Podcasts about wanting

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Economic term for something that is desired

  • 4,740PODCASTS
  • 6,629EPISODES
  • 37mAVG DURATION
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  • Nov 30, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about wanting

Show all podcasts related to wanting

Latest podcast episodes about wanting

Because I Can Life
How to Start an Online Boutique (and Why It's Okay to Be Bad at Something New)

Because I Can Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 43:12


When we were kids, it usually didn't phase us to try new things—I mean, childhood is a time when we're always learning, right?  And for the most part, if we don't get it right, we just dust ourselves off and try again. As adults, however, we don't tend to give ourselves the same kind of grace. We want to get things right the first time. That's why I loved my conversation with Darlene Turner, who was one of the first people who joined my 0-$100K Program. In this episode of the podcast, Darlene shares her journey launching and growing her online boutique, CrushOnThis.net—and what she's learned along the way (including why it's okay to be bad at something new.) Key TakeawaysIntro (00:00)How we met (00:49)Wanting her own business (02:45)What school doesn't teach you (03:47)“I wanted someone that had done it” (04:48)Getting started (05:49)Finding inspiration (07:11)Crush on That, Crush on This (08:48)Too much inventory (09:50)Learning on deal sites (12:12)Going live on Facebook (14:20)It takes as long as it takes (22:28)Learning to be bad again (25:44) Home “studio” (27:48)Facebook groups and pages (28:29)Comment Sold (31:50)Don't attach an outcome (33:06)Wanting a connection (36:38)Top takeaways (40:45) Additional Resources Shop with Darlene: CrushOnThis.netFacebook: @crushonthis.netOn Instagram: @crushonthis Connect with Alison:Facebook: @alisonjprinceInstagram: @alisonjprinceLinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/alisonjprince/>>>Click here to join the $0-100k Program!

CFO Weekly
Why Every Business Owner Needs to Have Exit Strategies w/ Marvin Storm

CFO Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 43:28


Did you know that entrepreneurs often have to part with their businesses? And most of the time, it happens unexpectedly and forcefully, bringing lots of frustration and disappointment. To avoid that, entrepreneurs need to prepare for these moments. But do you know what those moments are and how to prepare for them? Many entrepreneurs have failed and had to pay for their mistakes. Wanting to help others avoid this and experience a positive exit, Marvin Storm launched The Business Exit Stories Podcast. The experts and consultants of this process share valuable insights on how an entrepreneur can prepare to exit from their business and not repeat others' mistakes. In this episode, we discuss: - Challenges That Business Owners Face - Why Unprepared Entrepreneurs Fail to Exit a Business - How to Prepare and Exit a Business Successfully For more interviews from the CFO Weekly podcast, check us out on Apple, Spotify, or your favorite podcast player! Presented by Personiv https://insights.personiv.com/cfo-weekly

All Things Telesales Podcast
EP 90 - Jake Lynn - Ego Vs. Higher Self in Sales

All Things Telesales Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 6:47


Having an ego is all about wanting to be perceived as the best.Ego is the inability to listen, act, or take direction because of pride.Wanting to crush your goals and be great at what you do doesn't have to come at the expense of everyone else. The ego-centric way of getting there is to put yourself on a pedestal and ignore everyone else and their opinions.But the truth is this:An unchecked ego can leave a career dead in its tracks.Let's break it down.Support the show (http://www.allthingstelesales.com)

ESN: Eloquently Saying Nothing
ESN #332 : The Ghetto Gallivanters Episode

ESN: Eloquently Saying Nothing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 131:32


This week's topics: • CBD Oil for body pains • Having a last ditch piece of fun before settling down • Going on holiday without your partner • Unyoked arranged marriages • Being ignorant to different cultures • Arranged marriages • Caring or not about Exes • Being disappointed with whom your Ex has slept with • People who can switch on the charisma • Talking to yourself • Leaving items after throws of passion • Going on holiday without your family • Women travelling solo • Travelling to ghettos and hood all over the world • Being scared on holiday • The hood being home • Stealing cars • Children being shy or outgoing • Being able to work on TV • Who we'd interview if we could pick anyone, dead or alive • Guiding children in the direction you want • A deeper dive on Kyle Rittenhouse's acquittal • Listener email • Wanting more women on the podcast • Telling people they're special unprompted • Telling family you love them • AITA for leaving my boyfriend stranded at a party for making a 'joke'? • Taking jokes too far with people • #StavrosSays : 1. William Irvine: How To Live a Stoic Life [The Knowledge Project Ep. #123] [https://fs.blog/knowledge-podcast/william-irvine/] 2. Kate [https://www.netflix.com/title/80216200] 3. Passing [https://www.netflix.com/title/81424320] Connect with us at & send your questions & comments to: #ESNpod so we can find your comments www.esnpodcast.com www.facebook.com/ESNpodcasts www.twitter.com/ESNpodcast www.instagram.com/ESNpodcast @esnpodcast on all other social media esnpodcast@gmail.com It's important to subscribe, rate and review us on your apple products. You can do that here... www.bit.ly/esnitunes

ChaseLife with Kelly
50: Letting Go

ChaseLife with Kelly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 32:43


Today's episode was inspired by a conversation with someone very close to me. I know you will be able to relate. Whether you are in a relationship, or single, you can be navigating hardships and heartaches. You see, I used to find it so challenging when it came to letting go, particularly with men. Thankfully, what I've learned, and what I invite you to learn as well, is that the more I shift my mindset to abundance, gratitude and growth - it doesn't take me as long to let go of things anymore. The more I do this, the easier it is to align myself to the person that I want and desire. Anything that isn't that, I don't align with. I am happily able to let go of that someone, or something. Align Yourself to New people and New Energy [3:31] “If you don't like your current situation, obviously it's time to let go. But if you're in a relationship - work on it first. Don't just surrender and throw in the towel. ” Fear of Loss vs. Fear of Happiness [5:30] “We fear loss in fear of being happy. We stay single/stuck in a relationship because we are afraid to be happy.” There is Always Going to be Pain and Hurt [8:49] “There is always gonna be the duality - pain and pleasure. Acknowledge the pain it's gonna create and work through it.” Are You in a Position to Have Love Right Now? [10:25] “How am I not showing up for myself today?”  Tune In to You [13:00] “Embrace the fear, so that you can learn a lesson and get to the other side of it.” “That person who should come, should only compliment you and not complete you.” Keep Aligning to Who You Are and Who You Want to Become [14:15] “That next level version of you, who is she?” Hurt People hurt people, Free People free people [15:50] “Audit yourself now, tune into your messes, insecurities etc. in order to start showing up differently.”  Stand Up for Yourself [17:48] “If they're not showing up for themselves the way that you like, you have the power to let them go.” Be Strong in Your Boundaries [18:45] “I love you, but I love myself more.”  Get Really in Alignment and Excited About What You're Wanting [23::13] “No more self-sabotaging, just keep focusing on yourself.”  Remember, if you keep thinking or saying what you don't want, you're only going to keep attracting them. Shift to abundance, positivity, possibility and gratitude. If you love this episode let me know and send me a message on instagram! I want to lead you to become more confident and create the life you crave! I want to help you shift your mindset, so that you are showing up as the highest version of yourself! Connect with me at: Instagram @chaselifewithkelly Youtube ChaseLife with Kelly Facebook https://www.facebook.com/groups/chaselifetogether/ Website www.chaselifetogether.com Review this podcast and share with friends!

Chronic Victory Podcast
Chronic Victory Podcast #60 - Wanting to Give Up

Chronic Victory Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 36:23


I explain why you shouldn't kill yourself, a value about yourself that you might not notice, some considerations and things we can do when we feel like giving up.  There is a better way than suicide, we just need to find it!Topics:A new answer to the question:  Why shouldn't I kill myself?Weighing options offers a clear answer.Death reveals itself to us, Living offers chance and hope and unknown.Curiosity plays a part.Something you're NOT seeing right now.Don't believe the LIE that you are ALONE.You're right, I AM EMOTIONAL.Concept of Refocusing.You've won this battle before, you can do it again.From "I have to..." to "I GET to...".Go to work as a human being.Your gift of perspective.Make sure it takes a long time to be killed.LIKE TO SUPPORT THE SHOW, SMALL BUSINESS, AND YOURSELF? Please visit our affiliates for even more support!The Healthy PlaceVisit findyourhealthyplace.com for all your natural supplement needs! Vitamins, proteins, CBD, pre-workouts, recovery, snacks, beauty products, toiletries, chocolates...you name it!Use code: VICTORY for 30% off & Free Shipping! (USA only)Wild Theory CBDCheck out wildtheory.com for some amazing CBD products!Use code: VICTORY for 30% off & Free Shipping! (USA only)Please consider donating, buying merch or simply sending a message!Instagram:  @chronicvictorypodcastEmail:  chronicvictorypodcast@gmail.comYoutube:  Chronic VictoryPatreon:  Chronic VictoryRedbubble:  Chronic VictoryMusic Credits:Ataraxia By AERØHEADhttps://soundcloud.com/aerohead Music provided by https://www.plugnplaymusic.netRPM99Aggressive Epic RockNo copyright musicThe Healthy Place Support the podcast & an awesome small business! Go to findyourhealthyplace.com - use code: victoryWild Theory CBD Support the podcast..farmers..small business & yourself! Go to wildtheory.com and use code: victoryWild Theory CBD Check out wildtheory.com for all your CBD needs and use code: victoryDisclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.Support the show (http://www.patreon.com/chronicvictory)

Liberate Your People Pleaser Podcast
Why wanting more is an Inner Journey?

Liberate Your People Pleaser Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 17:02


Subject/Title: Why wanting more is an Inner Journey? It's natural to desire to have more. Sometimes we feel guilty about it, as if wanting more is somehow a criticism of what we have now. And we know that “chasing more” doesn't satisfy us, so what is it with wanting more?  It is what leads us ever onward. Wanting more can give us the motivation to keep on going, to grow to our full potential - to more happiness, more well-being, more fulfillment, and attain self-realization. Wanting more is an Inner journey that gives us the feeling of deep satisfaction, fulfillment and purpose.  In today's episode of Liberate Your People Pleaser I'm going to dig deep into this topic and answer the most important question and the name of our today's episode Why wanting more is an Inner Journey? Plus! In today's episode, I have a special offer that's only good for 2 more days! To support you in your inner journey to getting more passion, purpose, and fulfillment out of life, I'm offering The Solve It Method™ Digital Program at a special price and adding a FREE COACHING SESSION with it! Get all the deets and sign up before the special ends at midnight Nov. 30th! It's all right HERE! ------------- -Get information and register for The Solve It Method™ Digital Program HERE. -Book a Connection Call to explore working with me HERE. -Join my Facebook Group, Liberate Your People Pleaser, HERE.  -Ask a question to be addressed on a future episode, HERE or email me at brenda@brendaflorida.com

Tough Girl Podcast
Steph Cooke - A mature plodder's forays in trekking and ultra racing. Marathon des Sables and going on - A Pennine Journey.

Tough Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 53:54


Steph in her own words:   “Being a very shy and uncoordinated child I used to avoid anything active until a family holiday to the Lake District ignited a passion for walking and the outdoors.    I love to get outside and active and to push my body to see just what it's capable of.    The excitement of tackling a long-distance trail appeals to me, but I also enjoy discovering the adventure my local area has to offer. I find joy in immersing myself in nature- wherever you are you can find great beauty.    Middle age is a time when people tend to slow down and stop being active. I want to inspire other people in their 40s, 50s, 60s and beyond that you are still capable of doing some pretty amazing things and that it's never too late for adventure.”   New episodes of the Tough Girl Podcast go live every Tuesday at 7am UK time - Hit the subscribe button so you don't miss out.    The Tough Girl Podcast is sponsorship and ad free thanks to the monthly financial support of patrons.    Support the mission to increase the amount of female role models in the media. Visit www.patreon.com/toughgirlpodcast and subscribe - super quick and easy to do and it makes a massive difference. Thank you.   Show notes Turning 50 and being passionate about getting outdoors Wanting to do more and more Being very shy and uncoordinated while growing up Doing everything to avoid physical activity Being inspired by spending time walking in the Lake District Progressing her walking and joining the Long Distance Walkers Association (LDWA)  Getting involved in Challenge Walks with the LDWA Deciding what challenges to do next Doing the coast to coast walk Feeling scared at the start  How her confidence grew through experience  Walking with a friend on the Isle of Man Walking the Pennine Way and why it was challenging due to lockdowns and covid Dealing with the British Weather…. Planning and preparation for walks The importance of long training walks Equipment and gear on a budget Ways to keep the costs down as a single traveller Doing her first overnight camping trip A Pennine Journey (247 miles) The plan… Food and nutrition while on the challenge Training and getting physically ready Wanting to share her stories with others Signing up for the Marathon des Sables (MDS) to document the training of the journey  Start small and build up  Running the London Marathon  Marathon des Sables Building up fitness and training for the MDS Preparing the mind and getting mentally ready for the challenge Running the wettest MDS ever! Lessons learned from finishing the MDS Dealing with stomach issues Craving coffee Follow along with Steph on social media   Part 2 A Pennie Journey The route Why things didn't quite go to plan Dealing with blisters and the Summer heat wave Building her confidence with camping and using her tent The magical moments from the experience  Getting resupply on the route Going solo and meeting other walkers Making a few changes to stay out on the trail for 17 days Dealing with blisters and pain Feeling a little disappointed at the end Final words of advice Starting small and building up Going on local adventures   Social Media   Website: www.endurance-adventures.co.uk    Instagram: @endurance_adventures    Facebook: @enduranceadventures   

The Best Life Podcast
Ep. 241: When Is It Time To Level Up?

The Best Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 39:02


How do you know when the time is right to level up? And when the time is right, how do you get there? Wanting is really easy, but it's the doing that's hard. Jill and Danny have felt “ready” to level up many times in their businesses, but it wasn't until recently that their actions started matching their words. Are you ready?   How Jill decided it was time to up-level [4:25] Wanting is easy, but doing is harder [8:40] Anything is better than what's currently happening [10:46] Different actions, not different thinking [17:15] Set up your environment for success [18:13] Getting the right support [21:16] Having a singular focus [25:36] Figure out your priorities [27:29] You can't do everything at once [35:02]   thehappinessdiet.com   Get 20% OFF Organifi products at organifi.com using code ‘thebestlife'   Don't forget to leave us a review and subscribe so you never have to miss an episode! Comments and questions can also be sent to info@thebestlifepodcast.com, and you can head to thebestlifepodcast.com to join our Facebook Group.   FOLLOW US ON IG: @TheBestLifePodcast FOLLOW JILL: @jillfit FOLLOW DANNY J: @dannyjdotcom   You can also follow us on Facebook @Jill Coleman @Danny-J

Bill Handel on Demand
The Bill Handel Show - 9a - Parents Wanting Books Banned in Schools and Adding Insult to Injury

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 31:11


Wayne Resnick sits in for Bill Handel. There's a list of books parents are fighting to have banned in schools. There's a new type of ink that's alive and made entirely of microbes. The ancient history of adding insult to injury. And Tech Guru Marc Saltzman is in for Gary and Shannon today - he and Wayne catch up before the show's end.

What Are You Made Of?
Pursue Multiple Passions (And Nail Them All) With DkDashoota

What Are You Made Of?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 32:45


Show notes: In today's episode, we talk about: His childhood in Memphis, growing up without a father, and not wanting to go down the same path as others. How he used to be angry at God until he realized that everything happens for a reason. How a certain goal is not an option if we believe it's gonna happen, and how we should direct our thoughts and actions towards it. How he learned what true courage and leadership meant when he joined the ROTC and the military. Drawing the line between his personal beliefs and his mission as a military man. His excitement in making his first album and collaborating with other artists. Juggling between his budding rap music career and his military duties. Wanting to be more independent in the future and make it big in the music industry but stay real as a person. Learn more about DkDashoota here: Website: https://unitedmasters.com/a/dkdashoota4qg (https://unitedmasters.com/a/dkdashoota4qg) Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DkDaShoota/ (https://www.facebook.com/DkDaShoota/) Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dkdashoota (https://www.instagram.com/dkdashoota) YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCl6pcKWPTJcQe2oaL5zUkEQ (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCl6pcKWPTJcQe2oaL5zUkEQ) Apple Music: https://music.apple.com/us/artist/dkdashoota/1571902267 (https://music.apple.com/us/artist/dkdashoota/1571902267) For more information and to explore podcast episodes, visit themikecroc.com. To drop him an email, use: info@peoplebuildinginc.com   Follow Mike on social media:   LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-ciorrocco/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-ciorrocco/) Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mikeciorrocco (https://www.facebook.com/mikeciorrocco) Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mikeycroc (https://www.instagram.com/mikeycroc)  Twitter: https://twitter.com/mikeycroc (https://twitter.com/mikeycroc)    If you haven't smashed the subscribe button, do it here➡️ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCGWHuKojqZfcXmvGCAi_t1Q/ (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCGWHuKojqZfcXmvGCAi_t1Q/)   The views and opinions expressed on the "What Are You Made Of?" podcast are solely those of the author and guests and should not be attributed to any other individual or entity. This is an independent production of Mike "C-Roc" Ciorrocco. The podcast production and the book "What Are You Made Of?" are the author's original works. All rights of ownership and reproduction are retained—copyright 2021.

Behind The Baller Podcast with Ben Baller
EP 234 - Kevin King (Toy Entrepreneur & Owner) + $1,000 Toy Giveaway, 1st Time in Marshalls, BBDTBlockChain Army Updates - Presented by HobbyTron.com

Behind The Baller Podcast with Ben Baller

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 52:55


This episode is brought to you by HobbyTron.com Follow @kevking23 His name is Ben Baller, not Ben Humble & he's here to discuss: The importance of toys for kids, there being a toy shortage, his back feeling better, first time in a Marshall's, climbing the podcast charts, shout out to Chrissy Teigen, BBDTBlockChain Army updates & more.  Then it's an honor & a privilege to have Kev King (Toy Entrepreneur & Owner of HobbyTron.com) on to discuss: How his family started in toy sales, learning the toy industry, raising $10K at 17 and going to China, talking toys to Marvel & Warner Brothers in 2009, making toys for Kobe's retirement, new toys upcoming & more. Then Ben brings back the Outro to discuss: Wanting to have more female guests on the show, April Koh, Seahawks getting flexxed out and needing a changing of the guard, getting a new car & more. This episode is not to be misseed! If you are interested in MLB, NBA, NFL & UFC Picks daily, weekly or monthly subscribe at www.CaptainPicks.com & Follow @TheCaptainPicks on Instagram Produced by: DBPodcasts www.dbpodcasts.com Follow @dbpodcasts on Instagram & Twitter Music by @lakeyinspired Available on all Podcast Platforms, YouTube & BehindTheBallerPod.com Behind The Baller Theme Music  Artist: Illegal Kartel (@illegal_kartel_mikal_shakur) Produced by: Gene Crenshaw @yuyuthemaker

Daylight Meditations
25 Nov 2021: You are Complete in Love, Part 2

Daylight Meditations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 11:53


Jesus' words to our Father are the urging and desires of love. Wanting nothing more than we would experience the riches of understanding. How we desire that as well! So much is made known when we trust God's timing, God's direction and God's whispers. Daylight Meditations is a daily podcast from CFO North America. Please visit CFONorthAmerica.org to learn more about our retreats, and online courses. If you are encouraged by this podcast, please consider supporting us. Contributors: Michelle DeChant, Adam Maddock, and Phil Reaser

The Bert Show
Update: She's Afraid Her Plan To Deter Her Husband From Wanting Kids Will Backfire

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 5:23


She's been married for six months, and the last thing she's ready for is kids. However, her husband is eager to start a family. She's not ready for this drastic change. So she has a plan to curb his enthusiasm.She volunteered herself and her husband to watch her best friend's kids over the weekend. She hopes this will be an eye-opening experience, and he'll change his mind about having kids.Will her plan work? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-bert-show.

The Bert Show
She's Afraid Her Plan To Deter Her Husband From Wanting Kids Will Backfire

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 7:19


She's been married for six months, and the last thing she's ready for is kids. However, her husband is eager to start a family. She's not ready for this drastic change. So she has a plan to curb his enthusiasm.She volunteered herself and her husband to watch her best friend's kids over the weekend. She hopes this will be an eye-opening experience, and he'll change his mind about having kids.Will her plan work? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-bert-show.

Ways to Flourish
S3, Ep 14 - Ditching Your Diet Thoughts During the Holidays

Ways to Flourish

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 24:01


Content warning: This episode contains discussion of diets and unhealthy eating patterns.Diet culture has become pervasive in our society in large part due to misinformation spread through social media. Wanting to try new diets and eating patterns is especially common during and after the holidays. This week, Stephanie May, William & Mary's Registered Dietitian, talks to us about the unhealthy practices many people often fall into around the holidays, common misconceptions about nutrition and dieting, and trustworthy resources people can consult for reliable nutrition information. Most importantly, enjoy your Thanksgiving, and while being mindful, enjoy your food!ResourcesStephanie's pageeatright.org

Naughty But Nice with Rob Shuter
Chrissy Teigen slammed for post about eyebrow transplants – she responds! Tori Spelling's husband absent from family Christmas card photo. Caitlyn Jenner talks Ellen DeGeneres feud, even wanting Kris to ban Kardashians from Ellen's talk show.

Naughty But Nice with Rob Shuter

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 25:48


Chrissy Teigen is facing fan backlash once again. Tori Spelling gave fans a sneak peek at her family's Christmas card this year and noticeably absent was her husband Dean McDermott. Caitlyn Jenner recalled how she went on The Ellen DeGeneres Show months after coming out as transgender and things got ugly.  OKMagazine.com editor Donny Meacham joins Rob! Don't forget to vote in today's poll on Twitter at @naughtynicerob or in our Facebook group. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Optimal Body
157 | Baby Development and Play with Pediatric Therapist, Kailee Noland

The Optimal Body

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 44:30


Curious about baby development? Feel like your parent-worth is defined by the visible developmental stage of your baby? Wanting to optimize the physical and neurological development of your baby? Kailee, a pediatric physical therapist, walks you through her top tips in navigating self-worth as a parent and how it relates to baby development, as well as her approach to finding a balance between allowing natural exploration, nurture for your baby, safety-watch, and interference or control over the stimuli they are exposed to. Furthermore, Kailee shares the importance of crawling for physical and neurological development, and how different stages of baby development relate to spinal and joint maturation and innate reflexes. With a particular focus on tummy time and floor play, Kailee's provides insight into appropriate levels of standing for babies and when baby containers may or may not be beneficial for babies. As she debunks common marketing promotions for baby containers, she discusses how baby containers may be affecting hip and spinal maturation, as well as independent walking. Finally, she explains how parents can create a more active environment through the idea of imitation, and the importance of spending more time outside. Let's take a deep dive into baby development. What You Will Learn in this Interview with Kailee Noland 2:16 - What drew Kailee into Pediatric Physical Therapy 5:29 - How Kailee navigates differences in google's definitions of baby development 9:11 - Kailee's recommendations on interfering with baby development 12:41 - Why is crawling so pertinent? 15:06 - Tips on progressing from crawling to upright play & inspiring confidence 18:52 - Is it okay for babies to stand a lot? 22:03 - Is there a benefit to using jumper/bouncer devices? 26:18 - Baby Containers Kailee does not recommend 33:04 - How can parents keep their kids active? 39:02 - The power of getting outside & how the pandemic influenced that! 39:57 - Kailee's projects coming soon & her current guides 42:10 - Where you can learn more about Kailee To learn more about Kailee and view full show notes, please visit the full website here: https://www.docjenfit.com/podcast/episode157 Thank you so much for checking out this episode of The Optimal Body Podcast. If you haven't done so already, please take a minute to subscribe and leave a quick rating and review of the show! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/tobpodcast/message

Orange Juice Optional
Why Hello…Thanksgiving 2021

Orange Juice Optional

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 49:51


Episode Notes Why Hello everyone and welcome to Thanksgiving week!! Cheers to this November Holiday and all the wonderful things that come with it.  From self reflection and gratitude, to the entertaining of wonderful family and friends, Thanksgiving brings warmth and comfort to the late days of fall.  While most people consider Thanksgiving dinner to be the most delicious meal of the year, find out why Suzanne holds a much different opinion.  While potatoes and gravy don't ever appeal to her, Suzanne's Thanksgiving does always includes spinach artichoke dip (a family favorite). Michelle then happily shares that her Thanksgiving must have is Robb's (recipe for) ‘little smokies'.  She believes most people come to her house just for this saucy treat.  (This is an episode correction: The little smokies are made with grape jelly and CHILI sauce - not cocktail sauce.  Please read that correction twice, because she got it wrong in the episode). Now POP…THAT…CORK and settle in, as Suzanne and Michelle share what they are most grateful for this year!!  Wanting to go further than the typical or generic answers that you might get around the Thanksgiving dinner table, they challenged themselves (and all of you) to go deeper with their gratitude. From funny, to realistic and thought provoking, they both completed this challenge.  As the episode continues, Michelle then shares some interesting Thanksgiving Day trivia and “corny” Thanksgiving Day jokes (both were found at parade.com - Thank you!!). Ever curious and needing some clarity, Suzanne researches, and then provides additional facts about some of the questions asked.  For  this quiz,  we ask that you grab a pen, and guess along!  Much to Suzanne's disappointment, we aren't really keeping track of points. However, you can still listen, and then impress your guests on Thanksgiving Day. In conclusion, and with gratitude in our hearts, we would like to wish each of you a Happy Thanksgiving Day and a blessed holiday season!! As you step into this season of wonder, please remember to spread kindness with a smile, a simple gesture or kind words. Kindness is contagious, and some people need that extra encouragement this time of year.  With all the shared and until next week…Cheers!! Special thanks to parade.com!! All trivia questions (plus additional trivia questions) can be found in the article:   “50 Thanksgiving trivia questions and answers to impress all” https://www.google.com/amp/s/parade.com/1072705/jessicasager/thanksgiving-trivia/amp/ Thanksgiving Jokes can be found at: “50 funny Thanksgiving jokes for kids and adults) https://parade.com/1056665/kelseypelzer/thanksgiving-jokes/ For more information on orange juice optional, please check out the following websites and social media platforms: Orangejuiceoptional.com Whyhellomodernhome.com Goodnight Sweet Bear (@ Amazon.com or Barnesandnoble.com) Orange juice optional on facebook Orangejuiceoptional on Instagram

BiOptimizers - Awesome Health Podcast
#169 - How This Doctor Reversed Her MS and Recovered - with Dr. Terry Wahls

BiOptimizers - Awesome Health Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 67:34


What a remarkable story.  Twenty years ago, our guest took a walk with her wife when her left leg suddenly stopped working correctly. The leg inexplicably lost most of its strength, causing Dr. Terry to hobble home confused. The next day, our guest was in a neurologist's office and heard these life-changing words: “Terry, this could be bad. Or, really, really bad.”  Over the next two weeks, Dr. Terry went through a battery of tests. During those two long weeks, she kept thinking about what her neurologist said - and prayed for a fatal diagnosis to avoid a life of disability.  Finally, the diagnosis came in: multiple sclerosis. Within three years, Dr. Terry found herself in a tilt-recline wheelchair, unable to sit up at her desk. This rapid deterioration occurred despite seeing the best specialists and taking the newest, cutting-edge medications.  Whether listening or watching on YoutTube, Dr. Terry's story on what happens next is jaw-dropping. Listen to get inspired. If you know someone with MS, please share this interview with them.  Because everything Dr. Terry shares is science-based. Fortunately for her (and ultimately for all of us), being a doctor with MS was a blessing in disguise. This enabled her to begin using the research skills she developed in her medical career to explore multiple sclerosis and search for possibilities. During her journey, Dr. Terry became a functional doctor through the Functional Medicine Certified Practitioner program. She is also a longtime clinical professor of medicine at the University of Iowa, conducting clinical trials. In 2018, Dr. Terry won the Institute for Functional Medicine's Linus Pauling Award for her research, clinical care, and patient care.    She is also the author of The Wahls Protocol: A Radical Way to Treat All Chronic Autoimmune Conditions Using Paleo Principles, and The Wahls Protocol: Cooking for Life.   How did Dr. Terry go from being in a wheelchair to riding her bike to work each day? How did she overcome MS and restore her health?  Tune in and find out!     In this podcast, we cover: Dr. Terry's emotional story What is multiple sclerosis? That moment her entire family cried tears of joy  Dr. Terry's profound “A-ha” moment The dietary changes involved in her breakthrough How meditation played a role in Dr. Terry's recovery Dr. Terry's exciting clinical trials The emotional struggles of losing your ability to run, ride a bike, or hike How Terry's partner dealt with her MS  How to bring more innovation to the medical industry A Funny Moment that Shocked Her Doctors For a long time during her illness with MS, Dr. Terry saw her neurologist every six months.  As her condition turned around and she found herself in a much better place, Dr. Terry called her neurologist's office. “There's been a big change! I should really see a physician.” Wanting to see her that day, Dr. Terry said, no, I want to come on Friday. Despite their protests, she waited till Friday. “So I walk in, and I'm not in my tilt recline wheelchair. I'm in the waiting area, and the nurse comes out. She's got a chart, and she's looking around, and I realized she is looking for me.” “So I stand up and go, ‘Hey, Cindy! Over here!' She is like, ‘Oh my God, you're walking!” My physician is thrilled, and he says the same thing, ‘Oh my God! You're walking!'” Those Who Disrupt the Status Quo Face Ridicule and Criticism Over the time since she defied her prognosis and went on to clinically test her theories and positively change the lives of others suffering from MS, plenty of tomatoes get hurled at Dr. Terry.  Here is a snippet of what Dr. Terry said about her critics: “Anyone who is truly innovative is going to draw ire because it's very uncomfortable to have to abandon constructs of how you understand the world.” “I don't want to do that. You don't want to do that. None of us do. So I don't think it's possible to have innovation without facing ridicule and rejection at first.”  “And then your new ideas either pan out or are suppressed. So you keep doing the experiments.”   One of the most profound episodes of the Awesome Health Podcast, Dr. Terry's personal story from an MS diagnosis back to feeling good again, is truly astonishing. But what makes this even more startling is the fact that this happened to a medical doctor, a clinical professor, who has gone on to show the medical community a whole new way of looking at MS. Many people get results through Dr. Terry's breakthrough work and will continue to do so as she continues her research at the University of Iowa. Check out this episode - discover a groundbreaking approach to multiple sclerosis. Episode Resources:  Check out more about Terry Wahls, MD  FREE GIFT: Pick up a one-page handout for the Wahl's Diet Clinical Trial in Sage Journals Terry Wahls M.D. on YouTube Dr. Terry Wahls on Instagram Terry Wahls MD on Facebook Dr. Terry Wahls on Twitter Read The Episode Transcript: 1 00:01:24.930 --> 00:01:25.140 Oh. 2 00:03:43.620 --> 00:03:44.700 Wade Lightheart: hi Terry how are you doing. 3 00:03:45.150 --> 00:03:46.320 Terry Wahls: Excellent how are you. 4 00:03:46.860 --> 00:03:52.530 Wade Lightheart: Excellent i'm so excited to have you here today it's so great, for you, James Where are you calling in from. 5 00:03:53.370 --> 00:03:55.170 Terry Wahls: A client from iowa city iowa. 6 00:03:55.560 --> 00:03:59.040 Wade Lightheart: Okay okay so great, where the papers have been published. 7 00:04:01.260 --> 00:04:17.310 Wade Lightheart: But I had the pleasure of reviewing beforehand before we get started, I just want to go through a couple of quick things is there any particular areas that you'd like to talk about today, or is important to kind of cue you up to mention. 8 00:04:18.210 --> 00:04:20.730 Terry Wahls: US remind me who your audiences. 9 00:04:21.030 --> 00:04:24.900 Wade Lightheart: So our audience is people who are looking at. 10 00:04:26.190 --> 00:04:35.640 Wade Lightheart: We call biological optimization they're leveraging technology and nutritional supplementation exercise fitness all that sort of stuff to address. 11 00:04:36.150 --> 00:04:42.720 Wade Lightheart: How do they improve their health, how do they you know live a healthier life, a better life that sort of stuff and we bring different people from. 12 00:04:43.350 --> 00:04:50.820 Wade Lightheart: Every possible background to address the importance of diet, nutrition and how they can improve the quality of their life or their family members. 13 00:04:51.420 --> 00:05:15.510 Terry Wahls: Okay, so our recent research will be launching another study here shortly we're very close to having that approved in, then I have a seminar next year and so it's a four part series and get the whole seminar or they could just get the last one, which is all about healthy aging. 14 00:05:16.530 --> 00:05:17.280 Wade Lightheart: Oh wow. 15 00:05:20.910 --> 00:05:21.360 Wade Lightheart: and 16 00:05:23.820 --> 00:05:28.530 Wade Lightheart: will probably going to your story, because I think it's super inspirational and. 17 00:05:28.890 --> 00:05:32.460 Terry Wahls: Oh yeah I should tell my story people yeah so how much time do we have. 18 00:05:32.730 --> 00:05:39.510 Wade Lightheart: Well, the year actually the defining component on it so that was my next question is, do you have any hard stops there, and like. 19 00:05:39.900 --> 00:05:46.170 Terry Wahls: I probably do so let me look at my calendar now because my team keeps this going. 20 00:05:47.430 --> 00:05:52.680 Terry Wahls: So it looks like 1230 is absolutely hard stop. 21 00:05:53.430 --> 00:06:00.030 Wade Lightheart: Okay, great well let's get you guys are two hours difference in iowa then over here on the west coast right. 22 00:06:01.350 --> 00:06:03.570 Terry Wahls: yeah, it is now 11. 23 00:06:04.290 --> 00:06:05.220 Terry Wahls: Before four. 24 00:06:05.640 --> 00:06:16.440 Wade Lightheart: Perfect alright, so I will do my little razzle dazzle introduction and then we'll get into we'll get into this as soon as you're ready to go. 25 00:06:17.310 --> 00:06:17.850 Wade Lightheart: Okay. 26 00:06:18.300 --> 00:06:19.980 Terry Wahls: I get settled, we are good. 27 00:06:20.700 --> 00:06:21.210 Okay. 28 00:06:22.530 --> 00:06:33.900 Wade Lightheart: Okay, for our recording team, we will start the podcast here in 321. 29 00:06:34.710 --> 00:06:51.810 Wade Lightheart: Good morning, good afternoon and good evening it's way too light heart from by optimizer with another edition of the awesome health podcast and today we have Dr Terry walls joining us, and this is a really exciting and important. 30 00:06:53.400 --> 00:07:09.000 Wade Lightheart: audio recording video recording if you're watching it on YouTube because Dr Terry walls has a very unique story, first of all, she is in the Institute of functional medicine certified practitioner in a clinical professor of medicine at the University of iowa. 31 00:07:09.270 --> 00:07:22.560 Wade Lightheart: where she conducts clinical trials in 2018 she was awarded the Institute for functional medicines Linus Pauling Award for her contributions and research clinical care and patient advocacy. 32 00:07:23.040 --> 00:07:29.160 Wade Lightheart: she's also a patient with the secondary progressive multiple sclerosis sclerosis sclerosis sorry. 33 00:07:29.760 --> 00:07:38.250 Wade Lightheart: I have a hard time saying that sometimes we're going to say that again she is also a patient with secondary progressive multiple cirrhosis. 34 00:07:38.640 --> 00:07:47.310 Wade Lightheart: Which couldn't find her to a tilt recline wheelchair for four years walls restored her health. 35 00:07:47.730 --> 00:07:56.790 Wade Lightheart: Using a diet and lifestyle program she designed specifically for her brain and now pedals her bike to work every. 36 00:07:57.210 --> 00:08:09.870 Wade Lightheart: Each day she's the author of the walls protocol a radical new way to treat all chronic autoimmune conditions, using Paleo principles and the cookbook the walls protocol cooking for life. 37 00:08:10.350 --> 00:08:25.050 Wade Lightheart: learn more about her Ms clinical trials at http PS, you know that colon slash slash walls w H l s dot lab diet you I O w a.edu. 38 00:08:25.560 --> 00:08:40.680 Wade Lightheart: Forward slash.we will have the links to this, I just had a chance there, Dr Terry to look at that trial and it's extraordinary you have an extraordinary story, I mean you know I had. 39 00:08:41.610 --> 00:08:56.520 Wade Lightheart: Some a relative that suffered from multiple sclerosis, and it is a very progressive in kind of depressing condition of it's in so many people suffer suffer from it. 40 00:08:56.970 --> 00:09:06.450 Wade Lightheart: I was actually Member when I was in elementary school, we did fundraising for multiple sclerosis research, and I remember I. 41 00:09:06.780 --> 00:09:15.780 Wade Lightheart: raised a bunch of funds and I got this little green little puppy dog as a prize for my for my work is again, I was very proud of that, because that was the first time I was. 42 00:09:16.170 --> 00:09:31.590 Wade Lightheart: introduced to the importance of research around degenerative conditions, and you have kind of spearheaded not only your own recovery, but also some extraordinary research in this area, can you talk about your journey that led you to this. 43 00:09:31.830 --> 00:09:32.220 sure. 44 00:09:33.360 --> 00:09:47.520 Terry Wahls: So when I was 20 years ago i'm out walking with my wife and my left leg gross week on dry unit a humble home next day, I see the neurologist who says, you know Terry this could be bad or really, really bad. 45 00:09:48.240 --> 00:10:01.080 Terry Wahls: So the next two weeks, while i'm thinking going through the workup I think about bad in really, really bad I, and I don't want to be disabled so actually i'm praying for a fatal diagnosis. 46 00:10:02.100 --> 00:10:09.630 Terry Wahls: Two weeks later, I hear multiple sclerosis, I see the best people take the no drugs three years later I hear totally fine wheelchair. 47 00:10:10.530 --> 00:10:26.400 Terry Wahls: I take my de Santo infusions than ties IV infusions nothing helps I am too weak to set up at my desk my zingers do the trigeminal neuralgia electoral jolts of pain, are more frequent more severe more difficult to turn off. 48 00:10:27.870 --> 00:10:33.090 Terry Wahls: Fortunately i'm a physician, so I go to the basic science, I began reading. 49 00:10:34.140 --> 00:10:47.910 Terry Wahls: And experiment, the based on what i'm reading I developed theory that mitochondria are a big driver, particularly in the more progressive decline and so At first I work on supplements. 50 00:10:49.200 --> 00:11:01.350 Terry Wahls: speed of my declined slows, then I discovered study using electrical stimulation muscles I convinced my physical therapist so let me try that my test session hurts like hell, but when it's over I feel great. 51 00:11:02.520 --> 00:11:15.450 Terry Wahls: I, and so my therapist lets me add East him to my workouts I discovered the Institute for functional medicine, I take their course on neuro protection, I have more supplements that i'm taking. 52 00:11:16.770 --> 00:11:31.170 Terry Wahls: In, then I have a really big Aha and sort of in retrospect wait i'm like dear God how That takes me so long to think about this i'm like what if I redesign my Paleo diet that i'd been following for last five years. 53 00:11:32.520 --> 00:11:40.350 Terry Wahls: Based on all the science i've been reading the nutrients that i've said, are important if taking supplements, what if I figure out where they are in the food supply. 54 00:11:41.370 --> 00:11:43.020 Terry Wahls: So redesign my Paleo diet. 55 00:11:45.120 --> 00:12:01.440 Terry Wahls: And it's stunning three months later, my zingers of 27 years are gone my fatigue is gone and my physical therapist says Terry you're getting stronger it begins advancing exercise. 56 00:12:03.090 --> 00:12:03.600 Terry Wahls: and 57 00:12:04.620 --> 00:12:07.680 Terry Wahls: Three months after that I am walking without a cane. 58 00:12:09.000 --> 00:12:10.560 Terry Wahls: Three months after that. 59 00:12:15.240 --> 00:12:15.570 Terry Wahls: I. 60 00:12:17.190 --> 00:12:18.150 Terry Wahls: got on my bike. 61 00:12:19.290 --> 00:12:25.860 Terry Wahls: For the first time in six years with my son zach jogging alongside in the left my daughter's tab on the right. 62 00:12:27.240 --> 00:12:29.310 Terry Wahls: And my wife behind. 63 00:12:30.900 --> 00:12:43.140 Terry Wahls: I biked around the block for the first time, you know everyone's crying my kids are crying my wife's crying i'm crying if you could see my face you'd see that i'm crying because that. 64 00:12:45.090 --> 00:12:56.460 Terry Wahls: That was the moment where I understood that the current understanding of multiple sclerosis was incomplete and who knew how much recovery might be possible. 65 00:12:57.660 --> 00:12:58.140 Terry Wahls: and 66 00:12:59.760 --> 00:13:02.070 Terry Wahls: You know it's about five months after that. 67 00:13:03.780 --> 00:13:13.170 Terry Wahls: Then I completed an 18.5 mile bike ride with my family and once again roll cry you know my kids are crying my wife's crying i'm crying. 68 00:13:13.980 --> 00:13:30.840 Terry Wahls: If this really transforms how I think about disease and health, it will transform the way I practice medicine and it transforms the focus of my research, I and we've done five clinical trials. 69 00:13:32.010 --> 00:13:46.560 Terry Wahls: We hopefully we'll be talking about most recent one we've got a couple more trials that will be getting launched here momentarily I and i've gone from being this. 70 00:13:48.570 --> 00:13:56.070 Terry Wahls: sort of unusual eccentric person that was roundly condemned by many in the Ms community. 71 00:13:57.540 --> 00:14:02.400 Terry Wahls: To be now are respected dietary intervention research. 72 00:14:03.930 --> 00:14:18.720 Terry Wahls: In the Ms community and really changing the whole discussion that diet and lifestyle are in should be an essential part of the care plan for me every Ms patient. 73 00:14:20.190 --> 00:14:28.500 Wade Lightheart: is profound first off your story is incredible and I can see why that would be activating so emotional because you know. 74 00:14:29.040 --> 00:14:39.990 Wade Lightheart: there's two two parts to it, one you're not just someone with a diagnosis you're someone with a medical background, so you understand the progressive degeneration, and what that's going to look like over a period of time. 75 00:14:40.590 --> 00:15:02.070 Wade Lightheart: Based on prior research, you were of all the medications the interactions the contraindications all that sort of stuff and then you go off and kind of do some your own experiments and start reversing what is generally believed to be a and reversible condition is that not. 76 00:15:02.220 --> 00:15:04.140 Terry Wahls: Correct no absolutely and. 77 00:15:04.650 --> 00:15:13.380 Terry Wahls: I want to be clear at the time that I was doing all of this, all of my physicians my primary care doc's all of the various neurologists i've seen. 78 00:15:13.770 --> 00:15:26.490 Terry Wahls: were very clear MS is a progressive disease, the whole point three says Wayne and I was thrilled to take these incredibly toxic compounds that I knew had at a rate of causing. 79 00:15:27.990 --> 00:15:36.150 Terry Wahls: leukemia to percentage time you took it because I was, and I was already seriously disabled I didn't want to become even more disabled so. 80 00:15:36.600 --> 00:15:51.450 Terry Wahls: I was happy to take very toxic drugs that may be very l in an effort to slow my decline, because this was all about slowing the decline it as I improve, so my my face pain is gone first time in 27 years. 81 00:15:52.140 --> 00:16:00.090 Terry Wahls: My fatigue is gone first time in seven years i'm walking again around the hospital and then around the block. 82 00:16:02.220 --> 00:16:09.930 Terry Wahls: But you know I don't know what it means, and in part of what you you do when you have a progressive neurological disorder. 83 00:16:11.490 --> 00:16:24.090 Terry Wahls: Is you learn to let go of the future right and take each day as an adult and that's a very healthy coping strategies so here I am. 84 00:16:25.140 --> 00:16:36.750 Terry Wahls: i've let go the future I don't know what it means i'm clearly at a different place than I was a month ago, or ios six months earlier but I don't know what it means I don't know. 85 00:16:38.070 --> 00:16:39.330 Terry Wahls: You know I didn't know what it means. 86 00:16:41.370 --> 00:16:42.780 Terry Wahls: until the day I rode my bike. 87 00:16:43.620 --> 00:16:44.310 Wade Lightheart: mm hmm. 88 00:16:44.940 --> 00:16:54.510 Terry Wahls: And that's when I understood in my heart and my bones, that the current understanding of Ms was wrong and that. 89 00:16:57.000 --> 00:17:03.240 Terry Wahls: I was recovering and who knew how much recovery might be possible. 90 00:17:04.770 --> 00:17:18.150 Terry Wahls: You know i'll to note sort of funny story I in this happened, the month previous pay and seen my neurologist you know access home every six months. 91 00:17:18.630 --> 00:17:33.000 Terry Wahls: And I called the office to say you know there's been a big change I should really see a physician, so they were happy to see me that day as well, oh no, I want to come on Friday so know if there's a big change, we should not wait till Friday Friday i'll be fine. 92 00:17:34.680 --> 00:17:40.740 Terry Wahls: So you know I go in I i've walked in so i'm not in my total Klein wheelchair i've seen in the office. 93 00:17:41.340 --> 00:17:54.240 Terry Wahls: In the waiting area and my the nurse comes out and she's got a chart she's looking around and I realized oh I bet she's looking for me and i'm not in the wheelchair, so I stand up go hey. 94 00:17:55.620 --> 00:17:57.750 Terry Wahls: Cindy over here, and she goes. 95 00:18:01.320 --> 00:18:04.140 Terry Wahls: And I was like oh my God you're walking. 96 00:18:05.730 --> 00:18:09.990 Terry Wahls: And so yeah I see my position is like oh my God you're walking. 97 00:18:11.130 --> 00:18:22.680 Terry Wahls: he's thrilled you're showing what I might East him, you know what i'm doing he still the startup got to get your MRI and see what's going on and. 98 00:18:23.760 --> 00:18:28.830 Terry Wahls: we're both quite surprised there's no change on the MRI and it comes back and says, you know. 99 00:18:30.000 --> 00:18:35.880 Terry Wahls: Of course there's no changing them right, these are old lesions they haven't been active in a long time to still that active. 100 00:18:37.080 --> 00:18:42.360 Terry Wahls: But what you clearly have done is you have rewired your brain. 101 00:18:43.380 --> 00:18:55.950 Terry Wahls: You are we miley and the MRI can't capture that but your body clearly has rewired in re function your brain and your spinal cord. 102 00:18:56.700 --> 00:19:12.300 Wade Lightheart: Can you explain to our listeners just what multiple sclerosis is so that they understand what it what it what it is what and then this breakthrough that you've. 103 00:19:12.300 --> 00:19:14.400 Wade Lightheart: Experienced why that's so profound. 104 00:19:14.850 --> 00:19:31.740 Terry Wahls: So it's a autoimmune process where your immune cells are attacking your spinal cord in your brain first we said it was just the installation the mile and part now realized in fact that they're killing all sorts of parts of your brain astrocytes have been damaged. 105 00:19:33.000 --> 00:19:43.290 Terry Wahls: glial cells are being damaged neurons are being damaged axon to being damaged there are these acute inflammation episodes so as a call to relapses that gradually improve. 106 00:19:43.980 --> 00:20:05.520 Terry Wahls: In addition, in the background, this is slow, steady deterioration brain bind spinal cord shrinkage that is lit that is associated with that cognitive decline we're seeing disability that from which people do not recover so and I clearly have a lot of fatigue. 107 00:20:06.600 --> 00:20:18.180 Terry Wahls: Had was being to have some cognitive decline in you know, had had severe severe disability, I could not sit up in a regular chair like I am right now, at that point. 108 00:20:20.310 --> 00:20:21.300 Terry Wahls: And so. 109 00:20:23.310 --> 00:20:28.650 Terry Wahls: What what my neurologist said very clearly is I had rewired. 110 00:20:32.580 --> 00:20:39.810 Terry Wahls: My brain and my spinal cord we didn't really have the technology that could have measured mile and production. 111 00:20:41.490 --> 00:20:55.530 Terry Wahls: And so unfair, unfortunately, we had not sent me over to the neuro ophthalmologist to get something called flicker fusion if we had the product if they had done that previously and now. 112 00:20:56.040 --> 00:21:07.110 Terry Wahls: They probably would be able to measure the remote island nation there, and my optic nerves, but you know we didn't have it, because there's no reason to think you know it's going to be any modulation occurring. 113 00:21:07.560 --> 00:21:24.300 Wade Lightheart: Right and that's an important distinction, I think, for people to recognize is now that you've you've demonstrated that it's possible well, we can start designing divine developing and designing trials about how to measure this to see which might well. 114 00:21:24.870 --> 00:21:30.870 Terry Wahls: Right and that the end that's what we're doing so, the next trial that we're doing. 115 00:21:32.160 --> 00:21:36.840 Terry Wahls: Well, maybe talk about the trial that we just published and then we'll talk about the next one. 116 00:21:36.870 --> 00:21:40.290 Wade Lightheart: yeah let's let's do that let's we're getting ahead of ourselves here because it's so. 117 00:21:40.290 --> 00:21:51.690 Wade Lightheart: exciting I just read through this trial now basically if you want to kind of outline what you've been able to put forth here in this in this discovery or. 118 00:21:52.230 --> 00:21:55.080 Terry Wahls: The sequence of doing research ghost. 119 00:21:55.440 --> 00:22:07.980 Terry Wahls: Typically, like this, an interesting case study, then an interesting case series about a intervention that may be changes it leads to an unexpected outcome. 120 00:22:08.670 --> 00:22:17.730 Terry Wahls: We then did what's called a single arm safety and feasibility study so and that was my chair medicine that got me to do this. 121 00:22:18.420 --> 00:22:29.430 Terry Wahls: We wrote up a protocol that outlined what I did for myself and then we enrolled 20 folks with secondary and primary progressive Ms. 122 00:22:29.790 --> 00:22:40.350 Terry Wahls: Sure, expect any of them to get any better, and the fact of all you can do is hold them flat, as a group that would be an amazing home run and anybody improve that would be studying. 123 00:22:41.850 --> 00:22:54.570 Terry Wahls: So we enrolled them we showed that people could implement it if the big the big side effect weight was if you're overweight or obese you lost weight get back to a healthy weight. 124 00:22:56.280 --> 00:23:10.260 Terry Wahls: And I had to file reports every three months about the weight loss that was occurring fatigue reduced quality of life, improved in half of our folks motor function walking function improved. 125 00:23:11.280 --> 00:23:17.730 Terry Wahls: So 50% of the people start to see improvements in motor function function that that's really quite remarkable. 126 00:23:18.210 --> 00:23:23.610 Terry Wahls: cognition improved depression declined anxiety declined. 127 00:23:24.090 --> 00:23:30.870 Wade Lightheart: Now, where was in that trial, where you just measuring dietary changes or Where are you adding the. 128 00:23:30.870 --> 00:23:31.800 Terry Wahls: stimulation well. 129 00:23:31.920 --> 00:23:32.490 Terry Wahls: You know. 130 00:23:33.330 --> 00:23:47.400 Terry Wahls: We, the program was to do could they do everything that I did so there was diet, there was meditation those exercise electro stimulation and supplements very complicated. 131 00:23:48.480 --> 00:23:50.760 Terry Wahls: In severely criticized I might get. 132 00:23:51.750 --> 00:23:53.070 Terry Wahls: Really criticize because. 133 00:23:53.460 --> 00:23:56.850 Terry Wahls: Well, if it works, who knows what the mechanism is and i'm like. 134 00:23:57.330 --> 00:24:06.360 Terry Wahls: Who cares cares first, you have to show, can they do it, and do you heard them and does it work, then you could do follow up studies to figure out the mechanisms. 135 00:24:06.840 --> 00:24:25.800 Terry Wahls: Yes, so so get that first study, then we got some again it was a small small study funded by my friends and Canada, the next study again small pilot study now randomized and simplified so it's just a diet. 136 00:24:26.970 --> 00:24:34.320 Terry Wahls: And we did relapsing remitting folks we looked at fatigue, quality of life and motor function so again people could do it. 137 00:24:35.460 --> 00:24:43.110 Terry Wahls: Safe and less fatigue higher quality of life better motor function. 138 00:24:44.490 --> 00:24:46.440 Terry Wahls: Then we did a comparison of. 139 00:24:47.910 --> 00:24:55.800 Terry Wahls: The Paleo diet, the ketogenic diet to usual diet and again showing that people could do it, it was safe well tolerated. 140 00:24:57.540 --> 00:25:01.320 Terry Wahls: The next study, which is a study that you read. 141 00:25:02.490 --> 00:25:10.620 Terry Wahls: Looked at the low saturated fat diet, which is a swank diet and that was the only other diet that was out there for. 142 00:25:11.970 --> 00:25:14.730 Terry Wahls: people with MS and the modified Paleo diet. 143 00:25:16.320 --> 00:25:32.790 Terry Wahls: We had a 12 week observation phase where we looked at people's all of the measures over that baseline period that run in period to see if they were stable or not, and they were then we randomize them. 144 00:25:34.080 --> 00:25:38.280 Terry Wahls: To either the low saturated fat diet, or the modified Paleo diet. 145 00:25:39.480 --> 00:25:48.840 Terry Wahls: They came back at 12 weeks repeated all the measures and came back again in 12 weeks repeated all the measures, so we had 12 and 24 weeks worth of intervention. 146 00:25:50.640 --> 00:25:55.500 Terry Wahls: were able to show is both sides were associated with a significant reduction fatigue. 147 00:25:56.880 --> 00:25:59.040 Terry Wahls: And improvement in quality of life. 148 00:26:00.270 --> 00:26:15.660 Terry Wahls: was being and they're really pretty cool in at 12 weeks at 24 weeks walls had greater poverty reduction in some measures and higher quality of life than swank and some measures. 149 00:26:17.010 --> 00:26:18.090 Wade Lightheart: Now that's physical abuse. 150 00:26:18.120 --> 00:26:20.520 Wade Lightheart: that's the reduced fat the saturated. 151 00:26:20.550 --> 00:26:20.910 Right. 152 00:26:22.170 --> 00:26:26.610 Wade Lightheart: And why is it, why is that do you understand why that mechanism is. 153 00:26:26.790 --> 00:26:35.010 Terry Wahls: Well, so let's first think about what the two diets have that similar and what is different. 154 00:26:35.070 --> 00:26:36.330 Wade Lightheart: Uniform I love that pro. 155 00:26:36.390 --> 00:26:40.650 Terry Wahls: Okay, so what's similar we had. 156 00:26:41.790 --> 00:26:55.830 Terry Wahls: Increased fruits and vegetables in both walls had more fruits and vegetables and swag, but we also increase fruits and vegetables, compared to baseline in there was less sugar less hydrogenated fats. 157 00:26:57.120 --> 00:27:01.350 Terry Wahls: So less of those are harmful fats in both that. 158 00:27:02.580 --> 00:27:14.520 Terry Wahls: Now what is different yeah actually you're both walls and sway had a so the swank group had on average about 10 grams of saturated fat. 159 00:27:15.810 --> 00:27:26.130 Terry Wahls: The walls had on average 16 grams of saturated fat so both diets are relatively low in saturated fat swank being a little more so than the walls. 160 00:27:27.570 --> 00:27:47.790 Terry Wahls: The walls group had more fiber had more fermented foods, I had little more structure the vegetables more green green leafy vegetables more sulfur rich vegetables more deeply colored vegetables and probably a greater variety of fruits and vegetables and a greater variety of meats. 161 00:27:49.980 --> 00:27:59.010 Terry Wahls: What are the market as well, we were working on a grant that will get submitted tomorrow that's going to look at. 162 00:28:00.120 --> 00:28:15.090 Terry Wahls: Changes in the microbiome well between the running face, that is, the observation face in the diet intervention face, so we can see how that changes both the swank died in the walls night we'll get some biomarkers. 163 00:28:16.110 --> 00:28:22.980 Terry Wahls: In terms of the essential fatty acid metabolism and neural filaments a marker of. 164 00:28:24.990 --> 00:28:36.780 Terry Wahls: of brain cell damage in osteopontin a marker of metabolism and of inflammation and actually also. 165 00:28:37.980 --> 00:28:39.300 Terry Wahls: bone metabolism as well. 166 00:28:41.310 --> 00:28:52.650 Terry Wahls: And will correlate changes with dietary changes and changes with clinical outcomes as well, so we'll begin to tease out. 167 00:28:54.000 --> 00:29:05.220 Terry Wahls: what's the mechanism of diet that yo it diet is is a huge driver in changes in the microbiome so so my interpretation is. 168 00:29:07.650 --> 00:29:11.880 Terry Wahls: We ever genetic vulnerability, we have our existing microbiome. 169 00:29:13.380 --> 00:29:19.920 Terry Wahls: In the two of them interact to create more inflammation at the higher risk of autoimmunity and accelerated aging. 170 00:29:21.480 --> 00:29:28.530 Terry Wahls: You change your diet you fertilize and starve out different populations of the microbiome. 171 00:29:29.700 --> 00:29:42.480 Terry Wahls: And so, should I or I path deciding we starve out disease, promoting microbes fertilize health marine microbes who then as they eat up the food that we eat create. 172 00:29:43.800 --> 00:29:51.300 Terry Wahls: The these anti inflammation compounds that get into our bloodstream and have a favorable impact on our physiology. 173 00:29:52.350 --> 00:30:02.970 Wade Lightheart: You know it's interesting that you've discovered that because we've been in digestive health research, we have a partnership with birch University in Croatia and we develop. 174 00:30:03.900 --> 00:30:11.970 Wade Lightheart: A variety of probiotic agents in order to elicit the same effects, and we do all kinds of interesting tests we add vitamins to them, we give them. 175 00:30:12.270 --> 00:30:23.370 Wade Lightheart: Different types of food we blast them with EMF waves, sometimes we do we'd all kinds of things to do this research to see and we've come to the same conclusion that if you can. 176 00:30:23.940 --> 00:30:30.210 Wade Lightheart: feed the good guys and starve the bad guys we see positive progressive changes. 177 00:30:30.720 --> 00:30:38.460 Wade Lightheart: That enhance well being enhanced health or like vitality immune system response these type of things and it's really exciting. 178 00:30:38.880 --> 00:30:44.610 Wade Lightheart: That you've done this in a disease state because we're obviously we're in health promotion. 179 00:30:45.540 --> 00:30:54.000 Wade Lightheart: we've got a recent book called from sick to superhuman and our goal is to promote the individuals, the therapies, the research. 180 00:30:54.540 --> 00:31:06.210 Wade Lightheart: That it takes people who might have a diagnosis that says here's what it's going to be it's the end of the line for you it's going to be progressive degenerative you're going to take these toxic chemicals and drugs and whatever and then. 181 00:31:06.600 --> 00:31:25.140 Wade Lightheart: you're going to kind of waste away to say hey no, you know what there are other options that you can take and experienced a higher quality of life, at best, or worst and maybe even recover from your condition or or delay it's it's a you know its destructive nature. 182 00:31:25.620 --> 00:31:31.020 Terry Wahls: You know it my clinical practice in our clinical research week we talked a lot about. 183 00:31:32.220 --> 00:31:51.300 Terry Wahls: Maintaining your locus of control reflect on are you doing all that you can to have the best life today and in the future, and so I just think that is so important to remind people that you always have choices. 184 00:31:52.740 --> 00:31:59.700 Terry Wahls: That you know what i'm eating is a big choice, yet, so I can eat. 185 00:32:00.720 --> 00:32:06.660 Terry Wahls: food that is delicious and health, promoting work eat food that is delicious and disease, promoting. 186 00:32:10.860 --> 00:32:11.880 Wade Lightheart: it's very simple. 187 00:32:13.500 --> 00:32:25.080 Wade Lightheart: I want to talk about something that I think is really important, before we get into some more topics and you mentioned meditation and you, you mentioned. 188 00:32:25.920 --> 00:32:30.690 Wade Lightheart: kind of letting go of the future, in other words just dealing with things as they come up, which is. 189 00:32:31.110 --> 00:32:45.720 Wade Lightheart: kind of mindful Buddhist almost practice of being in the moment and seeing the moment unfold into that and not getting ahead of yourself or behind yourself What role do you think that played in maybe. 190 00:32:46.950 --> 00:33:03.300 Wade Lightheart: How you approach this discoveries that you made management of kind of you know, negative thinking or you know that sort of like how important was that do you think to your recovery or your your your discoveries. 191 00:33:03.630 --> 00:33:09.570 Terry Wahls: You know what else diagnosed my children are quite small five and eight. 192 00:33:10.680 --> 00:33:30.360 Terry Wahls: And at the time that I was diagnosed, I was still athletic still skiing biking and hiking with them, but very quickly, I cannot do that you know, I was having to reimagine parenting and as having to reimagine my life, each year, as more functions were being taken away. 193 00:33:31.410 --> 00:33:31.980 Terry Wahls: I. 194 00:33:32.040 --> 00:33:34.320 Wade Lightheart: Is what was that, like just. 195 00:33:34.470 --> 00:33:36.570 Wade Lightheart: From an emotional and psychological level. 196 00:33:37.980 --> 00:33:38.310 Terry Wahls: well. 197 00:33:40.470 --> 00:33:43.410 Terry Wahls: It was certainly incredibly challenging. 198 00:33:44.550 --> 00:33:45.030 Terry Wahls: i've. 199 00:33:46.110 --> 00:34:07.860 Terry Wahls: All my life I struggled with depression and, as a young person I had made the astute observation that for me if I was athletic my mood was much, much better I and so that drove me to get into biking hiking running. 200 00:34:08.940 --> 00:34:16.350 Terry Wahls: martial arts and then, as I was losing that it's like you know that was very, very tough. 201 00:34:17.610 --> 00:34:19.590 Terry Wahls: And thinking about. 202 00:34:23.040 --> 00:34:30.120 Terry Wahls: Is sort of very depressed out looking at okay how bad could this be was I going to be filtered Bob. 203 00:34:31.140 --> 00:34:35.190 Terry Wahls: Was I going to have cognitive issues and then. 204 00:34:36.480 --> 00:34:40.140 Terry Wahls: yeah you know within three years, you know, should I was wheelchair bound. 205 00:34:42.270 --> 00:34:46.170 Terry Wahls: In the average it's 15 years, so I was. 206 00:34:48.840 --> 00:34:51.090 Terry Wahls: extremely difficult. 207 00:34:52.830 --> 00:34:55.440 Terry Wahls: But I also fortunately. 208 00:34:56.550 --> 00:34:57.690 Terry Wahls: was impressed by. 209 00:34:58.740 --> 00:35:00.300 Terry Wahls: Victor frankel's book that. 210 00:35:01.380 --> 00:35:10.110 Terry Wahls: Between every event in your life and your response to it there's a space in that space, you can make a choice and it's the choice that defines your character. 211 00:35:12.720 --> 00:35:22.440 Terry Wahls: And so my choice was Okay, you have two young kids who are watching what you're doing and my choice to give up. 212 00:35:23.580 --> 00:35:31.680 Terry Wahls: And succumb to my depression and the dark thoughts that I had would be modeling on life is tough you you give up. 213 00:35:32.760 --> 00:35:37.170 Terry Wahls: Or, I could make the choice of i'm going to do all that I can. 214 00:35:38.280 --> 00:35:47.820 Terry Wahls: In which was, I want to keep working out whatever my limited workout is going to be every day i'll keep going to work in they're going to have to have chores. 215 00:35:49.050 --> 00:36:06.660 Terry Wahls: You know I grew up on a farm I understood that chores were really very beneficial for children and young people growing up, and so my wife right said, your kids will have to have chores and, of course, as I became more disabled like it yep they have chores and they have. 216 00:36:08.640 --> 00:36:13.680 Terry Wahls: It really is real work that needed to happen, I and so. 217 00:36:14.940 --> 00:36:22.980 Terry Wahls: that's sort of would chuckle like Okay, I guess, God heard me and I said, my kids need to have chores and saw to it that they were going to have chores. 218 00:36:25.020 --> 00:36:31.260 Wade Lightheart: Viktor frankl has impacted so many people in the book man's search for meaning I think it's. 219 00:36:31.650 --> 00:36:32.700 Terry Wahls: Really striking found. 220 00:36:33.270 --> 00:36:44.340 Wade Lightheart: I want to extend one other piece to this because, to your partner and i'm sure you had plenty of candid discussions inside of that what was like that for you and what was your best. 221 00:36:45.660 --> 00:36:46.830 Wade Lightheart: Observation of what that. 222 00:36:46.830 --> 00:36:47.940 Wade Lightheart: was her. 223 00:36:49.170 --> 00:36:50.640 Terry Wahls: Well, I remember. 224 00:36:52.710 --> 00:37:11.310 Terry Wahls: She worked really hard at getting me to get to go out and do things so she loves mountain biking and took me in my wheelchair out to the park set set me up under the tree well she what mountain biking so. 225 00:37:12.900 --> 00:37:22.860 Terry Wahls: much bigger deal for her, and then it came back and helps me walk down to the water's edge and. 226 00:37:24.090 --> 00:37:25.140 Terry Wahls: got in the water, but. 227 00:37:27.720 --> 00:37:39.000 Terry Wahls: You know, a wonderful commitment just another example, all that she had done for me and then, when she was out mountain biking in the winter. 228 00:37:40.620 --> 00:37:42.690 Terry Wahls: She broke her ankle. 229 00:37:43.800 --> 00:37:46.020 Terry Wahls: It would have to have so. 230 00:37:47.940 --> 00:37:52.110 Terry Wahls: After our two kids were going off to Sweden. 231 00:37:53.280 --> 00:38:05.310 Terry Wahls: For a week to be with friends, so we sent sent them off we showed them that you know jack and I would be fine jack header surgery to have her ankle set and the pins set. 232 00:38:06.390 --> 00:38:06.990 Terry Wahls: And i'm. 233 00:38:08.100 --> 00:38:11.940 Terry Wahls: taking care of jack getting her her pain pills. 234 00:38:12.960 --> 00:38:15.150 Terry Wahls: And our friends were bringing over. 235 00:38:16.170 --> 00:38:23.040 Terry Wahls: takeout for us so so we could eat and the week that we had planned to have off with each other. 236 00:38:24.210 --> 00:38:30.540 Terry Wahls: While the kids were in Sweden, of course, was quite different was giving her pain pills were watching. 237 00:38:32.010 --> 00:38:33.660 Terry Wahls: netflix movies. 238 00:38:35.100 --> 00:38:39.810 Terry Wahls: And I just felt immensely grateful that I could finally be taking care of her. 239 00:38:41.790 --> 00:38:42.600 Wade Lightheart: You know. 240 00:38:44.190 --> 00:38:57.120 Wade Lightheart: One of the things that i've noticed, I went through a tragedy at an early age, my sister was diagnosed with hodgkin's disease and progressively until she died at age 22 she was four years, my senior and the striking. 241 00:38:59.070 --> 00:39:10.410 Wade Lightheart: component of being subjected to a serious medical condition and all of its dire consequences and everything that kind of disrupts the natural flow of life. 242 00:39:11.040 --> 00:39:27.480 Wade Lightheart: There is this other side of it, where you see the outpouring of love and connection and humanity and kind of the noble aspects that inspire all of us to you know it's. 243 00:39:27.930 --> 00:39:37.860 Wade Lightheart: I call it the sublime or to see that there are other energies or forces beyond our intellect that have that define what it is to be a human. 244 00:39:38.940 --> 00:39:47.070 Wade Lightheart: And there's these beautiful little moments, whether that's in the patient rooms, or maybe with a nurse or a doctor. 245 00:39:47.490 --> 00:39:56.460 Wade Lightheart: or a loved one or a friend, where they going above and beyond in the care of either the extended family or with the individual and. 246 00:39:57.420 --> 00:40:16.620 Wade Lightheart: it's if you've been in that situation it's hard to describe it's transcendent because you just see pure kindness and pure love and concern for other people and it's it's inspired me in my own life to continue to advocate you know. 247 00:40:18.030 --> 00:40:26.130 Wade Lightheart: Then commit to helping other people live a healthier and better life, because I saw the impact that well your health isn't a guarantee and your life isn't a guarantee at a very early age. 248 00:40:27.330 --> 00:40:31.500 Wade Lightheart: How has this situation with yourself. 249 00:40:32.520 --> 00:40:35.790 Wade Lightheart: Inspired you your research and what. 250 00:40:35.820 --> 00:40:46.050 Wade Lightheart: We see happen as a way of you know, providing hope and opportunity for more of those moments for other people. 251 00:40:46.800 --> 00:40:56.550 Terry Wahls: You know, when I had my remarkable recovery my chair of medicine at the university called me and told me first to get a case report written up. 252 00:40:57.720 --> 00:41:03.060 Terry Wahls: In like on myself so yeah yeah this is your job, your assignment for the years right I got that done. 253 00:41:04.260 --> 00:41:12.360 Terry Wahls: Then, my got that published he called me back and say okay Now I want you to safety and feasibility study testing out this Protocol. 254 00:41:13.590 --> 00:41:24.360 Terry Wahls: You know there's and I said well that's not the research that I do it goes i'll get you the mentors that's your assignment and that's what you'll do so I saluted that Okay, Sir, and. 255 00:41:25.410 --> 00:41:41.550 Terry Wahls: Then, as people at the university some books were intensely critical, but what I was doing I in as I published my research and published my book, and my Ted talk I got all sorts of hate mail immense criticism. 256 00:41:42.810 --> 00:41:46.110 Terry Wahls: And so I do these interviews had say well. 257 00:41:47.400 --> 00:41:58.350 Terry Wahls: You know, obviously, obviously I want you to do what you think is ethically right, but I will tell you that I remember what it's like to be disabled. 258 00:41:59.700 --> 00:42:17.160 Terry Wahls: And that I need to tell people what my story was and the research that i'm doing, and they can decide how comfortable, they are with eating more vegetables meditating exercising asking for physical therapy in work with your medical team. 259 00:42:18.810 --> 00:42:21.300 Terry Wahls: And i'll keep putting that information out there. 260 00:42:22.320 --> 00:42:34.020 Terry Wahls: And so many times, I was you know ripped to shreds called unprofessional in dangerous in worse, and I would just call me set you know. 261 00:42:34.470 --> 00:42:45.930 Terry Wahls: Absolutely do what you think is ethically right, and I am i'll be to do what I think is ethically right absolutely I will disclose my conflicts of interest, I will disclose. 262 00:42:46.650 --> 00:42:59.670 Terry Wahls: Where the researcher that a caution people to work with they're treating physicians and they can decide how dangerous vegetables are how dangerous meditation is it how dangerous exercises for that. 263 00:43:01.290 --> 00:43:11.010 Terry Wahls: I just call me state those things, and then you know people would have their intense reaction like yo ever wonder I just saying like. 264 00:43:11.520 --> 00:43:27.180 Terry Wahls: Well, and how would you feel if I came started saying I could do all these things to treat rheumatoid arthritis and say, well, if that got my rheumatoid arthritis patients eat more vegetables to meditate exercise, I would say hello yeah. 265 00:43:30.330 --> 00:43:33.150 Wade Lightheart: i'm gonna ask I just a big thing because we're living in. 266 00:43:34.380 --> 00:43:46.020 Wade Lightheart: An interesting time right now, and there is a significant condemnation of certain narratives around medical and i've been following. 267 00:43:47.370 --> 00:43:51.810 Wade Lightheart: The weinstein's I don't know if you know who they are their evolutionary biologists. 268 00:43:52.380 --> 00:43:59.310 Wade Lightheart: That were essentially kicked out of evergreen university and ended up starting their own podcast because they were willing to challenge. 269 00:43:59.790 --> 00:44:05.370 Wade Lightheart: Some of the negative criticism that was directed towards the research and and heather and. 270 00:44:06.210 --> 00:44:13.620 Wade Lightheart: And Brett the husband and wife team they go through the science currently with the pandemic that we're dealing with today. 271 00:44:14.070 --> 00:44:24.930 Wade Lightheart: And they take it apart like reasonable rational scientists with skepticism and scientific method night as a non scientist person or I don't have a medical background. 272 00:44:25.260 --> 00:44:38.310 Wade Lightheart: I find it very refreshing to be able to kind of borrow on their intellectual acumen and they're structured thinking to go through this, and they also have received extreme levels of criticism. 273 00:44:38.790 --> 00:44:58.230 Wade Lightheart: And i've interviewed a number of doctors, who have made breakthrough discoveries we've had them on the podcast and variety of conditions and they to get subjected, particularly to very vicious attacks from their peers, why is that do you think is something threatening about it or. 274 00:44:58.950 --> 00:44:59.550 Terry Wahls: Explain. 275 00:44:59.610 --> 00:45:00.750 Terry Wahls: The biology of what. 276 00:45:00.810 --> 00:45:05.880 Terry Wahls: That happens i'm going to invite you to reflect pretty carefully we'll talk about this. 277 00:45:07.560 --> 00:45:09.240 Terry Wahls: sensory input, as it comes up. 278 00:45:10.860 --> 00:45:30.900 Terry Wahls: to buy spinal cord and brain is an overwhelming by him of information so at various points, the amount of information that gets through keeps getting cut down to smaller and smaller amounts so that my vision my hearing my sensory my sense of space. 279 00:45:32.100 --> 00:45:41.040 Terry Wahls: Is a tiny fraction less than half a percent of what's coming in and that and as infants, we learn to do that, so we can. 280 00:45:42.180 --> 00:45:56.880 Terry Wahls: cope, we can feed ourselves interact with the world on on just a tiny amount of information in we learn to do that in our social constructs first in our family unit in our expanded. 281 00:45:57.990 --> 00:46:03.930 Terry Wahls: universe of friends colleagues in our educational life and then in our work life. 282 00:46:05.070 --> 00:46:16.470 Terry Wahls: And so we we learned to interact with a tiny amount of information for my relationship with my my spouse my kids my family. 283 00:46:17.580 --> 00:46:32.670 Terry Wahls: I, and so is information that comes in that doesn't conform to my understanding of the world, it doesn't get to my cortex it doesn't get to my higher and say it's been pruned out and then what apply does get to my cortex I ignore it. 284 00:46:33.960 --> 00:46:36.240 Terry Wahls: Because it doesn't it doesn't match my to save the world. 285 00:46:37.470 --> 00:46:40.380 Terry Wahls: And then I may ridicule it I may push back. 286 00:46:41.490 --> 00:46:50.520 Terry Wahls: And then occasionally there's enough information that I realize maybe I need to change my understanding of the world. 287 00:46:51.990 --> 00:47:03.870 Terry Wahls: And we will do that with minus eight of my best friend my spouse my kids my work environments my professional environment until mindset of the world is somehow shatter. 288 00:47:05.610 --> 00:47:25.950 Terry Wahls: So of course our anyone who is an innovator, who thinks of something really new and different is going to face that kind of resistance, the innovators, in order to be successful, have to be okay with being ridiculed rejected potentially burned at the stake mm hmm. 289 00:47:27.330 --> 00:47:31.110 Terry Wahls: And you know part of the reason that I think i've been successful. 290 00:47:32.130 --> 00:47:54.930 Terry Wahls: And wanting to hang in here with this is that I had this internal moral obligation, because my own experience, the other reason that i'm successful is i'm a lesbian, and so I had to as part of my evolution as a emotional adult is it to let go of societal expectations of May I finally. 291 00:47:56.190 --> 00:48:02.550 Terry Wahls: Let all of that roll off my back and became comfortable with who, I am in my family structure. 292 00:48:03.750 --> 00:48:12.090 Terry Wahls: In being able to eventually get comfortable with that I think has made it easy for me to let the criticism that i've gotten. 293 00:48:12.960 --> 00:48:25.050 Terry Wahls: and probably another thing that's helpful is I am sort of clueless My family has found it far more stressful for the amount of criticism i've gotten over the years that I have because I just. 294 00:48:26.640 --> 00:48:27.690 Terry Wahls: focused on. 295 00:48:27.810 --> 00:48:28.590 My. 296 00:48:30.780 --> 00:48:36.060 Terry Wahls: You know my work my family what i'm doing and i'm oblivious to the world. 297 00:48:38.580 --> 00:48:46.590 Terry Wahls: And so i've i've learned to pay more attention to the world professionally but i'm still more oblivious than many of my colleagues. 298 00:48:49.200 --> 00:48:55.590 Wade Lightheart: it's a very important distinction, I think, for people to understand that. 299 00:48:57.120 --> 00:49:00.180 Wade Lightheart: Much of our world, I think it was. 300 00:49:02.970 --> 00:49:05.070 Wade Lightheart: reminded Maharishi that says. 301 00:49:06.180 --> 00:49:10.170 Wade Lightheart: there's no sense of being upset of the world, because the world he perceived doesn't actually exist. 302 00:49:13.980 --> 00:49:14.280 Wade Lightheart: enough. 303 00:49:14.640 --> 00:49:25.380 Wade Lightheart: That you brought this up is on Sunday, I was at my meditation Center and the monk was giving a discussion about the. 304 00:49:25.890 --> 00:49:30.360 Wade Lightheart: amount of information that's coming into our nervous system and how much is if it's actually filtered out. 305 00:49:30.930 --> 00:49:45.150 Wade Lightheart: And the component of meditation is to increase in open up one's awareness, to increase the opportunity for us to expand our consciousness or awareness into other areas, yet we live in a world today. 306 00:49:46.230 --> 00:49:59.400 Wade Lightheart: Which is fascinating because we've never had more information coming through to us yet specialization has increased as society. 307 00:50:00.300 --> 00:50:10.500 Wade Lightheart: improves and technological innovation so, for example, 100 years ago I needed to know how to chop wood and I needed to know how to farm and I needed to know how to maybe. 308 00:50:11.490 --> 00:50:23.910 Wade Lightheart: Properly hunt or clean animals and how to fix my house and it was a very more rural setting and today, you can have a job in in an urban area let's say as a cashier. 309 00:50:24.570 --> 00:50:30.750 Wade Lightheart: And you literally don't have to know anything other than how to punch numbers into the code and what's up and so. 310 00:50:31.170 --> 00:50:39.210 Wade Lightheart: The the interesting component as we've developed so much technologically we in and we get so much more information there's almost like. 311 00:50:39.630 --> 00:50:57.990 Wade Lightheart: As a response there's a drilling down to narrowness do you think that is something that needs to be identified in the medical community or do you think there's a way that we can cultivate innovation in geniuses in a way that doesn't. 312 00:50:59.130 --> 00:51:03.360 Wade Lightheart: draw the ire of people who are performing functions within that field. 313 00:51:04.590 --> 00:51:05.310 Terry Wahls: I think. 314 00:51:06.510 --> 00:51:17.370 Terry Wahls: Anyone who's truly innovative is going to draw the ire because it's very uncomfortable to have to abandon my constructs of how I understand the world. 315 00:51:18.450 --> 00:51:34.950 Terry Wahls: None of us want to do that I don't want to do that, you don't want to do that, we won't easily do that, so I don't think it's possible to have innovation that without facing ridicule and rejection at first and then either your ideas pan out. 316 00:51:36.240 --> 00:51:37.740 Terry Wahls: Or the suppressed. 317 00:51:39.690 --> 00:51:46.530 Terry Wahls: And so you keep doing the experiments, I have. 318 00:51:48.420 --> 00:52:01.260 Terry Wahls: A unique story, you know it actually the university's sort of commented on this, because most of my research has been funded by philanthropic gifts. 319 00:52:02.730 --> 00:52:05.640 Terry Wahls: From people whose lives, I have touched. 320 00:52:06.660 --> 00:52:14.370 Terry Wahls: Who then afterwards, who happen to have money, and so you know I believe what you're doing a turtle like to support your research. 321 00:52:15.990 --> 00:52:34.260 Terry Wahls: And so here's a gift for your next project, and so the second time that happened, but we got a six figure donation to my research lab the dean of the College called me and I had a meeting I thought your God yo who have I pissed off now. 322 00:52:36.990 --> 00:52:37.380 Wade Lightheart: Of course. 323 00:52:37.410 --> 00:52:38.430 Terry Wahls: And it was like. 324 00:52:39.870 --> 00:52:43.620 Terry Wahls: This has never happened at the University of iowa So what are you doing. 325 00:52:45.030 --> 00:52:59.850 Terry Wahls: And you know we continue to have some remarkable philanthropic support, which is a that has allowed me to invest it to do some really interesting and small projects and now we'll be doing this much larger project. 326 00:53:01.770 --> 00:53:02.730 Terry Wahls: Because. 327 00:53:04.080 --> 00:53:25.110 Terry Wahls: i've made a diff I have a protocol that has had some dramatic impact on people who have resources, then, to come back to me in my lab say you know what we like what you do a talk to us about some ideas and we think we'd like to give you another larger gift. 328 00:53:27.090 --> 00:53:28.050 Terry Wahls: And so. 329 00:53:29.100 --> 00:53:46.470 Terry Wahls: That allows me in some ways to be vastly more innovative than folks who have to write grants that have to convince their peers have a newly innovative idea who can't accept new big innovations, they can accept small incremental. 330 00:53:47.490 --> 00:53:48.630 Terry Wahls: Partial ovations. 331 00:53:49.290 --> 00:53:51.030 Terry Wahls: You know and and what i've done. 332 00:53:51.960 --> 00:54:07.050 Terry Wahls: With my multi multi modal studies was a huge big innovation that was completely utterly rejected by all the NIH folks in 2010 when we're writing those grants. 333 00:54:08.370 --> 00:54:15.960 Terry Wahls: But now you're in 2011 these multimodal studies are being done, and our work has been cited. 334 00:54:17.100 --> 00:54:17.550 Terry Wahls: Beautiful. 335 00:54:18.000 --> 00:54:30.570 Wade Lightheart: I was also listening to Eric weinstein that's brett's brother he runs a podcast called dark horses and advanced physicist a super genius and he was sharing how. 336 00:54:31.200 --> 00:54:45.240 Wade Lightheart: Many of the current research grant organizations are stifling a lot of the development of science and what he felt that there was between him and his brother and a sister they had three. 337 00:54:47.220 --> 00:54:57.330 Wade Lightheart: Human human transformational discoveries that was essentially being suppressed, and he says, well, if you do the math of how many other researchers that could be. 338 00:54:57.690 --> 00:55:04.080 Wade Lightheart: Situated in this, I think a lot of people and, and this is what I love about alternative funding. 339 00:55:04.560 --> 00:55:14.610 Wade Lightheart: That the NIH over the last 30 years I think has given out somewhere around $3 trillion in research grants, but they develop they define what gets. 340 00:55:15.360 --> 00:55:23.940 Wade Lightheart: What gets accepted and what doesn't but now there's these other funding options that you kind of illustrated with yourself that are allowing researchers to maybe go outside of. 341 00:55:24.330 --> 00:55:34.890 Wade Lightheart: The normal parameters using science, but to kind of create exponential growth, do you see that as the future for research that you're doing or expanding teachers in the field. 342 00:55:35.040 --> 00:55:38.190 Terry Wahls: So, so I think that peer review. 343 00:55:39.270 --> 00:55:41.550 Terry Wahls: incremental approach has certainly. 344 00:55:42.780 --> 00:55:48.180 Terry Wahls: hugely deepen understanding of physiology in very wonderful ways. 345 00:55:51.030 --> 00:56:11.820 Terry Wahls: The ability to do what i'm doing his also ultra understanding in really profound ways I in that as been on the basis of this philanthropic gifts because we've made an impact on the lives of people have to have a lot of money. 346 00:56:13.560 --> 00:56:28.710 Terry Wahls: And you know when i'm in these meetings with my other scientific colleagues who are doing dietary research in there right yeah i'm writing grants, along with them and sore they were talking about the issued struggles to get through to peer reviews. 347 00:56:29.940 --> 00:56:33.210 Terry Wahls: To do the innovative work I and. 348 00:56:34.470 --> 00:56:43.680 Terry Wahls: When I reflect on what i'm going to be able to launch into next because i've had i'm so blessed to have this philanthropic support. 349 00:56:46.800 --> 00:56:53.910 Terry Wahls: And I think the bigger breakthroughs will come through from folks who have access to philanthropic support. 350 00:56:54.630 --> 00:56:57.420 Wade Lightheart: know, can you talk about what's coming down the pipe for. 351 00:56:57.450 --> 00:56:57.870 yeah. 352 00:56:59.370 --> 00:57:00.000 Terry Wahls: it's very exciting. 353 00:57:01.200 --> 00:57:12.660 Terry Wahls: So again, this is from a grateful patient who really believes in what we're doing we're going to enroll people. 354 00:57:13.680 --> 00:57:32.370 Terry Wahls: with multiple sclerosis relapse remitting who want to do a dietary approach they'll need to be agreed to be randomized between a ketogenic diet, a modified Paleo diet and dietary guidelines will give them support. 355 00:57:33.750 --> 00:57:43.860 Terry Wahls: over that time period, we will follow them over two years we will be measuring did they actually implement the diet. 356 00:57:44.310 --> 00:58:00.450 Terry Wahls: What what are they eating so will will know about dietary adherence we will know about clinical outcomes in terms of walking function vision function hand function will understand patient reported outcomes in terms of mood. 357 00:58:03.570 --> 00:58:11.610 Terry Wahls: Processing speed or memory fatigue, quality of life, we will have biomarkers as well. 358 00:58:13.200 --> 00:58:13.740 Terry Wahls: and 359 00:58:15.930 --> 00:58:34.380 Terry Wahls: This will be the first time that will have had a study of this size for two years, that will be able to look at changes in clinical outcomes changes in biomarkers whilst be looking at myelination along the way. 360 00:58:35.610 --> 00:58:36.180 Terry Wahls: as well. 361 00:58:37.680 --> 00:58:46.350 Terry Wahls: And we're will be freezing microbiome specimens will be freezing blood specimens so at the end. 362 00:58:47.400 --> 00:58:55.200 Terry Wahls: We will ask bill to write another grant to go back and say let's look at the molecular mechanisms of what is going on and why. 363 00:58:56.250 --> 00:58:59.820 Terry Wahls: So this will be absolutely transformational. 364 00:59:01.440 --> 00:59:05.910 Terry Wahls: A smaller study that may be even more transformational in some ways. 365 00:59:05.910 --> 00:59:08.640 Terry Wahls: Ways it may be looking at an. 366 00:59:10.380 --> 00:59:21.510 Terry Wahls: An online course that we've created that teaches people through virtual technology such as this, how to improve diet. 367 00:59:22.770 --> 00:59:24.600 Terry Wahls: Stress reduction and exercise. 368 00:59:25.620 --> 00:59:30.060 Terry Wahls: In these supplemental non diet not exercise things that you can be doing. 369 00:59:31.710 --> 00:59:44.310 Terry Wahls: And we'll see that impact on MS patients with we're so that cities approved, we are talking now with our cancer Center and. 370 00:59:45.600 --> 00:59:57.690 Terry Wahls: We anticipate having it studied in cancer we're also talking to rheumatology folks and saying this in rheumatology patients as well, so if we can show anticipate that will we will build a show. 371 00:59:58.170 --> 01:00:10.590 Terry Wahls: That we can teach these concepts online and have improvement in dietary intake improvement in patient reported outcomes Now this is. 372 01:00:12.120 --> 01:00:13.020 Terry Wahls: The sky's the limit. 373 01:00:14.550 --> 01:00:19.170 Terry Wahls: We can transform more lives, this can be. 374 01:00:22.050 --> 01:00:26.130 Terry Wahls: expanded its it has no limits. 375 01:00:27.180 --> 01:00:34.080 Wade Lightheart: You know, this is one of the beauty beautiful things about the Internet and the distribution of information is once. 376 01:00:35.190 --> 01:00:45.750 Wade Lightheart: A demonstrated will protocol breakthrough can be developed, you can share that with a wide variety of people who might not have both the medical. 377 01:00:45.750 --> 01:00:54.000 Wade Lightheart: Or you know the or the even the knowledge of that by you know hey they find out about it, they can experiment they take it to their professional medical science said hey i'd like to. 378 01:00:54.570 --> 01:00:58.920 Wade Lightheart: i'd like to experiment with this on our own, on my own Is that what you anticipate happening. 379 01:00:59.310 --> 01:01:03.930 Terry Wahls: Well, what we certainly anticipate is that this makes it so much more available to. 380 01:01:04.950 --> 01:01:12.090 Terry Wahls: Rural communities to small small communities that don't have access to professionals that could. 381 01:01:13.050 --> 01:01:35.760 Terry Wahls: say a dietitian or to those populations, for whom tra

Empowered People Podcast
E⚡️P - 251 I Want What You Have

Empowered People Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 17:06


Wanting what someone has, without wanting to be the kind of person that deserves it, is a sure fire way to failure. Looks past all the glitter and gold, focus on what they do, who they interact with, and ultimately who they ARE deep down. It might not be the quick fix secrete that you're looking for, but it is real and true.    Also if you are feeling like during the holiday season you need to take some time off alcohol be sure to check out Hop Wtr. Its delicious and awesome and good for you.  https://hopwtr.com/ Use Coupon Code EEKC to get 10% off.  

Tough Girl Podcast
Anisah Patas - Disabled/chronically ill outdoor enthusiast who enjoys everything from hiking to wild swimming and more.

Tough Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 36:37


Anisah is the founder of the new blog: Outside Our Way which features interviews from other disabled and chronically ill folks, sharing their stories of their outdoor experiences.   Anisah in her own words:   My name is Ani. I have multiple chronic illnesses and I am disabled. That probably brings an image to your mind of what it means to be ‘disabled', But when you look up the definition of ‘disability' you'll find various ways you can categorise it - as well as plenty of opinions about what it means to be disabled.   The UK Equality Act 2010 classifies disability as: “a physical or mental impairment and the impairment has a substantial and long-term adverse effect on his or her ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities.”    The truth is there are so many variations and types of impairments that fit this definition. There are visible physical disabilities, there are hidden physical disabilities, there are learning disabilities, and there are mental health disabilities. The variations and combinations are endless and as a result each person's disability or impairment is unique. How that affects their daily life is completely individual to them.   I have what is called hidden disabilities or invisible illnesses. I'm diagnosed with Lupus SLE and Hypermobility Spectrum Disorder (HSD). I have chronic pain, fatigue and memory loss along with other symptoms that affect me daily.    People often think that I'm not disabled or chronically ill.  There's a common stereotype that comes to a lot of people's minds when the words “sick” or “disabled” is used, and like so many I don't really fit that image. Most of the time when you look at me I don't look like I'm in pain or fatigued. I walk without aids. I take part in active outdoor activities.    People don't realise that I don't look in pain or fatigued because I have a lifetime's worth of experience pretending I'm not. I time my painkillers to kick in before I see someone. I'll make sure the environment I'm in when I'm with people is one that won't drain too much energy or add to the pain. I'll plan my week prior and after to ensure I'm rested enough and won't crash.    Finally, when I'm too exhausted to handle a simple conversation despite all my planning and methods… I will cancel and you will not see me in that state at all. The same amount of work goes into planning any outdoor activities. I have to use tactics and creative methods just to take part. I need extra preparations and plans to get by in a world that was created with non-disabled people in mind. This is the aspect of disability that people might miss.    Which brings me to the question - how can we help change this?   I can only be an expert on my own experience/disability/illness (and even then, that's iffy!). After brief conversations with others with chronic illnesses or disabilities, I have come across some amazing tips to help manage my own disabilities outdoors. I have found people who can relate to my feelings like no-one else can, and have helped me pass challenges I'd previously faced alone. I've realised that there's so much that I don't know about people who are chronically ill/disabled and so much more I should learn.    I want to talk to people with different disabilities and conditions to mine. I want to see what challenges they face when they access the outdoors, what hurdles they have to navigate when going outdoors. I want to ask them what everyone should do to flatten those hurdles as much as we can.    Outside: Our Way is a collection of interviews to show that we as a community are here. These interviews are a chance for disabled people to shape their own narratives and tell us about their way of going outside. It's aim is to shine a light on what it's really like to be an outdoor enthusiast and disabled/chronically ill.   To those who are disabled or chronically ill - I hope you can find something to relate to. There's a beautiful community that have shared experiences and can truly understand what you might think or feel.    To those who are non-disabled - I hope to show you what it takes to be disabled/chronically ill in the outdoors. And perhaps prompt you to consider how you can help us access the outdoors our way.   Listen to Ani on the tough girl podcast - New episodes go live every Tuesday at 7am UK time - Hit the subscribe button so you don't miss out.    The Tough Girl Podcast is sponsorship and ad free thanks to the monthly financial support of patrons.    Support the mission to increase the amount of female role models in the media. Visit www.patreon.com/toughgirlpodcast and subscribe - super quick and easy to do and it makes a massive difference. Thank you.   Show notes Who is Ani Being an advocate for disability and chronic illness in the outdoor environment Getting into the outdoors and not liking it at first Getting back into the outdoors 2/3 years ago Deciding not to follow the advice  Enjoying her time in the outdoors Her life as a child and experiencing symptoms from a young age Hating going to school Learning energy management Not knowing what something was wrong dealing with pain was normal Getting the diagnosis as 12 years old Making the decision to go outside and wanting to do something Spending too much time inside Why the outdoors is her happy place Feeling empowered and enabled Learning how to balance caution and happiness Planning every aspect of her life Connecting with other women who have a similar condition Spending time around water and feeling at peace Trying to get good with cold water Making adjustments to make wild camping accessible  Figuring out how it can work for you What Outside Our Way is about The women who have inspired Ani Wanting to share her hiking journey on line Future dreams and ambitions Wanting to do a multi-day hike Hike your own hike Advice for your next adventure    Social Media   Instagram: @ani_went_outside    Outside: Our Way - A blog sharing stories from from across the outdoor sector and disability and chronic illness landscape.   Hosted by @alltheelements   www.alltheelements.co/outside-our-way   Instagram @outside_our_way    

The Zach Gelb Show
Wilson Wanting Out? (Hour 1)

The Zach Gelb Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 40:22


Week 11 whiparound l Should Russell Wilson force his way out of Seattle this offseason? l Calls on the NFL See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

No Time To Turn - A KISS Nerd Podcast
Episode 13C - Gene Simmons

No Time To Turn - A KISS Nerd Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 58:53


Wanting to establish himself as more than a blood drooling, fire belching Demon, Gene spreads his wings. When you wish upon a star, your dreams come true...

Artfully Told
Episode 078 - ”What‘s the Most Important Role of an Artist?” - Part 2

Artfully Told

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 24:45


In today's episode, I have compiled some of our more recent guests' answers to the question, "What is the most important role of an artist?" This delightful compilation brings a plethora of unique, honest, and inspiring answers to that question, and I'm excited to share part two of this series with you today. Enjoy!    Enroll in Lindsey's dance and wellness courses: www.elevateart.thinkific.com  Support Artfully Told: www.paypal.me/elevateart Artfully Told links: www.facebook.com/artfullytold | www.artfullytold.podbean.com | elevateartskc@gmail.com Get a free audiobook through Audible!  http://www.audibletrial.com/ArtfullyTold Schedule your own interview as a featured guest with Artfully Told! https://calendly.com/artfullytold/podcast-interview   Episode 78 - "What's the Most Important Role of an Artist? - Part 2 [00:00:00] Lindsey Dinneen: Hello and welcome to Artfully Told, where we share true stories about meaningful encounters with art. [00:00:06] Krista: "I think artists help people have different perspectives on every aspect of life." [00:00:12] Roman: "All I can do is put my heart in to the world." [00:00:15] Elizabeth: "It doesn't have to be perfect the first time. It doesn't have to be perfect ever, really. I mean, as long as you, you're enjoying doing it and you're trying your best, that can be good enough." [00:00:23] Elna: "Art is something that you can experience with your senses and that you just experience as so beautiful." [00:00:31] Lindsey Dinneen: Hello, and welcome back to another episode of Artfully Told. I'm your host Lindsey, and I am delighted to be bringing you another special episode today. We are going to explore all of the different answers to the question, "what's the most important role of an artist?" Over the last year and a half I have gotten to ask that question of so many artists and guests that have been on my show. And I absolutely love hearing people's perspective on this question. So I'm excited to bring it all together for you in this special episode that I hope you thoroughly enjoy. [00:01:11] Mike Huerter: Probably just be true to yourself. You know, you, you can't fake art. It's, I mean, yeah, I'm portraying a role in something, and I guess people would maybe think that's fake, but for me, I want to do it to the very best of my ability. I want people to--when they, when they look and see me doing something, they don't see me, they see the person or, you know, that I'm trying to portray. [00:01:38] Gregg Gonzales: I think, I think it's to delight. Truly, I think it's to delight those, whether that delight can be in the form of, "I appreciate it. I think it's garbage. I think it's the greatest thing ever." I think it's to gain, to get a response from the people who are experiencing the art, whether it be music, whether it be a painting, whether it be a book. You want a response. You want, you want them to feel something. So to me as an artist, I want my people to, or I want the people who are experiencing my work to feel something. I know that sounds very general, but to me, it's about feeling. [00:02:23] Jami Robben: I would say the most important role is probably sharing your gifts with others, just to again, make them happy. I think a lot of times are sometimes can be, you know, just kept to yourself if you're scared of showing other people. But the best thing you could do as an artist is share it and inspire others with it. [00:02:44] JaJa Smith: To be honest, because we as people have dealt with enough bologna sandwich that, you know, it doesn't do anything for anyone, if you're just doing something for the sake of the adoration or the sake of a finished product. But if you're true and you're intentional and you're authentic, I mean, that is the product that people can truly get on board with. You know, I think that that is to not just to people, but also to the work itself, and then to the artists, because there have been a few times I may have flubbed or played it safer. And then, you know, I stepped back and the scene is over and, you know, I was just like, "What are you doing?" Like you, you know that you cheated yourself and you're like, "Why did I do that?" So the biggest thing to me is just be honest, be authentic with your work and everything that you do. You know, I don't see any need to talk about things that you don't understand. You know, like if, if you're a music artist, that's like, you know, tell your story. You know, you have a story. And it's beautiful. I mean, it's yours and it deserves to be told. [00:03:49] Darnell Benjamin: I think the number one rule for an artist is to be honest. I think that, to be honest, whatever that means, to be honest. [00:03:59] Emily Moores: I think that there are a lot of different kinds of roles for different kinds of artists. Like some artists have you reflect on, you know, historical events or connect you to maybe an idea or group of people that you wouldn't have a connection with. And I guess in any situation, whether, you know, like if I'm just creating artwork to be playful, I'm still creating a connection to this like physical, tangible object existing in space. And so for me, I would say artists create connections where we maybe haven't thought about them previously. [00:04:39] Harlem Lennox: To be themselves and to be truthful about what it is that they are trying to convey, whatever it is, no matter how dark you might feel that it is, or no matter how light it is, because it just-- I feel like if you can feel something and you can get something, some type of meaning from whatever it is, then it is art. And so if you are making, whether it's a piece of music or painting, if you're dancing, whatever it is, if it has meaning, and it is true to you, then I think that is the response. That is the responsibility of an artist. I don't want an artist who tries to be the next whomever. I don't want an artist who, okay, what is everybody liking right now? Let me try to create that. And I understand that people got to do what they got to do to get where they're trying to go. And so maybe they start off that way because they're still learning. But when you get to a point where you're confident enough and brave enough to be able to produce your own work, your own truth, whatever is in your soul, then I definitely think that that people have a responsibility to bring themselves to the art world, because like I said, we need it. We don't need another Van Gogh. He's here. He did his thing. Thank you Van. But I want to see another whomever it is: Brittany, Sam, you know, Godfrey, whoever. Bring me your art, bring me your truth. Or else it doesn't mean anything. [00:06:23] Christina Stanton: It's to tell their truth, because we all are having such different experiences in this world that what you want is that somebody is expressing your experience somewhere in art, doing something. And you just want to connect with art that's expressing your particular experience that you're having on this planet and is sharing your human experience. And so I just think artists should be telling their truth of how they're viewing the world and their experience, because there's going to be people out there that can relate and want to relate and want that comradery, and wants somebody to quote unquote, "understand them," but I just feel like it's a shared experience. So it's a story that, that can be shared with several people. We're not all having the same experience, but there are people out there who are having, you know, the same struggles, and the same highs and lows and joys. And they're looking at life in the world and God, and in the same way, do you want to connect to art that is speaking to you personally. [00:07:33] Jeffrey Holst: I think that artists bring perspective to everything. If we didn't have artists, our world would be very boring. So I think perspective and entertainment are probably the two things that are most important. [00:07:49] Lucas Zellers: The role of an artist is to tell us what to think about. And I think my experience with monsters and the study of them and sort of the practical use of monster theory is that art gives us a way of saying things that we couldn't say, or feeling things that we couldn't feel or experiencing things that we had no other way to experience. [00:08:13] Kristin Beale: The important role: to entertain and not to entertain others for that is a big plus, but to entertain yourself, to keep yourself happy to stay while you're doing it for it to be a good, you know, way to keep yourself happy. And, you know, it's a major plus if it can bring happiness to other people too. [00:08:34] Doug Motel: Well, I think the, the role of the artist is to lead us in our evolution. I think that you know, Darwin pointed out that we evolved from creatures in the sea, you know, we keep evolving and I think that there's an assumption that evolution is just kind of like on autopilot, but I don't. I believe that we could actually hasten the pace of our evolution. We can you know steer and direct our evolution and the ones that do that are the artists. So the role of the artist is nothing short of saving humanity. [00:09:15] Gloria Grace Rand: Well, the most important role-- I think it's just being true to who you are and to trust yourself to be able to communicate whatever it is that you want to communicate. Because if you're going about doing something in the arts to please someone else, it's not really ultimately going to be successful. I think you've gotta be able to do whatever it is from your heart to really be able to please yourself. And it may not please everybody. And that's okay. But as long as you are conveying what you want to convey from your heart, then it is going to touch someone else's heart. [00:09:58] Donna Kay Yarborough: There are many different roles that people have depending on their abilities and what their focus is. So like I mentioned earlier, some people just want to bring joy into the world. And I think that is lovely. Joy is defined on many different levels and that can be a pure focus in me. I I flavor joy on top of a baseline of perspective. I am ever the educator, even though I am not officially teaching in a classroom, my goal is to always teach in some manner or another. So making this tasty nugget of learning I think is how I function. And a lot of people out there function, there's other things you can do. Sometimes you just want to make a pretty thing, or sometimes you just want to decorate. And that again is very, very valuable in this world, but mine is teaching. [00:10:59] Christopher John Garcia: To make art. I mean, really, that's what it comes down to, I think. Wanting an artist to be a philosopher, a spokesman, any of that? Really not as important as the fact that they just create the work. [00:11:16] Jeff Leisawitz: To authentically create. I mean, that's it. So you create with the truth of their experience, whatever that is. It's not about building skills, although that's great if you do, right? I mean, you look at it again and in music, punk rock, you know, the Ramones and the Sex Pistols and, you know, bands like that, they sucked as musicians, but you could feel it, right? They were putting their heart and truth into the music and that's why it resonated so much. [00:11:50] Shawn Kilgore: To keep it alive, to keep it going. [00:11:53] Natalie Cordone: I think for me, it's to tell the truth, whatever your truth is in that moment, to be vulnerable enough, to be honest, in a way where you are sharing something real, sharing a piece of yourself with people that you might never meet or really get to know. [00:12:13] Corry MacDonald: Oh, artists are the way-showers. Most of us are stuck in our, our brains, myself included. Why do you think I share this? I have to learn what I'm sharing. So the artists seem to know that when they go into that flow state, when they go into that still point inside and bring something into the world that was never seen before, that they're dovetailing with all of life, with consciousness itself. And so they show those who've never gone there before what's possible, and they bring something new to form, which is sheer magic. [00:12:48] Sandy Rodriguez: I think that they're --okay-- it has two types of importance. One would be important for oneself. I think that as an artist, the importance of art to yourself would be allowing you to express feelings and modify them, so it's something that is both a source of expression and also a source of comfort to yourself as an artist, I think. But as to society or more as a whole, I think that, firstly, it can make society better by adding more beauty to everyday lives, but it can also shine a light on things that might be social ills or social problems. So it's simply another way of communicating. As a journalist, as a former newspaper editor, I would say that the role of art is not entirely different from the role of any other form of media. You can either shine a light on problems or spread the word on something that is beautiful, spread the word about something that is fascinating, bring more beauty to the world. [00:13:53] Sabrina Osso: It goes back to freedom to liberate. I like that word that you used during our interview: to, to liberate, liberate all emotions, whether it be happiness, sadness, anger. It could be, yeah, sadness, happiness, joy, liberation of all emotions, because once you release it, then you can get to the next level. So, yeah, liberation, I would say. [00:14:24] Anthony Saldana: Tell the truth. Just tell your own truth and also try to find your own. I know that stories have been told and retold, but try to find your own angle to, to put your own expression on, on a different take on a story. But I, I really believe in, in being honest in your work. [00:14:47] Jason Figueira: I think persistence is also something very important for an artist to have, because when you have a passion to tell a story, you don't give up telling it. There are a lot of obstacles that come up in any different kind-- dancing, whether it's painting, whether it's film or so many things that come up in your way. But as long as you have your passion to tell a story, you will overcome those obstacles. And I'd say, you know, there's an expression: a genius is 90% hard work and 10% ideas. So really it's about how much work you put into it. So I would say persistence is absolutely key for an artist to have, is absolutely a key quality rather, for an artist to have. [00:15:30] Sharon Glassman: I think if you truly believe it, see it, want to share it. That I think is probably what makes art, art. There's something there that's just intrinsically real. [00:15:47] Christopher Boorman: Well, for me, the role of an artist is to share their art. It's to share with other people how they see the world, to share how they feel about the human experience. I hate to sound trite, but I'm reminded of that question, "If a tree falls in the forest and there's nobody around, does it make a sound? So if you're creating art and you don't share it, then are you really an artist? You, you might have a hobby and that's just fine. You can make art for yourself. But I think for it to be art in its truest form, to be an artist, art needs to be shared, it needs to be enjoyed. [00:16:31] Bryan Colley: Well, that's a, that's a tricky question. I mean, I think the role of the artist is to, to offer ideas to the world and hopefully they can offer an idea. No one's thought of before. And of course, you know, everyone is born ignorant, so everyone experiences new ideas all the time in the, in the course of their life. It's not like there's this one set of ideas everybody knows. Everyone has a different experience. So, so everyone has a way to experience art and some people gain something from it and other people don't because maybe they've already experienced that or, or they don't understand it, you know? So, so you need a wide field of art out there because there's just different art for each person. [00:17:17] So you go through life learning things. You get an education, you read books, you, you know-- I'm a media junkie. I watch films and I listen to music, you know, it's consume, consume, consume. And I think at some point you want to contribute to that or you want to give back and it's like, "Well, I've learned all this for what reason?" It's like, so that I can take my experience and my knowledge and offer my ideas or my observations on that. So that's where art comes into play, I think. And I think it's something everyone can participate in. It's not just for professionals. Everyone can be an artist and offer something to the world. [00:18:01] Jessie Katz Greenberg: I think that it's just to share your perspective, whatever it is. And, and again, I mean, you'll, this might be very obvious from the way I've answered, I'm answering these questions, but I just feel like, you know, art is for everyone. So I just think the most important role is to share your perspective. And if that perspective is, you know, something deep that people have to think about, or if you're making an important political commentary or you're, you know, making things because it's cute and your perspective as you want to cheer people up and make them happy. And that's the point of it then. All of that is valid. So I think it's just sharing your perspective, whatever that is. [00:18:42] Patricia Karen Gage: I think it's liberation, freedom, total expression, and to help shift the misconceptions of, of reality. And it's an opportunity to interpret whatever it is that you, as a human being are here, are here in your own path to experience. And yeah, it's, it's the artist journey. [00:19:09] Sally Brown: I think to express themselves and make their voices heard because we're, we're documenting life in a creative way for history. So just continuing to do it and using their voice in different ways is just, is the most important role for them. So, yeah, just doing it. [00:19:28] Will Blaine: I know that artists do different things. I think that many artists like to make political statements and, and things like that, but I, I don't think that's the most important rule or role. I think that that artists should do it for themselves primarily. I, I've, I've seen people that are artists that want to become famous. I don't particularly want that myself. I, I mean, I don't, I never desired to be famous. I just like entertaining kids, basically. But I think that a person needs to do it as a, as a way of expressing themselves. That's the most important thing above everything else. [00:20:02] Phillip Andrew Bennett Low: So my instinctive response to that is leeriness, because I, first of all, I obviously do believe that there is an important role for artists. I'm a professional artist. It's, it's something I've devoted a huge portion of my life to. It's my passion. I am always a little fearful that there's a danger because we've all known that sort of the artist with the sort of messianic complex, you know, the idea that I'm creating something because I believe it's important. And this approach generally creates art that is not that enjoyable. And I'm, I'm resistant to that. That said, I do believe that art is important, but I, I tend to flinch from that as a starting place for making something. But if I had to say, what is the role of art? Again, the first thing that leaps into my mind is, it's to provide a kind of fun house mirror. It's to provide a reflection of reality that distorts it in some way or shifts our focus onto a specific aspect of it. [00:21:14] Aunia Kahn: The most important role of an artist is to not worry about what everybody thinks. The most important role of an artist is to do what they want to do in, in themselves, what feels right for them and to not cater to anybody else. Unless of course they're catering for a reason, like I said you know, a minute ago, like, you know, I want to sell my work and I know this kind of stuff sells, and this is what I'm creating, because I know I can make a dollar and pay my bills. That's great. You know, but I-- the role of an artist is to be who they want to-- I think the role of anybody, I think the role of an artist is the role of anybody, really, to be who you want to be without explaining yourself. Of course, unless you're harming people, that's a whole other thing, but, you know, be who you want to be, express how you want to express, live how you want to live, without the expectations and pressures of society and other people. That's how I feel artists and people not should-- cause I don't like the word should-- but would benefit in living life, being free, free of, free of all of that, to just be what you want to be, do what you want to do. Say what you want to say. [00:22:31] Justin Alcala: The most important part is communicate and inspire. If you have to find a fundamental way to connect to someone through your medium, and once you communicate with them, you inspire them to take what you said and make it their own. And for books, any characters' story, once I get it out in the world, it was no longer my story. It is the reader's story. What they think is far more important about the protagonist /antagonist, the plot than anything that I've dreamed up, it is their world to be inspired and kind of take it into their own lives and contribute. [00:23:05] Natsune Oki: Artists are the key player in terms of creating something new and creating a future of a future. Like it really like, you know, until now it's it was an engineer, but because now we've built some infrastructures for people to be more creative, possibility is unlimited, like with the artists combined with technology, like it's, it's going to be like crazy. Like it's going to be our future. [00:23:33] Rachel Moore: I know it's kind of a, that's been kind of a weird idea lately --the truth, but I think to shine a light on things that maybe for various reasons, society or people have said, you know, we can't look at this to shine a light in a way that is accessible. I think that if we just like, you know, shove things in people's faces like, eh, that's not really doing the job of art in my opinion. To invite people to see things differently, that's what I think the role of an artist. [00:24:01] Lindsey Dinneen: Well, I hope you enjoyed all of the answers to the question. What's the most important role of an artist. As you can tell, we have such a diverse group of guests who have come through the show and it's been so much fun to hear their perspectives on some of these really interesting questions that lead us to think deeper about different aspects of art. So thank you for joining me. And if you're feeling as inspired as I am, I'd love if you would share this with a friend or two and we will catch you next time. [00:24:35] If you have a story to share with us, we would love that so much. And I hope your day has been Artfully Told.

WTW Radio
AUDIO JOURNEY | Ambition Hour | EP 186

WTW Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 63:53


Yooo and welcome to episode 186! This week we talk about celebrating anniversaries of accomplishments we have had, the solitude that comes from going to the gym, A Man Named Scott, the Kid Cudi documentary and the Umbrella that is Rocafella. Wanting to know if the person you are around is on hard core drugs. The lost art of music video channels. The Latin Grammys, Christina Aguilera's longevity and plastic surgery taboo. We speak on the recent death of Memphis rapper Young Dolph and how hip hop never recovers from grief. Death and the reality of it and so much more. Links to where you can listen to us: linktr.ee/ambitionhour Make sure to check us out on socials: @AmbitionHour @ClaudiaRenee__ (Two underscores) @Jav600 Executive produced by: Jav and Claudia Audio Visual: Jav Engineered by: Jav Color Corrected by: Claudia

Beyond Risk and Back
Permission to Heal- The journey from wanting to allowing.

Beyond Risk and Back

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 50:26


Once you begin to understand that your experience as a parent was informed by your parents, and their parents...and their parents...then what?    Marci Brockmann,  a high school teacher for 27 years, tells her story of childhood pain and walking away from the legacy of trauma passed down in her family, generation after generation after finally giving herself...permission to heal.   Now it's your turn.   Marci Brockmann is a multi-passionate woman – an artist, an author, a podcaster, and an English teacher. She has been writing expressively in journals for 35 years which became the basis of her two new books, Permission to Land: Searching for Love, Home & Belonging, and Permission to Land: Personal Transformation Through Writing, and her podcast Permission to Heal. She lives in New York with her husband, their grown kids, frisky cats, and many fishes. PERMISSION TO LAND: SEARCHING FOR LOVE, HOME & BELONGING is a memoir about surviving narcissistic abuse and addiction and learning to thrive and love yourself to build a life of love, joy, success, and friendship. She survived familial mental illness and addiction, emotional abuse and neglect, an emotionally abusive marriage, and in her book, she shares her story and experiences to empower others to trust their inner voices and to live their best lives of love, home, and true belonging.   * Graphic Language

We Hate Politics
Fairfax Commonwealth Attorney Steve Descano talks about AG-elect Miyares wanting to intervene in localities

We Hate Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 10:43


In this audio interview, Fairfax County's Commonwealth Attorney Steve Descano (D) talks about everything happening in Virginia politics right now along with what is happening in the Republican recall movement against him and the status of that effort.Descano also talked about the recent statements from Attorney General-elect Jason Miyares when he expressed a desire to go into localities and intervene in cases when officials think a local prosecutor is mishandling a case. “My initial response was that it is silly,” Descano said. “It doesn't make any sense. Quite frankly what we have is Jason Miyares wants to cosplay as a prosecutor.” He also talks about what he would like to see from the Democratic Party moving forward. He believes one priority for the party should be to “focus on propelling our vision for the commonwealth, instead of presenting as counter to someone else.”  Descano finished by answering a question about whether or not he is considering running for attorney general in 2025. 

Abraham Hicks Wisdom Guide
Abraham Hicks #0055 - Wanting something back

Abraham Hicks Wisdom Guide

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 10:24


• MANIFESTATION • Follow our YouTube Channel Abraham Hicks Wisdom Guide Go to https:/abraham-hicks.com/ to learn more from Abraham Hicks and their teachings. Abraham-Hicks audio materials are copyrighted by Esther Hicks and shared following the USE-OF-COPYRIGHTED-MATERIAL GUIDELINES : https://www.youtube.com/user/AbrahamHicks/about --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/wisdom-guide/message

Caregiver Connection Podcast
Making Self Care Work: Step by Step Guide to Making Self Care Possible for Caregivers

Caregiver Connection Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 22:16


You'd like to take care of yourself but have no idea what you'd do or how you'd do it?  I have the solution! This is the last of the self-care series for caregivers. In this episode, I go through the process of how to choose your form of self-care and how to incorporate it into your day. Listen today as I take you through the same process I do with clients and learn how to make self-care in your life a reality. ------------------------------------------ Show Notes This is the last episode of the Caregiver self-care series. Today I'm going to show you how to put everything together so you can start taking moments to care for yourself throughout the day. Let's talk about bringing one self-care tool into your day. Over the past month, I've shared with you the reasons why you might not think you can bring self-care into your days so you can be better able to care for the person you are a caregiver for. If you haven't listened to the past four episodes I suggest you go back to them after you've listened to this one. To summarize… It is difficult for you to make yourself a priority to care for yourself and that comes from a lot of different reasons. You feel like you can't take time for yourself because you'll be judged or you'll judge yourself for it. There isn't time in the day for self-care. Or you can't afford self-care because you think it costs money. I've given you six different types of self-care tools that don't cost money and take as little or as much time as you'd like for them too. In one of the episodes, I even lead you through an extremely short breathing exercise to teach you the first step to learning how to use your breath to reduce stress. Last week I stressed that a lot of not being able to prioritize yourself is not your fault. If you had more support from your social circles and society in general it would be easier for you to take time for yourself. People would expect you to care for yourself so you could continue doing the important work you're doing right now. So the last thing we need to work on together is figuring out how to fit one new thing into your day. How to get yourself to take at least five minutes for yourself every day. I can tell you for certain that when you are finally able to be consistent and show up for yourself. Life changes! If you've listened to the earlier episodes of this podcast you know that when I became a caregiver it was rough for me. I was reactive. I cried a lot and didn't have a handle on the way my life was turned upside down. I was overwhelmed with stress and anxiety but at the same time was working as a Yoga and meditation teacher. It was ironic that my doctor had to suggest that I try meditating for me to realize that my training was what would help me out of the overwhelm and burnout I was experiencing. I was able to take all of my yoga and meditation training and bring self-care back into my day so I could go back to being able to enjoy my life with my husband and daughter even though caregiving was extremely difficult for me. If I hadn't already had all of that training I don't know where I would be right now. I certainly didn't have anyone warn me not to lose myself in caregiving or that if I didn't care for myself I would become bitter and resentful, depressed and overwhelmed. It was simply a small suggestion from a doctor that made me realize that I already had what I needed but caregiving had been thrown on me with such a force that all I could do was fight to keep up. I didn't have the energy or the willpower, in the beginning, to figure out how to care for myself with tools I already had and I didn't have a connection with other caregivers who could let me know I wasn't alone in all the things I was experiencing. That's actually why this podcast exists. It's my way of helping you know you aren't alone and to hopefully help you find ways to enjoy your life as a caregiver easier than I did. It makes sense why it's difficult for you to figure out how to do something for yourself. Caregiving is rough and most times you're just trying to keep up with things. Caregiving can also be long-term and you won't be able to sustain the pace you are at if you don't start caring for yourself. What a lot of us need is for someone to help us figure out how to make ourselves a priority again. If you are burnout right now you might not be able to think of what or how to do something for yourself. As I said in last week's episode - shame on the people who tell you that you need to care for yourself and then don't take the time to help you do that. Having someone come sit in your house to make sure things are ok while you go for a walk or a drive is a way a friend or family member can help. They can help you escape by inviting you to do something that takes as much or as little energy as you'd like to use. Maybe a quick hike or just a drive to pick something up to eat. Maybe someone can sit with a spouse during chemo treatments or play a game with your child so you can take a much-needed nap. So now that we know there are ways to care for yourself, and there are things that you can ask people to do to support you caring for yourself let me take you through the process I use with my clients in helping them figure out how and what to do for self-care. Step into my office... First of all, you have to start with just one thing. So you'll need to pick something from one of the six categories I went over in the first three episodes of this series. They were: Stop - Finding a way to be still. Do absolutely nothing for a few minutes and take a moment to just be. Get Out - Getting yourself out of the house. From just sticking your head out of the window of your house or apartment, taking one step out of the front door to taking a walk or a drive somewhere.  Connect - Finding a way to connect with a friend or family member, go to a support group meeting, find a caregiver mentor, or do anything you would like to do that involves you interacting with a person you don't live with. Touch - Anything you can do with your hands. From just snuggling up with something soft and cozy to creating something with your hands or journaling. Anything that you can use your sense of touch to do.  Thought - Would include meditation, prayer, mantras, manifestation, reading anything that allows you to escape into your thoughts. Breath - can be simply breathing or it can be other things like breath work, singing, or humming. I have my clients sit with this list and think about the ones that interest them and then we dive a little deeper into the one category to see if there is something they would really like to do and know that they will do. Wanting to and actually doing something are two different things. So you have to pick something you will actually do and will be enjoyable for you. This first thing has to be easy for you. We need to eliminate as many roadblocks as we can before even starting. So you pick that one thing. It's something that is accessible for you. You know you should be able to do it every day and you write it down. So let's say you pick enjoying a cup of coffee during the day. You know this isn't the cup that you drink quickly in the morning or the one you continually warm up in the microwave because you don't get to drink it before it gets cold. You like coffee. You know how to make coffee and it's something you always have in your house. The next step would be how can we make this coffee part of your self-care? How do we make this just a little more than just drinking a cup of coffee and turning it into a short break for you? I would have you change how you approach this cup of coffee. Instead of just drinking a cup of coffee I would have you notice the smell of it as it brews. Notice the sounds as you pour it into a cup and stir in the sugar and cream. Then you would take the coffee to a quiet place. Maybe it's the kitchen table, maybe sitting on the stairs or the sofa. A place that you most likely won't be disturbed. Then when you sit down with the coffee you just really try to focus on the experience. The feeling and texture of the mug. Notice the color of the mug and how it feels in your hands. Notice how the warmth of it feels. See the steam coming from it and the color of the coffee. How are your taste buds reacting? How is your body reacting to the promise of a sip of coffee? Then before taking a sip take three nice deep breaths in so you can truly enjoy the scent of the drink you're holding. Then you take a sip. Just a sip and really taste the coffee. You focus on just this… not the things you really have to do, not worry about all the things you have to worry about because - these next 3,15, 20 minutes are just for you. Almost anything that can happen in three minutes can wait for a short period of time. You have to let go of it all and focus just on that cup of coffee. After the first sip, you continue drinking and enjoying the coffee. You don't bring anything with you by the way. It's just you and that cup. So, no list-making or social media surfing. It's just you and that cup of coffee. You continue to enjoy just that cup of coffee for as long as you can and then… when you're done you don't just get up and walk away. You take one second to bring in a deep breath say to yourself something that lets you know it's time to move on like - on to the next thing. Or, you got this. And then you move on. This can easily be three minutes of your time. Sitting with just a cup of coffee. And it doesn't have to be coffee. It can be a piece of chocolate, a meal, spending time with a pet, or just breathing. The focus is on just that one thing because it lets your brain take a break. It helps you reset and can bring you a sense of calm when you most need it. So now that we have identified the one thing you'll do and how you'll do it we have to find a time you will commit to it. It has to be a time when you know there is a 75% chance you will be able to do it. When during your day can you do this one thing? When can you sit down to enjoy this cup of coffee? So whatever it is you choose the next step is to figure out when in your day you will do it. It's important to start out with something you will and can do every day. The first step towards making yourself a priority and being ok with caring for yourself needs to be something you will be able to do every day. Of course, it's good to have things you might only do on the weekend or monthly but first, that doesn't help you with your day-to-day stress, and second if you don't make it work once it's very easy to give it up altogether. So once you find the one thing you will do for yourself, identify what and how you will do it and then when you will do it each day. Find that window of time that's open for you. After that, you have to plan. Set things up so there is no excuse not to try. Staying with the coffee example I would have you make sure you have coffee. Choose the cup that you would want to use and set it aside. The cup doesn't matter but having the cup ready for you does. You have to ask yourself what will get in the way of you doing this one thing. Are you trying to set this up at a time of the day that the person you care for will need you or are you doing it when they usually take a nap? Figure out what will get in the way and then see how you can get around that. Then the next part is important. You have to set boundaries and it can be difficult to do when the boundaries are for you. So let's say you care for your husband and you have decided that every afternoon at three pm you're going to enjoy a cup of coffee. It's a time when nothing is really happening in the house and your husband is usually doing something on his own. You have to make this time for yourself a priority. Maybe your husband will ask for some coffee if he can smell it. That's not a problem just make extra and serve him some and then go and enjoy your coffee on your own. If he asks why you're making coffee or why you are going somewhere else to drink it you can just explain to him that you're trying something new. Everyone has their special relationships with the people they care for so what needs to happen is for you to already know that you aren't going to be made to feel like what you're trying to do is stupid or selfish. You have to tell yourself that you won't allow anyone to shame you for trying to take a moment out of the day for yourself.  It's a little bit easier for me to go through this with a person one on one because they can explain what the other person's reaction might be. You will have to go with what you think they will react to. However, it's very possible they won't even notice you're gone. You'll have to choose if you're going to talk to them about it. It would be a great conversation to have with your loved one. Letting them know why and how you plan on caring for yourself a little bit more and assuring them it's because you want to be a better caregiver for them. People don't like change and it's vulnerable to try to make changes. So this can be a non-event or a bigger conversation that you need to have. The most important thing for you to know is - yes it's just a cup of coffee or just a walk but it's also more than that. It's time you need to take it for yourself and if it is just a cup of coffee then it shouldn't be a big deal to do it.  Don't let anyone make you feel bad for doing something for yourself. This will be easier for some people than others. That's why it might help to have a partner in crime. Your hype girl. Your backup singer. However, you want to think of it. The person you can talk this over with. The one that can be there and not let you talk yourself out of enjoying that cup of coffee. The person that genuinely will say - you're full of crap you need to just do this when you try to make excuses. Your support person. If you don't have a support person, send me an email and I help you talk through these things so you know what to do when you want to back out. Because that cup of coffee, that is just a cup of coffee, is starting to feel like more isn't it. And what happens is when that time gets hijacked you can get very emotional about it and give up altogether. So let's try to keep it important enough to want to do but not what could turn into the last straw. We are all holding on to a lot of frustration. It's completely understandable when your life has become nothing like you expected it to be. But setting up self-care is not a way to start a fight or air your frustrations. It isn't a symbol of how things just never go right in your life or how you aren't allowed to have happiness. Those are self-limiting beliefs that can be worked on once you start caring for yourself more. Or with a therapist. So we've identified the one thing you want to do. We have decided how you plan to do it. You've found the best time during the day that you can try We've identified what can get in the way of you being successful and how to get around those roadblocks before they even happen. You've thought about the boundaries you need to set. Found a person you can have hold accountable or you've reached out to me for support. What happens next? You do it. You get to tomorrow afternoon and you have your coffee. You sit with it and you enjoy it and when you are done you end it by saying something like “on to the next thing” or You got this and — Important part here - you are going to take one quick second and see how you're feeling. Then you go live the rest of the day. If you are a list writer you might want to create a note in your phone or a notebook and just write the date, if you drank that coffee and how you felt after. At the end of the day, you're going to check in before you go to sleep to see how the rest of your day went. You do the same thing if you miss that time for yourself. That way you can see if this one thing is working for you. Or if you start to notice you are really missing it a lot then maybe it isn't what you should be trying to focus on. There's nothing wrong with the first form of self-care that you pick to not be the right one for now. It might fit all the criteria except one and that one thing is what will make it difficult for you to do.  If that's the case you go back through the process again. The good thing is, each time you are reinforcing how important it is to prioritize your care. Now there will be days that are difficult for you and you aren't able to care for yourself the way you've been trying to. Or you feel like it just isn't worth it to try to find joy in your day. When this happens I want you to remember why you are a caregiver. Who is that person you give so much of your life to? Remember how much you love them. How badly you wish things would be different for both of you. Remember why you decided to care for them and know that this simple cup of coffee or a short walk or whatever it is you decided to try to do is not only important for you it's important for them because doing this one thing is how you come back to loving your life a little bit more, become a better caregiver, find ways to enjoy that person you care for and find a little bit of joy in your life. You can do this. You are worth it! Find more at www.loveyourcaregivinglife.com

Next Stop Crazytown
YNS Live with Stephanie Moram

Next Stop Crazytown

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 41:17


Listen to a new episode of Your Next Stop recorded live on Fireside with host Juliet Hahn featuring Green Living Expert/Mentor and Green Junkie Podcast host Stephanie Moram.   “Always be intentional with what you're doing!” - Stephanie Moram   Stephanie Moram is a Green Living Expert, the CEO and Founder of Good Girl Gone Green, and host of the podcast Green Junkie, where she guides people to live a greener and more sustainable life without feeling overwhelmed.   Wanting to limit the unnecessary and potentially harmful items she was bringing into her family's home, she began DIY-ing her own cleaning and personal care products. Now with over 10 years of experience, she has helped more than 20,000 people to not only live more sustainably, but to live with less, shop ethically, and reduce their exposure to toxins.   With a combined social following exceeding 50,000, Stephanie has spoken at events like The Most Powerful Women in Network Marketing, Slay Online Sales Summit, Expo Yoga & Wellness Summit, and Be True Brand You. She has also been a featured expert on Good Day LA, KTLA 5, Morning San Diego, CTV Northern Ontario, San Antonio Living, Earth 911 Podcast, Vegetarian Times,  Wall Street Journal, and more!   Learn more about Stephanie at GoodGirlGoneGreen.com. Follow her on Instagram, Facebook, Pinterest, and LinkedIn.   Listen to The Green Junkie Podcast at GreenJunkie.co.   Sponsor Today's episode is sponsored by TookTake, the best way to know if you took, or still need to take your medication & supplements. Visit them at https://tooktake.com/. Get 10% off upon check out by using this code: NEXTSTOP   Follow TookTake on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram. Find Us Online! Fireside: Juliet Hahn Instagram: @iamjuliethahn LinkedIn: Juliet Hahn FB: Juliet Hahn Clubhouse: @iamjuliethahn YouTube: Juliet Hahn Twitter: @iamjuliethahn

It's The Bearded Man
143. The LA Marathon : The Greatest Physical + Mental Challenge of My Life

It's The Bearded Man

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 32:24


Running the LA marathon was the biggest physical & mental challenge of my life. 26.2 miles of non-stop running for 3 hours & 48 minutes, that breaks down to an average pace of 8:42 per mile & 3,923 calories burned. It was months of training and hundreds of hours out on the open road by myself to prepare but so worth it in the end! Today we're going to dive into the entire experience : how I could barely run a mile when the pandemic hit, training for it, how the day went of the marathon and some of the biggest takeaways I had from it. Let me be clear : you do NOT need to be training for a marathon for this episode to resonate with you. If you're someone working towards a goal, then I hope this podcast pours gasoline onto the fire. Let's fire it UP!   Topics. : Wanting to run a marathon since I was a kid Three pivot moments in past 18 months Got Started Kept the momentum going forward Paid Attention To The Details Training for marathon Race Day What the marathon meant to me 6 Lessons from the experience My next marathon in January   Challenge for the listeners Let's flip the script. What's that 1 bucket list item you've always wanted to accomplish? Write it down today & start reverse engineering the steps it will take to accomplish it. If I can run a marathon, you can do anything you put your mind towards - I promise.   Got a topic / question you want me to cover? Hit me UP on IG @Bobbbaaaay Sign up for the Stay Dialed In Newsletter! You wanna help blow this podcast up? GREAT! Here's how: Leave a 5 star review on the podcast app with your hot take of the show Share out the episode on your IG story tagging me @Bobbbaaaay —- Follow The Bearded Man! Instagram : @Bobbbaaaay YouTube : @BobbyHobert Twitter : @Bobbbaaaay Website : ItsTheBeardedMan.com

Today's Issues
Pres. Biden Wanting To Investigate Why Gas Prices Are High

Today's Issues

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 24:15


Tough Girl Podcast
Tiphaine Muller - aka Little Miss Pedals - Cycled 20,000+ km over 14 months throughout Europe and Africa.

Tough Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 43:42


Tiphaine in her own words:   "My name is Tiphaine, I'm from France and since I was a child my parents took me backpacking in other continents. They've opened me to the world. After three years of studies to obtain my Specialized Educator diploma, I felt the urge to explore more of this planet. I went to Australia on a Working Holiday Visa for a year. The adventures I've experienced there made me reconsider my whole perspective on life.   Inspired by my short cycling trips in Australia and New Zealand, I bought a bicycle and left, in June 2017, on my 23rd birthday. I started from my home in Paris, without a real plan, without a final destination and ended up cycling 20,000 km in 14 months, half of it with Martin (@hi.martin.cycles).    This trip, more than any others, showed me that dreams can come true and that travelling is a matter of motivation. Since then, I dare to live a different life, “unstable”, full of changes, adventures, experiences, that make me who I am today.”   Listen to Tiphaine on the tough girl podcast.   New episodes go live every Tuesday at 7am UK time - Hit the subscribe button so you don't miss out.    The Tough Girl Podcast is sponsorship and ad free thanks to the monthly financial support of patrons.    Support the mission to increase the amount of female role models in the media. Visit www.patreon.com/toughgirlpodcast and subscribe - super quick and easy to do and it makes a massive difference. Thank you.   Show notes Who is Tiphaine Wanting some adventure  Deciding to head to Australia on a working holiday  Wanting to continue living this different lifestyle Her younger years and spending time backpacking with her family  Not being afraid of travelling solo Having a plan verses being more flexible and playing things by ear Wanting to join the Civil Service in France Rethinking her whole perspective on life Realising how little you need to be happy Coming back to Paris after 15 months of travelling Not knowing what to do next  Paying for her cycle trip and saving up money Why its cheap to travel by bike Keeping costs down while on the road Leaving Paris on her 23rd Birthday  The route and the plan Meeting Martin in Africa @hi.martin.cycles and deciding to cycle across the Sahara together Using Warmshowers in Europe  Wanting to explore more of Africa and heading to East Africa for 7 months Dealing with elephants close to the tent!  Resupply and accommodation in Africa  Route planning and the challenging in Europe  Trying to pick the nicer routes and avoiding the main roads Maintaining the bike on a long journey  Not knowing how to change a flat tyre at the start Buying a simple bike for 450 EURO Learning new skills on the road Writing her first e-book: Little Miss Pedals: 20,000 km on a bicycle through Europe and Africa  Final words of advice to encourage you to take on your own challenge or adventure. Why it's worth it!   Social Media   Website: www.dreamsontracks.com    Instagram: @littlemisspedals    Facebook: @littlemisspedals    Book: Little Miss Pedals: 20,000 km on a bicycle through Europe and Africa   

Mornings on the Mall
11.17 - Hour 3: A State AG wakes up wanting to sue the administration and a congresman thinks AG Garland has some explaining to do

Mornings on the Mall

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 29:23


In the third hour of The Vince Coglianese Show, Vince discusses the legality of vaccine mandates along with the Attorney General's office targeting school parents. For more coverage on the issues that matter to you visit www.WMAL.com, download the WMAL app or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 from 3-6pm To join the conversation, check us out on social media: @WMAL @VinceCoglianese See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bulture Podcast
What if You Can't Heal Because you The Demon?Ep150

Bulture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 142:48


Wanting to be loved is dangerous places to allow yourself to go!! BMF- All in The Family What if you can never heal because you the demon? New Rick Ross ft Jazmine Sullivan Remember Michael Jordan made “the last dance” to tell his own history cause other people well try to rewrite their way!! Prime Tariq vs Lamar who you hate more? Can we talk about Giveon one more time - World we created (( Layin' by your side as you wakin' up Losin' track of time, as our feelings touched We fall deep into the bed, we become the threads Intertwinin' I just wanna stay in the world we created I just wanna sink in the plans that we makin')) You can't help but say corny stuff when you really into woman (( like dumb emoji's It's funny how everybody mad they ain't by tickets to see Teyana Taylor after viral lap dance with young Miami Did y'all listen to the kayne deluxe? Meme, DaBaby's Other Baby Mama, Shows No Sympathy For DaniLeigh Amid Ongoing Drama I ain't laughing at the situation, I'm laughing at you,” Meme indirectly said to DaniLeigh. “Because, baby, it ain't fun when the rabbit got the gun. It's crazy how the motherf*cker was turned, and that's the moral of the story. It's backwards for you to ever have a problem with any female he's involved with, dealing with, you don't have that right, you get what I'm saying?” Dave Chappelle's Appearance At His High School Fundraiser Postponed Due To Threat Of A Student Walkout Stemming From Netflix Controversy This 18-Year-Old College Student Is Whippin' Holiday-Level MEALS Out Of His Dorm!

The Gold Collar Investor
TGCI 164: Want to create a side hustle with a Franchise? How do you know if it's for you?

The Gold Collar Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 39:42


In today's show, Pancham interviews Giuseppe Grammatico - franchise advisor, consultant, speaker, author of Franchise Freedom: A New Manifesto For Your Financial And Time Freedom, and host of the Franchise Freedom Podcast. Have you ever thought of owning a business but aren't sure if it's the right fit for you? Wanting to start a business but doesn't want to start from the ground up? Do you want another source of income wherein systems are already set up and you just need to follow certain procedures? Well, franchising may be the answer to all of your questions!  Join us in today's episode as Giuseppe provides you a glimpse of the business world as he shares his expertise on franchising! He'll simplify the process of franchising as he discusses how you can get started with owning one, why researching every single franchise is not gonna work, and why you should find a franchise that matches your character! Listen and enjoy the show!   Quote: “A franchise is a great way to have this support system which can turn into other things.” Timestamped Shownotes: 1:28 - Pancham introduces Giuseppe to the show 2:52 - How he realized that franchising is perfect for him 6:43 - Top reasons why you should consider investing in a franchise 8:58 - Why your long-term goals are a deciding factor to get started 12:47 - How the “4-Step Process” will give you a headstart in franchising 19:30 - On the growth of home services and health industries during 2021 24:00 - How shifting your mindset can beat your fear of making that first step 32:47 - Taking the Leap Round 32:47 - His first franchise investment in 2007 32:55 - How he overcame his fear when he first started investing 33:35 - How his investment didn't turn out as expected 34:58 - Why investors should focus on their vision and their goals 35:57 - Where you can get a FREE copy of his book 3 Key Points: Franchising is a great stepping stone to get into business ownership. Getting into franchise investing could help motivate you for what's next in your goals. Look at franchises that best fit your own business model rather than compromising your model into a franchise as it can turn out the complete opposite of what you wanted. Start to work backward by identifying your vision and end goals first before you work on how you'll get there.  Get in Touch: Get a FREE copy of his book “Franchise Freedom: A New Manifesto For Your Financial And Time Freedom” at franchisefreedom@thegoldcollarinvestor.com GG The Franchise Guide Website - https://ggthefranchiseguide.com/ The Gold Collar Investor Club - https://thegoldcollarinvestor.com/club/ Pancham Gupta Email - p@thegoldcollarinvestor.com Book: Who Not How: The Formula to Achieve Bigger Goals Through Accelerating Teamwork by Dan Sullivan - https://www.amazon.com/Who-Not-How-Accelerating-Teamwork-ebook/dp/B0867ZJ151

Got Clutter? Get Organized! with Janet
Creating Habits To Reduce Food Waste This Holiday Season with Stephanie Moram, Good Girl Gone Green

Got Clutter? Get Organized! with Janet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 36:51


As a child where you told to eat all the food on your plate because there are starving children in (you name the country)? Have you had to toss food because you forgot you had it, or you purchased too much? Tune in as Stephanie Moran, Good Girl Gone Green share how we impact food waste. In this episode discover how… · She became the Green Living Expert · Our habits can cause us to waste foods · Small changes we can make to reduce food waste · As the wife, mom and green living expert how she manages it all · And more! Stephanie Moram is a Green Living Mentor and the CEO and Founder of Good Girl Gone Green, where she teaches busy women how to live greener and more sustainable lives without feeling overwhelmed. Wanting to reduce the number of unnecessary and potentially harmful products she was bringing into her family's home, Stephanie began DIY-ing her own cleaning and personal care products. Now with over 10 years of experience, she has helped over 20,000 women to not only live more sustainably but also live with less, shop ethically, and reduce the overall amount of toxins they are exposed to. With a combined social following of over 45,000, Stephanie has spoken at events like The Most Powerful Women in Network Marketing, Slay Online Sales Summit, Expo Yoga & Wellness Summit, and Be True Brand You. For her expertise she has been featured on CBS Rhode Island, ABC Talk of Alabama, CTV Calgary, Edmonton 630 CHED, Huffington Post Canada, Vegetarian Times, Wall Street Journal, Green Child Magazine, Direct Sales Diva Magazine, and BlogHer. You can follow Stephanie on Instagram @goodgirlgonegreen_ (there is an underscore) This episode's product suggestion are Stackable Cabinet Organizers This episode's book selection is The Organized Kitchen: Keep Your Kitchen Clean, Organized, and Full of Good Food—and Save Time, Money, (and Your Sanity) Every Day! Join my FREE Facebook Group For Women Ready To Live Life Totally Organized If you need help getting organized to better manage your time and life, click the following link to schedule a FREE 15 minute session Contact Me | Janet M. Taylor (janetmtaylor.com) --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/janetmtaylor/message

National Day Calendar
November 15, 2021 - National Bundt Day | National Philanthropy Day

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 3:30


Welcome to November 15, 2021 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate traditional cakes and a legacy of generosity.  The inventor H. David Dalquist was the first to cast the aluminum pan known as the bundt. In 1950 he created the pan in his Minnesota based Nordic Ware company for a local women's group who wanted to bake a traditional kugelhopf or ring-shaped cake. Naming the pan for the German word for bond, Dalquist added the ‘t' to the end of “bund” and patented the pan in a stroke of foresight genius. At first the pan did not sell well, and Nordic Ware considered discontinuing it. Then in 1966 the pan was used to create the “Tunnel of Fudge” cake in a Pillsbury bake off that inspired bakers everywhere! Over 200,000 orders for the pan streamed in and over 60 million have been sold to date. On National Bundt Day celebrate the bond of baking with your own family!   Giving back to the community is important and no one did that quite like Andrew Carnegie. As a child, he and his family emigrated to the United States from Scotland and he got a job as a bobbin boy at a cotton mill. Decades later, he became a railroad and steel tycoon who had amassed one of the largest fortunes of all time. Adjusting for inflation, he was worth over $350 billion. Wanting to leave the world a better place, Andrew set up pensions for his employees, gave donations that built universities, museums, and nearly 3,000 public libraries. On National Philanthropy Day, we celebrate the successful men and women who make a difference by helping others.  I'm Anna Devere and I'm Marlo Anderson. Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every Day. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

From the Word
Daniel: Weighed and Found Wanting

From the Word

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 43:52


Pastor Peter Verhulst | Daniel 5

Plumbing the Death Star
What are the Implication of the 80s Calling and Wanting Their Shirt Back with Cass Paige

Plumbing the Death Star

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 44:45


Sign up to our newsletter here. Join our facebook group here or join our Discord here.You can physically send us stuff to PO BOX 7127, Reservoir East, Victoria, 3073.Want to help support the show?Sanspants+ | Shop | TeesWant to get in contact with us? Email | Twitter | Website | Facebook | RedditOr individually at;Jackson | Duscher | CassTheme music by the wonderfully talented Benny Davis! You can find all his stuff at his website or check out his YouTube channel. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Shaped by Dog with Susan Garrett
How To Stop Dogs Jumping Up On People

Shaped by Dog with Susan Garrett

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 12:49


Visit us at shapedbydog.com    How do I get my dog to stop jumping up on people? Wanting to know how to train a dog to greet people calmly is a question we see often. There are three simple steps to get your dog to never jump on anyone again. It starts with knowing why dogs jump up in the first place.   In the episode you'll hear:   • The reason dogs jump on people. • Why jumping up is rewarding for dogs and why they seek our face. • The tactic that I'd never use when dogs jump up. • About creating a new history of reinforcement. • The three easy steps to stop your dog from jumping up. • Why it all starts with your dog understating sit. • What the bubble of pressure means for your dog's greetings. • How Crate Games and Hot Zone give you a baseline. • What I do that I've never seen anyone else do for dog's jumping up. • How greet and re-greet will let your dog learn calm greetings.   Resources:   • Blog Post: How do I Stop My Dog from Pulling on the Leash? (RZ – Reinforcement Zone) - https://susangarrettdogagility.com/2020/01/stop-my-dog-pulling-on-leash/ • Podcast Episode 19: One of My Biggest Pet Peeves in Dog Training - https://dogsthat.com/podcast/19/ • Podcast Episode 52: The Five Most Common Words in Dog Training and Which Ones I Never Use - https://dogsthat.com/podcast/52/ • YouTube Video: Susan Garrett's Perch Work Dog Tricks (Pivots and Spins) - https://youtu.be/O6sj6fTJnFc • Podcast Episode 22: The Invisible Bubble of Pressure and Your Dog - https://dogsthat.com/podcast/22/ • Crate Games Online - https://get.crategames.com/ • YouTube Video: Susan Garrett's 5 Games for Puppies (Hot Zone Foundations) - https://youtu.be/Hxd1sVEQp2Y • Podcast Episode 11: The Power of Permission in Dog Training - https://dogsthat.com/podcast/11/ • Watch this Episode of Shaped by Dog on YouTube - https://youtu.be/Iy4KUSCc3cw

Top Hill Recording
Phourist and the Photons - Genre Defying Contemporary Rock

Top Hill Recording

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 59:49


Nick Hill began as the solo project "Phourist". Wanting to expand his sound, he brought on the "Photons". Lineup changes over several years have led to the Louisville, KY foursome of Nick (vocals, keys, guitar), Andrew Critchelow (guitar, synth), Jailynn Lake-Noel (bass), and Scott Boice (drums). Together they are Phourist and the Photons, known for non-linear songcraft, winding musical passages, and adventurous arrangements flanking undeniable pop-rock hooks. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tophillrecording/support

Watch What Crappens
House Hunters: Wanting it All in Destin Florida

Watch What Crappens

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 49:47


Dwell Hello, the Househunters roast, is back for a second season! On our first episode, we're going to Destin, Florida to find a space for Joseph and Deek. Will they get high ceilings? A view? A parking spot to save Deek from street parking? And will real estate agent Destin in Destin lose her cool while trying to find it? For those of you that like to watch along, this is is House Hunters Season 70 Episode 11.

Bulletproof Screenplay® Podcast
BPS 147: Neill Blomkamp - Big Budget Indies and Creative Freedom

Bulletproof Screenplay® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 70:30


Ever since I saw District 9 and learned of all the mythical stories behind the short film becoming a feature, I have been a massive fan of today's guest, Neill Blomkamp. Though Neill is here today to talk about his new sci-fi horror fiction film, Demonic, we also chatted up about his other films that have been successful over the years.Released in August 2021, Demonic follows a young woman who unleashes terrifying demons when supernatural forces at the root of a decades-old rift between mother and daughter are ruthlessly revealed.Neill is a South African Canadian film director, producer, screenwriter, and animator, best known for writing and directing multiple-award-winning films such as Chappie, Elysium, and the iconic District 9, along with a plethora of short films, commercials, and special effect credits.If you have seen a few of Neill's works already, you would already know and admire his dystopian, action, and sci-fi style of writing and filmmaking. He depicts the short film in documentary style, with xenophobic social segregation themes.In 2009 Neill and his wife, Canadian screenwriter Terri Tatchell, co-wrote a short film titled, Alive in Joburg, which later became his feature film debut, District 9. Neill received an Academy Award nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Picture for this $210.8 million-grossing film from a $30 millionbudget.District 9 was a critically acclaimed splash, earning multiple awards, including the Bafta, the Academy, Golden Globes, etc., for its visual effects, editing, screenplay, and picture. And a 90% on rotten tomato. But the success of this film is truly in the story it tells and the inspiration that drove it.In 1982, a massive star ship bearing a bedraggled alien population, nicknamed "The Prawns," appeared over Johannesburg, South Africa. Twenty-eight years later, the initial welcome by the human population has faded. The refugee camp where the aliens were located has deteriorated into a militarized ghetto called District 9, where they are confined and exploited in squalor.In 2010, the munitions corporation, Multi-National United, was contracted to forcibly evict the population with operative Wikus van der Merwe in charge. In this operation, Wikus is exposed to a strange alien chemical and must rely on the help of his only two new 'Prawn' friends.As you will hear in our conversation, this project was inspired by parts of Johannesburg in South Africa's history Neill was learning. His journey involved gaining awareness of xenophobia from relatively poor South Africans against immigrants from Mozambique, Nigeria, and Malawi --- a sentiment is still prevalent with some South Africans to this day.The initial short film, Alive In Joburg that preceded District 9, had a socio-political theme shot in realism-based style paired with sci-fi but of performers sharing real-life experiences of illegal aliens/immigrants in South Africa.By the time he had to adapt the script for the feature, District 9, Neill had moved into an interest of South Africa's history, including apartheid, and precisely its border war period in the 1980s.As mentioned earlier, Neill started his career in this industry through visual effects and animation in commercials. When he moved to Canada at 18 years old, the pathway opened up for him to finally pursue his childhood dream of working in the film industry.He did Ads animation for some years while closely following the works of film directors who had gone the commercials to film directing route. One of his most prominent commercials to date, which was shelved by the clients based on creative differences, was a short film Superbowl ad for Nike.Even though he spent a short time doing commercials, Neill has held on to all the transferable lessons and tips to his filmmaking and screenwriting.IN 2015, Neill released his third feature film, dystopian sci-fi action fiction, Chappie, co-written with his wife, Tatchell --- starring Sharlto Copley, Dev Patel, and Hugh Jackman. Chappie became a massive success at the box office with a gross of from a $49 million budget.Chappie, an artificial general intelligence law enforcement robot, is captured during a patrol and reprogrammed by gangsters after being stolen. He becomes the first robot with the ability to think and feel for himself.Wanting to experiment and have more creative freedom Neill created Oats Studios. Oats Studios makes experimental short films, a testing ground for ideas and creativity leading to full scale feature films based on ideas created here. One of the studios most popular shorts is Rakka.Not to give too much away, let's dig into my interview with our incredible and inspiring guest, Neill Blomkamp.

Shine with Mary Obana
From Wanting to Having

Shine with Mary Obana

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 15:40


042—Have you ever wanted something really badly, and it just didn't happen? Maybe there's something you want now—a new relationship, a dream job, expanding your family, a thriving business. No one wants to be stuck in a place of not having. This episode sheds light on why we get stuck and a trusted way to break the logjam so you can turn what you want into something you have. It's simple. And it works. Fast.---To learn more about Mary Obana, visit her website:maryobana.comTo learn more about having Mary connect you directly to your own spiritual guidance, visit:maryobana.com/private-readingFor more information about Mary's book "Shine: A Simple Guide to Finding Your Light and Letting It Shine on the World," visit:maryobana.com/amazonTo contact Mary directly or get added to receive her newsletter, please email her at:mary@maryobana.comFollow her:Facebook @maryobana.shineInstagram @obanamaryLinkedIn @maryobanaClubhouse @maryobana

Brew Roots
Black Pond Brews

Brew Roots

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 62:16


Going to Connecticut has always been on our radar, hindsight we wish we went sooner. We finally got to try Black Pond Brews in Danielson Conn. On this episode we hear about Mr Kitty the person and the beer. Some of the cool rules Connecticut has in respect to serving other options then beer and we discuss their new location opening soon in Dayville right up the road! Make sure to stay up to date with them and their tap list and to find out when their new location opens by going to their website!https://www.blackpondbrews.comCheers!***Claw Hammer Supply- Claw Hammer Supply has taken brew in a bag (BIAB) to a whole new level with there single vessel, turn-key, all grain, digital brewing system. It's a homebrew setup like you've never seen. Instead of a typical brewing systems that require 2 or even 3 different vessels (pots, pans, kettles, etc…). theirs only uses 1.Use our link https://www.clawhammersupply.com/?aff=12 and get your system today!Looking to start a new hobby? Wanting to get into homebrewing? Just looking to upgrade your current set up? We have you covered with our Beer & Wine Hobby promo code! Beer & Wine Hobby is a Family owned business driven to help folks make amazing beers, wines, cheeses, and charcuterie. Fortunately, for our listeners we are able to offer an exclusive promo code for 10% off your online order. Items can either be ordered online and picked up in store same day for our local listeners or delivered to your home (for free over $35). Use our promo code BREWROOTS for 10% off your next order! Go to www.beer-wine.com to get all your brewing needs! https://www.beer-wine.com***Each month, Shirts On Tap teams up with a local brewery, to collaborate on a sweet custom shirt design, and then send it to their members with coupons, stickers, a brewery bio, and more! Join the excitement with our exclusive link shirtsontap.com/offers/brewroots to get your first box for $5! ***Did you know that some of your favorite breweries use hops from a local family operated Hop Farm right here in Massachusetts. Our friends over at Four Star Farms are there for you wether you are a commercial brewery or a small scale home brewer. Make sure to head over to their website today and get your hands on some of the best and freshest hops locally. https://fourstarfarms.com Get bonus content on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Maximize Your Social with Neal Schaffer
Should You Niche Down or Become a Generalist with Your Digital Marketing? My Answer Might Surprise You!

Maximize Your Social with Neal Schaffer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 19:55


"The riches are in the niches.""You gotta niche down."You've heard these over the years, including on this podcast. And I don't disagree with the advice if you want to gain visibility in a noisy market.However, if you are a marketer or a marketing entrepreneur, just owning one niche might not be the ideal solution to your strategy and most likely not for your customers.Listen in as I share my own experience and advice and make the case for becoming more of a digital and social media marketing generalist.Key Highlights[02:27] Why It's Dangerous To Stick To A Niche?[02:50] How I Began Blogging[05:51] Wanting to Be A "Doctor of Social Media"[06:57] Offering Additional Value Beyond Niche[9:10] The Time I Went Generalist[10:34] Launching My Fractional CMO Service[12:29] Going Back to the Role of Generalist[13:06] Why You Need to Have a Broader Knowledge[15:31] My Work As A Fractional CMO[18:15] SummaryNotable QuotesIn other words, if you go to a doctor, you don't tell the doctor what you have, you tell the doctor your symptoms, and they propose something for it, that you might have this, you might have that, let's take some X rays, let's hear some medicine.If I want to pursue best practices, in my job, in my work in my career in my life, I have to provide the best thing that businesses need.Social networks don't exist in a vacuum. Social media does not exist in a vacuum. It's all part of digital marketing, which is all part of marketing.if your business obviously has something that is competitive in one specific niche area, it makes sense to go for it.Customers don't just use the tool to use a tool, they use a tool to solve a problem. Businesses don't look for people who seek out people with a niche, because they have a need for that niche. They have a problem that they want to solve.Niche gives you visibility. But it doesn't always solve all the problems that people that have an interest in a niche have. In order to become a generalist, you need to have niche knowledge. But it's not just one niche at the end of the day. It's a combination of niches.This really defines the current work that I do as a fractional CMO. Because it goes beyond just one niche, one category, it goes down to the problems that companies have, and the potential solutions for them. Using the entire toolkit of tools and channels that Digital Marketing provides.I do believe if you're not known for anything, the niche, without a doubt gives you that visibility. But as you niche, I want you to be thinking about the broader picture of the role of the generalists. And I don't want you to be afraid to go outside of your niche to gain other expertise, which I believe you will need, regardless of what niche you decide for what industry.Learn More:Join My Digital First Mastermind: https://nealschaffer.com/membership/ Contact Me about My Fractional CMO Consulting Services: https://nealschaffer.com/contact/ The Age of Influence Free Preview: https://nealschaffer.com/age-of-influence-preview Subscribe to my YouTube Channel: https://youtube.com/nealschaffer Learn More about This Podcast:  https://podcast.nealschaffer.com

Pound This
727: The Weight Will Come Off When You Do This

Pound This

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 21:19


Wanting to lose weight? Maybe this strategy will work for you!   If you're in need of a health coach, and you'd like to check out Team Fit With Me - Get 10% off month 1 of all packages, plans, and add on services using this link:  www.teamfitwithme.com/poundthis   For personal training with me at Cincy 360 Fitness email: Amanda@AmandaValentineBites.com Find me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/youcanpoundthis/ Website: http://amandavalentinebites.com/

Turn Me On
211 - Conflict: Two Animals Wanting to Murder Each Other

Turn Me On

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 96:13


Kat Nantz is a Somatic Pleasure & Relationship Coach. She coaches people and couples on reconnecting with pleasure and our bodies. Jeremie and Bryde talk with Kat about relationship anarchy, implicit and explicit boundaries, and why we sometimes want to annihilate our partners. Just the Tips includes watching Mike Flannagin's movies, specifically "Midnight Mass" and "The Haunting of Hill House", and checking out the "Stuff Mom Never Told You" podcast episode, "Women's Laughter: It's No Joke".HUMAN CONNECTION THROUGH TOUCH: a class for self-care and connection, will be led on November 14th at 11:30amET on Zoom. Bring a friend or partner or relative - someone you feel comfortable exchanging some platonic touch with, and we'll do an hour of loose movement and partner work. $15pp or $25/pair (FREE for Patrons). Email turnmeonpodcast@gmail.com to get the link!Thank you endlessly to all the Patrons of the podcast at patreon.com/turnmeonpodcast. $5+ PATRONS: check out the video version of today's aftercare! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.