage it productively?Azeem Azhar: It's a really hard question. I'm sure we will muddle through. We will muddle through because we're good at muddling through, you know? But the question is, does that muddling through look more like the depression years. Or does that muddling through look like a kind of directed Marshall Plan. Because they both get through. One comes through with sort of more productive, generative vigor? What I hoped to do in the book was to be able to express to a wider audience some underlying understanding about how the technologies work, so they can identify the right questions to to ask. And what I wanted to do for people to work in the technology field is draw some threads together because a lot of this will be familiar to them, but take those threads to their consequences. And in a way, you know, if I if I tell you, Harry, don't think of an elephant. What are you thinking about right  now?Harry Glorikian: Yeah. Yeah, of course it's not, you know, suggestive.Azeem Azhar: And by laying out these things for these different audiences in different ways, I'm hoping that they will remember them and bear those in mind when they go out and think about how they influence the world, whether it's decisions they make from a product they might buy or not buy, or how they talk influence their elected officials or how they steer their corporate strategy or the products they choose to build. I mean, that's what you would you would hope to do. And then hopefully you create a more streamlined approach to it to the change that needs to happen. Now here's the sort of fascinating thing here, is that over the summer of 2021, the Chinese authorities across a wide range of areas went in using a number of different regulators and stamped on a whole set of Exponential Age companies, whether it was online gaming or online education. The big, multi sided social networks, a lot of fintech, a lot of crypto. And they essentially had been observing the experiment to learn, and they had figured out what things didn't align with their perceived obligations as a government to the state and to the people. Now, you know, I'm using that language because I don't want this to become a kind of polarized sort of argument.Azeem Azhar: I'm just saying, here's a state where you may not agree with its objectives and the way it's accountable, but in its own conception, it's accountable to its people and has to look out for their benefit. And it took action on these companies in really, really abrupt ways. And. If you assume that their actions were rational and they were smart people and I've met some of them and they're super smart people, it tells you something about what one group of clever people think is needed at these times. This sort of time. And I'm not I'm not advocating for that kind of response in the US or in Western Europe, but rather than to say, you know, when your next-door neighbor, and you live in an apartment block and your next-door neighbor you don't like much runs out and says the whole building is on fire. The fact that you don't like him shouldn't mean that you should ignore the fact that there's a fire. And I think that some sometimes there is some real value in looking at how other countries are contending with this and trying to understand the rationale for it, because the Chinese were for all the strength of their state, were really struggling with the power of the exponential hedge funds in their in their domain within Europe.Azeem Azhar: The European Union has recognized that these companies, the technologies provide a lot of benefit. But the way the companies are structured has a really challenging impact on the way in which European citizens lives operate, and they are making taking their own moves. And I'll give you a simple example, that the right to repair movement has been a very important one, and there's been a lot of legislative pressure in the in Europe that is that we should be have the right to repair our iPhones and smartphones. And having told us for years it wasn't possible suddenly, Apple in the last few days has announced all these repair kits self-repair kits. So it turns out that what is impossible means may mean what's politically expedient rather than anything else. And so my sense is that that by engaging in the conversation and being more active, we can get ultimately get better outcomes. And we don't have to go the route of China in order to achieve those, which is an incredibly sort of…Harry Glorikian: A draconian way. Yes.Azeem Azhar: Yeah. Very, very draconian. But equally, you can't you know where that where I hear the U.S. debate running around, which is an ultimately about Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, and not much beyond that, I think is problematic because it's missing a lot of opportunities to sort of write the stuff and foster some amazing innovation and some amazing new businesses in this space.Harry Glorikian: Oh yeah, that's, again, that's why, whenever I get a chance to talk to policymakers, I'm like, “You guys need to get ahead of this because you just don't understand how quickly it's moving and how much it's going to impact what's there, and what's going to happen next.” And if you think about the business model shifts by some of these... I mean, what I always tell people is like, okay, if you can now sequence a whole genome for $50 think about all the new business models and all the new opportunities that will open up versus when it was $1000. It sort of changes the paradigm, but most people don't think that we're going to see that stepwise change. Or, you know, Google was, DeepMind was doing the optical analysis, and they announced, you know, they could do one analysis and everybody was like, Oh, that's great, but it's just one. And a year later, they announced we could do 50. Right? And I'm like, you're not seeing how quickly this is changing, right? One to 50 in 12 months is, that's a huge shift, and if you consider what the next one is going to be, it changes the whole field. It could change the entire field of ophthalmology, especially when you combine it with something like telemedicine. So we could talk for hours about this. I look forward to continuing this conversation. I think that we would, you know, there's a lot of common ground, although you're I'm in health care and you're almost everywhere else.Azeem Azhar: I mean, I have to say that the opportunity in in health care is so global as well because, you know, if you think about how long and how much it costs to train a doctor and you think about the kind of margin that live that sits on current medical devices and how fragile, they might be in certain operating environments and the thought that you could start to do more and more of this with a $40 sensor inside a $250 smartwatch is a really, really appealing and exciting, exciting one. Yeah.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Well, thank you so much for the time and look forward to staying in touch and I wish you great success with the book and everything else.Azeem Azhar: Thank you so much, Harry. Appreciate it.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and the MoneyBall Medicine show at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show. You can also find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.

MetFlex and Chill
#148 - How To Cultivate Strength In All Areas Of Your Life with John Welbourn and Chris McQuilkin

MetFlex and Chill

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 74:45


To watch this episode and other past episodes, please visit Rachel's YouTube channel. Don't forget to join Rachel's weekly newsletter, The Friday Flex here: http://www.metflexlife.com/newsletter  Listeners can find John Welbourn and Chris McQuilkin at their website http://powerathletehq.com and on Instagram @powerathletehq  John Welbourn is the Founder and CEO of Power Athlete. He is also the creator of the online training phenomenon, Johnnie WOD. He is a 9 year veteran of the NFL. John was drafted with the 97th pick in the 1999 NFL Draft and went on to be a starter for the Philadelphia Eagles from 1999-2003, appearing in 3 NFC Championship games, and a starter for the Kansas City Chiefs from 2004-2007. In 2008, he played with the New England Patriots until an injury ended his season early with him retiring in 2009. Over the course of his career, John has started over 100 games and has 10 playoff appearances. He was a four-year letterman while playing football at the University of California at Berkeley. He graduated with a bachelor's degree in Rhetoric in 1998. John has worked with the MLB, NFL, NHL, Olympic athletes, and US Military. He travels the world lecturing on performance and nutrition for Power Athlete. You can catch up with John weekly on his podcast, Power Athlete Radio, as well as his personal blog on training, food, and life, TalkToMeJohnnie.com. Coach McQuilkin is the Director of Training and Education for Power Athlete, a worldwide strength and conditioning organization focused on empowering performance. Chris has led over 100 clinics across 16 countries spanning 6 continents introducing the Power Athlete Methodology to athletes, sports medicine professionals, performance and sports coaches. He has coached and implemented programs for tactical athletes including Naval Special Warfare and US Army XVIII Airborne Corps. Coached collegiately with Georgetown University, Marymount University, as well as interned with the University of Texas at Austin's football program. Apprenticed under John Welbourn and Raphael Ruiz studying the proper implementation of science-based, performance-driven training systems. Chris is currently based outside Austin, Texas creating online education content, coaching high school lacrosse, and traveling to lead in-person clinics covering athleticism development, barbell training, and speed development. In this episode, we chat all about the power of raising strong and confident children in modern society, the benefits of investing in an individualized training plan, mindset tools and once you control your thoughts you can unlock endless potential, and more! “The one thing we've found to hold true is that if everybody could start with the singular mindset of just getting stronger, everything else seems to come into focus.” John Welbourn Top Takeaways: How to instill healthy habits in children to cultivate strength overtime Reasons sleep and nutrition should be taken as seriously as training  Importance of knowing your training age to align with your goals   Show Notes: [0:00] Intro to episode trailer  [0:30] Rachel gives a brief bio of today's guests John Welbourn and Chris McQuilkin   [2:00] Welcome back to MetFlex and Chill! Rachel welcomes guests John Welbourn and Chris McQuilkin   [2:30] John introduces himself and shares with the listeners his experience with CrossFit Football, along with how he built his business, Power Athlete  [5:00] Talktomejohnnie.com  [7:30] Ep: 543 An Intelligent Approach to Keto with Rachel Gregory [7:30] Chris introduces himself and shares with the listeners a brief background of how he got into strength and conditioning along with coaching [11:00] “Coaches often get locked into sets and reps and this program versus that program. Well, it still means nothing if you can't communicate, and really empower this person to make something more of what they believe they are at this moment.” Chris McQuilkin [12:30] Question: What does your process look like when establishing a training goal? [14:00] “The one thing that we found that if everybody could start with the singular mindset of just being stronger, everything else seems to come into focus.” John Welbourn [20:00] “All the cardio in the world is going to help you build an aerobic base. But at the end of the day, if you want to change your body composition, the best way to do this is to lift weights.” John Welbourn [23:00] “Strength is cultivated over a lifetime.” John Welbourn [27:30] Question: What is your experience when it comes to convincing female clients that they need to lift weights in order to change their body composition? [44:30] Question: How do you help clients find the balance between overtraining and not training enough? [57:00] Muscle Science For Women [1:02:30] Question: Is there anything in the past year that you have changed your mind about? And Why? [1:13:00] Check more out from John Welbourn and Chris McQuilkin at their website http://powerathletehq.com, podcast Power Athlete Radio, Instagram @powerathletehq, and YouTube [1:13:30] Thanks for listening to another episode! If you're loving MetFlex and Chill and want to help grow the show, please head over to Itunes and leave a rating and review! How to Leave an Apple Podcast Review: First, Open the podcast app on your iPhone, Mac, or iPad. Then, hit the “Search” tab at the bottom right-hand corner of the page and search for MetFlex and Chill. Select the podcast, scroll down to find the subheading “Ratings & Reviews”. and select “Write a Review.” Next, select the number of stars you'd like to leave. Please choose 5 stars! Using the text box which says “Title,” write a title for your review. Then in the text box, write the review itself. The review can be up to 300 words long, but doesn't need to be much more than: “Love the show! Thanks!” or “Rachel provides wonderful content from a multitude of expert guests!” Once you're done select “Send” in the upper right-hand corner. --- Rachel Gregory is a Board-Certified Nutritionist, Strength and Conditioning Specialist, Podcaster, and founder of MetFlex Life. She is also the author of the international best-selling book, "21-Day Ketogenic Diet Weight Loss Challenge." Rachel received her Master's Degree in Nutrition & Exercise Physiology from James Madison University and Bachelor's Degree in Sports Medicine from the University of Miami. Rachel completed the first-ever human clinical trial looking at the effects of the Ketogenic Diet in non-elite CrossFit athletes, which is published in the International Journal of Sports and Exercise Medicine. Currently, in her day-to-day coaching business, Rachel guides her clients to becoming the best, most confident version of themselves. She has a passion for educating those dedicated to optimizing their physical and mental well-being while improving long-term health and fitness goals. Her most popular course, Keto for Women, has helped women all across the world learn how to ditch the restrictive, all-or-nothing mindset associated with keto and instead thrive through the power of metabolic flexibility. You can connect and learn more about Rachel's work by visiting her website www.metflexlife.com  Social Links: Youtube: @rachelgregory Instagram: @rachelgregory.cns TikTok: @metflexlife Facebook: @metflexlife  Primary Programs: Keto For Women Muscle Science For Women

Fast To Heal Stories
Episode 61- A Different Approach to Kill Sugar Cravings

Fast To Heal Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 18:36


Sugar cravings are very real! How do you get back on track following a period of higher carb eating, longer eating windows, or falling off track? In this episode I discuss many strategies to killing sugar cravings and getting back on track: Bringing insulin levels down Decreasing carbs over time Extending fasting times Consider a fat fast, which will help decrease insulin, promote fat burning, and help you get back on track! LINKS: My website: https://www.fasttoheal.info/ My 2 FREE Starting Guides: https://www.subscribepage.com/fasttoheal Enroll in Finding Nutritional PEACE, discounted through Jan 16! Learn more about my mini course, Fat Burning Unlocked, to start transitioning from a sugar burner to a fat burner: https://www.fasttoheal.info/fatburningunlocked I would LOVE for you to leave a review on Apple Podcasts! This helps more people like you find the podcast, and start their healing journey. How to leave a review on Apple Podcasts Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. Navigate to the Fast To Heal Stories podcast. Scroll down to find the subhead titled “Ratings & Reviews.” Under one of the highlighted reviews, select “Write a Review.” 

Private Practice Elevation with Daniel Fava
Episode 99: How to Be Deeply Rested Wildly Successful with Maegan Megginson

Private Practice Elevation with Daniel Fava

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 35:53


In this episode of The Private Practice Elevation podcast, you're going to learn what it means to be deeply rested and wildly successful. I know we have many introverts out there listening to this podcast, and this one is especially for you. As an introverted person myself, I was super excited to have this conversation with Maegen Megginson. So much of the world's systems tell us that in order to be successful, we must hustle, grind it out, and sacrifice our rest and peace. But what if there was a way to be wildly successful in your private practice and business without giving up the things that bring you joy and leave you filled with energy, rather than depleted? Maegan Megginson is a Sex Therapist turned Business Coach on a mission to help successful entrepreneurs fall madly in love with their businesses.  After nearly burning out, Maegan finally figured out how to leverage her introverted and highly sensitive strengths to create two businesses she loves. Listen in as two introverts share their past and current struggles and successes with building businesses that fit their personality. In This Episode, You'll Learn: What it means to be “deeply rested and wildly successful” and how your definition of these terms can help guide you toward the life you want to live How to overcome the “arbitrary thirst for ‘more'” so you can can discover where it is you actually want to go and what you want to achieve How setting personal goals for rest can impact your business How to set goals that are in line with your introverted personality so that you can grow your business and get the rest you need How to retrain your brain to focus on rest How to increase your self-compassion so you can stay focused on your work instead of comparing yourself to your colleagues The challenge with social media and how it can detract from the goals you have from your business - plus how to deal with it Free Download: Grow Your Business Without Burning Out Download Maegan's free guide to learn from her mistakes so you can expand your services with ease, energy, and really big profits. Click Here Subscribe & Review in Apple Podcasts If you're not yet subscribed to the podcast I want to encourage you to do that today. This is the best way to make sure you don't miss an episode! Click here to subscribe on iTunes. And if you're feeling extra generous, I'd love to hear what you think about the podcast. Reviews help others find the podcast plus I'd really love to hear what you think! Click here to leave a review. Just click on “Ratings & Reviews” then “Write a review.” Let me know what you like best about the podcast. Thank you! Links mentioned in this episode: Maegan Megginson's Website Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World (affiliate link) Self-Compassion: The Proven Power of Being Kind to Yourself by Kristin Neff (affiliate link)   About Maegan Megginson Maegan Megginson is a Sex Therapist turned Business Coach on a mission to help successful entrepreneurs fall madly in love with their businesses. After years of struggling with overwhelm and burnout, Maegan finally figured out how to leverage her introverted and highly sensitive strengths to create two businesses she loves. She believes the key to happiness is to design your business to serve you first and your clients second – only then will you discover how to become deeply rested and wildly successful.

MetFlex and Chill
#147 - Menopause and Weight Loss with Dr. Morgan Nolte

MetFlex and Chill

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 50:16


To watch this episode and other past episodes, please visit Rachel's YouTube channel. Listeners can find Dr. Morgan Nolte at her website http://www.weightlossforhealth.com, on YouTube, on Facebook @drmoregannolte, and on Instagram @drmorgannolte  Dr. Morgan Nolte is a passionate board-certified clinical specialist in geriatric physical therapy. She's the founder of Weight Loss for Health, an online course, community, and coaching program that helps women learn the science behind insulin resistance, weight loss, and habit change. Her mission is to help adults lose weight, keep it off, and prevent the conditions she treats in geriatric physical therapy by living a low insulin lifestyle.  In this episode, we chat all about misconceptions around weight gain and menopause, how gut health changes as a woman goes through menopause, signs, and symptoms of insulin resistance, how macros affect insulin levels, and more! “When we shift the conversation from “how many points” or “how many calories does this have?” And we look at the science behind “how will this affect my insulin,” that's when you're going to start really seeing those long term results.” Dr. Morgan Nolte Top Takeaways: Reasons why menopause can change the way you gain or lose weight Three simple tips to reduce the blood sugar response of eating carbs How macronutrients affect insulin spikes and satiety levels  Dr. Morgan's hacks for setting up your environment for sustainable good health Show Notes: [0:00] Introduction to the episode trailer [0:30] Rachel gives a brief bio of guest Dr. Morgan Nolte [1:30] Welcome back to MetFlex and Chill! Rachel welcomes guest, Dr. Morgan Nolte, @drmorgannolte  [2:30] Dr. Morgan gives a brief background on how she got into the nutrition and geriatric physical therapy space  [9:30] Question: Can we talk about some of the misconceptions that people associate with menopause? [16:00] The XX Brain [16:30] Signs and symptoms of insulin resistance [20:00] Why We Get Sick [23:30] “When we shift the conversation from “how many points” or “how many calories does this have?” And we look at the science behind “how will this affect my insulin”, which is the hormone responsible for the level of body weight, and body fat, that's when you're going to start really seeing those long term results.” Dr. Morgan Nolte  [25:00] Macros and their effects on insulin [28:30] Question: Can you explain the difference between fructose and other sugars such as the kind in things like coca-cola? [31:00] Question: Can you explain to the listeners why insulin isn't the devil and instead why it's the consistent insulin spike that is the negative factor? [34:30] Question: Can you give your perspective on calories and if they are important to manage for fat loss? [48:00] Listeners can find Dr. Morgan Nolte at her website http://www.weightlossforhealth.com, on YouTube, on Facebook @drmoregannolte, and on Instagram @drmorgannolte  [49:30] Thanks for listening to another episode! If you're loving MetFlex and Chill and want to help grow the show, please head over to Itunes and leave a rating and review! How to Leave an Apple Podcast Review: First, Open the podcast app on your iPhone, Mac, or iPad. Then, hit the “Search” tab at the bottom right-hand corner of the page and search for MetFlex and Chill. Select the podcast, scroll down to find the subheading “Ratings & Reviews”. and select “Write a Review.” Next, select the number of stars you'd like to leave. Please choose 5 stars! Using the text box which says “Title,” write a title for your review. Then in the text box, write the review itself. The review can be up to 300 words long, but doesn't need to be much more than: “Love the show! Thanks!” or “Rachel provides wonderful content from a multitude of expert guests!” Once you're done select “Send” in the upper right-hand corner. --- Join the FREE MetFLex Life Course: www.metflexandchill.com  Rachel Gregory is a Board-Certified Nutritionist, Strength and Conditioning Specialist, Podcaster, and founder of MetFlex Life. She is also the author of the international best-selling book, "21-Day Ketogenic Diet Weight Loss Challenge." Rachel received her Master's Degree in Nutrition & Exercise Physiology from James Madison University and Bachelor's Degree in Sports Medicine from the University of Miami. Rachel completed the first-ever human clinical trial looking at the effects of the Ketogenic Diet in non-elite CrossFit athletes, which is published in the International Journal of Sports and Exercise Medicine. Currently, in her day-to-day coaching business, Rachel guides her clients to becoming the best, most confident version of themselves. She has a passion for educating those dedicated to optimizing their physical and mental well-being while improving long-term health and fitness goals. Her most popular course, Keto for Women, has helped women all across the world learn how to ditch the restrictive, all-or-nothing mindset associated with keto and instead thrive through the power of metabolic flexibility. You can connect and learn more about Rachel's work by visiting her website www.metflexlife.com  Social Links: Youtube: @rachelgregory Instagram: @rachelgregory.cns TikTok: @metflexlife Facebook: @metflexlife  Primary Programs: Keto For Women Muscle Science For Women

Fast To Heal Stories
Episode 60- Best-Selling Author Ben Azadi Transforms His Life and Teaches Others The Same With Keto Flexing!

Fast To Heal Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 62:15


In 2008, Ben Azadi, FDN-P, went through a personal health transformation, shredding 80 pounds of fat. Ever since, he has been on a mission to help 1 billion people live a healthier lifestyle.  He is known as ‘The Health Detective' because he investigates dysfunction, and he educates, not medicates, to bring the body back to normal function.  Ben is the founder of Keto Kamp; a global brand bringing awareness to ancient healing strategies such as the keto diet and fasting.  Ben is the host of a top 20 podcast, The Keto Kamp Podcast; and the fast growing Keto Kamp YouTube channel. In this episode we discuss: Ben's best selling book, Keto Flex How the body prioritizes energy and fuel burning The 4 pillars of a Keto Flex lifestyle Tips for getting started with an intermittent fasting and lower carb lifestyle LINKS: Ben's Website: www.benazadi.com   Instagram: @thebenazadi   Facebook: www.facebook.com/thebenazadi  YouTube: www.youtube.com/ketokamp My website: https://www.fasttoheal.info/ My 2 FREE Starting Guides: https://www.subscribepage.com/fasttoheal Enroll in Finding Nutritional PEACE, discounted through Jan 16! Learn more about my mini course, Fat Burning Unlocked, to start transitioning from a sugar burner to a fat burner: https://www.fasttoheal.info/fatburningunlocked I would LOVE for you to leave a review on Apple Podcasts! This helps more people like you find the podcast, and start their healing journey. How to leave a review on Apple Podcasts Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. Navigate to the Fast To Heal Stories podcast. Scroll down to find the subhead titled “Ratings & Reviews.” Under one of the highlighted reviews, select “Write a Review.” 

MoneyBall Medicine
At the Cutting Edge of Computational Precision Medicine, with Rafael Rosengarten

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 43:38


Genialis, led by CEO Rafael Rosengarten, is one of the companies working toward a future where there are no more one-size-fits-all drugs—where, instead, every patient gets matched with the best drug for them based on their disease subtype, as measured by gene-sequence and gene-expression data. Analyzing that data—what Rosengarten calls "computational precision medicine"—is already helping drug developers identify the patients who are most likely to respond to experimental medicines. Not long  from now, the same technology could help doctors diagnose patients in the clinic, and/or feed back into drug discovery by providing more biological targets for biopharma companies to hit."Our commitment to biomarker-driven drug development is very principled," Rosengarten tells Harry. "There are some amazing drugs out there that, when they work, work miracles. But they don't work that often. Some work in maybe 15 percent of the patients or 20 percent. If you could tell which of those patients are going to respond, then at least the ones who aren't can seek other options, and we would know that we've got to develop [new] drugs for the others." Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.For most people, the genomics revolution still feels pretty distant, like something that's happening off in the ivory towers of big pharma companies or research universities.But say, heaven forbid, you get diagnosed with cancer next week. All of a sudden you're going to want to get very familiar with your own genome. Because thanks to the Human Genome Project and all the new tools for sequencing and analyzing genes, we know today that there are many different forms of cancer. And each one may respond to a different type of medicine. So before you and your doctor can decide which medicines will work best for you, you really need to know which genes and mutations you carry and how they're expressed in your cells.Drug companies need similar data when they're testing new drugs. Because if they happen to test a drug on a population of people who happen to have the wrong genes to respond to that drug, they could wind up throwing away a medicine that would work perfectly well on people who have the right genes.The problem is that all of this gene sequencing and expression testing generates incredible amounts of data. And doctors and hospitals and even big pharma companies aren't always set up to understand or analyze that data.My guest this week is the CEO of a company that's helping with that problem. His name is Rafael Rosengarten. And his company Genialis has built a software platform that organizes and analyzes data from high-throughput gene sequencing and RNA expression assays. We'll talk more about what all those terms mean. But what you need to know is that Genialis is one of the companies on the cutting edge of translating genetic data into actionable predictions. Those predictions are already helping biotech and pharma companies get drugs to market faster. And in the near future they could help doctors funnel patients toward the right treatments. I wrote a whole chapter on this stuff for my new book, The Future You. So it was really fun to talk it through all of it with Rafael. Here's our conversation.Harry Glorikian: Rafael, welcome to the show.Rafael Rosengarten: Thanks for having me, Harry.Harry Glorikian: For those listeners that don't have backgrounds in, say, computational biology or drug development, could you define a few terms that are probably going to come up later in our discussion? I mean, first, you know, maybe define next-generation sequencing or this term we call NGS. What is next-generation about?Rafael Rosengarten: Sure, I'd be happy to do that, let me start by just kind of saying what Genialis is with some jargon in the words, and then I'll define the jargon for you. Okay. So Genialis is computational precision medicine. So what that means is we're really interested in matching patients to therapies, right? And we use data about the molecular biology of patients' diseases to do that. And our favorite kind of data to work with come from next generation sequencing. So next generation sequencing, often abbreviated as NGS, although we've been doing that for 15 years now, we probably just need to call it this-generation sequencing, is a technology where you can get the genetic information of the entire, say, genome or the transcriptome, that's the expression [for] which genes are expressed, and you get literally every base pair off of a machine that reads the DNA or RNA from cells in our body. And with that information, you do some fancy computation that, frankly, a lot of that's now fairly commoditized. And it kind of maps all of the individual bits of data into what we think we know about the human genome. And so you can say, OK, we've got this much of this gene and that much of this gene or you can say, you know, Gene A has certain mutations and Gene B has other mutations. And so it allows you to ask whether whether they're mutations or changes in the amount of certain molecules and so forth. But you get to do it for all the genes and not only all the genes you can do it for, [but] for all the space in between the genes in the genome.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I you know, it's funny because just the other day there was the announcement that we quote "actually finished" the entire genome, which I thought was an interesting announcement. One more definition. So this term RNAseq, right? So, you know, drawing the analogy of DNA and saying, OK, RNA is the next level. And why has that become so important now in drug discovery?Rafael Rosengarten: That's a great question, so again, for your listeners who may not live and breathe this stuff, there's a concept in in biology called the central dogma, and it kind of still holds. And the notion is that there are these different levels of organizations or different layers of the onion and peeling back the information that our cells use to conduct business. And the the core of this is DNA, and that's our genetic information that's encoded in our nucleus and it's passed down from parents to children. It's the heritable information, and I apologize to all my friends who do live and breathe this, who are going to call shenanigans on my definition of being overly simplistic. The next level is, as you described, is the RNA. And so RNA is actually a lot of things. But messenger RNAs are the transcription of the genes. So the DNA genes that hold our genetic information are converted through a molecular process into another kind of molecule. And that kind of molecule is RNA. It's chemically similar to DNA, but different, and that RNA tend to be in smaller pieces than the whole chromosomes, and they represent smaller pieces of genetic information, and they can vary widely from, say, one gene to the next in terms of how much RNA is made for that given gene.Rafael Rosengarten: And then just to fill out the picture a bit more, in principle, then, those RNA molecules get turned into protein, or they are the specific instructions to create proteins, and proteins then go do the work of the cell. What I just told you is mostly wrong, but it's sort of the framework that we think about. So the reason why RNA, the middle layer, is so interesting in drug discovery, and I'm going to add to that, in diagnostics world, is because it's a bit more, let's call it dynamic than the DNA level. So mutations sometimes are heritable and sometimes they arise de novo. But once they've arisen, they're kind of there and they go through from cell to cell, once the cells divide. And that's, you know, that's important and interesting and meaningful information, you can learn a lot about what genes are potentially druggable from that. But it doesn't tell you a whole lot about the state of tissue or the state of disease in this moment, right? It's kind of background information in a way. And so RNA is a bit more dynamic.Rafael Rosengarten: It changes. It can change on, you know, really rapid time scales, but certainly therapeutically relevant time scales. And so in some ways, it's a little bit closer to sort of what's happening now. Harry Glorikian: Right.Rafael Rosengarten: It's also just a different, it's a different class of information because there are these abundances, different genes at different levels. Those relative abundances have biological importance and sometimes therapeutic importance. A lot of cancers, for example, are bad for you. They are essentially dysregulation of gene expression, so they can arise from mutations or they can arise from events at the DNA level. But it's understanding how much of some species of gene is being expressed in the RNA that can be informative or potentially therapeutically actionable. And I'm going to shout out to my proteomics friends, the guys who study proteins. That may be even more therapeutically relevant in a sense, because most of our drugs actually target proteins. And that's quite the key of it. Except for gene therapy, which is a big deal, especially in the CRISPR era, we're not often targeting DNA with our drugs, right? Mostly, we're targeting proteins and occasionally we're targeting RNAs and less frequently we're targeting DNA. Again, all CRISPR bets aside, right?Harry Glorikian: Yeah. No, we did an episode with talking about CRISPR and, you know, amazing advancements happening there. But now, being from Applied Biosystems, I remember an entire room full of sequencers where we, I think they were like 600 or 800 we had running 24 hours a day at one point. Now I can do that on a desktop, right? But. There's a lot of data that comes off that. T  hat's a challenge, I think, for people in drug development to manage that much data. You started at Baylor with a lot of your research. How did how did you personally encounter these challenges in your research?Rafael Rosengarten: I mean, it was very much this challenge that inspired us to start Genialis. So the conception story of Genialis is my co-founders and I, we really wanted to be able to do advanced cutting edge data science like machine learning, AI type stuff, which I'm sure we'll talk about at some point, in order to really bring kind of the next level of analytics to bear on biomedical problems. And what we realized is that's all well and good, but you can't do any of that stuff unless you get the data in a place where you can work on it. And I remember going to talk to one of the top researchers at all ofe Baylor College of Medicine. This person is top of her field, chair of department, et cetera, et cetera. And I asked her, How does your lab deal with your data retention and your data management, your data analysis? And she said, Glad you asked, this is such a big problem. We just had one of our postdocs leave, and he took his little thumb drives with him, and all of the data from all of his stuff was on those thumb drives. And now we can't reanalyze. I was like, You're kidding me! She said “We had to go and redownload download some of it that he had published and put online.” So, so even top researchers didn't have a clue how to do this. And this wasn't that long ago. I would say that drug companies by now are mostly more savvy and certainly the commercial sector for data management tools is thriving, right? There are some really good commercial products.Rafael Rosengarten: Genialis has one. There's some others of note. And Big Pharma has invested a lot, obviously, in building in health solutions. But this creates another kind of complication, which is you get all these different solutions and they don't all talk to each other. Even having data on different clouds. Some people may use Amazon and others Google and others still, Microsoft. And those are the three majors. You know, those create silos in a way. So, so you know, the cloud has been super helpful. The advent of software purposely built for biological data management has been helpful. But, you know, there's still a lot of work to do. And I'm going to argue that the kind of next, let's not call it a frontier, but the next big challenge and the one that we encounter a lot, it's not even around the primary data. We're good now. We're good at sucking that off the machines and putting it in the cloud and organizing it and getting it processed really efficiently using distributed computation. Now the challenge is getting what we call the metadata, the annotations of where those data come from. Is it coming from patients and if so, what's the patient information associated with it? Is it an experiment? Getting those metadata consistently curated and attached and linked to the primary data is a big and very important challenge, and it's one that I think will be solved in a similar way through these software solutions. But it takes a lot of will and a lot of manual effort at this point.Harry Glorikian: Just to summarize, the software that you have is helping biologists and clinicians work with data without necessarily having to become a bioinformatician, if I had to frame it that way, is that is that a decent representation?Rafael Rosengarten: That is that's one of the softwares we have. So you're referencing Genialis Expressions, which was kind of our initial flagstone software. I'm excited, though, in November, at Biodata Basel, we launched our new software, our newest product, which is called Responder ID. And this is where our dreams of really applying machine learning and AI to these data have finally come to fruition. Responder ID is a software or really, it's a suite of technologies that we use on those clinical data and on those experimental data to actually extract knowledge and very specifically to figure out which patients are most likely to respond to certain therapies. And so the first piece of software is really the kind of about the data management. It's about getting data organized, getting it processed, all the best practices and efficiencies around that. And that was sort of, you know, I don't want to call it last year's problem because it's still a problem, but it was the first thing we did. It's where we started. And it's got some beautiful visualizations and it does let bench scientists like myself work with their own data. But the new stuff is where we're really bringing the application to bear on human health and on value propositions that I think really resonate with pharma, diagnostics, and other biotech and frankly, clinicians and and ultimately patients.Harry Glorikian: So, well, that's great, I mean, that transition to the new software, I must have missed that in when I was doing my research. I hadn't seen that yet, but what are some of the stories or anecdotes by customers that you can share? What have they been able to say, accomplish with it, so that we can put it into context for the listener?Rafael Rosengarten: Yeah. So you know, most of our customers are biotech drug companies and we help them solve a number of problems. But the key challenge is that drug development is just an incredibly risky and expensive and time consuming proposition. Most of our work's in the oncology space, not all of it, but it's a good place to make this example. The success rate of a drug that enters a Phase I clinical trial in the cancer space that actually makes it to market is something like three or four percent. It's dismal, and it's among the lowest of any therapeutic area. And there are any number of reasons for that. But the simplest, simplistic one is that biology is complicated and patients are diverse, right? Even within a single disease like, let's just say, breast cancer, there are at least four kinds of breast cancer. There are probably 40 kinds, and there are actually probably more than that. Each individual's disease is going to have its own unique flavors. And so what we allow a company to do, let's say a company that's developing a drug against, for example, breast cancer, is to really try to understand how many molecular types are we talking about, which ones are going to respond to our drug? And can we find those patients ahead of time? And what that lets them do is think about alternative and sort of novel and innovative strategies for designing clinical trials. It allows them, if they so desire, to think about partnering out on diagnostic development with third parties to actually create a diagnostic to go with their drug. That's not, obviously, necessary. You can you can build assays that you run in-house, but that's an alternative.Rafael Rosengarten: And to make it very concrete, we have one partner we work with a lot. A company called OncXerna Therapeutics. And with them, we've helped develop their first biomarker as part of their biomarker platform to the point not only of clinical trial assay, but also it's been licensed by Qiagen to be turned into a companion diagnostic for their lead drug and a research-use-only assay for scientists writ large around the world. And so, you know, this is a great success story. In about the course of two years, we went from taking a published academic signature, something in the literature—and by the way, there are about a million of these public academic signatures and there are only 46 approved companion diagnostics, so there's a big gulf between them—we went from an academic signature—and this was hand in glove work with them, so I don't want to take all the credit, but we certainly did a lot of the heavy lifting—and we built a category-defining first-of-its-class machine learning algorithm that learned a complex RNA-sequencing-based signature that predicts with uncanny ability patients that are going to respond to a wide array of drugs in a wide array of diseases. So it's pan-cancer, multi-modality, right? This is just it's an astonishing clinical advance, in my opinion, and it's something I'm clearly very proud of and willing to self-promote. But I do think it's an important advance, and I think it shows the power of both the Genialis philosophy around modeling biology and pairing patient biology with potential therapeutics, but also just what you can do if you're really thoughtful about getting the data in the right place, treating the data properly, and then using machine learning and some of these advanced algorithms to decipher.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I think we're starting to get to that cusp of producing the data is getting faster, more cost effective. I mean, if Illumina actually gets down to, I think they, at the last JPMorgan, they said, we're trying to get it down to $60 for whole-genome. But at some point you're getting to numbers that are, I don't want to say a rounding error, but damn near close to that. And so the burden is going to fall on, how do I interpret all this data and what do I do next, right? What's actionable? I mean, I think the treating doctors are like, this is all great data, but tell me what to do, right? And it sounds like your new suite of software might be more applicable for a clinician or to to be communicated to a clinician, than just on the research side. So is is Genialis now moving beyond its original set of customers and moving more towards the clinical space?Rafael Rosengarten: I certainly think that's, on the horizon, that's something that we're contemplating. You know, the U.S. health system, well, systems, plural, is a complicated beast, right? And so there are certainly big companies that have products that are there for drug companies and products that are there for patients and products that are there for providers and so forth. And that makes sense. I think once you've got a wide enough kind of horizontal, you can stack all these verticals on top of each other. You know, hopefully we get big enough to do that ourselves. But you know, for the time being, we found this really, you know, this really great motion and success story working around certain therapeutic modalities for certain therapeutic opportunities. I actually think what may be the bigger prize is to take what we learn about disease biology from some of these diagnostic models and turn them on their head and say, OK, we've shown this model really captures patient biology and it works. And we know that because look, there are patients and they respond to the drug that we predicted they would. We've definitely cracked something there. Now let's take what we've learned about that patient biology and interrogate this model for new therapeutic opportunities. What about all the patients who don't respond to this drug? What will they respond to? The model still has them pegged as nonresponders. The model understands their biology. We just need to interrogate it for the next generation of therapies. And so I think this is where my vision of precision medicine maybe deviates. Diagnostics is an industry. Drug discovery are an industry. Those are separate companies. Those are separate industries. But to me, precision medicine shouldn't be this kind of linear thing where you start with the target, you end up with a drug and a diagnostic, and that's where it ends. It should be a circle. It should wrap around. And what we learn from patients should feed right into the next round of drug discovery, right? And so I'm interested in playing at that sort of fusion point where the where the ends of the string meet and form a circle. And so we're really interested in partnering and learning more about, for example, discovering new drugs to match the targets, right? And so I kind of see that as where a lot of Genialis's future focus is going to go. I'm not ruling out patient reporting software. I'm not ruling out more clinical products. That would be logical, but my real interest is thinking about helping the patients who just don't have therapeutic options today.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer. It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in Kindle format. Just go to Amazon and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude] Harry Glorikian: When I think about this and where we're going with this and the I hate saying it, butthe old dogmatic way of looking at it is very compartmentalized as we look at it in discrete pieces. And these data analytics platforms allow us to look at multifactorial, or almost turn the data into a living organism where we can look at it in multiple ways, and I think it's hard for people to get there mentally. I mean, sometimes, sometimes when I'm looking at something, I realize that my limitation is the information that I have about a particular area and that I need to learn something new to put another piece of the puzzle together. But I think this, let me do this and then let me do this and then let me do this. That's breaking down because of the data analytic capabilities that we're bringing to bear. Applying AI, machine learning, or in reality, sometimes just hard math, to solve certain problems, is opening up a wider aperture of how we would manage a patient and then treat them appropriately. And I think. Hell, I don't know, Rafael,  I'm a little worried, I don't think the system is necessarily designed to absorb that next-gen opportunity, right? Because somebody will be like, OK, where do I get the information? Does that go in the EMR? I mean, wait, where is there a code that I can bill for it? I mean, there's these arcane roadblocks that are in the way that have nothing to do with, "I've got this model, and I'm telling you this will work on this patient," right?Rafael Rosengarten: Yeah, I don't know that I'm smart enough to know the solution to that. I will say that there are some really exciting newish young venture-backed upstarts that are interested in disrupting hospital systems, point of care, EHRs. All of that, is fair game, right? It is, as you described, it's just ripe for disruption because it's so, you know, it's so cobbled together, right? You know, I'm thinking about when my wife and I moved from Houston, Texas, to the Bay Area and then we got pregnant with our second child. We wanted to have all of our medical records from pregnancy number one sent from Texas Medical Center, which is one of the shining jewels of health care institutions, to John Muir Health System in the Bay Area, which, listen, they were changing out the wood panels from the 1970s during all of our doctors' visits. And literally, we asked the doctor if he could just print, print something for us. He said, No, I can't do that, but I could write it down on a sheet of paper for you. Like, you know, it's. But that's that's, you know, I agree with you. There are going to have to be changes top down, bottom up, and there's going to have to be hopefully support for this in the regulatory bodies, you know, at the governmental level. Rafael Rosengarten: Where I live and breathe, those is really kind of in a life sciences sector of the health care system. So again, we're interested in in drug development, we're interested in diagnostics, we're interested in drug discovery. And those themselves are kind of big things. So where I think about changes and regulatory and systemic stuff is more along, like, what is the FDA doing to to adopt or adapt to these kind of new technologies? What about standards like how are we thinking about data standards, model standards? Genialis is a founding member of and I'm on the board of directors of the Alliance for AI and Health Care. And this is a really exciting and rather amazing industry organization that was stood up at JP Morgan in 2019. And you know, we've got gosh, I don't know what the headcount, the member number now is, but over 50 member organizations, including the likes of Google and and Roche and bigs like that. Some of the more household names in the smaller biotech community like Recursion Pharma, In Silico Medicine, Valo Health, et cetera. And then and then companies like Genialis as well. Big academic centers. So we have a real great brain trust and we're interested in tackling, I'm going to call them, these hard, boring but incredibly important systemic questions around regulatory and standards and so forth. Health insurance, Medicare, all that stuff is a big fish, and we haven't, you know, we haven't set our hooks in it yet, but you know how hospitals bill and those kinds of codes, we'll have to have to revisit that at some point, for sure.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I know that you're a member there and sort of interesting to hear why you got involved in how you see it working. So if you think about the standardization side of this, you know, what is what is the organization sort of advocating for? Because I totally agree with you, but at some point, I think you almost need to reach back towards, how is somebody doing an experiment to make sure that then the data comes out the other side in a standard way, right? Because I used to joke, which sample prep product are you working with? And I could tell you sort of what direction something is going to lean. And that that in and of itself is a problem. So how is AAIHC thinking about some of these problems, I don't know if there's a proposal. What have you guys proposed so far?Rafael Rosengarten: That's a great question. So we have workstreams around things like the FDA, working with the FDA to propose guidance for a good machine learning, practice guidance for software as a medical device, AI as part of software, as a medical device. So a lot of this, it's less concerned with can we rein in and constrain the experimental part? Because again, that's that's a huge world. And maybe it's not really where the constraints need to be. But rather can we come up with a common set of guidelines for how you evaluate the quality of a data set, right? Recognizing the data are going to come in a lot of shapes and sizes and flavors, and even two different RNA sequencing data sets that are produced on different machines or with different kits may have slightly different flavors or tints to them. That's fine so long as you have some guidelines for characterizing those differences, for appreciating those differences and then for knowing what to do with the data, given those potential differences. A lot of the concern around AI in a regulated setting is that, the whole promise of a machine learning approach is that it gets smarter the more data it sees, right? So these should be, these algorithms should evolve in a way they should be living and breathing. But if you have a regulated product that's to work on patients, it's got to work the same every time or, you know, can't get worse.Rafael Rosengarten: So this is, there's a tension here, but it's not unsolvable. It's not insurmountable. For example, you know, a regulated AI doesn't have to evolve in real time. It can be updated over time, right? Right. And it can be it can be locked and then operate, and then you can improve it and update it and redeploy and relock. So building the plans, what are the change plans? How do you demonstrate that the retraining or the improvements are actually improvements? These are the kinds of things that at least we can sink our teeth into today. And then we're also interested in the standards problem. I think the organization is not necessarily going to be dogmatic about recommending exactly what the standards are today, but what we're trying to catalyze those discussions, right? And we're trying to create frameworks where those discussions can actually lead to some actionable tools. And there are examples of organizations that have done this in other fields. So we do have some blueprints. But it's a lot of work. And frankly, that's the privilege of being in the organization. It gives you the opportunity to roll up your sleeves and build the industry of the future, to build the industry you want to operate in.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. And this has got to be in lockstep with the regulatory authorities and everything to make sure that everything is, everybody's on the same page so that when you come up with a golden solution, they're ready to accept it. Because we can't have, you download the latest software for your phone and then it breaks, right? That's not an acceptable update that you can do, right, and somebody has to release a patch to get it to fix. You know, that's that doesn't necessarily... I'm sure it happens in our world, but it's. It's really not what you'd like to see happen.Rafael Rosengarten: Yeah, yeah. You know, I can tell you from having had to invest in a lot of the kind of procedures around clinical reporting in software and so forth, and, working with some really top tier point of care software providers, it's not foolproof. But boy, there are a lot of hoops to jump through, right? Like things do get tested the whole way. And I would just, I would argue, although, you know, let me not be overly full of hubris, that there are plenty of other failure points that are a lot more likely to fail than the AI software that's predicting a biomarker not working in a particular instance, right? Given the room for error in things like biopsy collection and human handling. There's a lot of stuff upstream of that where human error is more likely to play a part. That that may or may not be sweet solace, right. That might not help you sleep at night. But I think that the regulated environment, especially around regulating computational tools, can be rather bulletproof.Rafael Rosengarten: So is there anything else going on that at Genialis that that we would want to know about that and directionally or what's next, that you can [share]?Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, the exciting stuff is really twofold. It's, you know, just going deeper with our partners, right? So clinical development, as I mentioned, is is a long game. And you know, we like to start working before the drugs in the clinic, right? So these are meant to be long partnerships. And the other piece of this is we're doing a lot more internal R&D. A lot more internal R&D, a lot more work with our academic colleagues. And so we're really, really excited to just, you know, to innovate our way out of some of these hard problems.Harry Glorikian: Well, that's necessary in this field, right, you're always going to run into some, I like to call them speed bumps because I don't believe that they're like insurmountable problems, but they're speed bumps that you need to like innovate over or around.Rafael Rosengarten: Mm hmm. Yeah. So, you know, I want to give you something meaty like, you know what to look for from Genialis. So, sometime soon, my hope, knock on wood, is that we'll have first patients enrolled in clinical trials that are the biomarker I described to you earlier. This is the OncXerna trial. First patient enrolled, that's going to be super exciting. It's a Phase III trial and we're going to be stratifying patients with the biomarker. I mean, just the gratification of actually having our technology potentially impacting outcomes is huge. We've got a lot up our sleeves in terms of internal development improvements to Responder ID, but also, you know, some biomarker work we're kind of doing for ourselves, digging deeper into some pernicious problems in cancer that others haven't adequately addressed, in my opinion. And some some exciting partnerships, hopefully around, kind of…. we'll call them data partnerships. We talked a bit about just the scale of the data challenge, though, is it lives all over the place, right? And so there are different ways of getting your hands on it. And one of the ways a lot of companies have gone about is to become the testing companies, right? There are some giants out there that sequence literally millions of patients a year, and they've got big data warehouses, right? We haven't done that ourselves. And so we rely oncollaborations for a lot of our data. Not all of it, but we're building some of these collaborations, and I'm hoping we can talk more about that in future episodes or in other forums.Harry Glorikian: Just for a second, so people understand the magnitude. This Phase III trial, how many how many patients would you say are in it?Rafael Rosengarten: I need to be super careful not to misrepresent someone else's trial. It's going to be on the order of several hundred. You know, it's a properly powered Phase III and it's got two treatment arms. And so, you know, so it has to have quite a number of patients. And that's, you know, I would say that's a typical sized trial of for this stage in this kind of disease.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I just want people listening to sort of get an idea of like, these technologies are, you know, can affect lots of people and then if that drug comes through and then the technology is utilized afterwards to sort of stratify people or the biomarkers, then there's an even larger population of people that then gets affected by the work that you guys are doing.Rafael Rosengarten: Yeah, yeah. I think that's right. And you know, in a way, you know, our commitment to the sort of biomarker driven, you know, drug development, it's very principled. It's based on this idea that patients deserve to have the best treatment option, right? And there are some amazing drugs out there that when they work, work miracles. But they don't work that often. Right? And some of these drugs have, you know, first line approvals in dozens of diseases. But again, in some of those diseases, they work for half the patients, and that's great. And that's probably how it should be. But in some, they only work in maybe 15 percent of the patients or 20 or whatever the threshold is, because they were better than the alternative, right? But if you could tell which of those patients are going to respond, then at least the ones who aren't can seek other options. Or you know that we've got to develop drugs for the others. So it's very principled, although it's complicated because from an economic standpoint, if you have the ability to sell your drug to everybody, of course you're going to do that.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, look, I drank that Kool-Aid. I mean, Jesus, 20 years ago, right? I mean, you know, why wouldn't you want...I mean, if you were a patient, you'd want the best drug you can get, right? Because the data says that you respond to this particular drug. It's getting the system to that point. And I have seen, I have had stories where the data said one thing. They put the patient on it. They looked like they were responding. A new trial opened up. And somebody suggested that they go on the new trial, even though the therapy was working. And they switched and the outcome was not positive. Right. And so it's one of those things of like, I don't understand. The data clearly pointed in a particular direction and you deviated from that, and that doesn't make any sense to me. As a science person is as well as an investor, if the data is showing something, you better respond to the data or you're not going to be happy with the outcome. It's just seeing that implemented in a way that makes it very actionable for everybody, and they embrace that. That's where I sometimes, I find, you know, the biggest problems. But I totally agree. I mean, I have a whole chapter in my new book about that whole dynamic of why you want the data, how the data impacts you as a patient. What are the sort of questions you should ask, et cetera, because if you don't have that information, you're making suboptimal decisions.Rafael Rosengarten: Yeah. No, and that's absolutely right, I think the point you make there is probably the key one, which is a lot of biotechs and companies like ours, we operate with kind of a world view of our own research and our customers'. But we have to remember that the reason we do this, the reason we get up every day and the reason we toil is it's because we can impact patient lives. And if you actually want to really foment that change, then that subset, that stakeholder, needs to be involved, right? A patient needs to understand what are my choices? And so if a patient comes into the clinic and has a grave illness and the doctor says, well, this is the approved drug, but there's a test that could tell you if there's something else. I mean, if I'm the patient, I want to take that test. I want to know what my options are. And I think that frankly, it's unrealistic to expect publicly traded companies to not try to maximize revenue. That's just kind of the system we live in. But it's also incumbent upon us to to engage patients, to help them understand what their options are, to engage physicians the same and to say, there are multiple approved drugs, maybe, or this is the one, but there are some investigational drugs that haven't been approved yet that may be better fits for your disease. Remember, your disease isn't necessarily the same as someone else who happens to have it in the same tissue. And so I think that's a big deal, and I do think that there are any number of exciting organizations that are really focused, doggedly focused on this point of patient engagement and especially patient engagement around data.Harry Glorikian: No, I mean, I always I tell every one of my guests, “Hurry up, go faster,” because I'm not getting any younger and theoretically like, you know, statistically, I could end up in that place. I want the best that I can get when I get there. So Rafael, I know it's getting late where you are. So really appreciate your time and the opportunity to talk about what you guys are doing and the impact that it's having on not just drug development, but downstream on patients.Rafael Rosengarten: Well, thank you, Harry, for having me, for giving me the opportunity. This has been a lot of fun to connect over this.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Thank you. Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and the MoneyBall Medicine show at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show.You can also  find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.

Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol free life!
Take a Break from Booze - Part 2

Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol free life!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 38:03


Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol-free life! We want to help you to make a healthy start to the new year so we've launched our 7th Annual Fundraiser which will provide you with online and community support for an alcohol free month - and enable you to help a disadvantaged child.  Talk about a win-win! We believe in Challenges here at Tribe Sober - every year we run our Sober Spring Challenge - and then another one in January.  On this week's podcast we hear from 3 people who did Sober Spring 2021 - why did they sign up?  what was it like?  what tips do they have?  Let's hear from Jenny, Jimmi and Sybille:- In this Episode Our Challengers had plenty of useful tips to share  Throw the book at it! Both Jenny and Sybille have been reading all the quitlit and listening to all the podcasts.  As Sybille said if we understand the science behind alcohol dependence then we are more likely to stick with it – learn everything you can and eventually it will click! Work on your mindset – Sybille sees her alcohol free future as a very positive thing – a life full of benefits rather than some kind of punishment! Stock up on alcohol free drinks – if you are in South Africa and doing our January Challenge you can claim a discount from DrinkNil who will deliver to your door. Journalling was another important tip - buy a notebook, process your emotions and log your progress during the Challenge. We often have a vague feeling that we need to do something about our drinking but a challenge will enable you to dip your toe in the waters of sobriety and take action - SIGN UP FOR THE JANUARY CHALLENGE HERE "Alcohol is the only drug we have to justify not taking" so doing a challenge is a great "reason".  If you have to explain to your family and friends why you are not drinking you can say "I'm raising money for charity by doing a Dry January!" An alcohol free month will enable you to experience some benefits of sobriety but to really experience the joys of alcohol free living you need to keep going a bit longer.  You will meet others on the challenge who will be keep to extend the challenge to 66 days, 100 days - even six months! Another great tip we heard from our Challengers was to reconfigure your day - shake up your routine a bit and you won't miss alcohol so much! If you are listening to this and it's not January don't worry - we've got you covered - all you need to do is to go to our tribesober.com and hit Join Our Tribe and we'll put you on our 30 day starter challenge for new members. More info Subscription membership for Tribe Sober is just R85 (£4/$6/$8AUS) a month - you can join up HERE To access our website click HERE If you would like a free copy of our "Annual Tracker" or our e-book "66 Days to Sobriety" please email janet@tribesober.com If you would like to come to our Saturday afternoon Zoom Cafe as a guest and meet our community just email janet@tribesober.com Episode Sponsor           This episode is sponsored by the Tribe Sober Membership Program.  If you want to change your relationship with alcohol then                 sign up today           Read more about our 7-step program and subscribe HERE           Book a Discovery Call with me to find out if our membership would help you            Help us to spread the word! We made this podcast so that we can reach more people who need our help.  Please subscribe and share. If you enjoyed the podcast then please leave us a 5 star review on Apple podcasts, take a screenshot of your review and DM it to Tribe Sober's Instagram page - see PS for instructions - we'll send you something special to say thank you! We release a podcast episode every Saturday morning. You can follow Tribe Sober on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram  You can catch our FB live on Saturday mornings (11am SAST) and you can join our private Facebook group HERE Thank you for listening!  Till Next Week Janet x PS   How to leave an rating/review in Apple Podcasts (on an iOS device) 1. Open the Podcasts app. EASY. 2. Choose "Search" from the bottom row of icons and enter the name of the show (i.e., "Recover Like A Mother") into the search field. 3. Select the show under Shows (not under Episodes). 4. Scroll down past the first few episodes until you see Ratings & Reviews. 5. Click "Write a Review" underneath the displayed reviews from other listeners. You'll then have the option to rate the show on a 5-star scale, and write a review (you can rate without writing, too but it's always good to read your experience).

Rants About Humanity
Best Wishes For 2022

Rants About Humanity

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 3:25


Thanks so much for tuning in the last year and keep listening to different perspectives, think for yourself, and make up your own mind … and inspire others to do the same! ⬇️

Fast To Heal Stories
Episode 59- My 2021 Pep Talk for YOU!

Fast To Heal Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 22:20


I get it. It's the end of the year, it's after the holidays, and it is hard to get back on track and prioritize health. Here is my 2021 pep talk for you! In this episode I give you the momentum to get back to finding your best health, and outline my programs that will get your rolling in the right direction. I also recommend many books and resources for you to find your best health going into 2022! Links: My website: https://www.fasttoheal.info/ My 2 FREE Starting Guides: https://www.subscribepage.com/fasttoheal Take my carb quiz to help you start navigating the low-carb lifestyle: https://www.fasttoheal.info/carbquiz Watch my free masterclass to find out more about my life-changing Finding Nutritional PEACE Program: https://fasttoheal.ewebinar.com/webinar/unlock-effective-fat-burning-with-3-hormonal-secrets-2659 Learn more about my mini course, Fat Burning Unlocked, to start transitioning from a sugar burner to a fat burner: https://www.fasttoheal.info/fatburningunlocked I would LOVE for you to leave a review on Apple Podcasts! This helps more people like you find the podcast, and start their healing journey. How to leave a review on Apple Podcasts Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. Navigate to the Fast To Heal Stories podcast. Scroll down to find the subhead titled “Ratings & Reviews.” Under one of the highlighted reviews, select “Write a Review.” 

Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol free life!
Take a Break from Booze - Part 1

Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol free life!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 49:07


Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol-free life! This week's podcast is released on Christmas Day so by the time you get to hearing it the festivities will be drawing to a close and your thoughts may be turning to 2022.  We want to help you to make a healthy start to the new year so we've launched our 7th Annual Fundraiser which will provide you with online and community support for an alcohol free month - and enable you to help a disadvantaged child.  Talk about a win-win! We believe in Challenges here at Tribe Sober - every year we run our Sober Spring Challenge - and then another one in January.  On this week's podcast we hear from 3 ladies who did Sober Spring 2021 - why did they sign up?  what was it like?  what tips do they have?  Let's hear from Claire, Helena and Pam:-   In this Episode Like many of us Claire had fallen into the routine of drinking a bottle of wine every evening - and she wanted to make a change. Claire who wasn't sure that an online community would work for her - she thought she might be the "wrong generation" but in fact she loved it.  She posted comments daily and felt a deep connection with the other challengers. She didn't find it that difficult.  She had been "thinking about it" for so long that one she actually took action and signed up for the challenge she was more than ready - and got straight through 66 alcohol free days without a slip up! Then we heard from Helena who has struggled with drugs and alcohol for years but who is now making real progress. She was fascinated by the idea of a 66 day challenge and the fact that a new neural pathway can be created in this time. Pam explained  that she had been worried about her drinking for a while and that the challenge finally made it clear to her that "moderation" was not going to work for her.   Our Challengers had plenty of useful tips to share - "make a plan" was a big one - Claire explained that visiting an exclusive game farm carrying a huge bag of AF drinks may have bemused the staff but it enabled her to stay on track! Journalling was another important tip - buy a notebook, process your emotions and log your progress during the Challenge. Treat your Challenge as a research project - listen to podcasts, read the quitlit and learn everything you can. We often have a vague feeling that we need to do something about our drinking but a challenge will enable you to dip your toe in the waters of sobriety and take action - SIGN UP FOR THE JANUARY CHALLENGE HERE "Alcohol is the only drug we have to justify not taking" so doing a challenge is a great "reason".  If you have to explain to your family and friends why you are not drinking you can say "I'm raising money for charity by doing a Dry January!" An alcohol free month will enable you to experience some benefits of sobriety but to really experience the joys of alcohol free living you need to keep going a bit longer.  You will meet others on the challenge who will be keep to extend the challenge to 66 days, 100 days - even six months! Another great tip we heard from our Challengers was to reconfigure your day - shake up your routine a bit and you won't miss alcohol so much! If you are listening to this and it's not January don't worry - we've got you covered - all you need to do is to go to our tribesober.com and hit Join Our Tribe and we'll put you on our 30 day starter challenge for new members. More info Subscription membership for Tribe Sober is just R85 (£4/$6/$8AUS) a month - you can join up HERE To access our website click HERE If you would like a free copy of our "Annual Tracker" or our e-book "66 Days to Sobriety" please email janet@tribesober.com If you would like to come to our Saturday afternoon Zoom Cafe as a guest and meet our community just email janet@tribesober.com Episode Sponsor           This episode is sponsored by the Tribe Sober Membership Program.  If you want to change your relationship with alcohol then                 sign up today           Read more about our 7-step program and subscribe HERE           Book a Discovery Call with me to find out if our membership would help you            Help us to spread the word! We made this podcast so that we can reach more people who need our help.  Please subscribe and share. If you enjoyed the podcast then please leave us a 5 star review on Apple podcasts, take a screenshot of your review and DM it to Tribe Sober's Instagram page - see PS for instructions - we'll send you something special to say thank you! We release a podcast episode every Saturday morning. You can follow Tribe Sober on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram  You can catch our FB live on Saturday mornings (11am SAST) and you can join our private Facebook group HERE Thank you for listening!  Till Next Week Janet x PS   How to leave an rating/review in Apple Podcasts (on an iOS device) 1. Open the Podcasts app. EASY. 2. Choose "Search" from the bottom row of icons and enter the name of the show (i.e., "Recover Like A Mother") into the search field. 3. Select the show under Shows (not under Episodes). 4. Scroll down past the first few episodes until you see Ratings & Reviews. 5. Click "Write a Review" underneath the displayed reviews from other listeners. You'll then have the option to rate the show on a 5-star scale, and write a review (you can rate without writing, too but it's always good to read your experience).

The Flip Side with Noah Filipiak
Ep. 59: The Flip Side Christmas Special!

The Flip Side with Noah Filipiak

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 51:03


Chase and Noah share their favorite Christmas carols, most memorable gifts, thoughts on Santa Claus, and what they feel is important to remember at Christmas (including plenty of rant-worthy opinions!).   Leave a Review on iTunes Anyone who leaves an iTunes review between now and Christmas gets put into a drawing for some free Flip Side swag. Here are instructions for leaving a review:    1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac.  2. You can find "The Flip Side by Noah Filipiak" by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode. 3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews." 4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review." Flip Side Notes: Join an upcoming Beyond the Battle online group at www.beyondthebattle.net  Support Flip Side sponsor Angry Brew by using promo code FLIP at angrybrew.com or fivelakes.com to pick up some Angry Brew or Chris' Blend coffee at 10% off. Email the show at podcast@beyondthebattle.net  Support the show and get some sweet swag by becoming a patron at www.patreon.com/noahfilipiak  

MetFlex and Chill
#145 - Hormonal Imbalance: Root Causes with Dr. Halie Schoff

MetFlex and Chill

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 53:52


To watch this episode and other past episodes, please visit Rachel's YouTube channel. Listeners can find Dr. Hailie Schoff at her website www.drhalieschoff.com and on Instagram @drhalieschoff  Dr. Halie Schoff is a licensed and practicing Chiropractor, Integrative Health Practitioner, and Podcaster with a Master's in Applied Clinical Nutrition. She is a former collegiate athlete who has a passion for teaching people how to bridge the gap between fitness and holistic health. With a focus on women's hormones and gut health, Dr. Halie has helped hundreds of people all over the world regain their health through lifestyle, optimal diet, movement, and functional practices. Dr. Halie is incredibly outspoken about informed consent around birth control and aims to help those that she works with understand the root cause of their hormone imbalances. Her main goal is to help you be the alpha of your health by understanding what being optimally healthy means for YOU.  In this episode, Dr. Halie Schoff and I chat about the most common root causes of hormonal imbalances, how to support your hormones if you are using a contraceptive or getting off of one, the importance of adequate fat intake to produce progesterone, how to understand what's happening during your cycle, and more! “I see our female cycle as a vital sign. It's just like our blood pressure. It's just like our heart rate. It's just like our body weight in terms of…how is our health?” Dr. Halie Schoff Top Takeaways: Most common root causes of hormonal imbalances Types of nutrient-dense foods to focus on when getting off birth control Risks and benefits to hormonal and non-hormonal birth control methods  How to promote and support the production of progesterone Reasons environmental stressors can wreak havoc on your hormones Show Notes: [0:00] Intro to episode trailer  [0:30] Rachel gives a brief bio of guest Dr. Halie Schoff    [1:30] Welcome back to MetFlex and Chill! Rachel welcomes guest Dr. Halie Schoff @drhalieschoff     [3:00] Dr. Halie gives a brief background of her journey as a collegiate athlete as well as being in the fitness and holistic health space [10:30] Question: What are the risks and benefits of using birth control? [14:30] Question: What are some main focal points for someone to pay attention to when coming off of birth control? [19:30] Question: What would you recommend if someone wanted to switch methods but not completely come off birth control? [22:00] “I see our female cycle as just a vital sign. It's just like our blood pressure. It's just like our heart rate. It's just like our body weight in terms of, how is our health?” Dr. Halie Schoff [25:30] Question: Can you explain what is the female cycle and what is happening during that time so women can better prepare and support themselves for it?  [32:00] Foods to support progesterone production [35:00] Question: Can you explain some of the root causes of hormonal imbalances? [42:30] Question: Can you speak to stressors of overtraining and how that can potentially hinder you from achieving your goals? [49:00] Question: Is there anything you've changed your mind about in the past year, and why? [51:00] Listeners can check out more from Dr. Hailie Schoff at her website www.drhalieschoff.com, and on Instagram @drhalieschoff and @alpha.chiro.health.wellness and her podcast Alpha Health and Wellness Radio [53:00] Thanks for listening to another episode! If you're loving MetFlex and Chill and want to help grow the show, please head over to Itunes and leave a rating and review! How to Leave an Apple Podcast Review: First, Open the podcast app on your iPhone, Mac, or iPad. Then, hit the “Search” tab at the bottom right-hand corner of the page and search for MetFlex and Chill. Select the podcast, scroll down to find the subheading “Ratings & Reviews”. and select “Write a Review.” Next, select the number of stars you'd like to leave. Please choose 5 stars! Using the text box which says “Title,” write a title for your review. Then in the text box, write the review itself. The review can be up to 300 words long, but doesn't need to be much more than: “Love the show! Thanks!” or “Rachel provides wonderful content from a multitude of expert guests!” Once you're done select “Send” in the upper right-hand corner — You can connect and learn more about Rachel's work by visiting her website www.metflexlife.com  Rachel Gregory is a Board-Certified Nutritionist, Strength and Conditioning Specialist, Podcaster, and founder of MetFlex Life. She is also the author of the international best-selling book, "21-Day Ketogenic Diet Weight Loss Challenge." Rachel received her Master's Degree in Nutrition & Exercise Physiology from James Madison University and Bachelor's Degree in Sports Medicine from the University of Miami. Rachel completed the first-ever human clinical trial looking at the effects of the Ketogenic Diet in non-elite CrossFit athletes, which is published in the International Journal of Sports and Exercise Medicine. Currently, in her day-to-day coaching business, Rachel guides her clients to becoming the best, most confident version of themselves. 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MoneyBall Medicine
How To Track The Pandemic Using Mobile Data, With Nuria Oliver

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 58:49


When the coronavirus pandemic swept across the world in early 2020, Spain was one of the countries hardest hit. At the time, Nuria Oliver was a telecommunications engineer working and living in Valencia, one of Spain's 17 autonomous regions. She'd spent years working for companies like Microsoft, Telefonica, and Vodafone, using AI to analyze data from mobile networks to explore big questions about healthcare, economics, crime, and other issues—so she realized right away that mobile data could be an important tool for government leaders and public health officials trying to get a handle on the spread of COVID-19.With the backing of Valencia's president, Oliver put together a team of scientists to analyze network data to understand among other things, how much people in Spain were moving around. That helped them predict infection rates, and to see whether lockdowns were really helping to contain the virus's spread. The team's predictions were so accurate, in fact, that when they entered an X Prize Foundation contest seeking the best AI-based pandemic response systems, they won first place. Nuria Oliver joins Harry to explain how they did it—and why mobile data makes a difference in the fight against the pandemic and other health threats.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.When the pandemic swept across the world in early 2020, Spain was one of the countries hardest hit. At the time, Nuria Oliver was a telecommunications engineer working and living in Valencia, which is one of 17 autonomous regions in Spain, the equivalent of U.S. states.  She'd spent years working for companies like Microsoft, Telefonica, and Vodafone, using AI to analyze data from mobile networks to explore big questions about healthcare, economics, crime, and other issues.  And Oliver realized right away that mobile data could be a very important tool for government leaders and public health officials trying to get a handle on the spread of COVID-19.She went to the president of Valencia and proposed putting together a team of scientists who could support government decision makers by analyze mobile network data. She thought the data could reveal, among other things, how much people were moving around. That, in turn, could help predict infection rates, and it would show whether lockdowns and other restrictions on people's movement were really helping to contain the spread of the virus.The president immediately accepted her proposal and appointed her to the honorary position of “commissioner to the president on AI and data science against COVID-19.” And as it turned out, the predictions from Oliver's group were startlingly accurate. In December 2020, when the group entered a contest sponsored by the X Prize Foundation for an AI-based pandemic response systems, they won first place and wound up splitting the $500,00 prize with a second-place team from Slovenia.And for today's show, Nuria Oliver joined me to explain how they did it. We also talked about the difference data is making in the fight against the pandemic, and how our phones are helping to keep us healthy. We recorded this a couple of months ago, in mid-October. But obviously the pandemic hasn't receded at all since then, so everything you'll here is still relevant.Harry Glorikian: Nuria, welcome to the show. It's so great to have you on. I know there's a little bit of a time difference because you're over in Europe right now. But Nuria, I was looking at your background and I was like, Oh my God, I'm like, if I try to go through her entire CV like we're going to, it's the hour of the show is going to like completely go just for the CV. But I wonder if you can sort of give the listeners a quick version of of how your interest in the connection between technology and human behavior has developed over the years. What big themes did you focus on in your various academic and industry posts at MIT Media Lab, Microsoft Research, Telefonica, Vodafone? I mean, those are just a few of the things that you've done. You know, when I when I was think I've done something with my life, I look at people like you and I'm like, I've got so much more to do. But if you could sort of give us that a short version, that would be awesome.Nuria Oliver: All right. Thank you. It's a pleasure to be here. Let's see. So I'm originally from Spain. I studied electrical engineering and computer science in grad school, telecommunications engineering, and since I was very small, I was always fascinated by the idea of being a scientist or being an inventor or being a researcher and discovering something or inventing something new or for answering questions that hadn't been answered before. So I love mysteries and logic problems, and these are difficult things to solve. I wasn't sure how to kind of channel that. And when I studied telecommunications engineering, which was six years at the time, it was like together with a master's or equivalent degree. In my fourth year, I did a project on the parallelism between neural networks and human brain and the human brain and the human sort of like neurons. And it was the discovery of artificial intelligence to me, and it was pretty much love at first sight. I realized that it was fascinating to build technology that could do something intelligent. It sounded like science fiction to me. And I always have had this vision that technology is a great tool that we can use to have positive social impact and to improve the quality of life of people. So this has been my vision since I was also very small. So with artificial intelligence, I thought, Well, if I could build computers that could understand people, that would be the first step to build computers that can help people.Nuria Oliver: So I started focusing on modelling human behavior, and then I went to MIT to do a Ph.D., and that was the main focus of my work. So I built one of the first facial expression recognition systems in the world that was working in real time, or I made an intelligent car that could predict the next maneuver that the driver would do. I participated also in the first smart clothes fashion show in the world in 1997. So it was really an exciting time to be at the Media Lab, and I had a chance to develop new models of different aspects of human behavior. Then I went to Microsoft Research and I continued my work on that topic. I built an intelligent office. I did with a colleague, a system similar to the Minority Report, where you could control the computer. You see your hands in the air. And in 2005, I realized that I had spent a decade building, you know, smart computers, smart cars, smart rooms, but even at the time, the most personal computer was the mobile phone, and it probably was going to be the mobile phone. And I felt that, you know, we weren't really leveraging the opportunities that the phone was bringing to us in terms of helping us.Nuria Oliver: So I decided to explore that topic, and I started working on projects related to the intersection between mobile phones, health and wellness. So I did a project to detect sleep apnea on the phone. I did another one to help people achieve their exercise goals using what is called persuasive computing, which are sort of like theories of human motivation and psychology, but implemented like on the phone to encourage people and motivate people to change behaviors. I got the offer to move back to Spain at the end of 2007 and never thought I was ever going to go back to Spain, but it seemed like an interesting opportunity to create and lead a research area within a very large telco, Telefonica, the largest telco in Spain. And with my family, we decided, okay, let's try. So we move to Barcelona, and the challenge was to create a top research team from scratch in a topics that were not the traditional telco topics at the time. At the time telcos were sort of like networking companies, right? And I was doing, you know, big data, you know, data science, artificial intelligence topics that today are at the core of what a telco company is. But in 2007, it wasn't really the case yet. So so we continued working on on on two streams on the one hand, making phones the serve their name or of a smartphone, basically.Nuria Oliver: So we did a project to help people take their medication correctly, for example, and support medication adherence, particularly in the elderly. But the other strain was a new stream for me, which was because of working in a telco, we could have access to large scale, anonymized mobile network data. So data about an entire city or an entire country, fully anonymized, you know, fully non-personal data and that data transfer that is very valuable for social good. For example, when there is a natural disaster or when or to infer the socioeconomic status of a region or to understand crime and predict hotspots of crime in cities, or to help when there are pandemics. So those are all areas that I started developing and exploring while at Telefonica, and I created the area of data science for social good. I was in Telefonica for eight years and then they offer. I left Telefonica and I joined Vodafone as director of research in data science globally. And again, the challenge was similar to create from scratch research activities across, I don't know, 20 different countries in Vodafone. I also created the area of data science for social good. And then I left Vodafone. But I continue with a connection with Vodafone because I'm still chief scientific adviser to a think tank that Vodafone has in Berlin.Nuria Oliver: Since 2015, I had, while I was at Telefonica, I had also gotten involved with an NGO, which is based in the US, which is called Data-Pop Alliance, and it has been created by the MIT Media Lab, the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, the Overseas Development Institute and Flowminder. And the goal is how to leverage data and AI for social good. So it was very aligned with what I had been doing, so I've been collaborating with them in parallel, developing a lot of projects in developing countries in showing the value that data analyzed with AI methods can have to actually accelerate development of a lot of regions. Then in 2018, I became very involved with a very exciting European initiative called ELLIS, which means the European Laboratory for Learning and Intelligent Systems, and it is the result of a grassroots movement of the European scientists. And our goal is to contribute to Europe's technological sovereignty in AI by attracting and retaining the best scientists in AI to Europe. And to do that, we need to, you know, change a little bit how things are done in Europe, and we've launched a number of actions and activities that we can possibly talk about later. And then finally, in March of 2020, given that I had been working for over a decade on how to use data and AI for social good, including how to use it in the context of infectious diseases and pandemics, I felt that for the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, for the coronavirus pandemic, the governments weren't going to use all these advances that we had made in science, in actually analyzing data, using AI methods to support decision making.Nuria Oliver: So I felt that maybe it was a missed opportunity once again to actually have this disconnection between where science is and where sort of like the real world are and the decision makers are. So, I had an idea in March of 2020, which was proposed, my idea was to propose to the central government and also to the state, the state government, Spain is divided into 17 autonomous regions, which are the equivalent to a state in the US, and they have presidents which is equivalent to governors in the US. So I proposed to the president of the region the idea of having a team of scientists working really closely with the decision makers in sort of like performing relevant models and data analysis that would support their decisions. And they said yes immediately and the president of the Valencian government, and they appointed me commissioner to the president on AI and data science against COVID 19, which is an honorary position. And basically I have been leading a team of 20+ scientists in there since then, working on on four big areas and the intersection between data AI and the pandemic.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I was, you know, it's interesting that you say they don't always take advantage of things. I remember. I have to go back in my memory 20 years ago, actually, because it was right about the time my son was born, I pitched to Telefonica about location-based services. And at the time, it was almost impossible for people to wrap their head around this idea, that location intertwined with data, and giving somebody the information they were looking for to help them make a decision was going to be a, now what is it? You know, it's a billions and billions of dollars of an industry, but at that time it was people couldn't wrap their head around it. So I think if you're ahead of your time, it's always it's always difficult for the average person to sort of understand where things are going.Nuria Oliver: Certainly. Certainly this is certainly the case. And I think the case of our experience in Valencia, we were lucky that there was sort of like a confluence of factors that really enabled this initiative to not only to happen, but to actually be sustained over time for almost two years now, or a year over a year and a half. And to have a certain level of impact and success. And I think one of the elements was the government had already been working for a couple of years prior on the Fourth Industrial Revolution, the profound transformation of our society because of disciplines like biotechnology, nanotechnology or artificial intelligence. They had published their study on artificial intelligence. They had realized that the public administrations haven't undergone the digital transformation that most companies, particularly large companies, have already undergone, and they recognize that there was this opportunity to transform the public administration and become more data driven would become more digital. So I think when I made this proposal, they were in the right mindset and they were already thinking about this. And there was also a relationship of trust with me because I had collaborated with them in drafting the AI strategy.Nuria Oliver: And they they knew that it was a serious effort. They knew that we were going to try to do our best. So I think there are all these different elements that that really helped. And then there was one director general, well there is still there, working for the president who actually comes from the U.S. She's Spanish, but she spent a lot of time working in the for the mayor of New York City. So she had a lot of the same mentality that I had as he was a little bit of an agent of change within the government. She's been a member of our team since the beginning, coming to every single meeting, and that is absolutely necessary because they are the ones that are going to benefit from whatever we do, and they're the ones that need to use it. So they need to see the value and they need to understand it. So I think it's very important to have this sort of like mixed, multidisciplinary, multi-institutional teams.Harry Glorikian: So I mean, I applaud them for seeing that because if you have ever watched our Congress or Senate interview technology people,Nuria Oliver: Yeah, I've seen it, it's famous.Harry Glorikian: It's quite fascinating. Some of the questions where you know, you realize they know so little about. These technologies or their impact and don't understand like. All of these things are like you should be looking at them as nuclear weapons, how do you use them, how do you manage them, how do you use them for good? How do you put things in place to protect people, right?Nuria Oliver: Yes. And the other important message is, I don't think it is acceptable for any policy maker or any representative of citizens to publicly acknowledge, "Oh, I don't know anything about technology." I don't think that is acceptable because technology permeates everything, every single aspect of our lives. So it's it's such a fundamental element of our society that you need to know a lot about technology if you really want to make the right decisions about any topic, absolutely any topic, right? So I think that's definitely something that at least in some governments, they recognize that there is a need for identifying new profiles to work in the public administration, creating new positions, more tech savvy positions, data scientists, but also educating the policymakers and doing courses on on relevant topics related to technology. I think this is very, very, very important.Nuria Oliver: So let's pivot now because I think all of this technology came really in to a lot of good or use when COVID 19 came along. All right. So you know, you one of the data I think you collect in Valencia is mobile data, right? Exactly. Understanding how this data helped you understand and manage the course of the pandemic, can you talk about that a little bit because I think that that's important for people to understand.Nuria Oliver: Yes, so we had four large work streams in this data science for COVID-19 initiative, and the first one was modeling large scale human mobility. Why? Because an infectious disease like COVID-19 that is transmitted from human to human, it doesn't become a pandemic if people don't move. And that's why we have been confined, right? Because it's our movements, the ones that are propagating the disease. So understanding how people move, determining if the confinement measures are working or not, is very important to make the right decisions and the right policies.Nuria Oliver: So there was another lucky factor that I didn't mention, but that has really been very helpful in Spain and is the following factor. For two years prior to the pandemic, the Spanish National Office of Statistics had been drafting a collaboration agreement with the three largest telcos in Spain, which are Telefonica, Vodafone and Orange.Harry Glorikian: Mm hmm.Nuria Oliver: So. So let me rewind a little bit. So part of this transformation that we mentioned of society because you know of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, you know, an artificial intelligence part of this transformation is actually impacting the National Office of Statistics of everyone in the world where the traditional methods to build official statistics, which are via surveys, are susceptible to being improved, leveraging pervasive technology and sort of like big data. So there is a global movement in every National Office of Statistics, in pretty much of every country to explore how they could build official statistics through the analysis of data automatically without having to do surveys, because it's very expensive and it doesn't really scale. And that is why there is only one census every 10 years or 15 years, or in some countries, 40 years, because it's just very expensive to do the census. So the Spanish National Office of Statistics, one of the statistics that they compute is commuting patterns, and they do it by doing surveys. And they thought, OK, maybe we can collaborate with the telcos and analyze aggregated data from the antennas, from the cell phone antennas to infer these mobility patterns automatically without having to do surveys. So that was a very long process of negotiations and getting all the approvals under the data protection agencies and from the legal departments of all these telcos, blah blah blah. So that took them a huge amount of time. So in November of 2019, right before the pandemic, they got all the okays necessary, and they launched the pilot to see how well they could create commuting matrices from this data that was actually a relatively controversial project.Nuria Oliver: It appeared in the media. It wasn't communicated very well because they were saying the National Office of Statistics is tracking you, which is completely wrong. They weren't tracking anyone. But anyhow, when the pandemic happened, they already had all the infrastructure in place and all the legal agreements in place to actually get access to the mobile network data from the operators and combine the data and compute mobility matrices out of the data so that that mobility piece that we did was relatively easy in the sense that the data access was already available. So the vice minister, the vice president of Spain, Calvino, she appointed us the pilot region to be able to use that data during the first wave of the pandemic, at a time when there were really, there was almost no data and it was very hard. We were making a lot of decisions kind of blindly. So through the National Office of Statistics, we were able to access that data and then identify and measure to which degree the confinement measures had impacted the mobility of the population. How successful the stay at home campaign was, how much labor mobility was impactd, h ow was the radius of movement reduced because of the measures? But also what was the impact of those measures on the spread of the virus? Because at the end, you also want to know, OK, is this really slowing down the spread of the virus or not? Right. So we were also able to do that. Yeah.Harry Glorikian: So but now you carried out a large scale survey of the people in Valencia. And so when you look at survey data compared to mobility data, how do you think about that?Nuria Oliver: Yeah, so so the first line of work was the mobility analysis. Then we have two more lines, one which might we might talk about later. One is the computational epidemiological models, the other one was predictive models. And then the fourth line was a citizen survey. And why did we launch this citizen survey? So we launched the survey because in March of 2020 and even today, there were a lot of questions that we couldn't answer. We didn't have any data sources. For example, what is the social behavior that people have? What is the emotional impact of the pandemic. What's the resilience of the population toward all these measures. Are there tests, are people being tested. What is the prevalence of symptoms? Was the labor impact, the economic impact? What kind of protection measures are people taking? How are people moving? Are they leaving their homes, or are they taking public transportation? I mean, there were so many interesting questions that we couldn't really answer, so we decided to ask the people to say, Well, let's just draft, let's design the shortest possible survey that would give us the most information about people's behaviors and perception and situation during the pandemic. So we came out with 26 questions, which we translated to many different languages and the surveys deployed in different countries in the world.Nuria Oliver: It has almost 700,000 answers right now. And one of them is in Spain, evidently. But we also have a very representative sample of in the, I think, in the almost 100,000 from Germany, Italy, Brazil, and the survey has been regularly used by the media, by the policymakers, but also by people to have a sense of how we are doing. So I think the survey has different angles to it. One element is giving a voice to people. You know, I think we have been subject to a lot of measures that have happened to us, but we as citizens haven't had a lot of opportunities to really tell how we were doing and how the pandemic was impacting us and on our fears or what we were thinking. So the survey is a way to listen to to the people and to give them a chance to tell us every week how things are going. It's also an incredible tool to really connect the citizens to the policymakers so they understand, for example, what's the intention to get vaccinated. You know, we know since April of 2020, for example, that the most impacted group emotionally, psychologically is the youth.Nuria Oliver: So the government can think, OK, we need to invest in programs for the youth. But we know that since April of 2020, it's not that we know it now. We know it for over a year and a half from now. So there's a lot of things that we know, you know, for many, many, many months. So that has been incredibly helpful. So the survey is completely complementary to the large scale mobility data. We do have a little bit of mobility information because we ask people their transportation means because we wanted to see people were walking or they were driving individually or they were taking public transport. And we did observe where public transport was kind of shut down for a few weeks or months, there was a huge increase in walking. During the first lockdown, especially. And then there was there wasn't really a big use of public transportation until probably the fall of 2020 or even like the spring of 2021. So, yeah, we did have a little bit of mobility information, but very complementary to the large scale mobility that we could analyze with their mobile data.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I think this this sort of way that the government or your group is interacting with the people to sort of get this information. I mean, I think that's a more organized and statistically significant way than Facebook or Twitter or any of these other big rooms that you can yell in, right? So, you know, it adds to the discussion.Nuria Oliver: Yeah. I mean, we invested a lot of thought and a fair amount of time. We think the fact that we had no time because we had to react really quickly. But I think if we if we started this effort in mid-March, right, right at the very, very, very beginning of the pandemic. And I think we launched the survey March 28th. So we had about 10 days. Yeah, we're very fast, but we really thought a lot about it. We spent I mean, we worked all day, all night, all the time. I mean, there was nothing else to do anyway. So I mean, we were just sort of like working, working for...I mean, I have three children, too. But we were really working. And my husband also got very involved in this. So it was kind of like a family effort and we invested a lot of time in designing the survey so the questions were really, would be the most helpful possible and sort of like complimentary to the other data sources that we had. And I think that was relatively successful. I mean, it's definitely been very helpful to many different people. We built very quickly visualization tools of all the answers to the survey so anyone can access them, anyone can look at them. And that was very important so everyone can benefit from the answers.Harry Glorikian: So in a pandemic, what can you--if you said, "Oh my God, this these were the, you know, two or three things that we were able to influence," based on this technology integration or information that we were able to provide policymakers that made the biggest difference.Nuria Oliver: Well, I think there are different levels. I think we had the impact at different levels, so the mobility analysis was extremely helpful for the government to really understand to which degree the lockdown and the measures had worked. And They really appreciated that piece of work a lot. The computational epidemiological models, which we haven't talked about yet, but is basically we've been building models to predict the number of cases and the number of hospitalizations and the number of intensive care units and the number of deaths throughout the entire pandemic. And we've built different types of models because one of the take-home messages here is, of course, the underlying reality is extremely complex and it's not a purely deterministic system. Evidently, the world is really, really hard to model. So if we build models that are completely different in their approach and they give us similar predictions, we can be more certain about those predictions than if the models each of them says something different. So we have three different models running all the time with completely different methods like to really see to which degree, you know, they are aligned. So our predictions have been used. I mean, I've been I've been writing reports for many, many months every day with the predictions of the day. So, so they could have a sense of how things were going, how fast the cases were going to be growing and things like that.Nuria Oliver: So that was particularly helpful. I would say in the third wave, which took place after Christmas, and it was the worst wave here in the Valencia region. And it was very helpful because at the time we had just finished our third model, which was using deep neural networks and is a model that we use in the X Competition. And that model predicted extremely accurately the day of the peak of the number of cases and the number of cases at the peak. And it was very helpful because it was a very stressful moment where the cases were growing exponentially. There was a huge amount of tension as to whether to implement more measures or persist with these measures or change the measures or what to do. Because the number of cases were growing, the deaths were growing and they placed a fair amount of faith in our model, maybe more than I would have placed because I was just like, Oh my God, I hope this model works really, really well. But you know, there's this moment where you are thinking, Oh, I don't know. Maybe I mean, this is just a model, you know, the world is more complicated.Harry Glorikian: Exactly.Nuria Oliver: So that was that was very helpful. At the same time, we also build machine learning based, deep neural, network based prediction models of hospital occupancy and intensive care occupancy that was extremely helpful to allocate resources and to figure out which hospitals were going to be saturated and to to anticipate that and to determine whether they needed to mobilize more intensive care units and things like that.Nuria Oliver: And then, as I mentioned, the survey has been helpful, I would say, all throughout the pandemic to really understand the needs of the people, to understand the sort of like the impact of the pandemic on people's lives and and to determine what would be the areas of priority for new policies. So I think the different work streams have had different impacts, but I think that is a broader impact, which is probably the most important, maybe, which is the impact of showing a different way of working, a way of working that is a lot more data driven. That is more technological, that is very, very different to the traditional approach. And seeing that with with a clear example for a very long time and seeing the value that this way of working has brought, I think has been the best way for them to realize what they might be missing if they don't undergo, you know, the necessary digital transformation.Harry Glorikian: Can you have them come over here and talk to our guys? I think you need to have to come here and talk to our guys.Nuria Oliver: I think you would need also internal advocates.Harry Glorikian: I think that I think there's a lot of those. I think there are there are a number of people internally right that that want to you just need to. I think people who sit in powerful positions need to understand the implications and the impact of this,Nuria Oliver: And they have to accept they have to accept that the data might not tell something that they want to hear. I mean, there is also the risk of of losing control in a sense, right? Because the data could say that the policy didn't work, you know, something that maybe you really believed in and you really push for it and then it's like, OK, sorry, but this is not working right and you have to be.Harry Glorikian: But that's, you know, that's part of the that's part of the whole, you know, scientific method. You have a hypothesis, you go test it. And if it didn't work to come up with a new hypothesis, right? I mean, that's that's the way it should be. And you know, in reality, I have this debate with people. Nuria Oliver: The political world is not exactly like that.Harry Glorikian: But I think this sort of decision making is not just from a policy perspective, but it permeates, all the way through. I mean, I have this debate with a lot of people in the medical world of, it doesn't work. It's making the wrong mistake. It's biased. I'm like, it's always evolving. This is software. It's like every day it's getting better. It doesn't sleep, it can get better the next day. So a year from now, it can be an order of magnitude different than it was, you know, when it started. So. But [musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer. It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in Kindle format. Just go to Amazon and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: You mentioned the X Prize and you guys won the X Prize. And you split that prize with, you know, people in Slovenia. So did you have some programmers there or did you…Nuria Oliver: No, no, no. There was a first prize and a second prize, and we won the first prize and they won the second prize.Harry Glorikian: Oh okay, okay.Nuria Oliver: So there were first, first, I guess first winner and then second the people there stayed second. Yeah, so.Harry Glorikian: So how did that impact? How did that impact, you winning that, did that impact the way that people thought about the model?Nuria Oliver: I think I think it gave us a lot of legitimacy and, you know, a huge external validation because we had been I felt we had been doing very, you know, rigorous solid work for many, many months. But of course, it was constrained to the Valencia region, maximum to Spain and then the X Prize Challenge asked us to build predictive models of the pandemic in 236 countries and regions in the world. So it was a step up, you know, from what we had to do. So I think I think it definitely gave a lot of like external validation to the work. I think I find it a very inspirational story. I never thought we were going to win. I was a little bit the devil's advocate in the team. When I share with the team this idea, this opportunity of the of participating in the X Prize competition, but it was more like a teaser. I didn't think that they were going to actually decide to go for it. And I and I told them many times, Look, guys, guys and girls. I mean, this is, you know, this is a different level. I mean, this is a global competition. You know, if we go for it, we are going to have to work even harder than we have been working all over Christmas and New Year's and everything because the competition started at the end of November. I think it was a very beginning of December. And, you know, and I think we should try our best. I mean, if we go for it, we go 100 percent you. We just don't sort of go, Yes, this is, let's do it. Let's do it.Nuria Oliver: So we kind of jumped into the pool like the X Prize and. Uh, and it was incredible when we won, I couldn't believe it. It was to me, it really shows that there is talent anywhere and everywhere. And many times what fails is not even the talent, it's actually the environment where this talent is.Harry Glorikian: Correct.Nuria Oliver: If it is not an environment that supports the talent and that encourages the talent and that empowers the talent, that talent is like a little seed, right? And we don't have an environment that enables this seed to grow, it just stays on the ground there, you know, not growing. And I think the entire initiative and particularly the X Prize competition, was this sort of environment where, you know, anyone could win. Everyone was in equal conditions and in our team, our team is extremely sort of like a very flat structure. There are students and there are full professors and everyone contributes equally and anyone can do anything you know is very sort of a hands on, you know, very sort of like a start up. And I think that was a big change from the traditional, well-established, somewhat bureaucratic research processes that prevailed in many institutions, right? Where there is a hierarchy from the full professor to the student. And, you know, many times the students feel that they cannot even do some idea that they might have because they have to be asking for permission, you know. So I think for me, it was also this inspirational story on saying, Well, you know, anyone could win any of these competitions, you know, if the environment,Harry Glorikian: Environment and you know, geography, I always joke. I always say, like, if you're in the West Coast or you can fail multiple times, you come to the East Coast, you've got to fail a lot less and it depends on which college or university you graduated from. You go to Europe, you fail a lot less because your family and everybody around you will not be happy, right? It's depending on where you are, right? You're willing to take more or less risk. And then, of course, that can be superimposed on the organization that's also creating that environment. But let me jump now and say, you know and ask. You guys in Valencia have like a 90 percent vaccination rate, which I think is one of the highest in the world, much higher than the U.S. by far. I'm comparing a region to a country, but. What what do you think accounts for this? The differing levels of a compliance. Do you think the people in Spain are just more trusting of the medical establishment? I mean, you guys have Facebook too, so the same misinformation is getting to you. That's getting to us. Are they more trusting of technology?Nuria Oliver: I think there are multiple factors. I think one very important factor is that fortunately, the pandemic wasn't really overly politicized and anyone from any political inclination or party or view, you know, was adopting measures, was wearing masks, you know, was willing to get vaccinated. So there was there hasn't been this coupling that has happened in many countries between the pandemic and your political views. I think this has been completely orthogonal issues in Spain. You know, the pandemic impacts everyone. The pandemic doesn't care if you are right wing, left wing or center. Yes, the virus is going to infect you the same. It doesn't matter what you believe, you're going to get it. Maybe you don't believe in me but I'm going to infect you. So I that has that has definitely helped a lot. The other issue is Spain didn't have a strong anti-vax movement to start from. There is definitely a lot of trust in the medical system. Spain has universal healthcare for free, so you get the best medical care in the world, pretty much for free, you know, cancer treatment, the best cancer treatment. Everything is for free in Spain, and there is a big trust in the system that is a big trust in the doctors and and and people really love the Spanish medical system because they see that it saves a lot of lives, you know? They see that it helps them and is free.Nuria Oliver: So there isn't really clear economic incentives associated to health care because it's a right that people have. So I think that was another element the element of trust, the element of really trusting the system of the system being free and people realizing that, you know, health care is fundamental for a healthy society and everyone sort of like compliant. So we have the lack of politicization, the fact that we didn't have a strong, anti-vax movement initially, the fact that the health care system, you know, is very trust is trusted a lot and it's for free and people really appreciate it. And then we also have the fact that Spain is a very has a very strong group, whole sort of like group culture where conformism to the group is very important in Spain, as opposed to other cultures where they might emphasize more the individual and individualism. Spain is more of a kind of collective culture in that sense. So as soon as there was a minimum critical mass of people vaccinated, it just became an act of pride to be vaccinated and belonging to the group, you know, and sort of like complying with the group and. And I think that was also a factor.Nuria Oliver: So combining all of this, yeah, we are one of the countries with the highest vaccination rates in the world and we don't really have anti-vax movements like other countries have had or have still. And I think people, you know, you have to also remember that Spain was one of the worst impacted countries in the first wave. So the virus is very real to everyone. I would say everyone knows someone that has had COVID or has died from COVID. So I think as opposed to in other countries or regions in the world where the virus may seen something almost like theoretical because it hasn't been next to you, you don't know people infected. You might think, Oh, I don't know, I don't know anyone. So maybe this could not be real, right? Spain has been very, very real because the first wave was horrible here. And, you know, Spain and Italy were like the most impacted country for a long time. So I think that also has made the pandemic extremely real in Spain since the very, very beginning. And seeing the suffering, seeing people dying, seeing your relatives being in intensive care, you know, has really made people think, Oh, it's not, it's a no-brainer for me to get vaccinated. I don't want to go through this.Nuria Oliver: I don't want anyone from my family to go through this, don't want to infect other people. So I think there is also this element of of having really endured a very, very hard first wave of of of really, really shocked the society and people collectively feeling, OK, we need to defeat this virus together. We need to do anything we can to minimize the impact that is having in our society. So I think there are different reasons, you know, like anything. It isn't a simple answer, right, but there is a confluence of factors...Harry Glorikian: I wish.Nuria Oliver: ...that I think have played in our favor in terms of of the pandemic. I mean, the levels of vaccination are extremely high, but also the life is going back to pretty much normal now. I mean, we there is a lot of activity. I mean traveling, a lot of traveling. We had a lot of tourists this year this summer. Spain kept the schools open the entire school year last year. I think that was extremely smart to do. So that was also very positive in terms of not disrupting the lives of the children and the teenagers, which are some of the most affected demographic groups. So, so yeah, so I'm proud that that actually the response has been like this in Spain.Harry Glorikian: So going back to the technological part, do you do you think that phones will be more useful tools for epidemiology or personal health in the next pandemic? And what have we learned that will help us be smarter about how we use [technology]?Nuria Oliver: Yeah, so I think. So I think so there's a difference between phones and the mobile network. Ok, so what we analyzed was data from the mobile network, not from the phones themselves. This is important to clarify because the mobile network is the data captured at the antennas. Correct. That that are all over the geographic space that are the ones providing the cellular connection. So I think that that has proven in many, many cases for many, many years, very valuable, both in developing economies and in developed economies. Then the phone itself, I think the impact this pandemic has been. I would say varied. So the detailed contact tracing, I don't think it has been successful, at least the data that we have from the survey is that in Spain, it didn't really work at all. We didn't advocate for it because based on our research and we didn't think that that was the most important thing to do at the time. We knew since the beginning of the pandemic that roughly 50 percent of the people 59 years old or younger could not self-isolate if they had to. So in what is called TTI Control Strategy, which is trace to know whom to test, to know whom to isolate, if people cannot isolate, there is no point in tracing them and testing them because they're going to be infecting everyone else if they can't isolate? So I think, you know, investing in infrastructure to help people self-isolate and providing support to people so they can self isolate.Nuria Oliver: And it's not a huge burden to them was also very important to enable, you know, everyone to do a proper quarantine. I think there has been quite it's been quite successful actually the part of using the phones for entering symptoms. Many, many people answered our survey on their phones. I would say everyone, pretty much everyone answered a survey on the phones having some sort of like some digital, you know, certificates for vaccinations and things like that. I think that's probably more helpful. They have projects and using the sensors on the phone to diagnose COVID 19 from the... patterns or the coughing patterns. So I think the phone can also be used as a tool for sort of like a screening tool, maybe more than a diagnostic tool. And of course, it can be used for telemedicine as well, particularly in situations where you are. You can leave your house, you know, or you can't really go so. So for quite a few months, actually, the provision of care for non emergencies, non serious issues has been over the phone actually, and in many cases, is the mobile phone. So I think…Harry Glorikian: Which brings me, I have another question for you, though, because based on that is. Separate from the pandemic, because hopefully it's waning and we can get on with our lives. Do you have any ideas you want to pursue in the area of personal health and health care delivery?Nuria Oliver: Yeah, well, there's one idea that I've been trying to do for seven years, but I haven't been able to get around to it yet, which is a project that I call Mobi-well and it's a project that is really the hope is to really shed quantitative light on the interplay between the dependency that we developed towards our phones and our well-being. So I'm very interested in really understanding what are the implications of the fact that we can't live without our phones and our own well-being. I think the phone is an incredibly powerful tool to support our well-being and to help us in many ways, you know, for chronic disease management, for, you know, as I mentioned, the pressures that I mentioned in terms of helping us change behaviors that we want to change, you know, to exercise more or to sleep more or to drink more water or whatever we want to do. The phone is a great ally. It can be a great ally for as a screening tool for different diseases, as an early detection tool. Also for certain diseases. But we cannot obviate that we are addicted to our phones and that we have a dependency towards our phones. So I am also interested in understanding what are the health implications on the wellness implications of such an addiction and such a dependency, particularly in the younger demographic groups. So that's one project that I'm very interested in. I'm also. We are also working a lot in and the ELLIS Alicante Foundation that I just created on the ethical implications of AI.Harry Glorikian: Yes.Nuria Oliver: Implications such as the computational violation of privacy or the lack of veracity or the opacity or the manipulated subliminal manipulation or behavior discrimination, algorithmic discrimination. So a lot of these challenges, you know, we can test them on the phone and we can also explore and develop innovative algorithms that would have guarantees for non-discrimination. Or, you know, that would be privacy preserving. And we can do studies on the phone to see if that is the case. So I think it's also a great tool for human behavioral studies and for what it's called computational social sciences.Harry Glorikian: I mean, if we could just get Facebook to open its data to you?Nuria Oliver: Oh, yeah, I would love that.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I'm sure that we could see a lot.Nuria Oliver: Yes, definitely. Absolutely. I mean, you see what's happened with the latest, you know, revelations about some of the Facebook research. So so yeah. But I do think more research is needed to really understand this very complex interplay between ourselves, our wellbeing, both mental wellbeing and physical wellbeing and on the technology that we use. And it's an area that I'm very interested in.Harry Glorikian: My new book is all about that direction, which is how can you utilize technology to live a healthier life. Or is one of the gentleman that I interviewed once said a better health span, not just a life span.Nuria Oliver: Yeah, yeah, exactly. Yeah. So I mean, I've devoted my life to inventing and exploring and developing technology to somehow improve the quality of life of people in some way. But I think it's also time to really understand in a rigorous way, you know, what is the impact that that technology is having on our lives, not technology that is explicitly designed to support our well-being, but the the technology that we use on a daily, you know, on a daily basis, you know, the the services and the applications that we use every day for any purpose, you know, not specifically for health care purposes.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I think you were chosen, you were on the TR100 list, if I remember correctly.Nuria Oliver: Yeah.Harry Glorikian: And so you always wonder, like how well did the TR100 ed predict correctly? And it seems that they at least in your case, they got it. They got it right on the impact that you would have on the world.Nuria Oliver: Oh, thank you. Yeah, that was really. I have a very nice memory. You know, I got my PhD from M.I.T. So getting this recognition for the MIT Technology Review was really, really nice. And I think it was I was the first Spanish person to get it. So that was also really nice in terms of Spain, because I think, you know, it might have helped other scientists from Spain to, I don't know, be considered or for this award. So, yeah, so I have very nice memories, very fond memories of the event. They areHarry Glorikian: So well. I can't thank you enough for staying up later, or, you know, it's actually late afternoon your time and participating today and sort of giving people who are listening an insight of how technology can make such a profound impact on managing pandemic and keeping people safe and communicating the right information to them. It's huge. And so I hope that people hearing this can take the lessons from our discussion, and you never know people may end up reaching out to you because of it. So I hope that all this, you know, moves in a positive direction. So thank you so much for being on the show today.Nuria Oliver: It was my pleasure. Thank you so much for the interest. And yeah, it's been a really lovely conversation, so I thank you also. Also Linkedin for establishing the connection between us. Thank you.Harry Glorikian: Excellent.Nuria Oliver: Thank you. Ciao. Harry Glorikian: Ciao.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and MoneyBall Medicine at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show.You can find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.

Fast To Heal Stories
Episode 58- Dr. Tracy Page Interviews Me About Healing With Intermittent Fasting

Fast To Heal Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 46:27


  In this episode I am interviewed by Dr. Tracy Page of Wisconsin Functional Medicine. We discuss how fasting can heal the body and allow you to develop nutritional peace around food. What You Will Learn: What the acronym PEACE stands for with respect to fasting Why the traditional food pyramid and dietary recommendations fail most people when it comes to losing weight Reversing chronic disease, and getting healthy How fasting will decrease gut issues like bloating, gas, abdominal discomfort and reverse chronic disease What it means to be a sugar versus a fat burner Why people become insulin resistant, what foods contribute to this problem, and how to reverse it We also provide tips on how to add fasting into your lifestyle without major restrictions to your daily living. If you find this podcast of value, I'd be honored if you would write a review that helps others know the podcast exists.  How to leave a review on Apple Podcasts Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. Navigate to the Change the Way You Age podcast. Scroll down to find the subhead titled “Ratings & Reviews.” Under one of the highlighted reviews, select “Write a Review.” Links: Dr. Tracy Page's Functional Medical website: https://wisconsinfunctionalmed.com/ My website: https://www.fasttoheal.info/ My 2 FREE Starting Guides: https://www.subscribepage.com/fasttoheal Take my carb quiz to help you start navigating the low-carb lifestyle: https://www.fasttoheal.info/carbquiz Watch my free masterclass to find out more about my Finding Nutritional PEACE Program: https://fasttoheal.ewebinar.com/webinar/unlock-effective-fat-burning-with-3-hormonal-secrets-2659 Learn more about my mini course, Fat Burning Unlocked, to start transitioning from a sugar burner to a fat burner: https://www.fasttoheal.info/fatburningunlocked  

Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol free life!
Alcohol - and Breast Cancer with Mocktail Mom

Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol free life!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 56:12


Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol-free life! This week's podcast guest is Deb from Kentucky who is known as Mocktail Mom - she hosts an awesome IG live session on Monday night called Making Friends & Mocktails.  She has her own recovery journey to share and like me she is a breast cancer survivor. Dramatically reducing your risk of breast cancer is one of the benefits of sobriety we don't talk about much so we were both keen to highlight this issue during the conversation.   In this Episode Deb had done lots of challenges - we chatted about the value of short challenges and agreed that they can be counter-productive – 30 days is not quite long enough to experience the real benefits of sobriety so we are just doing the hard bit – and in the process our subconscious is registering that sobriety is difficult and not much fun! Don't let that put you off from doing our January Challenge though – it's a great way to dip your toe into the waters of sobriety and connect with other sober curious people – what usually happens is that some people decide to keep going for longer – sign up by going to TS.com and tapping January Challenge Deb didn't start drinking heavily until she turned 40 when she started using it to cope with some major life challenges. This is a pattern I am beginning to notice with some of the people I meet these days – rather than drinking socially in their 20's and 30's which led them to becoming dependent in mid life, they hardly drank much at all until they reached their 40's or 50's and then used it to cope with difficult times. People who do take up drinking later in life tend to hit it hard and within a decade Debs drinking had escalated to a level that worried her. She felt a lot of shame about her drinking – she felt she was driving a car with a trailer behind it – the trailer of shame! What motivated her to finally take action was the prospect of her 50th birthday – she had the blues and decided that she was just not living the life she was meant to be living..- so she signed up for another challenge – but this time it was different… When she signed up for her final 30 day challenge she was still lacking in confidence - so convinced she would fail that she told no-one… she didn't tell her husband or friends – however what was different this time was that she connected with other people who were doing the challenge – people she could talk to freely – she felt less alone as previously she felt she was the only person with this kind of problem! Deb had “found her people” and sure enough a group of the challengers decided to keep going when they got to the end of the 30 days – this is the way to do it, step by step. Avoid the “F” word – it's just too scary when we are at the beginning of this journey. Step by step is the way to go - we have so many examples of people who have signed up Sober Spring or our January Challenge and then have extended it – first to 100 days, then to 6 months, then to a year. Here the thing: once you've got to a year of sobriety you feel SO different, physically and mentally that you just won't want to go back to drinking.  You will be experiencing so many benefits that they will motivate you to carry on and it will become effortless – the new normal. So rather than your motivation coming from external forces (from your doctor, your family, a challenge) – your motivation will come from within - a much more powerful place. Deb learned the importance of planning – she would check in advance what drinks they were serving at the venue so she could decide what to drink and she would decide what she was going to say to people. She would play the movie forward which is one of our favourite tools here at Tribe Sober. We agreed that we felt embarrassed at first having to explain why we weren't drinking but that passes with time and Deb now just says “I choose not to drink” and we agreed that “I'm just taking a break” is also a good one. I think we need to remember that although alcohol is the only drug we have to justify not taking it's not our responsibility to make other people feel comfortable about their drinking – we must do what's right for us. We agreed on the importance of not even contemplating having “one drink” – as Deb put it that would be a switch and she'd be off and looking for the party! We both notice that there is a bit of a societal shift towards sobriety these days – the #sobercurious movement is great and enables people who don't even have a problem with alcohol to see what their lives are like without alcohol – to experiment a bit – and of course its so much lighter to say “I'm sober curious” than “I'm an alcoholic” (!) Deb listed her benefits which include better sleep, no more headaches, no more shame – she's lost weight and most important of all she feels a sense of freedom. I asked her for some tips for anyone listening who knows they need to make a change but is not ready to dive in just yet – her advice is to join some groups and just listen and learn – some of you may be doing just that as you listen to this podcast – your next step might be to join our January Challenge – use it to check your level of dependence – just be a bit sober curious. Go to ts.com and hit January Challenge for more info. One fairly compelling reason to quit drinking is that it will reduce your risk of breast cancer… Deb and I are both breast cancer survivors so we chatted about the fact that the evidence is stacking up linking alcohol consumption to breast cancer. We both had hormone receptor positive breast cancer and research shows that alcohol increases the risk because alcohol increases the levels of estrogen and other hormones in our bodies. Compared to women who don't drink at all, women who have three alcoholic drinks per week have a 15% higher risk of breast cancer. Experts estimate that the risk of breast cancer goes up another 10% for each additional drink women regularly have each day. So dramatically reducing our risk of breast cancer is one benefit of sobriety we don't talk about much – that's why I wanted to highlight it in this podcast On a lighter note Deb started her Making Friends and Mocktails sessions on IG because she wanted to have fun in sobriety You can follow her on Mocktail Mom on IG – her live sessions are Monday at 9pm Eastern time Her website is mocktailmom.com and she's also bringing out a Mocktail Box and a Mocktail Course soon More info Subscription membership for Tribe Sober is just R85 (£4/$6/$8AUS) a month - you can join up HERE To access our website click HERE If you would like a free copy of our "Annual Tracker" or our e-book "66 Days to Sobriety" please email janet@tribesober.com If you would like to come to our Saturday afternoon Zoom Cafe as a guest and meet our community just email janet@tribesober.com Episode Sponsor           This episode is sponsored by the Tribe Sober Membership Program.  If you want to change your relationship with alcohol then                 sign up today           Read more about our 7-step program and subscribe HERE           Book a Discovery Call with me to find out if our membership would help you            Help us to spread the word! We made this podcast so that we can reach more people who need our help.  Please subscribe and share. If you enjoyed the podcast then please leave us a 5 star review on Apple podcasts, take a screenshot of your review and DM it to Tribe Sober's Instagram page - see PS for instructions - we'll send you something special to say thank you! We release a podcast episode every Saturday morning. You can follow Tribe Sober on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram  You can catch our FB live on Saturday mornings (11am SAST) and you can join our private Facebook group HERE Thank you for listening!  Till Next Week Janet x PS   How to leave an rating/review in Apple Podcasts (on an iOS device) 1. Open the Podcasts app. EASY. 2. Choose "Search" from the bottom row of icons and enter the name of the show (i.e., "Recover Like A Mother") into the search field. 3. Select the show under Shows (not under Episodes). 4. Scroll down past the first few episodes until you see Ratings & Reviews. 5. Click "Write a Review" underneath the displayed reviews from other listeners. You'll then have the option to rate the show on a 5-star scale, and write a review (you can rate without writing, too but it's always good to read your experience).

MetFlex and Chill
#144 - Resistance Training For Health & Longevity with Sal Di Stefano

MetFlex and Chill

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 64:31


To watch this episode and other past episodes, please visit Rachel's YouTube channel. Listeners can find Sal De Stephano at his website https://www.mindpumpmedia.com/, and on Instagram @mindpumpsal   Sal Di Stefano is a personal trainer and co-founder of Mind Pump Media and co-host of Mind Pump, an online radio show/podcast that is dedicated to providing truthful fitness and health information. He is also the designer of the Muscular Adaptation Programming System (MAPS Fitness Products). Sal is dedicated to prioritizing health over appearance, and he aims to shift the direction of the fitness industry from aesthetic- and insecurity-based to one based on self-love and self-care. In this episode, we chat all about the stigmas with resistance training, why the fitness industry coined the word ‘toned' for women, reasons resistance training is the leading type of exercise for overall health, benefits to creating muscle memory, and more! “There is no form of exercise that reliably increases bone density, like resistance training, it's so effective, there's nothing that comes close to it.” Sal Di Stefano  Top Takeaways: Why resistance training produces more “permanent” results  Benefits to building muscle and creating muscle memory Reasons resistance training directly encourages “youthful” hormone levels Three reasons women may be afraid to train heavy Show Notes: [0:00] Intro to the trailer  [0:30] Rachel gives a brief bio of guest Sal De Stefano   [1:30] Welcome back to MetFlex and Chill! Rachel welcomes guest Sal De Stefano @mindpumpsal   [2:00] Sal gives a brief background of his journey and how he became a personal trainer and co-founder of Mind Pump Media [3:30] The Resistance Training Revolution  [4:00] Why did you decide to write The Resistance Training Revolution, and who is it for? [7:00] The Complete Book of Running [11:00] “Muscles don't tone. They build or they shrink.” Sal Di Stefano [12:00] In terms of longevity and health, studies are showing resistance training is the best form of exercise [13:30] Question: Why does resistance training produce more permanent results? [19:30] “In modern societies, having a metabolism that burns more calories is a tremendous benefit. It's one of the greatest buffers you can have against chronic disease.” Sal Di Stefano [23:00] Question: Why does resistance training directly encourage “youthful” hormones levels? [28:00] “There is no form of exercise that reliably increases bone density, like resistance training, it's so effective, there's nothing that comes close to it.” Sal Di Stefano  [30:00] Benefits of progressive overload and how lifting weights doesn't cause one to become bulky  [36:00] Question: What are your thoughts on circuit style training like Orange Theory and CrossFit compared to traditional hypertrophy bodybuilding style training? [38:00] “All forms of activity, I don't care what it is, so long as they're appropriate, because you can overdo anything or do anything wrong. All forms of activity done appropriately, have health benefits.” Sal Di Stefano [39:00] Question: In your opinion, what are the best bodyweight exercises? [41:00] Question: Does training fasted burn muscle? [45:30] Question: We hear training “to failure” often but what does it actually mean in a practical sense? [52:30] Question: What is your opinion and experience with ketogenic or low carb diets? [57:00] Question: Is there anything you've changed your mind about in the past year, and why? [1:00:30] Arthur Brooks [1:03:00] To check out more from Sal visit his website  https://www.mindpumpmedia.com/, his podcast Mind Pump Media, and on Instagram @mindpumpsal   [1:03:30] Thanks for listening to another episode! If you're loving MetFlex and Chill and want to help grow the show, please head over to Itunes and leave a rating and review! How to Leave an Apple Podcast Review: First, Open the podcast app on your iPhone, Mac, or iPad. Then, hit the “Search” tab at the bottom right-hand corner of the page and search for MetFlex and Chill. Select the podcast, scroll down to find the subheading “Ratings & Reviews”. and select “Write a Review.” Next, select the number of stars you'd like to leave. Please choose 5 stars! Using the text box which says “Title,” write a title for your review. Then in the text box, write the review itself. The review can be up to 300 words long, but doesn't need to be much more than: “Love the show! Thanks!” or “Rachel provides wonderful content from a multitude of expert guests!” Once you're done select “Send” in the upper right-hand corner.   --- Join the FREE MetFLex Life Course: www.metflexandchill.com  Rachel Gregory is a Board-Certified Nutritionist, Strength and Conditioning Specialist, Podcaster, and founder of MetFlex Life. She is also the author of the international best-selling book, "21-Day Ketogenic Diet Weight Loss Challenge." Rachel received her Master's Degree in Nutrition & Exercise Physiology from James Madison University and Bachelor's Degree in Sports Medicine from the University of Miami. Rachel completed the first-ever human clinical trial looking at the effects of the Ketogenic Diet in non-elite CrossFit athletes, which is published in the International Journal of Sports and Exercise Medicine. Currently, in her day-to-day coaching business, Rachel guides her clients to becoming the best, most confident version of themselves. She has a passion for educating those dedicated to optimizing their physical and mental well-being while improving long-term health and fitness goals. Her most popular course, Keto for Women, has helped women all across the world learn how to ditch the restrictive, all-or-nothing mindset associated with keto and instead thrive through the power of metabolic flexibility. You can connect and learn more about Rachel's work by visiting her website www.metflexlife.com  Social Links: Youtube: @rachelgregory Instagram: @rachelgregory.cns TikTok: @metflexlife Facebook: @metflexlife  Primary Programs: Keto For Women Muscle Science For Women

Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol free life!
Art Therapy and Addiction with Samantha Davis

Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol free life!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 50:02


Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol-free life! This week's podcast guest is an Art Therapist.   Just as I didn't realise how important yoga could be in recovery I also had no idea that Art Therapy had a role to play.. I interviewed Tribe Sobers yoga teacher Tamsin on episode 69 and today I'm chatting to Art Therapist – Samantha Davis Sami has operated a private Art Therapy practice for the past 18 years. She's worked with people who struggle with stress, addiction, depression and also people wanting to discover more meaning and purpose in their lives.   In this Episode Sami began by defining Art Therapy which involves “using art materials to help a client to communicate and express themselves with the guidance of a qualified therapist". We discussed how as adults many of us have lost the ability to play – we tend to get caught up in productivity and ticking boxes. We need to get back in touch with our creativity and art therapy can help us to do that. Some people feel intimidated at the thought of Art Therapy thinking that they need some artistic skill. This is not true at all and in fact Sam loves clients who come to her with no knowledge or aptitude for “art” – Art Therapy is in fact a way of getting in touch with our creativity and playfulness. Art therapy can play in important role in our recovery – it can help us to reconnect with ourselves and better understand who we really are. It can help us to decrease our reliance on alcohol and build new and different pathways and coping mechanisms. As drinkers some of us spent years numbing our feelings. Art therapy will help us to get back in touch with our feelings - and to express ourselves creatively. Sami sees the Art as the Bridge between what is inside and what is outside – it's simply a way to express ourselves. We discussed the fragility of early sobriety where Art Therapy can play the role of holding a safe space where we can “check in”. We talked about the power of vulnerability and how art therapy allows us to express our vulnerability Sam explained the concept behind the vision board sessions which help us to reconnect with our passions using images, art materials etc – I've done one of these sessions and can really recommend it – a vision board allows us to express ourselves and then the power of manifestion will come into play. Our subconscious will register our vision and help it to become a reality. The vision board workshop is particularly useful for people in sobriety as it helps them to get back in touch with what they really enjoy doing. We have extra time on our hands when we stop drinking so we need to find constructive ways to use that time.  Sam is quite happy to run a group vision board session for people in recovery so do get in touch with myself or Sam if you are interested. Sam explained that addictions mean that we are always busy focusing on our next fix which prevents us from being in the moment. Art Therapy can help with mindfulness and mental health generally – focusing on a creative project will enable us to get “in the flow”  which can give our minds a welcome break from stress and anxiety.  Art therapy can help us to build resilience and help us to recognize our triggers – all of which will help to prevent relapse. We often say that “connection is the opposite of addiction” here at Tribe Sober and we are referring to community. Sam helped me to realise that we also need to connect with ourselves – to get to know who we really are. Understanding ourselves better means that we can find new ways of coping – instead of using alcohol. At Tribe Sober we love learning about neuroscience, happy brain chemicals and our Lizard Brains – our gurus have been neuroscientist Staci Danfield who you can hear on episode 67 of this podcast and author of the Happy Brain, Loretta Breuning who is on episode 55. Sami explained that Art Therapy will also trigger our happy brain chemicals and will give us a boost in early sobriety when we can be plagued with a low mood. Loretta Breuning explained to us that we need a project in early sobriety to stay happy and focused. That's why we have designed our 7 step program – to give you a project – the project of self discovery, so sign up for our Art Therapy, Hypnotherapy, Coaching and Root Cause Therapy. Just throw the book at it! Sam and I both run our workshops on Zoom these days and agreed that they work really well and we enjoy opening them up to people all over the world. Sam works with individuals and with groups. Sometimes an individual will need personal attention for their growth, healing or recovery. However the group sessions can be special – she believes that groups come together for a reason – they bring their life experience and of course a key part of the workshop is about sharing our stories. Jung calls this the “collective unconscious” – the people who need to be together come together.  I loved that and it made me think of our workshops and the synergy and bonding that I've witnessed during the 6 years of running workshops. For more info about Sam and her courses just go to her website which is arttherapy.co.za https://www.arttherapy.co.za/about-samantha-davis/ More info Subscription membership for Tribe Sober is just R85 (£4/$6/$8AUS) a month - you can join up HERE To access our website click HERE If you would like a free copy of our "Annual Tracker" or our e-book "66 Days to Sobriety" please email janet@tribesober.com If you would like to come to our Saturday afternoon Zoom Cafe as a guest and meet our community just email janet@tribesober.com Episode Sponsor           This episode is sponsored by the Tribe Sober Membership Program.  If you want to change your relationship with alcohol then                 sign up today           Read more about our 7-step program and subscribe HERE           Book a Discovery Call with me to find out if our membership would help you            Help us to spread the word! We made this podcast so that we can reach more people who need our help.  Please subscribe and share. If you enjoyed the podcast then please leave us a 5 star review on Apple podcasts, take a screenshot of your review and DM it to Tribe Sober's Instagram page - see PS for instructions - we'll send you something special to say thank you! We release a podcast episode every Saturday morning. You can follow Tribe Sober on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram  You can catch our FB live on Saturday mornings (11am SAST) and you can join our private Facebook group HERE Thank you for listening!  Till Next Week Janet x PS   How to leave an rating/review in Apple Podcasts (on an iOS device) 1. Open the Podcasts app. EASY. 2. Choose "Search" from the bottom row of icons and enter the name of the show (i.e., "Recover Like A Mother") into the search field. 3. Select the show under Shows (not under Episodes). 4. Scroll down past the first few episodes until you see Ratings & Reviews. 5. Click "Write a Review" underneath the displayed reviews from other listeners. You'll then have the option to rate the show on a 5-star scale, and write a review (you can rate without writing, too but it's always good to read your experience).

MetFlex and Chill
#143 - Training While Injured, Using Lifting Tools, Squatting Misconceptions, and More with Dr. Zachary Long

MetFlex and Chill

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 50:47


To watch this episode and other past episodes, please visit Rachel's YouTube channel. Listeners can find Dr. Zachary Long at his website thebarbellphysio.com and http://performanceplusprogramming.com, and on Instagram @thebarbellphysio and @performanceplusprogram Dr. Zachary Long is a physical therapist in Charlotte, North Carolina, and runs an industry-leading fitness website “The Barbell Physio” where he is a trusted resource to thousands of athletes, coaches, and health care professionals across the United States and beyond.  Additionally, Dr. Zach teaches with the Institute of Clinical Excellence in their “Fitness Athlete” division where he helps medical professionals better understand the needs of CrossFitters, powerlifters, and weightlifters. Zach is a Board Certified Sports Specialist, Level One CrossFit Trainer, NASM Performance Enhancement Specialist, and certified SFMA practitioner. In this episode, Dr. Zachary Long and I chat about some of the most common mistakes people make when it comes to injury rehab, misinformation surrounding squat depth and why squatting with your knees over your toes isn't an inherently “bad” thing, why (and how) CrossFit training can lead to muscle or hypertrophy gains, and much more! “Our goal should always be ‘how close can we be to our intended stimulus in the workout without slowing down the healing process.' And when we do that, we're going to be significantly better off in the long term.” Dr. Zachary Long Top Takeaways: Why resting is often the worst thing you can do when injured and what you should do instead. How CrossFit training can lead to muscle gains Benefits of using modalities such as lifting shoes or heel elevation, wrist straps, and weight belts. Squatting misconceptions & misinformation How to know if you should be stretching something vs. strengthening something Show Notes: [0:00] Intro to episode trailer  [0:30] Rachel gives a brief introduction of guest Dr. Zachary Long     [1:30] Welcome back to MetFlex and Chill! Rachel welcomes guest, Dr. Zachary Long, @thebarbellphysio to the listeners [2:00] Dr. Long gives an intro to himself and how he got into sports and physical therapy [3:30] Question: If it is not resting, what should we be focusing on instead when we get an injury? [7:00] Question: What other modifications aside from rest would you focus on? [8:30] “Our goal should always be - how close can we be to our intended stimulus in the workout without slowing down the healing process - And when we do that, we're going to be significantly better off in the long term.” Dr. Zachary Long [9:00] Question: Is there any validity to R.I.C.E? (Rest Ice Compression Elevation)  [11:00] Question: What are your thoughts on NSAIDs? [12:30] Question: How do you know if you should be stretching something versus strengthening something? [15:00] Question: Do you use foam rolling and massage therapy in your practice? [20:30] Question: Limiting factors in training - should we try to “fix” them or is it okay to use external ‘help' depending on the goal? [24:00] Question: In terms of squatting, is it okay if your knees travel over your toes? [32:30] Question: Can you chat about how lots of CrossFit athletes get super jacked?  [35:00] Question: Is there anything specific that you personally do with your clients to help with accessory movements that they might not be getting in a typical CrossFit workout? [39:30] Question: When is it beneficial to use a lifting belt?  [43:30] Valsalva maneuver  [44:30] Using external lifting tools depending on your goals  [46:30] Question: Is there anything you've changed your mind about in the past year, and why? [49:00] To check out more from Dr. Zachary Long at his website thebarbellphysio.com and http://performanceplusprogramming.com, and on Instagram @thebarbellphysio and @performanceplusprogram   [50:00] Thanks for listening to another episode! If you're loving MetFlex and Chill and want to help grow the show, please head over to Itunes and leave a rating and review! How to Leave an Apple Podcast Review: First, Open the podcast app on your iPhone, Mac, or iPad. Then, hit the “Search” tab at the bottom right-hand corner of the page and search for MetFlex and Chill. Select the podcast, scroll down to find the subheading “Ratings & Reviews”. and select “Write a Review.” Next, select the number of stars you'd like to leave. Please choose 5 stars! Using the text box which says “Title,” write a title for your review. Then in the text box, write the review itself. The review can be up to 300 words long, but doesn't need to be much more than: “Love the show! Thanks!” or “Rachel provides wonderful content from a multitude of expert guests!” Once you're done select “Send” in the upper right-hand corner.   --- Join the FREE MetFLex Life Course: www.metflexandchill.com  Rachel Gregory is a Board-Certified Nutritionist, Strength and Conditioning Specialist, Podcaster, and founder of MetFlex Life. She is also the author of the international best-selling book, "21-Day Ketogenic Diet Weight Loss Challenge." Rachel received her Master's Degree in Nutrition & Exercise Physiology from James Madison University and Bachelor's Degree in Sports Medicine from the University of Miami. Rachel completed the first-ever human clinical trial looking at the effects of the Ketogenic Diet in non-elite CrossFit athletes, which is published in the International Journal of Sports and Exercise Medicine. Currently, in her day-to-day coaching business, Rachel guides her clients to becoming the best, most confident version of themselves. She has a passion for educating those dedicated to optimizing their physical and mental well-being while improving long-term health and fitness goals. Her most popular course, Keto for Women, has helped women all across the world learn how to ditch the restrictive, all-or-nothing mindset associated with keto and instead thrive through the power of metabolic flexibility. You can connect and learn more about Rachel's work by visiting her website www.metflexlife.com  Social Links: Youtube: @rachelgregory Instagram: @rachelgregory.cns TikTok: @metflexlife Facebook: @metflexlife  Primary Programs: Keto For Women Muscle Science For Women

MoneyBall Medicine
Impact of Artificial Intelligence on the Doctor-Patient relationship

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 49:24


We've learned from previous guests that machine learning and other forms of AI are helping to identify better disease treatments, get drugs to market faster, and spot health problems before they get out of hand. But what if they could also help patients find the best doctors for them, and help doctors frame their advice in a way that patients can relate to? This week, Harry's guest, Briana Brownell, talks about the computational tools her company Pure Strategy is building to find patterns in people's personal preferences that can lower cultural barriers, enable better matchmaking between patients and doctors, predict which patients are most likely or least likely to go along with a treatment plan, or help doctors communicate their recommendations better. "Not everybody makes decisions in the same way," Brownell says. "Not everybody values the same things. But by understanding some of those psychological and value-based drivers, we can get better health care outcomes."Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.If you're a regular listener you know I've had dozens of guests on the show who've explained how machine learning and other forms of AI are transforming healthcare They've talked about the ways AI can find better disease treatments, or help get drugs to market faster, or spot health problems before they get out of hand. In a way, that's what the show is all about.But my guest this week, Briana Brownell, thinks there are some gaps at the very core of our healthcare system where the power of AI is only beginning to be tapped.And one of those gaps is the relationship between patients and their doctors.Brownell is a data scientist and the founder and CEO of a consulting firm in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, called Pure Strategy. The company works with all sorts of clients and industries. And it's known for a package of computational tools called ANIE that uses forms of AI such as unsupervised learning and natural language processing to find patterns in data.In the healthcare sector, Pure Strategy collects that data in the form of patients' responses to behavioral surveys. And then it looks for patterns in people's personal preferences or cultural identities that can help match them up with the best doctors for them.These patterns can also predict which patients are most likely or least likely to go along with a treatment plan. That can help doctors communicate their recommendations better and raise the chances that patients will stay out of the ER or the ICU.Brownell argues that medicine should never be completely data-driven, since doctors always need to account for patient's unique life stories and preferences. But with AI, she says, providers can gather more input that helps them understand where patients are coming from and what challenges they're facing.All of which echoes one of the themes of The Future You, which includes several chapters about how technology is changing the relationship between us patients and our doctors.By the way, the book is out now in paperback and ebook formats at Barnes & Noble and Amazon. So check it out.And now here's my full conversation with Briana Brownell.Harry Glorikian: Briana, welcome to the show.Briana Brownell: Thank you so much for having me.Harry Glorikian: So, Briana, I've, like, read about what you've done. I've watched the TED talk you had given and seen you win awards and so forth. But I want to step back for everybody here and sort of, so they understand who you are or where you came from. And if you can give a sort of high level biography of yourself how you got to this point in your career, where you're building computational tools to help doctors and patients -- how did all of that start? Where did you grow up? What did you study? You know what? What are the experiences sort of shaped you to go in this direction? Because you didn't start off in health care.Briana Brownell: That's true, yeah. I've had a really kind of a roundabout career, certainly. The first job that I got after my undergraduate degree in mathematics was in finance, which was wonderful. But I started in 2006, which I'm sure you know what's happening next. The global financial crisis happened next, right? And so that was my very first start in the work world. And after that, I actually got into more of the data science area, which was amazing for me because I was always interested in data, always interested in mathematics. But at the time, nobody had ever really heard of data science. Nobody had ever really been all that interested in analytics. And so I found that my job was so bizarre to just about everybody that I met. And so you can't imagine how excited I am when now data science is on everyone's mind. And, you know, artificial intelligence is, you know, a huge industry now. So I feel like, you know, I started somewhere very strange. But, you know, the world kind of came back to realize how interesting it really was.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, it's interesting. I mean, when I was when I came up with the idea for my first book, it was, you know, at least five years before it published, maybe even six where it was like, Oh my god, . It's the data fixation of health care like. Once we get that data like, oh my God, we're going to be able to analyze it and then find opportunities and see patterns and longitudinal, and I was like, "But I don't hear anybody talking about that." So that's what I got me excited to write that first one. But tell us about your company. It's called Pure Strategy, which reminds me of Strategy Consulting, which was, you know, one of my last companies that I had. But you know, what do you you do for your clients? What do you sink your teeth into?Briana Brownell: So, you know, first of all, the name Pure Strategy is a game theory reference. So I actually have a master's in economics. And so it's a little bit of a nerdy game theory reference. And so every time I meet someone else who took game theory, you know, we have a little bit of an eye-to-eye with the name of the company. But so the reason we named it that is a pure strategy gives you a way forward regardless of what your opposition does. So you always know the best thing to do next. And so, you know, with that philosophy is how we approach all kinds of different problems. So what kind of data, what kind of information do companies need to make decisions about how to better serve their customers, what markets to enter, how to invest their money properly? All of those kinds of things.Harry Glorikian: I need to study pure strategy just to manage my wife and kids that so I know what to do every time something happens. But your core product at Pure Strategy is something you call automated neural intelligence engine or ANIE. What is Annie built to do?Briana Brownell: So ANIE has a few different components to it. The reason that we built this intelligence system is because what I found was as a data scientist, a lot of the things that I was doing by hand could be much better done with an automated AI system. And so I began to look at the sort of time intensive but lower value tasks that could be tackled by artificial intelligence. And so we have a suite of four modules within that system that makes data analysis easier, faster, better. All of those good things. And so, you know, working with language, for example, working with prediction, working with choice modeling and then working to find emergent patterns and data that you didn't even know to look for.Harry Glorikian: Ok, so NLP-based predictive capabilities. But step back for a second, so focus in a little bit on on, say, the clients in pharma and health care, because that's the constituency that generally listens to this. What kind of problems are you helping them solve? So if you had a few concrete examples.Briana Brownell: Sure. So one of the areas that we find it's extremely useful is to understand typologies of patients and physicians and understanding how their values and attitudes impact their decision making. So not everybody makes decisions in the same way. Not everybody values the same things. But by understanding some of those psychological and value based drivers, we can get better health care outcomes. So we can look at what are the motivating factors in the patient group. Why are they being readmitted? Why are they not adhering to their treatment plan? Why are they doing things like delaying appointments, canceling appointments, those kinds of things? And then we can understand why they're making those decisions and hopefully sort of break the negative patterns and encourage the positive patterns so that they are healthier, they live longer, healthier lives and that their everyday life is improved as a result.Harry Glorikian: Interesting. When you first started explaining it, my brain was going towards a dating app like making sure I put the right doctor and the right patient together.Briana Brownell: So that's that's a big part of it, actually. Because certain physicians have a world view of their role as a health care provider, they need to be able to match their sort of delivery and their communication with a patient with the way that the patient can best understand it. So some physicians are very science-based and focusing on what are the cutting edge things that are happening in my field? And do I want to sort of use those with my patients to add to their treatment plan, for example. Whereas some other physicians are more looking at these sort of holistic care aspect where the patient is the center of a huge ecosystem of other health impact factors. And so how do they treat that patient as sort of an entire person? Right. And so definitely matching. You can imagine certain patients want certain kinds of doctors, right? So I'm the kind of person that I want to get in there and get out and give me the information. And that's fine, right? But that's not for everybody. And so by treating both the patient group and the physician group as having their own individual sort of beliefs and nuances within their worldview can really, really help things.Harry Glorikian: So essentially, like, I'm simplifying dramatically, but we are talking about the fundamental functions of a sort of a dating app, at least for that application area.Briana Brownell: That's right. Yes, it is a lot like a dating app. Yep.Harry Glorikian: But so if I understood, because I was trying to listen to some of the things you had done and you've guys have written around it, basically you're trying to help lower the cultural barriers between patients and the medical system to make sure they get better care.Briana Brownell: Yes, exactly. Yeah, that's a great way to put it.Harry Glorikian: That sort of feels like a somewhat -- other than the dating aspect of it, right -- that feels like an unconventional problem for a computer science approach to tackle. I mean, we've had a lot of startup CEOs on the show talking about machine learning to sort genomes or chemical libraries, or to discover new drugs. But I don't think I've ever had anybody on, necessarily, that's trying to use AI to bridge a cultural gap. So I'd love to hear more abou that issue, like did you set out from day one to do this? I mean, you know, you've said in past interviews, it feels like you've been building a case that there are effective or emotional cultural issues at stake in the way doctors and patients communicate, and that if medical providers don't know about these issues or if they get them wrong, it can get in the way of achieving the best outcome for the patient. I mean, just summarizing. So if I'm wrong, you feel free to tell me,Briana Brownell: No, that you know that that's a really interesting way of putting it. And so why did we realize that this was an important way to go? Well, part of the answer to that is because early in my career after the GFC [great financial crisis], before I started the company, I did a lot of work understanding the motivating factors in encouraging technology adoption for people who needed to mitigate climate risk. So that's a huge mouthful. But basically, we wanted to see what could encourage people to adapt to climate variability in farming and mining and wineries and grape production, that kind of thing. Because being able to understand how people perceive risk to their business, how people understand technology in terms of it being a business investment, how people sort of copy or don't copy other people in the community who seem like savvy business people in their own right, and then adopt because of the social factor. And so we have seen a huge amount of success using that methodology to understand technology adoption. And so it wasn't too far afield to say, OK, this same kind of technique that's so successful in this other area would have a huge impact in the health care area. If we could understand some of those value-based and behavioral elements to understand why people are making the decisions that they're making. Health care is such a deeply personal thing that you really can't treat it at that surface level, and that's really what we've been doing for generations. We've gotten so far away from that doctor and in the community who knows everyone and their family and who has that close connection. Now we've sort of taken a step back, tried to scale it up, but what we've lost is understanding how those core values impact the decisions that you make around your own health care.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. Well, in the doctor's defense, it's sort of tough to do that in 10 minutes, right?Briana Brownell: Absolutely, it is. And that's that's the problem, is, you know, maybe we can eliminate some of those pressures and bring that right.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. And I and I look at sort of if I think about your system plus, you know, all the new technologies that are coming like wearables and so forth. So if you go to a doctor, they can get a longitudinal view of you, plus maybe the way that you're thinking about how you want your health care from the system that you're creating. But you mentioned you're solving these problems through machine learning or natural language processing. Why did you feel that these were the best tools in the AI toolbox to sort of help you with this?Briana Brownell: So the typology creation is actually an unsupervised learning method. And so the reason that that's so effective is because it doesn't force a pattern on the data due to the bias of the researcher. So it finds emerging patterns that are in the data that someone might necessarily not know to look for that specific pattern. And so it's sort of it doesn't care about your or my preconceived notions about what kinds of attitudes and behaviors are important. All of that comes directly from the data. And so for me, that's a huge, really powerful reason that it's so effective. It's because it will find the patterns, even if it's not something you need to look for.Harry Glorikian: So what's an example of the training dataset or the because I'm wondering like, you've got this system, but it's looking at certain sets of data. What would those be so that it can find those patterns?Briana Brownell: Right. So usually it's a series of attitudinal and behavioral questions that the individual is sort of rating on, let's say, a seven point scale. And the way that we come up with that sort of battery of questions is a whole lot of conversations with the patient group. So usually you talk to a large number of folks and then patterns emerge using the natural language, understanding that you can then quantify in order to find the typologies. So we have partners to find patients and physicians in specific regions with specific conditions. All of that so that we can target people to get their sort of attitudes on these different areas.Harry Glorikian: How do you distill all these squishy things like patient life stories, emotional states, cultural backgrounds, beliefs down into something that can be coded and categorized as data? I keep thinking about as spider graph, right? Yeah, yeah.Briana Brownell: So so that's the hard part. You know, and I fully admit that it's a very challenging area because on the one hand, you have the sort of individual story that needs to be understood in context. And then in the other area, you need to have sort of quantitative data that you can actually make real decisions on. And so moving from that one part to the other is sort of a combination of experience of folks working with patients within that specific treatment area. It's a combination of the sort of cutting edge understanding of psychology, of how people interact with the health care system. There's a huge amount of cultural factors. We, you know, work with patients and physicians all around the world. And so that's always a huge sort of elephant in the room, to make sure to add context to it. And so by combining all of these things together, then you essentially get closer and closer to the right answer.Harry Glorikian: So I'm almost thinking like, there's got to be this graphical interface, right, that somebody can look at quickly. I mean, I don't know why all of a sudden a Myers-Briggs popped into my head. So you get an idea of what that person is like and how to manage them. But so, I've heard you talk before, and you fundamentally believe, and you can correct me if I'm wrong, that it's the data plus the physician that takes it to a different level. It's not just the data itself.Briana Brownell: Mm hmm. And I mean, it's the data and the physician in partnership with the patient because, you know, at the end of the day, we all have a role to play in our own health care maintenance, in our own sort of world through journey through this world, I guess, right? And I think that by empowering the physicians to, as we say, practice at the top of their license, that's really a positive thing for everyone, right? So instead of focusing on tasks that can and should be automated, you're really focusing on making sure that those outcomes are as good as they can be. And so the support system around the patient is also extremely important. So you had mentioned wearables and some of those things. So that is another area that we're involved in as well, is making sure that we have some of that data that can feed into understanding the world view of the patient. And then in turn, so the physician can understand where that patient is coming from and identify whether they may be having challenges with their maintenance, for example, or with something at home.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I've got my new book is coming out soon, and I, you know, by putting it together, I almost feel like the technology plus the physician can almost bring get the patient to have a concierge medicine level experience without the cost of concierge medicine, right? And so I'm assuming your system is trying to give them that elevated level of care by giving the physician the insights that they need. But does the patient also get the same insights to get to know themselves? I'm just curious.Briana Brownell: They do, yes. And so we're actually looking at, rather than sort of -- you mentioned the concierge level medicine. We're actually looking at the most vulnerable people, rather than saying who needs the concierge service on the high end. We're saying, whose outcomes can we most impact? And so looking at the people who are more vulnerable, who struggle a lot more with their health care, where we want to make sure that we avoid them having to seek acute care. Because at the end of the day, nobody wants to end up in the emergency room, nobody wants to end up in the ICU. And so anything that we can do to sort of prevent that for those people is, you know, a huge positive for that individual and not only just them, but their whole support system, their family, their friends, everybody in their community.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer.It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in Kindle format. Just go to Amazon and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: So you grew up in Canada, you went to school in Canada. You operate a business in Canada. And so I'm picking on this sort of cross-border thing, right? Because our health care systems are just a little different. So, you know. But I also imagine you've worked with, you know, clients here in the U.S. and some based in Canada. I'd love to get your -- how do you think about the two systems when it comes to the implementation of a technology like yours? Because they feel like they come at health care from different vantage points.Briana Brownell: Absolutely. So interestingly enough, we actually do work not just in the U.S., but also in Europe and also in Asia. And so for that reason, there's a lot of really interesting cross-cultural differences in how different health care systems work. And so, you know, Canada, we have a single payer system. And so for some, for some areas, it's a huge positive. People aren't going broke paying their medical bills. There's sort of more access in certain areas. But there are struggles. So things like remote communities, being able to have access to health care from places. For example, here in northern Saskatchewan, it's a real challenge for patients to get care from some of those remote areas. Each system, I think, has some challenges and some benefits. And then same with the American system, the advantage being that preventative care is actively incentivized, right? And so in Canada, that's not the case. So I think it's just really a different balance and a different tradeoff.Harry Glorikian: So, so the system is designed -- I almost think you need to use the system to figure out your own clients so that you you can you can understand what their drivers are. But you've you've described yourself as a data scientist, a tech entrepreneur. But I've also heard the word futurist. So I'm super curious about, you know, let's talk about the future. So what do you think about the cutting edge ideas in AI? And, you know, do they really have the potential -- and I know what my bias is, so I don't have to cloud your thought with my bias -- but you know, whether it's in health care or business or other areas, what are you most excited about right now?Briana Brownell: So for me, a lot of the interesting AI applications bring in decision making and sort of data analysis that is completely new and different. So if you look at things like diagnostics, the diagnostic tools using different styles of AI make their decisions in a way that's different than the physicians do. So you could have an AI system that's extremely accurate, but then it misses certain things that a physician will catch and then vice versa. And I think that that, to me is one of the most interesting and most important parts. Because now all of a sudden, you can have a sort of augmented system where the physician can work with the technology in order to get better outcomes for everyone. So that's one area where I'm really excited. The other area is being able to have that personalization at scale. So, you know, we talked about, you have the community physician that knew everyone's family and everyone's coming and going, and so you could have that personalized care. But then we've sort of moved towards a more kind of data-driven system where you didn't have that personal connection. I think we're going to go sort of back. I think we're going to be able to look at ways that we can personalize interactions, treatment plans, even specific medicines at a scale that it can really help a lot of people.Harry Glorikian: Well, it's interesting because I was talking to someone at Facebook in their AI group and it was like, their system already knows so much about you, right? And so people don't realize like how that system truly does probably know them, better than they know themselves in a certain way. So I always think like, wow, if they could really start applying that to health care, you could really make a serious difference in the lives of these individuals, because most of health care is how you make your decisions and how you manage yourself. And did you take your meds? Did you go for that walk you were supposed to go for? Those sorts of simple things, right, that that we all struggle with on a daily basis. But so another futurism question. So you gave a TEDx talk in Calgary a couple of years ago where you talked about research done in pareidolia, just making sure I pronounce it correctly, which is the human brain's tendency to see faces and random things like in the environment, where you look in the I think you look in the clouds and you see a dog or something, right? But but you you tested computer vision. You found that that that doesn't happen. With the computer vision, they recognize different patterns, I guess, but not things like faces. And so from a philosophical question, how do you compare like the human mind and sort of the pattern recognition that we do? Because most of what we do in medicine is a certain form of pattern recognition. I'm just trying to figure out, is that what differentiates an intelligent system versus a conscious system?Briana Brownell: So I would say in that case, it wouldn't be necessarily consciousness, but certainly the human brain works differently from the artificial intelligence systems that we've built so far. Most of the AI systems that we're building are sort of focused on one specific narrow task, and it does really well at one thing. But as soon as it moves outside of that, or as soon as you add sort of additional kinds of media to it, it's really, really challenging. So I think, you know, speaking futurism, the next wave of really good AI applications are going to widen. So we're really, really narrow right now. But we're going to start to widen more and more in order to sort of combine some of this information and be able to sort of get greater insights. So I'll give you an example. So when people do sort of codifying datasets for image recognition, what they do is they link it to what are called synsets. And so what a synset is is a meaning, right? So if you have, let's say, like a coffee mug, right? So you have a picture of this, you know, you say, OK, it's a mug, right? But then what if somebody else codes it as a cup? Well, so there are two different things, right? But they're similar enough that most humans would recognize.Briana Brownell: Well, that's probably sort of really similar, right? But yet when we're doing image recognition and we're training on these huge data sets, that similarity is not always taken into account. So more and more we're able to make multiple linkages like that in order to improve the outcomes. But right now, in a lot of cases, that's not taken into account. And so that'll be I think the next step is, we're going to sort of widen some of the applications of artificial intelligence. And then after that, it's really about proactive and automated systems. So we right now are looking into this, being able to have a system that understands, adapts, and then makes a recommendation in order to improve health care outcomes. So this person is, let's say, their heart rate is constantly elevated. Maybe we need to send them a push notification and sort of ask them, Hey, how are you doing? Is everything OK? Right? Something like that. And so those proactive systems, I think, are going to become even more important in the next five or 10 years.Harry Glorikian: So it's interesting. I was reading a paper yesterday or the day before about how there's, when you make, to speed up memory there's breakages that happen in the DNA in the neurons that sort of helps the system adapt more quickly to a new memory. And so. I want to say, like you're talking about systems that have to be able to change part of the code to be able to then adapt to what it's now looking at. So sort of learning, but not learning the way that we think about learning.Briana Brownell: Yeah, so definitely, I mean, there's also challenges with those systems because you can have them quickly move away from where the original prediction was, right? And so being able to have that monitoring is extremely important. So this this is not a new idea. This is an old idea from the eighties about how you need to make like AI systems as collections of agents, right? So we're just digging up some of the old thought around this. But I think whereas it was extremely difficult to do 40 years ago, now it's actually relatively straightforward. And so I expect a lot of breakthroughs in that area.Harry Glorikian: Well, and I think what you know, some of the other areas that I see is sort of where you turn AI on itself to figure out how to improve what it does, like Google's doing with new chipsets and so forth and so on. Which I think most people aren't factoring in -- the dramatic improvements that could be made when you turn these things on themselves. So the shifts are, what I like to call the turns, are happening much faster than most people anticipate. Let's go back to health care for a second. So try taking today's, you know, trends in AI, looking forward a couple of decades, say 2040. Shit, I'm going to be really old by then. But how do you think technology will change the way patients interact with the health care system, and maybe it's earlier than 2040, so don't let me. You know, that might be too far out, but what do you predict is going to happen at that point?Briana Brownell: I think that there's going to be a much higher-touch system in place. So right now, most people go to the doctor for, maybe they'll go for an annual checkup, maybe not, depending on who you are. They'll go see a doctor when they have something go wrong, where they feel sick or they have an injury or that kind of thing. They might go to minor emergency if they had a sort of more serious injury or something happened there. But the truth is, it's not an everyday sort of a thing, or probably it's not an every week or every month kind of thing for most people. I see that changing. I think that there's going to be sort of a continuous back and forth. There's going to be a much more sort of low-friction way that anyone can communicate with a health care provider or even an AI system to get their health care questions answered. So, you know, I'm sure everybody has been in this situation where you either you feel sick or you have hurt yourself. There's something going on with your health care and you have to make a decision whether or not you're going to actually call and book that appointment and you're going to actually go down to the doctor's office and you're actually going to talk to some somebody about how you're feeling. I think that's going to disappear. I think it's going to be a lot of the sort of seemingly minor things are going to be sort of taken care of by high-touch technology system that can sort of direct people to a physician's care when they need to, but can handle sort of most other things that that happen. And so that drastically reduces sort of the load for things that are people are avoiding for months and months and months. And then all of a sudden it gets really bad and they end up in the emergency room. So I see that being completely eliminated from the system.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. Well, that would be wonderful. It's funny because in my brain, I was going to, OK, the serious movie that lays all this out and it looks totally cool. And then the comedy where the person is totally revolting against the system. But I do agree, like, I truly believe that we're moving towards health care and hopefully away from sick care. Or we sort of push the sick stuff out much further. But like I mean, you can't see it, it's under my shirt, but I've got a CGM [continuous glucose monitor], right, that I'm wearing under my shirt here. And so, you know, why am I wearing a CGM? I'm not diabetic, but I'm sort of monitoring, you know, don't eat -- like, what was it we went to? I think I had bibimbap at a Korean restaurant, and man, whatever was in the rice made that blood sugar spike and totally stay up. So I'm like, OK, no bibimbap. Or if I do it, it's going to be once in a blue moon. But I think the systems are going to be monitoring. I don't think there's anything we buy anymore, your car, your computer or whatever doesn't have a monitoring system in it to sort of do preventive maintenance or alert you before, you know, here's the mean time between failure. And that's what I see happening and what we're doing.Briana Brownell: Yeah, we even get, you know, I get my notification on screen time, like where I was spending time on my iPad, which app I was doing right. And so I feel like that's exactly where we're going to go to is where, you know, maybe every week you actually get a little sort of health care report or you get some some kind of information.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, that the delivery of that information is going to have to be there. We're going to need a few geniuses on how to deliver that to people because I can just see a few people having fits, right? Because my kids don't like the monitoring app. When I say, how long have you been on Instagram or Snapchat? And they're like, Oh, not very long. And then you can see the time. And they don't like that. But do you believe, like every doctor or nurse physician assistant is going to have sort of an AI assistant working alongside them sifting through patient data? Highlighting what the doctor needs to focus on or translating cultural gaps? You're working on a system that sort of is trying to understand people, bridge that gap and sort of make things better, so I just see you're sort of at the beginning stage. And I'm trying to go forward in the future to say, would that just be the natural progression as it goes forward?Briana Brownell: Yeah. So I definitely see multiple AI systems running behind the scenes that can sort of crunch the numbers and understand some of the macro level patterns that can then inform the physicians with information that might be relevant. So one of the areas that we've done some work in is with rare diseases. So you probably have heard the saying: If you hear hoof beats behind you, what do you think it is? Do you think it's a horse or a zebra? Right. So, you know, if you're a doctor and you see symptoms that match extremely rare disease, a zebra or something much more common, you're going to assume you're going to guess that it's a horse. But for the patient, you know, going through that rigmarole when you have a rare condition, when you are that zebra, that's a really difficult thing for the patient. And so if you can say, you know, this actually might be a zebra based on all of these other factors and all of these other sort of subtle cues, I think that that makes it better for everyone. I mean, for the physician who has access to pattern data that they would never be able to do by just sort of seeing patterns in their own patients and being able to look at that on just a much greater scale. And so that's an area where I think that there's going to be a huge, huge boon.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I'm a firm believer in genomic sequencing, to cut to the chase. And then, you know, I just interviewed Matthew Might, who looks at the genetic sequence and then helps identify already-approved drugs that might actually impact that disease state. You know, there's a number of things that are out there. I just wish they moved faster into the existing environment. And that's what drives me. I mean, I think at some point, I don't know how any of the systems can function without implementing these tools that sort of are assistive in nature. I've heard some venture guys say, "Oh, this is going to take the place of the doctor," and I'm like, "Oh my God, you're nuts." Like, that's not going to happen. But I think because I think every piece of data I've seen is the two together result in better outcomes rather than one or the other by themselves.Briana Brownell: Yeah, absolutely. I think you're exactly right on that. The idea is that maybe you have a sort of larger system of people that can support people in their health care. So instead of focusing on doctors and nurses and then things like physiotherapists, et cetera, I see a role for sort of other support people within the health care system that can sort of guide patients to lead healthier lives. Aside from that, so if anything, I think that it's going to be we're going to need more people involved in doing some of these things.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I think, you know, I keep trying to encourage my brethren in the tech world to come to health care because it has more impact on on everything and we need more people. There's just not enough people to do the computational work or the real hard math, sometimes that's what is required. I find people being pretty lazy at that stuff that moves the needle. But it's been great talking to you. This is fascinating. I would, you know, I almost wish I could turn your system on myself to find out what my biases are. You know, you may want to come up with a consumer facing thing so that people can learn things about themselves and maybe even relay that back to their own physician about how they want to be communicated with.Briana Brownell: Yeah, I love that. I think that right now we are actually working with a consumer facing application within the US system, so hopefully someday you'll be able to have access to it and you can learn all about yourself.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, like I said, I mean, I'm simplifying it, but sort of like a Myers-Briggs. When I was younger, I was ENTJ and now ENTP. But, you know, always good to know yourself. Great to speak to you. I wish you incredible success in your endeavors. And we want to see systems like this making impact on patients and bringing hard data to the table to get even the system itself to sort of change the way that it operates.Briana Brownell: Wonderful, well, it was great to talk to you, and, you know, it's always something that I am excited to chat about, so thank you for having me.Harry Glorikian: Thank you.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and MoneyBall Medicine at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show.You can find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.

Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol free life!
Why we need to Ditch the Drink in Mid-life - with Lori Massicot

Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol free life!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 51:57


Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol-free life! This weeks podcast guest is the lovely Lori Massicot a midlife sobriety coach. I discovered Lori when I found her podcast – it's called “to 50 and beyond” – it's a podcast aimed at women in mid-life where she highlights the beauty of aging and the freedom that comes along with alcohol free life. She's on a mission to raise awareness towards the life changing impact of sobriety as we age.  She interviewed me for her podcast and you can hear that conversation on episode 182 of to 50 and beyond. It's called “Getting Sober Over 60” and you can access it here In this Episode I'm always fascinated by the way peoples drinking evolves over the years – I'm the first person to admit that drinking can be a lot of fun – until it's not – until you become dependent - check out our podcast on how we go from "liking to wanting to needing"  Let's remember that 20% of social drinkers WILL become dependent over the years – if we are in that 20% then that doesn't make us bad people – or weak people – or diseased people. It just makes us people who have become addicted to an addictive drug!  People who will have to do a bit of work to change their habits – and that's where people like myself and Lori come in – we've been where you are and we can help you make the change.  As you heard Lori did the fun bit in her teens and 20's – partying as a teenager and then working in real estate, earning good money and drinking wine with friends and colleagues. Then it was the mommyjuice phase – in here 30's Lori felt depressed, put on weight and found her high pressure job all a bit much. She was using wine at home to cope with her stress and felt trapped in a vicious cycle. She refers to her early 40's as the “dark years, she lost her mom and could get through two bottles of wine at a time. She had a wake up call when a family member asked her if she was an alcoholic.  That's when she realised that alcohol had become the centre of everything in her life. Of course like many of us she tried “the rules” (drinking only on certain days, drinking red rather than white etc etc) which of course didn't work. Of course she also tried to “moderate” but of course that didn't work either - in fact we agreed that for many of us its only when we try to cut down that we realise the extent of our problem.  We realise that we have crossed a line with our drinking and it's going to take more than a bit of willpower to make a change. So if you are busy trying to “moderate” and using rules to control your drinking please save yourself a lot of heartache and take a complete break – no need to use the F (forever word) – just take a break Every drinker needs to take regular breaks to test their dependence. Tribe Sober has just opened their annual Dry January Fundraiser which offers community and online support for 30 days - more info here. “Playing the Movie Forward” is a very popular tool in our community.  Lori found herself “playing the movie forward 20 years” and was  horrified at what she saw.  She knew her drinking would escalate over the years and decided that she was done.  She poured her Chardonnay down the sink and got started on her life changing journey to sobriety. Lori used journaling as her key tool –there is so much evidence of the value of keeping a journal – and it helps us so much when we are on this path. We can use it to process our emotions, note our triggers and track our journey.  We can read back to the early days and see how much easier its getting and realise how many benefits we are experiencing. And of course the more benefits we do experience the less likely we will be inclined to return to Day 1! Exercise was another key tool for Lori and she educated herself about the best ways to strengthen her body in midlife. So journaling, exercise and playing the movie forward are all great tools which will help us to quit drinking. We all need to create a personal toolkit and we help you with that at our regular Tribe Sober workshops.  Read more about our workshops here. Sobriety has given Lori freedom and peace. When she feels anxious she now understands how to self soothe without alcohol. I loved the way she said that in early sobriety we have to protect ourselves and build ourselves up so that we can learn to cope. Then we can go on to learn how to actually thrive our alcohol free lives. That's exactly what we help our members to do at Tribe Sober with our 7 step program – get more info and sign up here.  We agreed that ditching the booze gives us a feeling of power - we are doing something that the majority of the population would not even consider - Sobriety is a Superpower! Times are changing and the sober curious movement is helping that. People are getting “sober curious” and wondering what their life would look like without it. Why not sign up for Tribe Sober's January Challenge and find out! Loris podcast is called "to 50 and beyond" and her website is here: lorimassicot.com. Lori coaches women on health, wellness and sobriety and you can contact her via her website and she's also on Instagram. More info Subscription membership for Tribe Sober is just R85 (£4/$6/$8AUS) a month - you can join up HERE To access our website click HERE If you would like a free copy of our "Annual Tracker" or our e-book "66 Days to Sobriety" please email janet@tribesober.com If you would like to come to our Saturday afternoon Zoom Cafe as a guest and meet our community just email janet@tribesober.com Episode Sponsor           This episode is sponsored by the Tribe Sober Membership Program.  If you want to change your relationship with alcohol then                 sign up today           Read more about our 7-step program and subscribe HERE           Book a Discovery Call with me to find out if our membership would help you            Help us to spread the word! We made this podcast so that we can reach more people who need our help.  Please subscribe and share. If you enjoyed the podcast then please leave us a 5 star review on Apple podcasts, take a screenshot of your review and DM it to Tribe Sober's Instagram page - see PS for instructions - we'll send you something special to say thank you! We release a podcast episode every Saturday morning. You can follow Tribe Sober on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram  You can catch our FB live on Saturday mornings (11am SAST) and you can join our private Facebook group HERE Thank you for listening!  Till Next Week Janet x PS   How to leave an rating/review in Apple Podcasts (on an iOS device) 1. Open the Podcasts app. EASY. 2. Choose "Search" from the bottom row of icons and enter the name of the show (i.e., "Recover Like A Mother") into the search field. 3. Select the show under Shows (not under Episodes). 4. Scroll down past the first few episodes until you see Ratings & Reviews. 5. Click "Write a Review" underneath the displayed reviews from other listeners. You'll then have the option to rate the show on a 5-star scale, and write a review (you can rate without writing, too but it's always good to read your experience).

MetFlex and Chill
#142 - Strength vs. Hypertrophy Training with Ashleigh VanHouten

MetFlex and Chill

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 47:29


To watch this episode and other past episodes, please visit Rachel's YouTube channel. To learn more about the Muscle Science For Women program, follow THIS link. To sign up for Kabuki Education Week, follow THIS link. In this episode, Ashleigh and I chat about the differences between training for hypertrophy versus training for strength and how to design your fitness goals around them. We also discuss how to safely start back in the gym after an injury, and we discuss the launch of the second round of the Muscle Science For Women program! “Strength training is focused on getting better and developing more skill while hypertrophy is focused on getting bigger and building more muscle.” Rachel Gregory “Strength is about efficiency of movement, whereas muscle building is less about the efficiency and more about the actual muscle contraction.” Ashleigh VanHouten Top Takeaways: Muscle Science For Women Program - second launch and how to sign up Kabuki Education Week Seminar highlight Differences and similarities between building muscle and getting stronger Advice for 47 year old women just starting her weight training journey Show Notes: [0:00] Intro to episode trailer  [1:00] Welcome back to MetFlex and Chill! Rachel gives listeners a brief intro of guest Ashleigh Vanhouten @themusclemaven     [4:00] Announcement! A new round of Muscle Science For Women launching!  [5:00] Sign up for the Muscle Science For Women Program at www.metflexlife.com/msw  [6:00] Ashleigh gives a breakdown of what you can get out of The Muscle Science for Women Program [8:30] Check out some MSW testimonials HERE!  [9:00] Differences and similarities between building muscle and getting stronger [12:00] Training for strength vs. hypertrophy [14:30] “Strength training is focused on getting better and developing more skill while hypertrophy is focused on getting bigger and building more muscle.” Rachel Gregory  [15:00] Performing power cleans for strength versus getting enough effective reps for muscle building [17:00] “Strength is about efficiency of movement, whereas muscle building is less about the efficiency and more about the actual muscle contraction.” Ashleigh VanHouten [27:30] Question: What is your best advice for a 47 year old woman that is just starting out on a weight training journey? [33:30] Question: How do I rebuild muscle after illness/injury and muscle wasting? [39:30] Question: Why am I shaking super early in a workout? [43:30] Kabuki Seminar Jan 9-15th  [44:30] Birth Fit  [46:00] To check out more about The Muscle Science For Women Program visit www.metflexlife.com/msw [46:00]Thanks for listening to another episode! If you're loving MetFlex and Chill and want to help grow the show, please head over to Itunes and leave a rating and review! How to Leave an Apple Podcast Review: First, Open the podcast app on your iPhone, Mac, or iPad. Then, hit the “Search” tab at the bottom right-hand corner of the page and search for MetFlex and Chill. Select the podcast, scroll down to find the subheading “Ratings & Reviews”. and select “Write a Review.” Next, select the number of stars you'd like to leave. Please choose 5 stars! Using the text box which says “Title,” write a title for your review. Then in the text box, write the review itself. The review can be up to 300 words long, but doesn't need to be much more than: “Love the show! Thanks!” or “Rachel provides wonderful content from a multitude of expert guests!” Once you're done select “Send” in the upper right-hand corner. --- Join the FREE MetFLex Life Course: www.metflexandchill.com  Rachel Gregory is a Board-Certified Nutritionist, Strength and Conditioning Specialist, Podcaster, and founder of MetFlex Life. She is also the author of the international best-selling book, "21-Day Ketogenic Diet Weight Loss Challenge." Rachel received her Master's Degree in Nutrition & Exercise Physiology from James Madison University and Bachelor's Degree in Sports Medicine from the University of Miami. Rachel completed the first-ever human clinical trial looking at the effects of the Ketogenic Diet in non-elite CrossFit athletes, which is published in the International Journal of Sports and Exercise Medicine. Currently, in her day-to-day coaching business, Rachel guides her clients to becoming the best, most confident version of themselves. She has a passion for educating those dedicated to optimizing their physical and mental well-being while improving long-term health and fitness goals. Her most popular course, Keto for Women, has helped women all across the world learn how to ditch the restrictive, all-or-nothing mindset associated with keto and instead thrive through the power of metabolic flexibility. You can connect and learn more about Rachel's work by visiting her website www.metflexlife.com  Social Links: Youtube: @rachelgregory Instagram: @rachelgregory.cns TikTok: @metflexlife Facebook: @metflexlife  Primary Programs: Keto For Women Muscle Science For Women

The Flip Side with Noah Filipiak
Ep. 58: Interview with Rob Dixon on Men and Women in Ministry Partnership

The Flip Side with Noah Filipiak

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 77:38


Noah interviews Rob Dixon on men and women being equals in vocational ministry, including the elder and pastor roles. They talk about the biblical implications of this view, as well as the practical and life-on-life for men, women, and churches.    Rob Dixon (DIS, Fuller Theological Seminary) is the author of Together in Ministry and is an associate regional ministry director with InterVarsity Christian Fellowship/USA and senior fellow for gender partnership with the InterVarsity Institute. He is an adjunct professor at Fresno Pacific University and Fuller Theological Seminary and provides training on flourishing mixed-gender ministry partnerships for numerous organizations around the country.   You can find an article from Rob on making the shift to egalitarian theology here and an article on a male allyship pathway here.  BOOK INFO: https://www.ivpress.com/together-in-ministry Follow Rob on Twitter: @robfdixon. Visit Rob's website at drrobdixon.com. Leave a Review on iTunes Anyone who leaves an iTunes review between now and Christmas gets put into a drawing for some free Flip Side swag. Here are instructions for leaving a review:    1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac.  2. You can find "The Flip Side by Noah Filipiak" by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode. 3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews." 4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review." Flip Side Notes: Join an upcoming Beyond the Battle online group at www.beyondthebattle.net  Support Flip Side sponsor Angry Brew by using promo code FLIP at angrybrew.com or fivelakes.com to pick up some Angry Brew or Chris' Blend coffee at 10% off. Email the show at podcast@beyondthebattle.net  Support the show and get some sweet swag by becoming a patron at www.patreon.com/noahfilipiak

Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol free life!
The Sober School with Kate Bee

Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol free life!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 62:26


Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol-free life! This week my guest is Kate from the Sober School About 7 years ago when I was casting about for help with my own drinking problem I stumbled upon a blog by Kate who had already been sober for a couple of years.  She was the first person I ever heard suggesting that sobriety could be fun – rather than the grey and miserable place many drinkers imagine it to be.  I now know that she was absolutely right of course so it was a real pleasure to chat to Kate about her own drinking story and the work she is doing these days.   In this Episode When Kate looks back she realises that at University she used to drink alone in her room – even though there were numerous bars and opportunities to drink with other students! If you enjoy drinking alone then that's a bit of a red flag because it means that you are not using it to “socialise” – you are using it to relax or perhaps to try to calm your anxiety. As you heard Kate cleverly gave up drinking at the tender age of 30 but for many of us the pattern seems to be that we DO use alcohol to socialise in our 20's and 30's and then as we get into our 40's and 50's it often turns more into self medication and that when we enjoy drinking alone. Kate had been worrying about her drinking for years before she actually did anything which is not at all unusual – A recent study highlighted the fact that it takes an average of 11 years between realising that you have a bit of a “problem” and actually doing something about it. This is a shame because for many of use our dependence and our unhappiness worsen during this period.  I think it takes such a long time to tackle our drinking for two reasons:-  1. As Kate said society tells us that we are either a “normal” drinker or we are a raging alcoholic –if we are a raging alcoholic we must to go AA – if not then we are fine.  We do see articles about “cutting down” which make it sound simple but of course once we've crossed a line with our drinking that becomes impossible.  Personally I spent my 11 years of procrastination trying to “cut down” so that I wouldn't have to quit completely! 2. Second reason we resist reaching out for help is that we don't know where to find it. Many of us don't want to go to AA or we try it and it doesn't work – then we just get stuck.  But times are changing and the modern recovery movement means there are many online solutions these days.  Solutions which work for the millions of people who are not “raging alcoholics” but they are not “normal drinkers” either.  Kate had been sober for 8 years and back then there was very little help around. However she discovered a blog – (the blog was Unpickled by Jean McCarthy) and it resonated with her.  For the first time she felt that there was someone out there “just like her” – which is exactly how I felt when I discovered Kate's blog.  So it's all about “finding your people” – that's the first step in the journey. Her own journey to sobriety began with a blog where she connected with others on the same path and did a 100 day challenge – she felt a “shift” after those 100 days and found herself reflecting on whether she could make sobriety enjoyable – rather than something to be “endured”. We both agreed that doing a Dry January is too short to experience any benefits of sobriety so by gritting our teeth and getting through all we teach ourselves is that sobriety is a miserable place to be! We discussed the value of of writing a Goodbye to Alcohol letter - you can check some out here I loved Kate's Breakthrough story when she was organising her 30th birthday party in early sobriety. Rather than organising a big party she decided to do it completely differently.  Accepting the fact that she actually didn't like socialising in big groups she organised several small gatherings – and loved them.  She realised that she'd been using alcohol to squeeze herself into what society expected her to be! This happens to SO many of us and in fact a whole book has been written about the subject! Do get hold of a copy of the book Quiet by Susan Cain which explains that roughly 50% of society are introverts but society favours extravert behaviour which leaves many of us using alcohol as a coping mechanism – fascinating!  The subtitle of Susans book is:- The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking and she argues that:  modern Western culture misunderstands and undervalues the traits and capabilities of introverted people, leading to "a colossal waste of talent, energy, and happiness". So if you ARE an introvert and use alcohol to help you cope then please read this book – it will help you understand yourself – and your power – so much better! Kate explained that the impact of quitting alcohol is deep – we lose our shame, guilt, worry which is SO freeing. We also free up our mental space and start keeping our promises. We agreed that another advantage of dealing with our drinking problem is that we get to know ourselves so much better than people who have never had to deal with addiction issues. Sobriety also means we start reflecting on what we really want out of life:- If we are an introvert and have been using alcohol to cope we may decide to embrace our introvert side and make some lifestyle changes Kate completely changed her lifestyle – she swopped her life in the city as a tv producer for a life in the country running the Sober School which helps other women to stop drinking. You can find Kate's blog and more info about the Sober School on her website which is thesoberschool.com More info Subscription membership for Tribe Sober is just R85 (£4/$6/$8AUS) a month - you can join up HERE To access our website click HERE If you would like a free copy of our "Annual Tracker" or our e-book "66 Days to Sobriety" please email janet@tribesober.com If you would like to come to our Saturday afternoon Zoom Cafe as a guest and meet our community just email janet@tribesober.com Episode Sponsor           This episode is sponsored by the Tribe Sober Membership Program.  If you want to change your relationship with alcohol then                 sign up today           Read more about our 7-step program and subscribe HERE           Book a Discovery Call with me to find out if our membership would help you            Help us to spread the word! We made this podcast so that we can reach more people who need our help.  Please subscribe and share. If you enjoyed the podcast then please leave us a 5 star review on Apple podcasts, take a screenshot of your review and DM it to Tribe Sober's Instagram page - see PS for instructions - we'll send you something special to say thank you! We release a podcast episode every Saturday morning. You can follow Tribe Sober on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram  You can catch our FB live on Saturday mornings (11am SAST) and you can join our private Facebook group HERE Thank you for listening!  Till Next Week Janet x PS   How to leave an rating/review in Apple Podcasts (on an iOS device) 1. Open the Podcasts app. EASY. 2. Choose "Search" from the bottom row of icons and enter the name of the show (i.e., "Recover Like A Mother") into the search field. 3. Select the show under Shows (not under Episodes). 4. Scroll down past the first few episodes until you see Ratings & Reviews. 5. Click "Write a Review" underneath the displayed reviews from other listeners. You'll then have the option to rate the show on a 5-star scale, and write a review (you can rate without writing, too but it's always good to read your experience).

MetFlex and Chill
#141 - Keys To Growing Muscle As A Female Part 2 with Alex Bush

MetFlex and Chill

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 56:01


To watch this episode and other past episodes, please visit Rachel's YouTube channel. Listeners can find Alex Bush at his website www.physiquedevelopment.com, on Instagram @alexbush_, and YouTube @Physique Development  Alex Bush is a coach, trainer, and co-founder of the online coaching platform, Physique Development. He has a bachelor's degree in Exercise Science as well as several continuing education certifications including N1, PN1, and CSCS. Alex has been coaching for 8 years and has worked with over a thousand competitive physique athletes as well as lifestyle clients. Alex resides in Ohio with his wife, Sue, and Pups, Gus & Tucker. In this episode, Alex and Rachel discuss the remaining key factors to growing muscle as a female: why you could be getting in your own way at the gym, how much time you should invest in a building phase, how to find balance while also making physique progress, and much more! “Discipline Leads to Freedom.” Alex Bush Top Takeaways: How to get the most out of an RDL Alex's recommended amount of time to be in a building phase  Try this tip if the scale causes stress but you still want to see progress over time Accountability is key. Why even coaches need coaches! Show Notes: [0:00] Trailer introduction to the episode [1:00] Welcome back to MetFlex and Chill! Rachel welcomes guest Alex Bush @alexbush_ to the listeners   [3:00] Keys To Growing Muscle As A Female Part 1 with Alex Bush   [4:00] Fourth Key: Exercise Execution  [6:00] How to get the most out of an RDL [10:00] Question: Can you speak to the difference between sensation versus actual tension and stimulus in the muscle tissue?? [16:00] Fifth Key: Periodized Training / Progressive Overload of Stimulus [23:00] Sixth Key: Time/ Patience [26:00] Question: What's the minimum time frame that you would recommend someone go through a building phase? [31:00] Episode 104: 8-Month Building Phase Results & Plan For Next Cut [36:30] Seventh Key: Audit Social Media Outlets [40:00] Eighth Key: Life Outside of Training - 'Balance' [43:00] “Discipline Leads to Freedom.” Alex Bush [46:00] Benefits of investing in a coach!  [52:00] If you're listening to this and want to apply for one-on-one coaching with Rachel check out www.metflexlife.com/apply. [53:00] Episode 140: Keys To Growing Muscle As A Female Part 1 with Alex Bush [54:00] Listeners can find Alex Bush at his website www.physiquedevelopment.com, on Instagram @alexbush_ and YouTube @Physique Development  [55:00] Thanks for listening to another episode! If you're loving MetFlex and Chill and want to help grow the show, please head over to Itunes and leave a rating and review! How to Leave an Apple Podcast Review: First, Open the podcast app on your iPhone, Mac, or iPad. Then, hit the “Search” tab at the bottom right-hand corner of the page and search for MetFlex and Chill. Select the podcast, scroll down to find the subheading “Ratings & Reviews”. and select “Write a Review.” Next, select the number of stars you'd like to leave. Please choose 5 stars! Using the text box which says “Title,” write a title for your review. Then in the text box, write the review itself. The review can be up to 300 words long, but doesn't need to be much more than: “Love the show! Thanks!” or “Rachel provides wonderful content from a multitude of expert guests!” Once you're done select “Send” in the upper right-hand corner.   --- Join the FREE MetFLex Life Course: www.metflexandchill.com  Rachel Gregory is a Board-Certified Nutritionist, Strength and Conditioning Specialist, Podcaster, and founder of MetFlex Life. She is also the author of the international best-selling book, "21-Day Ketogenic Diet Weight Loss Challenge." Rachel received her Master's Degree in Nutrition & Exercise Physiology from James Madison University and Bachelor's Degree in Sports Medicine from the University of Miami. Rachel completed the first-ever human clinical trial looking at the effects of the Ketogenic Diet in non-elite CrossFit athletes, which is published in the International Journal of Sports and Exercise Medicine. Currently, in her day-to-day coaching business, Rachel guides her clients to becoming the best, most confident version of themselves. She has a passion for educating those dedicated to optimizing their physical and mental well-being while improving long-term health and fitness goals. Her most popular course, Keto for Women, has helped women all across the world learn how to ditch the restrictive, all-or-nothing mindset associated with keto and instead thrive through the power of metabolic flexibility. You can connect and learn more about Rachel's work by visiting her website www.metflexlife.com  Social Links: Youtube: @rachelgregory Instagram: @rachelgregory.cns TikTok: @metflexlife Facebook: @metflexlife  Primary Programs: Keto For Women Muscle Science For Women

Let’s Get Vulnerable: Relationship and Dating Advice
EP 183: Attachment Theory Deep Dive and the “Good Enough Parent”

Let’s Get Vulnerable: Relationship and Dating Advice

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 30:41


“Corrective Emotional Experience”    Have you ever heard of this term?   These experiences facilitate our healing in ways that “doing the work” and journaling can't quite reach.    Inside of today's episode we do a deep dive on:  Understanding the importance of internalized attachment figures.  Exploring retraumatization, and the defense of dissociating from emotion.  What is required for allowing corrective emotional experiences into your life.    No matter your past, healthy, securely attached relationships are available to you!    If you enjoyed this episode or it resonated with you in any way, it would mean the world to me if you went and left a 5 star, written review on Apple podcasts. PLUS, when you leave a review it helps other people find the show!   Just head to the Let's Get Vulnerable page in the app, scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews", and select "Write a Review"!   XOXO - Dr. Morgan

MoneyBall Medicine
Seqster's Ardy Arianpour on How To Smash Health Data Siloes

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 58:48


Your medical records don't make pleasant bedtime reading. And not only are they inscrutable—they're often mutually (and deliberately) incompatible, meaning different hospitals and doctor's offices can't share them across institutional boundaries. Harry's guest this week, Ardy Arianpour, is trying to fix all that. He's the co-founder and CEO of Seqster, a San Diego company that's spent the last five years working on ways to pull patient data from all the places where it lives, smooth out all the formatting differences, and create a unified picture that patients themselves can understand and use.The way Ardy explains it, Seqster “smashes the data siloes.” Meaning, the company can combine EMR data, gene sequence data, wearable device data, pharmacy data, and insurance claims data all in one place. The big goal guiding Seqster, he says, is to put the patient back at the center of healthcare.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare. Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.If you've ever gotten a copy of your medical files from your doctor or hospital, you probably know these records don't make pleasant bedtime reading. They aren't designed to be clear or user-friendly for patients. In fact, it's usually just the opposite.The data itself is highly technical. And on top of that, there's the inscrutable formatting, which is dictated by whatever electronic medical record or “EMR” system your provider happens to use. But the problem isn't just that EMR data is incomprehensible.It's also that different EMRs are often incompatible with each other.So if you're being treated by multiple providers, it can be really tricky to share your data across institutional boundaries. That's why medicine is one of the last industries that still uses old-fashioned fax machines. Because sometimes a fax is the only way to send the data back and forth.But my guest today is trying to fix all that.His name is Ardy Arianpour, and he's the co-founder and CEO of Seqster.It's a company in San Diego that's spent the last five years working on ways to pull patient data from all the places where it lives, smooth out all the formatting differences, and create a unified picture that patients themselves can understand and use.The way Ardy explains it, Seqster quote-unquote “smashes the data siloes.” Meaning, the company can combine EMR data, gene sequence data, wearable device data, pharmacy data, and insurance claims data all in one place.The big goal guiding Seqster, according to Ardy, is to put the patient back at the center of healthcare.At the moment, however, consumers can't sign up for the service directly. Seqster's actual customers are players from inside the healthcare industry. For example, a life science companies might hire Seqster to help them make the experience of participating in a clinical trial more user friendly for patients.Or a health plan might use a Seqster dashboard to get patients more involved in their own care.Seqster did let me do a test run on my own medical data as part of my research for this interview. And I was impressed by how quickly it pulled in data that normally lives in a bunch of separate places. I'm hoping Seqster and other companies in this space will continue to make progress.Because, frankly, I think poor patient access to health data and the lack of interoperability between EMRs are two of the biggest factors holding back improvements in healthcare quality.If we can finally get those two things right, I think it can help unlock the data-driven healthcare revolution that I describe in my new book, The Future You. Which, by the way, is out now in paperback and ebook format at Barnes & Noble and Amazon.When we spoke back in September, Ardy and I talked about better EMRs and many other things. And now here's our conversation.Harry Glorikian: Ardy, welcome to the show. So, it's good to have you here, and you know, for everybody who doesn't know your story and the story of the company, I'd love to, you know, start covering some basics like, you know, the when, the what, the how, the why. What's the founding story of Seqster and what was the problems that you were really trying to go out there and solve when you started the company in 2016?Ardy Arianpour: Thanks so much, Harry. Always been a fan. I think we've known each other for quite some time, but it's been a long time since we've ran into each other since the genomic and precision medicine days. So great to see you. I hope you and your family are well and yeah, look, Seqster is super special and there's a secret story, I guess, that never has been told. It really starts way beyond 2016 when I founded the company. So I spent 15 plus years in DNA sequencing, next gen sequencing genomic market. And during that time in the 2000s to early 2010s, I was fortunate enough of being part of some amazing endeavors and organizations that allowed my team and I to take some risk. And when you take risk, when you're in biotech, pharma, precision medicine, genomics, bioinformatics, you learn new things that most people don't learn because you're you're you're, you know, trailblazing, I guess you could say. And we were able to do that back with one of my old companies where we were able to launch the first clinical exome test, launch the first BRCA cancer panels, launch the first next gen sequencing panels in a CLIA lab. Ardy Arianpour: And then, you know, it wasn't about the testing. It was all about the data, and we didn't realize that till later and we kept on seeing that wow genome data is really only one set of all the other data pieces, right? I think the genomics folks, me being a genomics guy, I guess you could say, for a decade and a half, we're so forward thinking that we forget about the simple things within science, and we never really thought, Oh, collect your medical data and pair it with your genomic data. We never really thought there would be a wearable out there. That data was going to be siloed, too. We never thought there was going to be, you know, many different medical devices and instruments that would be Bluetooth and sensor enabled, where there would be data that would be siloed. Claims data, pharmacy data. Never even crossed our minds. So, you know, when you put this all together, my inspiration with Seqster was actually really simple. And when I founded the company, I wanted to combine the genomic data with your EMR medical data as well as your wearable data, because in 2016, the tailwinds of those other, you know, services was really taken off.Harry Glorikian: Right. Totally understand it. And you know, as we were talking about before I hit record, it's like it was funny because I was just talking to another company that's working on NLP and they're able to look at, you know, papers and see drugs being used in different, you know, medical conditions. And then they figured out, well, they needed to tap into the unstructured data of a medical record to really, like, add the next layer of value to it. So, you know, there's a lot of activity going on about there. But how do you guys, how do you, how do your co-founders, you know, Zhang and Dana play into like the science, the technology and what's the sort of angle that you guys have taken to solve this problem? Or what's your idea on how to fix it? I'm not saying it's been solved yet, because that would be a Herculean task in and of itself. But how are you guys approaching it that? Is a little different than the. You know, maybe any any of your other you would you would consider anybody else out there, the working on this?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah, look for us we spent a lot of time understanding the power of data. But how what makes Seqster different is no one knows the power of the patient better than us. We've spent time with our platform with, you know, tens of thousands of patients: rare disease patients, oncology patients, parents, autoimmune disease patients, patients that have that are seeing functional medicine folks. Patients that were having issues sharing data through telemedicine, clinical trial patients. All these sorts of patients are very different. At Seqster we focused on putting the patient at the center of health care in order to smash all the data silos from their medical institutions to their wearable technology that they wear to the DNA testing that they get and even maybe a COVID test or a vaccine. How do you bring a 360-degree patient view? And you know, you tried the system, so I think you got a small teaser of how we can do that and we've really cracked this large problem. It is Herculean, I believe, and a lot of people believe because it's interoperability, it is the number one problem in all of health care.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I had the pleasure of trying it and imported my data and was able to see, you know, individual pieces. I mean, I made some suggestions on what might make it easier for me to hone in in different areas, right, and have the system highlighting different things. But I guess each data stream is being brought in separately and then at some point you're going to create a master dashboard above it, because now each one is separate from when I go into each record, right, When I go into my medical record, it gives me one set of data with my lab results and everything else and the notes, and then it pulls in my wearable data separately that I have to look at, right? So you've got to look at it separately. It doesn't. Then I guess the next step would be creating a master sort of view of how everything would look in a sort of I don't want to say integrated, but at least a timeline view of the world. But. You know, following up on the the sort of the what question, you know, how do you sort of combine data from different EMRs, tests, apps, devices in a sort of scalable, repeatable way? I mean, it seems like to date, that's been a hugely manual process, and I can imagine you could figure out every provider's ontology and then create a table that shows what's equivalent to. And but you know, there's got to be sort of a translation scheme that would be required that that provides some constant readjustment as the main providers tweak and evolve their own systems, right? Because if the provider is tweaking their system, your system has then got to adapt to changes that are happening in that end. So how are you guys managing all that craziness?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah. So I think it all and you hit on so many points, I'll try and cover them if I remember them all. Look, the number one thing for us is we can connect to any data source. It doesn't matter. And you saw it. And just before I continue, just tell the audience how fast, how fast, how long did it take for your data to be populated after you connected it?Harry Glorikian: Oh, it was. I mean, yeah, as soon as I created it, I could see that it was, you know, it was digesting and then populating. And, you know, I was just I was watching it as a matter of fact, when I was on the phone with your person, that was helping me. Yeah. At first I said, Oh, it's not there. And then a couple of seconds later, I'm like, Oh no, it's showing up, right? So it was happening in, I don't want to say real time, but it was happening as as we were watching it evolve, right? It was sort of it was. It was almost like watching time lapse.Ardy Arianpour: And that's actually a great way. That's a great way to actually describe it. We created the time lapse of all your health data. Now let's get to the what and the how. So we connect to any health data source. The patient is fully in control. You own your data, you control it. It's all consented by you. We don't own your data and we connect to every single medical record. And that's huge that we've achieved nationwide coverage. We didn't know what data you have, but we're you're able to connect to it. Why? Because our team, which our engineering team gets all the credit for six years now, almost since founding of the company we have written, I don't know, seven million lines of code, that standardizes and harmonizes all of the ICD 9, ICD 10, SNOMED codes and every single lab result to every single wearable terminology, from biking to cycling to, you know, you name it, VitaminDB, you know, characterized in 40 different ways. You know, we're harnessing data to improve patient lives at scale. We built it for scale because you can't do it by the traditional method of just faxes and PDFs. Now, you know, being able to do that is not a bad thing.Ardy Arianpour: We can bring that service into our platform as well. It's already integrated, but that type of service takes 30 to 60 days and it's static data. It's not real time right now. If Harry goes, I don't know, you go on a bike ride and you fall and you go to the E.R. and you had whatever data connected automatically in your sister portal, it'll be populated without you even touching Seqster. That's how our real time data works and another way that we're totally differentiated than anything else in the marketplace. I was never a fan of API businesses because they're just data in data out. I truly wanted us to create a patient engagement platform, a PEP right, or a patient relationship management system, what I call a PRM instead of a CRM. And that's what we created with Seqster. So that is beyond an API, beyond just data. We're visualizing the data, as you saw. We really nailed the longitudinal health record or the individualized health record. And I think it's, I always say this, health data is medicine. The reason why it's medicine is because our platform has saved patient lives.Harry Glorikian: Ardy, how do you, how are you handling the free form notes, right, because I noticed that I could look at all my notes, but they weren't necessarily, it wasn't pulling from the note and sort of making sense of it. I mean, I could look at all of it and it was all in one place. But the the system wasn't necessarily processing it, sort of. I was talking to Jeff Felton from ConcertAI and they do a lot of sort of, their big thing is the NLP that sort of tries to choose chew through that, which is not trivial, you know, yesterday today, context matters in health care.Ardy Arianpour: Yeah. Look, if we created the the the Tesla of health care, let's just say, right, we're we're changing the game. From static data to real time data. Ok. Well, you're talking about is, are you going to create a helicopter as well? Right, OK. And all right. So, no, we're not going to go create the helicopter. Is there going to be an electric helicopter by Tesla? There's no market for that, right? So that's why they're not doing it now. I'm not saying there's not a market for NLP. It's just the fact that we'll go ahead and partner with a third party NLP provider. And we already have we have like four of them and they all have their strengths and weaknesses because it's not a one size fits all thing. And you know, we can already run OCR, you know, over the free text and pull certain ontology information out. And then, you know, when you partner with an NLP company, once you have a system that can capture data, you could do anything. So people always ask me, Are you going to get into AI? It's just the buzzword. There's a million A.I. companies. What have they really done right in health care? It's not really there. Maybe for imaging they've done some things, but it's more of a buzzword. AI only becomes valuable if you have a system, Harry, that can instantly populate data, then you can run some great artificial intelligence things on it. So NLP, AI, OCR, all those things are just many tools that can add. Now, in your experience, you only got to see about 5 percent of the power of Seqster, and that probably blew you away, even though it was five percent of the power. Because you probably never -- I don't know, you tell me, have you ever been able to collect your data that quickly? It took, what, less than a minute or two?Harry Glorikian: Yeah, well, thank God, I don't have a lot of data. So, you know, just when I tap into my my health care provider, you know, my data is there and it's funny, I always tell people, being a not exciting patient is a really good thing in one way, and it's a really bad thing because you can't play with all the data. But you know, like even when I did my genome, it's an extremely boring genome.Ardy Arianpour: My question is it's not about it being exciting or not, because thankfully you're not a chronically ill patients. But imagine if you were and how this helps, but take a step back. I'm just asking the speed, yes, and the quality of the presentation of the data that seeks to you. It was less than what hundred seconds?Harry Glorikian: Yeah. Well, it was very quick. And I've already it's funny because I texted my doctor and I was like, I need to talk to you about a couple of these lab results that look out of out of norm, right? And they weren't anything crazy. But I'm just curious like, you know, how do I get them in norm? I'm just I'm always trying to be in in the normal band, if I can be.Ardy Arianpour: So it's interesting you say that because as a healthy individual. You know, and even a chronically ill patient, it doesn't matter. The best way to actually QC data is through visualization, and this is what this is. That's foundational to interoperability. So we hit on semantic and structural interoperability with our, you know, backend engine that we've created to harmonize and standardize the data. We built many different types of retrievers and then we parse that data and then it's standardized and harmonizes it. But that visualization, which some people call the Tableau of health data, you know that we've created when they see it, is really, we got to give the credit to the patients. We had so many patients, healthy ones and unhealthy ones that told us exactly how they want it to look. We did this on the genomic data, we did this on the wearable data. We did this on the medical device data and we have some great new features that can superimpose your clinical data with your fitness data on our integrated view and timeline.Harry Glorikian: Oh, that? See, now that would be, you know, another level of value, even for a healthy patient, right to be able to see that in an integrated way. I made a suggestion, I think that when a panel shows up is. You know, highlight the ones that are out of Norm very quickly, as opposed to having to look at, you know, the panel of 20 to find the one that's out of whack, just either color them differently or reorient them so that they're easier to find. But those are simple changes just from a UI perspective. But so. How would you describe that that Seqster creates value and say translates that into revenue, right? I'm just trying to figure out like, what's the revenue model for you guys? I know that you're I can actually, I'm not even sure if I can sign up for it myself. I would probably have to do it through a system if I remember your revenue model correctly. But how do you guys generate revenue from what you're doing?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah, I'll share another secret on your show here from the founding of Seqster. My dream was to empower seven billion people on our little mothership here called Earth to have all their health data in one place. And I had a direct to consumer model in 2016. The market wasn't really ready for it, number one. Number two, it was going to cost $500 million worth of marketing to just get the message out for people to know that it exists. So long story short, in 2016, you know, when I founded the company, not that many people wanted to talk to us. They thought we were just like nuts to go after this problem. 2017, we got some calls from some investors, we raised some great seed funding after I personally put in some money in in 2016 to get the company going. And then in 2018, I got a call from Bill Gates and that was when everything changed. Bill called and wanted to meet in person, I was supposed to get 30 minutes with him. And the reason why he called is because our first beachhead was with Alzheimer's patients. My grandmother, both my grandmothers, passed away due to Alzheimer's disease. Both my maternal and paternal grandmothers and being a caregiver for my mom's mom and being very close to her since she raised me, I learned a lot about a multigenerational health record, so I actually filed patents in 2016 on a multigenerational health record because I wanted to have my grandma's data, my mom's data, my data, and be able to pass it on to research as well as to generations down my family.Ardy Arianpour: Long story short there, Bill gets all the credit for telling me after I showed him our platform, "You got to take this enterprise. You guys built something that Google Health failed at and Microsoft Vault Health Vault failed at." And it's funny we're talking about this. Look, Google just dismantled their health division again. Why? Because tech companies just don't get it. They have a lot of money. They have a lot of power. They've got a lot of smart people. But they they they don't know where, I'll give you an example. It's like a tourist with a lot of money coming into a city. You don't know where the really good local bar is, right? Why is that? You don't know where the really good, you know, slice of pizza is. You're going to go to the regular joints that everyone finds on TripAdvisor and whatever. You know your friends told you, but if you're a local, you know where to get the authentic cocktails and the authentic, you know, drinks and food. Why? Because you've lived and breathed it in the city. So we've lived and breathed it right. And so we know what not to do. It's not about knowing what to do in health care or in genomics or in biotech. It's actually knowing what you shouldn't be doing. Yeah.Harry Glorikian: And knowing I got to tell you, there's some problems where I'm like, OK, I know exactly who to call for that problem, because there aren't, you know, they're not falling off trees in that particular problem. There's a small handful of people that understand that problem well enough that they can come in and sort of surgically help you solve that problem. And you can have all the money in the world and have all the smart people you want. Doesn't mean they're going to be able to solve that particular problem, especially in health care, because it's so arcane.Ardy Arianpour: And it's getting, you know, this is a problem that is growing like cancer, interoperability. Just on this 20 minute conversation with you it has grown by hundreds of millions of dollars. Do you know why? Because data is being siloed.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. And I think, look, I've always I've said this on, you know, whatever show or and I've actually I've written letters to Congress. You know, I think this this needs to be mandated because expecting the large EMR companies to do anything is a waste of time. They're not going to do it on their own if their feet are not put to the fire and it changes. And honestly, I believe that if anything will stop the innovation of health care or slow it down is the EMR systems. You know, if you don't have the data, you can't do the work.Ardy Arianpour: Absolutely. But you know what people don't understand. And not to go off that tangent, but I'll get back to the business model in a second to answer that question because I just recalled in my mind here that I didn't answer that. Look, people don't understand that at least the EMR companies, even though they're like Darth Vader, you know, they needed. They've put some foundation there at least. If that wasn't there, we would be in a much worse situation here, right?Harry Glorikian: Correct, but if Satya Nadella hadn't really changed Microsoft, really redone it right, it wouldn't be the company it is now, and I think they [the EMR companies] are just back in the dark ages.Ardy Arianpour: Of course, I totally agree. I'm surprised, actually. Microsoft, as an example, didn't come up with their own EMR system and launch it to the hospitals to go, compete with the servers and all scripts and Epics of the world. If I was Microsoft, that's what I would do. I would have enough money in power, know exactly what to do. I would take a system like Seqster and I would explode it in a good way and be the good guys and have it completely open source and open network. But that's a whole cocktail conversation if anyone's listening on the on the podcast that wants to talk about that. Give me a call or shoot me an email or find me on LinkedIn.Ardy Arianpour: Let me go back to the business model real quick so people understand. So direct to consumer was what I wanted to do. We built it for the consumer, for the patients. It was the smartest and dumbest thing I ever did. Let's go to why it was the dumbest thing first, because it was really, really hard. It was the smartest because we would not be where we are today. You wouldn't have called me to talk on your podcast and all these other great, you know, amazing people that want to hear about how we're, you know, cracking the code on interoperability now and changing the health care system, changing clinical trials, changing decentralized trials with our system.Ardy Arianpour: Why? Well, it's because our system was built by patients. Right, and so it's a patient centric, real time, real world data platform that layers in engagements for both the providers, the payers, the pharma companies and any other enterprise that white labels our platform. We have both iOS and Android SDK and Web available. It gets fully branded. We're the Intel Inside with the Salesforce.com business model. It's a Software as a Service service that we offer to enterprises. Patients never pay for the service. And we do give VIP codes to chronically ill patients and VIPs, you know, journalists, podcasters and to be honest, anyone who emails me that wants to try it. I've been always giving on that. That costs us time and money, and I'm happy to do it because it's my way of giving back to the community and health care because I know our team and I have built a system that have saved lives. It's been covered by the news multiple times.Harry Glorikian: So, so in essence, a large provider comes, buys the access to the system and then offers it to its patient population to utilize to aggregate all this information, right? How can the platform stay patient centric if the patients aren't directly paying for it?Ardy Arianpour: Ok, very simple. All of these enterprises in health care, whether that's Big Pharma, right, or Big Oayer from Pfizer to Cigna, to United Healthcare group to Humana to even Amazon, right, to other tech companies, they all want to go down a patient centric way. It's just what's happening. You know, I've been talking about this since 2016 because we pioneered patient centric interoperability. That's what we did. That's what Seqster did. That's that's what we set out to do. And we did it. Some, you know, a lot of people say they can do it. Very few actually. Do we fit in that model now, right? And you had the experience yourself. And I think the first time I saw patient centric ads was. 2020. No, sorry. Yeah, 2020, JP Morgan Health Care Conference in January, just three months before the lockdowns and the pandemic started. It was the first time I went to Johnson & Johnson's afterparty in downtown San Francisco. And saw a huge banner saying, you know, blah blah blah, patient centricity. It's the 22nd century, you know, whatever. So they add a bunch of ads that were all patient centric, and I looked to my co-founder, Dana, and I'm like, Look at this, these guys finally caught on. I wonder if they've been, because we've been in discussions with a lot of these folks, long story short, it's not because of Seqster, I think it's just the market was headed that way. We were so far ahead of the market and there was no tailwinds. Now it is all there. And the pandemic afterwards accelerated digital health, as I say, by 7 to 10 years.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you enjoy hearing from the kinds of innovators and entrepreneurs I talk to on the show, I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer.It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is out in print and ebook format from Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Just go to either site and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian. Thanks. And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: So the platform combines EHR, genetic, and fitness data, so. Why did you start with those three?Ardy Arianpour: So we started with those three, and I'll get to that, but we also do pharmacy, social determinants of health, and claims data as well. So we've added three other very large pillars. We can connect to any data source. We've created a universal interoperability platform that's patient centric that brings real time, real world data. And we're just super excited about all the business opportunities and the big pain points that we're solving for enterprise as well as for the patient. Why did we start with genomics, EMR, fitness. Ok. Here's the story. So I named the company Seqster after actually going on a five or six mile run in downtown San Diego, coming back and watching The Italian Job. And in the movie The Italian Job, it's one of my favorite movies, actually. I love that movie. I could just keep watching it over again, the real Napster was in the movie, and I used to be a Napster user where, you know, it was the way of actually pulling all your music and having it kind of in one place. Not really exactly Seqster's model, Seqster's model is is much more legal because it's patient centric. Yes, Napster was kind of stealing the data, right? So long story short, I was trying to think of a company name and I'm like, Oh my God. I don't know what hit me. I'll remember that moment like it was yesterday, Harry. Sequster came up because I had dived into DNA sequencing. We are doing everything that you can on next gen sequencing. And so I was like, Wow! Seqster. S-E-Q-S-T-E-R.Ardy Arianpour: And I went on GoDaddy.com. I bought it for $9.99. And the story started from right then. It was just me and the website. No co-founders, no onee else. I was just thinking, this is a great name. Now, you fast forward to why it's medical data plus genomic data, plus fitness data, to begin with. Well, the genomic data was an easy one because, right, I have 15 years underneath my belt on genomic sequencing technologies and clinical diagnostics and doing a lot of great things for patients in that arena. And I knew that it couldn't just be the genome, right? That's where the medical data came in because we knew and I never knew that we would be able to actually build something that would be able to pull it on together. I knew it was going to be really tough. I didn't think it was going to be this tough. We would have never done it if I knew that it was this tough. It's so great that we did because we solved it. But if you go back and say, "Ardy, would you do it again if you knew it was going to be this tough?" I wouldn't, because it's really, it's not the number two problem, it's the number one problem. And we're just, you know, I'm a peon. I'm a very small dot. I'm not anyone special. I'm just very passionate about solving this problem. That's it. And so is my team, and we got a great team and we've execute on. So great.Ardy Arianpour: And then, you know, it was my idea. I was forcing the wearable and fitness data because I was interested in that. And when the Apple Series One Watch came out, it was very limited, but I saw how it was going to change, you know, just connection of data. And my team being bioinformaticians and from the genomics world were so against bringing it in, I mean, I could show you emails of fights about me saying, get fitness data in here. They were not interested. I forced it on them. And then next thing you knew, clinical trials. One of the biggest things was how do you bring sleeping data and wearable data to x y z data? And that market started taking off. Decentralized trials. You can't even do it if you don't have wearable data. And so everyone started saying, you know, OK, you were right. That was one. I get one big pat on the back. And then we realized we can't be limited to just those three pillars. So what are the next three that we can work on? And that was claims data so we can marry it with the EMR and medical data for payers. And then we ran into pharmacy data. We just signed our first digital pharmacy deal three weeks ago with Paragon Health. And if we didn't have those capabilities, we wouldn't have the business opportunities. And the social determinants of health data being our last integrations comes in very handy for various different use cases.Harry Glorikian: So, three sort of things, right? You know, you combine all this data. What can you learn that wasn't obvious before? How do you translate into better health outcomes for consumers or, say, smarter decision making by consumers, right, so those are two potentially different ways to look at it.Ardy Arianpour: Absolutely. So one word for you: Seqster's longitudinal health record drives health economics, outcomes, research. It drives it.Harry Glorikian: Is that your clients doing that, you doing that, a third party group coming in?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah. We don't do that. We're just the patient engagement and data aggregation operating system that gets implemented for enterprise. And then the enterprise can run the analytics on top of it. They can, you know, take all of the raw data. So we're the only 21 CFR Part 11 compliant platform too. We're fully FDA compliant, Harry. It took us 19 months working with the FDA in order to get our compliance letter in September, October of last year, 2020. So about a year ago. And not only are we HIPAA compliance, not only are we High Trust certified and 256 bit encrypted on all the data that comes in, but having that FDA compliance sets us apart number one. Number two, because we're not an API, we have FHIR fully integrated. We have an API for sharing data, but we're not an API business. We're a SaaS business in health care, in digital health. We can make any company a digital health company. Let's say it's Coca-Cola, and they want to empower their 200,000 employees. They could launch a Coca-Cola Seqster white label in 72 hours to 200,000 employees. That's what we've created. Now, take that and imagine that now within pharma, within precision medicine, within clinical trials, within the payer network, which we're the only platform that's CMS ONC interoperability compliance from the Twenty First Century CURES Act as well.Harry Glorikian: So let me let me see if I... I'm trying to figure out like the angle, right? So I mean, ideally for interoperability, if we talk about the highest level right, you really want to get Epic, Cerner, Kaiser, et cetera, all in a room right? And get them to agree to something. Which is like an act of God.Ardy Arianpour: Some people say, we're doing, you know, it's not my words, but again, a figure of speech, people say, we're doing God's work.Harry Glorikian: But stepping back here for a second, what I see you guys doing is actually giving a platform to the patient and the patient is then connecting the record, not necessarily the systems themselves allowing for interoperability to take place.Ardy Arianpour: So yes, but you're speaking of it because of the direct to consumer experience that you had. The experience we gave you is much different than the experience from the enterprise side. We have a full BI platform built for enterprise as well. Right. And then we have the white label for the enterprise where they launch it to a million patients.Harry Glorikian: That's what, I'm trying to think about that, right? So. Coca-cola says, like, going down your example, Coca-Cola says, "Love to do this. Want to offer it to all of our employees." We make it available to them. But it's the employee that has to push the start button and say, yes, I want my electronic medical record to be integrated into this single platform, right?Ardy Arianpour: But that's that's an example with Coca-Cola. If we're doing something with Big Pharma, they're running a clinical trial for 500,000 COVID patients, as an example. They're getting data collection within one day versus two months, and guess what, we're going to be driving a new possible vaccine. Why? Because of the time it takes for data collection at scale. We empower patients to do that and they get something back. They get to track and monitor all their family health.Harry Glorikian: Right. So so it's sort of, you know, maybe I'm being dense, but sort of the same thing, right? Big Pharma makes it available to the patient. The patient then clicks, Yes, I want to do this and pull in my medical records to make it all everything to be in one place. Yes.Ardy Arianpour: Yes. And I think it's about the fact that we've created a unique data sharing environments. So that's, you know, Harry and Stacey and John and Jennifer and whoever, you know, with whatever use case can share their data and also consent is built with E-consent and digital consent is built within that process. You don't share anything you don't want to share.Harry Glorikian: Right. So let me see if I got this correct. So Seqster is providing a translation and aggregation between systems through a new layer of technology. Not creating true interoperability between systems, right?Ardy Arianpour: Yes. There's a spider web. And. We have untangled the spider beb in the United States of America. We've done all the plumbing and piping to every single health institution, doctor's office clinic, wearable sensor, medical device pharmacy, the list goes on and on, Harry.Harry Glorikian: So let's... Another question. So how does the 21st Century CURES Act of 2016 relate to your business? I think you know you've said something like Seqster has become law, but I'm trying to. I'm trying to understand, what do you mean when you say that?Ardy Arianpour: So when we founded Seqster, we didn't know there was going to be a Twenty First Century CURES Act. We didn't know there was going to be GDPR. We are GDPR compliance before GDPR even came out. Right? Because of our the way that we've structured our business, number one. Number two, how we built the platform by patients for CMS ONC interoperability, you know, final rulings and the Twenty First Century CURES Act, which is, they're synonymous. We worked hand in hand with Don Rucker's team and Seema Verma on the last administration that was doing a lot of the work. Now a wonderful gentleman, Mickey Tripathy has taken the role of ONC, and he understands, you know, the value of Seqster's technology at scale because of his background in interoperability. But what was interesting in the two years that we worked with HHS and CMS was the fact that they used Seqster as the model to build the rules. I was personally part of that, my team was personally part of that, you know, and so we were in private meetings with these folks showing our platform and they were trying to draft certain rules.Ardy Arianpour: We didn't know that they were going to be coming out with rules until they did. And then that's when high level folks in the government told us specifically on calls and also even at Datapalooza when I gave a keynote talk on on Seqster, when Don Rucker did as well right before me. You know, we're sitting in the speaker room and folks are like, "You're going to become law in a month." And this was in February of 2020. March 9th, those rules dropped. I was supposed to give a keynote talk at HL7,  at HIMMS. HIMMS got cancelled in 2020. I just got back from HIMMS 2021 in Vegas just a week and a half ago. It was fantastic. Everyone was masked up. There was only three cases of COVID with 10,000 people there. They did a great job, you know, regulating it. You had to show your vaccine card and all that good stuff. But you know, I would have never thought Seqster becomes law when we were founding the company. And so this is really special now.Harry Glorikian: So what does success look like for Seqster?Ardy Arianpour: It depends how you measure it. So we're in the Olympics. It's a great question. Here's my answer to you. We're in the Olympics just finished, right? So we started out in track and field. We were really good at running the 400 Meters and then somehow we got a use case on the 4x1 and the 4x4. And then we did really well there, too. And then because of our speed, you know, we got some strength and then they wanted us to get into the shot put and the javelin throw and then we started winning there, too. And then somehow, now people are calling us saying, "Are you interested in trying to swim?" We got the 100 meter butterfly. Well, we've never done that. So success for us is based off of use cases. And every use case that we deal with, within clinical trials and pharma, we've define 24 distinct use cases that we're generating business on. Within the payer community now, because of the CMS ONC Twenty First Century Cures Act, there's a major tailwind. Within life insurance for real time underwriting, there's, you know, a plethora of folks that are calling us for our system because of the patient engagement. So this patient centricity for us has been a central pillar, and I've never allowed anyone in our company, whether it's the board or our investors or employees, you know, get sidetracked from that. We've been laser focused on the patients and success at impacting patient lives at scale.Harry Glorikian: So as a venture guide, though, right, like I'm going to, there's only so much money on so much time to tackle, so many different opportunities, right? So it's there is a how do we create a recurring revenue stream and keep plugging along and then generate either enough revenue or raise enough money to do more? And so just trying to think through that for what you guys are trying to do, I get the 4x100 and the swimming. But all of that takes money and resources right to be able to prove out, of course.Ardy Arianpour: And here's another thing we're in a different state. Look, my team and I had a major exit before. We built a billion dollar company out of $3 million. And even though we weren't founders of that company, you know, I was the senior vice president and we we did really well. So, you know, that allowed us to not take salaries that allowed us to take our money and put it into doing something good. And we did that in 2016 to seed it. And then afterwards, I raised, you know, millions of dollars from folks that were interested in, you know, this problem and saw that our team had a track record. And I actually was not interested, Harry, in raising a Series A because of our experience, but we kept on getting calls. And then just six months ago, we announced, you know, our series a funding. Well, we actually announced it in March, I think it was, but we closed our Series A in January of this year and it was led by Takeda Pharma, Anne Wojcicki's 23andMe and United Healthcare Group's Equian folks that created Omniclaim and sold to UnitedHealth Group Omni Health Holdings.Ardy Arianpour: So check this out. Imagine my vision in 2016 of having medical data, genomic data fitness data. Well, if you look at the investors that backed us, it's pretty interesting. What I reflect on is I didn't plan that either. We got amazing genomic investors. I mean, it doesn't get better than getting Anne Wojcicki and 23andMe. Amazing female entrepreneur and, you know, just the just the force. Secondly, Takeda Pharma, a top 10 pharma company. How many digital health startups do you know within Series A that got a top 10 pharma? And then also getting some payer investors from UnitedHealth Group's Omniclaim folks and Equian OmniHealth Holdings. So this is to me, very interesting. But going to focus our focus has been pharma and clinical trials. And so Takeda has been phenomenal for us because of, you know, they they built out the platform and they built it out better for us and they knew exactly what to do with things that we didn't know. And with things that patients didn't know on the enterprise, you know, Takeda did a phenomenal job. And now other pharma companies are utilizing our platform, not just Takeda.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, well, they want their data aggregation. They want as much data on the patient aggregated in one place to make sense of it.Ardy Arianpour: So not necessarily that they actually want to empower patients with a patient centric engagement tool. That's pharma's number one thing right now, the data part, obviously is important, but empowering patient lives at scale is the key, and that's that's our mission. And so, yeah, that's that's a whole 'nother cocktail conversation when I see you soon hopefully in a couple of weeks.Harry Glorikian: Hopefully as life gets, or if it gets back to normal, depending on the variants, you know, we'll hopefully get to meet him in person and have a glass of wine or a cocktail together. So it was great to speak to you. Glad we had this time, and I look forward to, you know, hearing updates on the company and, you know, continually seeing the progress going forward.Ardy Arianpour: Thanks so much, Harry, for having me. Big fan of Moneyball, so thank you to you and your organizers for having me and Seqster on. If anyone wants to get in touch with me personally, you can find me on LinkedIn or you can follow Seqster at @Seqster. And again, thank you so much for. For having a great discussion around, you know, the the insights behind Seqster.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Thank you.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode.  You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and MoneyBall Medicine at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show. You can find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview. 

The Flip Side with Noah Filipiak
Ep. 57: Chase & Noah talk Critical Race Theory, White Privilege, & White Supremacy (is that enough buzzwords for you?)

The Flip Side with Noah Filipiak

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 89:18


Noah and co-host Chase Stancle respond to a mailbag question about Critical Race Theory. It's a convo you won't want to miss.    Anyone who leaves an iTunes review between now and Christmas gets put into a drawing for some free Flip Side swag. Here are instructions for leaving a review:    1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac.  2. You can find "The Flip Side by Noah Filipiak" by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode. 3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews." 4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."   Flip Side Notes: Join an upcoming Beyond the Battle online group at www.beyondthebattle.net  Support Flip Side sponsor Angry Brew by using promo code FLIP at angrybrew.com or fivelakes.com to pick up some Angry Brew or Chris' Blend coffee at 10% off. Email the show at podcast@beyondthebattle.net  Support the show and get some sweet swag by becoming a patron at www.patreon.com/noahfilipiak

Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol free life!
Soberfishie Dawn tells her story...

Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol free life!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 55:50


Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol-free life! My guest this week is Soberfishie Dawn. Her nickname is Fish. Of course she got the nickname because she drank like a fish! For Dawn her journey began back in 2016 when she decided to try an alcohol free year.  She blogged about her journey, decided to stay alcohol free and is now a Sobriety Advocate with a membership and a large social media following.   I always enjoy talking to people who do similar work to myself and in fact I had one of my “light bulb” moments during this conversation which I will highlight at the end.. In this Episode Dawns original plan was to do a Sober Year – she had done short stretches in the past but wanted to see what kind of results she got from a longer period.  Well the results were overwhelmingly positive which is why she is still alcohol free 5 years later! So if you've done lots of Dry January's and Sober Octobers but then gone back to drinking with great enthusiasm then you're missing out. You've done the hardest bit (those first few weeks are tough!) so now you need to keep going for a bit longer!  In 66 days when you will have built a new neural pathway you will not only find it easier but you will also experience more benefits - a win win situation which may well result in your choosing an sobriety as a permanent lifestyle choice. After all there is nothing so exhausting and demorolising as spending your life jumping on and off the wagon! Dawn shared her drinking story – started at 14 years old when she discovered that she didn't really have an off switch once she got started.  She would pre-load her drinks before going out – in theory to save money on drinks when she was out but she would drink as much as ever. We both agreed that there was a time when we would anticipate the week ahead and not arrange any activities for the day after drinking as we knew we would be feeling miserable and hungover Inevitably Dawn set herself some “rules” to try to limit the drinking – she actually came up with one that I hadn't tried – she set herself a curfew – a set time when she had to leave her event and come home. She actually managed this a few times but then found herself drinking when she got home!  Maybe to celebrate that she'd kept to her rule! We both suffered from blackouts and agreed that we'd put ourselves at risk in this way We also found ourselves at a bit of a loss when we first got sober – unlike “normal people” we had not built up hobbies or interests over the years because all our leisure time had been taken up by drinking! As Dawn put it we found ourselves wondering “what do normal people do with their time?!” Dawn got started on her sobriety journey by blogging and walking. She also "Saturated herself in Sobriety" to change her mindset.  Like many of us she needed to change her thinking about drinking!  Unlike willpower a different mindset will enable us to sustain our sobriety. We agreed that when we got sober 6 years ago sobriety had a definite image problem – it was seen as a dark and miserable place.  Things are changing and just a couple of weeks ago I interviewed Susan Christina, editor of the amazing Hola Sober monthly magazine.  This magazine is free and its busy making sobriety just as cool and glamorous as we all thought drinking was - you can access a copy HERE Dawn talked about what she calls her “contentment line” – when we drink we are either on a chemical high or on the hungover low – we rarely sit “on the line” which is actually where we live when we are sober. The contentment line is a peaceful and happy place to be – when Dawn feels a bit low and knows she is below her contentment line she knows how to self soothe – without alcohol.  In early sobriety we zig zag all over the line,  the highs of the pink cloud and the lows of FOMO but hang in there because the contentment line will be yours after you've done the work and notched up a period of sobriety. So talking of “doing the work” that's where I got my light bulb moment thanks to this conversation with Dawn. It hadn't really occurred to me until Dawn said it but “the work” is different for each of us AA talk about “doing the work” and of course they mean working systematically through every one of the 12 steps but I prefer William Porters approach that we should see it as a buffet and choose what works for us. For Dawn and myself “the work” has involved sharing our stories, writing about sobriety and leading a sober community – neither of us knew in advance that this was “our work” – we just did what felt right and gave us joy. So let's think about sobriety as a journey of self discovery – some of us missed out on creating hobbies and interests because we were too busy drinking – but now we have time and even a bit of extra money to explore – to discover what we really like doing That's why the Tribe Sober membership program offers yoga, nutritional advice, coaching and different types of therapy – we want to you to experiment and get to know yourself! I ended our conversation by asking Dawn to list her benefits and there were many! Quality of sleep, productivity, discovering work she loves, confidence – and specifically the confidence to go on two sober solo holidays!  Holidays she loved and can't wait to go on more To find out more about Dawn go to her blog soberfish.co.uk and she is Soberfishy on IG.  She is also a moderator on William Porters brilliant FB group which is called Alcohol Explained More info Subscription membership for Tribe Sober is just R85 (£4/$6/$8AUS) a month - you can join up HERE To access our website click HERE If you would like a free copy of our "Annual Tracker" or our e-book "66 Days to Sobriety" please email janet@tribesober.com If you would like to come to our Saturday afternoon Zoom Cafe as a guest and meet our community just email janet@tribesober.com Episode Sponsor           This episode is sponsored by the Tribe Sober Membership Program.  If you want to change your relationship with alcohol then                 sign up today           Read more about our 7-step program and subscribe HERE           Book a Discovery Call with me to find out if our membership would help you            Help us to spread the word! We made this podcast so that we can reach more people who need our help.  Please subscribe and share. If you enjoyed the podcast then please leave us a 5 star review on Apple podcasts, take a screenshot of your review and DM it to Tribe Sober's Instagram page - see PS for instructions - we'll send you something special to say thank you! We release a podcast episode every Saturday morning. You can follow Tribe Sober on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram  You can catch our FB live on Saturday mornings (11am SAST) and you can join our private Facebook group HERE Thank you for listening!  Till Next Week Janet x PS   How to leave an rating/review in Apple Podcasts (on an iOS device) 1. Open the Podcasts app. EASY. 2. Choose "Search" from the bottom row of icons and enter the name of the show (i.e., "Recover Like A Mother") into the search field. 3. Select the show under Shows (not under Episodes). 4. Scroll down past the first few episodes until you see Ratings & Reviews. 5. Click "Write a Review" underneath the displayed reviews from other listeners. You'll then have the option to rate the show on a 5-star scale, and write a review (you can rate without writing, too but it's always good to read your experience).

MetFlex and Chill
$140 - Keys To Growing Muscle As A Female Part 1 with Alex Bush

MetFlex and Chill

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 64:20


To watch this episode and other past episodes, please visit Rachel's YouTube channel. Listeners can find Alex Bush at his website www.physiquedevelopment.com, on Instagram @alexbush_ and YouTube @Physique Development  Alex Bush is a coach, trainer, and co-founder of the online coaching platform, Physique Development. He has a bachelor's degree in Exercise Science as well as several continuing education certifications including N1, PN1, and CSCS. Alex has been coaching for 8 years and has worked with over a thousand competitive physique athletes as well as lifestyle clients. Alex resides in Ohio with his wife, Sue, and Pups, Gus & Tucker. In this episode, Rachel and Alex chat about the key factors that play a role in growing muscle as a female, training during your cycle, if birth control plays a role in muscle growth, and much more! “Our greatest propensity to put on muscle tissue is going to be in a caloric surplus.” Alex Bush Top Takeaways: Training during your menstrual cycle Three factors to help optimize sleep Why carbs can be beneficial for females and hormonal health How birth control affects muscle growth Show Notes: [0:00] Trailer introduction to the episode.  [1:30] Welcome back to MetFlex and Chill! Rachel welcomes guest Alex Bush to the listeners   [2:00] Alex gives the listeners a brief intro of himself and also his journey in the nutrition and exercise space  [3:00] Physique Development  [10:00] Introducing the main topics of today's episode which include key concepts to building muscle as a female [11:30] First key: a calorie surplus  [13:00] “Our greatest propensity to put on muscle tissue is going to be in a caloric surplus.” Alex Bush [22:30] Second key: sleep and recovery [26:00] Alex's general recommendation on how many days a week you should focus on lifting [29:30] Question: Do you have any recommendations for optimizing sleep? [35:30] Third key: hormonal health [38:00] Question: What role does birth control play in building muscle? [41:00] Question: Have you ever found that manipulating certain macronutrients can be beneficial to hormonal health? [45:30] Why carbs can be beneficial for females and hormonal health [48:00] Question: What is your general recommendation in terms of changing up a client's training during the stages of their menstrual cycle?  [49:00] The Women's Book  [56:00] Question: Has there been anything that you've changed your mind about in the past year, and why? [1:02:00] Listeners can check out more from Alex on IG at @alexbush_, or his website www.physiquedevelopment.com, and on YouTube @Physique Development  [1:03:30] Thanks for listening to another episode! If you're loving MetFlex and Chill and want to help grow the show, please head over to Itunes and leave a rating and review! How to Leave an Apple Podcast Review: First, Open the podcast app on your iPhone, Mac, or iPad. Then, hit the “Search” tab at the bottom right-hand corner of the page and search for MetFlex and Chill. Select the podcast, scroll down to find the subheading “Ratings & Reviews”. and select “Write a Review.” Next, select the number of stars you'd like to leave. Please choose 5 stars! Using the text box which says “Title,” write a title for your review. Then in the text box, write the review itself. The review can be up to 300 words long, but doesn't need to be much more than: “Love the show! Thanks!” or “Rachel provides wonderful content from a multitude of expert guests!” Once you're done select “Send” in the upper right-hand corner. --- Join the FREE MetFLex Life Course: www.metflexandchill.com  Rachel Gregory is a Board-Certified Nutritionist, Strength and Conditioning Specialist, Podcaster, and founder of MetFlex Life. She is also the author of the international best-selling book, "21-Day Ketogenic Diet Weight Loss Challenge." Rachel received her Master's Degree in Nutrition & Exercise Physiology from James Madison University and Bachelor's Degree in Sports Medicine from the University of Miami. Rachel completed the first-ever human clinical trial looking at the effects of the Ketogenic Diet in non-elite CrossFit athletes, which is published in the International Journal of Sports and Exercise Medicine. Currently, in her day-to-day coaching business, Rachel guides her clients to becoming the best, most confident version of themselves. She has a passion for educating those dedicated to optimizing their physical and mental well-being while improving long-term health and fitness goals. Her most popular course, Keto for Women, has helped women all across the world learn how to ditch the restrictive, all-or-nothing mindset associated with keto and instead thrive through the power of metabolic flexibility. You can connect and learn more about Rachel's work by visiting her website www.metflexlife.com  Social Links: Youtube: @rachelgregory Instagram: @rachelgregory.cns TikTok: @metflexlife Facebook: @metflexlife  Primary Programs: Keto For Women Muscle Science For Women

Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol free life!
Yoga in Recovery - with Tom & Tamsin

Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol free life!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 69:39


Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol-free life! My guests this week are Tom and Tamsin Sheehey, co-owners of The Shala Yoga Studio in Cape Town, South Africa.  They are both yoga teachers and Tom is also a health coach with expertise in nutritional guidance.  They will both be offering their expertise to the Tribe Sober members. In this Episode Tom's studies were in what is now called “complimentary medicine” which we both agreed is a better description than “alternative medicine”. If we want to use things like nutrition, yoga, massage, acupuncture etc as part of our healing process then it should be seen as complimentary to traditional medicine – not as an alternative. He talks to us about how regular alcohol use can put the body in a state of chronic inflammation which is a pre-cursor to many illnesses including cancer. In fact a recent study showed evidence that alcohol is linked to 7 different types of cancer https://www.webmd.com/cancer/news/20160722/alcohol-seven-types-cancer  From his nutritional viewpoint Tom also pointed out that alcohol is simply liquid sugar which will affect our blood sugar levels which can lead to diabetes which again can lead to multiple health issues. We talked about whether alcoholism is genetic and Tom agreed that if people have alcoholism in the family then they may well be more pre-disposed to developing dependency issues but he firmly believes that our health is dependent partly on our genes, partly on environment and partly on our lifestyle. More on whether alcoholism is genetic in this podcast episode with Mary Anne Shearer - episode 31.  When Tom works with his clients we tends to coach people mainly on lifestyle changes as that is what is usually in our control. He talked about the negative impact of alcohol on the gut which is twofold. Not only does it prevent us from absorbing some of the nutrients in our food but it also means we are less efficient at expelling metabolic waste – resulting in increased toxicity. Tom coaches people around the 4 pillars of health which are diet, stress reduction, toxin reduction (alcohol being a toxin of course) and moderate exercise. He advises us to increase the three dietary essentials – oxygen, water and vegetables and reduce refined sugar refined salts and synthetic foods…. If you do this and remove the toxin that is alcohol you are going to feel amazing! Tamsin explained that she took up yoga because she wanted to access her body's natural vitality. Although she was only in her early twenties she didn't feel great and wanted to understand her body better.  20 years into her yoga practice Tamsin is a wonderful role model of health, strength and serenity. Becoming a yoga teacher has made her own practice sustainable as she integrates what she is teaching into her own body. She loves her healthy lifestyle and the fact that she now gets to “teach it forward” We talked about how yoga can help in recovery and Tamsin explained that it's about coming home into your body. With the focus on breathing and mindfulness we become aware of what's going on in our body.  Getting on our yoga mat gives us the opportunity to check in with our bodies and discover how we actually feel. If recovery is about connecting with something greater than ourselves then there is a consciousness that comes with yoga that can facilitate that. Yoga is not a competitive sport and Tamsin urged us not to be intimidated however old or unfit we are – especially now that we can do yoga online in the privacy of our own home! As we get older a yoga practice becomes more and more important – we need to keep our bodies strong and flexible and we need to move our joints to prevent arthritis. We are never too old to begin yoga and Tamsin explained that she has clients that do chair yoga or even bed yoga. She adapts the classes to her clients.  I discovered Tamsin after reading a feature in a magazine about “lymphasising” – I was recovering from cancer and read that it was an aid to recovery. So that's how I discovered trampolines.  You heard her saying that bouncing was essential to health and wellness.  Tamsin begins her day with a session on the trampoline and sees that as a lifetime practice. If like me you spend all day sitting at your computer then get a mini trampoline and get up and bounce for 5 minutes every hour. There are SO many health benefits and we really do need to keep “doing the dishes” as Tamsin described it! Sobriety is a journey of self discovery. When we give up drinking we have time on our hands and recover our energy– we actually want to try new things and start to look around at other areas of our life. Do we need to clean up our eating habits, do we need to do more exercise and some yoga for example.   One of my podcast guests (Will Black on episode 52 calls this the Domino Effect) So if you think your diet could do with a bit of a review and if you are ready to give yoga a try then please take this opportunity. If you are not yet a member of tribe sober then please sign up today – go to tribesober.com and hit join our tribe. Once you are a member go into “members only” area of the website and you will see an ICON for yoga and one for nutrition – just hit the Icons to read more about Tom and Tamsin what they are offering to our members. You can do just one online Yoga session with Tamsin and a couple of sessions with Tom – so much to gain and absolutely nothing to lose! You can read about The Shala Yoga Studio on their website www.theshala.co.za More info Subscription membership for Tribe Sober is just R85 (£4/$6/$8AUS) a month - you can join up HERE To access our website click HERE If you would like a free copy of our "Annual Tracker" or our e-book "66 Days to Sobriety" please email janet@tribesober.com If you would like to come to our Saturday afternoon Zoom Cafe as a guest and meet our community just email janet@tribesober.com Episode Sponsor           This episode is sponsored by the Tribe Sober Membership Program.  If you want to change your relationship with alcohol then                 sign up today           Read more about our 7-step program and subscribe HERE           Book a Discovery Call with me to find out if our membership would help you            Help us to spread the word! We made this podcast so that we can reach more people who need our help.  Please subscribe and share. If you enjoyed the podcast then please leave us a 5 star review on Apple podcasts, take a screenshot of your review and DM it to Tribe Sober's Instagram page - see PS for instructions - we'll send you something special to say thank you! We release a podcast episode every Saturday morning. You can follow Tribe Sober on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram  You can catch our FB live on Saturday mornings (11am SAST) and you can join our private Facebook group HERE Thank you for listening!  Till Next Week Janet x PS   How to leave an rating/review in Apple Podcasts (on an iOS device) 1. Open the Podcasts app. EASY. 2. Choose "Search" from the bottom row of icons and enter the name of the show (i.e., "Recover Like A Mother") into the search field. 3. Select the show under Shows (not under Episodes). 4. Scroll down past the first few episodes until you see Ratings & Reviews. 5. Click "Write a Review" underneath the displayed reviews from other listeners. You'll then have the option to rate the show on a 5-star scale, and write a review (you can rate without writing, too but it's always good to read your experience).

MetFlex and Chill
#139 - Is Your Metabolism Broken? with Brandon DaCruz

MetFlex and Chill

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 64:04


To watch this episode and other past episodes, please visit Rachel's YouTube channel. Listeners can find Brandon DaCruz at his website https://www.brandondacruzfit.com/, and on Instagram @brandondacruz_ Brandon DaCruz is an online nutrition and physique coach, sports nutritionist as well as the National sales manager of an internationally carried supplement brand. He's also a National Level NPC physique competitor and an internationally published fitness model who's written articles and filmed educational content for publications like Men's Fitness Magazine and Bodybuilding.com.  Brandon has spent the past 12 years working within the sports nutrition and fitness industries and has coached every type of client including Olympia Level professional men's physique competitors, college athletes, MMA fighters, CrossFit competitors, and lifestyle clients.  He believes in blending what's been proven in the research with his own anecdotal and first hand "in the trenches'' experience to improve body composition, optimize performance and enhance health in order to help his clients achieve their goals whether that be building muscle, losing body fat, increasing performance and/or optimizing health and longevity. This is what he refers to as his health-centric coaching model as he believes that improving one's health is the cornerstone to optimizing their physical goals.  In this episode, we chat about the four components that make up your metabolism, the power of mindset in any transformation journey, three components affected by metabolic adaptation, tips on how to manage adaptations, and much more! “We have to realize that metabolic adaptations are part of the process, and we can't completely avoid them, this is a natural response. However, we can minimize some of the factors that are downregulated to make the process of dieting easier, more efficient, and successful.” Brandon DaCruz Top Takeaways: Four components of your metabolism explained  One key component to elicit any type of adaptation  3 main components affected by metabolic adaptation How to manage metabolic adaptation to have more effective fat loss phases Show Notes: [0:00] Trailor introduction to the episode. Brandon discusses the importance of sleep in recovery [1:00] Rachel gives a brief bio about guest Brandon DaCruz to the listeners [2:00] Welcome back to MetFlex and Chill! Rachel welcomes repeat guest Brandon DaCruz to the listeners [2:30] Episode 129: Metabolic Flexibility: A Lifestyle Approach with Brandon DaCruz, Episode 112: Energy Flux: The Missing Piece To Your Fitness Journey with Brandon DaCruz [3:00] Brandon gives a brief bio of his journey within the health, nutrition, and supplement space  [5:00] “We all hit plateaus, and no process, especially the process of fat loss, is a linear one.” Brandon DaCruz [5:30] Question: What is metabolism? Can you break it down in layman's terms for everyone? [6:00] What is metabolism?  [8:00] Question: What are the components of your metabolism? [12:30] “When it comes to ‘what factors of our metabolism are within our control in terms of increasing energy expenditure,' NEAT is going to be the golden ticket.” Brandon DaCruz [18:00] Question: What is metabolic adaptation? [23:30] Question: What are the 3 main components affected by metabolic adaptation? [26:30] Nonexercise activity thermogenesis – liberating the life-force [43:30] Third component of metabolic adaptation: mitochondrial changes [45:00] Question: What are some practical tips that you would recommend to your clients for managing some of these adaptations that are inevitably going to occur? [45:30] “We have to realize that metabolic adaptations are part of the process, and we can't completely avoid them, this is a natural response. However, we can minimize some of the factors that are downregulated, to make the process of dieting easier, more efficient, and successful.”   [1:02:30] To check out more from Brandon DaCruz you can find him on IG @brandondacruz_ and for fitness inquiries at bdacruzfitness@gmail.com  [1:03:00] Thanks for listening to another episode! If you're loving MetFlex and Chill and want to help grow the show, please head over to Itunes and leave a rating and review! How to Leave an Apple Podcast Review: First, Open the podcast app on your iPhone, Mac, or iPad. Then, hit the “Search” tab at the bottom right-hand corner of the page and search for MetFlex and Chill. Select the podcast, scroll down to find the subheading “Ratings & Reviews”. and select “Write a Review.” Next, select the number of stars you'd like to leave. Please choose 5 stars! Using the text box which says “Title,” write a title for your review. Then in the text box, write the review itself. The review can be up to 300 words long, but doesn't need to be much more than: “Love the show! Thanks!” or “Rachel provides wonderful content from a multitude of expert guests!” Once you're done select “Send” in the upper right-hand corner.   --- Join the FREE MetFLex Life Course: www.metflexandchill.com  Rachel Gregory is a Board-Certified Nutritionist, Strength and Conditioning Specialist, Podcaster, and founder of MetFlex Life. She is also the author of the international best-selling book, "21-Day Ketogenic Diet Weight Loss Challenge." Rachel received her Master's Degree in Nutrition & Exercise Physiology from James Madison University and Bachelor's Degree in Sports Medicine from the University of Miami. Rachel completed the first-ever human clinical trial looking at the effects of the Ketogenic Diet in non-elite CrossFit athletes, which is published in the International Journal of Sports and Exercise Medicine. Currently, in her day-to-day coaching business, Rachel guides her clients to becoming the best, most confident version of themselves. She has a passion for educating those dedicated to optimizing their physical and mental well-being while improving long-term health and fitness goals. Her most popular course, Keto for Women, has helped women all across the world learn how to ditch the restrictive, all-or-nothing mindset associated with keto and instead thrive through the power of metabolic flexibility. You can connect and learn more about Rachel's work by visiting her website www.metflexlife.com  Social Links: Youtube: @rachelgregory Instagram: @rachelgregory.cns TikTok: @metflexlife Facebook: @metflexlife  Primary Programs: Keto For Women Muscle Science For Women

MoneyBall Medicine
Why AI-based computational pathology detects more cancers

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 49:36


Chances are you or someone you love has had a biopsy to check for cancer. Doctors got a tissue sample and they sent it into a pathology lab, and at some point you got a result back. If you were lucky, it was negative and there was no cancer. But have you ever wondered exactly what happens in between those steps? Until recently, it's been a meticulous but imperfect manual process where a pathologist would put a thin slice of tissue under a high-powered microscope and examine the cells by eye, looking for patterns that indicate malignancy. But now the process is going digital—and growing more accurate.Harry's guest this week is Leo Grady, CEO of, Paige AI, which makes an AI-driven test called Paige Prostate. Grady says that in a clinical study, pathologists who had help from the Paige system accurately diagnosed prostate cancer almost 97 percent of the time, up from 90 percent without the tool. That translates into a 70 percent reduction in false negatives—nice odds if your own health is on the line. This week on the show, Grady explains explain how the Paige test works, how the company trained its software to be more accurate than a human pathologist, how it won FDA approval for the test, and what it could all mean for the future of cancer diagnosis and treatment.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.Chances are you or someone you love has had a biopsy to check for cancer. Doctors got a tissue sample and they sent it into a pathology lab, and at some point you got a result back. If you were lucky it was negative and there was no cancer.But have you ever wondered exactly what happens in between those steps?Well, until recently, it's been an extremely meticulous manual process. A pathologist would create a very thin slice of your tissue, put it under a high-powered microscope, and examine the cells by eye, looking for patterns that indicate malignancy. But recently the process has started to go digital. For one thing, the technology to make a digital scan of a pathology slide has been getting cheaper. That's a no-brainer, since it makes it way easier for a pathologist to share an image if they want a second opinion.But once the data is available digitally, it opens up a bunch of additional possibilities. Including letting computers try their hand at pathology. That's what's happening at a company called Paige AI, which makes a newly FDA-approved test for prostate cancer called Paige Prostate.The test uses computer vision and machine learning to find spots on prostate biopsy slides that look suspicious, so a human pathologist can take a closer look.So why should you care?Well, in a clinical study that Paige submitted to the FDA, pathologists who had help from the Paige system accurately diagnosed cancer almost 97 percent of the time, up from 90 percent without the tool.That translates into a 70 percent reduction in false negatives. At the same time there was a 24 percent reduction in false positives. I gotta tell you, if I were getting a prostate biopsy, I'd really like those improved odds. And it's a great example of the kinds of AI-driven medical technologies that I write about in The Future You, which is now available from Amazon in Kindle ebook format.So I asked Paige's CEO, Leo Grady, to come on the show to explain how the test works, how Paige trained its software to be more accurate than a human pathologist, how the company got the FDA to give its first ever approval for an AI-based pathology product, and what it could all mean for the future of cancer diagnosis and treatment.Here's our conversation.Harry Glorikian: Leo, welcome to the show.Leo Grady: Hi, Harry. Glad to be here.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. You know, I've been watching the company for some time now, and the big story here seems to be that we're really entering the area of digital pathology, also known as sort of computational pathology, and it's funny because I've been talking about digital pathology since I think I started my career back when I was 25, which seems like a long time ago at this point. But for a lot of laboratory tests that we use, like it's usually done by eye, and now we can get a lot from sort of AI being assistive in this way. So keeping in mind that some of the listeners are professionals, but we have a bunch of sort of non-experts, could you start off explaining the term maybe computational pathology and summarize where the state of the art is, which I assume you guys are right at the cutting edge of it?Leo Grady: Yeah, so I think it actually might help just to jump back a level and talk about what is pathology and how is it done today? So today, so pathology is the branch of medicine where a doctor is taking tissue out of a patient through a biopsy, through surgery and making glass slides out of that tissue, looking at it under a microscope in order to make a diagnosis. And today, all of that process of taking the tissue out, cutting it, staining it, mounting it on slides. Then gets looked at under a microscope by a pathologist to make a diagnosis, and that diagnosis the pathologist makes is the definitive diagnosis that then drives all of the rest of the downstream management and care of that patient. When pathologists are looking through a microscope, sometimes they see something that they're not quite sure what it is. And so they may want to do another test. They may want to do another stain. They may want to cut more out of the tissue, make a second slide. Sometimes they want to ask a colleague for their opinion, or if they really feel like they need an expert opinion, they may want to send that case out for a consultation, in which case the glass slides or are put in a, you know, FedEx and basically shipped out to another lab somewhere. All of those different scenarios can be improved with digital pathology and particularly computational pathology and the sort of technology that we build at Paige. So in a digital world, what happens instead is that the slides don't go to the pathologist as glass. They go into a digital slide scanner, and those slide scanners produce a very high resolution picture of these slides.Leo Grady: So these are quarter-micron resolution images that get produced of each slide. And then the pathologist has a work list on their monitor. They look through those those cases, they open them up and then that digital workflow, they can see the sides digitally. When they have those slides digitally, if they want to send them out to a second opinion or or show them to a colleague, it's much easier to then send those cases electronically than it is to actually ship the glass from one location to another. Once those slides are digital it, it opens up a whole other set of possibilities for how information can come to the pathologist. So if they want additional information about something they see in those slides, rather than doing another stain, doing another cut, sending for a second opinion, what we can do and what we do at Paige is we we identify all the tissue patterns in that piece of tissue, match those against a large database where we have known diagnoses and say, OK, this case, this pattern here has a high match toward to something that's in this database. And by providing that information to the pathologists on request that pathologists can then leverage that information, integrate it and use it in their diagnostic process. And this is the product that the FDA just approved. It's the first ever AI based product in pathology that is specifically aimed at prostate cancer and providing this additional information in the context of a prostate needle biopsy.Harry Glorikian: Well, congratulations on that. That's, you know, that's amazing. And I'm. You know, the fact that the FDA is being more aggressive than I remember them being in the past is also a great thing to see. But, you know, we've been talking and quote digitizing things in pathology for for quite some time, let's say, separate from the AI based analytics part of it moving in that direction. What was the kind of technology advance or prerequisite that you guys came up with when you started Paige that that took this to that next level.Leo Grady: Well, as you're pointing out, Harry, most slides are not digitized today, single digits of slides in a clinical setting get digitized. And the reason for that has been you need to buy scanners, you need to change your workflow, you need to digitize these slides. They're enormously large from a file size and data complexity. So then you have to store them somehow and you make all of that investment and then you get to look at the same slide on a monitor that you look at under a microscope. And so pathologists for years have said, why? Why would we make this investment? Why would we go through all of that expense? And that trouble and that change and learn a new instrument when we don't really get a lot of value out of doing so? And furthermore, there was even a question for a long time, do you get the same information on a digital side that you get on glass through a microscope? Yep. There have been a number of things that have been changing that over time. So one is the maturity of the high capacity digital side scanners. There are now a number of hardware vendors that produce these. Storage costs have come down. And one thing that we offer at Paige is is cloud storage, which is really low cost because we're able to effectively pool costs with the cloud providers from multiple different labs and hospitals, so we can really drive those prices down as far as possible.Leo Grady: So that lowers that barrier. And then back in 2017, the first digital side scanner got approved, which demonstrated there was equivalency in the diagnosis between looking at the slide on a monitor and looking at it under a microscope. And that is something that that we also replicated with our digital side viewer, demonstrated that equivalency between digital and glass. But all of those barriers were barriers just to going digital in the first place. And now, really, for the first time, because of the maturity of the scanners, because of the FDA clearance of just the viewer, because of lower cost storage, many of those barriers have come down. Now what has not happened is still a major clinical benefit for going digital in the first place. Yes, you can share slides easier. Yes, you can retrieve slides easier. Yes, you can do education easier. It's still a lot of cost and a lot of changed your workflow, so I really think that that the introduction of the kinds of technologies that that the FDA approved, which we built with Paige Prostate, that actually adds additional information into the diagnostic workflow that can help pathologists use that information help them. You get to a better diagnosis, reduce false positives, reduce false negatives, which is what we showed in the study that for the first time is is going above and beyond just going digital and some of these conveniences of a digital workflow to providing true clinical benefit.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, whenever I look at this from an investment perspective, like if you take apart something and break it into its first principles, you know, levels, you have to have certain milestones hit. Otherwise, it's not going to come together, right? And I've, you know, looking at digital pathology, it's the same thing. You have to have certain pieces in place for the next evolution to be possible, because it's got to be built on top of these foundational pieces. But, you know, once you get there, the exponential nature of of how things change, once it's digitized and once you're utilizing it and prove that it works is sort of where you see the, you know, large leaps of benefit for the pathologist as well as, you know, ultimately we're doing this for better patient care. But you know, your product was I think the FDA called it the first ever FDA approval for an AI product in pathology, which is a big deal, at least as far as I'm concerned, because I've been doing it for a long time. But because it was first, it must have been a one hell of a learning process for you and the FDA to figure out how to evaluate a test like this. Can you sort of explain maybe a little bit about the process? You know, how did you win approval? What novel questions did you have to answer?Leo Grady: It was a long process. You know, as you point out, this is this is the first ever technology approved in this space. And I think you saw from the FDA's own press release their enthusiasm for what this technology can bring to patient benefits. Fortunately, we applied for breakthrough designation back in early 2019, received that breakthrough designation in February of 2019. And as a result, one of the benefits of breakthrough designation is the FDA commits to working closely with the company to try to iterate on the study protocol, iterate on the the validation that's going to be required in order to bring the the technology to market. And so because of that breakthrough designation, we had the opportunity to work with the the FDA in a much tighter iterative loop. And I think that they are they were concerned, I mean, primarily about the impact of a misdiagnosis and pathology, right? Which is really understandable, right? Their view is that, yes, maybe in radiology, you see something and maybe aren't totally sure. But then there's always pathology as a safety net, you know, in case you ever really need to resolve a ground truth. You can always take the tissue out and look at it under a microscope. But when you're dealing with a product for pathology, that's the end of the road. I mean, that is where the diagnostic buck stops. And so anything there that that was perhaps going to misinform a pathologist, mislead them, you know, ultimately lead to a negative conclusion for the patients could have more severe consequences.Speaker2: The flip side, of course, though, is that if you get it right, the benefits are much greater because you can really positively impact the care of those patients. So I think they they, you know, appropriately, we're concerned with the exacting rigor of the study to really ensure that that this technology was providing benefit and also because it was the first I think they wanted to be able to set a standard for future technologies that would have to live up to the same bar. So there were a lot of meetings, you know, a lot of trips down to Silver Spring. But I have to say that that the FDA, you know, I think in technology, there are a lot of companies that are are quick to, you know, malign regulators and rules. I frankly both at Paige and my previous experience at HeartFlow, at Siemens, I think the FDA brings a very consistent and important standard of clinical trial design of of, you know, technology proving that is safe and effective. And I found them to be great partners to work with in order to really identify what that protocol looks like to be able to produce the validation and then to, you know, ask some tough questions. But that's their job. And I think, you know, at the end of the day, the products that get produced that go through that process really have met the standard of of not only clinical validation, but even things like security and quality management and other really important factors of a clinical product.Harry Glorikian: Oh no, I'm in total agreement. I mean, whenever I'm talking to a company and they're like, Well, I don't know when I'm going to go to the agency, I'm like, go to the agency, like, don't wait till the end. Like there, actually, you need to look at them as a partner, not as an adversary.Leo Grady: Yeah. And a pre-submission meeting is is easy to do. It's an opportunity to make a proposal to the FDA and to understand how they think about it and whether that's that's going to be a strategy that's going to be effective and workable for them. So I always think that that pre subs are the place to start before you do too much work because you generally know whether you're on the right path or not.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I agree. And it's funny because you said, like, you know, they're concerned about the product, but it's interesting. Like from all the College of American Pathology studies where you send slides to different people, you don't always get the exact same answer, depending on who's looking at it. So I can see how a product can bring some level of standardization to the process that that helps make the call so uniform, even across institutions when you send the slides. So I think that's moving the whole field in a really positive direction.Leo Grady: Well, only if that uniform call is correct, right? Or better? Great. I mean, if you bring everybody down to the lowest common denominator that that standardization, but it's not moving the field forward. So. Correct. One of the curses of of bringing that level of standardization is that you have to really meet the highest bar of the highest pathologists and not not just the average. That said, you know, we're fortunate to come from Memorial Sloan-Kettering and to have the opportunity to work with some of the the leading pathologists in the world to really build in that level of rigor and excellence into the technology.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. So that brings me to like, you know. The algorithms are built on a fairly large training set would be my assumption and of pre labeled sort of images, where do you guys source that from? Is it you have like a thousand people in the background sort of making sure that everything is labeled correctly before it's fed to the to the algorithm itself?Leo Grady: Well, what you're describing is very common where you have pathologists or in radiology radiologists or other experts really marking up images and saying this is the important part to pay attention to. This part is cancer. That part's benign. Our technology actually works differently. Our founder, Thomas Fuchs, and his team at Memorial Sloan-Kettering actually really made a breakthrough not only in the the quality of some of the the AI systems that were building, but also in the technology itself. And what what they did, this was all published in Nature Medicine a couple of years ago, is basically find a way to just show the computer a slide and the final diagnosis without having a pathologist, you know, mark up the slide, but just show them the final diagnosis. And when you show the computer enough examples of the slide and the final diagnosis, the computer starts to learn to say, OK, this pattern is common to all grade threes. This pattern is common to all grade fours. Or whatever it is. And the computer learns to identify those patterns without anybody going through and marking those up. Well, this technology is important for a few reasons.Leo Grady: One, it means we can train systems at enormous scale. We can not just do thousands of cases, but tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of cases. Second, it means that we can really build out a portfolio of technologies quickly that are very robust and not have to spend years annotating slides. And third, it allows us to start looking for patterns that no pathologists would necessarily know how to mark up. You know, can we identify which tumors are going to respond to certain drugs or certain therapies? You know, no pathologists are going to be able to say, OK, it's this part of the the tumor that you need to look at because they don't really know. But with this technology where we we know these tumors responded, these tumors didn't it actually helps us try to ferret out those patterns. So that that's one of the real key benefits that differentiates Paige from from other companies in this space is just the difference in the technology itself.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. I mean, it's funny because I must admit, like when we talk about stuff like this, I get super excited because I can see where things can go. It's. It's always difficult to explain it where somebody else can envision what you've been thinking about because you've been thinking about it so long, but it's super exciting. So let's jump to like the most important benefits, like if you had to rank the benefits of the technology, I mean, I've I read on your website that in the clinical study you guys submitted to the FDA, pathologist used using the Paige Prostate were seven percent more likely to correctly diagnose the cancer. Is that the major innovation? Would that by itself be enough to justify an investment in the technology? I mean, I'm trying to. You know, if you were to say God, this is the most important thing and then go down the list, what would they be?Leo Grady: Yeah, that's right. So so the study that we did was like this. We had 16 pathologists. They diagnosed about six hundred prostate needle core biopsy patients and they they did their diagnosis. They recorded it and then they did it a second time using Paige so they could see the benefit of all this pattern matching that that Paige had done for them. And what we did is we compared the diagnosis. They got the first time and the second time with the ground truth, consensus diagnosis that we had from Memorial. And what we found is that when the pathologists were using Paige, they had a 70 percent reduction in false negatives. They had a 24 percent reduction in false positives, and their interest in obtaining additional information went down because they had more confidence in the diagnosis that they were able to provide. And what was interesting about that group of 16 pathologists is it it included pathologists that were experienced, that were less experienced, some that were specialists in prostate cancer, some that were not so specialized in prostate cancer. And among that entire group of pathologists, they all got better. They all benefited from using this technology. And what's more, is that the gap between the less experienced, less specialized pathologists and more experienced, more specialized pathologists actually decreased as they all used the technology. So it allowed them to, like we were talking about before, actually come up to the level of of the better pathologists and even the better pathologists could leverage the information to get even better.Harry Glorikian: So as a male who you know who's going to age at some point and potentially have to deal with, hopefully not, a prostate issue, we want them to make an accurate diagnosis because you don't want the inaccurate diagnosis, especially in in that sort of an issue. But what about the speed? I mean, you've you talk about that, you know, it helps streamline the process and reduce reduce turnaround time for for patients. What does that do to workload and and how quickly you're able to turn that around compared to, say, a traditional method.Leo Grady: Our study was really focused on clinical benefit and patient benefit. We were not aiming to measure speed and the way in which the study was designed and the device is intended to be used is that the pathologist would look at the case, decide what they they think the result is, and then pull up the Paige results and see if it changes their thinking or calls their attention to something that they may have missed. So the focus of the the product was really on the the benefit to the the clinical diagnosis and the clinical benefit to patients by providing more information to the doctors. And the result of that information was, you know, clearly demonstrated benefit. Now if they can get to that result by looking at the Paige results and they don't need another cut, they don't need another stain, they don't need another consultation, then that's going to get the results back to the urologists faster, back to the patient faster and will ultimately enable them to start acting on that diagnosis more quickly. But the intention of the study, the intended use of the device is not around making pathologists faster. It's really around providing them this additional information so that they can use that in the course of their diagnosis and get the better results from patients.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer.It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in Kindle format. Just go to Amazon and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: So I asked this out of naivete because I didn't I didn't go looking for it. But have you guys done a health economic analysis of the system?Leo Grady: We have one. It certainly it's, as you know, it's really key to be able to look at that we have a model that we've built. We're still refining it with additional data. There was a study that was announced in the U.K. a couple of weeks ago where the NHS is actually funding a prospective multicenter trial that includes Oxford, Warwick, Coventry, Bristol to be able to evaluate the the health, economics and clinical benefits of using this technology in clinical practice prospectively. So that's something that we engaged with NICE [the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence] on in order to try to get the design correct that will help feed in real world data into the model. But we have a model that we've been using internally and are continuing to build and refine.Harry Glorikian: So. Again, incredible that you guys got FDA approval, I think the company was founded in 2017, if I'm correct. Can you talk about, you know, the founders and yow you guys, you know, built this so quickly, I mean time scale wise, it's a pretty compressed time scale, relatively speaking.Leo Grady: Well, yeah, it isn't, it isn't, ...so the company started in 2017, our first employee was actually middle of 2018 and we had our first venture round and in early 2018. However, the work that went into the company that spun out of Memorial Sloan-Kettering started earlier. So there is a group of really visionary individuals at MSK that back, I want to say, 2014, 2015, actually had started this push toward digital pathology, computational pathology, really seeing where the puck was going and building this technology. They formed something called the Warren Alpert Center, and the Warren Alpert Center provided some initial funding to really get this going and to hire some of the founders and to really move this technology in the right direction. And it was really because that technology started to show such promise that MSK made the decision that that was at a point where it could be better, you know, more impactful to actually go outside of MSK into a company where where we could industrialize the technology and really bring it to hospitals and labs around the world. So the technology started earlier, 2014, 2015. Paige was really launched in, I would say, 2018, although technically it was incorporated earlier and and then from that point I personally joined in 2019. And so I'm not I'm not a founder, but when I joined in 2019, you know, we we really spun up a significant team and and brought to bear some of my own experience and industrializing AI technology and bringing it out to clinical benefit.Harry Glorikian: Well, you know, most founders don't take the company all the way. It's a rare breed that's able to get it that far. So you know this a great story, but let's step back here and talk about like now you have to like, get people to accept this technology right, which is the human factor which I always find much more confounding than the the the the computational factor. So you've got to get, you know, somebody inside a hospital or pathology lab. Do you run into resistance or pushback from the technology, I mean, are they skeptical about the algorithm? How do you get a human to sort of buy off on this? I remember when we were presenting this, oh God, again, 25 years ago, they hated it. I mean, just hated it. And as time has gone by, you've seen that that digitization is slowly taking effect and where you know, it's assistive as opposed to something, I remember when we first launched this, it was, "This is going to be better than" or "take your job," which is a great way to make an enemy on the other side. And I see that the two actually being better than one or the other per se on on its own. So how are you guys approaching this? And do you have any anecdotal stories that you might be able to share?Leo Grady: Yeah, and so I think there are two elements are one is, you know. Are people resistant by the nature of the technology because they feel threatened by it, and then the other is how does market adoption start with this sort of technology to just the first point? You know, I tend to be very careful about the term AI. I feel like it know it often introduces this concept of, you know, people think of a robot doctor that's going to run in and start doing things. And it's just it's not. I mean, AI is a technology that's been in development for four decades. I did my PhD in AI, in computer vision, 20 years ago, and it's just a technology, right? It's like a transistor. It can be used to build many different things. At its core, it's just complex pattern matching, which is what we how we leverage that technology. In the case of Paige Prostate was to help provide that information. I think, you know, the better frame to think about this technology is as a diagnostic. This is just like a diagnostic test. You validate it with a standalone sensitivity and specificity. The information gets provided the doctor. You have to do a clinical trial that samples the space effectively of the patient population and the intended use.Leo Grady: And you have to make sure the doctors understand the information and know how to use it effectively. It's before my time, but I heard that when immunohistochemistry was first really introduced in pathology, that there is a discussion that this was going to take all the pathologists' jobs. And who needs a pathologist if you can just stain with IHG and get get a diagnostic result out of it? Well, you know, 20 years, IHT is an essential component of of pathology, and it's a key element of of the diagnostic workflow for pathologists. So, far from replacing any pathologists, it's empowered them. It's made there the benefit that they can provide to the clinicians, even more valuable and even more important. And I think we're going to see a similar trajectory with this computational technology. Now your first question about market adoption, how people adopting this, I would say that, you know, last week I went to the College of American Pathology meeting, which was in person in Chicago. It's my first in-person meeting since COVID, so a year and a half ago. And I noticed--and this was this was right after the announcement by the FDA of of the approval for Paige Prostate--I noticed there was a market shift in the conversations I was having with pathologists.Leo Grady: It was a shift away from "Does this technology work? Is it ready for prime time? What does it really do?" Toward, "Ok, how do we operationalize this? How do we bring it in house, how do we integrate this into a workflow and how do we how do we pay for it?" You know, those are the conversations that we were having in Chicago at CAP. Not does this work? Is it ready for prime time? So I do think that there is a market understanding that the technology is real, that it works, that it can provide benefit. Now it's just a question of how do we operationalize and how do we get it paid for? Because today there's no additional reimbursement for it. But you know, again, with market adoption, you're got your Moore adoption curve for anything. You get them and you get your innovators and early adopters, your early majority, late majority and your laggards. And you know where I think we're at a stage where we've got innovators and early adopters that are excited to jump in and start leveraging this technology. And I think, you know, we're going to get to your early majority and the late majority over time. It's always going to be a process.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, no. I mean, you know, reflecting on your IHC [immunohistochemistry], that's where I started my career. Like, I think I taught like two hundred and fifty IHC courses over the first, say, three or four years that I was in the in the business. Three or four years. And you know, I agree with you. There's no way that any one of these technologies takes the place of [a pathologist]. They're additive, right? It's just a tool that helps. Make the circle much more complete than it would be in any one component, all by itself.Leo Grady: Could you ever hear when you were teaching these classes? Did anyone ever say that like, are we even going to need pathologists anymore?Harry Glorikian: No, it was when the is is when imaging systems came out that said the imaging system would then replace the pathologists. The IHC was was really the cusp of precision medicine, where I remember when I first started because we were working with ER and PR and, you know, when I first learned, you know about like, you know, the find and grind method, I would always be like, OK, it's x number of femtomoles. Like, What does that really telling you, right? Compared to this stain over here where I can see, you know, the anatomy, I can see where the cells are. I can see. I mean, there's so much more information that's coming from this that lets me make a better call. I will tell you selling it was not that hard to a lot of people, they they could see the benefit and you could you could really sort of get them to adopt it because they saw it as a tool.Leo Grady: Was that post-reimbursement?Harry Glorikian: Uh, even pre-reimbursement.Leo Grady: Really interesting. Yeah, there's there's a lot we can learn from you then.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, it was. It was. It was an interesting ride back then. I mean, I remember my first day at work. My boss comes to me and says. By the way, you're going to give a talk in Arizona in two weeks, and I was like, What do you mean I'm going to go? Who am I going to give a talk to you? He goes, Oh, you got to give a talk on the technology and how to use it. And I said, who's in the audience? And he said histo techs, and there'll be some pathologists. And I was like, Are you kidding me? And he goes, You got two weeks to get ready. Oh my God, I was cramming like crazy. I was in the lab. I was doing all the different types of assays that we had available. And you know, it was you went out there and I learned very quickly like, the show must go on, like you got to get out there and you got to do your thing. But it was it was a great time in my career to be on that on that bleeding edge of what was happening. So quickly, like, why did you guys start with prostate cancer, though like? It's not the most common cancer, although it's high on the list, so. Or maybe it's the second most type of cancer, but why did you guys start with that and where do you guys see it going from there, I guess, is next.Leo Grady: Well, the the decision of how to rank the different opportunities for, you know, ultimately we believe this technology can benefit really the entire diagnostic process, no matter what the question is in pathology. However, we did have to prioritize right and elements of of where to start, right. The elements of prioritization had a few factors. So one factor was how how prevalent is the disease? I mean, as you know, prostate cancer is one of the big four. Second, is there are a lot of benefit that we can provide today with prostate cancer. You know, man of a certain age goes in, gets a PSA test. It's high, they go and they get 12 cores, 14 cores, 20 cores out of their prostate and that produces. You know, it can be 30 slides, it can be 50 slides, I mean, it really depends, and this can take the pathologist a long time to look through. Most of those cores are negative. In fact, most of those patients are negative, but the consequence of missing something is really significant. And so we felt that this was a situation where there was a big need. There's a lot of there's a lot of screening that goes on with prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is prevalent and the consequence of missing something is really significant. So that's where we felt like we could provide maximum benefit, both in terms of the patient, in terms of the doctor, and also that it was a significant need across the space.Leo Grady: We also had the data and the technology that we could go after that one well. But that said, you know, we announced that we have a breast cancer product that is got a CE mark in an enabling clinical use in Europe. We're doing a number of investigational studies with that product in the US right now and and working toward bringing that one to market. You know, after our our recent funding round, we spun up a number of teams and a number of of verticals that were we're going after in other cancer types and ultimately even beyond cancer. So there's more to come. We wanted we really take seriously the quality, the regulatory confirmation as well as the deployment channel. I mean, we built the whole workflow to be able to leverage this technology throughout the workflow in a way that is meaningful to the pathologist. So the development is is maybe a little bit more heavy and validation than some other companies where you have a PhD student that says, Oh, you know, I won some challenge and I went to go bring this to market building real clinical products, validating them, deploying them, supporting them is a real endeavor. But prostate was just the first, breast is second, and we have a whole pipeline coming out. So stay tuned.Harry Glorikian: So before we end here, I want to just tilt the lens a little bit towards the consumer and say, like, you know. Why would consumers show interest or at least be aware that these things are coming? Because I always feel like they're almost the last to know, or they just don't know at all. But, you know, in the future, you know, with technologies like this, do you see it identifying tumors sooner, faster, more accurately? Or, you know, will it will it help increase survival or help us find better drugs? I mean that that's I think, what people are really... If you went down one level from us of the people that are affected by this. Those are the sorts of things they'd want to know.Leo Grady: Well, I think, you know, a useful analogy is what happened with the da Vinci robot. You know, when it was necessary for a patient to get prostate cancer surgery, they often chose centers that had the da Vinci robot. Why? Because they believed that they were able to get better care at those centers. And it's not because the surgeons at the other centers were no good. It's because the the da Vinci added elements of precision and standardization and accuracy that could be demonstrated that would enable the the patient to feel more confident they're getting the best treatment at those centers. So as I think about Paige Prostate and and ultimately the other technologies that we're bringing to market behind that, I would imagine that from the standpoint of the patient, they would want the diagnosis done at a lab where they had access to all of the available information, all the latest technology that could inform the pathologists to get the right answer, right? So would you want to go to a lab where the pathologists had no access to IHC? Would you want to send it to a lab where the pathologist had no ability to do a consultation? Do you want to send your your sample to a lab where the pathologist doesn't have access to Paige? I think in the future the answer is going to be no.Leo Grady: And I think that we're going to see ultimately, insurance companies and Medicare recognize that those labs are able to provide better care to patients and are going to encourage them and incentivize them to adopt these technologies. So, you know, ultimately from a patient standpoint, they they want to choose centers where they're going to get the best care, they're going to get the best diagnosis. I think one of the exciting elements of digital technology is that not everybody is able to go to Memorial Sloan-Kettering, not everyone's able to go to MD Anderson or Mayo Clinic. I think the opportunity with digital technology is to really increase the accessibility and increase the availability of these diagnostic tools that can really empower and enable pathologists in many parts of America, as well as beyond to really get to better results for their patients. And ultimately, you know, every patient cares about getting those those results accurately for themselves and for their loved ones.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I'm always explaining, you know, to different people like once you digitize it, there's so many opportunities that may open up to make things better, faster, easier, more accurate and even start to shift the business model itself of what can be done and where it can be done. So it's it's a super exciting space, and thanks for taking the time. It was great to talk to you. I mean, I don't get to talk to people in pathology all the time anymore. I'm sort of all over the place, but it's it's near and dear to my heart, that's for sure.Leo Grady: Well, thank you so much, Harry. We're so excited by these recent developments with the first ever FDA approved technology in this space and, you know, really excited to help roll this out to labs and hospitals around the country and around the world to really benefit those doctors and patients.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Well, I look forward to hearing about the next FDA approval.Leo Grady: Working on it. Look forward to telling you.Harry Glorikian: Thanks.Leo Grady: All right. Thanks so much, Harry.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and MoneyBall Medicine at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show.You can find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.

Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol free life!
Sobriety Goes Punk - with Jon Turner

Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol free life!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 65:04


Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol-free life! My guest this week is Jon Turner, the founder of Soberpunks – he is a musician, a blogger and is busy helping others to ditch the drink. He shares his personal recovery story and explains how he feels that not drinking is not only rebellious but it's positively punk..   In this Episode Like many of us Jon spent a decade trying to cut down – using those tried and tested “rules” that of course are useless once our drinking has crossed that line into dependence – lets face it people who can moderate just do it – they don't need to impose any rules We agreed that accepting that we can not drink any alcohol at all is a key moment on the path to sobriety – “if you can't have one – have none” or as AA say “one glass is too many and a thousand is not enough” Jon drank as a teenager and found that he quickly became the one urging the rest of his mates to drink more and more – we discussed the fact that for some of us the buzz of alcohol is more intense than others – and that's one of the reasons we get hooked when others can take it or leave it It was love that gave Jon the impetus he needed to give up drinking – he met a woman who loved him but hated the person he became when he drank – she made it pretty clear that she would not be sticking around if he continued to drink – so he stopped – and they got married What I really love about Jon's story is that he gave up drinking to please his partner – but after a few months of sobriety he realized that his life was SO MUCH BETTER without the booze he was motivated to continue. Many of us give up drinking to save our relationships and our health but not many of us are expecting sobriety to be much fun. I for one was expecting it to be a grey and boring place but in fact it's turned out to be the opposite for both Jon and myself – so if you're listening to this and you know you need to ditch the booze just try it for 6 months – you will be amazed at the improvements in your life and the chances are you will want to stay alcohol free. Jon eventually got divorced from the lady who convinced him to stop drinking. By then he was hooked on his sobriety and had not intention of restarting his drinking career.  As he puts it – “it would only make a horrible situation worse” That got me thinking about one of our recent Zoom Cafes – several of our members had been through a very tough time – three of them had recently lost a parent and they all said – I'm SO grateful to be sober – I have the strength to cope so much better. I found that really interesting as I remember feeling relatively secure in my sobriety after about six months but often wondering if I would turn to alcohol if something dreadful happened – so it's lovely to hear that Lucy, Merleen and Lexi were not even tempted. Well done ladies. Jon and I agreed that being present for the tough times is key to our emotional development – I remember listening to a podcast with Glennon Doyle when she describes alcohol as the “easy button” that we use to bypass the pain – but we are also missing out on an opportunity to become stronger. Along with being present comes the importance of “getting comfortable with being uncomfortable” – sitting with our thoughts is part of the healing process and can be cathartic. We talked about dealing with partners who drink too much and agreed that people have to want to do it for themselves rather than for anyone else – although Jon had in fact give up for his girlfriend he had been struggling for a long time and was pleased to get a concrete reason to make the change. He did say that sometimes the partner has to decide that in order to protect themselves they will just have to walk away – which can be really hard but may avoid years of pain. I asked Jon to list the benefits of sobriety and he had plenty! Weight loss and having more energy (stop drinking and start running was his advice) Reduction in anxiety – Jon used to have such a feeling of dread on his way into work that he was wishing his train would crash! -  since he is sober he is enjoying his work and is busy fulfilling his career potential. That made me think of one of my previous podcast guests – Ken Middleton, episode 23 - he said “even if alcohol doesn't destroy you it will prevent you from reaching your potential” – that is so true. Jon feels sobriety is a journey of self discovery and he is learning so much about who he is and what he really likes to do. We talked about the joys of a sober community – about how we immediately understand each other and can have fun together – we agreed that ex drinkers have been through a lot and proved themselves to be strong and resilient people – yes ex drinkers rock! Jon is passionate about the fact that those of us in recovery must support others as part of our own recovery – that's exactly what he is doing via his blogs and his FB group. So if you want to join a community please check out tribesober.com and also take a look at the SoberPunkGang FB group.  You can find Jon's blog on soberpunks.co.uk   More info Subscription membership for Tribe Sober is just R85 (£4/$6/$8AUS) a month - you can join up HERE To access our website click HERE If you would like a free copy of our "Annual Tracker" or our e-book "66 Days to Sobriety" please email janet@tribesober.com If you would like to come to our Saturday afternoon Zoom Cafe as a guest and meet our community just email janet@tribesober.com Episode Sponsor           This episode is sponsored by the Tribe Sober Membership Program.  If you want to change your relationship with alcohol then                 sign up today           Read more about our 7-step program and subscribe HERE           Book a Discovery Call with me to find out if our membership would help you            Help us to spread the word! We made this podcast so that we can reach more people who need our help.  Please subscribe and share. If you enjoyed the podcast then please leave us a 5 star review on Apple podcasts, take a screenshot of your review and DM it to Tribe Sober's Instagram page - see PS for instructions - we'll send you something special to say thank you! We release a podcast episode every Saturday morning. You can follow Tribe Sober on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram  You can catch our FB live on Saturday mornings (11am SAST) and you can join our private Facebook group HERE Thank you for listening!  Till Next Week Janet x PS   How to leave an rating/review in Apple Podcasts (on an iOS device) 1. Open the Podcasts app. EASY. 2. Choose "Search" from the bottom row of icons and enter the name of the show (i.e., "Recover Like A Mother") into the search field. 3. Select the show under Shows (not under Episodes). 4. Scroll down past the first few episodes until you see Ratings & Reviews. 5. Click "Write a Review" underneath the displayed reviews from other listeners. You'll then have the option to rate the show on a 5-star scale, and write a review (you can rate without writing, too but it's always good to read your experience).

MetFlex and Chill
#138 - Neurotype Training and The Personality Diet with Mike Millner

MetFlex and Chill

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 49:57


To watch this episode, please visit Rachel's YouTube channel. Listeners can find Mike Millner at his website www.Neurotypetraining.com , and on Instagram @coach_mike_millner  Mike Millner has been a high-level nutrition coach for almost 10 years. He has a gift for understanding the psychological and physiological needs of his clients, which has led to thousands of success stories. His personality-based approach with an emphasis on mindset has been featured in Thibarmy.com, Nutritional Coaching Institute, Ever Forward Radio, True Transformation, and many others. Mike believes the most important thing is connecting with you and understanding where you're at in your journey. Personally, he has been on every end of the spectrum when it comes to dieting and everywhere in between. He's been ashamed, insecure, overweight, orthorexic, skinny fat, and finally embarrassed to step foot in the gym. But he's come out the other side into a place of balance, harmony, and good health. Mike's goal is to help as many people as possible to navigate through life as a healthy individual in a way that's sustainable and enjoyable. As Mike would tell you – your personality is the key. In this episode, we chat all about the mind and body connection, three personality types and how to align your nutrition with each one, why chronic dieting could be working against your goals, and much more! “The middle ground is where the magic happens.” Mike Millner Top Takeaways: Benefits of aligning your nutrition goals with your personality traits   Mikes breakdown of personality types in 5 different categories and how to structure nutrition plans based on personality type Why always eating less is ultimately leading to weight gain Ditching the all or nothing mindset  Show Notes: [0:00] Rachel gives a brief bio about guest Mike Millner to the listeners [1:00] Welcome back to MetFlex and Chill! Rachel welcomes guest Mike Millner @coach_mike_millner to the listeners   [1:30] Keto + CrossFit & Metabolic Flexibility with Rachel Gregory [1:30] Mike dives into his life journey and what lead him into the nutrition and fitness industry [5:30] How Mike's podcast got its name: Mind Over Macros [7:00] Question:  How do you think personality plays a role in individualized nutrition? [8:00] “Stop Fighting Against Your Personality” Christian Thibodeau [10:30] Neurotransmitter Systems that drive the majority of a person's behavior [13:30] What is glutamate? [19:00] Three personality types and how nutrition aligns within each one [25:00] Question: Can you explain why always eating less and being in a deficit can actually hinder fat loss in some circumstances? [32:00] Question: How do you approach your clients when it comes to spending time in a maintenance phase and getting out of a chronic dieting phase? [40:00] Question: Is there anything from a psychological standpoint that helps you to explain to your clients that it's not perfection that makes the difference, it's consistency over time? [43:30] “As long as you keep moving forward, consistency is going to be the most important part of this process.” [46:00] “The middle ground is where the magic happens.” [46:00] Question: Is there anything that you've changed your mind about in the past year? And why? [47:30] You can find Mike Millner on IG @coach_mike_millner  or his Mind Over Macros podcast wherever you tune into listening.  You can take the personality assessment at neurotypetraining.com    [48:30] Thanks for listening to another episode! If you're loving MetFlex and Chill and want to help grow the show, please head over to Itunes and leave a rating and review! How to Leave an Apple Podcast Review: First, Open the podcast app on your iPhone, Mac, or iPad. Then, hit the “Search” tab at the bottom right-hand corner of the page and search for MetFlex and Chill. Select the podcast, scroll down to find the subheading “Ratings & Reviews”. and select “Write a Review.” Next, select the number of stars you'd like to leave. Please choose 5 stars! Using the text box which says “Title,” write a title for your review. Then in the text box, write the review itself. The review can be up to 300 words long, but doesn't need to be much more than: “Love the show! Thanks!” or “Rachel provides wonderful content from a multitude of expert guests!” Once you're done select “Send” in the upper right-hand corner.   --- Join the FREE MetFLex Life Course: www.metflexandchill.com  Rachel Gregory is a Board-Certified Nutritionist, Strength and Conditioning Specialist, Podcaster, and founder of MetFlex Life. She is also the author of the international best-selling book, "21-Day Ketogenic Diet Weight Loss Challenge." Rachel received her Master's Degree in Nutrition & Exercise Physiology from James Madison University and Bachelor's Degree in Sports Medicine from the University of Miami. Rachel completed the first-ever human clinical trial looking at the effects of the Ketogenic Diet in non-elite CrossFit athletes, which is published in the International Journal of Sports and Exercise Medicine. Currently, in her day-to-day coaching business, Rachel guides her clients to becoming the best, most confident version of themselves. She has a passion for educating those dedicated to optimizing their physical and mental well-being while improving long-term health and fitness goals. Her most popular course, Keto for Women, has helped women all across the world learn how to ditch the restrictive, all-or-nothing mindset associated with keto and instead thrive through the power of metabolic flexibility. You can connect and learn more about Rachel's work by visiting her website www.metflexlife.com  Social Links: Youtube: @rachelgregory Instagram: @rachelgregory.cns TikTok: @metflexlife Facebook: @metflexlife  Primary Programs: Keto For Women Muscle Science For Women

Let’s Get Vulnerable: Relationship and Dating Advice
EP 177: Understanding Masculine and Feminine Energy Dynamics

Let’s Get Vulnerable: Relationship and Dating Advice

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 31:42


Masculine Vs. Feminine Energy I want to be honest with you: YOU NEED BOTH in healthy relationships. Inside of this episode I discuss: The art of fulfillment. Why you might be sabotaging your dating life with masculine energy. The conscious relationship as a rebellion (a.k.a. you can build a new relationship paradigm). Honestly you don't want to miss this episode! I get very honest about my past experiences and why masculine energy felt “safer” to me. Tune in and make sure you check out other episodes I've covered on this same topic! If you're serious about stepping into your feminine energy, embodying a securely attached woman, and attracting a healthy relationship, make sure you apply to the ESL program! CLICK HERE to apply! P.S. It would mean the world to me if you took two minutes to leave a 5-star, written Apple Podcast review! When you leave a review it helps other people find the show! Just head to the Let's Get Vulnerable page in the app, scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews", and select "Write a Review"!

Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol free life!
Rebranding Sobriety - with Susan Christina

Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol free life!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 53:36


Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol-free life! My guest this week is Susan Christina is an Irish lady living in Spain. She's on a mission to rebrand sobriety and make alcohol free living as attractive and glamorous as we thought drinking was She's an advocate for the modern recovery movement and wants women to take back their power!   In this Episode   Susan is using her considerable communication and marketing skills together with her experience in the global drinks industry to rebrand sobriety. She talked about the way that the wine industry has targeted women and how we have bought into the idea that wine is our “me time” – we've come to believe that a glass of wine is an act of “self care” when in fact it's the exact opposite for many of us! Susan's personal story was a familiar one – successful career woman holding down a responsible job, bringing up a family – and drinking a bottle of wine a day. I think so many of us can identify with her description of getting home, opening a bottle of wine and gradually working our way through it during the evening – it just felt so normal and because we weren't getting “drunk” we didn't really think twice about it. But 7 bottles of wine a week is not sustainable – as she says we have to ask ourselves not whether we are an alcoholic but whether we can sustain a happy and healthy life drinking this amount of alcohol every week. Like many of us Susan was able to change course when she found “her people” – she signed up for the Sober School and met other people like herself – people she could relate to – she felt she had found accountability partners and connection. The relief of finding other people on the same path is considerable. She created a WhatsApp group and talked about having “people in her pocket” who she could reach out to when she is travelling – that's exactly what we provide with our membership program – an international community who support and encourage each other – because connection is the opposite of connection. Go to tribesober.com and hit “join our tribe” if you would like to join a community who are busy supporting each other on this life changing journey. Knowledge is everything and so many of us drink for decades without the slightest idea of the harm it is doing us. Even when I got breast cancer I was still in denial – I simply refused to join the dots and carried on drinking. Susan found that once she had understood the complexity, the toxicity and the way we use alcohol to numb the pain she began to see everything differently and was able to make the changes she needed to. I asked Susan what the biggest benefit of sobriety has been for her and she said “being present” - present for the ups and downs of life – after all our personal growth comes for being present and dealing with difficulties, rather than zoning out. She talked about the “drinking train” that many women board and pointed out that it was only travelling one way – the way of increasing dependence, rehab and for some people it's unfortunately travelling to disease and death. Susan set up a support group for her class when she graduated from Sober School and sent them daily mails and PDF's to keep them inspired. She started to collate this content which gave birth to the fabulous monthly magazine she now edits which is called Hola Sober. This magazine is quite simply rebranding sobriety – from a place of struggle to an aspirational lifestyle choice. It is a beautiful publication and relects how to live fully and joyfully in sobriety. It's absolutely free so sign up and then share it with everybody you know.  Susan also has a website called holasober.com as well as an IG account – just this week she's published a brilliant PDF called “The Giant Feck” which is a must read. Susan and I agreed that AA is not the only gig in town as she puts it – there are so many alternatives. We are both providing alternatives to AA and the people we work with would never dream of going to AA.  Woman are bonding together via recovery groups – women are taking back their power! All of us on this journey need to be advocates of the Modern Recovery Movement – we are part of something powerful – we've got smart and are seeing through the BS pumped out by the liquor industry. Sobriety is a Superpower so lets get the word out there – lets get this sober party started! Step one in making a change is to find a community – find your people – if you are looking for a community then just go to tribesober.com and hit “join our tribe” More info Subscription membership for Tribe Sober is just R85 (£4/$6/$8AUS) a month - you can join up HERE To access our website click HERE If you would like a free copy of our "Annual Tracker" or our e-book "66 Days to Sobriety" please email janet@tribesober.com If you would like to come to our Saturday afternoon Zoom Cafe as a guest and meet our community just email janet@tribesober.com Episode Sponsor           This episode is sponsored by the Tribe Sober Membership Program.  If you want to change your relationship with alcohol then                 sign up today           Read more about our 7-step program and subscribe HERE           Book a Discovery Call with me to find out if our membership would help you            Help us to spread the word! We made this podcast so that we can reach more people who need our help.  Please subscribe and share. If you enjoyed the podcast then please leave us a 5 star review on Apple podcasts, take a screenshot of your review and DM it to Tribe Sober's Instagram page - see PS for instructions - we'll send you something special to say thank you! We release a podcast episode every Saturday morning. You can follow Tribe Sober on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram  You can catch our FB live on Saturday mornings (11am SAST) and you can join our private Facebook group HERE Thank you for listening!  Till Next Week Janet x PS   How to leave an rating/review in Apple Podcasts (on an iOS device) 1. Open the Podcasts app. EASY. 2. Choose "Search" from the bottom row of icons and enter the name of the show (i.e., "Recover Like A Mother") into the search field. 3. Select the show under Shows (not under Episodes). 4. Scroll down past the first few episodes until you see Ratings & Reviews. 5. Click "Write a Review" underneath the displayed reviews from other listeners. You'll then have the option to rate the show on a 5-star scale, and write a review (you can rate without writing, too but it's always good to read your experience).

MoneyBall Medicine
Nanowear's Venk Varadan on the Next-Gen of Wearable Technology

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 53:03


Many of us wear wireless, battery-powered medical sensors on our wrists in the form of our smartwatches or fitness trackers. But someday soon, similar sensors may be woven into our very clothing. Harry's guest this week, Nanowear CEO Venk Varadan, explains that his company's microscopic nanosensors, when embedded in fabric and worn against the skin, can pick up electrical changes that reveal heart rate, heart rhythms, respiration rate, and physical activity and relay the information to doctors in real time. And that kind of technology could move us one step closer to a world where we're far more intimately connected to the medical system and doctors can catch health problems before they turn into disasters.Nanowear's leading product is a sash called SimpleSense that fits over the shoulder and around the torso. Last month the company won FDA approval for the software package that goes with the SimpleSense sash and turns it into a diagnostic and predictive device. It's currently being tested in a network of clinics as a way to monitor and manage congestive heart failure.Varadan trained in biochemistry at Duke, earned an MBA at Columbia, and spent about a decade in pharmaceutical sales and marketing and technology investment banking before co-founding Brooklyn, NY-based Nanowear in 2014. His father Vijay Varadan, MD, PhD, now an emeritus professor in the Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics at Penn State, is the other co-founder and the company's chief innovation officer. "Nanowear's technology was actually the culmination of his life's work," Venk says.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocateswho are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.Everyone's used to the idea that if they're being treated in a hospital, they'll probably get wired up to sensors that track their heart rate or respiration rate or blood oxygen level.We've talked on the show before about a new generation of portable medical sensors for everyday life, like continuous glucose monitors for people with diabetes.And some people even wear medical sensors on their wrists in the form of their Fitbit or Apple Watch. Some of these devices can go beyond fitness monitoring to alert wearers to problems like cardiac arrhythmia.But what if medical sensors were woven into your very clothing? My guest this week is Venk Varadan, and he's the CEO and co-founder of a company called Nanowear that's taken a big step in that direction. Nanowear has developed a way to put microscopic nanosensors inside clothes .If that cloth is worn against the skin, it can pick up electrical changes that reveal heart rate, heart rhythms, respiration rate, and physical activity and relay the information to doctors in real time. Nanowear's leading product is a sash called SimpleSense that fits over the shoulder and around the torso. And last month the company won FDA approval for the software package that goes with the SimpleSense sash and turns it into a diagnostic and predictive device.But Varadan says that in the future the nanosensors and the software could be put into even more places, like headbands, conventional clothing, or bed sheets. That's just one example of the explosion in mobile health technology that's putting more power into the hands of patients. And it's also one of the topics in my book The Future You, which is available now in Kindle ebook format. You can get your copy by going to Amazon.com and searching for "The Future You," by Harry Glorikian. The book grows partly out of conversations like the ones I have here on the podcast with medical researchers and entrepreneurs. But it goes even deeper into the impact of wearable sensors, AI, and so many other technologies that have the potential to help us live longer, healthier lives. So I hope you'll check it out.And now on to my conversation with Venk Varadan.Harry Glorikian: Venk, welcome to the show.Venk Varadan: Thank you, Harry.Harry Glorikian: So, look, we all know that with with technology startups, there's always this sort of chicken and the egg question what what came first in the mind of the inventors: the market need or the product that needs to address it. You know, ideally they come together simultaneously and there's a back and forth dialogue between founders and potential customers. And you end up with what the startup community calls--what is it?--product-market fit, if I talk to my, you know, my Silicon Valley nephew of mine. So in the case of Nanowear, you know, did you start to think about the problem and how to solve it? Or did you start out with the technology? Which in your case involves a way to embed these tiny nano-pillar sensors into cloth and then look at ways to make it sellable. So which one was it for you?Venk Varadan: Great question, Harry, and again, thanks for having me on the podcast. We were squarely the latter and I think most entrepreneurs are the former. But we had this great advanced material, a cloth based nanotechnology that could pick up really, really high fidelity clinical grade biomarker data off the body. And we didn't really know what to do with it. Do we start as a consumer company? Work on fitness, B2B, sports? Do we think about industrial safety, military use cases? They've been trying to figure out smart textiles forever. Or do we go into health care? And I think stubbornly so, and a little bit of altruism, we chose the harder route, which was health care. But I think it was probably more premised on that we believed in the quality of the sensor. It was doing something from a quality and quantity standpoint that no other on body sensor or non-invasive sensor out there could do, whether it was consumer grade off the shelf or health care based electrodes. So all we really knew when we started is that we wanted to be a health care company, but we didn't know the right application to start with.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I was going to say, let's, let's pick the hardest one and see if we can get over that hill. So let's back up here and talk about like the medical need you're trying to address. I mean, at a high level, why is portable diagnostic sensing so important for people's health?Venk Varadan: I think it was always important because of an access issue, right? Not everybody can go see a physician or can do high cost diagnostic tests that require a facility or diagnostic tools in person. And there's a cost even to running a blood pressure cuff or checking your heart with a stethoscope or running a hemodynamic monitor, all the way up to more expensive tests like sleep studies and sleep labs. So I think it started, remote diagnostic needs started with an access issue, and it's not like we haven't had telemedicine in the past. But even that was sort of limited due to access issues. You needed a broadband network, you needed particular devices, you needed smartphones, and there were a lot of industry, I guess, pressures holding this sort of need to sort of push health care out into the more wide stream for those that have access issues. And we all said that this was going to happen one day. Virtual care, telemedicine, remote monitoring at home, replacing offices at home. And it was a nice sound bite. And COVID kind of forced the issue and I think completely accelerated that 10 year frame on the need, right? Because folks were still sick. Folks still have chronic disease. Folks still needed acute procedures. But you weren't really able to do a lot before, during and after, if you had to have these people camped out in the hospital or in outpatient clinics or acute surgical centers. So that's when while everybody thought it was cool and one day I'll employ these digital technologies, it really took COVID to shut their business down or they didn't have any patients, to force them to adopt. So I think a lot of our, companies like us, we were all doing the right thing. And we also are the first to admit that we got fortunate that the pandemic sort of accelerated the need for our solutions.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I remember I put together, god, it's got to be like 15 plus years ago, I put together a distributed diagnostics conference, because I was like, "This is going to happen." And, well, OK, eventually. But so let's talk about, let's step back for a minute and talk about some of the specific medical conditions where continuous, high resolution, high fidelity data is useful. Like, I know we need to probably start with congestive heart failure.Venk Varadan: Yes, so that's where we actually started before COVID. That was the sort of market need where our technology, our ability to sort of simultaneously and synchronously look at biomarkers from the heart, from the lungs, the upper vascular system in a sort of contiguous way and sort of map the trends over the same period of time as you would with a stethoscope or blood pressure cuff and electrocardiogram or hemodynamic monitor if they were all in one platform. That's really what we're replacing as part of our solution and our device-enabled platform. But the economics of heart failure and the business need were really what was pulling us there in the sense that there were penalties from CMS to avoid that next hospitalization within 30 days. And many of these patients are, one in four are being readmitted within 30 days. One in two are readmitted within six months. So this isn't a problem that we can just medicate our way out of. We have to understand when decompensation of the heart is happening before symptoms show up, because once symptom show up in fluids accumulating in their lungs, it's already too late. So I think there was a good product need for us, as well as the economic need with reimbursement and solutions for something that can be done outside the body that a patient could be be using at home.Venk Varadan: And then I think, you know, COVID hit and the market applications really just exploded beyond heart failure. Heart failure is still on our roadmap. Our clinical study to prove that ALERT algorithm of, we take all these data points, send it into the cloud, do a risk based predictive algorithm to predict worsening heart failure or decompensated heart failure weeks before fluid accumulates in the lungs. That's still firmly on our roadmap. We've just got to restart the study that was halted due to COVID. But the same product that does the same parameters with a different sort of algorithmic use cases opened up a lot of other applications that now have a business need and economic need to use us. So the two that we're starting with is pos-procedural or post-surgical follow up in an acute use case setting. And the second is outpatient cardiology longitudinal care for someone who unfortunately probably has to see a cardiologist for the rest of their life.Harry Glorikian: And if I'm not mistaken, congratulations are in order because of an FDA approval.Venk Varadan: Yes, so we actually got our third 510K just two days ago. September 21st, sorry, September 22nd, we got our third 510K. This is actually an example of our of our first digital-only clearance. So our first two clearances, our first clearance in 2016 was primarily around the advanced material, the nanotechnology, to get FDA comfortable in its safety and efficacy profile. The second was for our product, which is the SimpleSense shoulder sash, which simultaneously and synchronously captures data across the heart, lung and upper vascular system biomarkers, feeds that data through a mobile application and into the cloud. And then this clearance is sort of for an end-to-end digital infrastructure that circularly includes ingestion of our 85 biomarkers and then analytics circularly across our spectrum that continues to sort of process and then has the ability to push insights or algorithmic alerts down. So that last part is not included. But if you think about it, Harry, we kind of had a strategy before we got to the AI part. Now everything we submit with FDA has nothing to do with the device, has nothing to do with software infrastructure, has nothing to do with what would be MDDS or what wouldn't be. We can simply send in statistical analysis on the AI algorithms based on the inputs that we've already cleared and then looking retroactively on the outcomes. So it was it's a nice win for us to kind of show that we're not a device company, we're a device-enabled platform. But I think what it's really exciting the market on is that we're ready for AI diagnostics. We hope to have a first one and our fourth 510K, I guess here with FDA pretty soon in the complex chronic disease state. So really exciting times for us.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. And I mean, as an investor, I mean, I, you know, I've been in diagnostics forever and I, you know, I'm so focused on Where's the data? Show me the exponential nature of the data and then what we can do with it and really like blow that up, right? That's where I see the value in these platforms and technologies. But there are technically other methods that had been used, right, that you might say you might or might not say are competitive in some way. But one of them is called a Holter monitor, right? Which people put on their skin to monitor, you know, electrocardiogram and EKG rhythms outside the hospital. And I don't want to say the name wrong, but I think it's SimpleECG for yours and then the SimpleSense vest, [how does it] compare to that. What are the alternatives? How long do you wear it and how do you compare it to the existing status quo?Venk Varadan: Sure. So, you know, a Holter monitor has a specific use case. It's looking at your electrocardiogram rhythm to see if you have a rhythm or abnormality, right? So we one of the metrics we capture is an electrocardiograph, right, and we do multiple channels of that. So it's not a single lead. So we could certainly compete against that application and just look at rhythm abnormalities in the same way. Companies like iRhythm have that, and Apple Watch has that 30 second feature on it. We are not playing in that space. And the difference between us, even though our signal quality, we would argue, is much cleaner than a Holter monitor that's using standard electrocardiographs, with those you have to shave your chest, you have to stand the dead skin down. You have to put gel on for the electrode to get a conductive signal. We don't have to do any of that because of the nanotechnology. But what the nanotechnology also affords, in addition to a better experience and better quality, is the ability to do more than just a Holter monitor, right? So imagine if that same Holter monitor wasn't just looking at rhythm abnormalities, it was also looking at the acoustics of your heart and your lungs, the sounds of your heart in your lungs. It was looking at the flow characteristics. The blood injection times, the fluid accumulation in your lungs. It was looking at your breathing rate, your breath per minute, your lung capacity, your changes in lung capacity over time, if it was looking at your pressure related issues at the aorta, systolic and diastolic blood pressure. In addition to being a better experience in all of these and sort of kind of replacing a Holter monitor and a stethoscope and what have you, the real value is being able to do all of that at the same period of time over the same period of time. So even if I'm monitoring for, our use cases are about 30 minutes to an hour in the morning, 30 minutes or at night. And because we're getting such dense quality and quantity of data over that time period, we can actually see trends across the cardiopulmonary and upper vascular complex, which is actually the first company and platform that can do that. And that may not have been important before COVID. But COVID, I think, was revelatory in the sense that COVID may have started as a respiratory disease, but it affects the heart. It affects the upper vascular system. You can get a DVT from it. And I think it opened the world's eyes into understanding. We're not looking at all of these systems, the heart-lungs-upper-vascular system that all work together and work uniquely in each of our own bodies. We're only getting a risk based signature on just cardiac rhythm or just breaths per minute or just the sound murmurs of your heart, whereas we're doing it now.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. So for a guy like me, like, I'm like, Oh my god, how do I get one of these? I want one of these right now. I'm thinking like, Oh, I could use it right after I work out. And I'm, you know, forget the I'm sick part of it. I want to use it as a wellness monitoring and sort of to see, get a baseline. Tell me where I'm going, right, over time. That's what I'm always discussing with my my physician is we need a baseline because I don't know how it's going to change over time. If I only look at it at that point in the future, I don't know what it was. So, but the other side, I think to myself, there are physicians listening to this show that are probably all excited about this. And there are physicians going, "That's a lot of different data points. How in the hell am I going to make sense of that?" And so I'm I'm assuming what you're going to tell me is you've got this amazing software that lets you visualize, you know, and make sense of all these different parameters together.Venk Varadan: And that's exactly right. You know, we were actually stubbornly annoying to our KOLs, our clinical teams, as well as our original customers in beta rollouts, because Harry, we agreed with you. We looked at where Gen 1 and Gen 2 sort of digital health companies struggled in health care. Health and wellness is a little bit different right? I mean, to each their own, right. I mean, if you market well, you'll find that pocket of people that want to be overwhelmed with data or what have you. But we really listened to what digital health was doing for the provider and patient relationship. There were some good things there and there were other bad things, and the bad things we realized actually wasn't monolithic between clinics. Some people thought that bad things were "I'm alerted too often." Others wanted to be alerted all the time. Some were like, "This is noisy data. It's too unclean." Others were saying, "I just need, you know, 70 percent C-minus level data," right? And then we were thinking about all of those aspects which we couldn't get consensus on. How do you bring all of those aspects that gives control to the provider so the provider can say, how often are they alerted, how much data and the raw signals do I want to look at, how much do I not want to look at? And really, with the thesis of building the platform on them, spending less time than what they do before? Because I think Gen 1 and Gen 2 products unfortunately actually added more time in adjudication and frequency of the provider being notified, and also cause some anxiety for patients as well because they were looking at their screen and their data at all times.Venk Varadan: So we really tried to be sponges of all of those different devices that were tech enabled and sort of moving from hundred-year-old devices to now Gen 1, Gen 2, pushing into the cloud. And really listened on... And I'll tell you, it was mostly from staff. It wasn't necessarily from the physicians and the surgeons themselves. It was mostly from triage nurse, from health care staff, the people that are running around coordinating the follow up visits, coordinating the phone calls from patients that were doing poorly or feeling bad after feeling sick after a procedure. And I just think we just kept our ears open and didn't go in saying, we know what you need. We were asking, What do you?Harry Glorikian: All right, so let's talk about the technology itself, the  SimpleSense wearable sash. How does the cloth sensor in the garment work? I mean, on a microscopic level, what are the kind of changes that this nano pillar detects and how?Venk Varadan: Yeah, so not to get to sort of, you know, granular into the physics, although I'm happy to Harry, if you if your audience ends up sending me some questions. But think about our ability to just detect a difference in potential action potential from point A to point B. And it's an oversimplified way of describing what we do, but the reason we can do it better than anybody else with any other sensor -- and that's what really feeds the cleanliness and the quality of our data and allows us to derive so many biomarkers that other others can't, which obviously feeds the ability for AI -- is because we've got these billions of vertically standing nano sensors per centimeter of surface area. The differential or the potential difference that we can find because our signal quality so clean is so narrow. Whereas other sensors that might be treated as noise, we can consistently see deltas from point A to point B and know exactly what caused those deltas, right? And that's unique to us and our vector orientation. And it's probably a little too wonky here, but if you have a vector across the largest slice of the heart, across the largest slice of the lungs, across the upper vascular system in its entirety, with that finite ability to get really microscopic level changes in potential, irrespective of what signal you're looking at. Because once you we know what signal we're looking for, we just set the frequency bands for those, right? Right. And that's really, in a nutshell, how it works across the multiple parameters that we can capture from a biomarker standpoint.Harry Glorikian: So you said 85 biomarkers, right? We're not going to go through all of them because we'll be at the end of the show. But what are the kinds of, let's say, physiological data that you're pulling in and that you're differentiating on?Venk Varadan: Sure. So I probably summarize it into several different buckets that each have maybe 20 or 30 derivatives under it. But, you know, cardiopulmonary biomarkers. So the coupling between the cardio and pulmonary complexes, impedance cardiography, thoracic impedance and then looking at not only the means and the median trends across those metrics, but the standard deviation. So one of our board members famously said, Nadim Yared, the CEO of CVRx, You will learn so much more from the standard deviations than you will from the trends. Don't just look at the sort of the trend. So that's an example. Cardiopulmonary: We look at the electrical signals of the cardio complex and electrocardiographs. We look at a combinatorial methodology of cardiographs, acoustics, BMI, height and weight. And then we tie activity, posture, movement. What is your sleep orientation? Are you sleeping on your left side? Are you sleeping on your right side? All of these sort of things together actually enable some really interesting insights from a machine learning standpoint. And again, the beauty of our ability to sort of understand them and see more biomarkers. Eighty-five is where what we know right now, what we've validated. There's probably a lot more that we will discover under certain disease states. But what we're able to sort of mesh together from all of those are really cool aspects like blood ejection times. That's not a physical, raw metric we're getting. That's a derived metric and combining a lot of these aspects cardiac output, stroke volume, you know, these are things that could only have previously been done with an arterial line in your body and in a hospital system. So I don't know if that answers your question.Harry Glorikian: Well, no. I mean, listen, I mean, this is why I invest in this space because, you know, theoretically, as I get older, I may be a patient and you know, the better these technologies get, the better off I'm going to be. But so let's talk about for a second, where did where did this originate from? And I think your dad, your father had something to do with this, if my research is correct.Venk Varadan: He sure did. This may be a little bit of a long winded answer, Harry. But but for your audience, I'll tell the story because it's important for dad to be happy at all times, even though I'm 40 years old. So, Dr. Vijay Vardhan is our co-founder and Chief Innovation Officer. My father, 40 plus year academic researcher in the fields of materials, research and biomedical engineering and this was actually, Nanowear's core technology was actually a culmination of his life's work. Back in the 80s and the 90s when I was still a young pup and he was convincing me to go be a doctor, he was doing research in this field, and it wasn't even called nanotechnology back then. There wasn't a term for it, but he was doing defense related projects in the ability to detect very minute signals at very, very, very, very difficult detect detection environment. So an example is submarine coating, right? Submarines when they're below water are picking up their external environment information through sonar. The deeper they get in the ocean, the harder that sonar frequency is to be able to differentiate. Is that a a school of plankton? Is that a whale? Is that a thermal geyser that's sending me the signal? Or is it a Russian sub, right? And his thesis was, if I have a really big footprint of sensors and exponentially higher surface area of sensors and not just one sensor or two or one hundred but billions across the hull, I can start to differentiate over time the nuanced differences between the sonar a whale emits, the sonar a thermal geyser emits, or oh, by the way, what are our friends in the USSR emitting, right? And that's an example in really, really hard to detect environments. He did the same with observatory jets and missile defense systems at 75,000 feet, you know, the opposite, very high frequencies at very high speeds. So that original thesis, the human body is also a very complex environment and hard to detect environment as well, right? So long story short, he kind of took that same thesis over many years of playing around in the lab and publishing papers and doing great work for our government and our Department of Defense, but also with an eye to the future on what could this do in the human body one day?Harry Glorikian: Right. Well, that's great. I mean, it's I'm sure he's very happy that you two are working together to bring this to market.Venk Varadan: He's not as disappointed in me about not going to med school anymore. Let's put it that way.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. Keeping parents happy is is a is a difficult thing. I know many people are like, Are you going to be a doctor or are you going to be a lawyer? You know, I know the I know the joke. So you've got FDA approval for a number of, as you said, you're building on top of, this layering that you've been doing from an FDA approval standpoint. What did it take to get them to sign off? What sort of evidence did they need to see?Venk Varadan: Yeah, it's a great question. I think that we kind of had to create our own playbook with them. I'm sure if they're listening, they don't want to hear this because you're not supposed to sort of commend and compliment the agency. They're just supposed to be there as sort of the gatekeepers. But we used to hear just a lot of horror stories like, "Oh man, you know, working with the agency, it's really tough. You know, they're really tough on this." I mean, we always looked at them as our partners, you know, we were bringing a novel technology to the world. We chose to go into a regulated environment because we believed in the promise of saving patients. We were not taking a sort of anti-regulation attitude that I can fix this, government get out of my way. I'm a patient first. I like living in a country with FDA where something is scrutinized that I have to take when I'm sick. And I think that attitude and going into it from us as a product and R&D team, first of all, helped in clarifying our understanding of FDA's processes because it's a lot, and you really need to dig through the guidance in that. But I would say this is really hats off, Harry, to our founding engineers. I mean, they went from being engineers to really understanding process, and that's really what FDA is. Our first clients we met with, we went down to Washington 11 times in person to demo to ask questions continuously. And "Hey, we read this part of the guidance. Does this make sense for us?" And we shut up and listened when we didn't agree with them. We said, "But what do you think about this? Doesn't this solve it?" We weren't trying to go around them, and so we were trying to develop sort of new understandings of it.Venk Varadan: And I think collaboratively we put together a good playbook with FDA to clear a material that they had never seen before. Right? It would be one thing if we use the standard electrode like all Holter monitors do and combined it with something, and did different things on the software side. That would be somewhat straightforward because they know the data that's being generated is often the standard electrode. But for us, we had to do a lot of different and in many cases, much more rigorous testing, which that was painful. Don't get me wrong, but totally worth it, right? I mean, our sort of boundaries and our understanding of what FDA put us through, it turned out to be a boon in disguise. I mean, our whole team can sort of run through the needs now of FDA and we feel very experienced and very well equipped on how they think. And now that they're comfortable with the sort of data we capture, all the great things we can do on the AI side, which is still scary to a lot of people. You just say I've got a black box and I'm combing electronic medical records, and here's what the unsupervised learning tells me. I was a regulator. I'd be like, Wow, I'm not touching that with a 10-foot pole, you know? So it's different with us, right? I mean, we can define everything that's coming in and we can define the outputs. Yes, the AI in the middle is the magic, but we're not sort of defining everything until the outcomes, right, which is where I see a lot of companies got into trouble. So I think it was worth it with the FDA.Harry Glorikian: Well it's funny because, I mean, I always say to people, I'm like, Listen, they're not the enemy, actually. They can make your life easier because and I say, people tell me, "Well, I'm not going to go until I'm absolutely done." I'm like, If you wait that long and they tell you you're wrong, you just spent a whole lot of money for "and you're wrong." Right? So you should look at them as your partner. Right. And I'm assuming you went to, you worked with the digital health group at the FDA.Venk Varadan: We worked predominantly, consistently we work with CDRH [the Center for Devices and Radiological Health] and now actually as a as a board member on Advamed, sitting on the executive leadership group for digital health, Advamed is a trade association that helps with FDA and with CMS on on industry innovation. CDRH does have its own sort of digital health group within it that's focused on a lot of these issues that we're talking about A.I., data privacy, cybersecurity, which in this sort of next decade, I think is going to be the main sort of frontier for the industry government relationship that we all sort of signed up for when we decided to go into health care, because even the most sleepy widgets right that we use consistently, they're all tech enabled now. Everything is digital, you know?Harry Glorikian: So yeah, and I mean, they're they've been creating that from the ground up. I remember talking to the the gentleman that runs it and he's like, I feel like I'm running a startup because, right, most of the stuff that we're, you know, we need to figure out has never been done before at the regulatory agency. And so we're sort of creating it from scratch, right? So I mean, in a way that that's good because he understands the pains that the companies are having to go through in creating something that hasn't been done before.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll   like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer.It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in Kindle format. Just go to Amazon and search for "The Future You" by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: So let's go back for a second to, you know, 2020 in the first wave of coronavirus pandemic, right? You partnered with some medical centers in New York and New Jersey to start using it to monitor patients. And what did you learn from those studies and how did the device help improve treatment?Venk Varadan: There were two things I think. One, it was all anybody was talking about, and there were so many unknowns about it that we recognized that this was a, you know, a virus that was affecting the cardiopulmonary complex. Those that were getting sick and we're going to the E.R. had issues there, and that's what we were doing. And so in the same way that we're looking at potential use cases with the ultimate goal of assessing someone's risk, right, which is really what we're what we're doing as a remote diagnostic company or a remote hospital at home patient monitoring company, we went into COVID with that same thesis in doing so. And obviously in our backyard in New York, we got punched in the mouth first in the USA. With that, pretty much everybody I know was infected in March. We were all riding the subway together, you know, up until the last day as sardines. So it was not escapable here. And we're a dense city, right? We all sort of live on top of each other and our hospitals almost in a week. There were patients in the cafeteria. They were we were making tent villages for additional beds in Crown Heights, Brooklyn. It was completely overwhelming. And so we really feel it felt like we wanted to do something about it now. We would have gotten on patients right away, but. We did have to go through the IRB processes, which would take time, unfortunately, but we learned a couple of things and the two things actually that we learned are is that we're not necessarily super helpful in a acute virus that hits you really fast.Venk Varadan: The patients that this is sending to the ICU, it's doing so very quickly. It's rare that someone is sick for three or four weeks. They progress so badly that then they go to the ICU. They have a drop pretty quickly when it happens. So what we found was, our study was really to go on patients while they were in the general ward, and the endpoint would be when they were transferred to the ICU because they had gotten so sick a morbidity event or they were discharged. And I think we were unable, to be candid, we were unable to find the lead up to that point because we just simply didn't know what patients were coming in. I would have loved data on them from 48 hours beforehand. Right? We could have learned so much, even very basic functions that Fitbit and the Apple Watch are trying to market. "I saw a spike in heart rate from the all patients that got infected with COVID 48 hours before." That is the premise of where I would have loved to go with our granular data, but we're not the type of device that somebody just wears at all times, whether they're sick or not, right? So I think that was a learning experience for us that if there's an unknown of when something's going to hit, it'll be challenging. Venk Varadan: For infectious disease that becomes chronic disease, I think we're going to be in much better shape, and I think we could definitely do a longitudinal study for the long hauler community, right> You know, the folks that have been infected with COVID and have literally seen symptoms for a year or two, I think there's a lot we can learn longitudinally from there. And that's really where I think our study with our with our great partners at Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn and Hackensack, New Jersey and others across the country would, we would be more than happy to to participate in some of those longitudinal studies because, you know, we don't know what the long hauler is going to look like in five to 10 years, right? Or even people that have been infected before the vaccines now. That's still a let's figure it out type thing. So it's not you have to balance sort of running a sales product business versus a research part, but with the right resources and the right partners we would love to continue that work in COVID because it's not going anywhere as you know.Harry Glorikian: Well, listen, I actually want you to put it into a T-shirt and send me one so that I can wear it and monitor myself. But let's talk about where this technology is going in the future, right? The SimpleSense sash looks, you know, comfortable, convenient, way more comfortable than, say, a Holter monitor. But you'll correct me if I'm wrong, but it's still a specialty device. It isn't made from off the shelf materials, et cetera. But do you think there's like we're moving to a day where you can sort of embed these sensors in, as I said, a T-shirt, familiar cloth items. I'm looking at digital health and saying it has the ability to monitor me and sort of help identify problems before they come up so I can get ahead of them. And so that's how I'm thinking about this technology, because those sensors look pretty small and thin, at least from what I could see visually in the picture.Harry Glorikian: We're the first to say we don't know when we don't know, Harry. I know the market wants you to always have an answer for everything. A lot is going to depend on the additional aspects that we all use in technology stack. Where does 5G take us? Where does increased broadband take us? You know, 10 years ago, we didn't realize everyone in the world would have a smartphone, right? Villages in India and Africa, they have these now, you know what I mean? They may not have running water, but they've got, you know, a Samsung device, right? And so we may have never thought that monitoring in remote places like that because we couldn't find an economic model to sell shirts or bed sheets for a dollar out there. But maybe with the volume and with the right partners, that's where we could go. We certainly built our our stack with that sort of dream in mind. We filed IP and got patents awarded to embed in clothing and bed sheets and upholstery on cars and seatbelts and on the steering wheel and. You know, this could be in the gloves of a pilot one day. You know, this could replace your sort of neurological monitoring. We've got a prototype of a headband that's calculating all your EEG and EOG signals could replace an 18 lead one day. I think when you throw in real good advances in automated supply chain and 3D printing, there's a lot that can be done in this space and it's going to be done through partnership. We're not going to do it all on our own.Harry Glorikian:  No way. I was going to say Venk, get to work, man! What are you doing? Like, you're using this in a in a medical application, but I really want to understand: so especially if, you must have believed in it because you filed the patents, but do you think that this sort of sensor technology could just be a normal part of preventative health care in healthy patients?Venk Varadan: I think that was always the goal, Harry. What can we do to really help a physician provider and ultimately a payer understand someone's risk without them coming in to a hospital or doing a visit? Because really the only people you should be seeing in person are people that need to be seen, not me, for an annual physical. Not you for an annual physical. Not, you know, somebody in the villages in Africa who really just needs to understand why they have a fever, whether there's something really wrong inside them. That's where I think this should go. It always was that case. We never knew what the right problem was to start to build a business around it. But this should replace your your annual physical, your annual checkup for healthy people. This should replace the follow up visit for your post-surgical, whether you get a knee replacement and angioplasty or a stent in your heart and should replace your chronic disease visits. If you have sleep disorder or heart failure where you know, do you really have to go get a $10,000 test every three months to see if you're regressing, improving or if you're staying the same? I think that this can democratize all of that in some way, and it's cloth. We all wear clothes every day, right? So yeah.Harry Glorikian: I mean, I look at I've looked at all these technological advances and I look at them as deflationary in a sense right. We're allowing people to get higher quality care from these technologies because of the information that comes off of it and then utilizing AI and machine learning and, you know, different forms of data analytics to sort of highlight trends and problems or hopefully, no problems, and then if one comes up, it sort of sticks out like a sore thumb, but it gives you a longitudinal view on that patient. And that's where I see all of this going, I mean, COVID has just pulled everything forward a lot faster than. You know, anybody could have guessed, and I agree with you, if you look at 5G and all these things coming together, it's just it's going to take it one more leap forward that much faster. I mean, I can imagine a partner for you would be Apple or Google thinking about, you know, clothing. Or Lululemon, for that matter, I guess. But somebody that that can incorporate this into their into their materials and make it more available. Because I got to believe that there's a consumer application that somebody could take advantage of rather than just a hardcore medical need, if that makes sense.Venk Varadan: No, you're absolutely right, and again, this sort of went through our strategic thinking when we were thinking about what we wanted to be when we grew up. And we think that the our unique cloth nanosensor technology, which good luck trying to replicate and copy that for anybody who's interested, I mean that again, this was 40 years of work that sort of how to create it and we're bulletproof, protected from a from a patent standpoint. But we think this can enable all of those markets. Our thesis was always, Harry, if we could start in health care we'd have the need-to-have population. The people that don't have a choice, right? I mean, I can go out for a jog or I don't need to go out for a jog, right? I can run with a monitor but I don't need to. But there's a good percentage of the population that doesn't have a choice. They must be monitored. If we could start with that, need to have population and prove it, prove that it works, that it's changing outcomes. Why would the nice-to-have market use something that you know, is already working for for sick people, right? And that was kind of always our thesis. We don't really have a timeline on when we're going into the consumer market, but because, you know, there are different aspects that are involved there from a business standpoint, customer acquisition marketing are the obvious ones, but sexiness, fit, we did not focus on "Do we look cool?" We were focusing on, you know, design is important on everything, don't get me wrong, but we first started with "make it work." We didn't start with "It has to be this big" and then figure it out, right? We started the other way around.Harry Glorikian: Well, and if you think about all the existing wearable technologies, they incorporate a sensor that everybody understands very well, right? There's no question that temperature monitoring, there's no question that, you know, if you can have a CGM on you, you can sort of understand what foods affect you positively or negatively. You're right. We need the scientific publication to prove that the technology that you built does what it needs to do, and it's probably all the time going to give you new information. You're going to be like, I didn't know we could figure that out, right? Which is the beauty of having 85 biomarkers. You're going to find something new all the time, but you could easily see that certain applications would then become accepted and then make its way into mainstream.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, absolutely. And I think the more that folks are using and the cool thing or not, maybe not cool, maybe it bothers some people, I'm sure, but technology goes one way. It does not go backwards, right? And COVID sort of shifting virtual care into the forefront, which is what technophiles did before. "Oh, I just talked to my doctor on the phone." I would have laughed. I was like, What can they do with that right before I started Nanowear, right? But that's not going back right. If you don't have to go see your position in person and you've got an alternative now that replaces it, why wouldn't you do that right? So. Yeah, I think as people get more accustomed with devices, they'll understand how to differentiate from them. You know, I'm not taking shots at our friends in Cupertino, but there's only so much you can do on the wrist, righHarry Glorikian: Absolutely.Venk Varadan: If you're not going across the heart, across the lungs, across the brain, you're going to be limited in what you can do if you just have an armband device that's picking up your pulse rate and your skin temperature, you're limited in what you can do, right? So I think what we're excited about, maybe not just on this form factor in this product, but understanding its application around the body. You can't put a smartwatch around your body, but you can put a cloth around your body. You can put a sheet around your body, right? I think that hopefully the understanding is going to come that there is a delineation between something that's great for the consumer and something that's great for, you know, the health care population. And where does that nexus come together? I think that's going to be driven by patients. I don't think it's going to be driven by us. I don't think it's going to be driven by the provider or the payer. I think the patients are going to demand, you know, as they are doing now, right? I mean, the reason providers are buying our solution right now is because the patients are demanding it right. The payers are kind of demanding it. To some extent, cardiologists would love to see 40 patients a day in their office again. They were really used to that, right?Harry Glorikian: Yeah. This is a longer debate over a beer at some point.Venk Varadan: It is Friday!Harry Glorikian: Listen, it was great to talk to you. Healthy congratulations on the on the latest approval and look forward to seeing other approvals as as you're taking this thing forward. And you know, I can only wish you great success. I mean, obviously since I'm an investor, I have a soft spot in my heart for every entrepreneur out there.Venk Varadan: Thank you, Harry, and thank you for the opportunity to spend some time with you and and your audience. Hopefully, it's the first of many and I can come back and give an update in a year or so. And hopefully by then, it's not just about FDA approvals, but I'm showing we really built sales here because I know investors care about that. Just selling our product in the enterprise for the first time this month in September, and early numbers are great. So it's a really exciting time. I think six and a half years into the journey and being able to do it starting with dad has been pretty special. So so thanks for having us and appreciate you following our progress going forward. Harry Glorikian: Excellent.Thanks for participating.Venk Varadan: Thanks, Harry.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and MoneyBall Medicine at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show.You can find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview. 

The Flip Side with Noah Filipiak
Ep. 56: You Are Human

The Flip Side with Noah Filipiak

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 67:25


As Christians, we often think (or are told) that we aren't allowed to feel disappointment, worry, anxiety, and sadness. We are implored by friends to have "the joy of the Lord" instead, or to remember how much God loves you. If God loves you, you should feel happy and not sad. These platitudes make us feel like we have to be robots or angels instead of humans. Meanwhile, God created us to experience emotion. He created us human. And He gives you grace to experience life as a human.    Flip Side Notes: Join an upcoming Beyond the Battle online group at www.beyondthebattle.net  Support Flip Side sponsor Angry Brew by using promo code FLIP at angrybrew.com or fivelakes.com to pick up some Angry Brew or Chris' Blend coffee at 10% off. Email the show at podcast@beyondthebattle.net  Support the show and get some sweet swag by becoming a patron at www.patreon.com/noahfilipiak How to leave a review on Apple Podcasts 1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac.  2. You can find "The Flip Side by Noah Filipiak" by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode. 3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews." 4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."

Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol free life!
Anxiety and Alcohol - Casey Joins up the Dots

Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol free life!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 64:41


Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol-free life! My guest this week is Casey McGuire Davidson who is from Seattle in the US. Like me Casey was caught in the corporate workhard/playhard culture as well as the mommyjuice trend…using alcohol to cope with stress and anxiety and becoming  more dependent over the years… But somehow we both found our way out of that trap and now we are finding joy in helping people to do the same In this Episode Casey realised in her 20's that she had no “off” switch – I think that's true of many of us yet we delude ourselves that we don't have a problem because we can go for days without drinking – but if you do finding yourself drinking far too much after that first glass then you probably need to make some changes Casey's first glimpse into the trouble that alcohol can cause came when she read “A love story” by Caroline Knapp – if you are worried about your drinking then reading some QuitLit is a great way to start – if you want a reading list then just email me janet@tribesober.com Casey went to doctors and therapists about her anxiety and insomnia – most of which was caused by alcohol but she was in denial about her drinking and just didn't CONNECT THE DOTS Like many of us Casey started making rules – in fact Casey and I had a whole conversation about the rules we used to make that you can find on her podcast (Hello Someday – episode 77 )  The reason we make these rules of course is that we are still trying to moderate as we can't imagine our life without it – having to give up completely is our worst nightmare – whereas with hindsight both Casey and myself can say that giving up completely was the best thing we ever did! Casey managed a year of sobriety (partly due to her pregnancy) but then was soon back to her bottle a night habit. The second time she gave up she understood so much more – she had joined up the dots and realized that alcohol was the cause of her anxiety and insomnia. She hired a Sober Coach and checked in with her every single day – because she was sick and tired of being sick and tired. Many of us get to this stage eventually – at our workshops I often hear people say “I'm done – I just can't do this anymore” – and those people usually succeedand go on to thrive in their sobriety We talked about the strong women we work with – and how many of us managed to hold it all together through the drinking years. Once we are liberated from the shackles of alcohol addiction there is no stopping us and we go on to achieve great things.  Sobriety is a Superpower I always say!  We talked about mindshift – Casey has gone from seeing alcohol as a “reward” to seeing it as a “maladaptive coping strategy” – alcohol is NOT self care – how on earth did the liquor industry convince us that a “glass of wine at the end of the day” was an act of self care when for many of us it's the opposite! I loved Caseys description of her breakthrough moment – how on Day 16 she's had a terrible day at work and wanted to buy a bottle of wine so much she was actually shaking – she managed to resist and then continued to get stronger. I loved her “magnet” analogy as well – how the pull of alcohol is SO strong in the early days of sobriety but the more AF days we stack up the weaker the pull  “Sober Firsts” are so important – Casey cleverly reconfigured her Italian holiday so she went to bed early, got up early to explore, went on gelato crawls instead of wine crawls and treated herself with Venetian jewellery with the money she'd saved from not drinking. Casey has some great analogies – we heard the magnet one and she also talked about how being dependent on alcohol was like carrying a backpack of rocks around – and how sobriety lets you put the burden down. Apart from reducing her anxiety and improving her sleep Casey loves the clarity of mind that sobriety gives us – we can look at our lives with fresh eyes and sometimes we can spot the things which were actually driving us to drink You heard Casey saying that she realized that corporate life had lost its appeal and that she wanted to retrain as a coach which has given her real purpose in her life I asked her for a final tip and love this one:- “don't wait until you WANT to stop drinking – it's never going to happen! -  just say you are sober curious and want to take a break to see what sobriety feels like.  Keep going for a few months and you'' begin to glimpse the joy that alcohol free living can bring. Do have a listen to Caseys podcast which is called Hello Someday, her website is called hellosomedaycoaching.com, she does 1.2.1 coaching as well as offering a course and some freebies. Another great analogy we heard from Casey is that in early sobriety we really have to “throw the book at it” – make it a priority for 6 months, treat it as a research project and “do the work” – the payback will be huge! So check out Caseys website, think about joining Tribesober.com, read the quitlit, listen to the podcasts.. Step one in making a change was to find a community – find your people – if you are looking for a community then just go to tribesober.com and hit “join our tribe” More info Subscription membership for Tribe Sober is just R85 (£4/$6/$8AUS) a month - you can join up HERE To access our website click HERE If you would like a free copy of our "Annual Tracker" or our e-book "66 Days to Sobriety" please email janet@tribesober.com If you would like to come to our Saturday afternoon Zoom Cafe as a guest and meet our community just email janet@tribesober.com Episode Sponsor           This episode is sponsored by the Tribe Sober Membership Program.  If you want to change your relationship with alcohol then                 sign up today           Read more about our 7-step program and subscribe HERE           Book a Discovery Call with me to find out if our membership would help you            Help us to spread the word! We made this podcast so that we can reach more people who need our help.  Please subscribe and share. If you enjoyed the podcast then please leave us a 5 star review on Apple podcasts, take a screenshot of your review and DM it to Tribe Sober's Instagram page - see PS for instructions - we'll send you something special to say thank you! We release a podcast episode every Saturday morning. You can follow Tribe Sober on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram  You can catch our FB live on Saturday mornings (11am SAST) and you can join our private Facebook group HERE Thank you for listening!  Till Next Week Janet x PS   How to leave an rating/review in Apple Podcasts (on an iOS device) 1. Open the Podcasts app. EASY. 2. Choose "Search" from the bottom row of icons and enter the name of the show (i.e., "Recover Like A Mother") into the search field. 3. Select the show under Shows (not under Episodes). 4. Scroll down past the first few episodes until you see Ratings & Reviews. 5. Click "Write a Review" underneath the displayed reviews from other listeners. You'll then have the option to rate the show on a 5-star scale, and write a review (you can rate without writing, too but it's always good to read your experience).

MetFlex and Chill
#136 - 10 Mistakes Women Make When Trying To Build Muscle

MetFlex and Chill

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 50:49


To learn more and apply to work one-on-one with Rachel, visit her website: https://www.metflexlife.com/ Join Rachel's weekly newsletter: https://www.metflexlife.com/newsletter  In this episode, Rachel breaks down 10 common mistakes women make when trying to build muscle, signs that recovery needs to be prioritized, benefits of incorporating electrolytes daily, and how to practice the art of patience when it comes to building your best physique. “Building muscle takes a long time. It takes a lot of patience, it takes getting comfortable with the uncomfortable...and with that comes setting goals that are outside of aesthetics.” Top Takeaways: Telltale signs you might be doing too much or need to prioritize recovery Strategic ways to track biofeedback daily  The minimum amount of months Rachel recommends devoting to a building phase  Show Notes: [0:00] Welcome back to MetFlex and Chill! Today's episode is a solo chat about common mistakes women make when building muscle [0:30] Keto For Women, Muscle Science for Women, or check out all of Rachel's programs at www.metflexlife.com/programs  [4:30] The next round of The Muscle Science for Women is opening soon! If you're interested in signing up for the waitlist check it out at www.metflexlife.com/msw  [5:30] The first common mistake: not eating enough food to support muscle growth and recovery [7:00] “Fueling appropriately is not just about fueling yourself for your workout, but to make sure that you're fueling your body and your muscles so that they can repair and rebuild after you've worked out.” [8:00] Not fueling appropriately and not paying attention to the amount of sodium and electrolytes you're consuming, could hinder progress [9:00] The Second common mistake: Overworking and not giving your body and mind enough time to recover [13:30] “The ability to recover isn't just about rest days, it also has to do with what's going on in the rest of your life.” [17:30] The Third Common Mistake: Too much HIIT and circuit style training (i.e., Orange Theory, CrossFit, F45) [19:00] “You don't have to be dead on the floor in a sweat angel to know you've gotten a good workout.” [23:00] The Fourth Common Mistake: No structure, no progression, and not enough intensity [28:00] The Fifth Common Mistake: Not tracking your workouts or biofeedback  [33:30] The Sixth Common Mistake: Not being patient! [36:00] Episode 104: 8-Month Building Phase Results & Plan For Next Cut, Episode 45: The Science of Body Recomposition with Dr. Bill Campbell, Episode 125: The Protein to Energy Ratio with Dr. Ted Naiman [36:30] “Building muscle takes a long time. It takes a lot of patience, it takes getting comfortable with the uncomfortable...and with that comes setting goals that are outside of aesthetics.” [39:00] The Seventh Common Mistake: Not being consistent [41:00] The Eighth Common Mistake: Scared to see the scale go up [42:30] The Ninth Common Mistake: Letting body image and body dysmorphia consume your mindset [44:30] If you're interested in working with Rachel one-on-one check out www.metflexlife.com/apply  [44:30] www.metflexlife.com/programs  [45:00] The Tenth Common Mistake: Letting your ego run the show [49:30] If you want to reach out to Rachel connect with her on Instagram @rachelgregory.cns or email her at rachel@metflexlife.com  [50:00] Thanks for listening to another episode! If you're loving MetFlex and Chill and want to help grow the show, please head over to Itunes and leave a rating and review! How to Leave an Apple Podcast Review: First, Open the podcast app on your iPhone, Mac, or iPad. Then, hit the “Search” tab at the bottom right-hand corner of the page and search for MetFlex and Chill. Select the podcast, scroll down to find the subheading “Ratings & Reviews”. and select “Write a Review.” Next, select the number of stars you'd like to leave. Please choose 5 stars! Using the text box which says “Title,” write a title for your review. Then in the text box, write the review itself. The review can be up to 300 words long, but doesn't need to be much more than: “Love the show! Thanks!” or “Rachel provides wonderful content from a multitude of expert guests!” Once you're done select “Send” in the upper right-hand corner. THINGS MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE: If you're interested in working with Rachel one-on-one check out www.metflexlife.com/apply  The next round of The Muscle Science for Women is opening soon! If you're interested in signing up for the waitlist check it out at www.metflexlife.com/msw  --- Join the FREE MetFLex Life Course: www.metflexandchill.com Rachel Gregory (@rachelgregory.cns) is a Board-Certified Nutrition Specialist, Strength and Conditioning Specialist, and Author of the best-selling book, 21-Day Ketogenic Diet Weight Loss Challenge. She received her Master's Degree in Nutrition & Exercise Physiology from James Madison University and Bachelor's Degree in Sports Medicine from the University of Miami. Rachel helps her clients transform their lives by starting with the physical (body), realizing the power of the mental (mindset), and ultimately gaining massive confidence that bleeds into every aspect of their lives (family, relationships, work, etc.).

Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol free life!
Some Good Clean Fun with Sarah Kate

Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol free life!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 70:30


Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol-free life! My guest this week is from Canada! Currently we have the grand total of 4 Canadian members in our tribe and we would love to welcome some more! Sarah Kate agrees with me that we need to “get smart” and see through the constant pressure from Big Alcohol to consume their product – the wine industry has particularly targeted women, trying to convince us that “mommy needs wine” etc etc Well here is one mommy that's fighting back! In this Episode Sarah Kate had some scares with alcohol – going over the top a few times but generally progressed in her drinking career like many of us As a career girl in her 20's she began to realise that she had no “off” switch – this happens to many of us and I think it's a real warning sign – when we can go for days without even thinking about alcohol but once we've had a couple of drinks we just want to keep going! We agreed that we seek out friends who drink like us so that we can validate our own drinking Many of us in the tribe had friends and relatives who would helpfully suggest that we just “had a couple” of drinks (rather than a whole bottle!) – and that's the beauty of the tribe – we understand each other and would never suggest that! Sarah Kate passed out on the bathroom floor at her 30th birthday party and began to feel ashamed of her drinking problem We talked about the shame women feel about their drinking and agreed that so many of us get trapped because of it – we don't want to “come out” about our problem so we battle alone and get nowhere, just more dependent and more depressed– have a listen to Claire Pooleys fabulous TED talk called “Making Sober Less Shameful” As Sarah Kate went on to become a mom she got more and more dependent and after the birth of her second child she became seriously worried that her baby would be affected by the alcohol levels in her breast milk. She was part of the mommyjuice culture and believed the hype that “moms need wine” taking a sippy cup of wine to the farmers market We talked about how crazy kids parties have become and how even at 1 year old parties the wine is flowing Sarah Kate tried to moderate many times – she is a runner and would schedule her drinking around her running – she feels she was running to counteract her addiction – almost as a punishment She finally managed to make a change when she read The Naked Mind – realizing that drinking heavily for a number of years will make anyone become dependent - alcohol is an addictive drug and that's what it will do! That's when Sarah Kate realized that there was nothing wrong with her and was able to ditch the shame and make a change She did Annie Grace's Alcohol Experiment and while she was not 100% alcohol free she probably reached a very respectable passgrade of 90% We talked about the value of seeing the big picture – that's why Tribe Sober offers annual trackers so that people can observe their sober stretches getting longer and longer and keep some perspective – much less danger of giving up if you have a slip up – if youd like an annual tracker then just email me at janet@tribesober.com On Christmas day Sarah Kate found herself buying a bottle of red wine (even though husband doesn't drink wine and her kids certainly don't!) – it made her reflect on the power of conditioning – if it's a holiday we must drink! (what an amazingly effective job Big Alcohol has done!) In fact her daughter was furious with her for having a glass of wine at Christmas lunch so that was it for Sarah Kate – she wanted to be a role model for her kids – someone who could stick to a commitment – so that was it for her We talked about the importance of education and how every university should offer a module called “The Science Behind Drinking Alcohol” rather than irresponsibly forcing dangerous quantities of alcohol on new students who are away from home for the first time Sarah Kate also emphasized that we should remember that it often takes a long time to pull ourself out of the clutches of alcohol and that we have to be patient – especially if we've been drinking for decades! Sarah Kate is playing a role in educating us about alcohol via her online magazine “somegoodcleanfun.com” She's coming at it from the wellness angle and has created it's a platform which will encourage us to “rethink drinking” – as individuals and as a society. Not so much a sobriety magazine but more a platform aimed at women who care about their health (eat organic, gluten free, exercise etc – yet still drink a bottle of wine a day) – she wants them to appreciate the impact that alcohol has on womens health. We agreed that the explosion of the alcohol free drinks markets was a very positive sign of a societal shift We agreed that step one in making a change was to find a community – find your people – if you are looking for a community then just go to tribesober.com and hit “join our tribe” More info Subscription membership for Tribe Sober is just R85 (£4/$6/$8AUS) a month - you can join up HERE To access our website click HERE If you would like a free copy of our "Annual Tracker" or our e-book "66 Days to Sobriety" please email janet@tribesober.com If you would like to come to our Saturday afternoon Zoom Cafe as a guest and meet our community just email janet@tribesober.com Episode Sponsor           This episode is sponsored by the Tribe Sober Membership Program.  If you want to change your relationship with alcohol then                 sign up today           Read more about our 7-step program and subscribe HERE           Book a Discovery Call with me to find out if our membership would help you            Help us to spread the word! We made this podcast so that we can reach more people who need our help.  Please subscribe and share. If you enjoyed the podcast then please leave us a 5 star review on Apple podcasts, take a screenshot of your review and DM it to Tribe Sober's Instagram page - see PS for instructions - we'll send you something special to say thank you! We release a podcast episode every Saturday morning. You can follow Tribe Sober on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram  You can catch our FB live on Saturday mornings (11am SAST) and you can join our private Facebook group HERE Thank you for listening!  Till Next Week Janet x PS   How to leave an rating/review in Apple Podcasts (on an iOS device) 1. Open the Podcasts app. EASY. 2. Choose "Search" from the bottom row of icons and enter the name of the show (i.e., "Recover Like A Mother") into the search field. 3. Select the show under Shows (not under Episodes). 4. Scroll down past the first few episodes until you see Ratings & Reviews. 5. Click "Write a Review" underneath the displayed reviews from other listeners. You'll then have the option to rate the show on a 5-star scale, and write a review (you can rate without writing, too but it's always good to read your experience).

MetFlex and Chill
#135 - Achieving Sustainable Success with Cody McBroom

MetFlex and Chill

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 57:34


To watch this episode, please visit Rachel's YouTube channel. Listeners can find Cody McBroom at his website https://tailoredcoachingmethod.com/ and on Instagram @codymcbroom Cody McBroom is the CEO and Head Coach of Tailored Coaching Method, where he and his team pride themselves on helping average individuals achieve and maintain above-average results through world-class individualization, education, and connection. Tailored Coaching Method is fueled by a relentless dedication to helping clients realize sustainable success with their physique, mind, and life - allowing them to live their very own life by design. In this episode, Cody and I talk about the hierarchy to a successful transformation, benefits of carbs for body recomposition, intensity vs. duration in training, “maingaining” and much more! “First and foremost, I do think that the behavior, lifestyle, and environment needs to be in the pyramid. That is the first thing because there's a psychology associated with body composition change, self-discipline…even just grit.” Cody McBroom Top Takeaways: The hierarchy of a successful transformation Why carbohydrates are an important tool for body recomposition Diet dials explained and how to use them in your training Benefits of cardio and conditioning regardless of your goal Show Notes: [0:00] Rachel gives a brief bio about guest Cody McBroom to the listeners [1:00] Welcome back to MetFlex and Chill! Rachel welcomes guest Cody McBroom @codymcbroom to the listeners! [1:30] Cody dives into his background and how he decided to pursue fitness and nutrition [6:30] Question: Can you talk about what you see the hierarchy has been for transformation, and what a successful transformation looks like in terms of getting to the goal, but being able to sustain that goal afterward? [7:00] Eric Helms Pyramid [9:00] “First and foremost, I do think that the behavior, lifestyle, and ‘environment' needs to be in the pyramid. That is the first thing because there's a psychology associated with body composition change, self-discipline…even just grit.” [14:30] Question: What's your experience with clients who have gone through a body recomposition? Is it really only for people who are new to training or who are coming back from training? Or do you feel like there is still some kind of runway for people who are more advanced or maybe they are more elite? [18:00] ‘Gaintaining' for the advanced athlete [19:30] “I think the truth about recomp is that most people either have to be a brand new beginner or just recently injured or you have to be unbelievably patient.” [23:30] Question: Can you give our listeners a rundown of what the benefits of carbohydrates are if you're trying to change your body composition and build muscle? [32:30] Question: In terms of periodization and going into a fat loss phase, can we chat about what you've found to be most optimal in your coaching practice for your clients? [40:00] Fast fat loss vs. slow fat loss [43:00] Question: Can we briefly go through the different ways that you would categorize cardio based on energy systems and why it's important to work in those energy systems regardless of your goal? [44:30] OPEX: Sustain Train Gain [50:00] Question: Do you feel you see a trend with women you coach overworking and overtraining? [52:00] “Your results are only as good as your recovery.” [52:30] Question: Is there anything in the past year that you've changed your mind about and why? [5:00] The One Thing [55:30] To find more from Cody please check out his website https://tailoredcoachingmethod.com/, or on Instagram @codymcbroom [56:00] Thanks for listening to another episode! If you're loving MetFlex and Chill and want to help grow the show, please head over to Itunes and leave a rating and review! How to Leave an Apple Podcast Review: First, Open the podcast app on your iPhone, Mac, or iPad. Then, hit the “Search” tab at the bottom right-hand corner of the page and search for MetFlex and Chill. Select the podcast, scroll down to find the subheading “Ratings & Reviews”. and select “Write a Review.” Next, select the number of stars you'd like to leave. Please choose 5 stars! Using the text box which says “Title,” write a title for your review. Then in the text box, write the review itself. The review can be up to 300 words long, but doesn't need to be much more than: “Love the show! Thanks!” or “Rachel provides wonderful content from a multitude of expert guests!” Once you're done select “Send” in the upper right-hand corner. --- Join the FREE MetFLex Life Course: www.metflexandchill.com Rachel Gregory (@rachelgregory.cns) is a Board-Certified Nutrition Specialist, Strength and Conditioning Specialist, and Author of the best-selling book, 21-Day Ketogenic Diet Weight Loss Challenge. She received her Master's Degree in Nutrition & Exercise Physiology from James Madison University and Bachelor's Degree in Sports Medicine from the University of Miami. Rachel helps her clients transform their lives by starting with the physical (body), realizing the power of the mental (mindset), and ultimately gaining massive confidence that bleeds into every aspect of their lives (family, relationships, work, etc.).

MoneyBall Medicine
A New Era of Participatory Medicine: Talking with E-Patient Dave, Part 2

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 44:32


Today we bring you the second half of Harry's conversation with Dave deBronkart, better known as E-Patient Dave for all the work he's done to help empower patients to be more involved in their own healthcare. If you missed Part 1 of our interview with Dave, we recommend that you check that out before listening to this one. In that part, we talked about how Dave's own brush with cancer in 2007 turned him from a regular patient into a kind of super-patient, doing the kind of research to find the medication that ultimately saved his life. And we heard from Dave how the healthcare system in the late 2000s was completely unprepared to help consumers like him who want to access and understand their own data.Today in Part 2, we'll talk about how all of that is gradually changing, and why new technologies and standards have the potential to open up a new era of participatory medicine – if, that is, patients are willing to do a little more work to understand their health data, if innovators can get better access to that data, and if doctors are willing to create a partnership with the patients over the process of diagnosis and treatment.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian.Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.Artificial intelligence.Big data.Predictive analytics.In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening much faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own healthcare and the healthcare of your loved ones, you'll need to some of these new tips and techniques of how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of the new book I have coming out soon, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we'll bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.In the previous episode we met Dave deBronkart, better known as E-Patient Dave for all the work he's done to help empower patients to be more involved in their own healthcare. If you missed it, I'm gonna recommend that you listen to the first discussion, and then come back here.We talked about how Dave's own brush with cancer in 2007 turned him from a regular patient into a kind of super-patient, doing the kind of research to find the medication that ultimately saved his life. And we heard from Dave how the healthcare system in the late 2000s was completely unprepared to help consumers like him who want to access and understand their own data.Today in Part 2, we'll talk about how all of that is gradually changing, and why new technologies and standards have the potential to open up a new era of participatory medicine – if, that is, patients are willing to do a little more work to understand their health data, if innovators can get better access to that data, and if doctors are willing to create a partnership with the patients over the process of diagnosis and treatment.We'll pick up the conversation at a spot where we were talking about that control and the different forms it's taken over the years.Harry Glorikian: You've observed like that there's some that there's this kind of inversion going on right now where for centuries doctors had sole control over patient data and sole claims to knowledge and authority about how patients should be treated. But now patients may have more detailed, more relevant and more up to date data than your doctors does. Right. You've talked about this as a Kuhnian paradigm shift, if I remember correctly, where patients are the anomalies, helping to tear down an old paradigm, you know. Walk us through the history here. What was the old paradigm and what's the new paradigm and what are you some of your favorite examples of this paradigm shift?Dave deBronkart: Well, so I want to be clear here. I have the deepest admiration for doctors, for physicians and for licensed practitioners at all levels for the training that they went through. I don't blame any of this on any of them. I did a fair amount of study about what paradigms are Thomas Kuhn's epic book The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, like discovering that the Earth isn't the center of the solar system and things like that. The paradigm is an agreement in a scientific field about how things work. And it is the platform, the theoretical model on which all research and further study is done. And these anomalies arise when scientists operating in the field keep finding outcomes that disagree with what the paradigm says. So in the case of the planets circling the earth and the how the solar system works. They discovered that Mars and other planets all of a sudden would stop orbiting and when they would do a little loop de loop. I mean, that's what they observed. And they came up with more and more tortured explanations until finally, finally, somebody said, hey, guess what? We're all orbiting the sun. Now, the paradigm inn health care has been that the physician has important knowledge. Lord knows that's true. The physician has important knowledge and the patient doesn't and can't. Therefore, patient should do as they're told, so called compliance, and should not interfere with the doctors doing their work. Well, now along comes things like all of those things that I mentioned that the patient community told me at the beginning of my cancer. None of that is in the scientific literature. Even here, 15 years later, none of it's in the literature. What's going on here? Here's that first clunk in the paradigm. Right. And we have numerous cases of patients who assisted with the diagnosis. Patients who invented their own treatment. And the shift, the improvement in the paradigm that we have to, where just any scientific thinker -- and if you want to be a doctor and you don't want to be a scientific thinker, then please go away -- any scientific thinker has to accept is that it's now real and legitimate that the patient can be an active person in healthcare.Dave deBronkart: Yeah, I mean, you've said you don't have to be a scientist or a doctor anymore to create a better way to manage a condition. So, I mean, it's interesting, right? Because I always think that my doctor and I are partners in this together.Dave deBronkart: Good participatory medicine. Perfect.Harry Glorikian: You know, he has knowledge in certain places I definitely don't. But there are things where him and I, you know, do talk about things that were like, you know, we need to look into that further. Now, I'm lucky I've got a curious doctor. I found somebody that I can partner with and that I can think about my own health care in a sort of different way. But I mean, sometimes he doesn't have all the answers and we have to go search out something. You know, I was asking him some questions about HRV the other day that, you know, he's like, huh, let me let me ask a few cardiologists, you know, to get some input on this. So do you see that, I mean, I see that as the most desired outcome, where a patient can have their record. They're not expected to go and become a physician at that level of depth, but that the physicians who also have the record can work in a participatory way with the patient and get to a better outcome.Dave deBronkart: Exactly. And the other thing that's happened is and I've only recently in the last year come to realize we are at the end of a century that is unique in the history of humanity until science got to a certain point in the late 1800s, most doctors, as caring as they were, had no knowledge of what was going wrong in the body with different diseases. And then and that began a period of many decades where doctors really did know important things that patients had no access to. But that era has ended. All right, we now have more information coming out every day than anyone can be expected to keep up with. And we now are at a point also where we've seen stories for decades of patients who were kept alive. But at what cost? Right. Well, and we now we are now entering the point where the definition of best care cannot be made without involving the patient and their priorities. So this is the new world we're evolving into, like and Dr. Sands wears a button in clinic that says what matters to you?Harry Glorikian: So I mean, one of the other, based on where you're going with this, I think is you know, there are some movements that have been arising over the years. I don't know, maybe you could talk about one of them, which is OpenAPS. It's an unregulated, open source project to build an artificial pancreas to help people with type 1 diabetes. And I think it was Erich von Hippel's work on patient driven innovation. I talk in my book about, and I ask whether we should be training people to be better patients in the era of, say, A.I. and other technologies. What do you think could be done better to equip the average patient with to demand access to patient data, ask their doctors more important questions, get answers in plain English. You know, be more collaborative. What do you think is going to move us in that direction faster or more efficiently, let's say?Dave deBronkart: Well, I want to be careful about the word better, because I'm very clear that my preferences are not everyone's preferences. Really, you know, autonomy means every person gets to define their own priorities. And another thing is one of the big pushbacks from the hospital industry over the last 10 years as medical records, computers were shoved down their throats along with the mandate that they have to let patients see their data in the patient portal was a complaint that most patients aren't interested. Well, indeed, you know, I've got sorry news for you. You know, when I worked in the graphic arts industry, I worked in marketing, people don't change behavior or start doing something new until they've got a problem. If it's fun or sexy, you know, then they'll change, they'll start doing something new. What we need to do is make it available to people. And then when needs arise, that gets somebody's attention and they're like, holy crap, what's happening to my kid? Right. If they know that they can be involved, then they can start to take action. They can learn how to take action. It's having the infrastructure available, having the app ecosystem start to grow, and then just having plain old awareness. Who knows? Maybe someday there will be a big Hollywood movie where people where people learn about stories like that and. You know, from that I mean that I think nature will take its course.Harry Glorikian: Well, it's interesting because I recently interviewed a gentleman by the name of Matthew Might. He's a computer scientist who became a surrogate patient advocate for his son, Bertrand, who had a rare and undiagnosed genetic disorder that left him without an enzyme that breaks down junk protein in the cells. But he, you know, jumped in there. He did his own research found in over-the-counter drug, Prevacid of all drugs., that could help with Bertrand's deficiency. But, I mean, Dave, you know, Matt is a, he was a high-powered computer scientist who wasn't afraid to jump in and bathe in that, you know. Is that the type of person we need? Is that a cautionary tale, or an inspiring tale? How do you think about that?Dave deBronkart: Desperate people will bring whatever they have to the situation. And this is no different from, you know, there have been very ordinary people who had saved lives at a car crash because they got training about how to on how to stop bleeding as a Boy Scout. You know, it is a mental trap to say, "But you're different." Ok. Some people said, "Well, Dave, you're an MIT graduate, my patients aren't like you." And people say, well, yeah, but Matt Might is a brilliant PhD type guy. What you mentioned few minutes before gives the lie to all of that, the OpenAPS community. All right, now, these are people you need to know appreciate the open apps world. You need to realize that a person with type 1 diabetes can die in their sleep any particular night. You know, they can even have an alarm, even if they have a digital device connected with an alarm, their blood sugar can crash so bad that they can't even hear the alarm. And so and they got tired of waiting the industry. Year after year after year, another five years will have an artificial pancreas, another five years, and a hashtag started: #WeAreNotWaiting. Now, I am I don't know any of the individuals involved, but I'll bet that every single diabetes related executive involved in this thought something along the lines of, "What are they going to do, invent their own artificial pancreas?" Well, ha, ha, ha, folks. Because as I as I imagine, you know, the first thing that happened was this great woman, Dana Lewis, had a digital insulin pump and a CGM, continuous glucose meter, and her boyfriend, who's now her husband, watched her doing the calculation she had to do before eating a hamburger or whatever and said, "I bet I could write a program that would do that."Dave deBronkart: And so they did. And one thing led to another. His program, and she had some great slides about this, over the course of a year, got really good at predicting what her blood sugar was going to be an hour later. Right. And then they said, "Hmm, well, that's interesting. So why don't I put that in a little pocket computer, a little $35 pocket computer?" The point is, they eventually got to where they said, let's try connecting these devices. All right. And to make a long story short, they now have a system, as you said, not a product, they talked to the FDA, but it's not regulated because it's not a product. Right. But they're not saying the hell with the FDA. They're keeping them informed. What are the scientific credentials of Dana Lewis and her boyfriend, Scott? Dana is a PR professional, zero medical computer or scientific skills? Zero. The whole thing was her idea. Various other people got involved and contributed to the code. It is a trap to think that because the pioneering people had special traits, it's all bogus. Those people are lacking the vision to see what the future you is going to be. See, and the beautiful thing from a disruptive standpoint is that when the person who has the problem gains access to power to create tools, they can take it in whatever direction they want. That's one of the things that happened when typesetting was killed by desktop publishing.Harry Glorikian: Right.Dave deBronkart: In typesetting, they said "You people don't know what you're doing!" And the people said, whatever, dude, they invented Comic Sans, and they went off and did whatever they wanted and the world became more customer centered for them.Harry Glorikian: So. You know, this show is generally about, you know, data, Machine learning and trying to see where that's going to move the needle. I mean, do you see the artificial intelligence umbrella and everything that's under that playing a role to help patients do their own research and design their own treatments?Dave deBronkart: Maybe someday, maybe someday. But I've read enough -- I'm no expert on AI, but I've read enough to know that it's a field that is full of perils of just bad training data sets and also full of immense amounts of risk of the data being misused or misinterpreted. If you haven't yet encountered Cathy O'Neil, she's the author of this phenomenal book, Weapons of Math Destruction. And she said it's not just sloppy brain work. There is sloppy brain work in the mishandling of data in A.I., but there is malicious or ignorant, dangerously ignorant business conduct. For instance, when companies look at somebody who has a bad credit rating and therefore don't give them a chance to do this or this or this or this, and so and they actually cause harm, which is the opposite of what you would think intelligence would be used for.Harry Glorikian: So but then, on the opposite side, because I talk about some of these different applications and tools in in the book where, you know, something like Cardiogram is able to utilize analytics to identify, like it alerted me and said "You know, you might have sleep apnea." Right. And it can also detect an arrhythmia, just like the Apple Watch does, or what's the other one? Oh, it can also sort of alert you to potentially being prediabetic. Right. And so you are seeing, I am seeing discrete use cases where you're seeing a movement forward in the field based on the analytics that can be done on that set of data. So I think I don't want to paint the whole industry as bad, but I think it's in an evolutionary state.Dave deBronkart: Absolutely. Yes. We are at the dawn of this era, there's no question. We don't yet have much. We're just going to have to discover what pans out. Really, I. Were you referring to the Cardia, the Acor, the iPhone EKG device a moment ago?Harry Glorikian: No, there's there's actually an, I've got one here, which is the you know...Dave deBronkart: That's it. That's the mobile version. Exactly. Yeah. Now, I have a friend, a physician friend at Beth Israel Deaconess, who was I just rigidly absolutely firmly trust this guy's brain intelligence and not being pigheaded, he was at first very skeptical that anything attached to an iPhone could be clinically useful. But he's an E.R. doc and he now himself will use that in the E.R. Put the patient's fingers on those electrodes and and send it upstairs because the information, when they're admitting somebody in a crisis, the information gets up there quicker than if he puts it in the EMR.Harry Glorikian: Well, you know, I always try to tell people like these devices, you know, they always say it's not good enough, it's not good enough. And I'm like, it's not good enough today. But it's getting better tomorrow and the next day. And then they're going to improve the sensor. And, yep, you know, the speed of these changes is happening. It's not a 10 year shift. It's it's happening in days, weeks, months, maybe years. But, you know, this is a medical device on my arm as far as I'm concerned.Harry Glorikian: It's a device that does medical-related things. It certainly doesn't meet the FDA's definition of a medical device that requires certification and so on. Now, for all I know, maybe two thirds of the FDA's criteria are bogus. And we know that companies and lobbyists have gamed the system. It's an important book that I read maybe five years ago when it was new, was An American Sickness about the horrifying impacts of the money aspect of health care. And she talked about, when she was talking specifically about device certification, she talked about how some company superbly, and I don't know if they laughed over their three martini lunch or what, some company superbly got something approved by the FDA as saying, we don't need to test this because it's the same as something else.Harry Glorikian: Ok, equivalence.Dave deBronkart: And also got a patent on the same thing for being completely new. Right. Which is not possible. And yet they managed to win the argument in both cases. So but the this is not a medical device, but it is, gives me useful information. Maybe we should call it a health device.Harry Glorikian: Right. Yeah, I mean, there are certain applications that are, you know, cleared by the FDA right now, but, you know, I believe what it's done is it's allowing these companies to gather data and understand where how good the systems are and then apply for specific clearances based on when the system gets good enough, if that makes sense.Dave deBronkart: Yes. Now, one thing I do want to say, there's an important thing going on in the business world, those platforms. You know, companies like Airbnb, Uber, whatever, where they are, a big part of their business, the way they create value is to understand you better by looking at your behavior and not throwing so much irrelevant crap at you. Now, we all know this as it shows up. As you know, you buy something on Amazon and you immediately get flooded by ads on Facebook for the thing that you already bought, for heaven's sake. I mean, how stupid is that? But anyway, I think it's toxic and should be prohibited by law for people to collect health data from your apps and then monetize it. I think that should be completely unacceptable. My current day job is for this company called Pocket Health, where they collect a patient's radiology images for the patient so the patient can have 24/7 access in the cloud. And when I joined there, a friend said, oh, I gather they must make their money by selling the data. Right? And I asked one of the two founding brothers, and he was appalled. That's just not what they do. They have another part of the company. And anybody who gets any medical device, any device to track their health should make certain that the company agrees not to sell it.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll   like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer.It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available for pre-order. Just go to Amazon and search for The Future You, Harry Glorikian.Thanks. And now back to our show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: You mentioned FHIR or, you know, if I had to spell it out for people, it's Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resource standard from, I think, it's the Health Level 7 organization. What is FHIR? Where did it come from and what does it really enable?Dave deBronkart: So I'll give you my impression, which I think is pretty good, but it may not be the textbook definition. So FHIR is a software standard, very analogous to HTTP and HTML for moving data around the same way those things move data around on the Web. And this is immensely, profoundly different from the clunky, even if possible, old way of moving data between, say, an Epic system, a Cerner system, a Meditech system nd so on. And the it's a standard that was designed and started five or six years ago by an Australian guy named Graham Grieve. A wonderful man. And as he developed it, he offered it to HL7, which is a very big international standards organization, as long as they would make it free forever to everyone. And the important thing about it is that, as required now by the final rule that we were discussing, every medical record system installed at a hospital that wants to get government money for doing health care for Medicare or Medicaid, has to have what's called a FHIR endpoint. And a FHIR endpoint is basically just a plug on it where you can, or an Internet address, the same way you can go to Adobe.com and get whatever Adobe sends you, you can go to the FHIR endpoint with your login credentials and say, give me this patient's health data. That's it. It works. It already works. That's what I use in that My Patient Link app that I mentioned earlier.Harry Glorikian: So just to make it clear to someone that say that's listening, what does the average health care consumer need to know about it, if anything, other than it's accessible? And what's the part that makes you most excited about it?Harry Glorikian: Well, well, well. What people need to know about it is it's a new way. Just like when your hospital got a website, it's a new way for apps to get your data out of the hospital. So when you want it, you know that it has to be available that way. Ironically, my hospital doesn't have a FHIR endpoint yet. Beth Israel Deaconess. But they're required to by the end of the year. What makes me excited about it is that... So really, the universal principle for everything we've discussed is that knowledge is power. More precisely, knowledge enables power. You can give me a ton of knowledge and I might not know what to do with it, but without the knowledge, I'm disempowered. There's no dispute about that. So it will become possible now for software developers to create useful tools for you and your family that would not have been possible 15 years ago or five years ago without FHIR. In fact, it's ironic because one of the earliest speeches I gave in Washington, I said to innovators, data is fuel. Right. We talked about Quicken and Mint. Quicken would have no value to anybody if they couldn't get at your bank information. Right. And that's that would have prevented. So we're going to see new tools get developed that will be possible because of FHIR and the fact that the federal regulations require it.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, my first one of my first bosses actually, like the most brilliant boss, I remember him telling me one at one time, he goes, "Remember something: Knowledge is power." I must have been 19 when he told me that. And I was, you know, it took me a little while to get up to speed on what he meant by that. But so do you believe FHIR is a better foundation for accessing health records than previous attempts like Google Health or Microsoft Health Vault?Dave deBronkart: Well, those are apples and oranges. FHIR is a way of moving the data around. Several years into my "Give me my damn data" campaign, I did a blog post that was titled I Want a Health Data Spigot. I want to be able to connect the garden hose to one place and get all my data flowing. Well, that's what FHIR is now. What's at the other end of the hose? You know, different buckets, drinking glasses, whatever. That's more analogous to Google Health and Health Vault. Google Health and Health Vault might have grown into something useful if they could get all the important information out there, which it turns out was not feasible back then anyway. But that's what's going to happen.Harry Glorikian: What is the evolution you'd like to see in the relationship between the patient and the U.S. health care systems? You know, you once said the key to be would get the money managers out of the room. You know, if you had to sort of think about what you'd want it to evolve to, what would it be?Dave deBronkart: Well, so. There are at least two different issues involved in this. First of all, in terms of the practice of medicine, the paradigm of patient that I mentioned, collaboration, you know, collaboration, including training doctors and nurses on the feasibility and methods of collaboration. How do you do this differently? That won't happen fast because the you know, the I mean, the curriculum in medical schools doesn't change fast. But we do have mid career education and we have people learning practical things. So there's a whole separate issue of the financial structure of the U.S. health system, which is the only one I know in the world that is composed of thousands of individual financially separate organizations, each of which has managers who are required by law to protect their own finances. And the missing ingredient is that as all these organizations manage their own finances, nobody anywhere is accountable for whether care is achieved. Nobody can be fired or fined or put out of business for failing to get the patient taken care of as somebody should have. And so those are those are two separate problems. My ideal world is, remember a third of the US health care spending is excess and somebody a couple of years ago...Guess what? A third of the US health care spending is the insurance companies. Now, maybe the insurance companies are all of the waste. I don't know. I'm not that well-informed. But my point is there is plenty of money there already being spent that would support doctors and nurses spending more time with you and me beyond the 12 or 15 minutes that they get paid for.Harry Glorikian: So it's interesting, right? I mean, the thing that I've sort of my bully pulpit for, for a long time has been, once you digitize everything, it doesn't mean you have to do everything the same way. Which opens up, care may not have to be given in the same place. The business model may now be completely open to shift, as we've seen with the digitization of just about every other business. And so I you know, I worry that the EMRs are holding back innovation and we're seeing a lot of innovation happen outside of the existing rubric, right, the existing ivory towers, when you're seeing drug development using A.I. and machine learning, where we're seeing imaging or pathology scans. I mean, all of those are happening by companies that are accessing this digitized data and then providing it in a different format. But it's not necessarily happening inside those big buildings that are almost held captive by the EMR. Because if you can't access the data, it's really hard to take it to that next level of analytics that you'd like to take it to.Dave deBronkart: Yes, absolutely.Harry Glorikian: I mean, just throwing that out there, I know we've been talking about the system in particular, but I feel that there's the edges of the system aren't as rigid as they used to be. And I think we have a whole ecosystem that's being created outside of it.Harry Glorikian: Absolutely. And the when information can flow you get an increasing number of parties who can potentially do something useful with it, create value with it. And I'm not just talking about financial value, but achieve a cure or something like that. You know, interestingly, when the industry noticed what the open apps people were doing, all of a sudden you could no longer buy a CGM that had the ability to export the data.Harry Glorikian: Right.Dave deBronkart: Hmm. So somebody is not so happy about that. When an increasing number of people can get out data and combine it with their other ideas and skills and try things, then the net number of new innovations will come along. Dana Lewis has a really important slide that she uses in some presentations, and it ties in exactly with Erich von Hippel's user driven innovation, which of course, shows up in health care as patient driven innovation. The traditional industrial model that von Hippel talks about is if you're going to make a car, if you're going to be a company going into the car business, you start by designing the chassis and doing the wheels and designing the engine and so on and so on. And you do all that investment and you eventually get to where you've got a car. All right. Meanwhile, Dana shows a kid on a skateboard who can get somewhere on the skateboard and then somebody comes up with the idea of putting a handle on it. And now you've scooter. Right. And so on. The user driven innovations at every moment are producing value for the person who has the need.Harry Glorikian: Right. And that's why I believe that, you know, now that we've gotten to sort of that next level of of datafication of health care, that these centers have gotten cheaper, easier, more accessible. You know, like I said, I've got a CGM on my arm. Data becomes much more accessible. FHIR has made it easier to gain access to my health record. And I can share it with an app that might make that data more interpretable to me. This is what I believe is really sort of moving the needle in health care, are people like Matthew Might doing his own work where it's it's changing that. And that's truly what I try to cover in the book, is how these data [that] are now being made accessible to patients gives them the opportunity to manage their own health in a better way or more accurately and get ahead of the warning light going on before the car breaks down. But one of the things I will say is, you know, I love my doctor, but, you know, having my doctor as a partner in this is makes it even even better than rather than just me trying to do anything on my own. Dave deBronkart: Of course, of course. Dr. Sands is fond of saying "I have the medical training or diagnosis and treatment and everything, but Dave's the one who's the expert on what's happening in his life." Right. And and I'm the expert on my own priorities.Harry Glorikian: Right. Which I can't expect. I mean, my doctor has enough people to worry about, let alone like, me being his sole, the only thing he needs to think about. So, Dave, this was great. It was great having you on the show. I hope this is one of many conversations that we can have going forward, because I'm sure there's going to be different topics that we could cover. So I appreciate you taking the time and being on the show.Dave deBronkart: Well, and same to you. The this has been a very stimulating I mean, and the you've got the vision of the arriving future that is informed by where we're coming from, but not constrained by the old way of thinking. And that really matters. The reality, the emerging reality, whether anybody knows it or not, is that people with a big problem are able to act now in ways that they weren't before. I mean, another amazing example is a guy in England named Tal Golesworthy has Marfan syndrome. And one problem that people with Marfan syndrome face is aortic dissection. The walls of the aorta split open and it can be pretty quickly fatal. And he describes himself in his TED talk as a boiler engineer. And he says when we have a weak pipe, we wrap it. So he came up with the idea of exporting his CAT scan data or the MRI data of his beating heart and custom printing a fabric mesh to wrap around his aorta. And it's become and medically accepted treatment now. Harry Glorikian: That's awesome, right.Dave deBronkart: This is the data in the hands of somebody with no medical training, just. But see, that's the point. That's the point. He enabled by the data, is able to create real value, and it's now an accepted treatment that's called PEARS and it's been done hundreds of times. And, you know, here's a beautiful, it's sort of like the Dana Lewis skateboard scooter progression, years later, a subsequent scan discovered something unexpected. The mesh fabric has migrated into the wall of his aorta. So he hadn't he now has a know what doctor, what hospital, what medical device company would have ever dreamed of trying to create that? That's the beauty of liberation when data gets into the hands of the innovators.Harry Glorikian: Well, that's something that everybody can take away from today is at least thinking about their data, how it can help them manage their health better or their life better. Obviously, I always say, in cahoots with your doctor, because they have very specific knowledge, but having the data and managing yourself is better than not having the data and not understanding how to manage yourself. So on that note, Dave, thank you so much for the time today. It was great.Dave deBronkart: Thank you very much. See you next time.Harry Glorikian:That's it for this week's episode. You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and MoneyBall Medicine at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show.You can find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.

MetFlex and Chill
#134 - Paleo/Low-Carb/Keto Journey, Benefits of Electrolytes, CrossFit, and More with Robb Wolf

MetFlex and Chill

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 54:13


To watch this episode, please visit Rachel's YouTube channel. Listeners can find Robb Wolf at his website, on Twitter @robbwolf, and on Instagram @dasrobbwolf  Robb Wolf is a former research biochemist and 2X New York Times/Wall Street Journal Best-selling author of The Paleo Solution and Wired To Eat. He and co-author Diana Rodgers recently released their book, Sacred Cow, which explains why well-raised meat is good for us and good for the planet. Robb has transformed the lives of hundreds of thousands of people around the world via his top-ranked Itunes podcast, books, and seminars. He's known for his direct approach and ability to distill and synthesize information to make the complicated stuff easier to understand. In this episode, Robb and I chat all about Robb's perspective on metabolic flexibility, how to better understand hydration and sodium intake, the carb swish trick, how macros on keto can fluctuate based on exercise and exertion, and more! “In a textbook of medical physiology, hydration means water and electrolytes. And when we're really thinking about physical performance, the main electrolyte we need to be concerned with is sodium.” Robb Wolf  Top Takeaways: Robb's perspective on metabolic flexibility and how to achieve it Benefits to a carb swish for performance  A daily recommended minimum dose of sodium should be this if you eat a mostly whole foods diet When fasting becomes too much and could cause more metabolic harm Show Notes: [0:00] Rachel gives a brief bio on our guest today, Robb Wolf @dasrobbwolff [1:00] Welcome back to MetFlex and Chill! Rachel welcomes guest Robb Wolf @dasrobbwolff    [1:30] Robb gives a brief background of how he got into working with people with complex issues and needed something other than standard care [4:00] Question: Can you tell us about your personal Paleo/Keto/Low-carb journey and how it's evolved over the years? [5:00] “My base recommendations really haven't changed a ton other than I think I've become even more aware that the folks that are struggling with body composition, appetite control, metabolic issues, etc... that protein really is THE thing to focus on.” [9:30] Question: Have you seen metabolic inflexibility on both sides of the spectrum? And what would you say about how to mitigate that?  [17:30] A Low-Carbohydrate Ketogenic Diet Combined with 6-Weeks of Crossfit Training Improves Body Composition and Performance [17:30] Question: What's your opinion on implementing a lower-carb protocol within a CrossFit setting for those people who are not elite? [22:00] Zone diet  [25:00] What is a carb swish?  [25:30] Question: Do you think there's a difference in terms of genders for those who want to implement a keto/low carb approach and also do CrossFit?   [26:30] Theories around keto and performance: Could be electrolyte management? Could it be from excessive sweat causing fatigue?  [28:30] Question: Can you speak to the importance of electrolytes not just in terms of performance but overall health and functioning? [30:00] The main electrolyte to replenish during performance = Sodium [31:00] “In a textbook of medical physiology, hydration means water and electrolytes. And when we're really thinking about physical performance, the main electrolyte we need to be concerned with is sodium.” [36:00] Question: ​​Is there a recommended intake of sodium-based on body bodyweight? [40:00] Listener Question: I noticed that I get bloated or kind of puffy if I have too much sodium. Can you talk to that a little bit? [42:30] Listener Question: Can you actually overdose on a potassium supplement? [44:30] Question: Is there anything in the past year that you've changed your mind about and why? [52:00] If you want to check out more from Robb you can find him at https://robbwolf.com/, www.drinklmnt.com, or The Healthy Rebellion  [52:00] Thanks for listening to another episode! If you're loving MetFlex and Chill and want to help grow the show, please head over to Itunes and leave a rating and review! How to Leave an Apple Podcast Review: First, Open the podcast app on your iPhone, Mac, or iPad. Then, hit the “Search” tab at the bottom right-hand corner of the page and search for MetFlex and Chill. Select the podcast, scroll down to find the subheading “Ratings & Reviews”. and select “Write a Review.” Next, select the number of stars you'd like to leave. Please choose 5 stars! Using the text box which says “Title,” write a title for your review. Then in the text box, write the review itself. The review can be up to 300 words long, but doesn't need to be much more than: “Love the show! Thanks!” or “Rachel provides wonderful content from a multitude of expert guests!” Once you're done select “Send” in the upper right-hand corner. --- Join the FREE MetFLex Life Course: www.metflexandchill.com Rachel Gregory (@rachelgregory.cns) is a Board-Certified Nutrition Specialist, Strength and Conditioning Specialist, and Author of the best-selling book, 21-Day Ketogenic Diet Weight Loss Challenge. She received her Master's Degree in Nutrition & Exercise Physiology from James Madison University and Bachelor's Degree in Sports Medicine from the University of Miami. Rachel helps her clients transform their lives by starting with the physical (body), realizing the power of the mental (mindset), and ultimately gaining massive confidence that bleeds into every aspect of their lives (family, relationships, work, etc.).

MetFlex and Chill
#133 - Determining Energy Output, Structuring Lifting & Running Sessions, Bloat Throughout The Day, and Alternate Day Fasting Insights

MetFlex and Chill

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 30:46


To learn more and apply to work one-on-one with Rachel, visit her website: https://www.metflexlife.com/ Join Rachel's weekly newsletter: https://www.metflexlife.com/newsletter  In this episode, Rachel chats about ways to determine your TDEE, the most controllable variable of TDEE, signs, and symptoms of when it might be time to pivot training and nutrition protocols, how to get the most out of resistance training and running, and more! “If at least 80% of your day is made up of whole foods that have either had a face at some point or grown from the earth at some point, then you're probably doing pretty well.” Today's Questions: What is the best way to determine energy spent? (energy expenditure) Alternate Day Fasting with daily heavy workouts makes me feel less efficient. What should I do? Why does my body change drastically throughout the day? Is it water weight? My son needs to run for his psyche but wants to build muscle and resistance train. How should he go about mixing the two? Top Takeaways: These 4 components combined are what make up your TDEE or total daily energy expenditure Tips on how to decrease bloat throughout the day  How to structure your days to get the benefits of both resistance training and running Show Notes: [0:00] Welcome back to MetFlex and Chill! Today is a Q&A solo episode taking on questions from IG [0:00] If you're loving MetFlex and Chill and want to help grow the show, please head over to Itunes and leave a rating and review! How to Leave an Apple Podcast Review: First, Open the podcast app on your iPhone, Mac, or iPad. Then, hit the “Search” tab at the bottom right-hand corner of the page and search for MetFlex and Chill. Select the podcast, scroll down to find the subheading “Ratings & Reviews”. and select “Write a Review.” Next, select the number of stars you'd like to leave. Please choose 5 stars! Using the text box which says “Title,” write a title for your review. Then in the text box, write the review itself. The review can be up to 300 words long, but doesn't need to be much more than: “Love the show! Thanks!” or “Rachel provides wonderful content from a multitude of expert guests!” Once you're done select “Send” in the upper right-hand corner. [1:00] Question: What is the best way to determine energy spent? (energy expenditure) [1:30] What is TDEE: Total Daily Energy Expenditure  [11:30] “If at least 80% of your day is made up of whole foods that have either had a face at some point or grown from the earth at some point, then you're probably doing pretty well.” [13:30] This simple tweak to your day can make a HUGE difference! [16:00] TDEEcalculator.net  [18:30] Episode 46: How To Find Maintenance Caloric Intake, Fast vs. Slow Fat Loss, Accuracy of Tracking Devices, and More! [19:30] Question: Alternate-day fasting with daily heavy workouts makes me feel less efficient. What should I do? [21:30] “You're going to hinder your performance and your recovery if you don't have any fuel coming in.” [23:30] Question: Why does my body change drastically throughout the day? Is it water weight? [24:30] Episode 52: Most Common Causes of Bloating, Intermittent Fasting vs. Time Restricted Feeding, and Training While Fasted [25:30] Question: My son needs to run for his psyche but wants to build muscle and resistance train. How should he go about mixing the two? [29:30] Thanks for listening to another solo Q&A episode.  If you know anyone that could benefit from MetFlex and Chill please share it out on your social media and tag Rachel @rachelgregory.cns or head over to iTunes and leave a review to help grow the show!   THINGS MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE: This simple tweak to your day can make a HUGE difference! TDEEcalculator.net Episode 17: THE Fasting Episode with Mike Mutzel  Episode 46: How To Find Maintenance Caloric Intake, Fast vs. Slow Fat Loss, Accuracy of Tracking Devices, and More! Episode 52: Most Common Causes of Bloating, Intermittent Fasting vs. Time-Restricted Feeding, and Training While Fasted --- Join the FREE MetFLex Life Course: www.metflexandchill.com Rachel Gregory (@rachelgregory.cns) is a Board-Certified Nutrition Specialist, Strength and Conditioning Specialist, and Author of the best-selling book, 21-Day Ketogenic Diet Weight Loss Challenge. She received her Master's Degree in Nutrition & Exercise Physiology from James Madison University and Bachelor's Degree in Sports Medicine from the University of Miami. Rachel helps her clients transform their lives by starting with the physical (body), realizing the power of the mental (mindset), and ultimately gaining massive confidence that bleeds into every aspect of their lives (family, relationships, work, etc.).

MetFlex and Chill
#132 - Exploring Top Supplements for Sleep, Stress, Exercise, and Immune Health with Shawn Wells

MetFlex and Chill

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 77:04


To watch this episode, please visit Rachel's YouTube channel. Listeners can find Shawn Wells at his website https://shawnwells.com/, and on Instagram @shawnwells  Shawn Wells is one of the world's leading nutritional biochemists and experts on health optimization. He has formulated over 500 supplements, food, beverages, and cosmeceuticals and patented 10 novel ingredients. Formerly a Chief Clinical Dietitian with over a decade of clinical experience, he has counseled thousands of people on innovative health solutions. He has also personally overcome various health issues including Epstein-Barr Virus, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Fibromyalgia, depression, insomnia, obesity, and a pituitary tumor. As a world-renowned thought-leader on mitochondrial health, his insights have been prominently featured in documentaries, podcasts, and on morning television. His expertise can help any health-conscious individual to better manage stress and experience greater resilience and more energy through utilizing his practical research-backed solutions. His book, "The ENERGY Formula" has been recognized by both USA Today and Forbes as well as an Amazon best-seller in multiple categories. In this episode, Shawn and I chat all about his new book “The Energy Formula” and discuss Shawn's top three supplements for sleep, stress, and exercise. Shawn gives his tips on how to find quality supplements in a saturated market and why he considers sodium to be one of the most underrated, yet powerful tools for performance.  Top Takeaways: Three factors to take into consideration when buying a quality supplement  Two supplements that pair well with melatonin  One of the most underrated pre-workout supplements Benefits to taking Dihydroberberine Show Notes: [0:00] Rachel gives a brief introduction of guest Shawn Wells @shawnwells [1:00] Welcome back to MetFlex and Chill! Rachel welcomes guest Shawn Wells  [2:30] Shawn dives into his background as a nutritional biochemist [4:00] The Energy Formula [4:00] Question: What would you recommend people look for when seeking out a quality supplement? [4:30] Check out www.energyformula.com to listen to the first couple of chapters for free! [10:30] What are proprietary blends in supplements? [13:00] www.examine.com , www.pubmed.gov  [19:00] Question: What are your thoughts on melatonin and would you recommend it as a sleep aid? [28:00] Can you test your melatonin levels? [32:00] If you're curious about supplements and dosages, check out https://shawnwells.com/ for more info! [33:30] Question: Are there any stress-reducing supplements that you take or recommend? [35:00] Hormetic Stress: benefits and when it can be too much [38:00] Question: Can you talk about the importance of finding the sweet spot between performance vs. recovery? [45:00] Question: Do you recommend any pre-workout and post-workout supplements? [45:00] Theacrine and Dynamin [53:00] Question: Are there any post-workout supplements you stand by? [53:30] Dr. Rob Wildman PhD, RD, FISSN  [1:02:00] Question: What are your top three immune health supplements? [1:02:00] Active Hexose Correlated Compound (AHCC) [1:03:30] Lysine [1:10:00] Question: What about elderberry? [1:11:30] Dihydroberberine [1:12:30] If you want to check out more from Shawn Wells you can find him at his website https://shawnwells.com/, and on Instagram @shawnwells and his book The Energy Formula is available on his website or amazon [1:14:00] Episode 43: All Things PROTEIN with Shawn Wells, Episode 33: Top 5 Supplements Everyone Should Consider with Shawn Wells Thanks for listening to another episode! If you're loving MetFlex and Chill and want to help grow the show, please head over to Itunes and leave a rating and review! How to Leave an Apple Podcast Review: First, Open the podcast app on your iPhone, Mac, or iPad. Then, hit the “Search” tab at the bottom right-hand corner of the page and search for MetFlex and Chill. Select the podcast, scroll down to find the subheading “Ratings & Reviews”. and select “Write a Review.” Next, select the number of stars you'd like to leave. Please choose 5 stars! Using the text box which says “Title,” write a title for your review. Then in the text box, write the review itself. The review can be up to 300 words long, but doesn't need to be much more than: “Love the show! Thanks!” or “Rachel provides wonderful content from a multitude of expert guests!” Once you're done select “Send” in the upper right-hand corner. --- Join the FREE MetFLex Life Course: www.metflexandchill.com Rachel Gregory (@rachelgregory.cns) is a Board-Certified Nutrition Specialist, Strength and Conditioning Specialist, and Author of the best-selling book, 21-Day Ketogenic Diet Weight Loss Challenge. She received her Master's Degree in Nutrition & Exercise Physiology from James Madison University and Bachelor's Degree in Sports Medicine from the University of Miami. Rachel helps her clients transform their lives by starting with the physical (body), realizing the power of the mental (mindset), and ultimately gaining massive confidence that bleeds into every aspect of their lives (family, relationships, work, etc.).

MetFlex and Chill
#131 - Improving Body Composition Starts With Behavioral Change with Danny Matranga

MetFlex and Chill

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 67:35


To watch this episode, please visit Rachel's YouTube channel. Listeners can find Danny Matranga at his website https://www.coachdannymatranga.com/, and on Instagram @danny.matranga and Podcast: Dynamic Dialogue with Danny Matranga  Danny Matranga is a personal trainer and nutrition expert. You may know him best from the many videos he's done with Mind Pump TV. He's also the host of the Dynamic Dialogue Podcast. Danny first discovered fitness as a kid playing sports and he quickly became fascinated not only with the practical aspects but the intellectual as well. His undergraduate degree is in Kinesiology and he has been a personal trainer since 2013. He has had the privilege of working with hundreds of clients and traveling all over the country learning from the best experts in the fields of strength, conditioning, mobility, nutrition, and more. His desire to grow, learn, and develop is at the core of his coaching philosophy and is the driving force that keeps him energized and excited after all these years. In this episode, we chat about improving body composition with five reasonable behavioral changes, pros and cons of circuit style training, two common misconceptions when it comes to changing your body composition, neurological benefits to creatine and, more! “You have to allow adequate time for a diet to work for the behaviors to fall in place for you to do them consistently enough. And a lot of times, you have to do that through failing.” Danny Matranga Top Takeaways: Five reasonable behavioral habits to adopt to help your fat loss journey Two prevalent factors that could be hindering your body composition transformation  Pro's and con's of circuit style training Danny's recommendations on peri-workout nutrition Danny's top three supplement recommendations Show Notes: [0:00] Rachel gives a brief introduction of guest Danny Matranga  [1:00] Welcome back to MetFlex and Chill! Rachel welcomes guest Danny Matranga @danny.matranga to the listeners   [1:00] Danny dives into his background of how he got into the fitness and nutrition industry [3:00] In-person training vs. online coaching  [7:30:] Question: What's your opinion and experience with fat loss from a fast versus a slow approach? [13:30] Question: How do you address scale fluctuations and “stalls” with your clients? [20:30] What behavior changes do you think make the biggest impact for long term success with body composition? [27:30] Question: What do you feel are the biggest mistakes that you see with your women clientele who come to you when they're looking to change their body composition? [29:00] ​​Question: People are still super fat phobic. And then there's people who are still super carb phobic. Do you experience that at all with your clients? [33:00] Question: What is your opinion on circuit style classes like Orange Theory, CrossFit, F45, etc.? [39:00] Question: What are your top recommendations when it comes to peri-workout nutrition? [48:30] Question: If you had to pick three supplements that could actually make a difference? What would they be? [46:30] Question: For you personally, what does an average day of nutrition and training look like? [52:30] Question: Do you implement any type of calorie cycling with your clients?  [59:00] Question: Is there anything that you've changed your mind about in the last year and why? [1:05:00] You can check out for from Danny on IG @danny.matranga   [1:06:00] Thanks for listening to another episode! If you're loving MetFlex and Chill and want to help grow the show, please head over to Itunes and leave a rating and review! How to Leave an Apple Podcast Review: First, Open the podcast app on your iPhone, Mac, or iPad. Then, hit the “Search” tab at the bottom right-hand corner of the page and search for MetFlex and Chill. Select the podcast, scroll down to find the subheading “Ratings & Reviews”. and select “Write a Review.” Next, select the number of stars you'd like to leave. Please choose 5 stars! Using the text box which says “Title,” write a title for your review. Then in the text box, write the review itself. The review can be up to 300 words long, but doesn't need to be much more than: “Love the show! Thanks!” or “Rachel provides wonderful content from a multitude of expert guests!” Once you're done select “Send” in the upper right-hand corner.   --- Join the FREE MetFLex Life Course: www.metflexandchill.com Rachel Gregory (@rachelgregory.cns) is a Board-Certified Nutrition Specialist, Strength and Conditioning Specialist, and Author of the best-selling book, 21-Day Ketogenic Diet Weight Loss Challenge. She received her Master's Degree in Nutrition & Exercise Physiology from James Madison University and Bachelor's Degree in Sports Medicine from the University of Miami. Rachel helps her clients transform their lives by starting with the physical (body), realizing the power of the mental (mindset), and ultimately gaining massive confidence that bleeds into every aspect of their lives (family, relationships, work, etc.).