Podcasts about brene brown

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American academic, speaker and author

  • 2,119PODCASTS
  • 3,278EPISODES
  • 37mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Dec 5, 2021LATEST
brene brown

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Best podcasts about brene brown

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Latest podcast episodes about brene brown

Let's RUN Podcast with Pahla B Fitness
Ep. 213: When Other People Don't Support Your WEIGHT LOSS

Let's RUN Podcast with Pahla B Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 25:48


You've seen it before. You're working hard toward a HEALTHY WEIGHT and -- bam

Woman's Hour
Brene Brown on emotions, Stepmums, Women in the Army, Poet Kim Moore, Morning after pill costs, Chef Ravinder Bhogal

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 57:51


Brené Brown's Tedx talk 'The Power of Vulnerablity' is one of the most viewed talks in the world with more than 50 million views. Her new book 'The Atlas of the Heart' takes on a journey through 87 of the emotions and experiences that define what it means to be human. Photo credit: Randal Ford. Calls for Boots, the chemist to permanently reduce the price of the morning after pill. With campaigner Rosie Stokes, and the Labour MP Diana Johnson. More than 4,000 women gave evidence to the Defence Sub-Committee on Women in the Armed Forces for its landmark inquiry, which was published earlier this year. This week the Ministry of Defence responded to the recommendations from that inquiry. We heard from Sarah Atherton, Conservative MP and Chair of the Defence Sub Committee. Raising awareness of the complexities and realities of being a stepmum today, with Katie Harrison, host of a a new podcast 'You're Not My Mum: The Stepmum's Side' and Suzie Hayman, a counsellor and spokesperson for the parenting charity Family Lives and author of 'Be A Great Step-Parent.' The poet Kim Moore on her new collection 'All the Men I Never Married'. Alternative Christmas food ideas with the chef and restauranter Ravinder Bhogal. She shares her houghts on creating some rich adaptations of everything from brussel sprouts and ham to samosas and mathi. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Dianne McGregor Photo credit: Randal Ford

A Need To Read
#135 Why we all need a bit of Shelf-Help with Toni Jones

A Need To Read

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 76:24


Toni is a freelance journalist who has spent time at some of the world's leading publications, at 38 Toni decided to turn to freelance journalism. She turned to Non-Fiction books in her spare time and found real comfort and guidance in books. Since then she has created ShelfHelp, a worldwide book club, to connect with other readers on a weekly basis. We chat about; how self-help and non-fiction books have shaped our lives for the future, the importance of journaling in a crisis, how to use gratitude effectively, the importance of kindness, the daily practices she has picked up in all of her reading that have added to her wellbeing, and a few of her favorite books.    Tp join the club for January's book- Atlas of the Heart by Brene Brown head to: https://www.shelfhelp.club/membership     Books discussed   Change your Life in Seven days by Paul McKenna Atomic Habits by James Clear Self-care for Tough Times by Suzy Reading How to do The Work by Dr Nicole LePera Happy Sexy Millionaire by Steven Bartlett Your Mental Health Workout by Zoe Aston The Alchemist by Paulo Coehlo Feel the Fear and Do It Anyway by Susan Jeffers The Five Side Effects of Kindness by Dr David Hamilton     Support   The best way you can support me and help me spread the word is by sharing the podcast with someone. If you like the podcast please share as far and wide as you can.   You can also use the links to my sponsors, it helps keep stuff going whilst also giving you handy discounts from great companies I know and love.   For 1 month use of Headspace full library head to www.headspace.com/needtoread   For 10% off your first month of therapy head to www.betterhelp.com/aneedtoread    For 10% off your Heights Braincare Supplement subscription head to https://www.yourheights.com/products/the-smart-supplement/?ref=edcunningham    For Everything else head to www.Linktree.com/aneedtoread   

10 MINUTES TO LESS SUFFERING
Another Variant - How Can This Not Be Stressful?

10 MINUTES TO LESS SUFFERING

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 10:19


Are you stressed about the Omicron variant? Are you wondering how to manage your fear and worry about what will happen next? Then, listen to this podcast to embrace the best mindset to stay calm and hopeful even during uncertain times.

Tamarindo
Overcoming Shame & Embracing Vulnerability

Tamarindo

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 38:16


Shame is the voice in our ear that tells us we're not enough, that asks us who we think we are when we have the courage to try to do or be. On this episode of Tamarindo, we are joined by guest Angelica Maria, a Chicana poet & singer. She is an advocate of divine femme power, an internationally touring artist & mami of the poetry book “They Call Me”.Together we unpack shame; we ground in what shame is, why we experience it, and how we can stop giving it so much power while embracing the power of vulnerability.    During the conversation, we reference Brene Brown's Ted talk “Listening to Shame” and Glennon Doyle's Book “Untamed”.    Angelica reads a poem from her poetry book called  “They Call Me bien creida” and we play a portion of her song “Me Vale”, from her forthcoming album.    Our episode is sponsored by Alma Explores, Marisa Ramirez Consulting, and by Justice Work. Justice work is encouraging our community to participate in the first ever National LGBTQ+ Women*s Community Survey to help address the gaps in knowledge, policy analysis, organizing, and advocacy about the life experiences, needs, priorities and challenges faced by LGBTQ+ women, our partners, and families. Take the Survey.    Tamarindo podcast is the Latinx show where hosts discuss politics, pop culture, and how to balance it all con calma, hosted by Brenda Gonzalez and Ana Sheila Victorino. Join us as we delve into discussions on culture, politics, identity, representation, and life!   Brenda and  Ana Sheila are executive producers of Tamarindo podcast with production support by Mitzi Hernández and Augusto Martinez, of Sonoro Media. Jeff Ricards provides original music. If you want to support our work, please rate and review our show here. You can get in touch with us at www.tamarindopodcast.com   Follow AnaSheila on instagram @la_anasheila and twitter @Shelli1228 Follow Brenda on twitter at @BrendaRicards We need media that portrays our community, especially Latinas, in a positive light! ✨ . This week's guest is making sure children see themselves represented in the stories they read. We speak to Naibe Reynoso (@naibereynoso) , the founder of @contodopress, a publishing company dedicated to celebrating Latino leaders and culture through its children's books.  . Naibe Reynoso is a Mexican-American multi-Emmy award-winning journalist and mom based in Los Angeles California. Listen to her journey into become a #1 best selling author of children's books. Available now whereever you listen to podcasts! . Save 20% offer when you use code TAMARINDO at checkout when you order books from @controdpress from now until Dec. 31, 2021

How I Work
Michael Bungay Stanier teaches you how to begin

How I Work

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 44:40


It wouldn't work to try to tell the Michael Bungay Stanier story - if anyone's a collection of stories, it's MBS. He finished law school being sued for defamation by his professor, he was a Rhodes Scholar in his early 20s, and he's coached Brene Brown on her own podcast.  A life and career with so many twists, turns and new directions brings with it an equally eclectic and overflowing bag of tips, tricks and mindset shifts, and Michael shares them generously.  Michael covers everything from how to tackle multi-month projects, journaling techniques, honing your personal brand, and knowing when to say “no”.  Connect with Michael at his website and pre-order How To Begin. Neil Pasricha - ‘Two Minute Morning' Julia Funt - ‘A minute to think' Visit amanthaimber.com/podcast for full show notes from all episodes. Get in touch at amantha@inventium.com.au If you are looking for more tips to improve the way you work, I write a short monthly newsletter that contains three cool things that I have discovered that help me work better, which range from interesting research findings through to gadgets I am loving. You can sign up for that at http://howiwork.co   CREDITS Produced by Inventium Host: Amantha Imber Production Support from Deadset Studios Episode Producers: Jenna Koda and Liam Riordan Sound Engineer: Martin Imber

Love Your Story
Episode 207 It's All About the Love: Interview Sterling Jaquith

Love Your Story

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 41:22


Episode 207 It's All About the Love:Interview Sterling Jaquith Brene Brown said, “If we want to fully experience love and belonging, we must believe that we are worthy of love and belonging.” We are going to build on this idea. Step 1 is to believe we are worthy of love and belonging. Step 2 is to develop self-love I am currently reading a book called, Health Revelations from Heaven and Earth, by Tommy Rosa and Stephen Sinatra, MD, where Tommy shares his near-death experience and the things he was taught in while in “heaven” and one of the most important points he learned was about self-love. He said -  “To be self-loving is the foundation of divine love. Divine love flows eternally and unconditionally between God and all living beings and never waivers. But for you to truly perceive and feel divine love, there must be a foundation of self-love in your life. With this foundation you can also love others unconditionlly, as God loves you. You will be able to love without fear and without wanting. Self-love also activates the Divine Spark within you. You will become love, and you will find your life filled with miracles and possibilities. So, love yourself first - without ego - and you will be complete within.”  I've put this podcast together today because a couple things fell in line. 1. I want to feel that love because I think it's hard to love our neighbor as God does when we don't understand what that kind of love feels like. 2. because I am reading that book. And, 3. Because the other day I was listening to Brooke Castillo and The Life Coach School podcast and she was doing an interview with Sterling Jaquith, a Catholic Mom Life Coach that was talking the god-love, self-love talk.  I invited Sterling to the show, because I wanted to talk with her about these topics. You get to listen in. Tune into the audio program to hear our discussion on these topics: What do you think of this idea that we have to have self-love as our foundation before we can love others? What about the idea that we have to love ourselves before we can truly perceive and feel divine love?  How did you learn this concept? Have you felt God's love in a direct way? There are those people who have had the opportunity to feel an actual down pour of God's love upon them. For those who have felt that incredible, all-encompassing love, it's hard for them to put it into words, because there is simply no earthly comparison they can draw for us. They use terms like, non-judgmental, flowing, utter peace, unconditional…sometimes we get these reports from those who have had a near-death experience, or from someone who shares a deeply personal moment where God has enveloped them in his love and let them feel it first-hand.  What are steps we can take to increase our self love? “One way to engender self-love is through forgiveness. Learning to forgive others as well as yourself…” To contact Sterling Jaquith:Catholic Life Coach http://www.madeforgreatness.co/ (www.madeforgreatness.co) Lets just review the steps for accessing that great understanding of who we are and how much we are loved. #1 - as Brene Brown stated, we have to believe we are worthy of love and belonging. #2 Once we get that we are worthy of it, we much work to love and accept ourselves - this is what Love Your Story is all about - coming to love who you are and what you've been through, no matter how messy the path has been. #3 With these under our belt we begin to access divine love, which helps us to love ourselves even more, to love others better, to begin to feel God's divine love for us.  Your challenge for this week is to check in with yourself. Do you believe that you are worthy of love? Do you accept and love YOU? Ask a few searching questions - how does knowing your own worth help you love others better?  As we close out 2021 I want to remind you to pick up

The Long and The Short Of It
166. In Plain Sight

The Long and The Short Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 15:49


Pete has had a problem with his foot, and shares with Jen that the solution he found was more obvious than he had imagined, which leads them both to wonder, what else might be hiding in plain sight?Specifically, in this episode Jen and Pete talk about:How might we more quickly realize the solution to our problem?What is first principle thinking, and how might we implement it?Why is a gratitude practice and also asking for feedback so important?To hear all Episodes and read full transcripts visit The Long and The Short Of It website: https://thelongandtheshortpodcast.com/.You can subscribe to our Box o' Goodies here (https://thelongandtheshortpodcast.com/) and receive a weekly email full of book and podcast recommendations, quotes, videos and other interesting things Jen and Pete are noodling on. To get in touch, send an email to: hello@thelongandtheshortpodcast.comLearn more about Pete's work here (https://humanperiscope.com/) and Jen's work here (https://jenwaldman.com/).

Education Evolution
86. Breaking Down Barriers to Change Laws in Arizona with Emily Anne Gullickson

Education Evolution

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 54:59


Arizona is a national leader in education reform, having recently passed one of the most robust education reform bills in the nation. The goal? To showcase that seat time does not equate quality learning. Instead, thanks to HB 2862, the state recognizes that instructional time can look vastly different depending on the students' needs. Imagine that! This and so much more was possible thanks to the work of Emily Anne Gullickson, CEO of A for Arizona, a nonprofit with a vision to build an education system that prepares every student to succeed in the global economy and contribute to local communities. In this episode, we talk about the inequities in education today, how schools are taking the learnings from the pandemic and creating new ways to teach and learn, barriers to education because of student access, and so much more. This is a refreshing conversation about an organization that's making a big difference in lives and laws. It's a must-listen for anyone who wants to create viable solutions to the challenge that is education today.   About Emily Anne Gullickson: Emily Anne brings to A for Arizona a unique background of executive, advocacy, legal, and teaching experience as a Teach For America – Phoenix alumna. She is the founder and CEO of A For Arizona and also leads sister organization Great Leaders Strong Schools. Emily Anne was recognized by the Arizona Capitol Times and state Capitol community as Leader of the Year in Education and Best Activist in the State of Arizona, and was recently recognized in Arizona as Best Political Rising Star, Women Achievers of Arizona – Nonprofit Leader, and Breakdown Breakout for being one of the sharpest political minds in Arizona under 40. Nationally, Emily Anne serves on the PIE Network Leadership Council and was recently recognized amongst her peers as a finalist for Breakout Advocate of the Year and Gamechanger Policy of the Year.   Jump in the Conversation: [4:03] Introducing Emily Anne [5:08] Where school transformation began for Emily Anne [6:12] Policy with good intentions - the impact on schools [7:35] What would happen if we built policy around high performing, innovative schools in high poverty communities [9:51] Expanding access for next-generation leaders [10:27] Engaging businesses to improve access [12:17] Bringing geometry to life [13:25] HB 2862 - seat time flexibility and innovation [17:09] Innovation zones [18:53] Some schools are running with change [20:56] Barriers to dismantle [25:23] Benefits of micro-schools: the relationship aspect [26:56] It doesn't have to be either-or [28:09] Barriers of transportation to student access - beyond the bus driver shortage [33:53] how others can begin to engage the government and change laws [36:46] What's your biggest hurdle to serve families and how can you get past it [40:30] Turbo Time [45:05] What you need to know about educational policy making [46:36] Emily Anne's Magic Wand [49:53] Maureen's Takeaways   Links & Resources A for Arizona Carnegie units VELA Education Fund A Fine Line: How Most American Kids are Kept Out of the Best Public Schools by Tim DeRoch  TED talk: Brene Brown's The Power of Vulnerability Email Maureen Maureen's TEDx: Changing My Mind to Change Our Schools The Education Evolution Facebook: Follow Education Evolution Twitter: Follow Education Evolution LinkedIn: Follow Education Evolution EdActive Collective Maureen's book: Creating Micro-Schools for Colorful Mismatched Kids Micro-school feature on Good Morning America The Micro-School Coalition Facebook: The Micro-School Coalition LEADPrep

TAGYST
#124: Letting Go Of Perfectionism

TAGYST

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 55:25


Perfectionism is self-destructive simply because there is no such thing as perfect. Yet, striving to obtaining a level of perfectionism is enticing if not addictive because when we invariably do experience shame, judgment, and blame and we often believe it's because we weren't perfect enough, so we try harder and harder... In this week's episode, we share: What perfectionism is and how it shows up The myths around perfectionism Understanding the difference between healthy striving and perfectionism 3 steps to start overcoming perfectionism Notable mentions from the show: Brene Brown's The Gifts of Imperfection Generation Wealth on Netflix Tucker Budzyn The Golden Retriever Danae Mercer Dr. Kristin Neff Self Compassion Assessment

Let's RUN Podcast with Pahla B Fitness
Ep. 212: Pahla B's BOOK CLUB reads The Menopause Manifesto

Let's RUN Podcast with Pahla B Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 43:50


I'm so excited to bring you today's episode of the Fitness Matters podcast, with our very first BOOK CLUB

Joy in the Weeds
A life lived for God with Beatrice Ngugi

Joy in the Weeds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 65:00


Kim and Beth sit down with an incredible woman who is an inspiration to so many.  We know you are going to be inspired by hearing how God has been leading in her life and how she has been listening and serving Him.  BEATRICE NGUGI:  Inspired by her deep walk with God, Beatrice utilizes her experience to ensure students can pursue their calling to serve as student missionaries. She is finishing up her masters in Social Work at Southern Adventist University and has a passion for serving wherever God calls. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram.Send us an email: joy@carolinasda.org Recorded in Collegedale, TN. 

BizWell Podcast
What is your gratitude practice?

BizWell Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 10:12


  What is your gratitude practice?   Recently listened to the awesome, amazing, Brene Brown and learned some new ways to practice gratitude. In this episode, I am sharing some of her ideas and my thoughts on gratitude.     www.MBBizwell.com Bizwellpodcast@outlook.com

VO BOSS Podcast
Modern Gratitude

VO BOSS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 26:56


You may be busy carving the turkey and making holiday shopping lists, but have you really spent time considering what makes you grateful? In this episode, Anne & Laya reflect on gratitude during the holiday season, covering how to tastefully thank clients during the holidays + how the concept of gratitude can help you reframe negative experiences, elevate your business, and improve your relationships like a #VOBOSS!. Transcript >> It's time to take your business to the next level, the BOSS level! These are the premiere Business Owner Strategies and Successes being utilized by the industry's top talent today. Rock your business like a BOSS, a VO BOSS! Now let's welcome your host, Anne Ganguzza. Anne: Hey everyone. Welcome to the VO BOSS podcast. I'm your host, Anne Ganguzza, along with my very special guest cohost Laya Hoffman. Hey girl. How are you? Laya: Yay. And Hey, BOSSes. It is so good to be back chatting with you, of loving our conversations and just let's keep it flowing. We got so much to talk about. Anne: Well you know, my calendar has reminded me, for some people, there's a holiday here that is Thanksgiving. Laya: Oh yes. Anne: And I thought to myself, you know what? It may just be one day on the calendar, but for me every day needs to be Thanksgiving. And I thought it would be a great opportunity to start talking about attitude of gratitude and how that can help our modern mindset and our businesses on a day-to-day basis. Laya: And I'm so glad we are, because it seems like such a small thing, or maybe even, I don't know, cliche in a way -- Anne: Yeah. Laya: -- to like act from a place of gratitude, but it is really the core of my business. And I believe helps center myself and my whole family to keep us on track and keep us grounded every day. So I'm glad you -- we're talking about it today. Anne: Totally agreed. And so I think that I have some things that I do that, that help me express my gratitude and make sure that I'm thinking about that on a day-to-day basis. And I'm asking, what do you do to express your gratitude or to think gratitude? I know what I do when I wake up in the morning. I really try every day to think about what I'm grateful for. And I just take a moment, take a deep breath and give thanks. And usually I have my loving husband around, my family of cats, and I always, whenever I see them, I just smile and I'm very grateful. And that just helps me to just be grateful for everything that I am fortunate to have in my lifetime. What about you? Laya: Yeah. You know, that's great. It's really just about being present and looking around, even if that's the simplest act of gratitude you can incorporate in your day. For us, we've taken it to a family level and a way to try to cultivate more gratitude and appreciation from the core for our daughter. So at dinner every night, we say, what are your gratefuls? You know, we're not a religious family for all intents and purposes. I'm Jewish. My husband, we're, we're a little loose in the religious space, and that's okay because our spirituality is really gratitude based. And so we say at night, while we're just sitting around having conversation, we say, let's do our gratefuls tonight. And we go around the table, and we say what we're grateful for. Anne: I love that. Laya: And sometimes it's the small things -- Anne: Yup. Laya: -- like how beautiful the weather was today, or this breeze you felt, or it's the big stuff, you know, a big win or the opportunity to use our voice for good every day. Anne: Yeah, absolutely. Laya: That's something we often talk about. My husband has another cool tip. I love that you say your family is included in this too, whether it's your cats or your partner -- Anne: Yup. Laya: -- but my husband actually has an alarm on his phone that is a gratitude check-in every day. I think his is two times a day. And it's just -- Anne: I love that. Laya: -- something that a beep that goes off. Yeah, right? And sometimes when it's just him, I guess he just envisions it in his mind. But if we're around he's like, all right guys, gratitude check-in, and we just rattle off three quick things. It helps you get focused. Anne: Oh, I love that. Laya: Like really remember what's important, especially if you're having kind of an off day, right? Anne: Absolutely. And like you said, even just the simple things like this morning, right before, right before getting on ipDTL with you, bacon. I am grateful for bacon and my husband who cooks it for me. Laya: I'm grateful for that too. Anne: Something, something is as small as that, but I think -- Laya: Sure. Anne: -- you know, it really helps to translate it to the larger picture, and it helps to really translate it into your business as well. And I think sometimes, I've been doing this for so long, you know, you tend to forget sometimes that it is a privilege to be able to literally roll out of bed, and, you know, walk over to my studio, and -- Laya: Yes. Anne: -- do this job that I love on a day-to-day basis. And I know it sounds like you said, I don't want to sound cliche, but it's true. I think we just, you know, everybody -- Laya: It's a gift. Anne: -- that brings up the gratitude at this time of the year or every day, it is something that is so important to be grateful for. And I know that, you know, we've talked about social media and how sometimes that can turn like sour and -- with reading comments, and I don't know, arguments discussions. I think if we start to approach our businesses with gratitude and maybe just push that out, manifest that out to the universe. And that's even in our social media, because that represents our business. Laya: Absolutely. Anne: There's so many eyeballs looking at us, and it amazes me because I try to put myself in my potential client's position while I'm reading Facebook posts. And I'm like, wow, there's so many people that are like, they're miserable, you know? Or they're not happy, or they're, they're complaining about where are the jobs? They don't know how to get the jobs or whatever. They're posting out there into the universe. And I think, gosh, if I were a potential client, I don't know if I'd want to work with this person. Laya: Right. Anne: Yeah. I think it just really speaks to your brand if you are expressing gratitude. Laya: Yeah. And you've hit on so many things that I just want to chat about with you -- Anne: Yeah. Laya: -- because you've totally hit the nail on the head. Think about it. If your words are energy, your thoughts are energy. They turn into words. They come from the heart. It puts this energy out there in the world. And whether you believe in manifestation or the power of attraction or anything like that, say what you will, that puts out an energetic force field around you. And so if you're coming from a place of misery, you're going to attract more misery. Anne: Yup. Laya: If you're coming from an abundant mindset, you're going to attract more of that. Now, if you apply that social media, right -- Anne: Yeah. Laya: -- and all the eyeballs on you, and you're griping, you've just doubled, tripled, you've magnified the negativity instead of magnifying the positivity. Anne: Yeah. Laya: Which is why in almost every one of my posts, my hashtag has always been for years gratitude is the attitude, love what you do, because I really do. This is a gift we're given here, no matter where you are on the trajectory or in your career. It's a gift to be able to use your voice and get paid for it -- Anne: Yeah. Laya: -- and cultivate someone else's story. And there's no better way to show your appreciation than knowing it. Anne: And if it's genuine, right? Laya: Yeah. Anne: And I'm just going to say, there are those people who will actually kind of poke fun at the people who are hashtag gratitude, hashtag blessed, hashtag -- you know, that has become something that I have seen. And I think that that's honestly, I think that's a little bit sad. Laya: Yeah. Anne: Because if somebody is expressing and it's truly authentic -- I don't want to say it's truly authentic. Some people, maybe it's not authentic, but who am I to judge? Right? Laya: Right. Anne: But if I'm posting that, I'm grateful for something somebody's making fun of that or kind of just poking fun at that whole hashtag thing, I'm sad for them. Laya: I agree. Anne: You know? Laya: I am too, because sometimes you do have to fake it 'til you make it. Anne: Yeah. Laya: We don't all have perfect days. We are -- Anne: Isn't that the truth? Laya: -- spiraling in a world of just a new level of anxiety where we're all at right now, especially coming through this pandemic. We're still in it. So sometimes you do have to put it out there and fake it 'til you make it. And sometimes you do have to remind yourself or have other people say, hey, great job. And I prefer to surround myself, especially in social, but in my private circles as well with people that are lifting each other up. Anne: Absolutely. Oh my gosh. Laya: If your tribe isn't also operating from a place of appreciation and respect and support and lifting each other up, then there is something more wrong with their picture. Then there's something sour in their space, and maybe they can't appreciate someone else's success or their gratitude because they're not happy with what's going on for them. Anne: Absolutely. Laya: And I wish there was a different pull there. Ane: Yeah, no. And I try to, even if that is the case, there's always a reason. Right? I think I'm trying to be understanding and gracious for everyone, trying to think that, okay, there's a reason why they're posting this, and it doesn't necessarily have anything to do with me. And so I try not to be angry or toxic at that either the fact that they might post something that is, you know, against, let's say my particular post or making fun of my post or for any reason, I try to just know, we don't know what's going on with anybody from day to day, from time to time. And I'm sure there's many reasons for them to post what they post. And I guess my other question, Laya would be, so how do we extend this gratitude from a business perspective to our clients? I know that I do periodically the year, I'm always expressing gratitude to my clients, and it means a lot to them. I think picking up the phone, believe it or not, and actually contacting my clients. And just, if I'm on the job or asking a question, making sure that I'm always thanking them for their business and really trying to connect with them on a human level to express my gratitude, to be able to work with them. As a matter of fact, I just made a post the other day that, you know, one of my partners in crime, my audio engineer, I love, love, love working with him. And I'm so grateful to know him and to be able to work with him that I, you know, I sent him a, a nice little post, and here's to you, John, thanks so much. Laya: Sure. Anne: I'm grateful to work with you. And it's amazing how many people chimed in. Laya: And lift each other up. Anne: Yup. Laya: And that gives credit and appreciation on a public level. Yeah. And like you said, definitely on that personal level, that one-on-one connection, it just deepens the relationship. Right? Anne: Yeah. Laya: And so to answer your question about how to convey or transmit this positivity, this gratitude into business, I think we need to take a step back as talent. I think back in the day maybe when voice talent were like screen actors, and there was this ego involved, like you walked into a studio, and I don't know, I hear crazy stories about talent from engineers and producers and creatives today that have these horror stories -- Anne: Yeah. Laya: -- about personalities and negative egos in the studio and how this talent wasn't willing to do this. Like I'm all about setting your boundaries, don't get me wrong -- Anne: Yeah, yeah. Laya: -- but -- and not being taken advantage of. But if you're the talent that comes to the booth with great appreciation, thanking each person in the session. Thank you for inviting me in. I'm so honored to be working with you today, or that you've brought me back for a particular project. And thank you so much, you know, at the beginning and the end of those sessions, then they will know that you, you know, really mean it -- Anne: Yeah, yeah. Laya: -- and you're coming from that authentic place, and that you take pride in your work, and you don't take it for granted. And I think people are more willing to bring those type of people back in than those with the ego problem and who couldn't be bothered or don't want to cop to whatever, 'cause we're all human. Right? Anne: Oh, yes. Laya: And that levels the playing field, for sure. Anne: And for goodness' sake, if you didn't have a good session, don't come back and post about it. Laya: Oh gosh. Anne: Just, you know, I, I cannot believe the amount of posts that I see where it's like, oh, I had a horrible session. Or the director drove me crazy. Or the client, for whatever reason, the client wasn't happy. If you can just walk away from that, I think that that really behooves your business -- Laya: Yes. Anne: -- because I myself have looked upon those posts, and I'll be -- and in my head, I'll go, ooh, not sure that's a good thing to actually post. Laya: I wouldn't put that on a -- exactly. Anne: And I won't say anything. So I don't think that we can ever have a really true idea of how many eyeballs are actually on that post. And I think we forget that. We become, you know, those brave people behind the keyboard, and just because somebody didn't like or comment on it, don't think that there aren't a thousand other people who've looked at it -- Laya: Sure. Anne: -- and made a judgment call right then and there, whether or not they want to work with you again. Laya: Absolutely. Well, the other part of that too is I would encourage BOSSes to consider or reframe those negative experiences to be, hey, what did I learn from this? Anne: Right. Laya: You know, there's a takeaway here that I'm not seeing, or what's going on for me, that I can't see the lesson in this. Anne: Yeah. Laya: And if you can flip those negative situations on their head, that's also a modern mindset as it pertains to the positive takeaway that can be from this. It's something I teach my daughter. So why not put it into practice myself? You know? Not everything has to be so humdrum when it goes wrong. Because if you focus on that, you'll continue to spiral down -- Anne: Yeah. Laya: -- instead of spiral up and say, you know what? I blew something there. Or they really didn't, you know, they got me beat on this, or I didn't get paid fairly enough or man -- but what is the lesson there? And if you can pull that out, even just one little thing, then you win. Anne: Always a lesson, right? Laya: Yeah. Anne: Always a lesson, even from something that didn't go well. And I don't want to just contain this to just jobs that you've done. I would like to also extend this for any auditions that you do. You know, just -- Laya: Oh yeah. Anne: -- just no talk, just to, there should just be no talk about any auditions because that's even more, I think, on the edge of potentially discouraging people from wanting to work with you. If you're going to complain about an audition or complain about the audition specs, even if you're on a pay-to-play and you're not getting auditions, I honestly, I just, I stay away from any of that type of chatter on social media, even in the groups that you think are closed and personal, and you know -- Laya: You never know. Anne: You never know who's in that group and who's looking, or it could be somebody that, you know, in the group that then ultimately private messages their friend, who happens to be a casting director -- Laya: Sure. Anne: -- or their friend who happens to be a potential client. And it happens all the time. How many times, right, do we read something and then maybe post something in Messenger to our friend or text somebody and say, oh my gosh, did you see that post? Or did you hear what he said? And honestly, that's just what happens. And I think that's what I think keeps me in social media control. But the other thing too, it also keeps me cognizant of being grateful and looking at, oh, look at this. I don't know. I don't think, I don't agree with that. I think that that's, that's spreading toxicity for me. It just gives me a good old reminder that let's just be grateful for everything. And I'll tell you, I mean, gosh, I'm the last person to say I have perfect days all the time. It may seem like it, you know? I don't necessarily want to present negative things, but I'll present things that I think have a value to people, that aren't, you know, necessarily being toxic. If I don't have a good day and I share it and I think it will help people, yeah. I'll share that, but I'm not necessarily going to complain about an audition or a job or a potential client to really kind of put a stain on my brand. Laya: And you hit the nail on the head is where my train of thought was going, Anne. It is the integrity of your brand. You are your brand. Anne: Yup. Laya: So the integrity of your brand is being put out there. And would you like the integrity of your brand to be compromised by your complaint or your attitude or negativity or your lack of gratitude for these opportunities that we're given on a daily basis when so many are not? I mean, that to me is one of the most profound things about gratitude is what you can do with, with the positivity and with a different frame of mind, as we've been talking about during this entire thing. To have the opportunity to just talk for a living in the privacy of our homes, when so many are really struggling out there, especially coming out of a pandemic. I don't know about you, my business had a boost during the pandemic because of these capabilities. How cool is that? How grateful are we? Right? And so I encourage everyone to keep that positive spin upwards, and also keep your projection outwards positive so you can attract more positivity. Anne: Absolutely. And again, I'm going to go back to when you are talking to your clients that you have currently. You know, there's nothing wrong with just sending them a note or picking up the phone, or I think that that probably almost means more than let's say a gift. 'Cause usually around the holidays, we all talk about what do you send your clients? Do you give a gift? How do you express your appreciation? Sometimes it's just really picking up the phone or taking the time to write a personalized note saying, you know what? I love working with you and why, and it doesn't have to be flowery professional language. It can be like, you know what? Your brand is so cool or I love your product. It means the world for me to be able to work with your company. And I love how easy you make it for me, and all those things that really compliment the person that hires you, the person that writes that check. And it can be, I think if you delve a little bit deeper than, you know, a surface thank you for your business, right, that's going to really mean a lot to the person 'cause we're connecting on a human level. And I think if we can push ourselves to go to the human level and just say maybe that one thing that just says, you know what, I love your product. And thank you for giving me the opportunity. You make it so easy for me to love your brand or whatever it is that compliments the person that's hired you or the person that you're communicating with. Laya: Yes. In fact, I have two ideas that are coming to mind right now. And so one, I want to answer the thought of how do you gift or do you gift or show your thanks around the holidays? I personally don't send gifts, hard goods. Right now, we're in a pandemic. Things have been weird. It's a big cost. And like you said, so many other big companies are doing those types of things. What I like to do is send, you know those e-cards? Anne: Yup. Laya: You can personalize an e-card and it just pops up in their box. It's a little bit different. You can personalize those as you go, and it doesn't cost you anything or maybe a couple of bucks if you want to make it frilly. That's one thing that I've done, and I've found some great feedback from and just deepening the relationship and the connection with our clients. Anne: Yeah. Laya: The other thing is, you really want to show gratitude? One of the best things I've found to do is to go on LinkedIn and leave them a recommendation -- Anne: Oh my gosh, yes. Laya: -- on their page. If you do that -- they're of course going to see it, but their colleagues are going to see it. And not only that, they're going to see your name as a voice talent and -- Anne: Absolutely. Laya: -- appreciative you are of working with that creative. In fact, I just did this the other day, and it even got me another job. So let me tell you how we did this, real quick. I worked with an excellent director in a session. I couldn't get his last name. It was just not appropriate for me to really dive deep. There was about 18 people on the call, but this guy was so on the ball and so efficient. He was honestly such a pleasure to run this session because of this, the way he was directing. Couldn't find him, but I knew his company, and I reached out to the principals of his company, and I said, hey, I just want to let you know, I just worked with John from your production team. And he was the honest to God the best director I've ever worked with. You're doing a great job over there cultivating killer creative talent. Thank you for making my job as a voice talent easier -- Anne: Yup. Laya: -- and just left it as that. Can you pass this along to John -- Anne: Absolutely. Laya: -- if you get that message, to go to his boss and give him that compliment? Oh my gosh. Yeah, it was a win-win win-win spreading that gratitude. Anne: Absolutely. Absolutely. That's a wonderful idea. I love the LinkedIn idea because it makes it public. And the other day I had one of my interviewees for the podcast for the AI and voice series, they were promoting the podcast and really gave me such kudos and said, thank you so much for the interview. It was wonderful to connect with a former educator -- because this gentleman was also an educator. And just, we were both like elevating each other. Laya: Yes. Anne: And I think it was so nice because I'm like, wow, thank you for what you do for the community and what you're doing for educating people in this industry and -- and all the wonderful work you've done. And I think that that just really generates such great positivity. And, you know, I guarantee you that there will be more leads that will come from that. Laya: Yes. Yeah. And then one other thing I was thinking of while we were talking is how do we convey that even in our social media posts, one thing that kind of gets my goat is when I see creative houses or casting put out the final video and we cast this. Well, who did you cast? Right? We're always looking to get a little bit of credibility for the creative that we put out. And when production teams leave out the voice actor, you know how that feels. Anne: Yup. Laya: And so knowing that from my standpoint, as a business, as a brand, as a human, as anytime I put the information or final product out there with permission, of course, I always make sure to thank all parties -- Anne: Yup. Laya: -- and tag them appropriately and give them credit publicly for the work they did, because we don't always see the same in return, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't do the same for them. Anne: Exactly. Absolutely. Laya: Follow them, engage, like, tag them, use their hashtags in your posts. One, it will increase your visibility. It will further your projection of positivity and show them, whoever they may be listening or watching from their side, hey, that you took the time to follow the right person, tag the right business, and give them credit. Anne: Absolutely. It's all about recognition, right? Laya: Yeah. Anne: And credit -- Laya: Credit is due. Anne: -- because we know it's always appreciated, always appreciated. Laya: Yeah. Anne: So in terms of gratitude, in terms of a daily, I don't know, a daily mantra, do you have anything that you do that we can share with the BOSSes so that they can maybe start to adopt this, if they haven't already done so already? Any, any tips, tricks? I'll start with mine. Laya: Please. Anne: I like writing it down. Writing it down makes a big difference for me to really understand and really feel the appreciation and the gratitude for things that I'm grateful for. And I'll just jot it down in my, and I have a little like journal on a day-to-day basis, and I just keep them as a list. And so if I'm ever feeling, oh gosh, if I'm ever feeling down or just, oh my gosh, what am I even doing the today? I like to go back and look at that list because it really is a great reminder. And it brings me joy -- Laya: Yes. Anne: -- to be able to see all those things I'm grateful for and accomplishments that have happened in my business because of that. Laya: Yes, exactly right. Milestones achieved, et cetera. I do another version of that that really just came to me out of sure -- I couldn't contain my pride in myself after a recent job I completed. And so I flipped the camera on myself, and I recorded a note to me that said, this was such an incredible opportunity. Laya, this is what it took to get here. This is what this feels like right now. I am so grateful for that. I saved the video. Maybe I'll post it if I feel cute when the project comes out. Who knows? But I have a folder on my phone, an album that has just snippets of video to myself to remind me when I'm having one of those days that doesn't feel so great to come back to source of like, wow, that really felt good. And see the passion in my eyes, my face -- Anne: Yeah. Laya: -- my body language and my voice -- Anne: Yup. Laya: -- when I knew it and I felt it the most. Anne: Absolutely. Laya: That's a great tip. I love writing it down. I usually jot down three things in the morning as well in my journal when I'm doing my Kundalini yoga practice. And then, like I said, the nightly round table with the fam brings everybody together. We'll even do it when we've got guests or visitors coming over. Makes everybody feel a little awkward at first, but it resets the mood, enlightens the levity. And when you bring people into that space -- Anne: Oh gosh, yes. Laya: -- they're like, oh yeah. Gratitude is the attitude. Anne: When I've done that, I've never had anyone complain. Laya: No. Anne: As a matter of fact, just the opposite. It's been like, wow, what an amazing, thank you so much for that. And what an amazing dinner. And everybody walks away feeling good. And I, I like that too, because in my family growing up, my family was never one to talk or open up about their feelings. Laya: Sure. Anne: I would always be that person. You couldn't shut me up. Laya: You don't say. Anne: I mean, so obviously I became a voice talent. Yeah. Laya: Right. Anne: So, but you know, during Thanksgiving I would start to do that. I would say, all right, guys, we're going to go around the table and say what we're grateful for. And I remember the first time I did it, everybody was like, huh, kind of awkward. Laya: Yeah. Anne: But as we went along, it just started to pick up momentum -- Laya: Yes. Anne: -- and it was really a beautiful thing to see. And like I thought, oh my gosh, I didn't think I could really talk heart to heart with my father. Right? He was always like, you know, the quiet one that went to work, and you know, this is showing you how my family is a little bit old school. Right? My father went off to work and didn't say much. My mother was the one that kind of stayed home with the kids, made the food and the dinners. And so when we started, as we were getting older, and things were changing and evolving, when I started doing that, it was really wonderful to hear what my father had to say, what he was grateful for and what my brothers had to say, when traditionally, we didn't really talk on that level to one another. Laya: Yeah. Anne: So I love how it just opened up the space and allowed for a lot more love to flow. Laya: Yes. Anne: Just a lot more positive feelings and all good stuff. Laya: Yeah. How beautiful is that, right? Anne: Yeah. Laya: So no matter how our BOSSes are celebrating this year or what these belief systems that you are -- or you've cultivated, maybe sit down and say, hey, what's everybody's gratefuls? And if it makes everyone a little uncomfortable at first, start with three. Anne: Yeah. Laya: Get the conversation going and put yourself out there and feel vulnerable. Right? Brene Brown says our vulnerability is the key to unlocking success and happiness and positivity and love and -- Anne: Absolutely. Laya: -- therefore, abundance. So you know, that gratitude will build on an abundant mindset, which will build on your business. Anne: Yeah. Absolutely. Well said, Laya. It has been a wonderful, wonderful episode. I am so grateful. I am very grateful to have you as a special guest co-host for these sessions. And I am truly loving our conversations as well. So thank you for that. BOSSes -- Laya: Thank you, Anne. Grateful for you and all these opportunities and your listeners out there, way to level up. Thank you. Anne: Grateful for our BOSSes, I am also grateful for our sponsor ipDTL. You too can connect and network like a BOSS and express your gratitude through the awesome connectivity that is ipDTL. Find out more at ipdtl.com. You guys, have an amazing week, grateful for all of you. We'll see you next week. Laya: See you guys. Take care. Anne: Bye. >> Join us next week for another edition of VO BOSS with your host Anne Ganguzza. And take your business to the next level. Sign up for our mailing list at voboss.com and receive exclusive content, industry revolutionizing tips and strategies, and new ways to rock your business like a BOSS. Redistribution with permission. Coast to coast connectivity via ipDTL.

Decoding the Gurus
Decoding Academia: Chris on Religion & Ritual *Patreon Sample*

Decoding the Gurus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 54:09


It had to happen eventually. As Matt and Chris listen week in and week out to the world's greatest gurus pontificating on the mysteries of the universe, it's only natural that the siren call of Galaxy Brain takes and revolutionary theories would prove too great. And so seeking to take advantage of the parasocial bonds they have scrupulously cultivated (and signal their value to the University of Austin) they are launching a new Patreon bonus series on 'Decoding Academia'. The first two instalments covering Matt & Chris' work & main research interests will be freely available to all. But for the deeper arcane knowledge that only true free thinkers would dare behold, you will need to smash through our Patreon 'Strategic Economic Barrier' or SEB. In this episode, Chris discusses the cognitive and evolutionary relevance of religion (what is it?, why is it?, and what is it good for?), rituals (what are they? why do we do them? and why are there painful ones?!?), & Gods (why do we care about them? Do we need them for religion). So take a breather from the culture war and enjoy some light academic waffle! We will be back on Friday this week with a full guru episode on Brene Brown! Links https://aeon.co/essays/can-religion-be-based-on-ritual-practice-without-belief (Chris' article on 'Religion Without Belief' at Aeon) https://aeon.co/ideas/people-are-intensely-loyal-to-groups-which-haze-newcomers-why (Chris' article on Hazing Rituals at Aeon) https://psyarxiv.com/qyt95/ (Preprint version of Academic Article by Chris on 'Is Japan Religious') Support this podcast

The Long and The Short Of It
165. Pay Attention

The Long and The Short Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 17:17


Jen remembers her former mentor, Martin Charnin, and tells Pete about what she learned from Martin about the art of paying attention.Specifically, in this episode Jen and Pete talk about:What are strategies one can use to pay attention in a more full way?What is the difference between soft focus and sharp focus?How might a person leave room for serendipity?To hear all Episodes and read full transcripts visit The Long and The Short Of It website: https://thelongandtheshortpodcast.com/.You can subscribe to our Box o' Goodies here (https://thelongandtheshortpodcast.com/) and receive a weekly email full of book and podcast recommendations, quotes, videos and other interesting things Jen and Pete are noodling on. To get in touch, send an email to: hello@thelongandtheshortpodcast.comLearn more about Pete's work here (https://humanperiscope.com/) and Jen's work here (https://jenwaldman.com/).

TAGYST
#123: Shame Resilience 101

TAGYST

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 47:46


We think it's important to unpack shame because #1: It's an emotion we all feel. #2 We don't like to talk about it. According to most research, confronting your shame story and sharing your truth it is one of the best ways to release shame and all it holds you back from. The material for today's episode is sourced from Brene Brown's book, The Gifts of Imperfection. She herself is a shame researcher and all her references and sources within this book to back up her message. And listen up, because it's a powerful one. Just this year BRene released an updated 10-year Anniversary Edition of the book with updated topics and segments that reflect her deeper research into living a whole hearted life and not always hustling to prove your worthiness. Topics we discuss: · What shame is · How to start building your Shame Resilience – in other words, being able to move forward even in the amidst of shame. · The difference between shame and guilt · Why sharing your story and being authentic to who you are matters when it comes to healing and becoming shame resilient · A four-question tool to kick start your shame resilience Notables from this episode: The Gifts of Imperfection by Brene Brown Open Book by Jessica Simpson

The
3 Tips to Let Go of Holiday Food Guilt

The "Cake Doesn't Count" Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 12:34


It is hard to let go of holiday food guilt. For some reason, we think we have to be really "good" around food. But enter the holiday Trifecta of dessert overload and it can be challenging: Halloween + Thanksgiving + December holidays = lots of sweets. I went to visit my niece in Raleigh over Halloween and had a few too many Reese's pumpkins. Because I was a bit hungry and hadn't had enough dinner before we went trick-or-treating, I ended up eating more than I had "planned" in my mind. I started feeling guilty, caught myself and channeled the 3 tips I'm talking about in the podcast today. It's easy to get down on yourself when you've gone "off" whatever it is you think you should have eaten. But keep these 3 tips in mind to help you let go of holiday food guilt that comes up! There's also another way to look at approaching Thanksgiving, with the "Thanksgiving Challenge" post I wrote a few years ago here.  Also if you struggle to say to the food peddlers or the extra pie, check out the 4 Tips to Say No To Extra Food This Holiday blog post  here! And if you need some gratitude support? Brene Brown has some good thoughts on that :)

Crina and Kirsten Get to Work
Empathy: Cultivating Compassion at Work

Crina and Kirsten Get to Work

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 43:51


Cultivating an empathetic workplace is all the rage, but how do we do it? It begins with a commitment to ensure that empathy is baked into your workplace culture. Next, you and your coworkers need to be willing and able to recognize and respond to each other's emotions. Finally, when you truly act in order to relieve each other's suffering, you may have found the key to unlocking the benefits of empathy.   SHOW NOTES Today on Crina and Kirsten Get to Work our gals engage in an exciting exchange on empathy.  Let's get clear about what we are talking about.  We often use sympathy, empathy and compassion interchangeably and narrowing down on what each means helps us better understand the concepts.   Sympathy means we can understand what the other person is feeling. Empathy means that we feel what a person is feeling. Compassion is the willingness to feel what a person is feeling and to relieve the suffering of another.   Now that we know what we are talking about, why are we talking about empathy?  Because it turns out it is a really good thing and we all should want to give and receive more of it in the workplace.  We rarely “should” on our listeners, but this is a first for a reason.  Empathy is powerful.   Of course, Brene Brown has created a spectacular and hilarious video should be the first stop on a tour of empathy. Brené Brown on Empathy - Bing video It turns out that we are hardwired for empathy.  Children as young as two demonstrate an appreciation that others hold perspectives different than their own, as evidenced in a study at Lund University in 2018.  Lund University, And research at the University of Virginia found when people saw their friends experiencing threats, they experienced activity in the same part of their brain which was affected when they were personally threatened. See - literally - empathy is wired into our brains.   Empathy contributes to better mental health, better physical health and more ease with work-life balance for employees.  And it turns out that what is good for employees is good for employers - empathy increases innovation, engagement, inclusivity and performance, according to a .2021 study by Catalyst.   What about the gender gap in empathy?  Women self-report that they are more empathetic; however, it turns out the vast majority of studies on this issue report no significant gender difference in empathy ability.   How can we bring more empathy to work:   Give your full attention to people Consider other people's perspectives Actively support people  Start meetings, calls, emails and other communication with a personal check in Open your written communication with a signal of gratitude Ask specific questions (not “how's it going) and be curious about the answer/body language Speak directly with individuals Show active listening skills Follow up after life events (how was your time with your parents this weekend?) Create more informed policies and statements about social issues See The Power of Empathy in Times of Crisis and Beyond (Report)

Rock Your Purpose Podcast
Unraveling Perfectionism with Bre Brown of the Modern Manifestation Podcast [#156]

Rock Your Purpose Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 39:09


Here at the Rock Your Purpose Podcast we are committed to bringing you content that elevates your life and spiritual business while aligning you with your soul purpose. This episode is right in alignment with that vision: on this show, we're in conversation with Bre Brown of the Modern Manifestation Podcast. We dive into what's really behind perfectionism, and so much more. Bre Brown is a mindset and manifestation coach who empowers women to boldly pursue their career goals with confidence and clarity. Bre's life mission is to help women increase their net-worth by increasing their self-worth through various personal development topics on her podcast, Modern Manifestation. You can learn more about her on her website, and her podcast, Modern Manifestation. Follow Bre on Instagram @Modernmanifestation, and on Facebook. Mentioned on the show: The Gifts of Imperfection by Brene Brown The Perfectionism Project Podcast with Sam Laura Brown How To Be an Imperfectionist by Stephen Guise This episode is brought to you by  Luminary: The Mastermind. Our next cohort starts in January. The Luminary process walks spiritual leaders and entrepreneurs just like you through the steps to amplify your income, impact, & influence using energetic mastery techniques & proven soul-aligned strategies. Book your free discovery call with Emily at emilyperry.com/luminarycall, or learn more at emilyperry.com/luminary. Related Episodes: Episode 133: Limiting Beliefs and Your Abundance Story Episode 130: Stop Waiting and Start Leading Episode 33: How to Get Your Life Off Autopilot and Live a Purpose-Driven Life

Power Women In Insurance
Exploring Leadership Gems With Monica Adwani

Power Women In Insurance

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 79:01


In this episode of Power Women In Insurance, Teresa Kitchens sits down with Monica Adwani, to review Brene Brown's book: The Gifts of Imperfection. Teresa and Monica discuss how the ten Guideposts may benefit women and leaders. Episode Highlights: Monica talks about their new virtual professional company called Savvital. (3:42) Monica discusses the book's first paragraph. (7:41) Monica explains why we must remember that everyone has unique challenges. (17:17) Monica discusses what she learned from the book on how we can support each other and approach each other in ways that promote an authentic experience. (19:52) Teresa and Monica discuss that responding appropriately, listening, and acknowledging when somebody comes to you is important. (22:18) Monica explains how it is empowering to know that she can educate her children to hope because it is a conscious choice. (29:47) Monica talks about letting go of perfectionism (40:02) Teresa and Monica tackle the third guidepost from the book, which is cultivating a resilient spirit and letting go of numbing and powerlessness. (51:22) What does Monica do to cultivate joy? (1:00:22) Monica mentions how great it is to understand that happiness is momentary, but joy can be constant. (1:06:08) Monica believes that no matter what stage or scenario we are in, we constantly say, "just look on the bright side of things," and that joy is just practicing more of that. (1:10:43) Key Quotes:  “We all play different roles at different times of the day with different people. And when we are stepping into those roles, we need to learn how to quickly adapt to how we're going to react, and how we are going to provide them with the conscious choice of how this relationship is going to go." - Monica Adwani “I cultivate gratitude and joy when I cook for other people. When I just do anything that is selfless...I feel like I cultivate gratitude and joy, and I feel good. And I feel joyful when I am able to do those things that don't have any impact on me, but they have an impact on others.” - Monica Adwani “There are moments that you can feel happiness, but the joy in your heart is something that only you can achieve by having that space within yourself and knowing that you are loved, regardless, and that this is yours, right? This is your thing and no one can mess with it.” - Monica Adwani Resources Mentioned: Monica Adwani LinkedIn Savvital Brene Brown's book: The Gifts of Imperfection Contact Teresa Kitchens Sterling Insurance Group

Agency Intelligence
Power Women In Insurance: Exploring Leadership Gems With Monica Adwani

Agency Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 79:01


In this episode of Power Women In Insurance, Teresa Kitchens sits down with Monica Adwani, to review Brene Brown's book: The Gifts of Imperfection. Teresa and Monica discuss how the ten Guideposts may benefit women and leaders. Episode Highlights: Monica talks about their new virtual professional company called Savvital. (3:42) Monica discusses the book's first paragraph. (7:41) Monica explains why we must remember that everyone has unique challenges. (17:17) Monica discusses what she learned from the book on how we can support each other and approach each other in ways that promote an authentic experience. (19:52) Teresa and Monica discuss that responding appropriately, listening, and acknowledging when somebody comes to you is important. (22:18) Monica explains how it is empowering to know that she can educate her children to hope because it is a conscious choice. (29:47) Monica talks about letting go of perfectionism (40:02) Teresa and Monica tackle the third guidepost from the book, which is cultivating a resilient spirit and letting go of numbing and powerlessness. (51:22) What does Monica do to cultivate joy? (1:00:22) Monica mentions how great it is to understand that happiness is momentary, but joy can be constant. (1:06:08) Monica believes that no matter what stage or scenario we are in, we constantly say, "just look on the bright side of things," and that joy is just practicing more of that. (1:10:43) Key Quotes:  “We all play different roles at different times of the day with different people. And when we are stepping into those roles, we need to learn how to quickly adapt to how we're going to react, and how we are going to provide them with the conscious choice of how this relationship is going to go." - Monica Adwani “I cultivate gratitude and joy when I cook for other people. When I just do anything that is selfless...I feel like I cultivate gratitude and joy, and I feel good. And I feel joyful when I am able to do those things that don't have any impact on me, but they have an impact on others.” - Monica Adwani “There are moments that you can feel happiness, but the joy in your heart is something that only you can achieve by having that space within yourself and knowing that you are loved, regardless, and that this is yours, right? This is your thing and no one can mess with it.” - Monica Adwani Resources Mentioned: Monica Adwani LinkedIn Savvital Brene Brown's book: The Gifts of Imperfection Contact Teresa Kitchens Sterling Insurance Group

No One's Okay
Oversharing is Caring with Sean Jenkins

No One's Okay

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 48:24


Thanks for listening! This week, actor and entrepreneur Sean Jenkins (American Horror Story, Brooklyn Nine-Nine) joins me to talk about his career journey. He shares how he got started in acting as well as how he became the co-founder of his long-lasting refillable natural deodorant company. We definitely overshare and talk everything from fear of failure, to meditation, to peeing on road-trips, to our favorite onscreen kicks in cinema history. As always we concluded with the eternal question, “Are You Okay?” But, spoiler alert… we weren't. xo, Pamela LISTEN/SUBSCRIBE TO THIS PODCAST Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/no-ones-okay/id1495487224 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/71zwoGcKEgZ8FvMVcwPawh?si=85kZIupGTICYMvarnmw0ag Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/show/no-ones-okay NO ONE'S OKAY SCHEDULE New Episodes every Tuesday BASED ON SCHEDULE New Episodes every other Monday CONNECT WITH US Website- http://www.noonesokay.com SOCIAL MEDIA Instagram- https://www.instagram.com/noonesokay @PamelaPortnoy SEAN JENKINS https://www.instagram.com/seanjenkski/?hl=en https://www.getbarela.com/ #NoOnesOkayPodcast #SeanJenkins #ActorEntrepreneur

SPA Girls Podcast
SPA Girls Podcast – EP318 – Lessons For Writers from Brene Brown

SPA Girls Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 46:37


How can we, as authors and self-publishers, deal with the internal (and external!) voices of criticism, meet our expectations and forge ahead with our publishing plans when we don't feel at all confident we're on the right path? How do you know when it's time to move on from your book or books you loved writing, but no one else seems interested in buying?

Badass Confidence Coach
063.What Is Your Attachment Style?

Badass Confidence Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 59:35


My guest today is therapist, Jeremy Fox. Jeremy is a Licensed Professional Counselor and an EMDR Consultant specializing in Trauma Recovery as well as the treatment of Anxiety and Depression.  Jeremy gives us a masterclass in understanding Attachment Theory and the different Attachment Styles.  This is good stuff.  Learn about your own attachment style and how it shows up in your life.  Where you can find Jeremy on social media: Instagram @foxcounselor Twitter @FoxtherapyLLC Clubhouse@foxtherapy  Resources mentioned:  Books: Attached: The New Science of Adult Attachment and How It Can Help You Find-and Keep-Love by Amir Levine, MD & Rachel S.F. Heller, M.A. The Body Keeps The Score: Brain , Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma by Bessel van Der Kolk, MD. Getting Past Your Past: Take Control Of Your Life with Self-Help Techniques From EMDR by Francine Shapiro Stop Walking On Eggshells: Taking Back Your Life When Someone You Care About Borderline Personality Disorder by Paul T. Mason and Randi Kreger Books by LCSW and Author, Brene Brown. For information about EMDR: contact www.emdria.org           

The Long and The Short Of It
164. Share the Stoke

The Long and The Short Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 15:39


Pete brings Jen a new phrase this week, and they noodle together on the concept of what it means to share the stoke.Specifically, in this episode Jen and Pete talk about:Why might it be important to share the things you are excited by with someone else?How might we share excitement with other people, about what they are doing?Is happiness only real when shared?To hear all Episodes and read full transcripts visit The Long and The Short Of It website: https://thelongandtheshortpodcast.com/.You can subscribe to our Box o' Goodies here (https://thelongandtheshortpodcast.com/) and receive a weekly email full of book and podcast recommendations, quotes, videos and other interesting things Jen and Pete are noodling on. To get in touch, send an email to: hello@thelongandtheshortpodcast.comLearn more about Pete's work here (https://humanperiscope.com/) and Jen's work here (https://jenwaldman.com/).

“What It’s Really Like to be an Entrepreneur”
Season 11 Finale with Dr. Diane Hamilton

“What It’s Really Like to be an Entrepreneur”

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 23:46


Sharing a stage with Martha Stewart and Daymond John, Tonerra, Nationally Syndicated Radio Host, Author, and more...this guest does it all.In this episode, you will learn how to carefully select which products or services to add to your wheelhouse, about the Curiosity Index, additional tools for growing your brand, and so much more!Episode #161 - "What It's Really Like to Be an Entrepreneur" has been rebranded  to "That Entrepreneur Show" https://www.VincentALanci.com/.Each week, the founder of a company or brand shares what worked for them, what they needed to improve on, and all of their learning lessons along the way.Dr. Diane Hamilton is the Founder and CEO of Tonerra, which is a consulting and media-based business. She is a nationally syndicated radio host, keynote speaker, and the former MBA Program Chair at the Forbes School of Business. She has authored multiple books which are required in universities around the world, including Cracking the Curiosity Code: The Key to Unlocking Human Potential, and The Power of Perception: Eliminating Boundaries to Create Successful Global Leaders. Hamilton is the creator of the Curiosity Code Index® assessment, which is the first and only assessment that determines the factors that inhibit curiosity and the Perception Power Index, which determines the factors that impact the perception process. Her groundbreaking work helps organizations improve innovation, engagement, and productivity. Thinkers50 Radar chose her as one of the top minds in management and leadership. She is a highly sought-after keynote speaker who has shared the stage with top speakers including Marshall Goldsmith, Sal Khan, Brene Brown, Martha Stewart, and Daymond John. Hamilton has been featured on Forbes, INC, Investors Business Daily, Harvard Business Review, Global Leaders Today, First for Women, Investopedia, SHRM, International Institute for Learning, International Coach Federation, HR Virtual Summit, Flerish YOU app (in association with Reid Hoffman), Cross Knowledge (Wiley), Training Industry, ABC, NBC, CBS, and Fox.Diane has a history of award-winning performance; the creator of multiple behavioral assessments and a Forbes brand publishing course and decades of top-performance within billion-dollar organizations.Website: drdianehamilton.comLinkedIn:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/drdianehamilton/Host Name: Vincent A. LanciEmail: PodcastsByLanci@Gmail.comYouTube: youtube.com/channel/UCy0dil34Q5ILEuHgLVmfhXQInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/thatentrepreneurshowFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/ThatEntrepreneurShowTwitter: twitter.com/PodcastsByLanciLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/thatentrepreneurshowDigital Editing Inquiries: Email PodcastsByLanci@Gmail.comUplifting Energy by Mixaund | https://www.free-stock-music.com/mixaund-uplifting-energy.htmlAdventure by MusicbyAden | https://soundcloud.com/musicbyadenCreative Commons Attribution-ShareSpotlight Story & Quote Source: Crunchbase.com

Joy in the Weeds
A Conversation with Dr. Michael Hasel and wife Giselle

Joy in the Weeds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 75:22


This is a powerful conversation about Archeology, family, and God's calling on their lives. Both Michael and Giselle are remarkable human beings, who have lived a life following God.  This conversation speaks about the privilege of serving God and the richness of a life lived for Him. Michael G. Hasel, PhD, has taught Near Eastern studies and archaeology at Southern since 1998. He is married to Giselle Sarli Hasel, a professor of art history in the School of Visual Art and Design at Southern. Dr. Hasel is curator of the award-winning, Lynn H. Wood Archaeological Museum at Southern Adventist University and Giselle served as the design director and art coordinator for the museum which opened in 2004.  Together they have two children, Daniella and Sarah, who enjoy traveling with their parents whenever possible.Follow us on Facebook and Instagram.Send us an email: joy@carolinasda.org Recorded in Collegedale, TN. 

Catalyst Podcast
EPISODE 627 - Ken Coleman // The Clear Path to Doing Work You Love

Catalyst Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 68:24


In this episode of the Catalyst Podcast, Brad Lomenick sits down with former Catalyst podcast host & America's leadership coach, Ken Coleman for a conversation about how to find a clear path to doing the work you love, a holistic view of vocation, and what we all can learn from the great resignation. Listen in as Ken draws on what he learned from his own ten-year journey as well as from coaching thousands of others to walk you through the seven stages to discovering and doing meaningful work. Get involved in an Operation Christmas Child campaign! Collection week is November 15-22, 2021! Keep up with Ken:  Instagram: @kencoleman Facebook: Ken Coleman Twitter: @KenColeman Get Clear Career Assessment: https://www.ramseysolutions.com/store/digital-products/get-clear-career-assessment Mentioned in this episode: The Evangelical Church is Breaking Apart: https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2021/10/evangelical-trump-christians-politics/620469 How to Reach the West Again podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/part-1-a-missionary-encounter/id1504466939?i=1000469458195 Brene Brown and Charles Duhigg: https://brenebrown.com/podcast/brene-with-charles-duhigg-on-habits-and-productivity/ How to Improve Your Sales Skills, Even if Your Not...: https://hbr.org/2017/05/how-to-improve-your-sales-skills-even-if-youre-not-a-salesperson

ALL FIRED UP
Body Liberation Through Photos With Lindley Ashline

ALL FIRED UP

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 53:48


My guest this week is the fierce and fabulous Lindley Ashline, fat-positive photographer and body liberation activist, who has literally BANNED the weight loss industry from using her stock photos. In this glorious episode, Lindley tells how she pushed back when a diet company tried to do just that! The AUDACITY of diet companies and the weight loss industry is next level, but they were no match for Lindley! Join us for a completely fired up, inspiring conversation with a woman who takes no bullshit, AND takes staggeringly awesome photos! Show Transcript Intro: Welcome to All Fired Up. I'm Louise your host, and this is the podcast where we talk all things anti-diet. Have diet culture got you in a bit of rage/ is the injustice of the beauty ideal? Getting your nickers in a twist? Does fitspo make you want to spitspo? Are you ready to hurl if you hear one more weight loss tip? Are you ready to be mad, loud and proud? Well, you've come to the right place. Let's get all fired up. Hello, passionately pissed off people of diet culture. I am so excited for some episode of All Fired Up. And thank you to all of the listeners who send messages of outrage to me via email louise@untrapped.com.au. If something about diet culture is really getting your go, let me know about it, get it off your chest. And who knows, we might be able to rant about it here on All Fired Up. And if you are a listener, don't forget to subscribe, so you don't miss episodes when they pop out. And while you're at it, why not leave us a lovely five star review and rating wherever you listen to your podcast, because the more five star reviews we get, the more people listen, the quicker diet culture topples, and then I can go and become a florist. As the COVID crisis unravels, more and more people are banging on about the relationship between weight and health. And if that's really getting up your nose and you want a strong resource to help you push back against that, and you want something for free; look no further then now wonderful ebook, ‘Everything you've Been Told About Weight Loss is Bull Shit' co-written by me and the wonderful Dr. Fiona Willer, anti-diet dietician, and general all-round awesome person. In this ebook, we are busting wide open the diet culture bullshit myths about this relationship. Because when you look under the hood and scratch the surface just a tiny, tiny bit, we see that all of this BMI stuff is complete bullshit, and it's great to have a booklet in which all of the scientific evidence to support the health at every size and anti-diet approaches can be presented to people who are still upholding the greatest injustice when it comes to health. So have a look for the ebook, it's at untrapped.com.au, and a little popup will happen, and you can download it from there. Give it to all your friends and all your family. Put it in their stockings for people for Christmas, give it away, trick or treating for Halloween. Hell you know, give it away instead of Easter eggs, just get it out there to as many people as possible because just so over this groaning insistence that size is all accounts when it comes to health. If you're looking for more free stuff and you're struggling with your relationship with your body, because let's face it – who doesn't in diet culture. Have a look at the Befriending Your Body eCourse, which is completely free. You can find that on untrapped_au on Insta. In this course, basically you'll get like an email from me for 10 days. Every day for 10 days, you get a lovely little email from me talking through the wonderful skill of self-compassion, which is essentially literally learning how to become your body's best friend and become your own best friend as you wade through the of diet culture. So have a look for that course, as I said, it's on Instagram, it's completely free. What have you got to lose? Huge shout out to all of the Untrapped community. Untrapped is my online community and masterclass for all things anti-diet. Untrapped has been around since 2017. And we have built ourselves into this wonderful online group of fierce and fantastic people. If you are struggling with your relationship with food, with how you are moving, with your body, with just generally trying to get along in diet culture with all of the pressure that's heaped upon us every day and you're just absolutely sick of dieting; have a look at our Untrapped course and community because we would really love to have more people join us. You can find it at untrapped.com.au. Louise: Okay, let's get into the nitty-gritty. Shall we? I'm so excited in this episode, I'm having this awesome conversation with fat activist, photographer, author, and cat mom, Lindley Ashline. Lindley is the creator of Body Liberation Photos and does some really amazing ethically produced diverse stock photos of people in larger bodies. And, oh my gosh, how much do we actually need this kind of stuff. So I had the most amazing ranty conversation with Lindley. You are going to absolutely love her. So without further ado, here's me and Lindley. Lindley, thank you so much for coming on the show. Lindley: Oh, thanks for having me. I'm so excited to be here. Louise: Me too. So tell me, what's firing you up at the moment? Lindley: Well, when we were emailing back and forth talking about doing this podcast episode you had said, I want to hear what's firing you up, and I would love to hear you talk about stock photos, which are photos that can be used for marketing that people buy from other people. And also, wondering if you've experienced any diet culture co-opting of your work. And I immediately said, I have all that put together because I do have the stock photo website where I sell my photos. And most of my clients, my stock photo customers are health at every size oriented, or anti-diet, or body positivity folks who are marketing their small businesses. But the other day there is a diet that is probably familiar to you, that is very big here in the United States, that is called Whole30. Louise: Whole30, is that the Brene Brown one? Was she doing that? Lindley: Oh, I don't know. Louise: I'm sorry. Lindley: That's very, very trendy here. So, someone from Whole30, the company that runs that diet bought some of my stock photos. Louise: Oh no. Lindley: To use for an event. And I know this because I reacted to that. I'm a small business, so I do sell a decent number of stock photos, but I'm not at the point where I don't see every order as it comes in. So every time someone buys something from me, I get an email, of course, and I'm always curious, who's buying things. So I saw this such-and-such a name @whole30.com. And I said, wait a minute. Because not only do I not want… my photos are, they're mostly people in larger bodies or fat bodies. When I use the word fat, I'm using it as a neutral descriptor of people's bodies and not an insult. You don't have to use that word for yourself, but I have reclaimed it and many other people have too. Louise: That's such a beautiful way of putting it. Thank you. Lindley: Oh, thank you. Yeah, it's like saying that I'm a medium height, or if I were tall or short, I have long hair. It's just a descriptor. But the people who appear in those photos, they are in vulnerable bodies themselves. They are often people of color. They are people in very large bodies; people who experience a lot of discrimination and stigma just by living in their bodies. And not only do I not want those bodies being used to represent diet… Louise: Yeah, like they're not before photos. Lindley: Yeah. No, but also when I started creating stock photos, I worked with a lawyer to create my license that you are bound by when you buy these photos, you have to agree that you're going to respect this license to use the photos, and in the license, it specifies that you cannot use them to promote diets. Louise: You are terrific. So they're buying it in breach of your licensing already. Lindley: Yeah. If I'm going to set out to create body-positive and fat-positive stock photos, and work with people who are in marginalized bodies to start with; I can't allow those photos to be used in ways that will hurt people. Louise: How dare they. They have the audacity. Lindley: I was very fired up speaking into the theme. Oh, I was fired up and I said, no, how you. I immediately messaged my best friend and said, how dare they. And so, I emailed her, I issued her a refund. So here's what I did; I issued her a refund for the money that she's paid. I deleted her account. I couldn't delete the account, so I changed her password on her. I couldn't delete it, but I could change the password. And then I emailed her and said I have refunded your money, you may not use these photos, my license prohibits you from doing so. And that's that. Louise: So, did she respond to you? Lindley: Well, to make it even better, she had put her work email address in when she placed the order. But for her billing address, she was using a corporate credit card. So she had put as the email for the credit card, she had put in the corporate address. So I emailed her, but I CC'd the whole company. Louise: Oh my God. That's fantastic. Lindley: CC'd headquarters@whole30.com. I'm sure that maybe just a random assistance, someone deleted it, but like, I'm sure it didn't go to all the employees, but that was very satisfying. Louise: That is very satisfying. So she did email? Lindley: Yeah, she emailed right back and sent me kind of an indignant email. And she did say that they wouldn't use the photos. I keep meaning to go check and see if they actually did. But she was very indignant because she said we were going to use these for an event to promote body positivity next month, and I guess we won't. And I'm like, yeah, I guess you won't. Louise: What are you doing in the field of so-called body positivity if you're a diet company? Lindley: And that's the co-opting, that aspect of it. Because now, like Weight Watchers has changed its name formally to WW. What does that even mean? Like, we all know it's Weight Watchers, we're not stupid Louise: Well, they think that we might be. Do you remember in the eighties when Kentucky Fried Chicken decided to improve its brand by going to KFC, because then it wouldn't be fried. Lindley: But it's still fried chicken. Louise: Yeah. And this is still like, we want your money. Lindley: Yeah. And they've realized that people are wising up. Louise: We know that their diets are shit. Lindley: Yeah. They don't work, and in fact, they're worse for you, for your health than not dieting than being at a stable weight. Louise: Yeah. And then they're like, well, we can't have that, so let's launch into the field that grew around resistance to us, and let's nick everything, including their stock imagery. And how dare they run a body positivity event when they're in the business of shrinking bodies. Lindley: And as we move forward in time, you're going to see more and more of this because there is a lot of profit in telling people to love their bodies while selling them products because you made them hate their bodies. And in the body positivity movement, it's really rampant. If you look at Dove, Dove is one of the first companies to really monetize at a grand scale the body positivity movement. In the last decade, they've done a bunch of very high profile feel good, “love your body no matter what,” you can't see me, but I'm making really sarcastic hand gestures right now. Louise: Yeah, I'm loving it. Lindley: I mean, you can see me, but our listeners will be able to. But all these love your body just the way you are things, but at the same time, they're selling skin lightning cream to people of color. Louise: How dare they? Lindley: And they're selling wrinkle cream or whatever. Louise: Anti-aging, right? Lindley: Yeah, so it's very two-faced. Louise: Yeah, they were just changing the marketing where baiting and switching people on a global scale. And I agree. I think we're going to see more and more and more of it, but it's also like kind of core at the same time, because the fact that these big nasty wolves are coming to sniff at your door means that you are the one with the power, right. Body positivity movements are the ones who are driving the direction of – like the increasing level of diversity that's happening around the planet. I think they're just getting a bit desperate. Lindley: I mean, these are dinosaurs – that meteorite is coming. And I want to say too, for our listeners, I want to acknowledge, because you don't hear this stated enough, how traumatic, like full-on psychologically traumatic it is for both us as a culture and for people as individuals to be told for hundreds of years that their bodies, particularly fat bodies, and particularly women's bodies, but all bodies are bad in their natural states. And then have a generation of companies turn around and tell us that it's our fault for not loving those bodies. That's trauma. That is trauma – culturally and individually. So I want to be very clear that if you don't love your body, which most people don't, I have days I do and days I don't, but if you don't love your body, that is not on you, that is on hundreds of years of culture driving up and product power, so it's not you. Louise: It's the system. Lindley: Yeah. And you're not individually possible for fixing that, unless you want to. Louise: I'm so glad you're here. You are on fire and I love it. Lindley: I get so angry at the scam that's been perpetuated. Louise: Yes, that's exactly what it is. It's a giant gaslighting scam that turns us against ourselves and each other. And when we kind of hit body size as a measure of worth, it's really damaging and divisive. I really want to ask how you got to this point. Lindley: I got mad. Louise: Yeah, how did you get mad? Like, how did you come to have this amazing idea to start the body liberation stock photography stuff, and come to it with so much conviction to protect people who have been marginalized? Lindley: Well, it's been a process of about – it took about 10 years to go from being very, very sort of normal person invested in diet culture, sort of very mainstream, to being very passionately anti-diet and doing this activism work. In 2007, thereabouts, I discovered I had been on the website live journal for a very long time. At that point, it was like a pre-Facebook. Louise: The dark days of early internet. Lindley: Yeah. And I had stumbled across this group called Fatshionista. So like fashionista, but with fat folk. And it was such a revelation because here were these mostly women who were in large bodies in very large bodies who were being styling and confident and walking around in horizontal stripes. Louise: Oh my God. Lindley: And tight fitting outfits and colorful outfits and just living their lives confidently. And I just lurk for a really long time. But from there I started discovering… so the pre-cursor, these of foundation of the body positive movement is the fat acceptance movement, which started in the 1960s and has been the backbone of all of this. So this was a little bit before body positivity became a thing. And I found these fat acceptance blogs, where they were talking about the science of weight loss and why scientifically it doesn't work. And I had been in this state that I think many people sort of existed where they're like, well, it's fine to say, love your body, but my body is big. My body is not okay. Like, that might be cool for other people, like maybe other people deserve to be confident. But something about… Louise: Gosh, that is like, when you said that, that is like where so many of us are stuck. Like it's okay for everyone else and I love the idea of diversity and I love the idea that large and small and everyone in between can exist, but my body. I can't get there. Lindley: Yeah. And so, when I learned the science and the fact that somewhere around 98% of diets fail and that people gain the weight back, I started to feel like I'd been scammed. I'd been raised my whole life to believe that if I could just be good enough and strong enough and have enough willpower and do the right things for long enough, then I too would be thin and healthy and fabulous and have the life I'd always dreamed of and all those other things you see in diet ads, and it turned out none of that was true. Louise: It's bullshit. Amazing. Lindley: I started to get annoyed and then gradually I got mad, and then I got really mad. Louise: Excellent. Lindley: And then I started doing my own activism work because it was so tragic to see people that I love trapped in that system and be lied to. And so, I started speaking out – just a little bit, just a little bit. Like, I'd post something on my Facebook about, “Hey, we know that diets don't work because of science.” Louise: Yeah. I mean, like in tiny little writing. Lindley: Yeah. And that's really scary when you start doing it because it's so counter to what we think we know. So in about 2015, I was in a really crappy job, after a series of really crappy jobs, corporate full-time jobs. And I said, you know what, I got to a breaking point. And I said, “I'm done. I want to take my photography and turn it into a full-time business.” Louise: So you'd learned photography for a while. Lindley: Yeah. Well, I've done nature photography for many, many years, but I had never photographed people. Louise: Interesting. Lindley: So I took a year and I took a bunch of classes online and then I learned to photograph people. So in 2015, I quit that job. And I want to acknowledge my privilege here. I am a white cisgender straight woman who lives in the United States, and my husband is my financial safety net, so I was able to take that. I also have a part-time job as well, but I was able to take that leap because of my privilege. And so, I've always… Louise: Because you have some security, yeah. Lindley: There's not a lot of path that is open to everyone, and so I always want to acknowledge that. Louise: Yeah, it is really important, but I also think it's kind of fabulous that there are people who are able to do that because what you've done is create something for so many people. Lindley: And if you had asked me a decade ago, if you had said maybe in 10 years, how you feel about being a full time, small business person, photographer and activist, and I would've laughed in your face. Because at this point I have enough experience speaking out that I often sound very confident and powerful. Louise: You do, you sound really fired up and it's fantastic. Lindley: Which is wonderful, but that is not where I came from. Louise: So you took it on. Lindley: Yeah, I came from a very meek sort of very nice lady, southern sweet background, where you never disagreed with anybody to their face. Not to their face… Louise: Disagree behind their back with a cup of tea. Lindley: Yeah. That's how we do it in the south, the Southern US, we smile at your face and then snip at you behind your back. But like, I wasn't brought up in a way where I was allowed to access anger or to even believe that I felt it. Louise: It's part of the, like, part of the gaslighting of diet culture is that it uses other gaslighting of being raised female, and like, just be nice and shut up and don't rock the boat. And if you're mad, it's probably a period, right – it's not worthy. Lindley: Yeah. And it's very threatening to a lot of people, too, particularly when someone in a fat body is angry, that's very threatening because we are expected to shut up and take it. And so, I do get a lot of trolling. I've had some threats, but thankfully I'm not yet high profile enough to really be getting a lot of that. But it there's been some unpleasantness. Louise: It's really terrible. What you were saying about the science stuff and speaking up about the science, its that's sort of, my pathway was through the science as well, initially as well as like the massive sense of social justice and eating disorder work as well. But I'm so aware, and when I talk about the science, so if we were in the same room talking about the science, it's possible that my voice would be listened to more, even though we're talking about exactly the same thing, because our body sizes are different, which is ridiculous because actually you've got more lived experience alongside the science, so it's kind of like what the… Lindley: Yeah, yeah. We consider it culturally, we consider a thin body or a thinner body to be a credential, just like a degree. I was actually talking about this on Instagram literally last night that we consider thin body is to be a credential. So even though I live in this body and I have experience with this body, in general, I am considered as much of an authority on this body as someone who is in a more socially acceptable body. Louise: Which is so weird, it's like being like, oh, I'm the expert on same sex relationships, but I'm completely head show. Why would that credential be? Lindley: Yeah. Again, when marginalized people are allowed to speak and allowed to be angry and allowed to be believed, it's very threatening to the status quo. So it's easier to, I mean, again, both at a cultural level and an individual level, it's easier to assume that I am lying or that I'm exaggerating or that I am unacceptably angry or unacceptably sad or whatever, so that it blunts the impact of what I'm saying. Louise: Yeah, it's easy to dismiss something you don't agree with. Lindley: Right. I had someone who is in an average size body for here to the US. A maybe US 14, 16, which I think in Aussie size is about a 12. Louise: I have no idea because sizes confuse me. Lindley: I think the Aussie sizes run one size lower, I think. But anyway, at any rate, someone who is of average size here in the US. And often I find, again, I am speaking for my US experience. I'm not speaking for the whole planet, but I often find that folks who are of the average size because of the nature of our culture, think that they are much larger or much farther along that spectrum. So I often find that there's people who are of average size assume that the way that they are treated is the same way that people much larger than they are, are treated – which is not accurate. Louise: But it's about that unconscious, like they don't know the privilege they have. Lindley: Yeah, because it's a spectrum. I live in a very large body, but I am nowhere in near the extreme end of the fatness spectrum. There are many, many people who are larger than I am. And then I have privilege over those people because I can still get clothes that are… I can't get them in person. I mostly have to buy online, but I can still get clothing that's commercially made. Even if it's not the clothing I would prefer, and even if it doesn't fit very well, I can still find clothing somehow. But this was a person who I think wasn't quite ready to understand that that is a spectrum. Louise: And that's real. Lindley: And I had written this, I was recently diagnosed with a new to me health condition that has been quite challenging and that I am pursuing treatment for. And the treatment for that condition, it is a stigmatized condition. I'm not going to go into details, but it is a stigmatized condition, and it is a condition that is correlated with larger bodies. We don't have any scientific evidence that it is caused by being in a larger body, but it is correlated. And so, as someone who now has condition, there's sort of a double stigma and there it's been very challenging to get treatment. Louise: So you're stuck in the whole stigmatizing, like, medical condition stuff where they're like, “Oh, you've got this condition. If your body was different, you wouldn't have this condition,” Which is really not an interesting conversation, but it seems to be one that keeps on happening. Lindley: Right. Right. And so, this is something that I have been dealing with for a while now. Just pursuing treatment and it's taken much longer than it should have. And I was talking on my personal Facebook about the challenges of getting this health condition addressed and the ways in which some of those challenges have been caused by people reacting to my body size by fatphobia, plain and simple. And this person who has been listening to me speak for years and who is very earnest and was clearly trying very well intentioned. Because this was not the same experience that this other woman had had in her life, she approached me and wrote me a long message about how I was basically bringing all this on myself. Louise: Oh, bringing all of what on yourself? Lindley: That maybe I was just imagining that people were treating me poorly. Louise: Oh ouch. Oh dear. Lindley: Because I was putting out negative energy into the world, and so my poor treatment was my own fault. And there was a time in my life that I would've been devastated and I would've believed her. I would've gone, “Oh no, maybe because I'm in a fat body, maybe I am putting some kind of energy out into the world that maybe I just, oh no, it's all my fault.” Louise: Oh wow. Lindley: And my friend Brandy, calls this confidence magic. Louise: Good time. Lindley: Yeah. She said she calls it confidence magic because she is also in a very large body. And quite often, when we talk about the way we're treated it, the retort is, well, if you were just acted more confident, if you were just friendlier, if you just did X, Y, Z. But mostly, if you just acted more confidently, then people wouldn't treat you that way. And it's entirely possible that for someone who is in a smaller than ours body, that works. Maybe it does work if you're in a smaller body. But I want to be very that there is nothing I can do or not do that will make my body not an oppressed body. It doesn't matter what kind of energy I put out into the world, I don't deserve to be treated poorly, especially for the size of my body. Louise: It's putting emphasis back onto you, it puts it back onto you and it takes the focus away from the person who's being the dick head. Lindley: Right. My oppression is never my fault, period. And so now I asked her to sit down and really look at that discomfort because the problem was that she had reached a point where she couldn't imagine that people actually get treated the way that I was describing. And so, it was so uncomfortable to realize that her experience was universal, that she sort of flipped over into this default state of, oh no, you must have done it to yourself, because it it's so hard to think. It is hard to think about people you like being mistreated. And it's easier to think that it must somehow be under their control it, that it [unclear28:21] behavior. Louise: Exactly. I was going to say that it's a locus of control problem. If we can locate the problem within us, then we feel like it's controllable and that we can do something about it. But to actually kind of recognize that this is structural, this is big. And we can be as kind and nice and put as much positive energy crystals out to the universe as possible and it won't change fatphobia. Lindley: Yeah. And unfortunately, this particular person was not receptive to being asked to reevaluate what she was saying, and so she wandered off and I haven't seen her since. But it really illustrates that when we start learning about systems of oppression, it can be really uncomfortable. As an America, I have had to do a lot of work around racism and a lot of learning, and as a very white person, that is very uncomfortable. But also, I feel like it's part of my job on this planet. Louise: We're not always supposed to be comfortable. Lindley: Yeah. And it's okay to be uncomfortable, especially when you're learning; you have to learn to sit with it. Louise: Yeah. Gosh, like there's so much that you have to deal with, when all you're really wanting to do is get on Facebook and talk about it. Lindley: I just want to whine on Facebook, and now too, my personal Facebook, because I have so many professional connections there, it is up being a hybrid. It is a hybrid space. When I'm speaking there, half of the folks who are in my sphere are there because of my work, so it's never really personal. And that is a boundary that I chose. I could choose to maintain my Facebook to be much, much smaller and more closed, and so I do have to be aware that I'm sort of speaking to a hybrid audience there, but sometimes you just want to get on Facebook and gripe too. Louise: You want to have a good old Facebook page and just get supported. That's kind of what we want to. Lindley: Right. But yeah, it's so important that all recognize that when we are treated badly for something about ourselves or related to something about ourselves, that's not ever our fault. Louise: Ah, such a good message. And the solution isn't to be kinder to the person who's being the dick head. Lindley: Yeah. I don't owe someone who is oppressing me, who is treating me badly based on the size of my body. I don't owe them in anything. I don't owe them an explanation. I don't owe them kindness. I don't owe them education. The only thing I owe is to myself to minimize the harm done to me. And if I give them anything beyond that, that's a gift. Louise: Yeah. Ah, God, what you're saying is so important, it's going to resonate with so many listeners. I just know it. Lindley: I hope so. It's time to stop blaming ourselves for the way that we're treated. Louise: Yes. Yes. And just last week, one of my clients was talking to me about a health interaction here in Australia with yet another person who is kind of locating the problem, same story. There's a person who's lived for a very long time in a larger body, tried every diet under the sun, the body's not going to change size. Now there's a health condition that needs urgent attention, and this person has been told very nicely that the problem is their body size. And they're actually experiencing delays to the actual treatment, while they are referred to a “obesity clinic” to address the problem of their size. And the emphasis there for this person, this health profession was being kind – it was being said to me in a nice way, which was a revelation for this person, because they've been treated so unkindly, but people can still be kind and still be a dick head. Lindley: Yeah. Oh yeah. Like a doctor, many years ago now; the doctor who lied to me about my health numbers so that she could put me on an off-label medication to try to make me lose weight. And so, she told me I had a condition that I did not have so that she could prescribe me a medication to actually try to make me smaller. She was so nice about it. I assure you; she was kind and sweet and gentle while she lied to me and gave me an unnecessary medication for a decade. Oh, she was very nice though. Louise: I have no words, that is dreadful, but this brings us right back to that Whole30 thing, right. I'm sure their body positive event would be full of kindness and niceness and fairy wings. But what the fuck are they doing? They're selling a diet. Lindley: Yeah. And you can, you can put as much lipstick on that pig as you want, but it's still going to be a pig. And I understand that pigs are smart, sweet, intelligence animals, they're still going to be a pig. Louise: That's right. You know, shit rolled in glitter is still shit. Lindley: Yeah, it's still terrible. Louise: So I've looked at your website and there's the most beautiful photo of a woman in a larger body, in a chair, in a garden, and oh, it is stunning. It is such a beautiful photo. And there are many, many photos like that. And I really want to talk to you about your photography, like how you got… so you got angry at the science, you got all fired up, you started to take pictures of people and now ended it up in this body liberation photography. So tell me about that and how you feel that photographing larger bodies is such an important piece? Lindley: Yeah, there are two sides to the photography. The one side is the stock photos, and for that I'm finding people who most of those folks are not models. They're just regular folks that I find in various ways. And then I'd also do offer client photo sessions; boudoir photography and portrait photography and business branding like business photos, and so there's sort of the two sides of it. And I started out doing the client photography because when I quit my full-time job, that seemed like the most obvious path to take income-wise at the time. And a couple of years later, there's a stock photo company, a very famous one called Getty images, based out of New York – when you see red carpet photos and you see really high quality stock photos that big companies use, those are often from Getty. They are very large and powerful. And they released, I think it was in 2017, they released a special stock photo collection. That was a body positive collection. And it got a ton of press. And I got really excited because we need – the more of that in the world, the better. But I went to go look at the photos and it turned out that they were mostly people who are again, in the US average size, which again is much larger than model size body. It was still different, but it wasn't particularly representative. And also, the photos were very expensive and they were also for editorial use only. And in stock photo lingo, that means that you can't use them for marketing. Louise: Okay. Lindley: What on earth was the whole point of that? Louise: What are they folding? Lindley: What a wasted opportunity. And so once again, I got mad and I said, I can do that, so I did. Louise: And you went like the full spectrum of body sizes, and identities, and cultures and genders, it's like everything, basically humans. Lindley: Yeah. When I am looking for models for the stock photos, and again, most of these people aren't trained models, but when you pose, you become one. So now these folks can all say that they're, that they're models too, which is cool. But I am always looking for the largest possible bodies to represent because I'm the only one on the planet doing this work right now, photographing very fat people – the only one. And I look forward to the day when that's not true. I look forward to the day when I have tons of competition. Louise: When it's not a niche or a specialty. Lindley: Yeah. And it turns out that many of the people who come to work with me on that basis are also people of color, are also LGBT+, or they're folks, or they have a mental illness, or they have a disability. They bring these other identities with them, and so I have the honor of being able to represent those things as well. Lots of folks in eating disorder recovery. Louise: Yes. And so, how did someone, like, if someone wants to do a stock photo with you, do they approach you or do you like follow people in shopping centers and ask them? What do you do? Lindley: It's been a combination. I have an email list that I maintain. And if you would like to be on that list, I am in Seattle, Washington in the US. But if you're ever visiting or you want to be on my list just in case, you are welcome to contact. We'll put that in the show notes, but I do have an email list that I send out model calls to, at least in non COVID 19 times. And then, I did once follow a coworker into a work bathroom; I was doing a corporate contract at a big company, and I had kept running into this woman, she was just lovely and seemed, I don't like you can tell when you're washing your hands at a bathroom sink beside someone, but she seemed very nice. And she was right in the demographic I represent. And so finally I followed her into the bathroom one day and I said, “I'm so sorry if this is creepy, and you can tell me to leave at any point and I will leave and never talk to you again. But I do photography and I'd love to have you as a model.” And she came and modeled for me, and it was wonderful. Louise: That is so gorgeous. Lindley: But yeah, it's a combination. When I started out, I was finding people on Craigslist, which is an American website, the classified ads, so it is just been a combination. Louise: Fantastic. Have you heard of Obesity Canada? Lindley: I'm aware that they exist. I've tried not to get tangled. Louise: That's pretty gross. It's pretty eww. Well, actually, I'm not sure who has released it, but they're kind of like this O organization up there who have this stock photos collection. Lindley: Oh yeah. It's another one of those weird co-opting things. Louise: Yeah. Yeah. And they work very closely with our friends at Novo Nordisk who are releasing all the weight loss drugs, and trying to take over the whole world. Lindley: Of course. Louise: Yes. But those I guess they're competition for you in a way. Lindley: Well, yeah, in a way. There's also a free collection on a website called Unsplash of our own bodies. And those photos are lovely and they are free to use, unlike my photos, which are not free because I need to eat. Louise: Imagine that! Lindley: Yeah. My models have the choice of, they can either choose a living wage money or for every hour that they are modeling or they can choose to be paid in photos. Many of them are very poor and they need the money, so I'm happy to pay them. But everybody involved in mine gets paid a living wage, which is why the photos aren't free because I get paid a living wage too. But yeah, there are some collections out there that do compete, which is fine. Again, we need all the representation we can get. Louise: We too, but I guess it's ethics, isn't it? And because I think that some of the people who are being photographed for those stock photos associated with the O organizations use members of their so-called patient groups, who are people who – that's another kind of section of my podcasts, people who are being encouraged by the weight loss industry to promote body positivity in the name of getting better public healthcare for weight loss surgeries and the like. So, it's really nice to hear about the ethics of you treat the people that you work with. Lindley: Yeah. When I'm photographing people, because again, almost everyone who comes to me… now, sometimes I'll get people who are just like, I'm ready. Let's do it. I love my body. I'm ready to show it off. Let's do the thing. Louise: How often does that happen? Lindley: It's rare, but it's cool. That's fun too. But most of the people who come to me, they're nervous. These are bodies – we live in these bodies that are not considered okay. And now here's this girl with a camera pointed it at you going, “No, you're great.” That's very disconcerting. And so, we do a lot of coaching. We do a lot of… I tell people like they get to control when they're done, whether they need a bathroom break or they're hungry or they just need to not have a camera pointed at them. It's a very warm and friendly environment because that's the only way to be ethical about this. And if nothing else, if you're unhappy, it's going to show in the photos. Louise: Yeah, of course. Lindley: So I have a vested interest in keeping you relaxed too. But these organizations releasing these photos is another example of this smiling oppression because it doesn't matter. Louise: What a beautiful way of putting it. Lindley: It doesn't matter how nice you are about it; if you're trying to erase me, and if you're trying to get me to pay you for surgeries or drugs or meal plans or meals or whatever, or weigh-ins, whatever that are not evidence-based. And you can tell I'm all fired up about this, come back to our theme again, because it doesn't matter how nice you are about it. Louise: You're still a dick head. Lindley: I know all about nice, but nice is not kind and kind is not anti-oppressive. Louise: Yeah, we've got to stop this bullshit. Yeah, I love that term “smiling oppression”. Yeah, if people are being nice to you and trying to represent you, and simultaneously trying to eradicate you; that's bullshit. Lindley: Yeah. I mean, again, I talk about being Southern because it's very relevant here because I have an ancestor who owned a slave, who owned another human being. That was a couple hundred years ago, so I had no idea whether that person was nice to their slave. I wouldn't have any way of knowing. Louise: It doesn't matter. Lindley: Yeah, it doesn't matter. In the south, one of the things that I was taught in history classes in school was that slavery wasn't it really all that bad because people were nice to their slaves and let them live in the house, and I'm not going to repeat the rest of it. It is very… Louise: Oh my God, that's just, yeah. Lindley: Yeah. And I had to learn better as an adult. But just because, and I'm not comparing slavery and fatphobia, they are not the same thing. They are not the same oppression. It doesn't matter how nice I am to you' if I am hurting you, if I'm stepping on your foot while smiling and asking you about the weather, the proper response is, “Hey, get off my foot.” Louise: Yeah. Right. Oh God, so many people need to hear this, and it's so good to hear how fired up you are. Lindley: We're being lied to, and we're continuing to be lied to by people who want to present, particularly weight loss surgery is now the big new thing, but it's still not evidence-based. We know that the side effects are really horrific, that a lot of people die. And then most people who even have that surgery gain the weight back. I know somebody who's had it twice and the doctor is pushing her to have it a third time because it didn't work. I mean, she lost the weight and then she regained it right back because that's what human bodies do – they protect. Louise: Our bodies are amazing. They're smarter than the weight loss surgeons. Lindley: Yeah. My body says, “I see a famine coming. We're hungry, I need to protect you.” That's what our bodies are doing. Louise: And I love that the photography that you do highlights the beauty inherent in diversity. And like that picture of the woman in the backyard, she is by no means small and she is just absolutely, like, there is just such beauty in that photo. A lot of the people that I work with really can't see that beauty in their own body and really don't even look at their own body, and that's where I guess photography can open up. Like, what are you trying to do for people when you take their photo, when you're aware of that much, like avoidance or disgusted or all of that stuff that people get stuck on when it comes to their own body? Lindley: Well, again, there's, there's kind of two facets. There is often when client come to me, generally the folks who are modeling for stock photos, because they are aware that those photos will be used publicly and sold, so there's an extra layer there of not only being willing to see yourself, but to know that many, many, many other people are going to see these. So generally, the folks who model for stock photos are maybe a little more ready for that. But a lot of the clients who come to me, maybe they haven't had a photo of themselves since their wedding day, or maybe they haven't had one since high school, or maybe they're always in the back of photos, or they're the ones behind the camera because they can't stand to be in front of it. And for those people, when I started doing this, I didn't know the term for it, but the term is exposure therapy. This is not a process that I'm qualified to coach at this point, generally, this is ad hoc, people do it for themselves. But people will often take their finished photos, and we've always look at them together. We always go through them together, both from that's… I mean, it's part of my sales process. It's business, we look at them together because people are buying products with them. But also for support, I think your photos are amazing, and I know that you will too, but I'm still going to be there to metaphorically hold your hand while we look at them. But then people take them home, and they'll look at them for just a minute. And then the next day they'll look at them for two minutes, and they will expose exposure therapy themselves. That's the coolest thing because they're teaching themselves to look at their own bodies. And then the other facet of that is that you saw that photo of the woman in the chair, in my backyard. I'm very lucky to have overgrown backyard to put people in. Louise: You have a nice backyard. Lindley: And we had the behind the scenes of that photo is that I had sheets hung up all over around her because the back of my backyard is open to the next area behind, so I had sheets hung up all over for privacy because she is very nude. So, you saw that photo on the website and it made a difference for you. You remembered it. And so the other facet is that you can… I don't know what the verb is. You can expose your therapy yourself by finding photos of people who are either look like you, like have your similar body type or are bigger or have visible disabilities, or basically by exposing yourself to all kinds of bodies, not just the ones that you kind of get forced fed by the media. You can do this process for yourself without necessarily having to look at photos of yourself. Although eventually you will also want to look at your own body, but you can do so much just by looking at people of actual bodies; look at them. Louise: Not in a creepy way – maybe in a creepy way. Lindley: I mean, maybe don't go staring at people in the grocery store. Louise: Don't follow people into the bathrooms at pools. Lindley: Yeah, please don't follow people around staring at them, but the internet is a wonderful place to stare at other bodies. Louise: Yeah. And actually, you raise a really good point because I think it's, well, 20 years into my foray into like the non-diet stuff. And I think me, even in the mid two thousands, looking at that same photo, I wouldn't have had the same reaction of just like being struck by the beauty because I hadn't done all of that. Like, I do surround myself with lots and lots of pictures of, like we've got naked women all over this house and my kids make a point of warning their friends, and I'm pretty sure my dad does think I'm a lesbian, which is okay, because I'm exposing him to diversity, but it's the exposure, exposure to diversity. If we see ourselves everywhere, represented everywhere and see other people represented everywhere, nothing strikes us as wrong, and then the beauty can grow. Lindley: Yeah. You know, what we are exposed to inn our regular lives, without taking efforts otherwise is a very narrow slice of humanity. And the more we see people… the more we see all different kinds of bodies, the more normal they become. The more we can see the beauty in those bodies as opposed to those bodies and out of bounds, or wrong, or transgressive, and the more you can expose yourself, the faster it will work. Louise: Yeah. And do you think that the last place that that kind of appreciation happens is your own body? Lindley: I think it depends for people. I think for some people, yes. I think for some people, body is the least, like theirs is the last place that happens. And I don't know, you know, I'm not in other people's heads, so I don't know whether that correlates with how outside the mainstream your own body is or not. Louise: Yeah, I do think there's something in that, but to keep going. So you are basically encouraging us all to take modes of ourselves. Lindley: Oh, yeah. Take some new selfies, seriously. Start in the bath. Like if you have access to like a bubble bath, because then you can like take pictures of your toes, like pointing delicately up from the bubbles and it's the least offensive nude in the world and it's really safe. And then you turn that camera around or use your use the other camera on your phone. Don't electrocute yourself please. Louise: Don't live stream it. Lindley: You take a photo of like if you have cleavage and you want to see that cleavage, like you do the bubbles and the cleavage. Again, I'm making hand gestures that you can't see so you don't imagine. And you do like the coy bubbles and the cleavage and you like camp it up. And then from there, you get out the bath and you dry off or not, I don't know your life. And you start putting that camera on a timer and you do whatever makes you happy if that's nudes or a costume or a Godzilla suit, I don't care – as long as you're seeing yourself. Louise: I love it. It sounds really playful. Lindley: Yeah. It doesn't have to be… like, there is a lot. And if you are an eating disorder recovery there a chance that you have been exposed to some of these exercises already on body image. There is a ton of resources out there on things like mirror work, where you're looking into mirror and seeing yourself and lots of… like, I have a whole book of journaling prompts about body image. There's a ton of resources out there, but just taking a selfie and deleting it, you can delete it. You don't have to keep it. Louise: You don't have to put it on Facebook. Lindley: You don't have to share it. I know that some people will start like a secret Instagram that is just them sharing selfies just to have them out into the world, but you don't have to, you don't have to do any of that. Louise: You don't have to perform this. Yeah, this is fast, this is good stuff. Lindley: Just like anything you can do. But again, you're not obligated to, this is not a moral imperative. You don't have to do selfies. You don't have to do nudes. You don't have to love your body. It's great if you can respect your own body, but there's no particular moral good in it other than that, you deserve it. None of these – I'm not giving you marching orders. I'm giving you some options, but like we get to do you. Louise: Lindley, thank you so much. This conversation has been immense and everything and awesome. Thank you for everything that you're putting out there in the world and for being so fired up. Lindley: Yeah, thank you. Such a joy to get to come in and talk about what I'm really head up about. Louise: Yeah, it's truly terrific. And I hope that your health condition gets properly addressed and that you feel better soon. Lindley: Thank you. Louise: All right. Thank you. Outro: What a dead set legend. Thank you so much, Lindley, I just adored that conversation and thank you everybody for listening. So if you are looking to learn more about Lindley and all of her amazing work, you can find her at bodyliberationphotos.com or on Insta @ bodyliberationwithlindley. And don't forget that her name has a silent D in it. So it sounds like Lindley, but it's L I N D L E Y. Okay everyone, that's all for this week's episode, I will see you soon, I promise. Take really good care of yourself in the meantime, trust your body, think critically, push back against diet culture, untrap from the crap. Resources Mentioned Find out more about Lindley here Follow Lindley on Insta @bodyliberationwithlindley

Solo Women Travel Tribe Podcast with Xena Jones
124: Belonging V Fitting In

Solo Women Travel Tribe Podcast with Xena Jones

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 19:25


I recently discovered I was in an environment I wanted to be in and was thinking that I didn't belong. I was holding back, distancing myself from my peers & not getting what I wanted out of the experience. In this episode we are exploring the difference between belonging & fitting in & how to tell which one we are doing. I also share with you exactly what it takes to feel like you belong. And we explore Brene Brown & her powerful work around belonging & how we can apply this to our lives. For more info on coaching & to schedule a free call with me visit: https://www.xenajones.com

The Embodied Healing Self with Jen Mons
Ep 119 Belonging vs Fitting In

The Embodied Healing Self with Jen Mons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 28:40


In this episode, Jen talks about Belonging vs Fitting In. Jen shares why learning the difference between belonging and fitting in is important and why it matters. How if you have nothing to prove, you have no need to fit in.    Key Notes: How belonging is a sense of knowing How belonging vs fitting is about knowing your own worth What true belonging really means Show Notes: (00:28) Jen shares what inspired her about this week's topic (02:40) Jen shares a quote from Brene Brown's book titled “Braving the Wilderness” (03:51) Why belonging vs fitting in is important and why it matters (07:02) How often do you play small to fit in (11:05) How it's more important to be truthful, loyal, happy and peaceful than it is to be right  (13:38) How if something seems too good to be true, it probably is (16:05) How validation is different from support (18:50) How your existence alone is enough (21:57) How we try to fit in when we feel alone Quotes: (04:53) Don't try to fit in when you were born to stand out (09:51) Accept people for who they are and to love them unconditionally (17:48) Wake up everyday, remembering who you are (18:22) True belonging is knowing (18:55) Every person matters (25:01) All we have is today Resources: Website: https://www.jenmons.com/  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/JenMonsCoaching  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jen.mons/  Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXFG_uyCRg9nxM43jS9mvUg    PODCAST DISCLAIMER: This podcast is to educate, inside, and inform the listeners of various pathways to wholistic well being.  This information is not to replace the advise of your physician, specialist, medical doctor, therapist, nutritionist or dietician. Please refer to full Medical Disclaimer Here.

The Long and The Short Of It
163. So Much To Do

The Long and The Short Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 13:46


With their workloads ramping up over the past few weeks, Jen and Pete noodle on what to do and what questions to ask when there is so much to do.Specifically, in this episode Jen and Pete talk about:How might one manage their to-do lists?What questions can you ask yourself to realize and manage your priorities?What will the consequences be if something on the to-do list doesn't get done?To hear all Episodes and read full transcripts visit The Long and The Short Of It website: https://thelongandtheshortpodcast.com/.You can subscribe to our Box o' Goodies here (https://thelongandtheshortpodcast.com/) and receive a weekly email full of book and podcast recommendations, quotes, videos and other interesting things Jen and Pete are noodling on. To get in touch, send an email to: hello@thelongandtheshortpodcast.comLearn more about Pete's work here (https://humanperiscope.com/) and Jen's work here (https://jenwaldman.com/).

Geeky Girls Knit
Episode 467 ~ In Which I've Got Issues

Geeky Girls Knit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021


Show Notes:Intro - On the Needles - ~Izzy's 2022 Birthday Socks - French Vanilla Cappuccino Socks by ME! on US1.5 (2.5mm), Urth Yarns Uneek Fingering in the 3014 colourway & Sunsoaked Sister Everything Earth in the Blue Christmas Without You colourwayProject bag from Lizzie Bags & Progress Keeper from Ann TudorFinished Projects - ~2021 Preemie Hat #44 on US6 (4mm), Vidalana Ambient Worsted in the Dawn Blush colourway & Lion Brand Vanna's Choice in the Taupe colourway~Katy's 2021 Birthday Socks - French Vanilla Cappuccino Socks by ME! on US1.5 (2.5mm), Uru.Yarn Sugared Sock in the Peachy Queen colourwayFlosstube - Begins at timestamp 7:00~Hilde's Chupacabra Campout by Bendy StitchyProject Bag from The Black Needle SocietyI'm so excited to be a rep for The Black Needle SocietyJoin TBNS Waitlist to be notified when you can subscribe.Save 5% on your first box of a box to box subscription with the code JAVAPURL5 - doesn't work on 6 and 12 month subscriptions as they have a discount built in, not valid on special edition boxes~Edinburgh Castle by Terra Luna StitcheryUsing Pattern Keeper software on Kindle Fire 7Needle Minder from TopKnotStitcherProject Bag from KnitRunDigGrime Guard from Crab Shack StitcheryBitzy Bob Basic from That's So Kelly Co.Silicone tiesYummies (our current favourite things) - ~Purl sleeve from Love You More Studios~Knit Crate - Use the coupon code GEEKY20 to get 20% off of your first order! This code will only work to discount the first month of a recurring monthly subscription and any of our Shop items.What We're Watching, Reading, + Listening To - Please be aware that we do discuss recent tv show episodes that have aired in the last week or so. This is your spoiler warning!October / November / December 2021 RAL - 15 minutes of reading daily challenge* 88-92 of 92 days - 1 or more giveaways for eBook, everyone gets $1.20 off any single pattern coupon code & 88+ days RAL virtual badge* 61-87 of 92 days - 1 or more giveaways for single pattern, everyone gets 61+ days RAL virtual badge* #GGKRAL21* #GGKRAL21~ October / November / December* 92 days - 10 entries* 88-91 days - 8 entries* 61-87 days - 5 entries~ Read All 365 days - 10 bonus entries~ Complete the Modern Mrs. Darcy 2021 Reading Challenge - 12 bonus entries [all or none] (we'll open a thread for you to post this in December 2021)Episode 467 Bookshop List~The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma by Bessel van der Kolk - reading~Faith After Doubt: Why Your Beliefs Stopped Working and What to Do About It by Brian McLaren - finished reading to for Unashamed Love Collective ~ A Community for LGBTQ+ People and Allies~Inward by Yung Pueblo - reading~The Unquiet Dead (Rachel Getty & Esa Khattak #1) by Ausma Zehanat Khan - finished reading~The Year of Needy Girls by Patricia A. Smith - finished reading~A Share in Death (Duncan Kincaid & Gemma James #1) by Deborah Crombie - finished reading~All Shall Be Well (Duncan Kincaid & Gemma James #2) by Deborah Crombie - reading~Law & Order: Special Victims Unit - watching episodes for That's Messed Up: An SVU Podcast~Gilmore Girls - rewatching Season 2 with the I Am All In With Scott Patterson Podcast~Lucifer - finished watching~Doctor Who - watching Series 13~Murdoch Mysteries - watching Season 15~NCIS - watching Season 19~The Masked Singer - watching Season 6~My Favourite Murder podcast~Random Spotify PlaylistsSeptember / October / November Artistic Autumnal AL -*Runs from 1-September through 30-November*Details - any project you knit/crochet/weave/spin/stitch/sew that you can convince us relates to autumn*No WIPS - Your project must be begun no earlier than 1-September and finished no later than 30-November*Each project that you knit/crochet/weave/spin must be at least 20yds/18.3m that you finish and post in the Facebook Group FO Thread counts as 1 entry into the giveaways. If your project is not at least 20yds/18.3m, you need to group it in a single post with other projects that together total at least 20yds/18.3m. For stitching/sewing projects, we'll leave it to your best judgment. If you wanted our official ruling, PM email us at ggkcspodcast@gmail.com*Feel free to poly-dip in other ALs as long as it fits in with other rules*Please complete our Google form in order to help us make sure you are receiving a prize that you'll actually enjoy using.*Prizes: If you'd like to donate one, email us at ggkcspodcast@gmail.comAudine Wools by KnitCrate Mellow - 2 skeins of Cordial (2 winners will each win 1 skein)Woodandcat Owl Needle Minder from Lori & Pumpkin/Kid/Turkey Needle MinderTry to Relax Cross Stitch Kit donated by LoriKnitting Wrist Yarn HolderLa Brebis Light Alpaca - 1 skein of Dogwood BerryLine Where The Sky Meets the Sea Shawl pattern by Windswept KnitsONline Supersocke DK - 1 skein of 1758 & the winner's choice of a sock pattern up to $10 USD donated by Emily*Must be a member of the our Facebook group ~ GGKCS Podcast / FlossTube to participate*Social Media Hashtag: #GGKCSAutumn21*Thread will be locked the morning of 1-December and winner(s) drawn on the next podcast following that*For any and all giveaways, prizes, competitions, ALs, etc. that we host, the winner(s) have 30 days from the date of announcement (the date the podcast episode in which the winner was announced goes live) to contact us to claim their prize or it will be forfeited. If this occurs, the prize will be used for another giveaway at our discretion. Thanks for understanding!*There is a Chatter Thread in our Facebook group so we can encourage each other along the way.Ask the Geeks - Originally asked/answered in 2019:Samantha asks:What are your current favorite podcasts to watch or listen to?We mention: My Favourite Murder, Criminal, We Can Do Hard Things, Brene Brown, Under Our Roof, Latter-Day Lesbian, Lesbian Chronicles, I Am All In, That's Messed Up: An SVU Podcast, David Tennant Does a Podcast With…, Michelle Bendy Stitchy, LindyStitches, 2 Martini Stitcher, Creativity By Gidge, LadyRobyns, Stitching the High Notes, The Black Needle Society, The Pattern QueensMisc. - ~Pride AL - Runs from 17-May-2021 [The International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia, and Transphobia (IDAHOBIT)] through 30-June-2022. #GGKCSPrideAlong2122~Support the Podcast, Become A Patron~Support the Podcast, Join us on YouTube~Each week, we create a list on Bookshop of all the books we talk about in that week's episode. Bookshop is an online bookstore with a mission to financially support local, independent bookstores. If you purchase a book from our list, we earn a commission & local, independent bookstores also earn money from your purchase.~Want another way to help support our podcast? Throughout our website, links to books, tv shows, movies, etc. are Amazon Affiliate Links. We receive a portion of what you spend when you click through our website to shop on Amazon. What we receive helps us with the costs associated with producing this podcast as well as with prizes & shipping for giveaways. Thanks in advance for your support!If you are in the UK, please click this link, Amazon.co.uk, or the banner below to shop:If you are in Canada, please click this link, Amazon.ca or the banner below to shop:~For any and all giveaways, prizes, competitions, ALs, etc. that we host, the winner(s) have 30 days from the date of announcement (the date the podcast episode in which the winner was announced goes live) to contact us to claim their prize or it will be forfeited. If this occurs, the prize will be used for another giveaway at our discretion. Thanks for understanding!Find Us Online -C.C. - (she/her)~ on Instagram as CC_JavaPurlDami - (they/them)~ on Instagram as damisdoodlesPink Purl - ~on Instagram as pinkiepurlJavaPurl Designs~ JavaPurl Designs websiteGGKCS -~ our Facebook group ~ GGKCS Podcast / FlossTube~ our Facebook page~ email us: ggkcspodcast@gmail.com~ on Apple Podcasts~ on YouTube~ Support the Podcast, Become a PatronUntil next time,

はみだし系ライフの歩きかた
Ep. 182 信頼について話そう

はみだし系ライフの歩きかた

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 27:09


今週のトピックは「信頼」 ゆかりがブレネーの本に書かれていることの中でも一番好きな「ビー玉のびん」の話と、「信頼の7つの要素」について話しています。 ブログ:信頼とは、ビー玉のようなもの Shame(恥)を使った教育や社会について Clubhouse: 日本時間11月11日9:00AM 「読み説く英語:NEXT LEVEL ENGLISH」 日本時間11月13日11:00AM 【はみライClubhouse】Ep 179 アメリカの刑務所で働くってどんな感じ? について話そう 日本時間11月13日 11:30PM Netflixドラマ"MAID"について話そう   ブレネーブラウンブッククラブ Atlas of the Heart申し込み受付開始 ゆかりのニュースレター←はみライクリスマスプレゼントへの応募はこちらから クラハで話したいトピックがあればぜひ送って下さい。メールはこちらから。 「ブレネー・ブラウンって誰?」 ゆかりのニュースレターに登録する ☆ゆかり Instagram Twitter ※※※※※※※※※※※※※※※※※※※※※※※※※※※※※※ いつも聴いて頂いてありがとうございます! 今週もみなさんからのコメント、ご質問を募集しています。また、このポッドキャストをより多くの方に聴いて頂くために、ぜひシェアして下さい。 Facebook 非公開グループ「はみライコミュニティ」年齢性別関係なくご参加下さい♪ 週1ペースで無料コーチングセッションを提供しています。スケジュールはこちらから。 はみライ公式SHOPもオープンしました! 海外在住者向けはみライ公式SHOP on Etsyはこちら! Patreonでの毎月サポートも募集中です! 不定期でのサポート用に、ペイパルアカウントも作成しました。お好きな金額でサポートできます。こちらからどうぞ。 Apple Podcastにて☆とレビューをつけて下さった方にははみライステッカーをお送りします☆住所をお知らせ下さい。 はみライのスポンサーに関するお問合せ、感想メールなどはこちらから

#PTonICE Daily Show
Episode 1078 - The intersection of Brene Brown & Jocko Willink

#PTonICE Daily Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 17:52


Dr. Megan Daley // #LeadershipThursday // www.ptonice.com

Unbreak My Heart
The Anatomy of Trust | Dr. Brené Brown

Unbreak My Heart

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 27:25


In a live appearance at UCLA's Royce Hall, Dr. Brené Brown discusses the fundamentals of trust. Brené explains how she was moved to focus on the topic after watching her daughter struggle with a betrayal of trust. Brené says she eventually found a way to teach her daughter to build trust and identify the people in her life who deserve it. She also explains why gossip harms relationships more than we realize and creates an intimacy that isn't real. This talk is universal to all relationships. Enjoy! We have a Patreon membership account! Please check out how to participate behind the scenes and collaborate on growing the podcast! You can visit www.patreon.com/unbreakmyheart.com for more information.

The Long and The Short Of It
162. Imperfection

The Long and The Short Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 17:20


Pete and Jen noodle on the idea that it is our imperfections that connect us, and how sharing those imperfections may be an empathy tool.Specifically, in this episode Jen and Pete talk about:Why (and when) is it important to share your imperfections?How might sharing an imperfection move a conversation forward, or create connection?Why is perfectionism hard to relate to, and imperfection easier to understand?To hear all Episodes and read full transcripts visit The Long and The Short Of It website: https://thelongandtheshortpodcast.com/.You can subscribe to our Box o' Goodies here (https://thelongandtheshortpodcast.com/) and receive a weekly email full of book and podcast recommendations, quotes, videos and other interesting things Jen and Pete are noodling on. To get in touch, send an email to: hello@thelongandtheshortpodcast.comLearn more about Pete's work here (https://humanperiscope.com/) and Jen's work here (https://jenwaldman.com/).

Word To Your Mama
EP. 50 Vanessa Ramirez: mexican Monster Maker

Word To Your Mama

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021


WTYM EP 51 Vanessa Ramirez: Mexican Monster MakerVanessa Ramirez: Sculptor | Monster MakerIn this episode we discuss how a Mexican introvert became an artist and her transition from 2d to 3d art. Vanessa “embracing the cute” to create her solitary monsters. How her drawings convey puffiness similar to the ghosts in City of Ghosts. Then Vanessa and Ritzy, two brown women, get hella real about mental health and how they both f*ck with Brene Brown heavy!The Supernatural Bear CornerDuring The Supernatural Bear corner, The SNB (9yrs old) talks about what he thinks of Vanessa's monsters.New Patreon Patron: Berry from Podcastsincolor.com GRACIASBonus Episode Links:Latino Comics ExpoCity of Ghosts on NextflixBrene BrownAtreyu's “Creature”Europe's The Final CountdownWTYM is brought to you byWord To Your Mama Store: Use code WTYM at check out to receive 10% off any order ritzyperiwinkle.comWTYM Patreon PageDONATEMEDIA KIT AVAILABLE WHERE EVER YOU CONSUME PODCASTSon socials @wtymama | email: hola@wordtoyourmama.com

Joy in the Weeds
The Weeds of Abuse — Special Guest: Dr. Annie Perez

Joy in the Weeds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 71:02


This is an important podcast for everyone to listen to.  You will learn a lot, whether you are currently experiencing or have experienced abuse, know someone who has, or just want to have tools for navigating a world where abuse is all too common.  Please take the time to listen, like, share, and subscribe! Dr. Annie. Pérez is a Psychologist with a specialization in Health Psychology and Marriage and Family Counseling. She is currently serving as the Prayer Ministries Director and the Women's Ministries Director for the Florida Conference.  She is a speaker, a daughter, wife and mother.  National Resources:Adult Children of Alcoholics/Dysfunctional Families       Central Office - Torrance, CA                                    1-213-534-1815Al-Anon/12-Step Support Groups                         1-800-344-2666     Domestic Violence/Sexual Assault                        1-800-656-HOPE              Families Anonymous                                                      1-800-736-9804National Council                                                               1-816-361-5900National Domestic Violence Hotline                    1-800-333-SAFE (7233)     County Mental Health Agencies                                        In your Yellow PagesCounty Crisis Hotline Numbers                                          In your Yellow PagesFor a list of Domestic Violence Resources, please Visit our Facebook page for list.Follow us on Facebook and Instagram.Send us an email: joy@carolinasda.org Recorded Live via Zoom.

Alcohol Recovery Podcast | The ODAAT Chat Podcast
OC183 Dr Anna Lembke - Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance In the Age of Indulgence

Alcohol Recovery Podcast | The ODAAT Chat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 56:23


Please Subscribe For More Episodes!   iTunes: https://apple.co/30g6ALF Spotify: https://odaatchat.libsyn.com/spotify Stitcher: https://bit.ly/3n0taNQ YouTube Channel: https://bit.ly/2UpR5Lo   Purchase Her Book on Amazon! Be sure to follow me on Instagram for daily inspiration: @odaatpodcast and @arlinaallen Hello Loves,   Thank you for downloading the podcast, my name is Arlina, and I'll be your host.   In case we haven't met yet, I am a certified Recovery Coach and Hypnotist. I am obsessed with all things recovery, including neuroscience, reprogramming the subconscious mind, law of attraction, all forms of personal growth and spirituality. I have been practicing abstinence from drugs and alcohol since 4/23/94, and I believe in people finding what works for them.    Today I'll be talking with Dr Anna Lembke, she is Chief of the Stanford Addiction Medicine Dual Diagnosis Clinic at Stanford University and author of the #1 Bestseller “Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance In the Age of Indulgence”. It would be a vast understatement to say it was such an honor to interview her for the podcast.  If you've been listening to these interviews for any length of time, you'll know I love learning about ideas I can share that will help lead people out of suffering. Up til now I've been hyper focused on empathy largely based off of Brene Brown's work around vulnerability and she shared that empathy is the antidote to shame. I've also treasured the idea that “honesty without compassion is cruelty” so I've been pretty focused on empathy but it felt like something was missing.   Then I read this by Anna: “Empathy without accountability perpetuates victimhood”. I had an absolute “holy crap” moment. Not an “aha”, a holy crap. Because, I believe that I can't really help people who are stuck or committed to a victim mentality. Those are people who are unwilling or unable to accept personal responsibility and I actually have a visceral and negative response to that type of thinking.   I had to send Anna a follow up email and ask for more feedback, specifically around what to say to people who have relapsed, and this is what she said:   “I'm so sorry. I'm sorry for your suffering. That must be so hard.”  What this does is validate that the relapse happened, while also acknowledging the pain that person is experiencing. I think of it similar to what I would say to someone who told me their cancer which had been in remission came back.”   So brilliant. I just love her.   Anyway, that was a very long intro, but I wanted you to have that extra bit of wisdom from her.   I hope you enjoy this conversation as much as I did.   Arlina Allen  6:09   Okay, here we go. We'll talk to you. Thank you. Thank you so much for joining me on the podcast.   Unknown Speaker  6:15   Thank you for inviting me, I am very happy to be here.   Arlina Allen  6:18   I'm so excited. Listen, I say that all the time. But I really, really men it this time because I have been reading your book, and actually I listened to the audio book first while I'm walking, because I sort of like the first wash of like, all these concepts. And then I get the book because I'm a students. And I like to, you know, highlight and underline and Mark things. And this book was stuff. It has some pictures. Yeah. Picture like people like me, pictures are amazing. Yeah. But I just it's called dopamine, finding balance in the age of indulgence, I'm sorry, dopamine nation. And, wow, I have so many questions to ask. But I think a good place to start might be with maybe what what is dopamine? Really, because I think there's a lot of misconceptions about what dopamine is, there isn't like a dopamine pill. But you know, when people take drugs, I think they activate dopamine, but maybe I don't really have a good understanding. So I thought maybe I could sort of clarify what it really is, and, and why it's important.   Dr Anna Lembke  7:31   Yeah, so dopamine is a chemical that we make in our brain. And it's very important for the experience of motivation, reward, and pleasure, and also fundamental in this self reregulating kind of system, that's called homeostasis, that is so fundamental to our physiology, and also, you know, to our survival. So essentially, you know, in a kind of broad brushstrokes simplified form, if you imagine that there is a balance in your brain, kind of like a teeter totter in a kid's playground, when we do something pleasurable that balance tips one way, and when we do something that's painful, that balance tips the other way, or when we ingest a substance that's pleasurable, or when we have an injury, you know, we cut our finger to the side of pain. But one of the overarching rules governing that balance is that it wants to remain level or preserve what neuroscientists call homeostasis. And it will work very hard to preserve a level balance with any deviation from neutrality. So when we do something that is pleasurable, we release dopamine, the pleasure neurotransmitter in the brain's reward pathway, which is a special part of our brain that's been conserved over millions of years, and is the same across many different species, even very primitive organisms. And that balance tip slightly to the side of pleasure. But no sooner Has that happened, then our brain will try to reregulate to bring that balance level again. And it does that by down regulating dopamine production and down regulating dopamine transmission in the reward pathway. But it doesn't just bring dopamine back down to tonic baseline levels, it actually brings it below baseline. So what happens I think of that as these Gremlins hopping on the pain side of the balance to bring in level again, but they stay on until the balance is tipped and equal and opposite amount to the side of pain. Yes, and that's of course, the kind of looking at the book. There's a little graphic in there, right there. And with Gremlins, right, I'm also a visual thinker. And so I just, you know, wanted to create a simple metaphor.   Arlina Allen  9:52   This is Brian, on page 52 of the book. There's like the seesaw or the teeter totter that you mentioned. And I thought That was so interesting because it when you're talking about uh when we indulge in the dopamine like you know even on the little graph is chocolate social media gaming porn shopping in my case drugs alcohol all that stuff not to say that I don't indulge in social media those other are those other things shopping that we there is that deficit it's like the equal opposite   Dr Anna Lembke  10:26   yes right for every pleasure we pay a price yes price is the come down and sometimes can be very subtle outside of conscious awareness. But you know it's there. And you know if we wait long enough that feeling of wanting to buy one more thing or watch one more video or have one more piece of chocolate goes away and and homeostasis is restored. But if we continue to bombard our dopamine reward pathway with highly reinforcing drugs and behaviors, what ends up happening is that to compensate for that, let's say artificially high levels of dopamine and I call it artificial because you know, the fundamental difference between things that are addictive and those that are not are that addictive, things release a whole lot more dopamine in the reward pathway. And of course, technology has taken even things that were not addictive like food, and made them highly potent and turn them into drugs or human connection. Social media has drug A fight human connection. But as a result of constantly bombarding our dopamine reward pathways, what ends up happening is our brains are desperately trying to compensate. And so they're way down down regulate, our brains are down regulating our dopamine production, and we end up in this kind of chronic dopamine deficit state where we have, you know, 1000s, of Gremlins on the pain side of the balance, and they've kind of camped out there, right, they brought their barbecues, their tents, they're not going anywhere fast. And, and it lasts a long time, which I think is really fundamental to understanding a couple of things. The first thing is, why on earth do people with addiction, relapse, after months, or even years of recovery and abstinence and their lives are so much better? Why on earth would they go back to using the reason is because they're not necessarily walking around. With a level balance, they are potentially walking around with a balance tilted to the side of pain on a daily basis experiencing the universal symptoms of withdrawal, which can last for months to years. And those include anxiety, insomnia, irritability, depression, and craving or intrusive thoughts of wanting views. The other reason I think this is balances is really helpful, is because not only does it allow us to understand the disease of addiction and relapse and to have compassion for that. But also it might explain, and this is the fundamental hypothesis of dopamine nation. Why it is that despite the fact that we have all our survival needs met, and then some why our rates of depression, anxiety and suicide going up all over the world, especially in rich countries. And I do believe that's because we individually and collectively, are engaging in so many high reward high pleasure activities and substances, that in order for our primitive brains to compensate, we have collectively downregulated, our own dopamine transmission such that we're all more depressed and anxious.   Arlina Allen  13:22   Yeah, you know, in the beginning of recovery, a lot of people talk about boredom. And I think we're so overstimulated when we're using that, when we get sober and practice that, you know, those of us are practicing practicing abstinence, I am aware that there is like harm reduction, you know, and that's the thing I totally I feel like that's totally valid. I quit drinking alcohol on my 25th birthday and continued to smoke weed for five months. I didn't know that recovery is about complete apps. That's just, they called it the marijuana maintenance program back in the day. Uh huh. Anyway, now we're calling it harm reduction, just fine. But what I thought was so interesting is and this is what I have heard over the years is that when people first get sober, they're bored. And I listened to the interview you did with Dr. Andrew Huber many we're talking about boredom and anxiety, which at first blush, you wouldn't think that those two go together. But when all your needs are met, and you really have and you don't have a passion or in my case obsessions for different things. If you don't if you don't have that you like get bored and then it's like, creates anxiety. Right? I see that in my kids.   Unknown Speaker  14:37   Yeah, of course. Yeah. I mean, especially the way because we're living in a time when we're constantly able to distract distract ourselves from our own thoughts, and our own ruminations and even our own creativity really, such that when we take away those distractions, we're suddenly you know, plummeted into the abyss really existentially We are bored, and sort of then contemplate well, gee, I don't have anything to do like, What? What is the purpose of my life anyway. But I think the key really is number one to acknowledge that boredom can be an extremely painful emotion, literally, physically painful, and scary. But that if we can just sit with it, and not try to run away from it, it is also the progenitor of creativity, and a place where new things are born. And so you know, just thinking about, like, you know, open space, like, it's like, you need space before you can have a supernova, you know, you need to have that blankness in order to, you know, initiate something new. And the internet really allows us all to be in this constant state of reactivity, where we're always responding to some some kind of input, rather than, you know, sitting quietly and generating.   Arlina Allen  15:56   Yeah, no, it's, I have a question for you about the neurotransmitter. So it's my understanding, like, from a chemistry perspective, that, you know, your receptors, your brain cells have receptors on them that are the uptake with Deborah allow the cells to receive the dopamine. And if you flood your cells, I'm sorry, I don't know that is your neurotransmitters? Yes, yes. Okay. So the receptor if there, there's like little receptors that allow that uptake of the dopamine, but if it's flooded too much, your cells will retract those receptors. Exactly. Right. So this is the attic mind, how long does it take the brain to heal, meaning it puts back a normal amount of receptors, because in my mind, I was thinking, I took some physiology anatomy in college, and it was like, Oh, that's why when people first stop using, they don't feel anything, it's like they can't, because their brain was trying to protect them this whole time by retracting those receptors, not allowing them to uptake the dopamine. And so because they're not there, people feel flat, like they, they feel flat, and they can't feel it. And so everybody always says, Well, how long until I start feeling good again? Like, how long does it take their brain cells to put those little receptors back out? So people start feeling good?   Dr Anna Lembke  17:21   Yeah, so in my clinical experience, it takes a minimum of a month, and that's less bad, not bad. And let me just say, a minimum of a month to start to regenerate other receptors and regulate dopamine transmission. But I mean, the protracted abstinence syndrome can last many months to even years, in some cases, right? Yeah. pends on the person, it depends on the drug, it depends on how you know how much they used. But in my clinical experience, and again, this is supported by some evidence, if people totally abstain for one month, in weeks one and two, that pleasure, pain balance to transmission is below baseline, because it's exactly as you say, our neurons have retracted those dopamine receptors, so we're not getting, you know, that stimulation. And we're experiencing withdrawal. But by weeks, three or four, people typically start to feel better. And by week four, even people with some very severe addictions, will start to notice improvement. Now, one thing you have to be really careful about is cross addiction. So all addictive substances work on that same common pathway, don't mean is a universal currency for the process of addiction, at least as far as we know, at this point. So if you give up your cannabis, but you keep smoking cigarettes, you know, you're not going to get the same kind of upregulation. Because you're not going to be abstaining from nicotine, which is gonna be you know, it's not, you know, most of my patients are not willing to give up cigarettes and nicotine and alcohol and all of it at once. That's a lot to give up. So whatever they're willing to do is great. And often they will see improvements, even if they just give up one thing. But to really get the full benefit and really restore homeostasis, you kind of have to give it all up in order. What   Arlina Allen  19:12   about what about caffeine?   Dr Anna Lembke  19:14   Well, you know, caffeine is a stimulant. So it sort of depends on how much you're using. If you're one cup of coffee a day, it probably isn't going to make much difference and you can just keep doing that. But if you're at you know, eight cups of coffee a day, that's that's probably probably time to. And the truth is that, believe it or not, it sounds harder to give it all up at once. But it might in fact be easier. There are studies showing that people who quit drinking and quit smoking cigarettes at the same time have better outcomes than people who just quit drinking but keep smoking.   Arlina Allen  19:50   Or these people who were considered pretty heavy on the alcohol use disorder spectrum or you know, I don't think alcoholic is really a A clinical term any longer Is that true?   Unknown Speaker  20:02   That's true.   Arlina Allen  20:03   It's alcohol use disorder.   Dr Anna Lembke  20:04   Yes, that's right. So we're trying to the alcoholic comes from Alcoholics Anonymous. It's just not a medicalized term. It's a perfectly good term. But it's just not one that we're, you know, we're using in Medicine Today we're trying to use a more generic term that can crossover many different substances to now it's, we don't even use the term addiction, believe it or not in a lot. Yeah, strange, right? And that's, you know, believe it or not, it hasn't really been the term the medical term. Now, let me say I use it all the time. It's the broadly understood term for this process. It is used in neuroscience texts. It is in the name of the of NIDA, the National, its own National Institute of Drug Abuse, which is a term we don't use anymore. The language of addiction is changing. But in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, it's not called nicotine addiction, or alcohol addiction. It's called nicotine use disorder, alcohol use disorder, cannabis use disorder, and I'm like that.   Arlina Allen  21:01   Okay. So it is specific to the whatever people are using. Okay, that's so interesting. I did not know that. Listen, I kind of came up in Alcoholics Anonymous. So, you know, but I've noticed that, and I'm sure you've noticed this too, like, and maybe not because you're not on social media. Is that true? You're not on social media? That's not true. Yeah, that's true. But you are in the social dilemma. Right? Fascinating. Like I had resisted watching it, because I'm sorry, I was sort of in the camp of, you know, I use social media for good. You know, so I don't, I didn't maybe are good. Yeah, it can. Yeah, I mean, it's that's how I communicate all everything that I do. My podcast and everything that I do is I'm trying to disseminate information, you know, solution. And he's social media. So I'm like, it's all it hits like money. It's all in how you use it, right? Like you use your powers for good. Kind of like Spider Man. But, um, where am I going with that, but but it's there's a bit of self denial because I do find I'm, you know, sort of like the typical addict, let's say, have that sort of propensity for addiction or anything obsessive anything that I like, I want more, right, I don't really have that off switch. So it's like, oh, I found something I'm passionate about is helping people recovering, Alcoholics Anonymous, and so that's all I want to do. So he says, it seems like a healthier obsession.   Dr Anna Lembke  22:37   You know, putting investing our energy into things that we care about, that gives us to me meaning and purpose that serve others that make the world a better place, those are all those are all good things, they can also cross the line into addiction, we can, you know, there is work addiction. People can get, you know, caught up in that in a way that's not healthy for themselves or others. But in general, you know, when we're serving others, those are usually healthy behaviors.   Arlina Allen  23:06   Yeah, I remembered my point of that little thing I just did. But with the social media, it's so interesting to see that the vernacular is changing in the world of social media, how people like me who are trying to disseminate information about recovery and sobriety, the vernacular is changing, because a lot of people, women, especially, actually are very, like anti a, because of the male dominated vocabulary. And, you know, there's this sort of patriarchal overtone, and overtures. And I kind of grew up in the church where I learned to, you know, you're supposed to read the Bible, and then you sort of decipher what it means to you. When I got sober. I was like, these people are like, Oh, you can solve that problem here. And I was like, I'm all in. And I would read the text and literature and I would just translate like, I had that ability to translate into what it means to me. So I didn't really get hung up on I was super desperate to be sober. So I didn't get hung up on terms like alcoholic or, you know, everything being in he him. There's like in the book, I'm sure you're familiar, a chapter to the lives, right? Yeah. As if we were, you know, the women were sort of secondary. And so there's all this discussion right now about how, like a lot of people I interview they talk about alcohol free, they won't even use the word like alcoholic seem shaming. Uh huh. Or have you have you experienced that and the people that come to see you.   Dr Anna Lembke  24:43   I certainly have, you know, encountered a lot of people who for whom a was not useful or effective, but I've encountered an equal number or more for whom a was absolutely you know, the lifesaver for them men and women. But I think it's important to put a into its historical context, it started in the 1930s. It was started by, you know, two men who met each other and support each other. It is one of the most remarkable and robust social movements in the last 100 years, totally peer driven, takes no financial outside support takes no political stance is free is everywhere. And I do agree with you that, you know, language was important and needs to change with changing times. And I think there have been some updates to the big book, you know, more more modern, and more accessible. And certainly, I've heard of certain I'm aware of abuses in the rooms and in a, I mean, I'm glad today that there are many options, different options for me to get into recovery online, in person. abstinence oriented, moderation oriented, and I think this is great. I think there are lots of paths to the top of the mountain. But I would not throw out a you know, I know, it's a really powerful philosophy and approach. And, you know, just absolutely miraculous for, you know, for people for whom it works and who actively participate.   Arlina Allen  26:15   Yeah, well, there you go, you have to actively participate. I'm a huge fan like it absolutely. There was not actually when I got sober 27 years ago, there wasn't really nothing else. Yeah, there was really nothing else, I was super grateful. And I lived in San Jose. So in the Bay Area, where you are, there are there were like 800 meetings a week. Yeah. And there were women's meetings and very specialized meetings, there was I used to go to a 6am meeting every day that attracts a certain crowd. So I was I was super lucky. And I know that's not the case everywhere. But   Dr Anna Lembke  26:51   the other thing to keep in mind is that the rates of alcohol use disorder and women have gone up 85% in the last two decades, 85%, the ratio of women who are addicted to alcohol, or men who are addicted to alcohol versus women has been in the range of five to one to two to one for many generations, but in the last generation, starting with the millennials, that is approached one to one. And so now women are as likely to present with an alcohol use disorder as men, which is a brand new phenomenon. And really, you know, therefore, I do appreciate that, you know, women, who are we have more women than ever, you know, addicted to alcohol, they're also wanting new ways that are better suited to women, possibly, you know, to get into recovery.   Arlina Allen  27:41   Yeah, I had a friend point out that, you know, the court system is sending people to a, who may or may not belong there, you know, predators, people with, you know, you know, violent histories or whatever that, you know, the court system is sending a lot of people there, too, I always tell women to go to women's meetings,   Dr Anna Lembke  28:00   I think that's a good place place to start. Or what I say to people is that, you know, going to meetings is a little bit. I mean, maybe this isn't a great analogy, but it's a little bit like dating, you have to, you know, meet a bunch of different meetings before you find one that you like, that's a great analogy. And there's a lot of frogs. Yeah. And then the truth is that recovery is better in some meetings than others. So you want to make sure you find a meeting where there's good recovery and recovery can change. I mean, these are very organic, human gatherings, and you can have a meeting that's really unhealthy and positive, and then it loses a few key people, or there's some other disruption of location or time you lose that frame and you lose the meeting. So it's important to, you know, to just make sure you're going to Good, good meetings.   Arlina Allen  28:47   Yeah, absolutely. And, you know, I've seen, like for women who have children like I, you for, so I was with my husband, and he's sober. And we didn't go to meetings together for like, 10 years when we first had kids, because number one, I never, I can't focus on funding to bring my kid to Yeah, it was just a variety mindset. Yeah, yeah. So there were so for women, when they have kids, it's like lifestyle changes, you know, affect your ability to go to, to meetings. I know. For some women, it was like, they're working full time. They have kids, it's like, you want me to go to 90 meetings in 90 days? That seems impossible. But you know, nowadays, it's a little different because we have online meetings and things like that. We have a little more, but gosh, it depends. I know the pandemic was really hard on a lot of people in a lot of ways. But it also presented has now provided new opportunities, because now women can go to meetings like we can literally, there's an international woman's meeting that goes 24 seven. Wow, that's cool. Yeah, it's been continuous for four months now. I want to ask you, I've so many questions. So we were talking about early recovery, people experiencing boredom and Takes about, you know, it takes some time for that to heal. So I think if people are aware of that that's coming that they can adapt to that. And to know that their passions for things will come back. Dr. Haberman described addiction as a narrowing of things that bring pleasure. And it's so interesting because as soon as we set it down, it's like, we start finding other things interesting again, when it comes to so I'm a mom, I know a lot of my listeners are your mom, you know, the whole video game thing, especially in this age of pandemic, where kids don't really have a whole lot to do and they're craving connection. It's been really confusing as a parent to know how to support your kids. It's like, Listen, I can't entertain their, you know, their teenagers, I can entertain them the whole time. It's like I have work to do. But I'm terrified about what's what happens to them sometimes in this in this age, and I have moms that are like, and our kids are so in touch with, like their neurosis now, like when I was coming up, we didn't know that my sister was struggling with clinical depression. We didn't know that that was the thing. The you know, whatever. 40 I don't know how overall I don't do math A long time ago. But now the kids are like, Oh, I have anxiety. I have depression. I have this. It's you know, the sex. Sexual orientation is so fluid. And it's like, as a parent, it's hard to know how to support your kids because we were kind of grew. I think you grew up with syrup. Did you grow up with like, a little bit of tough love?   Dr Anna Lembke  31:36   Yeah, you know, a little bit of healthy neglect. I think it's fair to say, maybe verging on unhealthy neglect. But yeah, baby nine.   Unknown Speaker  31:44   Is that a thing? benign?   Arlina Allen  31:45   Yeah, so that's Yeah, my mom was a total badass. Is that was like it was the whole Go figure. Figure it out? That's right. Yeah, for yourself. And, but we don't do that to our kids now, because we are aware of like the suicide rate. So I feel like we're in a rock between a rock and a hard place, because we can't really do the hardest thing anymore. Because our kids might kill themselves. And it's like, how, as a mom, am I supposed to help my kids through the difficult times without them getting addicted to video games? Or like, even if they're home all the time, they're not doing drugs and alcohol? They can still be, you know, porn. And listen, I don't even want to know. But video, let's just say video games, just like the online stimulation. How do I, as a mom, like your mom, how do you help your kids? How do we help our kids like self regulate?   Dr Anna Lembke  32:44   Well, I think an important important place to start is to talk about how pleasure and pain are processed in the brain. And how the brain really does want to assert this level balance or preserve homeostasis. And that any deviation from neutrality, whether it's on the pleasure side, or the pain side actually constitutes a stressor to the brains when we think about what's stressing kids out. Now, I would argue, as I do argue, in my book, that it's all of the feel good drugs and behaviors that's actually contributing to the stressors itself. Because when we're the kids are playing these video games, they're getting a huge bolus of dopamine in the reward pathway, then their brains need to compensate by down regulating their own dopamine transmission, bringing it bringing in those postsynaptic receptors. Such that you know, when those kids try to pull away from the video game, first of all, it's very hard to do that they will experientially describe that. And then they're depressed. So it's actually the gaming and the pornography and the social media that is causing the depression and anxiety and not the other way around. So what I counsel parents to do is to first understand something about that basic neurophysiology, explain it to their kids, talk to kids about how these online products can be great, but they can also be drugs and that they have been engineered to be drugs and to keep us clicking, and swiping and scrolling. And that we have to be really mindful of how we're using them and that in moderation, it's just fine. But just like you wouldn't get up and eat ice cream for breakfast, you probably don't want to get up first thing in the morning and, you know, be scrolling through social media and do that all day long. You know, the all all good things in moderation. Right, right. I mean, so we're all we all struggle with this. It's not just our kids. The other thing I say to parents, you know, so, as a family, talk about the dangers in talking about the good things about social media and video games and all that, but also talk about the dangers. Talk about how important it is to pay attention to not just how you feel when you're doing the activity, but also how it makes you feel afterwards. Talk about the importance of having some device free and tech free times in the day like maybe at dinner time or some other time with the family. Family, maybe taking tech free vacations, if you can do that, where maybe for a week at a time, everybody leaves their devices at home and goes and interacts in nature. These are all things that people, they just like they're horrified at the thoughts they get, right? Thinking about just leaving their phone behind, but But the truth is, that's really an indication of how addicted, we have all become. Even the thought of not bringing our phones with us, you know, generates anxiety. And you know, that's the same thing as my patients who are addicted to alcohol. And the thought of not having access to alcohol at that party, or at that gathering, or when I get home, you know, is absolutely terrifying to me. So I think we really have to, you know, conceptualize these behaviors as potentially highly addictive and, you know, be thoughtful about organizing our use around them to really respect the pathophysiology. In the   Arlina Allen  35:57   first the first thought they came up here and he said, Take a tech free vacation, I was like, isn't the first week off of addiction like your worst week?   Dr Anna Lembke  36:06   It is, it is. And frankly, that's why I do recommend a full month off in order to give it enough time to reset reward pathways so that you're not craving anymore. Yeah. And then and then if you want to go back to using or you have to go back to using because you need the smartphone for your work. Really, at that point, it's much easier to be intentional and thoughtful about using differently using less barriers.   Arlina Allen  36:31   Like the self binding you were talking about.   Unknown Speaker  36:34   Right? Okay, so   Arlina Allen  36:35   I'm going to jump to that since we just talked about it. So page 93 of the book, we talk about binding and I thought that was really interesting. I loved how he used Homer's Odysseus and the sirens, the story of the sirens, how's the captain would be back on his air in time self to the boat. You know what's funny is this whole time I thought the sirens were like mermaids. They're birds.   Dr Anna Lembke  36:57   They're half bird, half human creatures who spell bind sailors with their enchanting song, lure them to the rocks, and kill them that way. Kill him. I don't know. But yeah, so the story, right is that that he he but he asks his sailors to bind him to the mast, and to put beeswax in his ear so they can get through that passage without being lowered, lowered by the sirens.   Arlina Allen  37:22   What are some of those? Okay, so we mentioned, let's see, I have a list of I had a list of soft binding, things you mentioned, you know, first thing that came to mind was rehab, that's kind of a soft binding thing. And it's the first 30 days gives you a chance for your brain to reset. Obviously, like changing your environment, removing all temptations around your house when you were talking about video games, you know, or other devices. You had an interesting, I don't want to spoil the book for anybody, but you had an interesting client or patient that had a machine. Right, right, machine. But anyway, he broke in her head and did all kinds of crazy things to try to avoid it. bless his heart, that must have been awful. But yeah, so we do all kinds of self binding practices or so but I kind of wanted to relay that relate that to medications, would you consider medications a self binding? practice?   Dr Anna Lembke  38:25   Yeah, I think they really can be so for example, if you take a medication like now trek zone, which blocks the opioid receptor, that's been shown to help people reduce or stop opioids because obviously if the receptors blocked opioids like heroin or fake it in whatever it is, can't bind, but alcohol is also mediated through our own endogenous opioid system. So when the naltrexone is on the opioid receptor, alcohol is not as reinforcing. And so that can help people either stop drinking alcohol or reduce the number of drinks on drinking days. So it's a nice medicine to help people not only whose goal is abstinence, but also who have a goal of moderation. You know,   Arlina Allen  39:09   I have a client who has a family member, let's say is probably physically addicted alcohol is naltrexone use for somebody that you're chemically detoxing or medically detoxing. Is that a is that a drug that   Dr Anna Lembke  39:24   we we think of detox which is that period of helping somebody through acute withdrawal, especially potentially life threatening withdrawal and say that alcohol withdrawal can be life threatening benzodiazepine withdrawal can be life threatening that Xanax, Valium, Klonopin, advant opioid withdrawal can be life threatening. So if you're somebody who's so physically dependent on alcohol, benzos, or opioids, that you're going to go into life threatening withdrawal, you wouldn't want to just quit, you know, you would want to go see a doctor and have a medically supervised you know, medically managed withdrawal All we really think of addiction treatment or recovery as beginning, when acute withdrawal is over. Oh god, no, naltrexone is a medicine that we would use to help somebody get into and maintain recovery. It's not a medicine that we use in in acute withdrawal.   Arlina Allen  40:22   Okay, so that's after acute withdrawal. That's right. Yeah, that's important. Let's talk a little bit about I like that you have dopamine as an acronym on page 88. Okay, he had it summarized in that little, and a picture. I like pictures. Can we go over the what it stands for?   Dr Anna Lembke  40:44   Yeah. So the dopamine acronym is really just a framework for how to initially approach the problem of compulsive overconsumption, or in some cases, addiction. This is a framework that is good choice in people who are not so physically dependent, that they're going to go into life threatening withdrawal. And it wouldn't be a good framework for somebody who had already repeatedly tried to stop on their own and just was incapable somebody, for example, who was injecting heroin multiple times a day and just couldn't even go for a day without so that that would be somebody who would really need a higher level of care. But for those of us who have maybe mild to moderate addiction, or maybe aren't even addicted yet, but we're on our way to becoming addicted and or just engaging in compulsive overconsumption. This dopamine acronym kind of outlines a basic framework, and the D stands for data. And that's where I asked patients to describe to me what they're using, how much how often, and just by getting them to articulate to another human being what they're doing, that often brings into relief, their actual use in a way that they can be in denial about as long as it's just kind of this amorphous behavior in their heads. So I really like to start with just asking them in a non judgmental way, you know, how much are you on social media? How many hours a day? What are you doing? The O of dopamine stands for objectives. And this really gets into why why is it that you're doing that drug, or that behavior? What's positive about it for you, because I really do think that even irrational behaviors make some sense, subjectively, and so it's important for us to understand what's driving that individual's behavior. And then the P of dopamine stands for problems, that's when we get into, you know, what's problematic about your use, I understand why you do it, I understand what's good about it, what's problematic about it, and that can range to everything from you know, it's not working anymore. Like it used to do X, Y, and Z for me, and it's not doing those things, too, it costs a lot of money to it's interfering with my relationships work with my ability to do schoolwork, with my health. So there are many, many different reasons that people people will say, often, you know, in the way they do it, that it's, you know, to solve a problem, like anxiety or depression, but it may not be solving that problem anymore.   Arlina Allen  43:13   Sorry. So you get them sort of in touch with specifics. Yeah. So yeah, so you're not asserting pressure? Because I think I used to be a sales grown and sales, they teach you not to pressure people because it viscerally creates resistance. Yeah, right. Right. But when you ask somebody like, what, what problems is it caused? Like, what specifically what caught? What problems? Is it causing for you? They're coming up with their own. Like, I went through that experience to specific consequences that were a problem for me,   Dr Anna Lembke  43:47   right? Yeah, you basically ask them just to be objective and analytical about their own subjective experience. And just kind of, you know, go, Hey, you know, this is what I do. And this is, this is how it makes me feel.   Arlina Allen  44:00   You know, what I love about science when it comes to addiction? Is it kind of depersonalized is that because we experienced so much shame and guilt? And we did terrible? Listen, I did, did some terrible and embarrassing things when I was drinking and using they caused guilt and shame, right? Well, when I started to understand the mechanics of why I fell into the trap in the first place, was sort of depersonalized it a little bit, right and took away some of the guilt and shame. And I love this approach of objective analytical sciency stuff, because it does sort of make it more easier for me to then accept the solution.   Dr Anna Lembke  44:37   Yeah, you realize it's not about your it's not that you're a bad person, it's that it's a bad disease. And these are highly addictive substances and behaviors and they were engineered to hook us, right. The a of dopamine is really the the key intervention and that's where I ask patients to abstain from their drug of choice for 30 days. Why 30 days because that's an amount of time that most people can wrap their head around and I say never drink again. I'm Not going to be very persuasive, but I say, Hey, can you give it up for 30 days, please, I can, I can probably do that. The other thing again is that 30 days is the minimum amount of time it takes for those neural adaptation Gremlins to hop off the pain side of the balance for homeostasis to be restored, which is just another way of saying that's the amount of time it takes for us to up regulate our dopamine receptors and dopamine transmission so that we can widen our lens start to enjoy other things, but also look back and see true cause and effect because when we're chasing dopamine we really don't see the impact that it has on our lives.   Arlina Allen  45:37   It's so we get so blind that's like the denial part, right? Yeah, we lose completely lose perspective.   Dr Anna Lembke  45:43   That's right. The hard thing about getting patients to you know engage in this in this task is that many of them come in feeling bad already, right? They're looking fresh and anxiety and then I'm suggesting to do something that's going to actually make them feel worse and worse. But what I say to them it's kind of like getting you know treatment for cancer it's it's really hard when you're in it, but when you come out the other side of it, it'll it'll be worth it and potentially life saving, saving. Yeah. And then the The M is stands for mindfulness is just a way to sit with feelings, including negative, scary, strange feelings, without judgment and also without reaction without trying to get rid of those feelings. insight of dopamine acronym, just stands for how this this experiment really does give us an enormous amount of insight often into how addicted we really are. Because like I said, we were we will tend to minimize and normalize and you know, in the book, I talk about my my own romance novel reading addiction. So   Unknown Speaker  46:42   funny as all I'm right there with you, girl. Until I like, Oh, yeah, right. As it is embarrassing. my   Arlina Allen  46:48   mic, as   Unknown Speaker  46:49   I know, it is.   Arlina Allen  46:51   My boys are like sparkly vampires. What   Dr Anna Lembke  46:53   is right, right, I know, two additional ways that we are sort of incontinent around our desires is always shame producing. It's interesting. Yeah. But, but you know, this is really again, just a way to gather data, do an experiment, gain insight. And it's an embodied physical experiment, I think that's really key, too, because so much of our mental health interventions are asking patients to sort of just rearrange their thoughts. But this is a really physical thing where you know, you go into withdrawal, you know, when you feel that physically, and it's painful. So kind of asking people to embrace something that's painful in the service of feeling better in the long run. And then N stands for next steps. That's when people come back after a month, if they were able to do it, I say, Okay, do you want to keep abstaining? Or do you want to go back to using and most of them say they want to go back to using what they want to use in moderation? Yeah. And sometimes   Arlina Allen  47:48   disappointing for you to hear, like, does that make you nervous, you know,   Dr Anna Lembke  47:51   sometimes, because sometimes my choice for them really would be absence, and I kind of know that they're not going to be able to moderate. But you know, you got to meet patients where they are. And if I try to railroad them into it, it's not going to work pressure, sometimes they just have to go out and get more data and go through that loop a couple more times. And they're like, you know, what, I think I'm better off abstaining. I that's much more persuasive than if I try to tell them, that's not really gonna work for you. The other thing I would say is I have had patients who surprised me, and actually with enormous effort, were able to abstain sometimes even when they were able to do it, though they said it wasn't worth it, it took too much effort and energy, that it was easier to abstain. But importantly, there are no drugs that we use that we can't abstain from, like food, or like our smartphones so hard. Yeah. Or sex. I mean, I think most of us think of sex as, as a part of, you know, a healthy part of a healthy life. But then that idea of Well, how do we moderate becomes important, I think, for all of us, even for those of us who are trying to abstain from our drug of choice, because, because we're just bombarded by these highly rewarding substances and behaviors. And so we're all we're all challenged with, you know, abstention, and moderation and, and I really think that people in recovery, you know, as I say, in the book, our modern day profits for the rest of us kind of can show us how to live in this token saturated world. So just to finish off, then e of dopamine stands for experiment. That's where people go back out and implement what they've learned now with a pleasure pain pathway that's at the homeostatic level place. You know, so they can go out and have a better chance of being successful with moderation, or abstinence, or whatever it is.   Arlina Allen  49:39   Yeah. Thank you for going through that and being able to remember all the things you were super smart, I would not have been able to do that off the top of my head. A couple of questions came up from as you were going through that. So I just find it like such a paradox that you know, people with these use disorder. have such as high tolerance for pain on one hand like the consequences and on on the other hand we have such an in ability we have like this avoidance of emotional pain right and I just wonder I heard this I was watching this show things totally unrelated But anyway, I was watching the show called meat eater and this guy was talking about how and as a hunter, you know, human beings have something called shifting baseline syndrome. Have you ever heard of that idea? The idea is that as human evolution through human evolution or as societies change, we have good time feast and famine right? And so we have this ability to normalize lower standards of living, right and so in Alcoholics Anonymous that we talk about seeking lower companionship or like this is okay this is okay. Yeah, and so I was like that is so funny. But at the same time when it comes to paint like emotional pain tolerance, it feels like we're living in this really weird worldwide we're experiencing or we're creating all this pain for ourselves because we're you know, you drink in us you spend all your money and you're in all this pain and so what do you do you drink and use more to because you can't tolerate the pain you know, it's just such a weird place to be we have this and I feel like in all fairness that most people have an avoidance of emotional pain what are some of the ways I mean I feel like you know the great thing about a it was like we have community like it's a ready made community to help us get through emotional pain. I shared with you earlier that my mom is ill I just found out last week that she's terminally ill. And I'm not insensitive, and he might be a little bit maybe a little bit numb. But I have found I so I've been 27 years sober. It used to be if I got stood up on a date, I would go on a bender, like I couldn't tolerate it. Now I'm sober a long time. My mom is really sick. And it doesn't even occur to me to use what happened to my brain. From that, you know what I'm saying? It's like, yeah, oh, yeah. Now what happened to my brain?   Dr Anna Lembke  52:17   Well, I mean, your your brain is not any longer in that addiction cycle, your brain is at a homeostatic baseline. And it might even be tipped slightly to the side of pleasure such that you have the mental calluses and the resilience to withstand even enormously painful things like, you know, the potential loss of a loved one. Well, I'm again, I just think that thinking about the balance and the neurophysiology and that what happens when people are in their addiction loop is that they're essentially walking around with a pleasure pain balance tipped chronically to the side of pain, their dopamine transmission is at chronically lower levels. And so there's an enormous physiologic drive, to get their drug and to prioritize that drug over everything else, not to get high, but just to get out of pain and to feel normal. Whereas once you and that also means that even the nearest slight is going to make you feel more pain because you're already in this painful state. And that you know, what we call natural rewards, more modest rewards, food, clothing, shelter, a good conversation with a friend will no longer be adequate, right? Because you've got all these Gremlins camped out on the pain 10 pounds. Now you need a great big bolus of a supercharged potent drug, just to bring you level again. Whereas once you're in recovery, and you start to repair all of that and the Gremlins hop off and you start to upregulate, not just your own endogenous dopamine but also your endocannabinoid system, your endo opioid system, your serotonin or norepinephrine. Now you've got a pleasure pain balance, that's subtle, right? It's homeostatic it's level its sensitive, appropriately to small pleasures. It's sensitive to small pains but resilient enough to you know, quickly restore homeostasis in both directions. And you know, that's that's great. That's exactly where we want to be. Yeah, it   Arlina Allen  54:10   takes takes a lot of work takes a lot it does   Unknown Speaker  54:12   it takes a lot of vigilance and where it's you know, when you when I think about that pleasure, pain balance, it's sometimes I say it's like a teeter totter and a kid's playground, but really, it's more like a piece of plywood on a ball and you're standing on that piece and you're constantly having to move in order to keep in balance it's not a static process it's a really dynamic process that takes constant small adjustments   Arlina Allen  54:37   Yeah, and I'm glad you talked about that you're you know talking about balance and and and we only have a couple minutes and so I did want to touch on the scent. Thank you so much for writing this book. This was so such such an important book for people like me, who need to know why and need to know how and what to do about it right like we can we know ruminate on the problem. All day long, but I need to know what to do. Right? There are practical steps, tangible, practical, understandable, things to do to get better. And the idea is that and you did talk about like we can break our dopamine reward system, but you also said we can heal it. And that is the hope that this will give provides so much hope and like a real concrete, practical way that doesn't require like a you know, religion or you don't have to do like, like, I'm not knocking that at all right? Because I found that to be super helpful, but I don't know I'm a science girl at heart and I need to know why. I write I need to me, to me kind of girl at the end of the day, and at the end of the book on page 231 we're talking about your conclusion, which is the lessons of balance and you know, I've, you know, heard people say I think of balance is sort of a wide path that's not a razor's edge and I just gonna read under read you something that you wrote, you're like I already know. We all desire a respite from the world, a break from the impossible standards we often set for ourselves and others. It's natural that we would seek a reprieve from our own relentless ruminations. Oh, my God, the whole obsessive thinking, why did I do this? Why can't I do that? Look what they did to me? How could I do that to them? And then your question you pose is what if, instead of seeking oblivion by escaping from the world, we turn toward it? That is the challenge, right? That is the challenge is to, you know, Sheryl Sandberg said lean in, right, you know, but it's in the leaning in that, it we, you know, I'm always talking about let's process her resolution, right. And that requires leaning in,   Unknown Speaker  56:55   it does, yeah. And I think, you know, I mean, we're all seeking transcendence, and that loss of self, that non being where we're not ruminating and thinking about ourselves in the world, and, you know, escaping with drugs, or in my case in into fantasy novels, you know, is one way to do that, but not ultimately, a very adaptive way to do that, a better way to do that is actually to do the opposite. And really engage with the people around us with the life that we've been given, immerse ourselves in it. And when we invest in and immerse ourselves in, you know, in our real lives, they do become, you know, transcendental, they do take on a kind of luminous and numinous quality that's really enhancing that releases dopamine, but in a way that is enduring, and healthy. And so yeah, that's, I think, really the antidote to to to addiction, you know, instead of trying to run away, turn around, and immerse yourself in it.   Arlina Allen  57:57   That is the antidote simple, but not easy.   Unknown Speaker  57:59   That's not easy to do. Yeah, well, listen,   Arlina Allen  58:03   at the end of the day, that's why we all need each other. Right? You know, and, and I know from reading the book that you did your own work, and I really appreciated that about you, thank you for sharing those for your transparency and your vulnerability in the book of sharing your own, you know, struggles that you did your own work. So thank you. Thank you so much again, for this time, I'm so honored and and this was such an amazing book and where do people find? Find out more about you?   Unknown Speaker  58:32   Well, the book is available where books are sold, that's probably the best source of finding my work. It's also available on on Audible, as you mentioned, for people who'd rather listen than then read a physical book or a Kindle version. And then there's more about me on on Olympia calm or dopamine nation calm a website that was created for the book.   Arlina Allen  58:56   Listen, thank you so much for idea, tell Andrew I said “Hey”.   Unknown Speaker  59:03   All right. Yeah. Thank you so much.  

Late Bloomer Living Podcast
EP 70 - Nicole Lewis-Keeber: You Belong Here

Late Bloomer Living Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 58:10


Nicole Lewis-Keeber is an expert in helping business owners understand how unaddressed trauma can hold them back in their business.  We talk about the sneaky ways that trauma can show up and about how she learned to set strong boundaries in her life thanks in large part to getting certified in Brene Brown's Dare to Lead program.  After many years in practice as a therapist Nicole realized it was time for her to make a change.  She stepped away from her practice, worked another job and took some time to think about her next steps.  It took time, but she stayed open and finally found the path that she's on today…  She's now been featured on numerous media outlets including Fast Company and NPR for her work in breaking the stigma of mental health and business ownership.

Working Wife, Happy Life!
Ep 42 - Working Moms & Entrepreneurship with Erin Erenberg, Totum Women

Working Wife, Happy Life!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 58:32


Did you find yourself at a loss for support when you became a mom? Did you feel like EVERYTHING was geared toward motherhood and not the other aspects of your life and identity? Were you looking to be welcomed and lifted up as a “whole” woman versus bits and pieces of who you were and what you needed?  Enter this incredible woman, someone I consider a dear and immediate friend, Erin Erenberg. Erin is a mom of three, an attorney, a serial business builder, fund advisor and the founder and CEO of Totum Women, a community-powered platform to help women feel supported in motherhood. Totum means “whole” in Latin and is born of Erin's experience as a new mother who wanted more information and resources for her as a whole woman, not just a mother.  As topical as you can imagine, in this conversation we discuss the burnout of Moms and those in their communities, the importance of knowing where you're happiest and most fulfilled from a career perspective, giving yourself permission to step away, or to pivot, finding your financial dignity, and the importance of creating your personal narrative, and value prop - what you are uniquely able to do. (SO IMPORTANT) We also discuss the amazing Brene Brown's concept of “shame growing in silence” (so critical to breadwinning women!) and ironically, ice cream. Yep, it always comes back to ice cream. You can connect with Erin and the Totum community on social channels @totumwomen or on their site, totumwomen.com. Enjoy, my conversation with Erin!

The Long and The Short Of It
161. Competition

The Long and The Short Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 12:46


Jen and Pete noodle on the difference between competition and competitiveness, opening up a discussion around how to be competitive without bringing other people down. Specifically, in this episode Jen and Pete talk about:How can you be competitive without being an asshole?What steps might you take to improve your work within your industry?Why is important to separate work and/or process from outcomes?Is your work competitive? (And who might you be able to ask for feedback on that question?)To hear all Episodes and read full transcripts visit The Long and The Short Of It website: https://thelongandtheshortpodcast.com/.You can subscribe to our Box o' Goodies here (https://thelongandtheshortpodcast.com/) and receive a weekly email full of book and podcast recommendations, quotes, videos and other interesting things Jen and Pete are noodling on. To get in touch, send an email to: hello@thelongandtheshortpodcast.comLearn more about Pete's work here (https://humanperiscope.com/) and Jen's work here (https://jenwaldman.com/).

Better Call Daddy
172. Losing My Front Teeth Broke Me Open. Carlyn Shaw

Better Call Daddy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 61:09


Losing your teeth can be terrible, a train wreck,  or can lead you on an incredible journey!  What are your two front teeth? What do they signify?  Where do you experience shame? It's how you face the world!  Carlyn chose to self-forgive,  take a slap from the universe, and help others find their smiles!  Better Call Daddy: The Safe Space For Controversy!   Carlyn Shaw is a breath of fresh air leaving a trail of smiles wherever she goes. An Inspirational Storyteller, Connection Coach and Catalyst, and the Founder of Strangers To Friends, Carlyn empowers you to let go of limiting beliefs, turn pain into possibilities and live your most authentic life. Her ability to meet anyone where they are in life makes her a special soul, everyone can call, a friend. At 19 years old, Carlyn was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis followed by the death of two best friends, in separate car accidents. In the midst of despair, Carlyn became aware of the ability she had to help heal her body, heart and spirit. When Carlyn went within to uncover the means to shift her story. a profound awareness swept over her: she had the choice, to allow life to happen to her, or for her. Applying this wisdom, she overcame her MS, anxiety and depression, she began both listening to and following her heart. Carlyn jokes the Universe supplies her stories so she can share them and help people to not feel alone in their own stories. From job losses to breakups to loosing her house and something as unimaginable as loosing her front teeth in a freak accident, Carlyn live by her conviction that setbacks are silver linings in disguise. And more importantly, everyone and everything is connected. A purveyor of personal strength and starting over, Carlyn gives you permission to give yourself permission.  If you hang with Carlyn long enough she'll have you believing you can do… anything.  From countless interviews and speaking engagements ranging from The National MS Society to an appearance on Anderson Cooper, Carlyn inspires her audience shift their perspective and show up for themselves. A Boston and New York City Marathon Finisher, her 2015 feature in The Denver Post opened the door as a Keynote speaker for an Alaskan Marathon. On March 23, 2020, the day Colorado went into lockdown, Carlyn bravely moved herself to St. Petersburg, FL, sight unseen, with nothing open, trusting the signs to start over in a new city, solo. You can find Carlyn running along the Gulf of Mexico, cruising on her yellow scooter around town and starting smiles with strangers. Her new passion project is reminding people: Whoever Smiles First Wins, www.SmilesFirstWins.com Use the code THANKYOU for 20% off!   Carlyn is currently working on a book and will launch her Podcast, Connect with Carlyn, early 2022.   Most importantly, Carlyn can't wait to connect with you!     Ways to Connect with Carlyn: Instagram @ConnectWithCarlyn & @StrangersToFriends Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/carlyn.shaw1/ Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/in/carlynshaw/ Carlyn@CarlynShaw.com   Websites: www.StrangersToFriends.com www.SmilesFirstWins.com      To read Carlyn's Teeth Story (that Brene Brown shared on Twitter!) visit https://strangerstofriends.com/lessons-learned-from-losing-my-two-front-teeth/   Me and my daddy would love to hear from you podchaser.com/bettercalldaddy   Leave us a five star real review ratethispodcast.com/bettercalldaddy   Find me on Linkedin linkedin.com/in/reenafriedmanwatts   Find me on Instagram  instagram.com/bettercalldaddypodcast

The Business Power Hour with Deb Krier

In 2009, “Prosperity Summit” Seminars marked the beginning of Shannon's journey to empower 900 women financially. As an event promoter, Shannon has created and produced over 1100 live events, workshops and retreats. She has worked with over 200 industry-leading speakers including Tony Robbins, Mark Victor Hanson (Chicken Soup for the Soul), Fredric Lehrman (Prosperity Consciousness), and Loral Langemeier (The Millionaire Maker). For more than 12 years, Shannon has studied with women's empowerment luminaries like Alison Armstrong, Mama Gena and Brene Brown. She's continued to deepen her research of Feminine Leadership and Women's Studies, helping women to increase their productivity and be more effective leaders, without leading like men. Shannon has supported over 400 women leaders to own their authentic voice and speak on stages all across the world. In 2014, Shannon launched Big Impact, Inc with her husband Mark, a seminar and training company that has trained over 3000 women leaders in the art and science of presentation mastery. These women leaders have generated over $43 Million dollars in revenue and spoke on some of the world's most coveted stages, including TEDTalk, Tony Robbins, Good Morning America and The View. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

For The Love With Jen Hatmaker Podcast
[BOOK CLUB BONUS] Brene Brown's “Daring Greatly” ft. Kristin Howerton 

For The Love With Jen Hatmaker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 55:38


Calling all book nerds! Are you looking for a place where your book-loving heart can flourish? Join us at jenhatmakerbookclub.com, and become one of our sisters in nerdiness. For September 2021, Jen and the club read Brene' Brown's Daring Greatly. Most of us know and love Brene and all her work, but just in case you're new to her, here's the rundown. Brene is a research professor at the University of Houston where she holds the Huffington Foundation Endowed Chair. She is also a visiting professor in management at The University of Texas at Austin McCombs School of Business. She has spent years and years and years studying courage, vulnerability, shame, and empathy. So much of our community has been informed by Brene's work, and we're taking this month's book club spot to dissect Daring Greatly with an actual therapist to discuss key points and concepts of the book that we can all apply to our lives. We are thrilled to welcome a friend to Jen and our podcast community, therapist Kristin Howerton to discuss vulnerability and Brene's book, Daring Greatly. Kristin and Jen chat about what it's like to be vulnerable, how to identify toxic relationships, and why it's so important to care for ourselves first. Because we all know that it's impossible to pour from an empty cup, but in the busyness of life, we often forget that our hearts and minds need care too.  * * *   Thank you to our sponsors!   Betterhelp | Get 10% off your first month at betterhelp.com/forthelove to join more than 1 million people that have taken charge of their mental health. 

Weddings for Real
156: The Unraveling Series

Weddings for Real

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 10:45


Once a month moving forward, we're bringing you a new series - The Unraveling.  These episodes shine a light on the pivotal  moments and ensuing decisions that industry leaders have encountered that changed everything.  The unraveling moment.   Today, I'm sharing my own unraveling. Unlocking Us, Brene Brown's Podcast where she introduces the Unraveling Concept. The Midlife Unraveling, by Brene Brown   This episode is brought to you by The Planner's Vault, my online membership site for wedding planners who are hungry to grow, ready to hustle, and actively seeking community and education. In the vault, there are guest experts on many topics relevant to growing and cultivating a successful event planning business with new content added consistently, plus all of my templates that I have built out over the years, like How to Get on Preferred Vendor Lists, The Client Experience, and more. The mission with the vault is to elevate the industry (along with some amazing experts and fellow entrepreneurs) and I want it to be affordable so it's possible to stay invested in the community and yourself for the long haul. The doors are currently closed for The Vault, but join the wait list now so you can be the first to know when the doors re-open. Weddings for Real on Social Media: Instagram: @weddingsforreal Facebook: @weddingsforreal twitter: @weddingsforreal The host of the show is Megan Gillikin, owner and lead consultant at A Southern Soiree Wedding and Event Planning.  She's also available for wedding and hospitality business consulting and can be reached at megan@weddingsforreal.com. Weddings for Real is edited and produced by Earfluence.

The Game Changing Attorney Podcast with Michael Mogill
80 — Henry Cloud — Authentic & Transcendental Leadership

The Game Changing Attorney Podcast with Michael Mogill

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 50:32


"If you want to know if you're a leader or not, turn around and see if anybody's behind you." - Henry Cloud What makes a good leader? How important are boundaries in a professional environment? Why do people struggle approaching difficult conversations? How significant is strategy when building a team? What are the key components of emotional intelligence? Foundations: A Long Road to the Top Henry Cloud's passion for the human mind sprung from an early age, and he believes that "humans are glued together by character." As an expert in leadership, Henry has a firm grasp on human behavior. He understands the dynamics of people both in and outside of the workplace when it comes to hierarchical status. His book “Boundaries for Leaders” explores the appropriate behaviors needed when communicating with those around you — a must-read for the players at the top. Follow the Leader: Leading the Crowd In this episode, we look at efficient leadership skills such as emotional intelligence and problem-solving. We also ask why people become leaders and how they conduct their behavior when building a team. For Henry, leaders are those that "see something that doesn't exist," with the ability to transform and guide their colleagues. Henry also believes there are different types of leadership, and each of those leaders present different values. He says, "I've never met a CEO that had all of those strengths: vision, engaging talent, strategy and execution, measurement, accountability and fixing and adapting." Mr. Worldwide: A Man Who Speaks to All With his 45 published books and nearly 20 million copies sold worldwide, Henry is dedicated to spreading his knowledge. He's been named in the top 25 most influential leaders in personal growth alongside names such as Oprah, Brene Brown, and Seth Godin. But Henry's audiences still have to wrestle with difficult questions. In this interview, Henry says that great leaders "chase conflict so they can resolve it to get past that obstacle to the next level." Without obstacles in our way, how will we ever become stronger? Key takeaways: Lead by example: To be a successful and well-respected leader, make the effort and involve yourself in practice. Building blocks: You can't do everything on your own, so hold on to a helping hand. Be respectful: Showing respect is a key component to efficient leadership. Links and Resources The Game Changing Attorney Podcast Michael Mogill Facebook Michael Mogill Twitter Michael Mogill Instagram Michael Mogill LinkedIn Crisp Website Crisp Facebook Crisp Twitter Crisp Instagram Crisp LinkedIn Henry Cloud Website Henry Cloud LinkedIn Henry Cloud Twitter Boundaries for Leaders - Book

Currently Reading
Season 4, Episode 12: Book Gushing + Packing Your Non-Fiction November TBR

Currently Reading

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 54:31


On this week's episode of Currently Reading, Mary and Kaytee are discussing: Bookish Moments: indie bookstore moments for a day date and a meetup Current Reads: we both have books today that are contenders for favorite of the year Deep Dive: we talk about multiple categories of books that we have loved and think you might love for non-fiction November Book Presses: two more NF picks, both memoir As per usual, time-stamped show notes are below with references to every book and resource we mentioned in this episode. If you'd like to listen first and not spoil the surprise, don't scroll down!  New: we are now including transcripts of the episode (this link only works on the main site). These are generated by AI, so they may not be perfectly accurate, but we want to increase accessibility for our fans! *Please note that all book titles linked below are Amazon affiliate links. Your cost is the same, but a small portion of your purchase will come back to us to help offset the costs of the show. Thanks for your support!*   . . . . 1:26 Bookish Moment of the Week 1:43 - Boswell Books 3:30 - The Lincoln Highway by Amor Towles   3:33 - Garcia Street Books 5:18 Current Reads: 5:31 - Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon (Mary) 9:41 - The Very Nice Box by Laura Blackett and Eve Gleichman (Kaytee) 13:13 - Fat Chance Charlie Vega by Crystal Maldonado (Mary) 16:15 - Starfish by Lisa Fipps  16:38 - Redemption Point by Candice Fox (Kaytee) 19:56 - Magic Lessons by Alice Hoffman (Mary) 20:04 - Practical Magic by Alice Hoffman  20:07 - The Rules of Magic by Alice Hoffman 22:14 - The Book of Magic by Alice Hoffman 22:55 - All the Lonely People by Mike Gayle (Kaytee) 23:03 - Amy's Instagram @amyseptemberreads 26:06 - A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman 28:02 Deep Dive - Reads for Nonfiction November 31:01 - What Kind of Woman by Kate Baer 31:10 - I Hope This Finds You Well by Kate Baer 32:02 - A Thousand Mornings by Mary Oliver 32:17 - Great with Child: Letters to a Young Mother by Beth Ann Fennelly 33:04 - Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer 33:07 - An Indigenious Peoples' History of the United States (The Young Reader's Version) by Debbie Reese 33:55 - An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States (Adult Version) by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz 35:04 - At Home in the World by Tsh Oxenreider 35:41 - Heating and Cooling by Beth Ann Fennelly 36:11 - Glitter and Glue by Kelly Corrigan  36:17 - Tell Me More by Kelly Corrigan 36:40 - I Have Something to Tell You by Chasten Buttigieg 37:38 - All Over the Place: Adventures in Travel, True Love and Petty Theft by Geraldine DeRuiter 38:08 - Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? by Mindy Kaling 38:11 - Why Not Me? by Mindy Kaling 38:44 - Know My Name by Chanel Miller 39:03 - Love Lives Here by Amanda Jette Knox 39:21 - Heavy by Kiese Laymon 39:32 - Born a Crime by Trevor Noah 39:48 - Here for It by R. Eric Thomas 40:22 - A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson 40:46 - Year of Yes by Shonda Rhimes 41:06 - Animal, Vegetable, Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver 41:23 - Tiny Beautiful Things by Cheryl Strayed 41:58 - Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson 42:11 - Evicted by Matthew Desmond 42:28 - The Sum of Us by Heather McGhee 42:49 - A Knock at Midnight by Brittany K. Barnett 44:18 - HRH: So Many Thoughts on Royal Style by Elizabeth Holmes 44:52 - Bad Blood by John Carreyrou 45:20 - Essentialism by Greg McKeown 45:22 - The Lazy Genius Way by Kendra Adachi 45:24 - Atomic Habits by James Clear 46:25 - Designing Your Life by Bill Burnett 46:49 - The Gifts of Imperfection by Brene Brown 46:51 - Braving the Wilderness by Brene Brown 47:16 - Burnout by Emily Nagoski 47:39 - Come As You Are by Emily Nagoski 48:21 - The Road Back To You by Ian Morgan Cron and Suzanne Stabile 48:32 - The Four Tendencies by Gretchen Rubin 48:57 - Reading People by Anne Bogel 49:33 - Megan notes that it was “only” 41 books. 49:47 Books We Want to Press Into Your Hands: 50:00 - My Life in France by Julia Child (Mary) 51:25 Sitting Pretty by Rebekah Taussig (Kaytee) 51:33 - Season 3: Episode 15 Connect With Us: Meredith is @meredith.reads on Instagram Kaytee is @notesonbookmarks on Instagram Mindy is @gratefulforgrace on Instagram Mary is @maryreadsandsips on Instagram currentlyreadingpodcast.com @currentlyreadingpodcast on Instagram currentlyreadingpodcast@gmail.com Support us at patreon.com/currentlyreadingpodcast