Podcasts about Aranjuez

  • 189PODCASTS
  • 279EPISODES
  • 40mAVG DURATION
  • 1WEEKLY EPISODE
  • Dec 30, 2022LATEST
Aranjuez

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Aranjuez

Latest podcast episodes about Aranjuez

Composer of the Week
More One Hit Wonders: Part 2

Composer of the Week

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 47:27


Donald Macleod presents another selection of composers who are most famous for a single work. Last Easter, Composer of the Week explored the lives of ten composers whose music we adore but mainly only for a lone composition. This week, Donald Macleod makes a second selection of classical ‘One Hit Wonders' - ten more composers who have been catapulted into the mainstream thanks to the surprising popularity of just one of their pieces. He's joined by pianist and music director, Yshani Perinpanayagam, to uncover these composers' stories and to share examples of their best music. We'll hear the familiar hits alongside plenty of captivating music that's less well-known. Music Featured: John Cage: 4'33'' (extract) John Cage: Hymns & Variations: Hymn A (After W. Billing's "Old North") John Cage: In a Landscape Jeremiah Clarke: Trumpet tune 'The Prince of Denmark's March' Jeremiah Clarke: Ode On The Death Of Henry Purcell (extract) Boccherini: String Quintet in E major, Op 11 No 5 (3rd mvt) Boccherini (arr. Grützmacher) Cello Concerto in B-Flat Major (2nd mvt) Boccherini: Guitar Quintet No 4 in D (3rd mvt) Monti: Czardas Monti: Noël de Pierrot, Act II, "Ô vous que j'adore" Rodrigo: Concierto de Aranjuez for Guitar and Orchestra Rodrigo: Cancíon y danza Presented by Donald Macleod Produced by Chris Taylor For full track listings, including artist and recording details, and to listen to the pieces featured in full (for 30 days after broadcast) head to the series page for More One Hit Wonders https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m001g9nt And you can delve into the A-Z of all the composers we've featured on Composer of the Week here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/3cjHdZlXwL7W41XGB77X3S0/composers-a-to-z

Más de Uno Madrid
Madrileñismos por las tierras de Aranjuez

Más de Uno Madrid

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 2:16


El profesor Fernando Vilches nos enseña "Madrileñismos" de Aranjuez, también conocidos como alcagüenses.

Conocimientos Musicales
T4 x 26: Entrevista a Carlos Bonell

Conocimientos Musicales

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 43:05


Desde la temporada pasada no os habíamos traído ninguna entrevista de las que tanto nos gusta presentaros. Además, el invitado que nos acompaña no es cualquiera, ya que Carlos Bonell es una de las figuras más importantes de la guitarra clásica contemporánea. Nacido en Londres aunque en un hogar español, Bonell estudió en el Royal College of Music e inmediatamente se convirtió en profesor de esa institución, un cargo que todavía conserva a día de hoy. Sus 20 discos, además de muchísimas colaboraciones con otros artistas de primer nivel y los centenares de recitales y conciertos que ha dado a lo largo de los años han construido la leyenda de Carlos Bonell, quien en este programa nos acompaña para charlar sobre su guitarra, el Concierto de Aranjuez, Paul McCartney y muchísimo más. Desde aquí agradecemos una vez más al maestro su buena disposición para hablar con nosotros, y a todos vosotros os esperamos en este programa tan especial en el que nos acompaña un músico del más alto calibre.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 158: “White Rabbit” by Jefferson Airplane

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-eight of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “White Rabbit”, Jefferson Airplane, and the rise of the San Francisco sound. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-three-minute bonus episode available, on "Omaha" by Moby Grape. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Erratum I refer to Back to Methuselah by Robert Heinlein. This is of course a play by George Bernard Shaw. What I meant to say was Methuselah's Children. Resources I hope to upload a Mixcloud tomorrow, and will edit it in, but have had some problems with the site today. Jefferson Airplane's first four studio albums, plus a 1968 live album, can be found in this box set. I've referred to three main books here. Got a Revolution!: The Turbulent Flight of Jefferson Airplane by Jeff Tamarkin is written with the co-operation of the band members, but still finds room to criticise them. Jefferson Airplane On Track by Richard Molesworth is a song-by-song guide to the band's music. And Been So Long: My Life and Music by Jorma Kaukonen is Kaukonen's autobiography. Some information on Skip Spence and Matthew Katz also comes from What's Big and Purple and Lives in the Ocean?: The Moby Grape Story, by Cam Cobb, which I also used for this week's bonus. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Before I start, I need to confess an important and hugely embarrassing error in this episode. I've only ever seen Marty Balin's name written down, never heard it spoken, and only after recording the episode, during the editing process, did I discover I mispronounce it throughout. It's usually an advantage for the podcast that I get my information from books rather than TV documentaries and the like, because they contain far more information, but occasionally it causes problems like that. My apologies. Also a brief note that this episode contains some mentions of racism, antisemitism, drug and alcohol abuse, and gun violence. One of the themes we've looked at in recent episodes is the way the centre of the musical world -- at least the musical world as it was regarded by the people who thought of themselves as hip in the mid-sixties -- was changing in 1967. Up to this point, for a few years there had been two clear centres of the rock and pop music worlds. In the UK, there was London, and any British band who meant anything had to base themselves there. And in the US, at some point around 1963, the centre of the music industry had moved West. Up to then it had largely been based in New York, and there was still a thriving industry there as of the mid sixties. But increasingly the records that mattered, that everyone in the country had been listening to, had come out of LA Soul music was, of course, still coming primarily from Detroit and from the Country-Soul triangle in Tennessee and Alabama, but when it came to the new brand of electric-guitar rock that was taking over the airwaves, LA was, up until the first few months of 1967, the only city that was competing with London, and was the place to be. But as we heard in the episode on "San Francisco", with the Monterey Pop Festival all that started to change. While the business part of the music business remained centred in LA, and would largely remain so, LA was no longer the hip place to be. Almost overnight, jangly guitars, harmonies, and Brian Jones hairstyles were out, and feedback, extended solos, and droopy moustaches were in. The place to be was no longer LA, but a few hundred miles North, in San Francisco -- something that the LA bands were not all entirely happy about: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Who Needs the Peace Corps?"] In truth, the San Francisco music scene, unlike many of the scenes we've looked at so far in this series, had rather a limited impact on the wider world of music. Bands like Jefferson Airplane, the Grateful Dead, and Big Brother and the Holding Company were all both massively commercially successful and highly regarded by critics, but unlike many of the other bands we've looked at before and will look at in future, they didn't have much of an influence on the bands that would come after them, musically at least. Possibly this is because the music from the San Francisco scene was always primarily that -- music created by and for a specific group of people, and inextricable from its context. The San Francisco musicians were defining themselves by their geographical location, their peers, and the situation they were in, and their music was so specifically of the place and time that to attempt to copy it outside of that context would appear ridiculous, so while many of those bands remain much loved to this day, and many made some great music, it's very hard to point to ways in which that music influenced later bands. But what they did influence was the whole of rock music culture. For at least the next thirty years, and arguably to this day, the parameters in which rock musicians worked if they wanted to be taken seriously – their aesthetic and political ideals, their methods of collaboration, the cultural norms around drug use and sexual promiscuity, ideas of artistic freedom and authenticity, the choice of acceptable instruments – in short, what it meant to be a rock musician rather than a pop, jazz, country, or soul artist – all those things were defined by the cultural and behavioural norms of the San Francisco scene between about 1966 and 68. Without the San Francisco scene there's no Woodstock, no Rolling Stone magazine, no Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, no hippies, no groupies, no rock stars. So over the next few months we're going to take several trips to the Bay Area, and look at the bands which, for a brief time, defined the counterculture in America. The story of Jefferson Airplane -- and unlike other bands we've looked at recently, like The Pink Floyd and The Buffalo Springfield, they never had a definite article at the start of their name to wither away like a vestigial organ in subsequent years -- starts with Marty Balin. Balin was born in Ohio, but was a relatively sickly child -- he later talked about being autistic, and seems to have had the chronic illnesses that so often go with neurodivergence -- so in the hope that the dry air would be good for his chest his family moved to Arizona. Then when his father couldn't find work there, they moved further west to San Francisco, in the Haight-Ashbury area, long before that area became the byword for the hippie movement. But it was in LA that he started his music career, and got his surname. Balin had been named Marty Buchwald as a kid, but when he was nineteen he had accompanied a friend to LA to visit a music publisher, and had ended up singing backing vocals on her demos. While he was there, he had encountered the arranger Jimmy Haskell. Haskell was on his way to becoming one of the most prominent arrangers in the music industry, and in his long career he would go on to do arrangements for Bobby Gentry, Blondie, Steely Dan, Simon and Garfunkel, and many others. But at the time he was best known for his work on Ricky Nelson's hits: [Excerpt: Ricky Nelson, "Hello Mary Lou"] Haskell thought that Marty had the makings of a Ricky Nelson style star, as he was a good-looking young man with a decent voice, and he became a mentor for the young man. Making the kind of records that Haskell arranged was expensive, and so Haskell suggested a deal to him -- if Marty's father would pay for studio time and musicians, Haskell would make a record with him and find him a label to put it out. Marty's father did indeed pay for the studio time and the musicians -- some of the finest working in LA at the time. The record, released under the name Marty Balin, featured Jack Nitzsche on keyboards, Earl Palmer on drums, Milt Jackson on vibraphone, Red Callender on bass, and Glen Campbell and Barney Kessell on guitars, and came out on Challenge Records, a label owned by Gene Autry: [Excerpt: Marty Balin, "Nobody But You"] Neither that, nor Balin's follow-up single, sold a noticeable amount of copies, and his career as a teen idol was over before it had begun. Instead, as many musicians of his age did, he decided to get into folk music, joining a vocal harmony group called the Town Criers, who patterned themselves after the Weavers, and performed the same kind of material that every other clean-cut folk vocal group was performing at the time -- the kind of songs that John Phillips and Steve Stills and Cass Elliot and Van Dyke Parks and the rest were all performing in their own groups at the same time. The Town Criers never made any records while they were together, but some archival recordings of them have been released over the decades: [Excerpt: The Town Criers, "900 Miles"] The Town Criers split up, and Balin started performing as a solo folkie again. But like all those other then-folk musicians, Balin realised that he had to adapt to the K/T-event level folk music extinction that happened when the Beatles hit America like a meteorite. He had to form a folk-rock group if he wanted to survive -- and given that there were no venues for such a group to play in San Francisco, he also had to start a nightclub for them to play in. He started hanging around the hootenannies in the area, looking for musicians who might form an electric band. The first person he decided on was a performer called Paul Kantner, mainly because he liked his attitude. Kantner had got on stage in front of a particularly drunk, loud, crowd, and performed precisely half a song before deciding he wasn't going to perform in front of people like that and walking off stage. Kantner was the only member of the new group to be a San Franciscan -- he'd been born and brought up in the city. He'd got into folk music at university, where he'd also met a guitar player named Jorma Kaukonen, who had turned him on to cannabis, and the two had started giving music lessons at a music shop in San Jose. There Kantner had also been responsible for booking acts at a local folk club, where he'd first encountered acts like Mother McCree's Uptown Jug Champions, a jug band which included Jerry Garcia, Pigpen McKernan, and Bob Weir, who would later go on to be the core members of the Grateful Dead: [Excerpt: Mother McCree's Uptown Jug Champions, "In the Jailhouse Now"] Kantner had moved around a bit between Northern and Southern California, and had been friendly with two other musicians on the Californian folk scene, David Crosby and Roger McGuinn. When their new group, the Byrds, suddenly became huge, Kantner became aware of the possibility of doing something similar himself, and so when Marty Balin approached him to form a band, he agreed. On bass, they got in a musician called Bob Harvey, who actually played double bass rather than electric, and who stuck to that for the first few gigs the group played -- he had previously been in a band called the Slippery Rock String Band. On drums, they brought in Jerry Peloquin, who had formerly worked for the police, but now had a day job as an optician. And on vocals, they brought in Signe Toley -- who would soon marry and change her name to Signe Anderson, so that's how I'll talk about her to avoid confusion. The group also needed a lead guitarist though -- both Balin and Kantner were decent rhythm players and singers, but they needed someone who was a better instrumentalist. They decided to ask Kantner's old friend Jorma Kaukonen. Kaukonen was someone who was seriously into what would now be called Americana or roots music. He'd started playing the guitar as a teenager, not like most people of his generation inspired by Elvis or Buddy Holly, but rather after a friend of his had shown him how to play an old Carter Family song, "Jimmy Brown the Newsboy": [Excerpt: The Carter Family, "Jimmy Brown the Newsboy"] Kaukonen had had a far more interesting life than most of the rest of the group. His father had worked for the State Department -- and there's some suggestion he'd worked for the CIA -- and the family had travelled all over the world, staying in Pakistan, the Philippines, and Finland. For most of his childhood, he'd gone by the name Jerry, because other kids beat him up for having a foreign name and called him a Nazi, but by the time he turned twenty he was happy enough using his birth name. Kaukonen wasn't completely immune to the appeal of rock and roll -- he'd formed a rock band, The Triumphs, with his friend Jack Casady when he was a teenager, and he loved Ricky Nelson's records -- but his fate as a folkie had been pretty much sealed when he went to Antioch College. There he met up with a blues guitarist called Ian Buchanan. Buchanan never had much of a career as a professional, but he had supposedly spent nine years studying with the blues and ragtime guitar legend Rev. Gary Davis, and he was certainly a fine guitarist, as can be heard on his contribution to The Blues Project, the album Elektra put out of white Greenwich Village musicians like John Sebastian and Dave Van Ronk playing old blues songs: [Excerpt: Ian Buchanan, "The Winding Boy"] Kaukonen became something of a disciple of Buchanan -- he said later that Buchanan probably taught him how to play because he was such a terrible player and Buchanan couldn't stand to listen to it -- as did John Hammond Jr, another student at Antioch at the same time. After studying at Antioch, Kaukonen started to travel around, including spells in Greenwich Village and in the Philippines, before settling in Santa Clara, where he studied for a sociology degree and became part of a social circle that included Dino Valenti, Jerry Garcia, and Billy Roberts, the credited writer of "Hey Joe". He also started performing as a duo with a singer called Janis Joplin. Various of their recordings from this period circulate, mostly recorded at Kaukonen's home with the sound of his wife typing in the background while the duo rehearse, as on this performance of an old Bessie Smith song: [Excerpt: Jorma Kaukonen and Janis Joplin, "Nobody Loves You When You're Down and Out"] By 1965 Kaukonen saw himself firmly as a folk-blues purist, who would not even think of playing rock and roll music, which he viewed with more than a little contempt. But he allowed himself to be brought along to audition for the new group, and Ken Kesey happened to be there. Kesey was a novelist who had written two best-selling books, One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest and Sometimes A Great Notion, and used the financial independence that gave him to organise a group of friends who called themselves the Merry Pranksters, who drove from coast to coast and back again in a psychedelic-painted bus, before starting a series of events that became known as Acid Tests, parties at which everyone was on LSD, immortalised in Tom Wolfe's book The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. Nobody has ever said why Kesey was there, but he had brought along an Echoplex, a reverb unit one could put a guitar through -- and nobody has explained why Kesey, who wasn't a musician, had an Echoplex to hand. But Kaukonen loved the sound that he could get by putting his guitar through the device, and so for that reason more than any other he decided to become an electric player and join the band, going out and buying a Rickenbacker twelve-string and Vox Treble Booster because that was what Roger McGuinn used. He would later also get a Guild Thunderbird six-string guitar and a Standel Super Imperial amp, following the same principle of buying the equipment used by other guitarists he liked, as they were what Zal Yanovsky of the Lovin' Spoonful used. He would use them for all his six-string playing for the next couple of years, only later to discover that the Lovin' Spoonful despised them and only used them because they had an endorsement deal with the manufacturers. Kaukonen was also the one who came up with the new group's name. He and his friends had a running joke where they had "Bluesman names", things like "Blind Outrage" and "Little Sun Goldfarb". Kaukonen's bluesman name, given to him by his friend Steve Talbot, had been Blind Thomas Jefferson Airplane, a reference to the 1920s blues guitarist Blind Lemon Jefferson: [Excerpt: Blind Lemon Jefferson, "Match Box Blues"] At the band meeting where they were trying to decide on a name, Kaukonen got frustrated at the ridiculous suggestions that were being made, and said "You want a stupid name? Howzabout this... Jefferson Airplane?" He said in his autobiography "It was one of those rare moments when everyone in the band agreed, and that was that. I think it was the only band meeting that ever allowed me to come away smiling." The newly-named Jefferson Airplane started to rehearse at the Matrix Club, the club that Balin had decided to open. This was run with three sound engineer friends, who put in the seed capital for the club. Balin had stock options in the club, which he got by trading a share of the band's future earnings to his partners, though as the group became bigger he eventually sold his stock in the club back to his business partners. Before their first public performance, they started working with a manager, Matthew Katz, mostly because Katz had access to a recording of a then-unreleased Bob Dylan song, "Lay Down Your Weary Tune": [Excerpt: Bob Dylan, "Lay Down Your Weary Tune"] The group knew that the best way for a folk-rock band to make a name for themselves was to perform a Dylan song nobody else had yet heard, and so they agreed to be managed by Katz. Katz started a pre-publicity blitz, giving out posters, badges, and bumper stickers saying "Jefferson Airplane Loves You" all over San Francisco -- and insisting that none of the band members were allowed to say "Hello" when they answered the phone any more, they had to say "Jefferson Airplane Loves You!" For their early rehearsals and gigs, they were performing almost entirely cover versions of blues and folk songs, things like Fred Neil's "The Other Side of This Life" and Dino Valenti's "Get Together" which were the common currency of the early folk-rock movement, and songs by their friends, like one called "Flower Bomb" by David Crosby, which Crosby now denies ever having written. They did start writing the odd song, but at this point they were more focused on performance than on writing. They also hired a press agent, their friend Bill Thompson. Thompson was friends with the two main music writers at the San Francisco Chronicle, Ralph Gleason, the famous jazz critic, who had recently started also reviewing rock music, and John Wasserman. Thompson got both men to come to the opening night of the Matrix, and both gave the group glowing reviews in the Chronicle. Record labels started sniffing around the group immediately as a result of this coverage, and according to Katz he managed to get a bidding war started by making sure that when A&R men came to the club there were always two of them from different labels, so they would see the other person and realise they weren't the only ones interested. But before signing a record deal they needed to make some personnel changes. The first member to go was Jerry Peloquin, for both musical and personal reasons. Peloquin was used to keeping strict time and the other musicians had a more free-flowing idea of what tempo they should be playing at, but also he had worked for the police while the other members were all taking tons of illegal drugs. The final break with Peloquin came when he did the rest of the group a favour -- Paul Kantner's glasses broke during a rehearsal, and as Peloquin was an optician he offered to take them back to his shop and fix them. When he got back, he found them auditioning replacements for him. He beat Kantner up, and that was the end of Jerry Peloquin in Jefferson Airplane. His replacement was Skip Spence, who the group had met when he had accompanied three friends to the Matrix, which they were using as a rehearsal room. Spence's friends went on to be the core members of Quicksilver Messenger Service along with Dino Valenti: [Excerpt: Quicksilver Messenger Service, "Dino's Song"] But Balin decided that Spence looked like a rock star, and told him that he was now Jefferson Airplane's drummer, despite Spence being a guitarist and singer, not a drummer. But Spence was game, and learned to play the drums. Next they needed to get rid of Bob Harvey. According to Harvey, the decision to sack him came after David Crosby saw the band rehearsing and said "Nice song, but get rid of the bass player" (along with an expletive before the word bass which I can't say without incurring the wrath of Apple). Crosby denies ever having said this. Harvey had started out in the group on double bass, but to show willing he'd switched in his last few gigs to playing an electric bass. When he was sacked by the group, he returned to double bass, and to the Slippery Rock String Band, who released one single in 1967: [Excerpt: The Slippery Rock String Band, "Tule Fog"] Harvey's replacement was Kaukonen's old friend Jack Casady, who Kaukonen knew was now playing bass, though he'd only ever heard him playing guitar when they'd played together. Casady was rather cautious about joining a rock band, but then Kaukonen told him that the band were getting fifty dollars a week salary each from Katz, and Casady flew over from Washington DC to San Francisco to join the band. For the first few gigs, he used Bob Harvey's bass, which Harvey was good enough to lend him despite having been sacked from the band. Unfortunately, right from the start Casady and Kantner didn't get on. When Casady flew in from Washington, he had a much more clean-cut appearance than the rest of the band -- one they've described as being nerdy, with short, slicked-back, side-parted hair and a handlebar moustache. Kantner insisted that Casady shave the moustache off, and he responded by shaving only one side, so in profile on one side he looked clean-shaven, while from the other side he looked like he had a full moustache. Kantner also didn't like Casady's general attitude, or his playing style, at all -- though most critics since this point have pointed to Casady's bass playing as being the most interesting and distinctive thing about Jefferson Airplane's style. This lineup seems to have been the one that travelled to LA to audition for various record companies -- a move that immediately brought the group a certain amount of criticism for selling out, both for auditioning for record companies and for going to LA at all, two things that were already anathema on the San Francisco scene. The only audition anyone remembers them having specifically is one for Phil Spector, who according to Kaukonen was waving a gun around during the audition, so he and Casady walked out. Around this time as well, the group performed at an event billed as "A Tribute to Dr. Strange", organised by the radical hippie collective Family Dog. Marvel Comics, rather than being the multi-billion-dollar Disney-owned corporate juggernaut it is now, was regarded as a hip, almost underground, company -- and around this time they briefly started billing their comics not as comics but as "Marvel Pop Art Productions". The magical adventures of Dr. Strange, Master of the Mystic Arts, and in particular the art by far-right libertarian artist Steve Ditko, were regarded as clear parallels to both the occult dabblings and hallucinogen use popular among the hippies, though Ditko had no time for either, following as he did an extreme version of Ayn Rand's Objectivism. It was at the Tribute to Dr. Strange that Jefferson Airplane performed for the first time with a band named The Great Society, whose lead singer, Grace Slick, would later become very important in Jefferson Airplane's story: [Excerpt: The Great Society, "Someone to Love"] That gig was also the first one where the band and their friends noticed that large chunks of the audience were now dressing up in costumes that were reminiscent of the Old West. Up to this point, while Katz had been managing the group and paying them fifty dollars a week even on weeks when they didn't perform, he'd been doing so without a formal contract, in part because the group didn't trust him much. But now they were starting to get interest from record labels, and in particular RCA Records desperately wanted them. While RCA had been the label who had signed Elvis Presley, they had otherwise largely ignored rock and roll, considering that since they had the biggest rock star in the world they didn't need other ones, and concentrating largely on middle-of-the-road acts. But by the mid-sixties Elvis' star had faded somewhat, and they were desperate to get some of the action for the new music -- and unlike the other major American labels, they didn't have a reciprocal arrangement with a British label that allowed them to release anything by any of the new British stars. The group were introduced to RCA by Rod McKuen, a songwriter and poet who later became America's best-selling poet and wrote songs that sold over a hundred million copies. At this point McKuen was in his Jacques Brel phase, recording loose translations of the Belgian songwriter's songs with McKuen translating the lyrics: [Excerpt: Rod McKuen, "Seasons in the Sun"] McKuen thought that Jefferson Airplane might be a useful market for his own songs, and brought the group to RCA. RCA offered Jefferson Airplane twenty-five thousand dollars to sign with them, and Katz convinced the group that RCA wouldn't give them this money without them having signed a management contract with him. Kaukonen, Kantner, Spence, and Balin all signed without much hesitation, but Jack Casady didn't yet sign, as he was the new boy and nobody knew if he was going to be in the band for the long haul. The other person who refused to sign was Signe Anderson. In her case, she had a much better reason for refusing to sign, as unlike the rest of the band she had actually read the contract, and she found it to be extremely worrying. She did eventually back down on the day of the group's first recording session, but she later had the contract renegotiated. Jack Casady also signed the contract right at the start of the first session -- or at least, he thought he'd signed the contract then. He certainly signed *something*, without having read it. But much later, during a court case involving the band's longstanding legal disputes with Katz, it was revealed that the signature on the contract wasn't Casady's, and was badly forged. What he actually *did* sign that day has never been revealed, to him or to anyone else. Katz also signed all the group as songwriters to his own publishing company, telling them that they legally needed to sign with him if they wanted to make records, and also claimed to RCA that he had power of attorney for the band, which they say they never gave him -- though to be fair to Katz, given the band members' habit of signing things without reading or understanding them, it doesn't seem beyond the realms of possibility that they did. The producer chosen for the group's first album was Tommy Oliver, a friend of Katz's who had previously been an arranger on some of Doris Day's records, and whose next major act after finishing the Jefferson Airplane album was Trombones Unlimited, who released records like "Holiday for Trombones": [Excerpt: Trombones Unlimited, "Holiday For Trombones"] The group weren't particularly thrilled with this choice, but were happier with their engineer, Dave Hassinger, who had worked on records like "Satisfaction" by the Rolling Stones, and had a far better understanding of the kind of music the group were making. They spent about three months recording their first album, even while continually being attacked as sellouts. The album is not considered their best work, though it does contain "Blues From an Airplane", a collaboration between Spence and Balin: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Blues From an Airplane"] Even before the album came out, though, things were starting to change for the group. Firstly, they started playing bigger venues -- their home base went from being the Matrix club to the Fillmore, a large auditorium run by the promoter Bill Graham. They also started to get an international reputation. The British singer-songwriter Donovan released a track called "The Fat Angel" which namechecked the group: [Excerpt: Donovan, "The Fat Angel"] The group also needed a new drummer. Skip Spence decided to go on holiday to Mexico without telling the rest of the band. There had already been some friction with Spence, as he was very eager to become a guitarist and songwriter, and the band already had three songwriting guitarists and didn't really see why they needed a fourth. They sacked Spence, who went on to form Moby Grape, who were also managed by Katz: [Excerpt: Moby Grape, "Omaha"] For his replacement they brought in Spencer Dryden, who was a Hollywood brat like their friend David Crosby -- in Dryden's case he was Charlie Chaplin's nephew, and his father worked as Chaplin's assistant. The story normally goes that the great session drummer Earl Palmer recommended Dryden to the group, but it's also the case that Dryden had been in a band, the Heartbeats, with Tommy Oliver and the great blues guitarist Roy Buchanan, so it may well be that Oliver had recommended him. Dryden had been primarily a jazz musician, playing with people like the West Coast jazz legend Charles Lloyd, though like most jazzers he would slum it on occasion by playing rock and roll music to pay the bills. But then he'd seen an early performance by the Mothers of Invention, and realised that rock music could have a serious artistic purpose too. He'd joined a band called The Ashes, who had released one single, the Jackie DeShannon song "Is There Anything I Can Do?" in December 1965: [Excerpt: The Ashes, "Is There Anything I Can Do?"] The Ashes split up once Dryden left the group to join Jefferson Airplane, but they soon reformed without him as The Peanut Butter Conspiracy, who hooked up with Gary Usher and released several albums of psychedelic sunshine pop. Dryden played his first gig with the group at a Republican Party event on June the sixth, 1966. But by the time Dryden had joined, other problems had become apparent. The group were already feeling like it had been a big mistake to accede to Katz's demands to sign a formal contract with him, and Balin in particular was getting annoyed that he wouldn't let the band see their finances. All the money was getting paid to Katz, who then doled out money to the band when they asked for it, and they had no idea if he was actually paying them what they were owed or not. The group's first album, Jefferson Airplane Takes Off, finally came out in September, and it was a comparative flop. It sold well in San Francisco itself, selling around ten thousand copies in the area, but sold basically nothing anywhere else in the country -- the group's local reputation hadn't extended outside their own immediate scene. It didn't help that the album was pulled and reissued, as RCA censored the initial version of the album because of objections to the lyrics. The song "Runnin' Round This World" was pulled off the album altogether for containing the word "trips", while in "Let Me In" they had to rerecord two lines -- “I gotta get in, you know where" was altered to "You shut the door now it ain't fair" and "Don't tell me you want money" became "Don't tell me it's so funny". Similarly in "Run Around" the phrase "as you lay under me" became "as you stay here by me". Things were also becoming difficult for Anderson. She had had a baby in May and was not only unhappy with having to tour while she had a small child, she was also the band member who was most vocally opposed to Katz. Added to that, her husband did not get on well at all with the group, and she felt trapped between her marriage and her bandmates. Reports differ as to whether she quit the band or was fired, but after a disastrous appearance at the Monterey Jazz Festival, one way or another she was out of the band. Her replacement was already waiting in the wings. Grace Slick, the lead singer of the Great Society, had been inspired by going to one of the early Jefferson Airplane gigs. She later said "I went to see Jefferson Airplane at the Matrix, and they were making more money in a day than I made in a week. They only worked for two or three hours a night, and they got to hang out. I thought 'This looks a lot better than what I'm doing.' I knew I could more or less carry a tune, and I figured if they could do it I could." She was married at the time to a film student named Jerry Slick, and indeed she had done the music for his final project at film school, a film called "Everybody Hits Their Brother Once", which sadly I can't find online. She was also having an affair with Jerry's brother Darby, though as the Slicks were in an open marriage this wasn't particularly untoward. The three of them, with a couple of other musicians, had formed The Great Society, named as a joke about President Johnson's programme of the same name. The Great Society was the name Johnson had given to his whole programme of domestic reforms, including civil rights for Black people, the creation of Medicare and Medicaid, the creation of the National Endowment for the Arts, and more. While those projects were broadly popular among the younger generation, Johnson's escalation of the war in Vietnam had made him so personally unpopular that even his progressive domestic programme was regarded with suspicion and contempt. The Great Society had set themselves up as local rivals to Jefferson Airplane -- where Jefferson Airplane had buttons saying "Jefferson Airplane Loves You!" the Great Society put out buttons saying "The Great Society Really Doesn't Like You Much At All". They signed to Autumn Records, and recorded a song that Darby Slick had written, titled "Someone to Love" -- though the song would later be retitled "Somebody to Love": [Excerpt: The Great Society, "Someone to Love"] That track was produced by Sly Stone, who at the time was working as a producer for Autumn Records. The Great Society, though, didn't like working with Stone, because he insisted on them doing forty-five takes to try to sound professional, as none of them were particularly competent musicians. Grace Slick later said "Sly could play any instrument known to man. He could have just made the record himself, except for the singers. It was kind of degrading in a way" -- and on another occasion she said that he *did* end up playing all the instruments on the finished record. "Someone to Love" was put out as a promo record, but never released to the general public, and nor were any of the Great Society's other recordings for Autumn Records released. Their contract expired and they were let go, at which point they were about to sign to Mercury Records, but then Darby Slick and another member decided to go off to India for a while. Grace's marriage to Jerry was falling apart, though they would stay legally married for several years, and the Great Society looked like it was at an end, so when Grace got the offer to join Jefferson Airplane to replace Signe Anderson, she jumped at the chance. At first, she was purely a harmony singer -- she didn't take over any of the lead vocal parts that Anderson had previously sung, as she had a very different vocal style, and instead she just sang the harmony parts that Anderson had sung on songs with other lead vocalists. But two months after the album they were back in the studio again, recording their second album, and Slick sang lead on several songs there. As well as the new lineup, there was another important change in the studio. They were still working with Dave Hassinger, but they had a new producer, Rick Jarrard. Jarrard was at one point a member of the folk group The Wellingtons, who did the theme tune for "Gilligan's Island", though I can't find anything to say whether or not he was in the group when they recorded that track: [Excerpt: The Wellingtons, "The Ballad of Gilligan's Island"] Jarrard had also been in the similar folk group The Greenwood County Singers, where as we heard in the episode on "Heroes and Villains" he replaced Van Dyke Parks. He'd also released a few singles under his own name, including a version of Parks' "High Coin": [Excerpt: Rick Jarrard, "High Coin"] While Jarrard had similar musical roots to those of Jefferson Airplane's members, and would go on to produce records by people like Harry Nilsson and The Family Tree, he wasn't any more liked by the band than their previous producer had been. So much so, that a few of the band members have claimed that while Jarrard is the credited producer, much of the work that one would normally expect to be done by a producer was actually done by their friend Jerry Garcia, who according to the band members gave them a lot of arranging and structural advice, and was present in the studio and played guitar on several tracks. Jarrard, on the other hand, said categorically "I never met Jerry Garcia. I produced that album from start to finish, never heard from Jerry Garcia, never talked to Jerry Garcia. He was not involved creatively on that album at all." According to the band, though, it was Garcia who had the idea of almost doubling the speed of the retitled "Somebody to Love", turning it into an uptempo rocker: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Somebody to Love"] And one thing everyone is agreed on is that it was Garcia who came up with the album title, when after listening to some of the recordings he said "That's as surrealistic as a pillow!" It was while they were working on the album that was eventually titled Surrealistic Pillow that they finally broke with Katz as their manager, bringing Bill Thompson in as a temporary replacement. Or at least, it was then that they tried to break with Katz. Katz sued the group over their contract, and won. Then they appealed, and they won. Then Katz appealed the appeal, and the Superior Court insisted that if he wanted to appeal the ruling, he had to put up a bond for the fifty thousand dollars the group said he owed them. He didn't, so in 1970, four years after they sacked him as their manager, the appeal was dismissed. Katz appealed the dismissal, and won that appeal, and the case dragged on for another three years, at which point Katz dragged RCA Records into the lawsuit. As a result of being dragged into the mess, RCA decided to stop paying the group their songwriting royalties from record sales directly, and instead put the money into an escrow account. The claims and counterclaims and appeals *finally* ended in 1987, twenty years after the lawsuits had started and fourteen years after the band had stopped receiving their songwriting royalties. In the end, the group won on almost every point, and finally received one point three million dollars in back royalties and seven hundred thousand dollars in interest that had accrued, while Katz got a small token payment. Early in 1967, when the sessions for Surrealistic Pillow had finished, but before the album was released, Newsweek did a big story on the San Francisco scene, which drew national attention to the bands there, and the first big event of what would come to be called the hippie scene, the Human Be-In, happened in Golden Gate Park in January. As the group's audience was expanding rapidly, they asked Bill Graham to be their manager, as he was the most business-minded of the people around the group. The first single from the album, "My Best Friend", a song written by Skip Spence before he quit the band, came out in January 1967 and had no more success than their earlier recordings had, and didn't make the Hot 100. The album came out in February, and was still no higher than number 137 on the charts in March, when the second single, "Somebody to Love", was released: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Somebody to Love"] That entered the charts at the start of April, and by June it had made number five. The single's success also pushed its parent album up to number three by August, just behind the Beatles' Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band and the Monkees' Headquarters. The success of the single also led to the group being asked to do commercials for Levis jeans: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Levis commercial"] That once again got them accused of selling out. Abbie Hoffman, the leader of the Yippies, wrote to the Village Voice about the commercials, saying "It summarized for me all the doubts I have about the hippie philosophy. I realise they are just doing their 'thing', but while the Jefferson Airplane grooves with its thing, over 100 workers in the Levi Strauss plant on the Tennessee-Georgia border are doing their thing, which consists of being on strike to protest deplorable working conditions." The third single from the album, "White Rabbit", came out on the twenty-fourth of June, the day before the Beatles recorded "All You Need is Love", nine days after the release of "See Emily Play", and a week after the group played the Monterey Pop Festival, to give you some idea of how compressed a time period we've been in recently. We talked in the last episode about how there's a big difference between American and British psychedelia at this point in time, because the political nature of the American counterculture was determined by the fact that so many people were being sent off to die in Vietnam. Of all the San Francisco bands, though, Jefferson Airplane were by far the least political -- they were into the culture part of the counterculture, but would often and repeatedly disavow any deeper political meaning in their songs. In early 1968, for example, in a press conference, they said “Don't ask us anything about politics. We don't know anything about it. And what we did know, we just forgot.” So it's perhaps not surprising that of all the American groups, they were the one that was most similar to the British psychedelic groups in their influences, and in particular their frequent references to children's fantasy literature. "White Rabbit" was a perfect example of this. It had started out as "White Rabbit Blues", a song that Slick had written influenced by Alice in Wonderland, and originally performed by the Great Society: [Excerpt: The Great Society, "White Rabbit"] Slick explained the lyrics, and their association between childhood fantasy stories and drugs, later by saying "It's an interesting song but it didn't do what I wanted it to. What I was trying to say was that between the ages of zero and five the information and the input you get is almost indelible. In other words, once a Catholic, always a Catholic. And the parents read us these books, like Alice in Wonderland where she gets high, tall, and she takes mushrooms, a hookah, pills, alcohol. And then there's The Wizard of Oz, where they fall into a field of poppies and when they wake up they see Oz. And then there's Peter Pan, where if you sprinkle white dust on you, you could fly. And then you wonder why we do it? Well, what did you read to me?" While the lyrical inspiration for the track was from Alice in Wonderland, the musical inspiration is less obvious. Slick has on multiple occasions said that the idea for the music came from listening to Miles Davis' album "Sketches of Spain", and in particular to Davis' version of -- and I apologise for almost certainly mangling the Spanish pronunciation badly here -- "Concierto de Aranjuez", though I see little musical resemblance to it myself. [Excerpt: Miles Davis, "Concierto de Aranjuez"] She has also, though, talked about how the song was influenced by Ravel's "Bolero", and in particular the way the piece keeps building in intensity, starting softly and slowly building up, rather than having the dynamic peaks and troughs of most music. And that is definitely a connection I can hear in the music: [Excerpt: Ravel, "Bolero"] Jefferson Airplane's version of "White Rabbit", like their version of "Somebody to Love", was far more professional, far -- and apologies for the pun -- slicker than The Great Society's version. It's also much shorter. The version by The Great Society has a four and a half minute instrumental intro before Slick's vocal enters. By contrast, the version on Surrealistic Pillow comes in at under two and a half minutes in total, and is a tight pop song: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "White Rabbit"] Jack Casady has more recently said that the group originally recorded the song more or less as a lark, because they assumed that all the drug references would mean that RCA would make them remove the song from the album -- after all, they'd cut a song from the earlier album because it had a reference to a trip, so how could they possibly allow a song like "White Rabbit" with its lyrics about pills and mushrooms? But it was left on the album, and ended up making the top ten on the pop charts, peaking at number eight: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "White Rabbit"] In an interview last year, Slick said she still largely lives off the royalties from writing that one song. It would be the last hit single Jefferson Airplane would ever have. Marty Balin later said "Fame changes your life. It's a bit like prison. It ruined the band. Everybody became rich and selfish and self-centred and couldn't care about the band. That was pretty much the end of it all. After that it was just working and living the high life and watching the band destroy itself, living on its laurels." They started work on their third album, After Bathing at Baxter's, in May 1967, while "Somebody to Love" was still climbing the charts. This time, the album was produced by Al Schmitt. Unlike the two previous producers, Schmitt was a fan of the band, and decided the best thing to do was to just let them do their own thing without interfering. The album took months to record, rather than the weeks that Surrealistic Pillow had taken, and cost almost ten times as much money to record. In part the time it took was because of the promotional work the band had to do. Bill Graham was sending them all over the country to perform, which they didn't appreciate. The group complained to Graham in business meetings, saying they wanted to only play in big cities where there were lots of hippies. Graham pointed out in turn that if they wanted to keep having any kind of success, they needed to play places other than San Francisco, LA, New York, and Chicago, because in fact most of the population of the US didn't live in those four cities. They grudgingly took his point. But there were other arguments all the time as well. They argued about whether Graham should be taking his cut from the net or the gross. They argued about Graham trying to push for the next single to be another Grace Slick lead vocal -- they felt like he was trying to make them into just Grace Slick's backing band, while he thought it made sense to follow up two big hits with more singles with the same vocalist. There was also a lawsuit from Balin's former partners in the Matrix, who remembered that bit in the contract about having a share in the group's income and sued for six hundred thousand dollars -- that was settled out of court three years later. And there were interpersonal squabbles too. Some of these were about the music -- Dryden didn't like the fact that Kaukonen's guitar solos were getting longer and longer, and Balin only contributed one song to the new album because all the other band members made fun of him for writing short, poppy, love songs rather than extended psychedelic jams -- but also the group had become basically two rival factions. On one side were Kaukonen and Casady, the old friends and virtuoso instrumentalists, who wanted to extend the instrumental sections of the songs more to show off their playing. On the other side were Grace Slick and Spencer Dryden, the two oldest members of the group by age, but the most recent people to join. They were also unusual in the San Francisco scene for having alcohol as their drug of choice -- drinking was thought of by most of the hippies as being a bit classless, but they were both alcoholics. They were also sleeping together, and generally on the side of shorter, less exploratory, songs. Kantner, who was attracted to Slick, usually ended up siding with her and Dryden, and this left Balin the odd man out in the middle. He later said "I got disgusted with all the ego trips, and the band was so stoned that I couldn't even talk to them. Everybody was in their little shell". While they were still working on the album, they released the first single from it, Kantner's "The Ballad of You and Me and Pooneil". The "Pooneil" in the song was a figure that combined two of Kantner's influences: the Greenwich Village singer-songwriter Fred Neil, the writer of "Everybody's Talkin'" and "Dolphins"; and Winnie the Pooh. The song contained several lines taken from A.A. Milne's children's stories: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "The Ballad of You and Me and Pooneil"] That only made number forty-two on the charts. It was the last Jefferson Airplane single to make the top fifty. At a gig in Bakersfield they got arrested for inciting a riot, because they encouraged the crowd to dance, even though local by-laws said that nobody under sixteen was allowed to dance, and then they nearly got arrested again after Kantner's behaviour on the private plane they'd chartered to get them back to San Francisco that night. Kantner had been chain-smoking, and this annoyed the pilot, who asked Kantner to put his cigarette out, so Kantner opened the door of the plane mid-flight and threw the lit cigarette out. They'd chartered that plane because they wanted to make sure they got to see a new group, Cream, who were playing the Fillmore: [Excerpt: Cream, "Strange Brew"] After seeing that, the divisions in the band were even wider -- Kaukonen and Casady now *knew* that what the band needed was to do long, extended, instrumental jams. Cream were the future, two-minute pop songs were the past. Though they weren't completely averse to two-minute pop songs. The group were recording at RCA studios at the same time as the Monkees, and members of the two groups would often jam together. The idea of selling out might have been anathema to their *audience*, but the band members themselves didn't care about things like that. Indeed, at one point the group returned from a gig to the mansion they were renting and found squatters had moved in and were using their private pool -- so they shot at the water. The squatters quickly moved on. As Dryden put it "We all -- Paul, Jorma, Grace, and myself -- had guns. We weren't hippies. Hippies were the people that lived on the streets down in Haight-Ashbury. We were basically musicians and art school kids. We were into guns and machinery" After Bathing at Baxter's only went to number seventeen on the charts, not a bad position but a flop compared to their previous album, and Bill Graham in particular took this as more proof that he had been right when for the last few months he'd been attacking the group as self-indulgent. Eventually, Slick and Dryden decided that either Bill Graham was going as their manager, or they were going. Slick even went so far as to try to negotiate a solo deal with Elektra Records -- as the voice on the hits, everyone was telling her she was the only one who mattered anyway. David Anderle, who was working for the label, agreed a deal with her, but Jac Holzman refused to authorise the deal, saying "Judy Collins doesn't get that much money, why should Grace Slick?" The group did fire Graham, and went one further and tried to become his competitors. They teamed up with the Grateful Dead to open a new venue, the Carousel Ballroom, to compete with the Fillmore, but after a few months they realised they were no good at running a venue and sold it to Graham. Graham, who was apparently unhappy with the fact that the people living around the Fillmore were largely Black given that the bands he booked appealed to mostly white audiences, closed the original Fillmore, renamed the Carousel the Fillmore West, and opened up a second venue in New York, the Fillmore East. The divisions in the band were getting worse -- Kaukonen and Casady were taking more and more speed, which was making them play longer and faster instrumental solos whether or not the rest of the band wanted them to, and Dryden, whose hands often bled from trying to play along with them, definitely did not want them to. But the group soldiered on and recorded their fourth album, Crown of Creation. This album contained several songs that were influenced by science fiction novels. The most famous of these was inspired by the right-libertarian author Robert Heinlein, who was hugely influential on the counterculture. Jefferson Airplane's friends the Monkees had already recorded a song based on Heinlein's The Door Into Summer, an unintentionally disturbing novel about a thirty-year-old man who falls in love with a twelve-year-old girl, and who uses a combination of time travel and cryogenic freezing to make their ages closer together so he can marry her: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "The Door Into Summer"] Now Jefferson Airplane were recording a song based on Heinlein's most famous novel, Stranger in a Strange Land. Stranger in a Strange Land has dated badly, thanks to its casual homophobia and rape-apologia, but at the time it was hugely popular in hippie circles for its advocacy of free love and group marriages -- so popular that a religion, the Church of All Worlds, based itself on the book. David Crosby had taken inspiration from it and written "Triad", a song asking two women if they'll enter into a polygamous relationship with him, and recorded it with the Byrds: [Excerpt: The Byrds, "Triad"] But the other members of the Byrds disliked the song, and it was left unreleased for decades. As Crosby was friendly with Jefferson Airplane, and as members of the band were themselves advocates of open relationships, they recorded their own version with Slick singing lead: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Triad"] The other song on the album influenced by science fiction was the title track, Paul Kantner's "Crown of Creation". This song was inspired by The Chrysalids, a novel by the British writer John Wyndham. The Chrysalids is one of Wyndham's most influential novels, a post-apocalyptic story about young children who are born with mutant superpowers and have to hide them from their parents as they will be killed if they're discovered. The novel is often thought to have inspired Marvel Comics' X-Men, and while there's an unpleasant eugenic taste to its ending, with the idea that two species can't survive in the same ecological niche and the younger, "superior", species must outcompete the old, that idea also had a lot of influence in the counterculture, as well as being a popular one in science fiction. Kantner's song took whole lines from The Chrysalids, much as he had earlier done with A.A. Milne: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Crown of Creation"] The Crown of Creation album was in some ways a return to the more focused songwriting of Surrealistic Pillow, although the sessions weren't without their experiments. Slick and Dryden collaborated with Frank Zappa and members of the Mothers of Invention on an avant-garde track called "Would You Like a Snack?" (not the same song as the later Zappa song of the same name) which was intended for the album, though went unreleased until a CD box set decades later: [Excerpt: Grace Slick and Frank Zappa, "Would You Like a Snack?"] But the finished album was generally considered less self-indulgent than After Bathing at Baxter's, and did better on the charts as a result. It reached number six, becoming their second and last top ten album, helped by the group's appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show in September 1968, a month after it came out. That appearance was actually organised by Colonel Tom Parker, who suggested them to Sullivan as a favour to RCA Records. But another TV appearance at the time was less successful. They appeared on the Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour, one of the most popular TV shows among the young, hip, audience that the group needed to appeal to, but Slick appeared in blackface. She's later said that there was no political intent behind this, and that she was just trying the different makeup she found in the dressing room as a purely aesthetic thing, but that doesn't really explain the Black power salute she gives at one point. Slick was increasingly obnoxious on stage, as her drinking was getting worse and her relationship with Dryden was starting to break down. Just before the Smothers Brothers appearance she was accused at a benefit for the Whitney Museum of having called the audience "filthy Jews", though she has always said that what she actually said was "filthy jewels", and she was talking about the ostentatious jewellery some of the audience were wearing. The group struggled through a performance at Altamont -- an event we will talk about in a future episode, so I won't go into it here, except to say that it was a horrifying experience for everyone involved -- and performed at Woodstock, before releasing their fifth studio album, Volunteers, in 1969: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Volunteers"] That album made the top twenty, but was the last album by the classic lineup of the band. By this point Spencer Dryden and Grace Slick had broken up, with Slick starting to date Kantner, and Dryden was also disappointed at the group's musical direction, and left. Balin also left, feeling sidelined in the group. They released several more albums with varying lineups, including at various points their old friend David Frieberg of Quicksilver Messenger Service, the violinist Papa John Creach, and the former drummer of the Turtles, Johnny Barbata. But as of 1970 the group's members had already started working on two side projects -- an acoustic band called Hot Tuna, led by Kaukonen and Casady, which sometimes also featured Balin, and a project called Paul Kantner's Jefferson Starship, which also featured Slick and had recorded an album, Blows Against the Empire, the second side of which was based on the Robert Heinlein novel Back to Methuselah, and which became one of the first albums ever nominated for science fiction's Hugo Awards: [Excerpt: Jefferson Starship, "Have You Seen The Stars Tonite"] That album featured contributions from David Crosby and members of the Grateful Dead, as well as Casady on two tracks, but  in 1974 when Kaukonen and Casady quit Jefferson Airplane to make Hot Tuna their full-time band, Kantner, Slick, and Frieberg turned Jefferson Starship into a full band. Over the next decade, Jefferson Starship had a lot of moderate-sized hits, with a varying lineup that at one time or another saw several members, including Slick, go and return, and saw Marty Balin back with them for a while. In 1984, Kantner left the group, and sued them to stop them using the Jefferson Starship name. A settlement was reached in which none of Kantner, Slick, Kaukonen, or Casady could use the words "Jefferson" or "Airplane" in their band-names without the permission of all the others, and the remaining members of Jefferson Starship renamed their band just Starship -- and had three number one singles in the late eighties with Slick on lead, becoming far more commercially successful than their precursor bands had ever been: [Excerpt: Starship, "We Built This City on Rock & Roll"] Slick left Starship in 1989, and there was a brief Jefferson Airplane reunion tour, with all the classic members but Dryden, but then Slick decided that she was getting too old to perform rock and roll music, and decided to retire from music and become a painter, something she's stuck to for more than thirty years. Kantner and Balin formed a new Jefferson Starship, called Jefferson Starship: The Next Generation, but Kantner died in January 2016, coincidentally on the same day as Signe Anderson, who had occasionally guested with her old bandmates in the new version of the band. Balin, who had quit the reunited Jefferson Starship due to health reasons, died two years later. Dryden had died in 2005. Currently, there are three bands touring that descend directly from Jefferson Airplane. Hot Tuna still continue to perform, there's a version of Starship that tours featuring one original member, Mickey Thomas, and the reunited Jefferson Starship still tour, led by David Frieberg. Grace Slick has given the latter group her blessing, and even co-wrote one song on their most recent album, released in 2020, though she still doesn't perform any more. Jefferson Airplane's period in the commercial spotlight was brief -- they had charting singles for only a matter of months, and while they had top twenty albums for a few years after their peak, they really only mattered to the wider world during that brief period of the Summer of Love. But precisely because their period of success was so short, their music is indelibly associated with that time. To this day there's nothing as evocative of summer 1967 as "White Rabbit", even for those of us who weren't born then. And while Grace Slick had her problems, as I've made very clear in this episode, she inspired a whole generation of women who went on to be singers themselves, as one of the first prominent women to sing lead with an electric rock band. And when she got tired of doing that, she stopped, and got on with her other artistic pursuits, without feeling the need to go back and revisit the past for ever diminishing returns. One might only wish that some of her male peers had followed her example.

america tv love music american new york history black church children chicago disney hollywood master apple uk rock washington mexico british san francisco west holiday washington dc arizona ohio spanish arts alabama spain tennessee detroit revolution strange north record fame island heroes jews nazis empire rev stone vietnam matrix ocean tribute southern california catholic mothers beatles cd crown cia philippines rolling stones west coast thompson oz elvis wizard finland rock and roll xmen pakistan bay area volunteers parks snacks villains garcia dolphins reports ashes turtles nest lives bob dylan purple big brother bands medicare san jose airplanes northern americana invention woodstock omaha lsd cream satisfaction ballad elvis presley pink floyd belgians newsweek republican party dino added californians marvel comics peter pan medicaid other side state department katz antioch grateful dead chronicle baxter alice in wonderland rock and roll hall of fame miles davis peace corps spence lovin family tree triumphs carousel buchanan mixcloud tilt charlie chaplin san francisco chronicle sly would you like frank zappa santa clara kt starship national endowment janis joplin headquarters ayn rand schmitt chaplin hippies monkees slick steely dan concierto triad bakersfield old west garfunkel rock music elektra rca runnin sketches buddy holly greenwich village milne white rabbit phil spector village voice get together zappa haskell byrds ravel levis spoonful jerry garcia heartbeats doris day stranger in a strange land jefferson airplane fillmore brian jones glen campbell steve ditko george bernard shaw bolero david crosby my best friend wyndham levi strauss all you need lonely hearts club band whitney museum harry nilsson superior court methuselah jacques brel judy collins sgt pepper ed sullivan show heinlein dryden tom wolfe buffalo springfield weavers bessie smith rca records great society objectivism robert heinlein altamont jefferson starship ken kesey run around bob weir this life john phillips acid tests holding company golden gate park sly stone aranjuez ricky nelson bill graham haight ashbury elektra records grace slick san franciscan ditko bluesman john sebastian carter family tennessee georgia family dog colonel tom parker abbie hoffman mercury records bill thompson town criers balin roger mcguinn tommy oliver jorma fillmore east charles lloyd smothers brothers rickenbacker van dyke parks merry pranksters mystic arts gary davis one flew over the cuckoo hot tuna john wyndham monterey pop festival milt jackson jorma kaukonen antioch college jackie deshannon we built this city dave van ronk mothers of invention echoplex cass elliot monterey jazz festival yippies fillmore west mickey thomas slicks moby grape ian buchanan roy buchanan jimmy brown wellingtons jack nitzsche quicksilver messenger service paul kantner kesey al schmitt marty balin kantner casady all worlds blues project fred neil surrealistic pillow jack casady bob harvey bobby gentry skip spence john hammond jr billy roberts jac holzman papa john creach tilt araiza
Els homes clàssics
La guitarra: Joaquin Rodrigo (3/5)

Els homes clàssics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 55:09


Segurament una de les composicions per a guitarra m

Composers Datebook
Senor Rodrigo's popular Concierto

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 2:00


Synopsis The world's most popular classical guitar concerto, the “Concierto de Aranjuez” by Joaquin Rodrigo, had its first performance on today's date in 1940, in Barcelona. Joaquin Rodrigo was born in Spain in 1901 and lost his sight at the age of three. He wrote all of his music on a Braille music typewriter. The “Concierto de Aranjuez,” inspired by a small town of that name thirty miles south of Madrid, remains his signature piece, though he wrote a number of other successful works. Rodrigo died on July 6th, 1999, at the age of 97. In 1959, a friend had played a recording of Rodrigo's concerto for the American jazz trumpeter Miles Davis. Miles Davis said, “After listening to it for a couple of weeks, I couldn't get it out of my mind.” So, Miles Davis played it for his friend, jazz composer and arranger Gil Evans, and in short order the two collaborated on their own 16-minute version of Rodrigo's score. Their collaboration was included on their classic 1960 Columbia LP entitled “Sketches of Spain.” At the recording session, Miles paid Rodrigo this compliment: “That melody is so strong that the softer you play it, the stronger it gets…” Music Played in Today's Program Joaquin Rodrigo (1902-1999) Concierto de Aranjuez Manuel Barrueco, guitar; Philharmonic Orchestra; Placido Domingo, conductor. EMI 56175

La Diez Capital Radio
El Remate; El Gobierno limita las 'puertas giratorias (09-11-2022)

La Diez Capital Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 141:48


Programa de actualidad informativa, presentado y dirigido por Miguel Angel González Suárez. www.ladiez.es - Informativo de primera hora del miércoles 9 de Noviembre de 2022 en el programa El Remate de La Diez Capital Radio. Se prevé una bajada moderada de temperaturas y lluvias en los próximos días. En algunos puntos de las islas la diferencia de las máximas del jueves respecto a las del lunes podrá ser de hasta 8 grados menos. Hoy se cumplen 260 días del cruel ataque e invasión de Rusia a Ucrania. Hoy es miércoles 9 de noviembre de 2022. Buenos días Ucrania. El 9 de noviembre se celebra el Día Mundial de la Adopción, en homenaje a un acto legal y de amor que permite dar a niños y jóvenes huérfanos una familia y un hogar. 9 de noviembre de 1888: Jack el Destripador asesina a su quinta y última víctima, Mary Jane Kelly, en su habitación de Miller's Court, en Whitechapel (Londres). 1922.- El dramaturgo español Jacinto Benavente obtiene el Premio Nobel de Literatura. 9 de noviembre de 1938: En Alemania, ocurre la Noche de los Cristales Rotos, una serie de actos de violencia perpetrados por los nazis contra la comunidad judía en todo el Reich, en la que destruyeron las propiedades de más de 35.000 judíos. 1948.- El príncipe Juan Carlos de Borbón llega a España procedente de Portugal para iniciar su formación académica bajo la supervisión del general Francisco Franco, jefe del Estado. 9 de noviembre de 1989: Ocurre la caída del Muro de Berlín, la revuelta popular ocurrida en Berlín Oriental por la apertura de fronteras llevó a la caída del Muro y como consecuencia al final de la Guerra Fría. 9 de noviembre de 1998: En Reino Unido es abolida la pena de muerte completamente, que se mantenía en vigor solo para casos de asesinato. 9 de noviembre de 2016: El candidato republicano, Donald Trump, gana las elecciones presidenciales de Estados Unidos y se proclama 45º presidente de los EE.UU. Santos Alejandro, Benigno y Teodoro. PARTE DE GUERRA: Las fuerzas de Rusia siguen los preparativos defensivos en la región de Jersón. Elecciones a mitad del mandato en EEUU. Una batalla electoral marcada por la inflación. La resistencia demócrata deja en el aire el control del Congreso en un escrutinio muy ajustado. Los republicanos están en condiciones de conquistar la Cámara por la mínima, pero el Senado se les complica al no desatarse la “ola roja” que pronosticaba Trump. El Gobierno limita las 'puertas giratorias': los altos cargos deberán esperar dos años para pasar al sector privado. El Ejecutivo fija por primera vez límites en la influencia de los 'lobbies' o grupos de presión en el sector público. Creará un registro de estos grupos de interés y determinará los trabajadores de la Administración a los que afecta la ley. Emergencias ensaya este jueves en Canarias un sistema de alertas por SMS en Valleseco y Garachico que se quiere implementar en España en enero de 2024 La Gomera es la isla más beneficiada por las inversiones autonómicas del Gobierno del pacto de las flores. Con respecto a la anterior legislatura, las transferencias de capital en la isla colombina han aumentado un 128,52%. El Ejecutivo regional justifica la “especial incidencia” en las islas verdes en los últimos presupuestos. Las cifras, extraídas de los presupuestos del Archipiélago de los últimos ocho años, sitúan a las islas verdes como los territorios más beneficiados. Después de La Gomera, El Hierro ha visto aumentada su partida de inversiones y transferencias de capital un 112,41%, seguida de La Palma (90,16%), Lanzarote (62,72%), Gran Canaria (59,41%), Fuerteventura (58,94%) y Tenerife (55,05%). En La Gomera, por ejemplo, el gasto anual durante esta última legislatura está en 2.557,57 euros per cápita, por delante de El Hierro (2.508,94 euros), La Palma (1.055,67), Fuerteventura (686,30), Lanzarote (592,27), Gran Canaria (225,56) y Tenerife (220,42). El Gobierno canario critica que la privatización del 49% de Aena le “dificulta” participar en la gestión de los aeropuertos de las islas. El consejero de Obras Públicas y Transportes, Sebastián Franquis, considera que el actual modelo, a través de los Comités de Coordinación Aeroportuario, no es el instrumento adecuado y defiende que el Ejecutivo regional pueda intervenir en el Consejo de Administración de la entidad Turismo.- Ángel Víctor Torres se reúne en la WTM con los responsables de TUI. El principal investigado por el escándalo del caso Tradex será repatriado esta semana. Está previsto que Mukesh D., detenido en Dubái tras huir de la Isla al destaparse el escándalo financiero en Santa Cruz de Tenerife, sea trasladado hasta Madrid el próximo viernes. Curbelo: “El cable eléctrico submarino entre Tenerife y La Gomera es un hito histórico y extraordinario” El presidente del Cabildo adelanta que en la Isla “no solo nos autoabastecernos de energía limpia, sino que podremos exportarla”. La Gomera necesita unos 8 MW y con la renovables que aun no estan instaladas generará 12 MW. Ósea dará a Tenerife 4 MW de los 600 que necesita diariamente. Hoy en 1940.- Se estrena en el Palau de la Música Catalana de Barcelona el Concierto de Aranjuez, una composición musical para guitarra y orquesta del maestro Joaquín Rodrigo. - Sección de actualidad informativa con mucho Humor muy inteligente en el programa El Remate de Miguel Angel González Suárez, en La Diez Capital Radio con el periodista palmero y socarrón José Juan Pérez Capote, El Número Uno. - Sección en el programa El Remate de La Diez Capital radio con los Hermanos Pinzones: Antonio Molano y Francisco Pallero. - Entrevista en el programa El Remate de La Diez Capital radio al candidato a la alcaldía del Ayuntamiento de La Laguna, Jonathan Domínguez.

La Diez Capital Radio
Informativo; La Diez Capital Radio (09-11-2022)

La Diez Capital Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 24:23


Informativo de primera hora del miércoles 9 de Noviembre de 2022 en el programa El Remate de La Diez Capital Radio. Se prevé una bajada moderada de temperaturas y lluvias en los próximos días. En algunos puntos de las islas la diferencia de las máximas del jueves respecto a las del lunes podrá ser de hasta 8 grados menos. Hoy se cumplen 260 días del cruel ataque e invasión de Rusia a Ucrania. Hoy es miércoles 9 de noviembre de 2022. Buenos días Ucrania. El 9 de noviembre se celebra el Día Mundial de la Adopción, en homenaje a un acto legal y de amor que permite dar a niños y jóvenes huérfanos una familia y un hogar. 9 de noviembre de 1888: Jack el Destripador asesina a su quinta y última víctima, Mary Jane Kelly, en su habitación de Miller's Court, en Whitechapel (Londres). 1922.- El dramaturgo español Jacinto Benavente obtiene el Premio Nobel de Literatura. 9 de noviembre de 1938: En Alemania, ocurre la Noche de los Cristales Rotos, una serie de actos de violencia perpetrados por los nazis contra la comunidad judía en todo el Reich, en la que destruyeron las propiedades de más de 35.000 judíos. 1948.- El príncipe Juan Carlos de Borbón llega a España procedente de Portugal para iniciar su formación académica bajo la supervisión del general Francisco Franco, jefe del Estado. 9 de noviembre de 1989: Ocurre la caída del Muro de Berlín, la revuelta popular ocurrida en Berlín Oriental por la apertura de fronteras llevó a la caída del Muro y como consecuencia al final de la Guerra Fría. 9 de noviembre de 1998: En Reino Unido es abolida la pena de muerte completamente, que se mantenía en vigor solo para casos de asesinato. 9 de noviembre de 2016: El candidato republicano, Donald Trump, gana las elecciones presidenciales de Estados Unidos y se proclama 45º presidente de los EE.UU. Santos Alejandro, Benigno y Teodoro. PARTE DE GUERRA: Las fuerzas de Rusia siguen los preparativos defensivos en la región de Jersón. Elecciones a mitad del mandato en EEUU. Una batalla electoral marcada por la inflación. La resistencia demócrata deja en el aire el control del Congreso en un escrutinio muy ajustado. Los republicanos están en condiciones de conquistar la Cámara por la mínima, pero el Senado se les complica al no desatarse la “ola roja” que pronosticaba Trump. El Gobierno limita las 'puertas giratorias': los altos cargos deberán esperar dos años para pasar al sector privado. El Ejecutivo fija por primera vez límites en la influencia de los 'lobbies' o grupos de presión en el sector público. Creará un registro de estos grupos de interés y determinará los trabajadores de la Administración a los que afecta la ley. Emergencias ensaya este jueves en Canarias un sistema de alertas por SMS en Valleseco y Garachico que se quiere implementar en España en enero de 2024 La Gomera es la isla más beneficiada por las inversiones autonómicas del Gobierno del pacto de las flores. Con respecto a la anterior legislatura, las transferencias de capital en la isla colombina han aumentado un 128,52%. El Ejecutivo regional justifica la “especial incidencia” en las islas verdes en los últimos presupuestos. Las cifras, extraídas de los presupuestos del Archipiélago de los últimos ocho años, sitúan a las islas verdes como los territorios más beneficiados. Después de La Gomera, El Hierro ha visto aumentada su partida de inversiones y transferencias de capital un 112,41%, seguida de La Palma (90,16%), Lanzarote (62,72%), Gran Canaria (59,41%), Fuerteventura (58,94%) y Tenerife (55,05%). En La Gomera, por ejemplo, el gasto anual durante esta última legislatura está en 2.557,57 euros per cápita, por delante de El Hierro (2.508,94 euros), La Palma (1.055,67), Fuerteventura (686,30), Lanzarote (592,27), Gran Canaria (225,56) y Tenerife (220,42). El Gobierno canario critica que la privatización del 49% de Aena le “dificulta” participar en la gestión de los aeropuertos de las islas. El consejero de Obras Públicas y Transportes, Sebastián Franquis, considera que el actual modelo, a través de los Comités de Coordinación Aeroportuario, no es el instrumento adecuado y defiende que el Ejecutivo regional pueda intervenir en el Consejo de Administración de la entidad Turismo.- Ángel Víctor Torres se reúne en la WTM con los responsables de TUI. El principal investigado por el escándalo del caso Tradex será repatriado esta semana. Está previsto que Mukesh D., detenido en Dubái tras huir de la Isla al destaparse el escándalo financiero en Santa Cruz de Tenerife, sea trasladado hasta Madrid el próximo viernes. Curbelo: “El cable eléctrico submarino entre Tenerife y La Gomera es un hito histórico y extraordinario” El presidente del Cabildo adelanta que en la Isla “no solo nos autoabastecernos de energía limpia, sino que podremos exportarla”. La Gomera necesita unos 8 MW y con la renovables que aun no estan instaladas generará 12 MW. Ósea dará a Tenerife 4 MW de los 600 que necesita diariamente. Hoy en 1940.- Se estrena en el Palau de la Música Catalana de Barcelona el Concierto de Aranjuez, una composición musical para guitarra y orquesta del maestro Joaquín Rodrigo

Tertulias De Lo Desconocido Radio
Despertando Conciencias Con Marta Vilches y Joaquín Cot

Tertulias De Lo Desconocido Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 68:44


Nuevo programa y nuevos invitados. Nos visitan dos personas muy interesantes, polifacéticas, y emprendedoras. Marta Vilches y Joaquín Cot. Nos hablan de sus proyectos, sus inquietudes, su trayectoria. Tambien nos hablan del próximo evento MEDIUM, 19 Noviembre en Aranjuez, para acudir al el: https://eurekate.com/programa-medium-19-noviembre/?fbclid=IwAR1COGBn9eIn90Ghb0SKF3WClltAYwQozaGkRwQ3q71zangoiQJjEdKBE4E No pueden faltar Eva Carrasco, nuestra Brujita particular y Carlos Dueñas con su imperdible Cine en la Tertulia...Seguro que nos sorprende. Desde 2015 Tertulias de lo Desconocido Para contactar con el programa: tertuliasdelodesconocidoradio@gmail.com Dirige y Presenta: Pedro M. Girón.

Suivez le Guide – Radio Notre Dame
En Espagne, Aranjuez sonne comme un concerto et un dernière tour à Salamanque

Suivez le Guide – Radio Notre Dame

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022


Suivez le guide est en Espagne autour de Madrid. Dans cette dernière émission en Castille-et-Leon, Mercedes Villanueva nous invite à monter dans la tour de la cathédrale. Puis dans la Communauté de Madrid, avec Leticia Cuenca, vous saurez tout sur le célèbre concerto d'Aranjuez.

Tertulias De Lo Desconocido Radio
¡Os anunciamos! (MÉDIUM 19 Noviembre 2022)

Tertulias De Lo Desconocido Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 4:44


Te esperamos en este encuentro maravilloso 💗🙏💗 Toda la información: https://eurekate.com/programa-medium-... Muy pronto en Aranjuez en la jornada especial MEDIUM del 19 de noviembre organizada por Genioidea Experiences. Más información y reservas Marta +34 644 322 973 o Joaquín +34 653 95 26 25

Vento da Liberdade
Xuefei Yang (Concierto de Aranjuez)

Vento da Liberdade

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 6:09


Hora América
Hora América - Festival Música Antigua Aranjuez: 'Mirando a otras músicas' - 05/10/22

Hora América

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 30:10


Programa dedicado a la 29 edición del Festival Música Antigua Aranjuez (17 sept- 16 octubre). Con el ciclo de conciertos Mirando a otras músicas cierra la etapa iniciada en 2019 con el espectáculo Rumbo a Poniente, conmemorando los 500 años de la primera Circunnavegación Magallanes-Elcano. Lo cuenta su director, Javier Estrella, y conversamos también con el violagambista e importante renovador de la música antigua Fahmi Alqhai, director de la Accademia del Piacere, que ha participado en el festival con el concierto Músicas mestizas de la Nueva España, con un rico abanico de chaconas, fandangos, folías y canarios de clara influencia colonial.Escuchar audio

This Classical Life
Jess Gillam with... Cosmo Sheldrake

This Classical Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 27:56


Jess Gillam is joined by composer and multi-instrumentalist Cosmo Sheldrake for a listening party. Music includes Gil Evans and Miles Davis's take on Concierto de Aranjuez, and Thomas Tallis's Spem in Alium. Playlist: Rodrigo arr. Gil Evans - Concierto de Aranjuez [Miles Davis] JS Bach arr. Siloti - Prelude (BWV.855a), transc. for piano in B minor (orig. in E minor, '48' no.10) [Vikingur Olafsson] Mariah - Shinzo No Tobira Sibelius - Symphony No. 5 in E flat major, Op. 82 - III Allegro molto [Sakari Oramo, City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra] Britten - Friday afternoons Op.7 for children's voices and piano: Cuckoo! [Choir of Downside School, Purley, Viola Tunnard] Bremer/McCoy - Drommer Tallis - Spem in alium for 40 voices [Tallis Scholars, Peter Phillips] Courtney Pine - Haiti

LA PATRIA Radio
8. Se Aseguró Condena De Feminicidio En Le Barrio Aranjuez - Sucesos -Vier. 30 De Septiembre

LA PATRIA Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 4:04


Escuche esta y más noticias de LA PATRIA Radio de lunes a viernes por los 1540 AM de Radio Cóndor en Manizales y en www.lapatria.com, encuentre videos de las transmisiones en nuestro Facebook Live: www.facebook.com/lapatria.manizales/videos

Disques de légende
Concierto de Aranjuez / Fantasia para un gentilhombre. Label CBS

Disques de légende

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 11:42


durée : 00:11:42 - Disques de légende du mardi 27 septembre 2022 - John Williams et l'orchestre de Philadelphie dirigé par le chef Eugene Ormandy

Race Matters
Episode 121: Against Disappearance (with Leah Jing McIntosh & Adolfo Aranjuez)

Race Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 32:53


How do we tell the stories of those who have been diminished or ignored in the writing of history? How do we do justice to the lives they lived, or to the people they were? How does where we come from connect to where we are headed?  These are some of the questions put forward in a new anthology by LIMINAL, an anti-racist literary and art platform based in Naarm. A collection from the longlist of the Liminal and Pantera Press Nonfiction Prize, the book is titled, Against Disappearance. The essays on memory are a powerful collection of First Nations and People of Colour questioning the past and envisioning new futures - free from any shallow or singular story. Hear from editors Leah Jing McIntosh and Adolfo Aranjuez earlier this week on the importance of bringing together these works, fighting against the forced disappearance of cultures in so-called Australia through subversive and experimental writing and thinking. Catch them at the book launch on November 1st, details here. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Classical WSMR - Florida's Classical Music Station
Our Tuesday Concert with The Florida Orchestra Concert Broadcast - Shchedrin & Rodrigo for September 20, 2022

Classical WSMR - Florida's Classical Music Station

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 74:30


Our Tuesday Concert with The Florida Orchestra Concert Broadcast - Shchedrin & Rodrigo for September 20, 2022 Listen as host Russell Gant presents Our Tuesday Concert with the Florida Orchestra. Michael Francis conducts the Carmen Suite by Shchedrin, and the Concierto de Aranjuez by Rodrigo with guest guitarist Milos. That's Tuesday night at 8:00 on Classical WSMR 89.1 & 103.9, online at wsmr.org.

Ecos del Vinilo Radio
Rufus T. Firefly / Magnolia | Programa 336 - Ecos del Vinilo Radio

Ecos del Vinilo Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 58:37


Vamos a profundizar en uno de los mejores discos de la historia musical española reciente: Magnolia de Rufus T. Firefly, lanzado en enero de 2017. Ricardo Portman nos cuenta su historia, partiendo de varias de las entrevistas que le ha realizado a la banda de Aranjuez. Escucharemos Tsukamori, Río Wolf, Pulp Fiction, Espectro, Cisne Negro, ··O··, Última Noche en la Tierra, El Halcón Milenario, Nebulosa Jade y Magnolia. Espacio patrocinado por varios oyentes anónimos… ¡GRACIAS! Si os gusta el programa podéis apoyar Ecos del Vinilo Radio siendo patrocinadores ¡por lo que vale un café al mes! desde el botón azul de iVoox. Recuerden que nuestros programas los pueden escuchar también en: Nuestra web https://ecosdelvinilo.com Radio M7 (Córdoba) lunes 18:00 y sábados 17:00. Radio Free Rock (Cartagena) viernes 18:00. Generación Radio (Medellín, Colombia) jueves y domingos 19:00 (hora Col.) Radio Hierbabuena (Lima, Perú) jueves 20:00 (hora Perú)

La Tarde
Escucha La Tarde (08/09/2022) - 16h a 17h

La Tarde

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 60:00


Más de 12 horas de programación especial con los comerciantes y los clientes en los mercados. ¿Qué productos han subido y cuánto?Más de 12 horas de programación especial desde Herrera en COPE con los comerciantes y los clientes en los mercados, Mediodía en un polígono industrial de Alcobendas, La Tarde con agricultores en Toledo y La Linterna hablamos con los comerciantes y los clientes en los mercados, en La Linterna en varios comercios en Madrid. Comprobamos la evolución de los precios. Comparamos con el año pasado cuando estuvimos en esos mismos lugares. ¿Qué productos han subido y cuánto? En noviembre, cuando visitamos los mismos comercios y empresas la inflación era del 5,5% y hoy está ya en el 10,4%. Casi el doble. Y en el caso de la subyacente, la que no tiene en cuenta los precios de los alimentos no elaborados y la energía, ha pasado del 1,7% al 6,4%. Pilar Cisneros está con Fernando, agricultor de hortalizas en Aranjuez y Fernando De Haro está con Carlos, frente a su terreno de árboles frutales en La Puebla de Montalbán.Escucha ahora 'La Tarde', de 16 a 17 horas. 'La Tarde' es un programa presentado por Pilar Cisneros y Fernando de Haro que se emite en COPE, de lunes a viernes, de 16 a 19 horas con más de 470.000 oyentes diarios...

Pasión Habanos Podcast
Pasión Habanos Podcast, episodio 109, 6 de septiembre de 2022

Pasión Habanos Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 28:16


Pasión Habanos Podcast vuelve tras el parón estival y lo hace con la poeta, actriz y psicóloga Alejandra Martínez de Miguel. Ángel García Muñoz nos hace de cicerone en Habanos lovers. Viajamos a Aranjuez, para celebrar el 40 aniversario del restaurante Almíbar. En Buenos humos nos encendemos un Partagás Serie E Nº2. Nos despedimos conociendo la comarca de Matarraña en Teruel y a ritmo de "Veneno" de Leoni Torres.

Clip5
Programa 1 la Cámara de

Clip5

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 9:42


En este primer programa nos vamos hasta Aranjuez y les hablo de sus fiestas en la C3 y C3A de cercanías, tan bien nos vamos hasta Alcalá de Henares tan bien en la comunidad de Madrid en las líneas c2 y C7 y c8 vistamos su ciudad, y nos vamos en la línea c9 hasta el puerto de Navacerrada y Cotos en Segovia.

La Tarde
Escucha La Tarde (26/08/2022) – 17h a 18h

La Tarde

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 60:00


¿Cómo lograr terminar con la brecha digital?; Los restos más sorprendentes que esconden nuestros pantanos; ¿La inflación puede provocar escasez de pollo en los mercados?¿Cómo lograr terminar con la brecha digital? Algo que afecta a mayores, también a gente sin recursos y a las personas que viven en entronos rurales hasta los que no llega Internet. Manuel Bernardo, habitante Bermillo de Alba (Zamora), un pueblo sin Internet ni cobertura. Zaida Lozano, orientadora sociolaboral del campus Cáritas Madrid del servicio diocesano de empleo. Los yacimientos que resurgen de las aguas por la sequía. Los restos más sorprendentes que esconden nuestros pantanos. Santiago Ferrer, arqueólogo responsable de las excavaciones del campamento romano de Aquis Querquennis, uno de los complejos arqueológicos más importantes de Galicia, Bien de Interés Cultural, que queda a la vista con cada sequía en el embalse de As Conchas (Porto Quintela, concejo de Bande, Orense). Jesús Mercado Blanco, cronista oficial de Sacedón (Guadalajara). El Real Sitio de La Isabela y los baños termales, bajo las aguas del pantano de Buendía, hubiese sido otro de los puntos turísticos más importantes junto con Aranjuez, La Granja de San Ildefonso, El Escorial y El Pardo. ¿La inflación puede provocar escasez de pollo en los mercados? Los consumidores pagamos el pollo un 35% más caro que antes del verano, mientras que el sector acumula pérdida de 32...

Nova Ràdio Lloret
‘Concierto de Aranjuez’, amb el guitarrista turc-americà Celil Refik Kaya

Nova Ràdio Lloret

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 7:58


El concert és aquest dijous amb l'orquestra del Maresme, dins del Festival de Guitarra del Mediterrani. La notícia ‘Concierto de Aranjuez', amb el guitarrista turc-americà Celil Refik Kaya s'ha publicat al web de Nova Ràdio Lloret.

Marty in the Morning - RTÉ
Guitarist Redmond O'Toole chats to Marty

Marty in the Morning - RTÉ

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 18:46


Redmond O'Toole performed and chatted to Marty this morning ahead of playing Concierto de Aranjuez with the RTE Concert Orchestra next Tuesday 9 August at the NCH.

Más de Uno Madrid
Más de uno Madrid 02-08-2022

Más de Uno Madrid

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 90:00


Magazine de Madrid, presentado por Jorge Granullaque en el que contamos las noticias con Patxi Linaza, la previsión del tiempo con Javier Hernández ‘El Borrascas' y la actualidad deportiva con David Camps. Reportaje de Irati González. Martes de sección de Irene Calderón sobre lo que hacen los niños en verano. Un rincón para tardear con Laura Ojeda con entrevista a Iván García, de la Casa de los horrores en Aranjuez.

Kalm met Klassiek
#148 - Reizen - 'Concierto de Aranjuez: Adagio' van Joaquín Rodrigo (S02)

Kalm met Klassiek

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 15:18


Welkom terug bij een nieuwe aflevering van Kalm met Klassiek, dé podcastserie voor je dagelijkse momentje rust. Vandaag gaan we ook weer luisteren naar muziek die past binnen het thema ‘reizen'. We gaan namelijk op reis naar het Spanje van de jaren ‘40. In 1939 componeerde de spaanse componist Joaquín Rodrigo het Concierto de Aranjuez. Rodrigo omschreef zelf dat hij in deze muziek "de geur van magnolia's, het zingen van vogels en het vrolijke geklater van fonteinen" in de tuinen van Aranjuez heeft vastgelegd. Hoor jij het ook?

LA PATRIA Radio
3. Bebé Fue Recuperada En Aranjuez Luego De Ser Raptada - Inf. De La Mañana - Mar. 19 De Julio

LA PATRIA Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 3:21


Escuche esta y más noticias de LA PATRIA Radio de lunes a viernes por los 1540 AM de Radio Cóndor en Manizales y en www.lapatria.com, encuentre videos de las transmisiones en nuestro Facebook Live: www.facebook.com/lapatria.manizales/videos

LA PATRIA Radio
9. Comunidad De Aranjuez Protesta Para No Ser Fusionada Con El Liceo De Malabar - Lun. 18 De Julio

LA PATRIA Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 8:31


Escuche esta y más noticias de LA PATRIA Radio de lunes a viernes por los 1540 AM de Radio Cóndor en Manizales y en www.lapatria.com, encuentre videos de las transmisiones en nuestro Facebook Live: www.facebook.com/lapatria.manizales/videos

Klassiska krysset
V 27: Historien bakom en älskad gitarrkonsert

Klassiska krysset

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 27:00


Kryssa med P2! Jens Möller bjuder på musik och ledtrådar, du får försöka lösa veckans kryss. Joaquin Rodrigo skrev sin berömda Concierto de Aranjuez efter en sorglig händelse vilken? Skicka in din lösning i formuläret och få chans att vinna fina P2-priser! Det räcker att du listat ut det lodräta ordet för att vi ska ta emot ditt svar.Senast fredag 15 juli klockan 06.00 vill vi ha din lösning. Veckans fem vinnare presenteras på Klassiska kryssets hemsida samt i Klassisk förmiddag fredag 15 juli.

Nómadas
Nómadas - Aranjuez, el arte de la fotosíntesis - 25/06/22

Nómadas

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 58:00


En la fértil vega del Tajo, próximo a la desembocadura del Jarama, se extiende el Real Sitio de Aranjuez, destino primaveral predilecto de los Austrias y los Borbones. Este gran complejo vacacional, concebido por el emperador Carlos V y desarrollado por los sucesivos monarcas desde Felipe II, reúne la colección más variada y exquisita de jardines históricos y un palacio de enormes dimensiones, un diseño de Juan Bautista de Toledo ampliado por Francesco Sabatini. Fue Fernando VI quien reorganizó la vida en este enclave al sur de Madrid al abrirlo a la población general, aunque la villa no dispondrá de ayuntamiento propio hasta bien entrado el siglo XIX, poco antes de la instalación del segundo tren de la península ibérica: el ferrocarril Madrid-Aranjuez, inaugurado por la reina Isabel II y hoy recordado con el turístico Tren de la Fresa. Para comprender la densa historia ribereña contamos con José Luis Lindo, cronista oficial de Aranjuez. Nos acompaña también el guía Francisco Trujillo para descubrir el mercado de abastos. Indagamos sobre las típicas fresas y fresones de esta tierra en la frutería Tinín, regentada por Roberto Carlos Díaz; también nos interesa la explotación ganadera de José Antonio Chacón, que produce y vende sin intermediarios carne de vacuno de primerísima calidad. Poco más de cien metros más allá conocemos el acogedor y restaurado Teatro Real Carlos III de la mano de su gerente, José Antonio García, más conocido como Simón. La visita al Palacio Real de Aranjuez la hacemos con su directora, Ana Carmen Lavín. Después la paisajista de Patrimonio Nacional Yolanda Bruna nos ayuda a entender los distintos jardines del entorno: el del Rey, el del Parterre, el de la Isla o el inmenso Jardín del Príncipe. Aunque hoy por hoy no es visitable por obras, la arquitecta Maite Domínguez nos muestra la lujosa Casa del Labrador, un palacio adicional construido por orden de Carlos IV en la espesura de este bosque domesticado. La guinda de nuestra visita es una agradable excursión fluvial por el Tajo con Marin Macovei, capitán del barco turístico El Curiosity. Escuchar audio

KO a la Carrera
MMA a la Carrera #33: Entrevista a Alejandra Lara antes de Bellator 282

KO a la Carrera

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 40:42


Semana con mucho protagonismo español. AFL realizó un gran evento en Aranjuez y charlamos con David Er-Ramy y Emily Mota tras sus victorias. También estará Mireia García, quien cosechó un injusto nulo por el Mundial ISKA de kickboxing. Además, la colombiana Alejandra Lara nos dará sus sensaciones antes de meterse en la jaula de Bellator este viernes. 

MMAdictos (MMA en Español)
MMAdictos Essential 18 - Repaso a AFL 27

MMAdictos (MMA en Español)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 84:07


En este Essential especial, repasamos todo lo que ocurrió en la celebración de AFL 27 el pasado sábado en Aranjuez. En el main event, el italiano Albert Ciardo se vio las caras en un duelo lightweight contra el madrileño del equipo Black Panther, David Mora. Todo esto y mucho más en el programa más longevo de habla hispana del mundo de las MMA. Recordamos que podéis encontrarnos en las siguientes redes sociales: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/MMAdictos Twitter: @MMAdictos Facebook: MMAdictos iVoox/iTunes: MMAdictos Instagram: mmadictos_podcast E-mail: mmadictos@gmail.com Youtube: MMAdictosTV Twitch: MMAdictosTV

Conversa de Câmara - Música clássica como você nunca ouviu!
Joaquín Rodrigo resumiu medo, alegria e tristeza no Concierto de Aranjuez

Conversa de Câmara - Música clássica como você nunca ouviu!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 61:55


Em setembro de 1939, dois dias após o início da Segunda Guerra Mundial, um cego e sua esposa atravessavam a fronteira espanhola vindos da França. Eram o compositor Joaquín Rodrigo e a pianista turca Victoria Kamhi . Com eles levavam o manuscrito 'braille' de uma partitura, que estrearia um ano depois no Palau de la Música Catalana Barcelona e que acabaria por dar a imortalidade ao seu autor: o Concierto de Aranjuez! Conversa de Câmara é apresentado por Aroldo Glomb com Eduardo Masses na bancada! Estamos também no programa Antigas Novidades! ESSE PROGRAMA É PRODUZIDO POR NA PAUTA PODCAST! FAÇA PARTE DO CONVERSA DE CÂMARA COM O NOSSO PADRIM! Então entre na conversa! No Padrin.com.br você pode ajudar o Conversa de Câmara a crescer e seguir divulgando ainda mais a boa música da humanidade. Mostre que você tem um gosto refinado apoiando a gente no Padrim.com.br https://www.padrim.com.br/conversadecamara RELAÇÃO DE PADRINS Karollina Coimbra, Aarão Barreto, Gustavo Klein, Eduardo Barreto, Ediney Giordani, Tramujas Jr, Brasa de Andrade Neto, Thiago Pacheco e Aldo França

Teatro en la Granja
Guillermo Carnero - Dibujo de la muerte

Teatro en la Granja

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 26:24


DIBUJO DE LA MUERTE Guillermo Carnero (Valencia, 1947) Publicado por vez primera en 1967, Dibujo de la muerte era el rompedor poemario de un jovencísimo Guillermo Carnero (contaba tan solo 20 años) con el que inauguraba su trayectoria poética y confirmaba una nueva etapa para la lírica española, dejando atrás no sólo la llamada poesía social sino también el intimismo vitalista de sus más inmediatos predecesores generacionales. Podría decirse que, saltando por encima de ellos, entroncaba con el proceso literario interrumpido con la guerra civil y que tenía como punto de partida el Modernismo de finales del XIX y como término las vanguardias y la conocida como generación del 27. Dos son las notas que caracterizan a Dibujo de la muerte. En primer lugar, la representación de un mundo artístico de Belleza. Nos encontramos, aquí, ante la Belleza creada por el Arte: el monasterio de Las Huelgas, Citerea, Aranjuez, Venecia…O con individuos que encarnan la persecución de ese ideal: Scarlatti, Oscar Wilde, Watteau, o, incluso, el ficticio Detlev Spinell (protagonista de la nouvelle de Thomas Mann Tristán, que reemplaza en el poema de Carnero al compositor Gustav von Aschenbach de Muerte en Venecia). Y Belleza también del lenguaje con el que se describen objetos, espacios, sensaciones. Y junto a la Belleza, la omnipresencia de la Muerte, ángel debelador que transforma el Arte en artificio, que resuelve todo en ruinas: cómo lamenta Scarlatti la irrupción de las voces humanas (inexorablemente sometidas a la muerte) en medio de la belleza sonora de su Concertato, en qué pétreo silencio se ha convertido la vida en el monasterio de Las Huelgas, qué agónico el final de Detlev Spinell, tras haber comido un puñado de fresas, atrapado por su pasión amorosa en una Venecia apestada, con qué desprecio mira Watteau a los vulgares paseantes de los Campos Elíseos (¡los paradisíacos Campos Elíseos, nada menos!) siendo como es él dueño de un universo fabuloso surgido de su imaginación, con qué inútil obstinación se recluye Oscar Wilde en su mundo para preservarse del dolor. Y, finalmente, con qué piadoso desencanto ve el sujeto poético de “Embarco a Citerea” zarpar la nave hacia la isla de la eternidad. CRÉDITOS (Poema / Voz / música): Presentación / Fernando Alcaine / Mahler, symphony nº 5 - (Fragmento-Travermarch-1) 1-Amanecer en Burgos / Mingo España / Mahler, symphony nº 5 - (Fragmento-Travermarch-2) 2-Muerte en Venecia / Elena Parra / Mahler, symphony nº 5 - (Fragmento-Adagietto-1) 3-Watteau en Noguent-Sur-Marne / María José Sampietro / Mahler, symphony nº 5 - (Frag.Adagietto-2) 4-Óscar Wilde en París / Manuel Alcaine / Mahler, symphony nº 5 - (Fragmento-Adagietto-3) 5-Concertato / Lola Orti / Scarlatti (Sonata para clave) 6-El Serenísimo príncipe Ludovico… / Ica Ventura / Mahler, symphony nº 5 - (Frag.-Scherzo-1) 7-Capricho en Aranjuez / Mingo España / Mahler, symphony nº 5 - (Fragmento-Scherzo-2) 8-Embarco para Cyterea / Lola Orti / Mahler, symphony nº 5 - (Fragmento-Scherzo-3)

Más de uno
La receta de mermelada de fresas de Eva Arguiñano

Más de uno

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 35:04


Con Robin Food y Leo Harlem conocemos las diferencias entre la fresa y el fresón de la mano de Fernando Álcázar, productor y agricultor de fresa ‘De la Huerta de Aranjuez'. Además, Eva Arguiñano nos da la receta para cocinar mermelada de fresas y nos enseña a preparar un riquísimo y sencillo postre con fresas. 

MOZART - BEETHOVEN yMAS - OCTAVIO CHOY
P211 RODRIGO: CONCIERTO DE ARANJUEZ

MOZART - BEETHOVEN yMAS - OCTAVIO CHOY

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 29:09


MOZART, BEETHOVEN Y MAS presents the Guitarist PEPE ROMERO in the Beautiful CONCEIRTO DE ARANJUEZ for Guitar and Orchestra.

Triatlón y otras drogas
Ep205-Marco Marco nos desgrana la nutrición de Edu para Aranjuez

Triatlón y otras drogas

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 65:33


Buenas triadicto, hoy toca hablar de nutrición, charleta interesante que hemos tenido con Marco Marco, nutricionista que trabaja actualmente con Edu y se pasa por el podcast para comentarnos la características de la nutrición y suplementación de cara a esa prueba. Esperamos que os guste este formato. Tenéis los detalles en triatlonyotrasdrogas.com/episodio205

Triatlón y otras drogas
FANS16-El camino hacia Aranjuez de Edu Vela - Episodio exclusivo para mecenas

Triatlón y otras drogas

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 30:54


Agradece a este podcast tantas horas de entretenimiento y disfruta de episodios exclusivos como éste. ¡Apóyale en iVoox! Qué tal triadictos, hoy regresamos con un nuevo episodio para Fans, Edu nos cuenta sus peripecias en la preparación del Half que tiene este fin de semana. Será en Aranjuez, le deseamos mucha suerte! o mejor dicho... Justicia. Escucha este episodio completo y accede a todo el contenido exclusivo de Triatlón y otras drogas. Descubre antes que nadie los nuevos episodios, y participa en la comunidad exclusiva de oyentes en https://go.ivoox.com/sq/461007

Radio HM
¿Qué santo es hoy?: San José María Rubio (4 de mayo)

Radio HM

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 3:52


Nació en Dalías, Almería, en 1864. Fue ordenado sacerdote en 1887. Vivió su sacerdocio primero como diocesano y después como jesuita, con una entrega total al apostolado de la Palabra y de los sacramentos, dedicando largas horas al confesionario y dirigiendo numerosas tandas de ejercicios espirituales. Vivió siempre el lema: “Hacer lo que Dios quiere y querer lo que Dios hace”. Falleció el 2 de mayo  de 1929 en Aranjuez, a los 64 años.

Acercándonos a escuchar CDLA
El Romance De Yepes

Acercándonos a escuchar CDLA

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 4:09


Narciso Yepes, extraordinario concertista de guitarra española, falleció un 3 de mayo en Murcia hace 25 años. Con seis años, Yepes empezó a estudiar clases de solfeo y a familiarizarse con el dominio de su instrumento preferido, la guitarra. En 1964, Yepes creó su guitarra de diez cuerdas, invento para conseguir mayor resonancia, sobre todo a la hora de tocar música barroca. Transcribió múltiples composiciones y es considerado en todo el mundo como un referente para los estudiantes de guitarra. Este músico es posiblemente el solista que más veces interpretó el "Concierto de Aranjuez" del maestro Rodrigo y cuando lo grabó en 1954 fue el disco clásico más vendido hasta entonces con esa versión. Ya considerado un instrumentista de prestigio, fue requerido por el director de cine francés René Clement para que se encargara de la banda sonora de su película Juegos prohibidos, interpretando el llamado "Romance anónimo". Esta pieza cuyo origen se lo atribuye más de un compositor pero que finalmente termino siendo del maestro Yepes la escribió a los 6 años de edad. A continuación escucharemos Romance anónimo de manos del mismo Narciso Yepes.

Million Dollar Session
ARNO Le Flamand Rauque

Million Dollar Session

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 58:33


Miles Davis, Arno, Dutronc/Mitchell, StacyKent, Lucky Peterson,Guy Marchand, Flora Purin, Jimmy Smith, Chris Spelding & Peter Frampton, TSF.

Classical Guitar LPs
John Zaradin Rodrigo: Concierto de Aranjuez Concert Encores S4E4

Classical Guitar LPs

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2022 49:53


Aaron gives commentary about a guitarist that he is just learning about--check this episode out --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/powellguitar/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/powellguitar/support

Los Toros
Los Toros | Ahora Sevilla y Madrid, las dos grandes

Los Toros

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2022 70:02


Acaban Valencia y Castellón y hablamos con protagonistas que triunfaron como José María Manzanares y Tomás Rufo. Con David Galván comentamos el comienzo de la Copa Chenel y por fin abre Madrid como plaza de temporada. En el horizonte, festejos con peso tradicional como Aranjuez y las dos grandes Ferias, Sevilla y Madrid. Muchos protagonistas que puedes escuchar en el ruedo inmenso de la Cadena SER.

@ the Symphony
Juanjo Mena

@ the Symphony

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022


Pittsburgh Symphony Guest Conductor Juanjo Mena discusses the Lutoslawski Concerto for Orchestra, Debussy Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun featuring Lorna McGhee and Rodrigo and Concierto de Aranjuez with Pablo Sainz Villegas. He talks with Jim Cunningham about his work in Cincinnati with the May Festival, his recent recordings, and his thinking about the world emerging from a pandemic and immersed in conflict with Russia and Ukraine.

Los Toros
Los Toros | Esto va en serio

Los Toros

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 6, 2022 85:05


Esto va en serio y empiezan las Ferias. Valencia y Castellón ya están aquí y abre Las Ventas como plaza de temporada. Este fin de semana se dio Olivenza y se programan importantes carteles en plazas como Aranjuez, Córdoba, Cehegín, Illescas y las francesas de Vic, Arles o Bayona mientras toreros españoles siguen toreando en Colombia y México. Escucha a todos los protagonistas en el ruedo inmenso de la Cadena SER.