Podcasts about endocrine

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The body's hormone-producing glands

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Best podcasts about endocrine

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Latest podcast episodes about endocrine

The Innovative Mindset
Soul Provocateur, GuruNischan on How to Heal Burnout and Live an Integrated Life

The Innovative Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 67:42


GuruNischan on How to Rewire Your Brain and Body for Pleasure, Happiness, and Peak Productivity with a Lot Less Stress This episode is brought to you by Brain.fm. I love and use brain.fm every day! It combines music and neuroscience to help me focus, meditate, and even sleep! Because you listen to this show, you can get a free trial.* URL: https://brain.fm/innovativemindset If you love it as much as I do, you can get 20% off with this exclusive coupon code: innovativemindset Known as a "Soul Provocateur", GuruNischan helps people rewire their brains and bodies for increased pleasure and happiness, peak productivity, and much less stress. With a degree in Community Building and a background in Youth Work, Yoga and Meditation, and Nutrition Consulting, GuruNischan has a broad range of wellness and business experience to draw from. An entrepreneur and philanthropist, GuruNischan built an international business with over half a million dollars in annual sales by 27. An unexpected turn of events created an opportunity for her to heal acute Burnout and Endocrine distress from a decade of overworking and repeating unconscious patterns from a very religious childhood. Nearly a decade later, she has led hundreds of trainings on building the capacity of our nervous systems to heal burnout, break free from indoctrination and live an integrated life. GuruNischan has been a featured keynote speaker and facilitator for Make A Wish Foundation, TransUnion, Walgreens, Rotary International, European Yoga Festival, and more. Connect with GuruNischan Instagram: @gurunischan LinkedIn: @gurunischankhalsa Website: GuruNischan.com Listen and Subscribe on These Channels Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Podbean | MyTuner | iHeart Radio | TuneIn | Deezer | Overcast | PodChaser | Listen Notes * Brain.fm affiliate link.

Critically Speaking
140 Dr. Cheryl Rosenfeld: The Placenta and the Fetal Brain

Critically Speaking

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 21:13


What's the placenta? Some people think of it as a bag filled with fluid that protects the fetus inside from accidental blows, or a structure that sends maternal nutrients to the fetus while removing its waste products. Well, it's actually much more than this. When we may think that the placenta is protective, it can also create detrimental effects to the fetus - effects that can be lifelong. In fact, the placenta is a complex organ on its own and we've only recently been discovering some of the things that the placenta really does, and also what it can't do. Every new person that has arrived on this planet developed in a placenta, so to ensure the health and wellbeing of future generations, understanding what goes on with the placenta has become more critical. Today's guest is a leader in the field of placental biology. Dr. Cheryl Rosenfeld is professor of biomedical sciences and her cutting edge research on the multiple roles of the placenta and fetal development provides critical guidance for prenatal maternal lifestyle and care.    Key Takeaways: The placenta does have some ability to metabolize things, and it does offer some buffering capacity to the fetus. The placenta is an endocrine organ. It also produces neurotransmitters.  Endocrine disrupters can be found in household items and everything around us. Understanding the green chemistry movement can help us lead a healthy life style.    "Even though we can't really, completely, eliminate our exposure to environmental chemicals. We can try to offset it by living with good healthy practices." —  Dr. Cheryl Rosenfeld   Connect with Dr. Cheryl Rosenfeld: Professional Bio: https://biomed.missouri.edu/cheryl-s-rosenfeld-phd-dvm/  The United States Developmental Origins of Health and Disease Society:  https://www.usdohad.org/    Connect with Therese: Website:   www.criticallyspeaking.net Twitter: @CritiSpeak Email: theresemarkow@criticallyspeaking.net     Audio production by Turnkey Podcast Productions. You're the expert. Your podcast will prove it.  

ASCO Guidelines Podcast Series
Abemaciclib with Endocrine Therapy in the Treatment of High-Risk Early Breast Cancer: ASCO Optimal Adjuvant Chemotherapy and Targeted Therapy Guideline Rapid Recommendation Update

ASCO Guidelines Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 8:55


An interview with Dr. Sharon Giordano, co-chair on “Abemaciclib with Endocrine Therapy in the Treatment of High-Risk Early Breast Cancer: ASCO Optimal Adjuvant Chemotherapy and Targeted Therapy Guideline Rapid Recommendation Update.” Dr. Giordano discusses the results and impact of the monarchE trial, the updated recommendations on the use of abemaciclib, and impact for clinicians and patients. For more information, visit www.asco.org/breast-cancer-guidelines.

First Incision
Genetic Endocrine Disorders

First Incision

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 30:35


This episode has everything you need to know about genetic conditions that predispose to endocrine tumours. We cover:- Multiple endocrine noeplasia (MEN) type 1- MEN types 2a and 2b- SDH syndromes- Von Hippel-Lindau Syndrome- Neurofibromatosis type I (and brief mention about type 2)- Hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndromeDisclaimerThe information in this podcast is intended as a revision aid for the purposes of the General Surgery Fellowship Exam.This information is not to be considered to include any recommendations or medical advice by the author or publisher or any other person. The listener should conduct and rely upon their own independent analysis of the information in this podcast.The author provides no guarantees or assurances in relation to any connection between the content of this podcast and the general surgical fellowship exam.  No responsibility or liability is accepted by the author in relation to the performance of any person in the exam.  This podcast is not a substitute for candidates undertaking their own preparations for the exam.To the maximum extent permitted by law, no responsibility or liability is accepted by the author or publisher or any other person as to the adequacy, accuracy, correctness, completeness or reasonableness of this information, including any statements or information provided by third parties and reproduced or referred to in this document. To the maximum extent permitted by law, no responsibility for any errors in or omissions from this document, whether arising out of negligence or otherwise, is accepted.The information contained in this podcast has not been independently verified.© Amanda Nikolic 2021

Rio Bravo qWeek
Episode 76 - Eating Disorders

Rio Bravo qWeek

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 22:24


Episode 76: Eating Disorders. The malaria vaccine is announced by Dr Parker, eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia are briefly discussed by Sophia, Jeffrey and Dr Arreaza. Introduction: Introducing the malaria vaccine (RTS,S)Written by Hector Arreaza, MD; read by Tana Parker, MD.  Today is November 26, 2021.Malaria is a devastating disease that continues to kill thousands of people every year around the world. Since the year 2000, there have been 1.5 billion cases of malaria and 7.6 million deaths. In 2019, there were 229 million new cases, and 409,000 deaths, mostly children under 5 years of age.Effective vaccines for many protozoal diseases are available for animals (for example, the vaccine against toxoplasmosis in sheep, babesiosis in cows, and more.) However, vaccines for protozoal disease in humans had not been widely available … until now. The RTS,S is a vaccine against malaria approved by the European Medicines Agency in July 2015 for babies at risk, and it was rolled out in pilot projects in Malawi, Ghana and Kenya in 2019.  In October 2021, the World Health Organization announced the recommendation of this anti-malaria vaccine. The trade name of this vaccine is Mosquirix®. The vaccination is recommended for children in sub-Saharan Africa and other regions with moderate to high transmission of Plasmodium falciparum, which is considered the deadliest parasite in humans.  The approved vaccine has shown low to moderate efficacy, preventing about 30% of severe malaria after 4 doses in children younger than five years old. Implementation of vaccination is not free from challenges, and it should be executed not as the solution for the disease, but as part of the solution, along with other efforts such as mosquito control, effective health care, and more.RTS,S is an add-on to continue the fight against malaria worldwide. Hopefully we can lighten the heavy burden of malaria for more than 87 countries that suffer the severe consequences of poor control of this devastating disease. This is Rio Bravo qWeek, your weekly dose of knowledge brought to you by the Rio Bravo Family Medicine Residency Program from Bakersfield, California. Our program is affiliated with UCLA, and it's sponsored by Clinica Sierra Vista, Let Us Be Your Healthcare Home. ___________________________Eating Disorders. Written by Sophia Dhillon, MS3, Jeffrey Nguyen, MS3. Discussion with Hector Arreaza, MD.  This is not intended to be a comprehensive lecture on eating disorders. This episode is intended to give you basic information, hoping to motivate you keep learning about it. Let's start talking about eating disorders today, specifically anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. What is an eating disorder? An eating disorder is a disturbance of eating that interferes with health. As a reminder, health is “a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity.” So, an eating disorder, in a wide context, is any eating pattern that is out of what is considered “normal”, and that variation in feeding causes health problems. But in general, when we talk about eating disorders in medicine, we refer to anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, but it includes also avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder, binge eating disorder, night eating disorder, pica, and rumination disorder.  ANOREXIAIn general, anorexia is characterized by immoderate food restriction, inappropriate eating habits or rituals, obsession with having a thin figure or an irrational fear of weight gain as well as distorted body self-perception. There are 2 main subtypes of anorexia: restricting type vs binge-eating/purging type. Tell us the difference between anorexia restrictive type and binge eating-purging type.Anorexia, restrictive type is when weight loss is achieved by diet, fasting and/or excessive exercise, meanwhile the binge-eating/purging type entails eating binges followed by self-induced vomiting and/or using laxatives, enemas or diuretics. These patients will have intense fear of gaining weight or becoming fat. They will have a distorted perception of body weight and shape or denial of the medical seriousness of one's low body weight.Anorexia nervosa is different than avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder. In anorexia, you have an altered perception of your body (“I'm fat”), but in avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder, your perception of your body weight and shape is not abnormal. “I'm skinny, and I'm OK with that.” This is new information for me. I thought anorexia was present always when a patient refused to eat, whether you liked your body or not.Why do people develop eating disorders? There are so many reasons why people develop eating disorders. First, it can be psychological due to low self-esteem, feelings of inadequacy or failure, feeling of being out of control, response to change (i. e. puberty) or response to stress. Second, it can be due to interpersonal issues like having trouble with family and personal relationships, difficult expressing emotions or feelings, or even history of being teased based on size or weight. Lastly, it is the social and cultural norms that we grow up in. There are cultural pressures that glorify thinness and place value on obtaining the perfect body, narrow definitions of beauty that include women and men of specific body weights and shapes. Sometimes there is no reason. Some people just get obsessed with their weight and perceive themselves as “fat”. Effect of anorexia on different parts of the bodySince these patients are scared of gaining weight, how does it affect the entire body?Anorexia can affect multiple systems in our body. Just to name a few symptoms that it can manifest as: amenorrhea, infertility, constipation, dizziness, hypothermia, bradycardia, hypotension, dry skin and even hair loss. Starvation induces protein and fat catabolism that leads to loss of cellular volume and atrophy of the heart, brain, liver, intestines, kidneys, and muscles. Cardiac: It can decrease cardiac mass, decrease cardiac chamber volumes, cause myocardial fibrosis and pericardial effusion. These manifestations are reversible if the patient gains weight. Functionally, it can cause bradycardia due to increased parasympathetic activity, hypotension, decreased heart rate variability and QT prolongation on ECG. Lungs: shortness of breath due to weakened and wasting of the respiratory muscles, pneumothorax and aspiration pneumonia. GI system: it leads to gastroparesis with bloating, constipation, severe pancreatitis and mild transaminitis. Hematologic: anemia, leukopenia and thrombocytopenia. Skin manifestations include dry/scaly skin, hair loss, acne, hyperpigmentation and acrocyanosis. You can also find lanugo, which is a very thin, light colored hair on the face and body. It is thought that the lanugo is an adaptation from the body to keep it warm. Lanugo is common in patients with anorexia nervosa or other causes of malnourishment. That's why wearing coats in warm weather can be a silent sign of anorexia. Other subtle signs include social withdrawal, fidgeting (to burn calories), and always “eating” in private.  It is important to remember that all these manifestation that Jeffrey mentioned are not present with intermittent fasting because intermittent fasting is an intermittent restriction of food, the nutritional needs are met during the “feasting” periods after “fasting”. Some may argue that intermittent fasting may promote eating disorders, but I believe intermittent fasting is just an effective treatment for obesity.Treatment plan for anorexiaThere are several treatment options for these patients. We can refer them to nutritional rehabilitation where they can supervise meals. We can refer them to psychotherapy, such as cognitive behavioral therapy or motivational interviewing. There is also a drug called Olanzapine for this condition. Sometimes, patients may need admission to the hospital. I learned recently that UCLA has an Eating Disorder Program which includes inpatient services. Some centers are very specialized and include family therapy and group therapy. Listeners, you can continue to research about anorexia, it's is fascinating. The prevalence of anorexia in the US is estimated to be 0.6%[3]. BULIMIABy definition, bulimia nervosa is when a person binge eats and then uses certain behaviors to prevent weight gain. These behaviors may include self-induced vomiting, using laxatives or diuretics, exercising excessively, or fasting and having a restrictive diet. Signs and symptoms to look forA physical examination is key. On physical presentation, these people usually can have overweight or obesity. That's the main difference with anorexia. Anorexia: skinny people, bulimia: normal weight, overweight or obesity. Regardless of their weight, these patients are malnourished. They may lack some essential nutrients causing serious health consequences. That's why nutrition cannot be assessed by BMI only. Common signs they will present with will include tachycardia, hypotension (systolic blood pressure below 90), dry skin, and hair loss. If the person uses self-induced vomiting to prevent weight gain, they may have erosion of the dental enamel from all the acid that comes up when they vomit. There may also be scarring or calluses on the dorsum side of the hand from all the acid too. Their parotid glands, that are located on the side of the jaws will also be swollen, causing a sign known as chipmunk face of bulimia.From talking to this person and getting a detailed history, we will learn of the symptoms bulimia nervosa can cause. This will include lethargy and fatigue, irregular menstrual periods in a female, abdominal pain and bloating, and constipationThis disorder really does take a toll on the body. There's plenty of complications that come with it as well. Let's try to break it down by system. GI system has the most complications: esophageal tears from the vomiting called Mallory-Weiss syndrome, which will present with bloody vomits, a loss of gag reflex, esophageal dysmotility, abdominal pain and bloating, GERD, diarrhea and malabsorption of nutrients, fatty stools known as steatorrhea, colonic dysmotility leading to constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, rectal prolapse, and pancreatitis. Cardiac: serious complication is ipeac-induced myopathy, let's spend a little time on this. Ipecac is a syrup that someone with bulimia nervosa may use to make themselves vomit. If a person uses this syrup frequently or for a long amount of time, there is a component called emetine will accumulate in muscle, including cardiac muscle. If a person uses ipecac chronically, it can be detected in the urine for up to 60 days. This will damage the heart muscles or myocardium and lead to cardiomyopathy. It will present with symptoms such as chest pain, shortness of breath, hypotension, tachycardia or bradycardia, T wave abnormalities on ECG, conduction delays, arrythmias, pericardial effusions, and even congestive heart failure. Cardiomyopathy may be irreversible. Renal system: dehydration, hypokalemia, hypochloremia, hyponatremia, and metabolic alkalosis. This could happen in patient who use diuretics as a purging mechanism. Endocrine system: Electrolytes and hormones imbalance. The endocrine system primarily impacts the reproductive and skeletal systems. Among 82 women treated for bulimia nervosa, menstrual irregularities were present in 45 percent at pretreatment and in 31 percent at 12-month follow-up. These irregularities may look like spotty or very light menstrual cycles. Cycles may be very erratic or completely absent. Skeletal system: osteopenia and osteoporosis are common with bulimia nervosa. Osteopenia means weaker and more brittle bones. Osteoporosis is more serious than osteopenia and can more easily result in fractures.The diagnosis of bulimia nervosa can usually be made clinically. And after the diagnosis with bulimia nervosa, the first step in helping them is always getting a full lab work up to see what systems to the body have been impacted. Treatment options include nutritional counseling, behavioral therapy, and even medications. If a person needs help connecting with someone that can help with this disorder, there are organizations that they can contact which will connect them with proper resources in their area. Organizations include the Academy for Eating Disorders and the National Eating Disorders Association. Bulimia nervosa is more prevalent in females than males in all age groups. In the US, adult prevalence is 1.0% and adolescent prevalence is 0.9%, with the median age of onset of 18 years. After comparing different age groups, we have seen the prevalence of bulimia nervosa has increased over time. Conclusion: Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are eating disorders that can have consequences on the health of our patients. We should know the difference between these two diseases and know the resources available in our community to assist these patients. The diagnosis may be done clinically, but you will need to order labs or imaging for a full assessment. Eating disorders are an example of the direct effect a mental illness can have in the body. In the specific case, anorexia and bulimia cause malnutrition. The treatment of these diseases requires a multidisciplinary team to treat the patient and the family as well.____________________________Conclusion: Now we conclude our episode number 76 “Eating Disorders.” We started this episode with exciting news about the new malaria vaccine, a step forward on our fight against malaria. Sophia, Jeffrey, and Dr Arreaza presented an interesting overview about anorexia and bulimia. They taught us that if a patient perceives him or herself as “fat”, but they are actually underweight, they may have anorexia. Patients with bulimia tend to have normal or above normal BMI but have periods of binging and purging. Be aware of these conditions while assessing your patients' nutritional status and treat appropriately or refer as needed. Even without trying, every night you go to bed being a little wiser.Thanks for listening to Rio Bravo qWeek. If you have any feedback about this podcast, contact us by email RBresidency@clinicasierravista.org, or visit our website riobravofmrp.org/qweek. This podcast was created with educational purposes only. Visit your primary care physician for additional medical advice. This week we thank Hector Arreaza, Tana Parker, Sophia Dhillon, and Jeffrey Nguyen. Audio edition: Suraj Amrutia. See you next week! _____________________References: Malaria's Impact Worldwide, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, https://www.cdc.gov/malaria/malaria_worldwide/impact.html, accessed on November 15, 2021.  Constitution of the World Health Organization, Basic Documents, Forty-fifth edition, Supplement, October 2006, accessed on Aug 26, 2021. Accessed on November 15, 2021.  https://www.who.int/governance/eb/who_constitution_en.pdf. 12 Secret Signs of Anorexia, CBS News, August 12, 2010, https://www.cbsnews.com/pictures/12-secret-signs-of-anorexia/3/.  Hudson JI, Hiripi E, Pope HG Jr, Kessler RC. The prevalence and correlates of eating disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. Biol Psychiatry. 2007 Feb 1;61(3):348-58. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2006.03.040. Epub 2006 Jul 3. Erratum in: Biol Psychiatry. 2012 Jul 15;72(2):164. PMID: 16815322; PMCID: PMC1892232. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16815322/.  Mitchell, James E, MD; and Christie Zunker, PhD, CPH, CHES, Bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder in adults: Medical complications and their management, UpToDate, October 2021. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/bulimia-nervosa-and-binge-eating-disorder-in-adults-medical-complications-and-their-management?search=Bulimia%20nervosa%20and%20binge%20eating%20disorder%20in%20adults:%20Medical%20complications%20and%20their%20management&source=search_result&selectedTitle=1~150&usage_type=default&display_rank=1 Yager, Joel, MD, Eating disorders: Overview of epidemiology, clinical features, and diagnosis, UpToDate, October 2021. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/eating-disorders-overview-of-epidemiology-clinical-features-and-diagnosis?search=Eating%20disorders:%20Overview%20of%20epidemiology,%20clinical%20features,%20and%20diagnosis&source=search_result&selectedTitle=1~150&usage_type=default&display_rank=1 Yager, Joel, MD, Eating disorders: Overview of prevention and treatment, UpToDate, October 2021. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/eating-disorders-overview-of-prevention-and-treatment?search=Eating%20disorders:%20Overview%20of%20prevention%20and%20treatment&source=search_result&selectedTitle=1~150&usage_type=default&display_rank=1

Couch Talk w/ Dr. Anna Cabeca
Creating Mindful and Resilient Children with Dr. Anna Cabeca and Dr. Madiha Saeed

Couch Talk w/ Dr. Anna Cabeca

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 47:49


Madiha Saeed is on a mission as the Holistic Mom to help children live healthier, happier, more mindful lives. Learn about the inflammation epidemic that is afflicting children today and what we as parents can do to help our children make more rational, healthy decisions by choosing nutrient-rich foods, focusing on gratitude and optimism, and creating a home environment where they can thrive. [0:40] What can we do as parents to raise mindful and resilient children with a combination of functional medicine and parenting? That's the question that Madiha's new book tries to answer. [1:25] Because of widespread chronic inflammation, children are unable to make rational decisions today which are resulting in a number of societal issues. [3:10] Madiha's mission began after seeing her newborn child struggle to simply breathe. She started her journey of self-healing and put those lessons into practice to help her children as well. [5:35] Chronic disease has quadrupled amongst children since the 1960s. Now 1 out of 2 American children has a chronic health condition. By 2025, the projection is that 80% of children will be diagnosed with a chronic health condition. ADHD has increased 167% and by current projections 1 in 4 children will be diagnosed with autism by 2033. [8:35] By understanding the why and the what, we can understand the root cause of suffering, which is that our children are living unbalanced lives. The decisions children make every day are determined by their brain, and studies have shown that inflammation reduces the connection between the prefrontal cortex and amygdala, both of which are needed to make rational decisions. [10:30] During a research study, they found that children with behavioral issues had high levels of key inflammatory markers. Inflammation can impact babies in the womb. Society lives unbalanced lives and the chronic inflammation that comes as a result is passed from mother to child. [12:30] Endocrine disruptors have been found to be closely linked to inflammation, hormone imbalances, and gender confusion that we are seeing now. Medications that were commonly prescribed to pregnant women in the past decades are being found to have multi-generational impacts and increased suffering. [16:10] There are thousands of chemicals that are released on a regular basis and we have no idea what their long-term impacts are. BPA is a common culprit that is found in most plastics, including baby bottles. [18:00] We need to be more mindful of what is going into our children's bodies and what they are wearing. As parents, we need to empower our children to make positive changes to their daily lifestyles and improve the future. [21:00] Our consumer choices matter. Science has proven that gratitude and optimism strengthen the link between the prefrontal cortex and the amygdala and improves overall health and wellbeing. [22:15] When a child has a chronic health condition, it can become hard to focus on anything else, but if you can shift the focus to the lessons they can learn and what is going right in their lives, it can help them optimize their brain, body, and health simply by reducing the overall stress level. [23:20] Devices and social media are addicting for children. We need to incorporate stress management practices like nature and physical play to balance out their daily routine. [24:55] There is a direct connection between our gut and our brain. The microbiome is vital to helping a child's brain develop fully and reduce inflammation. Nutrients regulate every single chemical reaction in a child's body. [26:25] Madiha uses a diet framework that starts with vegetables, proteins, and healthy fats. Make it easy and fun for your children to eat healthy food and teach them at a young age how it helps them keep their hormones in balance. [28:10] During the pandemic, diabetes has doubled in children. [28:55] Unfortunately, children today are deficient in a number of nutrients, and this causes a cascade of health issues. Madiha typically begins supplementing with vitamin D, fish oil, and probiotics. [32:10] The more kids can enjoy the process and participate in creating the healthy food they need, the more they will consume. [33:30] Mindfulness shows us how best to respond at many different levels at once. It allows children to have the perspective they need to live a healthy life. [35:20] The Holistic Rx is meant for anyone taking care of children who wants direction on how to live a mindful and healthy life. It centers around the child's health and diet, and how to help them recover from inflammation, insulin resistance, and more.     Mentioned in this Episode: theholisticrx.com holisticmommd.com @holisticmommd youtube.com/thegirlfrienddoctor dranna.com/show     Always seek the advice of your own physician or qualified health professional before starting any treatment or plans. Information found here and results are provided for informational purposes only and are not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional and are not intended as medical advice.

The Flipping 50 Show
WHY YOU MAY BE EATING TOO LITTLE To LOSE WEIGHT

The Flipping 50 Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 33:43


Are you eating too little to lose weight? How would you know? Eating consistently less than your body wants will slow your metabolism. You will lose your metabolic flexibility. There is no way you can eat less and less, continue to exercise the same or more and not stress your body, causing a ripple of negative reactions.  That's what this episode is all about. You may have reactions to this content. That's okay. It's to be expected, really. You've been conditioned.  Endurance athletes say things like, I have a hard time believing I'm eating too little to lose weight.  In fact, they are the ones at greatest risk for losing lean muscle. Menopausal athletes or exercise enthusiasts, even more so.  But it's normal to have a response like that. Endurance runners have long had eating disorders, or dysfunctional feelings around eating. The desire to be lighter, thinner to be faster is strong.  If you have low energy availability, you'll risk: Thyroid function disruption Endocrine disruption Muscle loss Workout performance (therefor results) suffers Negative Mitochondria and muscle and muscle protein synthesis effects Low Energy Availability causes: Too low overall calories Too low protein Too low carbohydrates Too low fat Any combination of these Culprits: Dieting intentionally Fasting without conscious refueling and intentional goals  Keto continuously  lifestyle dietary choices (inadequate EAA in plant-sources) Protein needs To Maintain: Ideal body weight in lbs = grams of protein Your Maintain weight daily Protein need: To Lose weight: X 10-15% more Your weight loss daily protein need: (see handout link below for a worksheet to do calculations) **Regardless of overall need, it needs to be consumed at a specific dose. 30 grams of protein minimum – no more than 50-60 grams for best ability to synthesis. Carbohydrate needs Light activity days/Recovery/short interval days 1.4 gm carb/pounds bodyweight Your calculation: 1.4 x ___________ = ______________ 60-120 minutes of endurance exercise 1.8grams x body weight pounds Your calculation: 1.8 x _______________ = ______________ More endurance training – increased the carbohydrate need 2-2.7gm per pounds (this is also where you're no longer going to find you make weight loss possible, but you're working toward performance and preventing muscle wasting that will happen. Fat Servings per meal is an easier way to adjust and consider 5 servings a day, is 1-2 at each meal. Most foods with protein contain fat or meal prep or condiments contain fat. Low fat and higher carbs (high activity days) Higher fat and low carb (lower activity days) When both fat and carbs are high, we have issues. Even with “healthy resistant starches” this is true. Examples: I do a 20-minute HI interval training session and that's my exercise– that's a light day for carb But still higher than most women are trying to go (100 grams is as low as I would recommend for an active woman and never would I go that low for an athlete) Based on 130 lbs 1.4 x body weight = 182 grams of carbs The same 20-minute HIIT interval session before a strength training session (40-minute session). Now, that boosts my need for carbohydrates, not just protein. So, I am back to at least 1.8g/body weight in pounds of carbs on these days. 1.8 x body weight = 234 Timing of recovery meals is important too. You want to eat by bookending your workouts with adequate fuel. Pre workout and post workout both matter. During recovery if you are HIGHLY active woman: The ratio of protein: carbs post workout is ideally 1: 3 or 4 if you're endurance training and need recovery quickly for that next workout. If you're not that active and simply exercising at minimum, you are a little less concerned about that. If you're exercising intentionally 5-6 days a week for an hour (or more) you are “an athlete.” So, for more active women with a threshold of 30 grams of protein at each meal you want 90 to 120 grams of carbs in that meal as well. What does that look like? Carb counts of some high quality carb choices: 1 cup cooked oatmeal 27 grams 1 cup of frozen berries? 21 grams Medium apple 25 grams 1 medium sweet potato 27 grams Banana 27 grams 1 cup Chili 23.5 carbs 1 cup butternut squash soup 23 1 slice of pumpkin pie 46 grams If you don't repair & replenish your protein & carb stores during the window (0-2 hours with sweet spot at 60-90 minutes) you'll be more tired the next day, find next workouts harder – though less effective, dead legs, etc). Sample meals during one day and carb count: Smoothie with half a banana and 1 cup of blueberries         34.5 1.5 cups of chili and an apple                                                 60.25 Sweet potato and berries  for dinner                                     38.0                                                                                                 132.75 Falls short of even the lowest need for carbohydrates (182gm) for a 130 lb woman. If you're increasing training levels, eating during activity will help. (Long bike rides, long hikes) That isn't accounted for in the example. What's your Energy Availability? Fat Free Mass = your muscle weight only Example: 130 lbs, 54 lbs of muscle mass Dietary energy intake (kcal) – Exercise energy expenditure (kcal) divided by Fat Free Mass (kg) For Example (2000 calories is easy math- just as example) 2000 kcals/day – and expend 250 kcals in 30-minute HIIT divided by 24.5 kg (54 lbs divided by 2.2) Please note:  in the actual podcast and on the cheat sheet there is a (major) error) Apologies for the oversight!  ***CORRECTION to original post: 54 DIVIDED by 2.2 = kgs = 71 is my Energy Availability (EA) gms/kg body weight Your Calculation: Kcals in a day: ___________  - Exercise energy Expended (use a tracker or online estimate) Lean Muscle mass kg _______ (lbs x 2.2) = ________________ gms/kg bodyweight What's true:

Dream Freedom Beauty with Natalie Ross
Botanical Breathworkers Elliott Brinkley and Eliza Rose Kane on Reconnecting Plants and People Through the Breath [episode 64]

Dream Freedom Beauty with Natalie Ross

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 75:23


Eliza Rose Kane and Elliott Brinkley share about connecting deeper to our bodies so we can reconnect to the magic and medicine of the Earth. You'll also hear about: The stress of living within a system that honors profit over life Connecting with the Spirit of Merlin Eco Grief, why it's natural to feel grief for the Earth and vital to express it Eliza shares about her life-changing firewalking experience and how she reconnected to her creative expression   ♥♥♥ Join The Earth Speak Collective Membership! Join like-hearted folks in a sacred container and community where you'll: Connect deeply to yourself, others, nature & spirit Learn to trust your intuition Activate your Earth magic Expand your healing & divination skills Put your intuition into practice in everyday life Stop feeling lonely on your spiritual path Embody & express your creative power & truths Experience safe space without agenda or judgment When you join the Collective, you get access to all of our past workshops, any live workshops happening while you're a member, live weekly energetic reset calls, monthly community rituals, all the secret episodes, member-run meetups to explore magical topics, and a lively members-only forum (that's not on FB!). ▶▶▶ Learn more and sign up for the Collective membership here: https://www.earthspeak.love/collective ***** Elliott Brinkley is the owner of an herbal apothecary in Durango, CO called Dancing Willow Herbs. She began her professional herbal journey working at Dancing Willow Herbs in 2015 as the medicine maker. In addition to her hands-on experience, Elliott is a Certified Herbalist with over 600 hours of training from the Colorado School of Clinical Herbalism and Herbalist Paul Bergner. She is passionate about bridging plants and people through writing, herbal cooking, teaching, and providing herbal support for others. As a vitalist herbal practitioner, Elliott focuses on therapeutics that work with the body's natural processes and support its innate gravitation toward healing. Elliott loves to convey the emotional and spiritual wisdom of plants through leading plant meditations, and classes that allow others to develop their own relationships with the botanical beings.  Eliza Rose Kane is a healer, a teacher of breathwork and creativity, a writer, and most of all, a thought provoker. Using breathwork meditation, movement, and creative expression, Eliza plays with weaving together the esoteric and the scientific to create experiences that inspire people to dive into a deeper understanding of themselves and the world we operate in. The work Eliza shares, while fun, will push your capacity for growth, challenge your limiting beliefs and ultimately take you to a heightened level of awareness. Her goal is to help people feel safe and comfortable in their bodies, confident, connected, and full of possibilities.   In this episode, we talk about: Managing physical illness as a result of stress in our everyday lives On navigating emotional overwhelm as a sensitive person On living within a system that honors profit over life On evolving alongside nature Eco Grief, why it's natural to feel grief for the Earth and vital to express it Engaging with nature as medicine for our grief On trusting in the magical forces and rising above the system Making space for beauty and connection in the everyday On breakdowns as breakthroughs The energy of the Scorpio new moon On completing the stress cycle What is Botanical Breathwork Tuning in to the messages of plants Growing up feeling disconnected from the body Why nature is willing and ready to connect Connecting deeper to our bodies so we can reconnect to the magic and medicine of the Earth Eliza and Elliott share their relationships with their Spirit guides Connecting with the Spirit of Merlin On trusting your intuition and your connection to the Otherworld Bringing together plants and people through the breath The endocrine system and the nervous system as the epicenters of our wellbeing On getting out of your mind and into your body How stress affects our genes How breathwork can create space to be more open and receptive to our intuition and the plants On rooting back into the world Creating space to be an emotional being Eliza shares about her life-changing firewalking experience and how she reconnected to her creative expression Creative expression as a gateway to intuition The medicine of hawthorn And so much more! Secret Episodes! Get access to past secret episodes at https://www.earthspeak.love/secret. Links: Join the Earth Speak Collective Membership at https://www.earthspeak.love/collective Join us in the Botanical Breathwork workshop COMING SOON Learn more about Elliott's offerings at www.dancingwillowherbs.com Learn more about Eliza's offerings at elizarosekane.com  Connect with Elliott on Instagram @dancingwillowherbsco // https://www.instagram.com/dancingwillowherbsco/ Connect with Eliza on Instagram @elizarosekane // https://www.instagram.com/elizarosekane/ Get the secret episodes at https://www.earthspeak.love/secret    References: Breathwork https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breathwork Dancing Willow Herbs https://dancingwillowherbs.com/ Eco Grief https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ecological_grief Colorado School of Clinical Herbalism https://clinicalherbalism.com/ Paul Berger and Vitalist herbalism https://clinicalherbalism.com/vitalist-tradition/ Botanical Herbalism workshop with Earth Speak || COMING SOON Earth Speak t-shirt launch || COMING SOON  Bootstrap business https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bootstrapping Hawthorn https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crataegus Blendily https://www.blendily.com Celtic people https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celtic Native Land https://native-land.ca Hawthorn || Plant https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crataegus Somatic healing https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Somatic_experiencing David Elliot https://www.davidelliott.com/ Synergy https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synergy Dandelion https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taraxacum Merlin https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merlin St. Germain https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Germain_(Theosophy) Endocrine system https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endocrine_system Epigenetics https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epigenetics Beltane https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beltane Samain https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samhain Equinox https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equinox      ► Leave us a written review on iTunes, and get shouted out on the show! Theme music is “It's Easier” by Scarlet Crow http://www.scarletcrow.org/ and “Meeting Again” by Emily Sprague  https://mlesprg.info/ ► Join the Earth Speak Collective Membership at https://www.earthspeak.love/collective Follow Earth Speak on Instagram and tag us when you share @earthspeak https://www.instagram.com/earthspeak

The Horse's Advocate Podcast
#036 Horse Meeting Endocrine Disease And The Equine Athlete

The Horse's Advocate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 66:22


I attended a Zoom meeting hosted by the FVMA with the presenter Dr Jane Manfredi of Michigan State. The title of her talk was Endocrine Disease And The Equine Athlete. I arrived a few minutes late but from what I could tell, this was a presentation on equine metabolic syndrome (EMS), PPID / Cushing's Disease in horses, insulin resistance / dysregulation and other points. I go over her presentation discussing the good points and, once again, my disappointment that diet is not placed more prominently. Some of the information was old and not current with human investigations. The usual advice is about diagnosing early and getting the horse on an effective treatment based on lab work and flow diagrams. For this, Dr Manfredi did an excellent job. What makes this podcast interesting was her association of EMS with joint pain in horses using data extrapolated from human studies. She also mentions the importance of the proportions of bacteria living in the microbiome of the gut in having the horse be thin, just right or obese. This has been shown in rats as well as humans. Further, Dr Manfredi includes her opinion and studies of using a blend of polyphenols (specifically resveratrol) with a blend of amino acids to reduce general inflammation and specifically joint inflammation (osteoarthritis). What made this point so strong for me was a podcast I had listened to the day before where a legend in the field of human functional medicine had also said how effective adding the polyphenols resveratrol and curcumin were in reducing inflammation. By the way, Wikipedia says there is no evidence of this effect with resveratrol.

Patients Ensemble
PODCAST 143 - Sensibiliser sur Facebook aux Tumeur Neuro-Endocrine, avec le sourire

Patients Ensemble

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 9:27


Avec un esprit toujours positif, la page Facebook Ma tumeur neuroendocrine permet la discussion et les échanges autour de la maladie. Pauline Pineau, co-fondatrice, nous parle de son action et des bienfaits de la page pour les patients qui la suivent.  

Memorizing Pharmacology Podcast: Prefixes, Suffixes, and Side Effects for Pharmacy and Nursing Pharmacology by Body System

The Classroom Endocrine Lecture Part 1 of 1, you can complete the quizzes here https://residency.teachable.com/p/mobile

ASCO Guidelines Podcast Series
Endocrine Toxicities: Management of irAEs Guideline (Part 6)

ASCO Guidelines Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 14:06


An interview with Dr. Jennifer Mammen from Johns Hopkins University, author on “Management of Immune-Related Adverse Events in Patients Treated With Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy: ASCO Guideline Update.” She discusses the identification, evaluation, and management of endocrine toxicities in patients receiving ICPis, including thyroid-related irAEs, primary AI, hypophysitis, and diabetes in Part 6 of this 13-part series. For more information visit www.asco.org/supportive-care-guidelines   TRANSCRIPT [MUSIC PLAYING] SPEAKER: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. [MUSIC PLAYING] BRITTANY HARVEY: Hello and welcome to the ASCO Guidelines Podcast Series brought to you by the ASCO Podcast Network, a collection of nine programs covering a range of educational and scientific content and offering enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all the shows, including this one, at asco.org/podcasts. My name is Brittany Harvey, and today, we're continuing our series on the management of immune-related adverse events. I am joined by Dr. Jennifer Mammen from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, author on Management of Immune-Related Adverse Events in Patients Treated With Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy: ASCO Guideline Update and Management of Immune-Related Adverse Events in Patients Treated with Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cell Therapy: ASCO Guideline. And today, we're focusing on endocrine toxicities in patients treated with immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy. Thank you for being here, Dr. Mammen. JENNIFER MAMMEN: My pleasure, Brittany. BRITTANY HARVEY: First, I'd like to note that ASCO takes great care in the development of its guidelines and ensuring that the ASCO conflict of interest policy is followed for each guideline. The full conflict of interest information for this guideline panel is available online with the publication of the guidelines in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Dr. Mammen, do you have any relevant disclosures that are related to these guidelines? JENNIFER MAMMEN: I do not. BRITTANY HARVEY: OK. Thank you. Then, to start us off, what are the immune-related endocrine toxicities addressed in this guideline? JENNIFER MAMMEN: Yeah. So irAEs affect the thyroid and the pituitary most commonly. But we also addressed the possibility of primary adrenal toxicity and also the emerging toxicity of insulin-dependent type 1 diabetes, which, while rare, can present with grade 4 toxicity in the form of diabetic ketoacidosis. BRITTANY HARVEY: Understood. Then, starting with adverse events affecting the thyroid, what are the key recommendations for identification, evaluation, and management of thyrotoxicosis? JENNIFER MAMMEN: So thyrotoxicosis after ICI exposure is almost entirely due to subacute thyroiditis. That's a transient inflammation of the thyroid gland that causes a few weeks of high levels of thyroid hormone, followed by at least several weeks of hypothyroidism as the stores of thyroid hormone are replenished. In the irAE context, many patients do not ever actually recover adequate thyroid function and will remain hypothyroid, requiring thyroid hormone long term. Because the thyrotoxicosis is transient and results from the release of preformed thyroid hormone, anti-thyroid drugs do not help and actually can even make the hypothyroidism phase worse. Therefore, the treatment is really supportive care with beta blockers in particular to control symptoms of the hypothyroidism, such as tachycardia, tremor, or anxiety. BRITTANY HARVEY: In addition to those points for thyrotoxicosis, what are the key recommendations for primary hypothyroidism? JENNIFER MAMMEN: Yeah. So primary hypothyroidism is very common both in the general population and now in this population as a result of thyroiditis. Many patients might actually already be on thyroid hormone when starting immunotherapy. When the pituitary is working, the pituitary hormone thyrotropin or TSH is a reliable indicator of the adequacy of thyroid hormone replacement. And the goal is to use a dose of thyroid hormone that maintains the TSH in the mid reference range, generally between 1 and 3 million international units per liter. When a patient is first presenting or diagnosed with hypothyroidism, for example, in that second phase of thyroiditis, a weight-based dose can be used to estimate the needed replacement dose. For those with higher BMI, generally, an ideal body weight rather than an actual body weight gives a better estimate. And those specific recommendations are in the guidelines. Proton pump inhibitors, calcium/iron supplementation, or GI inflammation can all decrease the absorption of thyroid hormone. And so even the thyroid hormone is really common, and many oncologists are used to managing it, it can be tricky in these patients if there's issues with malabsorption. And so, therefore, an endocrinology consultation can be helpful to titrate and ensure that the dosing is adequate. Once that adequate dose, that stable dose is found, if other factors don't change, dose requirements are generally quite stable and can be monitored annually either by a primary care physician or an oncologist. BRITTANY HARVEY: Great. Those are important points. Then, addressing the immune-related adverse event that impacts the pituitary, what are the key recommendations for identification, evaluation, and management of hypophysitis? JENNIFER MAMMEN: So hypophysitis is inflammation of the pituitary, as you said. And although there are five hormone systems at risk, it's actually most common that the thyroid and the adrenal gland axes are what are affected. The diagnosis is made by a combination of assessing the pituitary hormone and the primary hormone, in this case, the thyroid hormone and cortisol along with the TSH and ACTH, which is the pituitary hormone that regulates the adrenal gland. With primary gland failure, as we said, the pituitary hormones will be elevated. But in hypophysitis, the problem actually comes from the pituitary. And so TSH and ACTH will be low or inappropriately normal for the low primary thyroid hormone level. There are several key points for oncologists who might need to initiate therapy before the patient can see endocrinology. First, thyroid hormone increases the metabolism of cortisol. And so if you've diagnosed central hypothyroidism due to hypophysitis, it's really important to replace cortisol, if needed, before replacing thyroid hormone, because in someone with both deficits, thyroid hormone alone can precipitate an adrenal crisis. Thus, the ASCO Guidelines really emphasize the need to assess both before starting thyroid hormone and also give the option to use steroids empirically, if needed, since the diagnosis can be sorted out later by an endocrinologist. A second important point is that headaches, visual changes, and diabetes insipidus, which is loss of fluid and generally marked by hypernatremia, those are much more common with metastatic disease in the pituitary rather than hypophysitis. And so such symptoms should really prompt a pituitary MRI when they're found in the setting of hormonal losses. The management of central hypothyroidism is similar to that of primary hypothyroidism. But as I said, the TSH is no longer a reliable marker for adequate replacement. So the goal, then, shifts from a TSH in the reference range to a free T4 at the upper half of the reference range. Adrenal insufficiency, as with thyroid hormone insufficiency, is managed by physiologic hormone replacement, and that's best done using hydrocortisone. This is a short-acting steroid that can be given in a way to imitate the natural diurnal rhythm. We use 2/3 of the dose in the morning and 1/3 in the early afternoon, allowing levels to fall as they naturally would overnight. Dose-titration is based on symptoms. And usually, 15 to 25 milligrams of a total daily dose is adequate to control symptoms from adrenal insufficiency. I do think all patients should see endocrinology at some point if they have been diagnosed with hypophysitis because they do need education on sick day rules, otherwise known as stress dosing, and also to be instructed on wearing an emergency alert bracelet or necklace or something. Long-acting steroids can be used for patients who have adherence problems. And of course, those long-acting steroids are more appropriate for the treatment of any other irAE that a patient may develop. While on higher doses of prednisone, patients can discontinue hydrocortisone and then restart it when the prednisone dose is weaned down below 5 milligrams daily. If there's a question about whether the central adrenal insufficiency is from hypophysitis or due to suppression after weaning off high-dose exposure, use of hydrocortisone because of the diurnal rhythm actually allows the adrenal axis to recover normally. And so after weeks, you can test for adrenal recovery using a morning endogenous level 24 hours after the last dose is given, which is another advantage to using the hydrocortisone mode of hormone replacement. BRITTANY HARVEY: Understood. And I appreciate you highlighting those key points for oncologists. Then, following that, what are the key recommendations for primary adrenal insufficiency? JENNIFER MAMMEN: Yeah. So primary adrenal insufficiency, you'll see the ACTH elevated just like in primary thyroid disease, and the cortisol will be low. Again, this situation is actually much more common with metastatic disease, and therefore, imaging is called for if you find that pattern of hormonal changes. It's been case-reported to happen with irAEs, but in general, this is incredibly rare. The management of hydrocortisone replacement for people with primary adrenal insufficiency is really the same as for hypophysitis. We're using hydrocortisone with that diurnal physiologic replacement pattern. Primary adrenal insufficiency, however, also generally results in the loss of mineralocorticoid function. And so most patients also need at least a low dose of fludrocortisone replacement. BRITTANY HARVEY: OK. And then the last adverse event addressed in the endocrine toxicity section of this guideline, what are the key recommendations for identification, evaluation, and management of diabetes? JENNIFER MAMMEN: Yeah. So diabetes in this patient population is very tricky because so many of these patients are getting high-dose steroids as part of their chemotherapy regimens, and this can cause a lot of hyperglycemia. And I think it's actually easy to become complacent about seeing blood glucoses in the 200s. And in fact, most of the hyperglycemia will be just that, secondary to steroid exposure and worsening type 2 diabetes. It can be managed with a titration of routine medications. But they are now increasingly less rare but still rare events of acute loss of pancreatic function, presumably autoimmune, that can be accompanied by life-threatening diabetic ketoacidosis. And the challenge for oncologists, I think, is to have a low enough threshold to investigate a suspicious pattern of hyperglycemia, for example, hyperglycemia with complaints of polyurea or, on physical exam, a more rapid respiratory rate that could indicate compensation for metabolic acidosis. So it's really a question of being a good clinician and taking the diabetes in context and not just assuming that it's due to steroid exposure. This is, I think, important because, like I said, diabetic ketoacidosis can be a grade 4 emergency, and patients can end up in the intensive care unit, needing a lot of intervention, which if we have a higher suspicion in clinic, we might be able to avert by getting rapid communication with endocrinology, starting people on insulin and that kind of an approach. BRITTANY HARVEY: Definitely. A common theme with these toxicities seems to be early identification is key. So thank you for reviewing the high-level recommendations for each of these toxicities. In your view, how will these recommendations for the management of endocrine toxicities impact both clinicians and patients? JENNIFER MAMMEN: Yeah. So I think making diagnoses in the hormonal systems can be complex and does require attention to the interactions, like we were talking about, between the pituitary and the primary gland. It's not something that oncologists necessarily have front of mind. And yet hormone replacement is actually quite straightforward. Once the need for it is recognized, since there's no side effects from replacing a hormone at an appropriate dose, it's just a replacement. And so, therefore, rapid diagnosis and initiation of hormone replacement can really allow patients to continue immunotherapy with a very minimal disruption, even in the face of an endocrine irAE. Although at our institution the close coordination between treating oncologists and endocrinologists is available, that's certainly not true everywhere. And I think that the ASCO Guidelines are designed to try and help oncologists make these diagnoses and initiate therapy to stabilize patients and even allow them to continue treatment while awaiting any necessary consultations, even in the case of thyroiditis, perhaps, managing what's a self-limited event and then moving on, which reduces the burden on patients with other priorities to focus on. BRITTANY HARVEY: Great. Those are very important points. So I really want to thank you for all of your work on these guidelines. And I appreciate you taking the time to speak with me today, Dr. Mammen. JENNIFER MAMMEN: It's my pleasure. BRITTANY HARVEY: And thank you to all of our listeners for tuning in to the ASCO Guidelines Podcast Series. Stay tuned for additional episodes on the management of immune-related adverse events. To read the full guideline, go to www.asco.org/supportive-care-guidelines. You can also find many of our guidelines and interactive resources in the free ASCO Guidelines app available in iTunes or the Google Play store. If you have enjoyed what you've heard today, please rate and review the podcast and be sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode. [MUSIC PLAYING]

Endocrine News Podcast
ENP50: Drones, Robots, and Diabetes Tech

Endocrine News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 35:34


For our 50th episode since launching in 2018, host Aaron Lohr takes a look at drone and robotic technology being used for medicine delivery and patient education. He speaks with Derek O'Keeffe, MD, PhD, of the National University of Ireland, Galway, who has been at the forefront of this development in patient care. Dr. O'Keeffe will present on Tuesday, November 9, at the Endocrine Society's upcoming half-day-long, educational event, "Insulin 2121: The Next 100 Years of Discoveries," which you can register for at https://www.endocrine.org/insulin100 . This episode is sponsored by an unrestricted, educational grant from Lilly USA LLC. For more information, including helpful links and other episodes, visit our website at https://www.endocrine.org/podcast

The Hartmann Report
THE NUMBER ONE ISSUE OF THE GOP IS THE SURVIVAL OF WHITE SUPREMACY

The Hartmann Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 58:02


If the GOP fails to purge itself of its racist politicians our future is grim. Will Sinema Become a Trumpian? Geeky Science - America Has To Stop Eating Plastic. David Sirota joins Thom to look at the current wrangling over the reconciliation bill - and review the link between the democracy crisis and the failure to pass robust economic agenda that helps the working class. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Pathways to Well-Being
Endocrine Disrupting Plastics: Minimizing Health Impacts and Restoring Well-being

Pathways to Well-Being

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 42:52


In the modern world, toxicant exposure is ubiquitous, with some studies reporting the average person is exposed to hundreds of environmental chemicals daily via air, water, soil, and food. While these exposures usually occur at a low-level, the bioaccumulation of toxins in the body can be a root cause of several types of dysfunction. On this episode of Pathways to Well-Being, Tom Malterre, MS, CN, clinical educator and cofounder of Whole Life Nutrition, explains the biochemical impacts of endocrine disrupting plastics such as Bisphenols like BPA and microplastics, and shares his insights on how nutrition and lifestyle can support the body's biotransformation pathways and reduce total toxic burden. To view the transcript for this episode, click here: https://www.ifm.org/news-insights/endocrine-disrupting-plastics-minimizing-health-impacts-and-restoring-well-being/.

Redefining Medicine
Redefining Medicine with special guest Dr. Kent Holtorf

Redefining Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 14:57


Kent Holtorf, M.D. is the medical director of the Holtorf Medical Group (www.HoltorfMed.com) and a founder and director of the non-profit National Academy of Hypothyroidism (NAH) (www.NAHypothyroidism.org), which is dedicated to the dissemination of new evidence-based information to doctors and patients on the diagnosis and treatment of hypothyroidism and advanced integrative diagnostic and treatment protocols. He has personally trained numerous physicians across the country in the use of bioidentical hormones, hypothyroidism, peptide therapy, stem cell therapy, complex endocrine dysfunction and innovative treatments of chronic fatigue syndrome, weight loss, fibromyalgia, and chronic infectious diseases, including Lyme and related diseases. Lyme and associated diseases have been the focus of the Holtorf Medical Group centers and have been a passion of Dr. Holtorf's for over 15 years.   Dr. Holtorf is a guest editor and peer-reviewer for a number of medical journals, including Endocrine, Postgraduate Medicine and Pharmacy Practice. Dr. Holtorf has published a number of peer-reviewed endocrine reviews, including on the safety and efficacy of bioidentical hormones, inaccuracies of standard thyroid testing, testosterone replacement for men and women, the diagnosis and treatment of growth hormone deficiency and on the diagnosis, treatment of adrenal dysfunction in chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia, peripheral thyroid hormone conversion and its impact on TSH and metabolic activity, and the clinical applications of thyroid hormone transport into cellular tissue. He has helped to demonstrate that much of the long-held dogma in endocrinology and infectious disease is inaccurate. He has lectured for prestigious medical societies across the United States and worldwide. He is a fellowship lecturer for the American Board of Anti-Aging Medicine and was the Endocrinology Expert for AOL Health. He is a contributing author to Denis Wilson's recently published Evidenced-Based Approach to Restoring Thyroid Health.   Dr. Holtorf has been a featured guest on numerous TV and radio shows, including CNBC, ABC News, CNN, EXTRA TV, Discovery Health, The Learning Channel, The Today Show, The Doctors, Dr. Dean Edell, CBS News, RT News, Glenn Beck, Nancy Grace, Fox Business, ESPN, Rush Limbaugh, CBS Sunday Morning, Sean Hannity, and So Cal News. He has been quoted in numerous print media including the Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, US News and World Report, San Francisco Chronicle (front page), WebMD, Health, Elle, Better Homes and Garden, US Weekly, Forbes, Cosmopolitan, New York Daily News, and Self magazine among many others.

Endocrine News Podcast
ENP49: Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes

Endocrine News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 21:13


Host Aaron Lohr talks about cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes with Jonathan Purnell, MD, from Oregon Health & Science University. Dr. Purnell chaired the Endocrine Society's recent educational series, "Current and Future State of Cardiovascular Disease in Type 2 Diabetes," which is available through December 2021. For more information, including helpful links and other episodes, visit our website at https://www.endocrine.org/podcast

Medici Medicine
Inflammation and Disease: Insights into the Psycho-Neuro-Endocrine-Immune System: -Show 542

Medici Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 26:52


https://medicienterprises.com/2021/10/09/show-542/

Primal Blueprint Podcast
03: The Link Between Female Health & Fasting with Dr. Mindy Pelz

Primal Blueprint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 62:06


This week Morgan sits down with fasting expert Dr. Mindy Pelz. Pelz believes fasting can be the key to regulating hormones, stress & overall well-being in women. Morgan gets the full scoop from Dr. Pelz, who debunks the belief that fasting can have a negative impact on women's health, as well as the lowdown on proper fasting techniques for women. Learn more about Dr. Mindy Pelz's take on fasting and it's impact on the female body.

Superheroes of Science
What is Environmental Health? Looking at endocrine disrupting chemicals, health disparities, and environmental racism

Superheroes of Science

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 59:33


Most all diseases include some kind of environmental component according to Dr. Sarah Evans, Assistant Professor of Environmental Medicine and Public Health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. If environmental factors are responsible for rapid disease rates, then we can work toward solutions that will be helpful in slowing these rates. Dr. Evans suggests actionable items we can do to reduce unnecessary exposure to dangerous chemicals including using our dollars to choose products that are phthalate-free, BPA-free, and fragrance-free, using more whole and fresh foods, and reducing household dust.

Just Live Well
Endocrine, Immunity, and Successful Aging with Jennifer Withey 9.28.21

Just Live Well

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 64:11


Living Well Clinical Nutrition Center, in League City, serves the community with a message of hope and healing without the use of drugs and surgery. Dr Aaron Chapa joins KHEA Radio to share this message and more!

The Tales of Osteopathy Students
S3 Ep 9: Endocrine Organs Part 2

The Tales of Osteopathy Students

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 34:38


Chelsea and V are both ill, again, but they've powered on through to bring you Endocrine Organs part 2. Starting with our favourite, the hats of the kidneys, the adrenal glands.

This EndoLife
Endo and Skin Conditions/Endo Friendly Skincare Q&A

This EndoLife

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 47:22


Today's episode is another bonus Q&A and this time it was more light-hearted and fun. This time I'm talking about endometriosis and the associated skin conditions, and I'm also sharing endo friendly skin care tips! In this episode I talk about... My personal experience with rosacea and eczema and how I healed those after over a decade of suffering with them. How treating SIBO improved my skin in so many ways but also dehydrated it and caused some surprising skin issues! My skin care routine, favourite products and gua sha technique that are all endometriosis friendly. The link between endometriosis, histamines and eczema. The link between SIBO and rosacea. Cystic acne, endometriosis and oestrogen and how to begin healing acne. Endocrine disrupting chemicals in skincare and how they affect endometriosis. I hope this Q&A is both fun and helpful! Listen and subscribe on your favourite player or listen directly/download MP3 here or just listen below! Let's get social! Come say hello on Instagram or sign up to my newsletter. Sign up to my free workshop: Creating a Roadmap to Endo Belly Healing To become a The Endo Belly Course Founding Member, email me at hello@thisendolife.com with ‘Yes' in the subject line. Sign up to the wait list for my course, Live and Thrive with Endo here. My cookbook This EndoLife, It Starts with Breakfast is out now! Get 28 anti-inflammatory, hormone friendly recipes for living and thriving with endometriosis. Order your copy here. If you feel like you need more support with managing endometriosis, you can join Your EndoLife Coaching Programme. A 1-to-1 three month health and life coaching programme to help you thrive with endometriosis. To find out more about the programme and to discuss whether it could be right for you, email me at hello@thisendolife.com or visit my website. This episode is sponsored by The Pod Farm. Learn all about how to start your own podcast with the complete course from The Pod Farm. Aimed at beginners, this course takes a simple and straightforward approach to planning, equipment buying, setting up, recording, editing and hosting your own podcast. With hours of audio and video materials, and downloadable guides and useful links, this multimedia approach aims to have something for every kind of learner. From now until April 15, newsletter subscribers get 20% off the course price. Visit www.thepodfarm.com to enroll or find out more This episode is sponsored by BeYou. Soothe period cramps the natural way with these 100% natural and discreet menthol and eucalyptus oil stick on patches and CBD range. Click here to find out more and to shop: https://beyouonline.co.uk

The Tales of Osteopathy Students
S3 Ep 8: Endocrine Organs Part 1

The Tales of Osteopathy Students

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 37:27


This week Chelsea and V are finally back after their unexpected break and are right back in with an A&P episode. Throughout this season e will be diving deep into the Endocrine system and we are kicking things off by discussing the Location, anatomy, function, hormones released and pathologies of the organs. 

Couch Talk w/ Dr. Anna Cabeca
A Long, Healthy Life with Dr. Anna Cabeca

Couch Talk w/ Dr. Anna Cabeca

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 49:58


Nourish your body from the inside out to live a long, happy, and healthy life. Dr. Anna breaks down the science behind longevity and explores the key supplements to promote health and reduce inflammation, how to reduce and avoid the toxins and endocrine disruptors we face everyday in our lives, and why love is the best medicine of all. [0:15] Longevity begins in the womb. What we do for our health matters for generations. In the past episode Dr. Anna talked about a number of different treatments that were meant to help maintain a pregnancy, but instead resulted in a plethora of negative effects generations down the line. [1:05] There are age reversal techniques that everyone can do that can have tremendous genetic and generational positive benefits. [1:40] The healthier we are as a community and with our relationships the longer we live with a high quality of life. Love, laugh, and give is a great mindset to start your day and end your life with. [3:50] Treatments can have generational effects. Endocrine disruptors like Diethylstilbestrol (DES) were touted as a wonderful, universal drug for pregnant mothers but resulted in numerous negative effects. [4:50] Dr. Anna recently attended the Da Vinci 50 conference and Dr. Gregory Church recommended that the FDA should require third generational animal studies before releasing a medication out to the public. Most medications today do not meet that standard. [6:30] Protect yourself from toxic overload and hormone disruptors. In many places, disruptors can even be found in tap water. [7:30] Another key area that affects our longevity is our epigenetics. If you don't have your 23andMe health yet, it can be a good idea to get it. Knowing how well you methylate will determine the best types of supplementation for you. [8:40] You also need to pay attention to toxin exposure. Things like fireproof treated fabric can be absorbed through the skin, and particular GMOs can cause issues. [10:05] Anything with PCBs is considered highly toxic. Dioxin, a byproduct from chloride containment processes, can linger in the environment for years and diminishes the production of thyroid hormones. [10:50] A recent patient came to Dr. Anna with low testosterone. Before dealing with the symptom, it's important to address the cause of the problem. Her approach was to do an endocrine toxicity screen and address the thyroid issues. [12:40] If you're suffering from low testosterone, we have to ask where the testosterone is going. Is it being converted to estrogen? Is it becoming dihydrotestosterone? These could result in either man boobs or hair loss, so it's important to understand what is going on. [13:55] Most of us haven't been aware of the potent complication of endocrine disruptors. We are seeing an overall increase of infertility, early menopause, and early andropause. [14:20] Phthalates are very common in the plastic drinking bottles we use. Avoiding BPAs is also important, which are found in plastics as well as metal food containers. The rule of thumb is to reduce our exposure to toxins as much as possible. [17:30] Off-Gassing of chemicals can also occur in your shower curtain and dry cleaning bag. Switching to a natural fiber shower curtain is an easy, quick fix. [18:00] Even something as innocuous as the receipts you get at the store have BPAs on them. Cashiers should think seriously about using gloves while handling receipts all day. [19:10] Seek out products that have the FDA-certified Organic label. The reverse should be the norm, where foods are labeled as grown with pesticides, but that's the reality we live in. [20:55] Heavy metals are major endocrine disruptors. Mercury from fish, and lead in air pollution, all impact fertility and cause complications in pregnancy. Dr. Anna often tests patients for heavy metals and recommends natural chelators. Vitamin C and certain foods like garlic, ginger, broccoli sprouts, and more help reduce toxic heavy metals in the body. [27:00] Chromosome maintenance and repair will improve all the downstream symptoms. Telomere erosion and genetic errors age us rapidly. Natural aging can be accelerated through life and environmental stresses like smoking, high blood sugar, high blood pressure, and inflammation. [27:50] Inflammation accelerates aging universally, from your hair to your skin to your brain cells. Mitochondria are the powerhouses of the cell, and when they are functioning poorly for a number of different reasons, it leads to rapidly declining energy and fatigue. [29:15] Anyone with autoimmune issues is affected by rapid aging. The lower your basal metabolic rate, the more unhealthy you are. [30:30] Glucose regulation is the number one recommendation from experts in longevity. Keeping your glucose levels steady throughout the day with a diet like Keto Green will certainly help. Especially for women going through menopause, a stable blood sugar and a habit of fasting can drastically improve the quality of your life. [34:10] Sticking with the Keto Green lifestyle leads to more benefits the longer you persist. [34:40] Maintaining a stable glucose level and avoiding the peaks and valleys of snacking and card heavy meals throughout the day is a true hack for longevity. [34:55] If you're a poor methylator because of your genetics, you will age faster if you don't intervene. [36:20] We live in a climate-controlled world, and exposing yourself to extreme temperatures can have a major positive impact on your metabolism. Cold plunges have been used for thousands of years to improve performance. [37:10] Supplements can also promote longevity. Things like turmeric, green tea extract, and resveratrol increase antioxidants in the body and promote healthy aging. [39:10] DHEA levels are something you should also try to keep high. Supporting the adrenal gland can help your body produce its own DHEA and keep your levels in the optimal range. [40:35] MNM is a precursor to NAD, a powerful anti-inflammatory and supports the mitochondria. [41:25] Dr. Anna breaks down her daily supplementation regimen which can be found in her Super Woman packs. [45:15] Another supplement mentioned during the conference is spermidine. Certain exercises can help you increase your flow of this natural longevity-promoting substance. [46:40] Stem cell injections have also shown anti-aging effects. As more science is produced supporting those results, the more likely it will be the future of anti-aging treatment. [48:10] If we have an unhealthy gut, we are unhealthy. Keeping the gut as healthy as possible is crucial to hormone balance and longevity. [48:25] Gratitude, meditation, being out in nature, and getting a good night's sleep are all components of a long, healthy lifestyle. [49:25] Most of the time, it's the things we say no to that make the most difference in your life. [49:50] Love is the best medicine. Love, laugh, and give is the mantra that Dr. Anna lives by and recommends others to do as well.       Mentioned in this Episode: youtube.com/thegirlfrienddoctor dranna.com/show     Always seek the advice of your own physician or qualified health professional before starting any treatment or plans. Information found here and results are provided for informational purposes only and are not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional and are not intended as medical advice.

Endocrine News Podcast
ENP48: Type 1 Diabetes

Endocrine News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 39:43


We explore type 1 diabetes, everything from diagnosis to treatment strategies, hypoglycemia, technology, and teleheath. Host Aaron Lohr talks with Irl Hirsch, MD, from the University of Washington, and Davida Kruger, NP, from the Henry Ford Health System. They co-chair the Endocrine Society's 8th Annual Endocrine Fellows Type 1 Diabetes Care and Management Program. For more information, including helpful links and other episodes, visit our website at https://www.endocrine.org/podcast

Talking USMLE
Endocrinology Drill Session (5-min mini-drill)

Talking USMLE

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 6:01


Today's 5-minute mini-drill is a 5-minute review of some high-yield USMLE Step 1 Endocrine details.Get our full library of over 10K+ drill session questions at https://usmledrills.comWant to work with us? Visit usmleguys.com to learn how we can help you pass your USMLE exams.Follow us on YouTube for more drill sessions, USMLE Coaching, & more... Follow us here: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheUSMLEPreparationCompanyFREE RESOURCES:(1) USMLE Step 1 Fast Facts (Study on your phone): https://theupc.net/ff(2) USMLE Step 2 CK Fast Facts: https://theupc.net/ck-ff

Awaken Beauty Podcast
How to Protect Your Endocrine Health at All Levels

Awaken Beauty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 54:58


If you listen to the Awaken Beauty Podcast, you're a woman in pursuit of high-quality thoughts, beauty, and lifestyle products.  You also are probably aware that we are exposed to hundreds of chemicals every single day -In fact, to dial it in, Studies show that we are exposed to over 500 synthetic chemicals every day - within our homes. One of the leading chemicals that wreaks havoc on our hormones and endocrine system is called Xenoestrogens.Our guest today matches my passion for awakening individuals at any point in their health journey by providing highly researched, vetted, and efficient optimal health and aging solutions. For over a decade, I've been educating and creating beauty and wellness products - before organic “was status quo” - and ladies, this is far deeper than “clean products.” So through a Functional Medicine lens, joining us today is Dr. Anthony Jay - who is a scientist, author, and leading expert on a wealth of topics including xenoestrogens, epigenetics, and even stem cells.In this epic episode, we'll explore the macro and micro on how our environment, diet, genetic expression, and endocrine disruptors affect the aging process, our health, and even the brain.  Of course, what you can do about it. About Doctor Anthony Jay: Not falling short of credibility - Dr. Jay is the founder of AJ Consulting Company and a scientist at the Mayo Clinic.   He offers incredible insights into your health and how to improve it with precision through high-level DNA testing, where he has experience of analyzing the DNA of individuals in the  NFL, U.S. special forces,   MMA fighters, and 100's of individuals seeking peak health.   In addition -  Dr. Jay is a bestselling author of the book called: Estrogeneration  - which we'll be cracking open today. On Today's Episode You'll Awaken to:Dr. Jay's Estrogeneration book shares the progression of a sick nation and how we're passing on a health crisis to our children and the next generations.  Overall, chemicals increase hormone-sensitive Cancers + Increase aging + Weight Gain + Brain/Emotional Symptoms.Exposure to xenoestrogens can predispose us to PCOS, Endometriosis, and Fibroids, and fertility.    HOW THEY ENTERMost exposure comes from our very own home- but we can be masters of our home.  Endocrine disrupters are a thousand times than normal estrogen.  Not all are manmade: one of the strongest xenoestrogens out there come from mold toxins as a mycotoxin - namely “ZEA.”  Bruce Blumberg's book “The obesogen effect” proves how critical detoxing efficiently is if you want to beat the battle of the bulge.HOW WE METABOLIZE & AFFECT OUR HEALTHHow Xenoestrogens affect the mind by dropping natural motivationHow estrogen can SAVE your health and damage your health: The difference between natural and artificial estrogen.The rate of breast cancer has increased by 250% since the 1980s.Gut Dysbiosis – Insufficient good bacteria in the gut inhibits the conversion of estrogen into water-soluble molecules.  This causes the estrogens to recirculate back into the bloodstream where it can re-exert their effects. Gut health is very important for the metabolism of all hormones.WHAT TO LOOK FORBirth-control Pills - whether taking them or not, they're found in our water -  filter!A Shower filter can reduce toxins in the water getting into our pores (step out of the shower, our pores are open, and we start to overload the system with lotions, creams, and perfumes).  Environmentally, the air within the home hosts sheetrock that has a high mercury content which is a heavy metal and is an endocrine disrupter.  Cannabis SMOKE is estrogenic[Top Beauty INGREDIENTS Lookout!]Phthalates: Are round in cosmetics, cleaning products, food packaging, and detergents, PVC plastic, toys, and plastic wrap.Parabens: Found in deodorant, antiperspirant, moisturizer, sunscreen, and makeup.  Formaldehyde: A known carcinogen and irritant found in nail products, hair dye, and eyelash adhesives  Fragrance: Has hormone-disrupting effects.  Lead: A known carcinogen and hormone disruptor found in certain eyeliners, hair dye, and lipsticks.Mercury:  accumulation over time, can impair the brain and nervous system.Oxybenzone: An active ingredient in chemical sunscreens that accumulates in fatty tissues.  Sunscreen Study: Oxybenzone application after 7 days, were still found in the bloodstream  The advantage of Zinc-based Mineral Makeup: At Beauty Ecology we offer La Bella Donna Makeup which is a Triple Mill Weight to block makeup from leaking into the skin.  DEA/TEA/MEA (Ethanolamines): Used as emulsifiers and foaming agents for shampoos, hair color.  Sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS, SLES)  Diethylene glycol (or DEG)HOW WE EXCRETEHow endocrine disruptors affect our DNA ExpressionIt's all in the pathways: Liver enzyme P450 issues commonly are attributed to irregular estrogen production.  Best detox option: Red light therapy sauna, Health gut biome, Supplementation through the phased protocol with a professional, and vitamin C.  How to test if you are able to effectively biologically remove xenoestrogens.  The impact of Alpha and  Beta receptors and ho fake estrogen impacts the alpha receptors - causing increased breast cancer risks.  How  DIM can have adverse effects: it is dose-dependent and may increase estrogen. Resources:Find out more about Dr. J's Services at the following link:Dr. J's consulting company: https://www.ajconsultingcompany.com/Blog Post: http://beautyecology.com/blog/2019/8/how-to-detoxify-harmful-xenoestrogens-from-your-beauty-rituals-part-2Podcast: https://awakenbeautypodcast.simplecast.com/episodes/part-2-mini-draft Share the Love:If you like The Awakened Beauty Podcast…Subscribe, Rate & Review via iTunesVisit us at awakenedbeautyhq.com for updates.Businesses: www.evoqbeauty.com | www.beautyecology.comInstagram @awakenbeautyhqInstagram @evoqbeautyWatch on Youtube at my channel: Awaken Beauty PodcastShop natural health and beauty products with EVOQHere's how!Go to AwakenBeauty-hq on ITunes and write your biggest takeaway in the rate and review section. Just pretend it says “ah ha” here!! Don't just review the episode, I would love your ah-ha moment from this episode that is more specific so you can confirm your takeaway as you write, but also help others capture your brilliance. It'll take 3 minutes from your day. What you declare will be life to others. So remember, go to I tunes to rate and review.Comment or question you'd like to ask Kassandra.P.S!Your review is not only paramount in helping others discover the show, but we also read each and every submission personally…and they mean the world to us.Love and Light! - KassandraIn the Meantime, STAY IN THE CONVERSATION! @awakenbeautyhq | #awakenbeautyLeave a comment below - let us know what you think!

Child Life On Call: Parents of children with an illness or medical condition share their stories with a child life specialist

This episode is sponsored by SmileMakers. Use code ONCALL20 for 20% off your order of smile making stickers, toys, patient supplies, and more!   Meet Bonnie, her husband and her three adult children. Bonnie calls herself "the replacement kid" after her parents lost their son to Type 1 Diabetes. Because of their history, Bonnie was hyper aware of the signs and symptoms and ended up diagnosing her own son at 5 years old with a urine test strip on the bathroom floor of their own home. Have you heard? The Child Life On Call mobile app for parents, kids and their care team will be available in 2022. Sign up to stay informed here. Child Life On Call is a community of parents and professionals that share ideas, stories and resources to help YOU navigate your child's unique experiences. We give you strategies to support yourself and your family through life's challenges. We are so glad you are here. Child Life On Call | Instagram | Facebook | Twitter

Female Athlete Nutrition
38: Understanding Hormones for Female Performance with Dr. Nicky Keay

Female Athlete Nutrition

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 57:52


Today's episode is a conversation about the importance of hormones for performance and health with sports endocrinologist Dr. Nicky Keay. We chat about hormones affected in RED-S, low energy availability, and even peri-menopause; what to monitor and how they affect us; and exciting updates on the use of Artificial Intelligence in understanding and tracking our hormones. Dr Nicky's aim is to redefine optimal health and fitness for the individual. Her approach integrates all aspects of her professional clinical experience with her medical research expertise in Endocrinology. Dr Nicky offers a clinical advisory service for those seeking a more personalized, evidence-based approach to optimizing health. She conducts clinical endocrine research, frequently publishes in medical journals, presents at medical conferences and is currently writing a book about hormones. Dr Nicky Keay was awarded a BA in Medical Tripos and medical qualifications MB, BChir from Cambridge University. After passing post graduate medical examinations to become a Member of the Royal College of Physicians (MRCP), Nicky gained extensive clinical and research experience in Endocrinology. As a Research Fellow at St Thomas' Hospital, she was also part of the international medical team working to develop a test to detect athletes doping with growth hormone, supported by the International Olympic Committee. Nicky's other research studies investigated the effects of exercise and nutrition on the Endocrine system, body composition and bone mineral density, supported by medical research awards. These various research projects led to a number of publications and awards. With medical scholarships her international attachments have included North Sydney Sports Medicine Centre, Olympic Park Sports Medicine Centre Melbourne; Australian Institute of Sport; Faculty of Medicine, Discipline Human Physiology, University Newcastle Australia; and Department of Paediatrics, Division of Growth and Reproduction, University of Geneva. Dr Nicky is an Honorary Clinical Lecturer in Medicine at UCL and Fellow in the Department of Sport and Exercise Sciences at Durham University. She is a member of the British Menopause Society and British Association of Sports and Exercise Medicine. Dr Nicky is Chief Medical Officer at Forth. Learn more about Dr. Nicky Keay at www.nickykeayfitness.com (where her blogs are located talking more about Forth & AI as well!) Insta @nickyfitness Twitter @nickykfitness This episode is brought to you by the Female Athlete System of Transformation: Click here to Book a Call & learn more Learn more about Lindsey's services and the Team at Rise Up Nutrition: www.RiseUpNutritionRUN.com

Health Sucks Podcast
H.S. Health Discussion W/ Medical Assistant

Health Sucks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 48:20


Join us at Health Sucks, once again as we continue this conversation on the current Health Crisis in America! This time we get to discover the perception and knowledge of an internal medical assistant. Not only is this next guest my number one Medical Assistant to ask internal medical questions, but she's also been number one in my heart the last 5 years of my life. Help welcome my girlfriend, Alexandra Carpenter; she spent most of her life dedicated to helping people on the field as an athlete, and has now dedicated the rest of her life to helping people in the field as a medical assistant and perhaps a future healthcare professional. Gain some insight on what's currently going on in the world, form the perspective of two educated people on opposite ends of the medical spectrum (Palliative Vs. Allopathic). The following topics were discussed:What is Health Sucks again?Who is Alexandra?What's going on in the world? What is science?What should we follow?Research MethodsConfusing ResearchFunded ResearchHealth CrisisFollowing Articles were discussed or referenced in some form:         -SARS-CoV-2 infection induces long-lived bone marrow plasma cells in humans-1. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2021.01.016 Diabetes, obesity, metabolism, and SARS-CoV-2 infection: the end of the beginning2.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejim.2020.04.037 The pivotal link between ACE2 deficiency and SARS-CoV-2 infection 3. https://doi.org/10.2337/db20-0669 Expression of ACE2, the SARS-CoV-2 Receptor, in Lung Tissue of Patients With Type 2 Diabetes4. 10.1016/j.metabol.2020.154254 Letter to the Editor: Mechanisms of increased morbidity and mortality of SARS-CoV-2 infection in individuals with diabetes: what this means for an effective management strategy5. Considering the Effects of Microbiome and Diet on SARS-CoV-2 Infection: Nanotechnology Roles.6. Means, C. (2020). Letter to the Editor: Mechanisms of increased morbidity and mortality of SARS-CoV-2 infection in individuals with diabetes: what this means for an effective management strategy. Metabolism, 108, 154254. 7.Cano, E., Campioli, C. C., & O'Horo, J. C. (2021). Nasopharyngeal SARS-CoV-2 viral RNA shedding in patients with diabetes mellitus. Endocrine, 71(1), 26-27. 8.Hodgson, S. H., Mansatta, K., Mallett, G., Harris, V., Emary, K., & Pollard, A. J. (2021). What defines an efficacious COVID-19 vaccine? A review of the challenges assessing the clinical efficacy of vaccines against SARS-CoV-2. The Lancet. Infectious diseases, 21(2), e26–e35. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(20)30773-8

ASCO Guidelines Podcast Series
Endocrine Treatment and Targeted Therapy for Hormone Receptor-Positive, Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer Guideline Update

ASCO Guidelines Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 16:19


An interview with Dr. Harold Burstein from Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, MA, chair on “Endocrine Treatment and Targeted Therapy for Hormone Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer: ASCO Guideline Update.” This guideline updates recommendations on use of alpelisib, and the role of biomarkers and CDK4/6 inhibitors. Read the guideline at asco.org/breast-cancer-guidelines. Suggest a topic for guideline development at surveymonkey.com/r/ascoguidelinesurvey.   TRANSCRIPT [MUSIC PLAYING] SPEAKER: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. [MUSIC PLAYING] BRITTANY HARVEY: Hello and welcome to the ASCO Guidelines podcast series brought to you by the ASCO Podcast Network, a collection of nine programs covering a range of educational and scientific content and offering enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all the shows, including this one, at podcasts.asco.org. My name is Brittany Harvey. And today I'm interviewing Dr. Harold Burstein from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts, chair and lead author on endocrine treatment and targeted therapy for hormone receptor-positive HER2 negative metastatic breast cancer ASCO guideline update. Thank you for being here, Dr. Burstein. HAROLD BURSTEIN: Glad to be with you. BRITTANY HARVEY: First I'd like to note that ASCO takes great care in the development of its guidelines in ensuring that the ASCO conflict of interest policy is followed for each guideline. The full conflict of interest information for this guideline panel is available online with the publication of the guideline in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Dr. Burstein, do you have any relevant disclosures that are related to this guideline topic? HAROLD BURSTEIN: I do not. BRITTANY HARVEY: Great, thank you. Then let's delve into the content of this guideline. So first, what prompted the update of this guideline and what is the focus of this update? HAROLD BURSTEIN: So this guideline focuses on metastatic breast cancer, and in particular, estrogen receptor-positive HER2 negative metastatic breast cancer. Worldwide in 2021, actually breast cancer became the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the world, excepting superficial skin cancers. And so it is a true global health problem. And the most common type of breast cancer is estrogen receptor-positive HER2 negative breast cancer, which accounts for 70% to 75% of all cancer diagnoses in the breast cancer space, and as a consequence, also accounts for 70% to 75% of the cases of metastatic breast cancer. So it's really important from a public health point of view and a quality point of view, both in the United States and globally, to have current up-to-date guidance for the management of this most common form of breast cancer that we have. In addition, there have been several innovations in the way of targeted therapies that are coming into place for advanced ER-positive breast cancer. And increasingly, we are using genomic tests to help us understand how best to treat patients with advanced ER-positive breast cancer. So those two initiatives-- the interest in genomic testing and the use of targeted therapies-- all warranted and justified an update to the guidelines. BRITTANY HARVEY: Great. Thank you for reviewing that landscape of where we are in clinical practice for this guideline. So then I'd like to review the key recommendations that this guideline addresses. So first, should alpelisib be given to post-menopausal women and to male patients with hormone receptor-positive HER2 negative PIK3CA-mutated advanced or metastatic breast cancer? HAROLD BURSTEIN: So alpelisib, as you indicated, is a new drug. It is now FDA approved. And it is a protein kinase targeted inhibitor. And it goes after the PIK3CA-mutated tumors. And in a seminal study called the SOLAR-1 study, there was randomization to endocrine therapy alone with fulvestrant or endocrine therapy plus alpelisib for ER-positive HER2 negative breast cancer. And that study showed two important things. First was that in women whose tumors did not have a PIK3CA mutation, there was no benefit for alpelisib. However, in the women whose tumors did have a PIK3CA mutation, there was an improvement in progression-free survival with the use of this targeted drug alpelisib. So based on that, the guidelines now incorporate alpelisib into the treatment algorithm. And as a corollary, it means that all patients who have ER-positive metastatic breast cancer now need testing of the tumor to see if they have a PIK3CA mutation because that's going to guide therapy. In the guideline, we now suggest that this be a standard thing to do-- to test all tumors for PIK3CA mutation. And in those cases where there is a PIK3CA mutation to add alpelisib-based therapy with endocrine treatment typically in second or subsequent lines of therapy. BRITTANY HARVEY: Great. And thank you for reviewing the evidence base behind that recommendation. So next, what is recommended regarding the role of biomarkers in treatment selection for patients with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer? HAROLD BURSTEIN: So there are two different ways of thinking about biomarkers. One is traditional biomarkers, such as estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2. Those are familiar to all clinicians who have been dealing with breast cancer. The second is to think about some of the newer technologies, including tumor genomic sequencing and the kind of mutational analysis we just discussed with the PIK3CA mutations. So in the breast cancer space, there are some important innovations in that latter genomic or genetic testing. One, of course, is the PIK3CA mutation testing that we now recommend for all cancers. That can be done on the primary tumor, or it can be done on cell-free or circulating tumor DNA samples from the bloodstream in most cases. The other kind of testing we do relates to ESR1 mutations. And one of the reasons that tumors become resistant to aromatase inhibitors is that they acquire mutations in the estrogen receptor itself, so-called ESR1 activating mutations. Those mutations mean that the estrogen receptor is on even in the absence of estrogen. And that accounts for probably 50% to 60% of the resistance that we see in treatment with aromatase inhibitors. So the panel really struggled with this because, on the one hand, this is not a uniformly accepted way to decide how to treat patients. On the other hand, there are a lot of data that women whose tumors have ESR1 mutations get negligible benefit from ongoing use of aromatase inhibitor therapy. So this recommendation fell into sort of our practice suggestions, which is that if you have the information on ESR1, then it probably is the case that there's very little, if any, role for ongoing aromatase inhibitor treatment. This fell short of the highest level in endorsement because, first, it's not a uniformly tested assay. And secondly, it's important to remember that these tumors can still benefit from ongoing anti-estrogen therapy with different anti-estrogens like fulvestrant. And finally, and perhaps this is the most practical issue, the way you become ESR1 mutated is usually through exposure to aromatase inhibitors. And if you've already had a patient with extensive exposure to AIs, and they need ongoing anti-estrogen therapy in the metastatic setting, it usually means you're switching treatment anyway. So that's an example of where we're sort of on the frontier of thinking about dynamic changes in the tumor as a way to select treatment for ER-positive metastatic disease. BRITTANY HARVEY: Great. That's helpful for a clinical interpretation of the recommendations and incorporating these into practice. So the final question that was addressed in this focused update was, what is the role of CDK4/6 inhibitors in the treatment of patients with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer? HAROLD BURSTEIN: So CDK4/6 inhibitors are another tyrosine kinase inhibitor class of drugs that has really emerged as an important part of first-line therapy for ER-positive metastatic disease. There have been multiple randomized trials looking at either first-line therapy with an aromatase inhibitor with or without a CDKI4/6 inhibitor, or second-line treatment typically with fulvestrant with or without a CDKI4/6 inhibitor in the metastatic setting. And the panel was able to update the guidance here based on the maturation of multiple randomized trials, as well as extensive subset analyses that have been performed by investigators associated with the individual pharmaceutical-led studies and by the FDA itself. So here are some important takeaways. The first is that in long-term follow-up, these drugs as a class are improving overall survival for women with ER-positive HER2 negative metastatic breast cancer. And for that reason, they are a very important part of the standard armamentarium for ER-positive disease. It's important to say that they also delay the onset of need for chemotherapy, and in general, are associated with a very well preserved quality of life. So this is a big win for patients with ER-positive metastatic breast cancer. We typically recommend them in the first-line setting. So if a patient has de novo metastatic disease, then they should get an endocrine therapy such as an aromatase inhibitor with a CDK4/6 inhibitor. If they've previously had adjuvant aromatase inhibitor treatment or recur while on adjuvant endocrine therapy, we often move to fulvestrant plus a CDKI4/6 inhibitor. Both settings have shown substantial benefit for this class of drugs. It's important that clinicians understand the side effects of these drugs. Neutropenia and diarrhea are common side effects associated with the various drugs. And because of the prevalence of ER-positive metastatic disease, it's really important for clinicians and all those who care for advanced breast cancer patients to know how to manage those side effects carefully. The panel discussed controversial issues, I suppose you might say, in the management. What about patients who have truly minimal metastatic disease? There aren't a lot of data on how best to think about those patients. And we all can imagine on a case-by-case basis an individual who might not need a CDK4/6 inhibitor at a given moment in time. But what was impressive when we pulled all the data was that in subset analyses, it's really hard to find a group of patients that does not benefit from the incorporation of these drugs. So that included premenopausal women who also get concurrent ovarian suppression and then endocrine therapy plus the CDK4/6 inhibitor. It included women with bone-only metastatic disease. It included women whose tumors were ER-positive but PR negative, or had other variations in ER expression. It included patients who had less rather than more metastatic cancer, including visceral disease. So in the literature, one is hard-pressed to see a subset that does not benefit meaningfully from this class of drugs. So we really wanted to reiterate in the algorithms just how important these are. They should be the standard first-line treatment for metastatic disease either paired with an AI or with fulvestrant. And so one of the other nice things that the update gave us was the opportunity to put in some fresh sort of algorithm flow sheets. I would very much encourage people to look at that. They make fantastic PowerPoint or downloadable Twitter documents if you are so inclined. But it's very clear the way the treatment should flow, which is the initial therapy is endocrine treatment plus a CDK4/6 inhibitor. While the patients are getting that, we typically test for PIK3CA mutations. In second line, if it's a PIK3CA mutated, you have the option of using alpelisib. You also might consider an older drug for PIK3CA wild type tumors called everolimus. We reiterated that recommendation in the guideline. Finally, one more thing to touch on that is emerging in the guidelines we generated and in the parallel guideline process for the ASCO guidance on chemotherapy-resistant or refractory breast cancer is the importance of genetic testing all patients who have metastatic breast cancer to look for the possibility of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 deleterious mutation, because there now is FDA approval for PARP inhibitors in the setting of metastatic disease. And one of the interesting things is that as we test more and more, we're seeing that not all the patients who are found to have a BRCA1 or 2 mutation meet the classic criteria for genetic testing-- strong family history, or say, triple-negative breast cancer. So it's really important to test, because that class of drugs, the PARP inhibitors, can be immensely helpful in women with ER-positive metastatic disease when they harbor a BRCA1 or 2 mutation. One of the things the guideline panel wrestled with and ended up putting into the sort of clinical discussion, as opposed to the strong guidance, was the 1% of patients who have PALB2 mutations. So PALB2 mutation, another hereditary predisposing factor for breast cancer. Most tumors that arise in PALB2 mutation carriers are in fact estrogen receptor positive. And a very small study, now published in the JCO, has suggested that those patients have a very high likelihood of response to PARP inhibitors. Because there were only like 15 patients in that cohort, we didn't feel that this warranted clear endorsement in the guidelines. But at the same time, everyone on the panel acknowledges that this is an active drug in that rare subset of tumors with PALB2 mutations in addition to the BRCA1 or 2 mutations. So the takeaway here is that genetic testing should be standard for all patients with advanced metastatic breast cancer to see if the patient is a candidate for a PARP inhibitor-based therapy. BRITTANY HARVEY: Definitely. Well, thank you for reviewing all of those updated recommendations and highlighting some of the ones that were still relevant to this guideline. HAROLD BURSTEIN: Work in progress. BRITTANY HARVEY: Yeah, definitely. And then finally, what is the importance of this guideline update? And how will it impact both clinical practice and what does it mean for patients? HAROLD BURSTEIN: Well, I think guidelines like this have multiple purposes. The first is to sort of describe the state of the art. And while breast cancer is a very common disease, and most clinicians who take care of a lot of cancer patients will see a lot of advanced breast cancer, I think it's still helpful to articulate the rationale for these treatment recommendations. And one of the great things about the ASCO guideline process is the thoroughness of the literature review, the thoroughness of the search to make sure we're including all important publications, and the thoughtfulness that the panel, which includes experts, patient advocates, quality of life expertise, all those things bring to bear on really thinking through what makes sense and what does not for our patients based on the best science available. So I think it is an important activity to really sort of benchmark where we're at. The second thing we've tried to do in the guideline is to introduce areas of nuanced discussion, because not every patient is the same. And I think for those who are interested and take the time to read the guideline, there really is a very nice discussion about how our panel thought about when best to use this approach and when to use a different approach. Third, there's extensive discussion of the side effects and the appropriate management of the side effects. These are drugs that do carry risks. And while by oncology standards, many of them are, quote, "well tolerated," unquote, there's no doubt that there are side effects to these drugs. And it's important for clinical teams to know how to manage them. Finally, I think by putting forward all the evidence, you make clear to investigators, to drug companies, to patients and advocates, and others who are involved in the review of new drugs what the benchmarks are and what the criteria should be for designing clinical trials and for approving new drugs. And I think we've done a nice job of framing that discussion quite handsomely in this guideline and to all of the ASCO guidelines. BRITTANY HARVEY: Great. Well, thank you so much for your work on this guideline update and for taking the time to speak with me today, Dr. Burstein. HAROLD BURSTEIN: Happy to join you and thanks very much. BRITTANY HARVEY: And thank you to all of our listeners for tuning in to the ASCO Guidelines podcast series. To read the full guideline, go to www.asco.org/breast cancer guidelines. Additionally, our annual survey for guideline topics is open for submissions. Suggest a topic for guideline development at SurveyMonkey.com /r/ascoguidelinesurvey. The link is also available in the episode notes of this podcast. If you've enjoyed what you've heard today, please rate and review the podcast and be sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode. [MUSIC PLAYING]

ASCO Guidelines Podcast Series
Chemotherapy and Targeted Therapy for Patients with Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer That is Either Endocrine-Pretreated or Hormone Receptor-Negative Guideline Update

ASCO Guidelines Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 11:21


An interview with Dr. Beverly Moy from Massachusetts General Hospital, co-chair on “Chemotherapy and Targeted Therapy for Patients With HER2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer That is Either Endocrine-Pretreated or Hormone Receptor-Negative: ASCO Guideline Update.” Updated guidance addresses optimal sequence of therapy & indications for treatment regimens. Read the guideline at asco.org/breast-cancer-guidelines. Suggest a topic for guideline development at surveymonkey.com/r/ascoguidelinesurvey.   TRANSCRIPT [MUSIC PLAYING] SPEAKER: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. [MUSIC PLAYING] BRITTANY HARVEY: Hello and welcome to the ASCO Guidelines podcast series brought to you by the ASCO Podcast Network, a collection of nine programs covering a range of educational and scientific content and offering enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all the shows, including this one, at podcast.asco.org. My name is Brittany Harvey. And today I'm interviewing Dr. Beverly Moy from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, co-chair and lead author on chemotherapy and targeted therapy for patients with HER2 negative metastatic breast cancer that is either endocrine pre-treated or hormone receptor negative ASCO guideline update. Thank you for being here, Dr. Moy. BEVERLY MOY: Thanks for having me, Brittany. BRITTANY HARVEY: First, I'd like to note that ASCO takes great care in the development of its guidelines and ensuring that the ASCO conflict of interest policy is followed for each guideline. The full conflict of interest information for this guideline panel is available online with the publication of the guideline in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Dr. Moy, do you have any relevant disclosures that are directly related to this guideline topic? BEVERLY MOY: I do not have any relevant disclosures related to this guideline topic. BRITTANY HARVEY: Great. Thanks so much. Then let's get into what this update covers. So first, what prompted the update of this ASCO guideline and what does the scope of this guideline update? BEVERLY MOY: So this guideline update was developed to address both chemotherapy and targeted therapy for women with advanced HER2 negative breast cancer that is either endocrine pre-treated or hormone receptor negative. So it really focuses on chemo and targeted therapy. The original ASCO clinical treatment guideline was published in 2014 and really focused on chemotherapy, since that was generally the standard of care at that time. Since 2014, however, there have been several important new therapies that have become available based on robust evidence from numerous clinical trials. These include, but are not limited to, BOLERO-6 and PEARL trials for hormone receptor positive HER2 negative metastatic breast cancer, the ASCENT and EMBRACE trials for triple negative metastatic breast cancer, and the EMBRACA trial for metastatic breast cancer associated with germline BRCA1 or 2 mutations. So it really was important to update the guideline in a fairly urgent matter. BRITTANY HARVEY: Great. Well, then this guideline addresses four overarching clinical questions. For each of these, I'd like to review the key recommendations for our listeners. So starting with question one, is there an optimal sequence of chemotherapy and/or targeted therapy for patients with triple negative metastatic breast cancer either with or without BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutations? BEVERLY MOY: So clinical question one really focused on patients with metastatic triple negative breast cancer. So for patients with metastatic triple negative disease, the first key question is, what is the Programmed cell Death Ligand 1, or what we call PD-L1 status? If the disease is PD-L1 positive, then patients may be offered first line therapy with an immune checkpoint inhibitor plus chemotherapy. And that's a very important development. If the disease, however, is PD-L1 negative, patients should be offered single agent chemotherapy rather than combination chemotherapy, unless they have symptomatic or immediately life-threatening disease, and you really need to get a response more quickly. In those cases, combination chemotherapy can be used. After the first line, if patients with metastatic triple negative breast cancer have received at least two prior therapies, then they should be offered treatment with the new antibody drug conjugate called sacituzumab govitecan, which is a very exciting development in the treatment of metastatic triple negative breast cancer. If the patient has a germline BRCA1 or 2 mutation and has metastatic triple negative disease and have been previously treated with chemotherapy, then they may be offered treatment with an oral PARP inhibitor rather than chemotherapy, also a very exciting development that this guideline update addresses. BRITTANY HARVEY: Great. Thank you for reviewing those recommendations for triple negative metastatic breast cancer. So then next for clinical question two, what are the indications for chemotherapy versus endocrine therapy in endocrine pre-treated estrogen receptor positive metastatic breast cancer? BEVERLY MOY: So clinical question two focuses on women or patients with metastatic hormone receptor positive breast cancer who have developed progressive disease on a prior endocrine therapy with or without targeted therapy. So really is focusing on patients with metastatic hormone receptor positive breast cancer that have become fairly resistant to endocrine therapy alone. These patients may be offered treatment with either endocrine therapy with or without a targeted therapy or single agent chemotherapy. Brittany, I think it's important for listeners to realize that there is another important clinical practice guideline update that's being released simultaneously with this guideline. And that one is called endocrine therapy and targeted therapy for hormone receptor positive metastatic breast cancer. This other guideline update will describe in detail recommendations for the various targeted therapies that can be used with endocrine therapy, such as CDK4/6 inhibitors, PI 3-kinase inhibitors, and others. So I encourage everyone to read this guideline as well. Importantly, both guidelines state that treatment choice should be based on individualized patient and provider assessment of preferences, risks, and benefits. BRITTANY HARVEY: Great. And thank you for pointing out that companion guideline. Listeners can also listen to a podcast episode with Dr. Burstein on that particular guideline, which will be available in our podcast feed. So then next, what are the key recommendations for the third question in the guideline, which is, is there an optimal sequence of non-endocrine agents for patients with hormone receptor positive but HER2 negative metastatic breast cancer who are no longer benefiting from endocrine therapy, either with or without BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutations? BEVERLY MOY: So this third question really focuses on patients with hormone receptor positive HER2 negative disease and the optimal sequence. Essentially what we recommend is that germline BRCA1 or 2 patients with metastatic hormone receptor positive HER2 negative breast cancer who are no longer benefiting from endocrine therapy, those patients may be offered an oral PARP inhibitor in the first through third line setting rather than chemotherapy. And that is evidence that is evolving and important, and that's what the guideline recommends at this time. BRITTANY HARVEY: Great. And then clinical question four was the last question addressed in this guideline update. And what did the panel say regarding at what point should a patient be transitioned to hospice or best supportive care only? BEVERLY MOY: So this obviously is an incredibly important question for clinicians and oncologists to consider. The current literature and evidence does not allow us, at this time, to make a firm recommendation regarding at which point a patient's care should be transitioned to hospice or best supportive care only. When to transition is a decision that really needs to be shared between the patient and clinician in the context of an ongoing conversation regarding goals of care. The conversation of that integration of supportive care and eventual consideration of hospice care really should start early in the management of metastatic breast cancer. And these conversations have to occur throughout. I would also refer listeners to other important clinical treatment guidelines on the ASCO website about incorporation of palliative and supportive care for patients with metastatic cancer. I think those are incredibly valuable guidelines. BRITTANY HARVEY: And then you've touched on this a bit as you've talked about the recommendations, but in your view, what is the importance of this guideline update? And how will these updated recommendations impact both clinicians and patients? BEVERLY MOY: I think that this is an extremely important guideline update. It provides really important clinical guidance about the new use of immune checkpoint inhibitors, which really is the first time immune checkpoint inhibitors are clearly recommended for the treatment of breast cancer. It also provides important clinical guidance about this new antibody drug conjugate, sacituzumab govitecan, and PARP inhibitors for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. These are all important and effective new treatments for breast cancer. And every clinician should be aware of their optimal uses. I will point out that many unanswered questions remain. And that was really an exciting part of doing this guideline update to look at these unanswered questions, such as what we described earlier, the optimal time to transition to best supportive care only and the widespread use of molecular tumor profiling. As treatments get more complicated and the entire oncology community are increasingly tasked to absorb new data, ASCO guidelines are enormously helpful in giving people an easy to access tool that takes into account the latest data. BRITTANY HARVEY: Great. Thank you so much for your work on this guideline update and for taking the time to speak with me today, Dr. Moy. BEVERLY MOY: Thank you. BRITTANY HARVEY: And thank you to all of our listeners for tuning in to the ASCO Guidelines podcast series. To read the full guideline, go to www.asco.org/breast cancer guidelines. Additionally, our annual survey for guideline topics is open for submissions. Suggest a topic for guideline development at surveymonkey.com /r/ascoguidelinesurvey. The link is also available in the episode notes of this podcast. If you've enjoyed what you've heard today, please rate and review the podcast and be sure to subscribe so you never miss episode. [MUSIC PLAYING]

Dr. Berg’s Healthy Keto and Intermittent Fasting Podcast
What is Gynecomastia (Man Boobs)? - Dr. Berg on Liver

Dr. Berg’s Healthy Keto and Intermittent Fasting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 4:42


In this podcast, Dr. Berg talks about the condition called Gynecomastia(man boobs) and the liver. Liver is involve in many body conditions and gynecomastia is an excessive estrogen and also a liver problem. Endocrine disruptors or estrogen disruptors is something in the environment that mimics estrogen. A series of enzymes called Phase I and Phase II detoxifies poison that turns them into water-soluble harmless particles that is also supposed to clear the excess estrogen. • Take Dr. Berg's Free Keto Mini-Course! • How to Bulletproof your Immune System Course • Dr. Berg's Beginner Guide to Healthy Keto & Intermittent Fasting Plan • Intermittent Fasting Basics for Beginners • Dr. Berg's Healthy Ketogenic Diet Basics: Step 1: https://youtu.be/vMZfyEy_jpI Step 2: https://youtu.be/mBqpaAKtnXE Dr. Eric Berg DC Bio: Dr. Berg, 51 years of age is a chiropractor who specializes in weight loss through nutritional & natural methods. His private practice is located in Alexandria, Virginia. His clients include senior officials in the U.S. government & the Justice Department, ambassadors, medical doctors, high-level executives of prominent corporations, scientists, engineers, professors, and other clients from all walks of life. He is the author of The 7 Principles of Fat Burning. Dr. Berg's Website: http://bit.ly/37AV0fk Dr. Berg's Recipe Ideas: http://bit.ly/37FF6QR Dr. Berg's Reviews: http://bit.ly/3hkIvbb Dr. Berg's Shop: http://bit.ly/3mJcLxg Dr. Berg's Bio: http://bit.ly/3as2cfE Dr. Berg's Health Coach Training: http://bit.ly/3as2p2q Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drericberg Messenger: https://www.messenger.com/t/drericberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drericberg/ YouTube: http://bit.ly/37DXt8C

The Entrepreneurial You
Miracle Mineral: Magnesium As A Response To Burn Out

The Entrepreneurial You

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 42:30


As we continue our health and wellness journey, I must tell you I am super excited to share today's episode because we are going to be looking at what has become my favourite food supplement and that is Magnesium. Ian Clark founded Activation Products out of a personal health crisis like me who created the Slow Down & Live Health Summit as a result of health challenges that I faced in 2020.  Stay tuned as Ian shares with us on the topic of 'Miracle Mineral: Magnesium As A Response To Burn Out.'  Here are three reasons why you should listen to the full episode:  Learn how Magnesium functions in the body. Learn about the different forms of Magnesium and how we can take it.  Hear about Ian Clark's personal experience with his energy's and what his own imbalance taught him about life and how to get the best out of it.  Episode Highlights   Your Body Demands Magnesium   Low Magnesium levels can affect brain power, our Immune system, Endocrine system,  Metabolism, Nervous system, Digestive system, Respiratory System, Cardiovascular system, and many other aspects of your bodily function.   Magnesium among other necessary minerals is found in some of the food we eat. However, over the years this has depleted as a result of practices such as mono farming and agricultural businesses that focus on mass-producing rather than quality production.    Magnesium Can Affect the Body's Nervous System  The body's control system is the Autonomic nervous system. This system has two arms which are the Sympathetic nervous system and the parasympathetic nervous system. Both of these systems must operate synchronized to avoid sympathetic stress lock. This kind of lock-in can result in the inability to digest and heal properly. However, with the correct levels of Magnesium, this can be avoided or corrected.  Magnesium affects your entire human operating network. Therefore, lack of this mineral can affect things such as your brain function and result in brain fog and anxiety as well as it may affect your instinct and your passions. Magnesium a Day Keeps the Doctor Away   A lack of Magnesium has a creeping effect on one's body and it can trigger a series of illnesses that can turn into long term underlying issues. The body operates with three energies; Chi, Jing, and Shen. Our Chi Energy has to do with the energy we put into our body via food.   People are often advised to eat as organic as possible and maintain a healthy diet to avoid the burnout that comes as a result of bad Chi.  Jing Energy is recognized as the body's natural battery. The energy we are born with contributes to length and quality of life.  Jing energy is very sensitive and is sometimes abused because people fail to find the balance between the Chi and the Jing. A lack of rest and poor eating habits force our bodies to tap into more of our Jing than we should have, which results in us taking years off our life without even realizing it.  Our Shen Energy is our character and how we treat others. Our Chi and Jing affect our Shen so it is important to find a balance and live better. All three of these energies can be affected by having the right amount of Magnesium or the lack thereof, Therefore it is important to have Magnesium in some way shape or form to increase your quality of life.  It won't be an overnight process but we are reminded that micro-adjustments can yield macro results.   3 Powerful Quotes from This Episode “Little things that we miss are extremely important because they have a gradual impact on our life on a cumulative basis.” “There are so many wonderful things that happen in your body  when you bring your magnesium levels up.” “This is the cheapest  insurance policy you can give yourself which is to make sure you are investing in yourself everyday with the proper form of Magnesium. ”   About Ian Clark   Ian Clark is the founder of  Activation Products.

The NPTE Podcast
064--Metabolic and Endocrine Blood Glucose Levels

The NPTE Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 8:57


A patient with type II diabetes mellitus is attending physical therapy to address generalized deconditioning.  When assessing the patient, which of the following casual blood glucose levels would be MOST appropriate to initiate exercise intervention? Find it all out in this podcast!  Be prepared for the NPTE so that you can pass with flying colors! Check out www.ptfinalexam.com/podcast for more information and to stay up-to-date with our latest courses and projects.

Cram The Pance
S1E30 50 High Yield Endocrine Questions

Cram The Pance

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 35:38


50 high yield Endocrine questions to help you prepare for your Pance, Panre and Eor's. ►Paypal Donation Link: https://bit.ly/3dxmTql Affiliate links to support the podcast (Thank you!): 1) Amazon Prime Student Membership- 6 month free trial https://amzn.to/3yMmH0i 2) Audible Plus- Free Trial and 2 free Audiobooks https://amzn.to/2SG3mNP 3) Pance Prep Pearls V3 https://amzn.to/3uxMUfC 4) Paramount + Sign Up https://amzn.to/2R2EaAu --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/scott--shapiro/support

Ketogeek's Podcast
68. Endocrine Response to Carbohydrates, Fats & Proteins (Part II)

Ketogeek's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 67:12


We continue our extremely science-heavy podcast by looking at how various macronutrients impact energy intake using a 2016 review paper. This show focuses on the endocrine response. BIO: Fahad Ahmad is a serial entrepreneur who enjoys delving into the science of food and nutrition. He practices Ashtanga Yoga, Weight Training, Crossfit, Calisthenics, and Plyometric type of training and has been part of the fitness and nutrition world for more than 15 years. He leads the "Modern Renaissance" lifestyle of tapping into multiple knowledge bases to solve a problem. TIMESTAMPS 0:15 - Ketogeek updates, Energy Pods re-launch, product information, and updates 5:57 - Delving into the endocrine response to macronutrients 8:22 - What are hormones and the end endocrine system? 10:12 - What are cholecystokinin and its role? 14:40 - GLP-1 and sweet taste receptors 15:40 - The role of cephalic phase insulin response and how substantial is it? 18:02 - What is the "incretin effect"? 19:40 - Sweet receptors and CCK 20:32 - Is there a connection between ghrelin and carbohydrate consumption? 25:08 - Are low-calorie sweeteners active in the GI tract?
 26:28 - What's the role of high fructose corn syrup and how does it impact the GI system? 28:29 - What's the role of fermentable carbohydrates and their impact on the microbiome? 33:37 - Endocrine response to Protein 37:15 - Does feeling full ensure you will lose weight? 39:46 - Does protein quality and type impact endocrine response? 44:16 - What happens when you inject satiety peptides directly into the body? 47:24 - Endocrine responses to fat 49:30 - Does fatty acid chain length impact food intake? 51:40 - Short-chain fatty acid, fermentation, and its endocrine response and energy intake 52:30 - Does saturation of fatty acid impact energy intake? 56:25 - Our takeaway & final plugs LINKS: Reference Paper: The macronutrients, appetite and energy intake (nih.gov) (2016) Ketogeek Ghee on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07B29HM3D Ketogeek Merchandise, Ghee & Energy Pods: https://ketogeek.com/collections Shop Energy Pods: https://ketogeek.com/collections/energy-pods Wholesale: https://ketogeek.com/pages/wholesale

DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast
64: A Harvard Surgeon Makes the Case for Hobbies and Interest Outside of Work with Dr. Roy Phitayakorn

DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021 22:50


“It's almost this idea or analogy of having a garden, and maybe when you were in college that garden was pretty robust or maybe it looked like a greenhouse or what have you. I think of this analogy, now that I think about it, because I actually used to run a greenhouse when I was in college. The flip side, though, is that once they become a resident, maybe it's more like an air plant or a cactus. You know, it's just one single thing that they can focus on, they can take care of, they can nurture. And maybe when they become an attending, it can grow again to a whole garden.” -Dr. Roy Phitayakorn MD In today's episode, Jill talks with Endocrine and General Surgeon and Associate Professor of Surgery, Dr. Roy Phitayakorn. But this conversation isn't about his medical career. It's about Dr. Phitayakorn's interesting hobby. He buys interesting objects and fixes them up to their former glory. Sometimes these are just things that he likes or sometimes they remind him of his childhood or sometimes he is fulfilling a bigger purpose of being a caretaker and preserving an item for its future owner. No matter what, it also fulfills a big purpose in his life. Tune in to hear how Dr. Phitayakorn's hobby impacts his life.  Dr. Roy Phitayakorn completed his residency training in general surgery at Case Western Reserve University in 2009 and completed an endocrine surgery fellowship at the Massachusetts General Hospital in 2011.  Dr. Phitayakorn is an Associate Professor of Surgery at Harvard Medical School with a practice in general surgery and endocrine surgery at the main campus of the Massachusetts General Hospital.  Dr. Phitayakorn is also the MGH Department of Surgery Director of Medical Student Education and Surgical Education Research and the Co-Director of the American College of Surgeons-accredited MGH Surgery Education Research and Simulation Fellowship program.     Dr. Phitayakorn has a Master's degree in Medical Education from the University of Illinois at Chicago (MHPE).  His MHPE thesis won the best thesis award in 2007 and best presentation at the 2008 MHPE medical education conference.  Dr. Phitayakorn was the first Surgical Simulation Fellow at the MGH Learning Laboratory and completed a certificate in simulation-based teaching from the MGH Institutes of Health Professions in 2011.     Dr. Phitayakorn is an external examination consultant for the American Board of Surgery and develops medical education content for the American College of Surgeons.  Dr. Phitayakorn is also a faculty member for several national medical education courses and institutions including the Harvard Macy Institute, the American College of Surgeons (ACS) Surgeons as Educators course, the Institute of Medical Simulation, the ACS Surgical Education Principles and Practice course, the ACS Certificate in Applied Surgical Education Leadership, and the Harvard Medical School Training to Teachers Egypt, Mongolia, and China programs.   Click Here Prepare For Your Board Exams & Get Your CME Quickly & Easily With Board Vitals! Save 10% on Question Banks with the promo code: DOCWORKING10   Find the full transcript of this episode on the DocWorking Blog   Our New DocWorking THRIVE Membership is coming at the end of July!! You'll get ongoing Small Group Coaching with our Experienced Team, Ongoing Coaching Support in a Private Community that Fosters Peer Support and Mentorship, and superb virtual courses to include ‘STAT: Quick Wins to Get Your Life Back' with Gabriella Dennery MD and Master Certified Coach Jill Farmer, and ‘A New Era of Leadership,' with Lisa Kuzman, and so much more!    Join our community by clicking here.   At DocWorking, our specialty is Coaching Physicians. We bring an exceptional experienced team to Coach Physicians to achieve the Best in Life and Medicine.    Doctors devote their lives to caring for others. But does that mean they must sacrifice their own health and wellbeing? Absolutely not!   At DocWorking, we have developed a unique way to embrace it all.   The caring for others that you do so selflessly AND the caring for YOURSELF AND YOUR FAMILY that you crave in order to bring it all into the perfect balance specific to YOU.   What if we told you that you CAN have it all? The career you dreamed of when you decided to become a doctor AND the life outside of medicine that you desire?   DocWorking empowers physicians to get back on the path to achieving their dreams.   At DocWorking, we understand the tug between life and medicine–a desire to make an impact through your specialized skills but a longing for more time to prioritize your own dreams and ambitions.   We understand because we are a team of physicians and experienced coaches who have been successfully coaching physicians for more than 10 years.   Professional coaching is transformational. Elite athletes, award-winning actors and top-performing executives all know this, which is why they embrace coaching to achieve such extraordinary success.  Smart leaders leverage the power of coaching to achieve outcomes that are meaningful, measurable, and attainable. Physicians definitely benefit from coaching, and we are here to provide the best of the best.   It's Time to Prioritize the Health and Wellness of Physicians! DocWorking is here for you.    Our Coaches Will Show You How!   To learn more about DocWorking, visit us here! Are you a physician who would like to tell your story? Please email Amanda, our producer, at Amanda@docworking.com to be considered. And if you like our podcast and would like to subscribe and leave us a 5 star review, we would be extremely grateful! We're everywhere you like to get your podcasts! Apple iTunes, Spotify, iHeart Radio, Google, Pandora, PlayerFM, ListenNotes, Amazon, YouTube, Podbean You can also find us on Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.    Some links in our blogs and show notes are affiliate links, and purchases made via those links may result in small payments to DW. These help toward our production costs. Thank you for supporting DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast! Occasionally, we discuss financial and legal topics. We are not financial or legal professionals. Please consult a licensed professional for financial or legal advice regarding your specific situation.   Podcast produced by: Amanda Taran

Real Soulutions Podcast
Dr. Jessica Peatross, MD, on Mold, Parasites, Toxicity and More

Real Soulutions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 42:27


Today we have Dr. Jessica Peatross to talk about parasites, molds, hormone issues, the root cause of disease and illness   In this episode of Real SOULutions: 03:30 - What is Jessica's story? 06:30 - Nutrition in medical training 10:30 - Signs and symptoms if you have issues 13:00 - How do people get issues with molds and parasites? 18:00 - Telling the truth and not shaming anyone 21:00 - What if you suspect that you are carrying molds or parasites? What should you test for? 26:00 - What is normal and what is not? 28:00 - What usually are the causes of hormone related issues? 30:00 - Endocrine disruptors and toxins that you should avoid, is it fear-mongering? 32:00 - Top products that can help support your overall health 34:00 - The C*V V   You can find Dr. Jessica Peatross on: https://www.instagram.com/dr.jess.md/ https://drjessmd.com/

The Story of a Brand
Vous Vitamin - Changing the Game with Personalized Vitamins

The Story of a Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2021 33:38


**This episode is brought to you by MuteSix, Repeat, and CarText** In the first half of this Feature, we have Dr. Arielle Levitan and Dr. Romy Block, Co-Founders of Vous Vitamin. This brand creates personalized daily multivitamins for your individual needs. Arielle specializes in internal medicine, while Romy's specialty is Endocrine and Metabolism. It all started when they noticed how confusing the world of multivitamins was to consumers. So Arielle and Romy stepped in and came up with a 7-minute online survey on a diet, lifestyle, and health concern that, when completed, provided consumers with personalized vitamins delivered directly to their door. In the first half, we talked about: * Gratefulness towards everyone who supported them * Overview of the brand * Coming up with the idea * Bringing Health & Wellness together with needed solutions * The personalized trend in Health & Wellness * How pandemic accelerated their growth Join Ramon Vela and Dr. Arielle Levitan, and Dr. Romy Block as they break down the inside story on The Story of a Brand. For more on Vous Vitamins, visit: https://www.vousvitamin.com/ * OUR SHOW IS MADE POSSIBLE WITH THE SUPPORT OF MUTESIX. MuteSix is the leading agency in performance marketing. They have been in this space for nearly eight years, growing and scaling the world's most recognizable e-commerce brands with breakthrough creative, targeted media buying, and data-driven results in every step of the funnel. They're currently offering listeners a FREE omnichannel marketing audit. Their team of auditors will perform a deep dive analysis into your current marketing efforts and identify which strategies might be budget wasters and which strategies will improve performance. The audit covers all digital marketing channels, including Facebook, Google, Email, Amazon, Snapchat, TikTok, Pinterest, Influencer, Programmatic, and Website CRO. For your free digital marketing consultation, visit: mutesix.com/storyofabrand * This episode is also brought to you by CartText. Are you interested in improving your Abandoned Cart Recovery rates? Cart Text is Powered by real people, not bots, not AI, real people. Cart Text will contact & engage with your customers in real-time to make the sales you missed. One by one, CartText will convert your abandoned carts, churned subscriptions, and billing-related issues using live agents + SMS. Real people, getting the job done. To learn more, visit https://carttext.com/ * This episode was brought to you by Repeat. Repeat is the easiest way for your customers to reorder products they love. Repeat will automate a frictionless reordering experience for the most significant part of a CPG brand's customer base: The non-subscriber. Repeat uses machine learning to analyze one-time shopper behavior, automates reorder notifications, and delivers personalized replenishment carts that aid in up-sell and cross-sell efforts. The result? Higher LTV, better margins, and more insights on your best customers. To learn more, visit https://signup.getrepeat.io/

The Not So Simple Life
54.) Dr. Carrie Jones: Simplifying the basics of hormone health & holistic ways to maintain balanced hormones.

The Not So Simple Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2021 48:34


In this episode, Kylie & Sophie are joined by the hormone expert herself, Dr. Carrie Jones. She is a functional medicine women's health and hormone doctor who believes in the importance of both men and women understanding their hormones in a simplified manner so they can feel more empowered to take control of their own health especially when they are told everything is "normal" but they don't feel "normal." She helps hormonally challenged people feel less crazy. Dr. Carrie does this primarily through real talk education, sarcasm, funny analogies and the occasional swear word. Some topics that will be covered in this information-packed episode with Dr. Carrie Jones include: A deep dive into Functional vs conventional medicine, the role of hormones in achieving great health, three main hormones & how each affects our body, the basics of an estrogen detox, how to identify harmful chemicals in our skincare, the impact of alcohol on our estrogen levels, best foods/vitamins for a healthy gut & balancing our hormones, multivitamins vs hand-picked supplements for detoxification, the benefits of magnesium and B12 for our hormones, the two main types of stress hormones and how they affect our daily lives, what it means to lose or have irregular periods, cheap & easy stress relieving activities, how to treat hair loss & hair thinning, common Endocrine disrupters in our environment, effective ways to get rid of toxins in our bodies, the benefits of colonics & infrared saunas for detoxification, PMS/cravings and what they mean for our hormones & SO MUCH MORE! You can find more on Dr. Carrie Jones by visiting her Instagram page and on her website. -CLICK HERE to shop Oura ring -CLICK HERE to shop for The Skinny Confidential Ice Roller -CLICK HERE to shop Dr. Carrie's favorite Castor oil If you liked this episode, please don't forget to SUBSCRIBE on Apple podcasts. We would love it if you could leave us a rating/review to tell us what's on about any thoughts you may have. Take a journey on over to our podcast Instagram page @TheNotSoSimpleLifePodcast. Feel free to email info@TNSSlife.com if you want to get in touch with @KylieVonnahme & @SophieLongford! FIND MORE & SHOP OUR FAVORITES ON OUR WEBSITE AT www.TNSSlife.com. NEW EPISODES EVERY TUESDAY...See ya'll then!

This Pathological Life Podcast
S2E40: Ep 40 Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia (M.E.N.) Pathology | Genetic Puzzles

This Pathological Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 46:05


Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia is a difficult diagnosis for patients, families, and clinicians. The vast array of symptoms, affected organs, and complex genetics often mean that it can take years (if not longer) for it to be diagnosed. In addition, the impact for the patient is significant as it is a familial disease that is autosomal dominant with very high penetrance. These syndromes were only identified around the 1960s. However, clinical suspicions were unable to be confirmed as the molecular/genetic techniques only in its infancy. It is a rare condition but one that is critical to recognise early to ensure we provide the best care and management for patients and their families. Special Guest Mark A. Lewis, MD, is director of gastrointestinal oncology at Intermountain Healthcare in Utah. Specializing in cancers of the gastrointestinal tract and accessory organs, his interests focus on hereditary cancer syndromes and young-onset cancers, shared decision-making, and patient-physician communication. The death of his father not only took a huge emotional toll on Lewis, but also piqued his intellectual curiosity. Lewis' paternal uncle and grandfather both died of rare cancer types and then Lewis was diagnosed with a suspicious symptom himself – hypercalcemia, or high levels of calcium – something his father had also experienced. As Lewis completed his medical training and established his current position as a haematologist/oncologist at Intermountain Healthcare in Utah, his PNETs were serially monitored. After the dominant PNET changed, crossing a threshold of concern, he had surgery and has documented the experience. Lewis had another special person in mind though and says, “I wanted my son, who has inherited MEN1 from me and may one day require pancreatic surgery himself, to have a record of my own operation.” Quote: “Pancreatic cancer need not be viewed as a death sentence.” REFERENCE pancan.org/news/quest-understand-fathers-illness-young-doctor-discovers/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Fit Rx
Peptides with Dr. Kent Holtorf, M.D.(Part 2)

Fit Rx

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2021 30:20


We are continuing our discussion about peptides with Dr. Kent Holtorf, M.D.  Today we discuss PT-141 or the "Sex" Peptide, Thymosin Beta-4, KPV and more.  Dr. Kent Holtorf, M.D. is the medical director of the Holtorf Medical Group and founder and medical director of the non-profit National Academy of Hypothyroidism (NAH). He is also the founder of Integrative Peptides, dedicated to training physicians about ground-breaking peptide therapies and bringing doctors and patients the highest quality natural bioidentical peptides as supplements with unique delivery systems.Dr. Holtorf is an internationally known lecturer, author, and innovator in cutting-edge research and treatments. He was the Endocrinology Expert for AOL Health; he has published multiple peer-reviewed endocrine review articles and is a guest editor and peer-reviewer for multiple medical journals, including Endocrine, which demonstrated that much of the long-held dogma in endocrinology and infectious disease is inaccurate.He has been a featured guest on numerous major news outlets and print media, including CNBC, ABC News, CNN, Fox News, Good Morning America, The Today Show, Discovery Health, The Learning Channel, the Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, US News and World Report, San Francisco Chronicle, WebMD, Forbes, among many others.

HNL Movement Podcast
Practice The Skill Of “Eating Until Satisfied” For Optimal Health And Performance

HNL Movement Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2021 23:49


The topic for this week’s episode is nutrition, eating until you’re satisfied.  Andrew gives us tips on how to understand the cues that tell us when we’re satisfied, and he lays out the key points that influence our eating habits.  The way that we eat and the portion sizes that we believe are appropriate are influenced by so many factors, including:•   Mental•   Emotional•   Social•   Cultural •   HabitualMost of us have learned to rely on these influences to determine how much to eat instead of relying on our innate system of cues.  We tend to either overeat or undereat, and neither way leads us to nutritional balance.  Both of these habits are caused by a misunderstanding of how we eat until we’re satisfied.  Listen in on this episode to learn how to tune in and find that balance of eating until you’re 80% full, which is that sweet spot of satisfaction.  Eating until we’re satisfied, as opposed to overeating or undereating, can yield the following benefits:•   Endocrine balance•   Better gut/brain connection•   Accurate communication loop of hunger cues•   Reliance on innate systemsTune into this episode to get back to the basics, eating until you’re satisfied.  Learn how to use this skill even at social events and restaurants, where the social and cultural influences on portions are heightened.  Take on the key points given to you in this episode and apply them to your life, and use them to adjust and adapt to a more natural way of eating that will bring positive results!  Enjoy this episode, Aloha. Did you enjoy this episode?Please subscribe and leave a review on:AppleSpotifyGooglePandoraiHeartRadio

Fit Rx
Peptides with Dr. Kent Holtorf, M.D.

Fit Rx

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2021 41:36


Interested to learn more about the health benefits of peptides? Dr. Kent Holtorf, M.D. is the medical director of the Holtorf Medical Group and founder and medical director of the non-profit National Academy of Hypothyroidism (NAH). He is also the founder of Integrative Peptides, dedicated to training physicians about ground-breaking peptide therapies and bringing doctors and patients the highest quality natural bioidentical peptides as supplements with unique delivery systems.Dr. Holtorf is an internationally known lecturer, author, and innovator in cutting-edge research and treatments. He was the Endocrinology Expert for AOL Health; he has published multiple peer-reviewed endocrine review articles and is a guest editor and peer-reviewer for multiple medical journals, including Endocrine, which demonstrated that much of the long-held dogma in endocrinology and infectious disease is inaccurate.He has been a featured guest on numerous major news outlets and print media, including CNBC, ABC News, CNN, Fox News, Good Morning America, The Today Show, Discovery Health, The Learning Channel, the Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, US News and World Report, San Francisco Chronicle, WebMD, Forbes, among many others.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 04.27.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2021 60:03


Anti-aging compound improves muscle glucose metabolism in people Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, April 25, 2021 A natural compound previously demonstrated to counteract aspects of aging and improve metabolic health in mice has clinically relevant effects in people, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. A small clinical trial of postmenopausal women with prediabetes shows that the compound NMN (nicotinamide mononucleotide) improved the ability of insulin to increase glucose uptake in skeletal muscle, which often is abnormal in people with obesity, prediabetes or Type 2 diabetes. NMN also improved expression of genes that are involved in muscle structure and remodeling. However, the treatment did not lower blood glucose or blood pressure, improve blood lipid profile, increase insulin sensitivity in the liver, reduce fat in the liver or decrease circulating markers of inflammation as seen in mice. The study, published online April 22 in the journal Science, is the first randomized clinical trial to look at the metabolic effects of NMN administration in people. Among the women in the study, 13 received 250 mg of NMN orally every day for 10 weeks, and 12 were given an inactive placebo every day over the same period. "Although our study shows a beneficial effect of NMN in skeletal muscle, it is premature to make any clinical recommendations based on the results from our study," said senior investigator Samuel Klein, MD, the William H. Danforth Professor of Medicine and Nutritional Science and director of the Center for Human Nutrition. "Normally, when a treatment improves insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle, as is observed with weight loss or some diabetes medications, there also are related improvements in other markers of metabolic health, which we did not detect in our study participants." The remarkable beneficial effects of NMN in rodents have led several companies in Japan, China and in the U.S. to market the compound as a dietary supplement or a neutraceutical. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is not authorized to review dietary supplement products for safety and effectiveness before they are marketed, and many people in the U.S. and around the world now take NMN despite the lack of evidence to show clinical benefits in people. The researchers studied 25 postmenopausal women who had prediabetes, meaning they had higher than normal blood sugar levels, but the levels were not high enough to be diagnosed as having diabetes. Women were enrolled in this trial because mouse studies showed NMN had the greatest effects in female mice. NMN is involved in producing an important compound in all cells, called nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD). NAD plays a vital role in keeping animals healthy. Levels of NAD decline with age in a broad range of animals, including humans, and the compound has been shown to contribute to a variety of aging-associated problems, including insulin resistance in studies conducted in mice. Supplementing animals with NMN slows and ameliorates age-related decline in the function of many tissues in the body. Co-investigator Shin-ichiro Imai, MD, Ph.D., a professor of developmental biology and of medicine who has been studying NMN for almost two decades and first reported on its benefits in mice said, "This is one step toward the development of an anti-aging intervention, though more research is needed to fully understand the cellular mechanisms responsible for the effects observed in skeletal muscle in people." Insulin enhances glucose uptake and storage in muscle, so people who are resistant to insulin are at increased risk for developing Type 2 diabetes. But the researchers caution that more studies are needed to determine whether NMN has beneficial effects in the prevention or management of prediabetes or diabetes in people. Klein and Imai are continuing to evaluate NMN in another trial involving men as well as women.   High dose of vitamin D fails to improve condition of moderate to severe COVID-19 patients   University of São Paulo's Medical School (Brazil), April 26, 2021 Can a high dose of vitamin D administered on admission to hospital improve the condition of patients with moderate or severe COVID-19? The answer is no, according to a Brazilian study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). The article reports a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, the kind of study considered the gold standard to evaluate drug efficacy. It was conducted with FAPESP's support by researchers at the University of São Paulo's Medical School (FM-USP), who recruited 240 patients treated at Hospital das Clínicas (HC), the hospitalcomplex run by FM-USP, and the Ibirapuera field hospital in São Paulo City in June-August 2020. "In vitro studies or trials with animals had previously shown that in certain situations vitamin D and its metabolites can have anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial effects, as well as modulating the immune response. We decided to investigate whether a high dose of the substance could have a protective effect in the context of an acute viral infection, reducing either the inflammation or the viral load," Rosa Pereira, principal investigator for the project, told Agência FAPESP. The volunteers were randomly divided into two groups, one of which was given vitamin D3 in a single dose of 200,000 units (IU) dissolved in a peanut oil solution. The other group was given only the peanut oil solution. All participants were treated according to the standard protocol for hospital treatment of the disease, which includes administration of antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs. The main purpose was to see if acute supplementation would affect the length of hospital stay for these patients, but the researchers also wanted to find out whether it would mitigate the risks of admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), intubation and death. No significant difference between the groups was observed for any of these clinical outcomes. According to Pereira, the study was designed above all to assess the impact on hospital stay and a larger number of volunteers would be needed to achieve a scientifically acceptable estimate of the effect on mortality. "So far we can say there's no indication to administer vitamin D to patients who come to the hospital with severe COVID-19," she said. For Bruno Gualano, a researcher at FM-USP and penultimate author of the article, the findings show that at least for now there is no "silver bullet" for the treatment of COVID-19. "But that doesn't mean continuous use of vitamin D can't have beneficial effects of some kind," he said. Ideal dose Pereira is currently leading a study at FM-USP to find out whether subjects with sufficient circulating levels of vitamin D combat infection by SARS-CoV-2 better than those with insufficient levels of the nutrient. The ideal level of vitamin D in the blood and the daily supplementation dose vary according to age and overall health, she explained. Older people and patients with chronic diseases including osteoporosis should have more than 30 nanograms per milliliter of blood (ng/mL). For healthy adults, 20 ng/mL is an acceptable threshold. "The ideal approach is case-by-case analysis, if necessary dosing the substance periodically by means of blood work, with supplementation if a deficiency is detected," Pereira said.         Sufficient serum vitamin D before 20 weeks of pregnancy reduced risk of gestational diabetes mellitus Fudan University Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital (China), April 16, 2021 A new study on Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases and Conditions - Obesity and Diabetes is now available. According to news originating from Shanghai, People’s Republic of China, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, “Our aim was to evaluate the relationship between serum vitamin D levels before 20 weeks of pregnancy and the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus. This study is a retrospective study.” Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Fudan University Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, “We analyzed the relationship between serum 25 (OH) D level before 20 weeks of pregnancy (first antenatal examination) and the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus. Age, parity and pre-pregnancy body mass index were used as confounding factors. 8468 pregnant women were enrolled in this study between January 2018 and March 2020 at the Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital of Fudan University. Adjusted smoothing splinespline plots, subgroup analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to estimate the relative risk between 25(OH)D and gestational diabetes mellitus. After fully adjusting the confounding factors, serum vitamin D is a protective factor in gestational diabetes mellitus (OR=0.90). Compared with vitamin D deficiency, vitamin D insufficiency (OR=0.78), sufficience (OR=0.82) are a protective factor for gestational diabetes mellitus. Sufficience vitamin D before 20 weeks of pregnancy is a protective factor for gestational diabetes mellitus. Vitamin D>20 ng/mL can reduce the risk of GDM, which is not much different from the effect of >30 ng/mL.” According to the news editors, the research concluded: “The protective effect of vitamin D is more significant in obese pregnant women.”     Review summarizes known links between endocrine disruptors and breast cancer risk University of Eastern Finland, April 20, 2021 Exposure to certain endocrine-disrupting chemicals could elevate the risk of breast cancer, according to a new comprehensive systematic review of epidemiological research. However, for many chemicals, evidence is inconsistent or still limited. The review was carried out by researchers at the universities of Hong Kong and Eastern Finland and published in Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can interfere with the body's hormonal system, also called the endocrine system, and are widely present in the environment. They originate from a variety of sources, including pesticides, plasticisers and other industrial and pharmaceutical chemicals, as well as natural sources. Humans are often exposed to EDCs through food, but other possible exposure routes include drinking water, skin contact and air. Breast cancer accounts for the majority of women's cancers. There has been an increasing interest in the role of estrogene-mimicking EDCs, so called xenoestrogens, in the development of breast cancer. They comprise a broad range of pesticides, synthetic chemicals, phytoestrogens and certain mycotoxins. The researchers reviewed 131 epidemiological studies evaluating the link between xenoestrogen exposure and breast cancer. Most studies assessed exposures by measuring the EDCs and their metabolites in urine, serum, plasma or adipose tissues.  Some may be genetically more vulnerable to EDCs According to the review, the nowadays widely banned pesticide DDT is one of the most studied EDCs in relation to breast cancer risk. Out of 43 epidemiological studies, eleven reported positive associations between DDT or its metabolites in lipid, serum or plasma and breast cancer incidence. Nine reported higher DDT levels among women with breast cancer than among controls. In a few studies, DDT was linked to estrogen-positive breast cancer or the association to breast cancer risk depended on genotype.  Polychlorinated biphenyls, PCBs, are a large group of compounds earlier much used in electrical devices, surface coatings and other purposes. The review of 50 studies found the association between total PCBs and breast cancer risk to be inconsistent. However, 19 studies linked certain PCBs to a higher breast cancer incidence. Similar to DTT, PCBs accumulate in the adipose tissue and in the food chain and can be excreted in breast milk.  Perfluorooctanoid acid (PFOA) found in some food packaging and cookware was linked to breast cancer risk in three out of five epidemiological studies. Some studies found an association between cancer risk and certain genotypes both for PCBs and PFOAs. DDT, PCBs ja PFOA are POP substances, persistent organic pollutants, the use of which is strictly regulated. DDT ja PCBs are old POP substances and their levels in the environment are decreasing. PFOA is a newer POP substance. Phytoestrogens were found beneficial in some, but not all studies Phytoestrogens are natural plant estrogens that have been suggested to prevent breast cancer. Genistein is a phytoestrogen found in soy products. The review included 29 epidemiological studies focusing on genistein, 18 of which linked it to a lower breast cancer risk, although some only in certain age groups or populations. For most EDCs included in the review, the link to breast cancer has been investigated in only a few epidemiological studies. Phtalates and bisphenol A (BPA), for example, are used in plastic packaging and can transfer to food. According to the review, four out of six studies linked phthalates to increased breast cancer risk. BPA was linked to more aggressive tumours in one study, but two other epidemiological studies found no link to breast cancer. Parabens are common preservatives in foods and cosmetic products and considered possible endocrine disruptors. The only epidemiological study on the topic reported a link between paraben exposures, breast cancer risk and mortality following breast cancer.  Oral contraceptive use was linked to an increased breast cancer risk in seven out of eight epidemiological studies, but there were controversies on how duration or discontinuation of oral contraceptive use affected the risk. The review also included the herbicide atrazine, the industrial by-product dioxine, mycotoxins produced by food and crop molds, and PBDEs found in household furniture coatings and appliances, but epidemiological studies on their links to breast cancer risk were still scarce and often inconsistent.  The writers point out that for EDCs to disrupt endocrine functions, dose, time, duration and age at exposure all matter. In addition, as multiple EDCs coexist in the environment, more research is needed to evaluate their interactive effects on breast cancer risk. The review also suggests that genotypes could determine whether EDC exposure affects breast cancer risk, and more research is needed on this topic. "One example is the polymorphism of the CYP1A1 gene, which is responsible for estrogen metabolism." According to the writers, next-generation technologies, such as genome sequencing, proteomics or epigenomics, can help identify new exposure biomarkers with better sensitivity and specificity. "These technologies will also pave way to better assessment of past exposure and prediction of future risks, by taking into account an individual's genetic profile."     Grape seed extract may protect gut from inflammation: Study Universitat Rovira i Virgili (Spain), April 25, 2021 Proanthocyanidin-rich grape seed extracts may protect the intestines from the deleterious effects of a high-fat/high-carbohydrate diet, according to data from a rat study. A high-fat/high-carbohydrate diet or Western diet has been reported to produce changes in the intestine, explained researchers from the Universitat Rovira i Virgili in Tarragona, Spain. “Concretely, several recent studies have provided compelling new evidence to suggest that changes in the epithelial barrier function and intestinal inflammation are associated with and could even lead to altered regulation of body weight and glucose homeostasis,” they added. “The main consequence of the gut barrier dysfunction has been proposed to be the entry of toxins from the intestinal lumen, which can trigger local inflammation or gain access to the circulation and induce systemic inflammation through cytokine release.” Their new research indicated that a grape seed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE) may protect the gut from such harmful effects. Study details Data published in Molecular Nutrition and Food Research reveals that supplementing the diet of lab rats with medium or high-dose proanthocyanidins had beneficial impacts on intestinal inflammation, oxidative stress, and barrier function. The medium dose was 25 mg/kg, which is a dose similar to the dietary proanthocyanidin intake in humans, explained the researchers. The high dose (50 mg/kg) would exceed the dietary proanthocyanidin intake in humans. Thirty-six week-old rats were fed a Western diet for 15 weeks and then divided into one of four supplementation groups, receiving 0 mg/kg (control), 5 mg/kg (low dose), 25 mg/kg, or 50 mg/kg for an additional three weeks. Results showed that intestinal inflammation, assessed by measuring myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, significantly increased in the control animals, but these increases were reduced in the rats receiving the grape seed extract. In addition, significant reductions in plasma levels of reactive oxygen species were observed in the medium and high dose groups, compared to the control group. Tight junctions The researchers also examined the function of the intestinal barrier, and looked specifically at so-called tight junctions (TJ) between cells in the lining of the intestine – the epithelium. On one side is the intestinal cavity and on the other is a mass of cells and tissues. In a healthy system, materials in the cavity find their way into tissues by passing through the cells, which controls which substances pass through. In an unhealthy system, the tight junctions are not so tight and materials can bypass the cells and find their way into tissues via the tight junctions. This increase in intestinal permeability has been referred to as "leaky gut". “Another point of interest in this study was to evaluate whether GSPE could modulate the alterations in the permeability of the intestinal barrier that are related to the state of intestinal inflammation,” wrote the researchers. “Our findings indicate that the TJ  proteins were negatively associated with measures of adiposity and with the circulating levels of [triglycerides]. These are not causal associations, but they suggest that increased adiposity is accompanied by lower expression of TJ components, which is in agreement with the hypothesis that obesity and a [high-fat diet] are associated with increased intestinal permeability. Then, given the importance of having a healthy barrier function, dietary interventions that can modulate the intestinal permeability might afford an effective tool for the prevention and treatment of metabolic diseases associated with obesity.” The researchers concluded: “Our findings indicate that orally administered GSPE modulates the intestinal inflammation, oxidative stress, and possibly the barrier function. Based on these findings, our data suggest that nutritional and/or therapeutic interventions focused on gut health and modulation of the intestinal permeability should be extensively explored in the context of obesity.”   Antidepressant use in pregnancy tied to affective disorders in offspring; no causal link   Mount Sinai Hospital, April 12, 2021 Major depressive disorder is highly prevalent, with one in five people experiencing an episode at some point in their life, and is almost twice as common in women than in men. Antidepressants are usually given as a first-line treatment, including during pregnancy, either to prevent the recurrence of depression, or as acute treatment in newly depressed patients. Antidepressant use during pregnancy is widespread and since antidepressants cross the placenta and the blood-brain barrier, concern exists about potential long-term effects of intrauterine antidepressant exposure in the unborn child.  Using the Danish National Registers to follow more than 42,000 singleton babies born during 1998-2011 for up to 18 years, researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai investigated whether exposure to antidepressants in the womb would increase the risk of developing affective disorder like depression and anxiety in the child. In a study published April 5 in Neuropsychopharmacology,the scientists found that children whose mothers continued antidepressants during pregnancy had a higher risk of affective disorders than children whose mothers stopped taking antidepressants before pregnancy. However, to understand whether the underlying disorder for which the antidepressant was given or the medication itself was linked to the child's risk of developing an affective disorder, they also studied the effect of paternal antidepressant use during pregnancy and similarly, found that children of fathers who took antidepressants throughout pregnancy had a higher risk for affective disorders. Thus, the research team speculates that rather than being an intrauterine effect, the observed link is most likely due to the parental mental illness underlying the antidepressant use.  "Approximately half of women who use antidepressants before pregnancy decide to discontinue use either before or during pregnancy due to concerns about the negative consequences for their child," said Anna-Sophie Romel, PhD, an instructor in the Department of Psychiatry at Icahn Mount Sinai and first author of the paper. "Our study does not provide evidence for a causal relationship between in-utero exposure to antidepressants and affective disorders in the child. So, while other long-term effects of intrauterine exposure to antidepressants remain to be investigated, our work supports antidepressant continuation for women with severe symptoms or a high risk of relapse because untreated psychiatric illness during pregnancy can have negative consequences on the health and development of the child. Women and their health care providers should carefully weigh all of the treatment options and jointly decide on the best course of action."   Staying Active Can Fight Declines in Cognitive Engagement   North Carolina State University, April 22, 2021   Preserving physical and mental health helps older adults experiencing cognitive impairment stave off declines in cognitive engagement, a new study suggests “We found that declines in physical and mental health were associated with more pronounced cognitive disengagement,” says Shevaun Neupert, professor of psychology at North Carolina State University and corresponding author of the study published in Entropy. “The impact of declines in physical health was particularly pronounced for study participants who had more advanced cognitive impairment to begin with.” There’s a lot of research showing that cognitive engagement can help older adults maintain cognitive health. However, the vast majority of that work has been done on healthy adults. “There’s very little work on cognitive engagement in people who are already cognitively impaired, such as people who have been diagnosed with dementia,” Neupert says. “Are they still capable of sustained cognitive engagement? What factors contribute to that engagement?” To begin addressing those questions, the researchers enlisted 28 study participants. All of the participants were over 60 and had documented cognitive impairment. Participants came to a testing site two times, six months apart. On each visit, researchers collected data on the physical and mental health of the study participants and performed a battery of tests designed to assess cognitive ability. They also connected participants to a device that tracked blood pressure continuously and then asked them to engage in a series of increasingly difficult cognitive tasks. This allowed researchers to track how cognitive engagement changed as the tasks become progressively harder. Cognitive engagement means taking part in activities that are mentally challenging. Monitoring blood pressure allows the researchers to track how hard study participants are working to accomplish cognitive tasks. Specifically, blood pressure rises as more blood is pumped to the brain when participants work harder at these tasks. Broadly speaking, the researchers found that if a participant’s cognitive ability, physical health, or mental health declined over the course of the six month study period, that participant became less cognitively engaged as the tasks became harder. “Normally, you’d expect more engagement as the tasks became harder, but we found that some people essentially stopped trying,” says coauthor Claire Growney, a postdoctoral researcher at Washington University in St. Louis. “The findings highlight the fact that well-being is holistic; physical health, mental health, and cognitive function can influence each other,” says coauthor Xianghe Zhu, a recent PhD graduate of NC State. “In practical terms, it suggests that it may be particularly important for people to focus on mental and physical well-being during the early stages of cognitive decline,” Growney says. “Or, at the very least, don’t become so focused on addressing cognitive challenges that you ignore physical health, or create anxiety or emotional distress for yourself that leads to mental health problems.” “Future research will be needed to determine how beneficial it might be for people to take part in cognitively engaging activities once they’ve started experiencing cognitive decline,” Neupert says. “But we already know that there is an element of ‘use it or lose it’ to cognitive function in healthy adults. And while it’s understandable for people to want to avoid tasks that are difficult or challenging, it’s really important to continue challenging ourselves to take part in difficult cognitive activities.”

Counselor Toolbox Podcast
Pharmacology of Alcohol

Counselor Toolbox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2021


Objectives ~ Explore the impact of alcohol on neurotransmitters and major bodily systems Intro ~ Heavy drinking worsens morbidity from chronic disease as it exacerbates the effects of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hepatitis, and interferes with the metabolism and therapeutic actions of various medications ~ According to the "Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015-2020,” U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture, moderate drinking is up to 1 drink per day for women and up to 2 drinks per day for men.

Ben Greenfield Fitness
Essential Oils to Boost the Brain and Heal the Body: 5 Steps to Calm Anxiety, Sleep Better, and Reduce Inflammation to Regain Control of Your Health.

Ben Greenfield Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2021 74:34


I thought I knew everything there was to know about essential oils. I've been using them ever since my father, Gary Greenfield, introduced me to the incredibly powerful oil of oregano nearly 18 years ago. I quickly adopted oil of oregano as part of my health regimen—using it for everything from supporting my immune system to balancing my gut microbiome to cleaning my teeth.  I've also done tons of podcasts about essential oils, including: The Wizard Of Essential Oils Strikes Again: The Hidden & Magical World Of Little-Known Plant Extracts For Digestion, Relaxation, Libido, Immunity & Much More! with Dr. Nick Berry. Everything You Need To Know About Essential Oils For Fat Loss, Performance, Smart Drugs, Scar Healing, Detoxing And More, With Dr. Sarah Lobisco. The Best Book That Exists For Learning About The Healing Power of Essential Oils And How To Use Them: Soothe Inflammation, Boost Mood, Prevent Autoimmunity & Much More, With Dr. Eric Zielinski. Psychoactive Sleep Edibles, Essential Oil Wizardry, Cosmic Orgasms & More With Dr. Nick Berry I am constantly diffusing essential oils in my bedroom and office; sniff oils like peppermint, rosemary, and cinnamon pre-workout; rub oils into the feet of my children before they go to bed at night; and basically check every box of being a full-on, card-carrying essential oil hippie. But, after recently reading the book Essential Oils to Boost the Brain and Heal the Body: 5 Steps to Calm Anxiety, Sleep Better, and Reduce Inflammation to Regain Control of Your Health by my friend Jodi Cohen, I wound up learning a host of new information and uses for essential oils I had previously been unfamiliar with. So naturally, I just had to get Jodi on my podcast. Jodi is a bestselling author, award-winning journalist, functional practitioner, and founder of Vibrant Blue Oils, where she has combined her training in nutritional therapy and aromatherapy to create unique proprietary blends of organic and wild-crafted essential oils. She has helped over 70,000 clients heal from brain-related challenges, including anxiety, insomnia, and autoimmunity. Her website, vibrantblueoils.com, is visited by over 500,000 natural health seekers every year, and she has rapidly become a top resource for essential oils education on the Internet today. Jodi believes that just as your cell phone or laptop slows down and drains the battery when too many tabs are left open, your brain fatigues when poorly functioning systems or ailments drain its energy. Complaints of brain fog, fatigue, and ADD/ADHD are on the rise and growing every year. All of these factors can block your brain's ability to detoxify and heal. If toxins are not eliminated, they recirculate in the brain, leading to inflammation, which further compromises your brain. What's more, formal diagnoses of brain-related health challenges like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and ALS are increasing exponentially. Here's her good news: Plant-based essential oils are a powerful self-care tool for transforming your life and healing on many levels, even when prescription drugs have failed. In Jodi Cohen’s five-step protocol outlined in her book, the body's natural systems are jump-started with essential oil recipe blends that can: Alleviate stress, anxiety, and depression Improve sleep Calm pain and inflammation Increase energy, sharpen focus, and improve memory Improve digestion and promote weight loss Strengthen the immune system Armed with Cohen’s five steps in her book, and this podcast, you’ll be able to start your own essential oils regimen immediately and be on your way to a healthier body and brain. During this discussion, you'll discover: -The Vibrant Blue Oils blend Jodi used during the interview that improves body circulation...09:05 Circulation blend Black pepper to a circulatory blend enhances synergy of the blend Helps with oxygen flow, thought, reactivity, etc. Datis Kharrazian Master Cleanse fast BioGeometry Protection Of Your Home, Plant Medicine, Parenting, Stacking Rocks, Stages Of Human Consciousness & More With Paul Chek. FUM pen -Stressful experiences that led to Jodi getting interested in essential oils...13:10 Jodi's daughter was diagnosed with bipolar disorder and her son was diagnosed with depression Collapsed emotionally after her son was under proper care Ingesting what she thought was the proper nutrition (trained as a nutritionist) A friend gave her a gift of essential oils; said her gut was damaged to not ingest the nutrition she was taking in Muscle testing technique to narrow into the most effective remedy Suffering from insomnia Pineal gland doesn't secrete melatonin when cortisol is released in excess Researched essential oils and realized two things Very little was researched on how essential oils balance physiology Existing research was too complicated Oils can be used for preventative medicine -How topical administration of essential oils affects the vagus nerve and the organ system...21:06 Clinical practice inconsistent with the research Topical application does not have a systemic benefit Behind the ears for vagal nerve stimulation Above the kidneys on the lower back for the adrenals Clinical practice was inconsistent with what the research said Research on topical application says it is not very effective Applying topical application on a sore knee after a workout has an almost immediate effect but a topical application on the knee does not relieve soreness on your neck Kevin Tracey, surgically implementing devices behind the ear to activate vagus nerve FDA has approved this for epilepsy, migraines, and such Stimulatory oils to trigger the parasympathetic nervous system (experiment with blends) Parasympathetic blend for the vagus nerve; trigger a systemic response by stimulating the vagus nerve Adrenal blend for the adrenals Acupuncture and oils alleviate stagnation and congestion with the energy Hidden Messages in Water by Masaru Emoto -What phenylpropanoids are...27:01 Plant constituents involved in flavonoid synthesis Terry Wahls wrote foreword to Jodi's book Advocates plant diversity and essential oils Good for the digestive process, act as prebiotics Chemistry of Essential Oils Made Simple by David Stewart Breast cancer treatments target hormone receptors and prevent cancer cells from metastasizing Endocrine-disrupting chemicals Essential oils are fat-soluble, can access the cell and clean cell receptors -Application points on the body that can elicit a certain response with essential oils...30:30 Reflex points are on the bottom of the feet and ears Big toe correlated with the brain Err on the side of caution with a carrier oil Parasympathetic blend has clove and lime for the vagus nerve; use as an acupuncture needle Only pressed citrus blends may have potential for harm to the skin in the sun (distilled isn't as harmful) Vagus nerve infection hypothesis Mouth is a hotbed for most infections The jaw drains near the earlobe where it intersects with the vagus nerve Dr. Christine Schaffer of Immanence Health in Seattle Topically applying oils on the neck has many benefits Lymph is like a one-way street -The best carrier oils for different situations...41:18 Different oils work differently as carrier oils Fractionated coconut oils for the vagus nerve Jojoba oil for slower, yoga-type effect Most essential oil research looks at blends, not single oils -How essential oils can be used to stimulate pineal gland function...43:18 Circadian Rhythm blend, with rose geranium, grapefruit, melaleuca, myrtle, lavender, myrrh, balsam of Peru, with fractionated coconut oil as carrier Pineal gland releases melatonin in response to darkness Melatonin is great for detoxifying Blood-brain barrier doesn't protect the pineal gland; blood flow is very high in that area Glyphosate, aluminum, and fluoride from the water hits the pineal gland harder than other parts of the brain (impedes ability to release melatonin) Most remedies can't get into the brain due to the blood-brain barrier They remove calcification, congestion Remove chelation in the brain area Skin above the ears is very thin, ideal place to apply oils Things imbalanced in most people (as discussed in the book): Stuck in the parasympathetic fight or flight state of the nervous system so they can't heal Lack of sleep; sleep is when the brain detoxifies; the brain cleans house during sleep Energy Immune modulation People report better recall of dreams and even erotic dreams using the Circadian Rhythm blend -Using essential oils as anesthetics...49:13 Essential oils improve blood and lymph flow, relieve inflammation Peppermint is efficacious for pain relief Parasympathetic blend, with clove and lime, calms pain signals Smelling as a general anesthetic - takes priority over all your senses Nose cells are actually brain cells; calms your nervous system that way Topically apply peppermint, basil, lavender, and frankincense for immediate relief -How cinnamon oil is used for blood sugar regulation...51:51 Different types of cinnamon oil depending on where on the plant it comes from Cinnamon bark for appetite suppression Topically apply in inner cheek, diluted with coconut oil Oil pulling is a great strategy Jodi's oil pulling strategy: 1/2 cup coconut oil 30 drops of either peppermint or cinnamon Cinnamon oil is also a great mosquito repellant Thieves oil BGF oral health podcasts: It’s All In Your Mouth: How Your Teeth Are Impacting Your Immune System, Sleep, Performance, Inflammation & Much More (& What You Can Do About It With Holistic Dentistry), With Dr. Dominik Nischwitz Is Charcoal Toothpaste OK, 8 Crucial Mouth Beauty & Oral Health Tips, Peptides For Oral Care, The Invisible Dental Flow In Your Mouth & Much More With Nadine Artemis. 403: Teeth Care Tactics, How To Time Your Protein For Muscle Gain, Biohacking Night Shift Work & Much More! -The 5 keys to health Jodi systematizes in her book...56:15 Shifting the nervous system into parasympathetic Improving sleep and detoxifying the brain Fueling the brain with energy; lymphatic flow Reducing stress, improving mood, weight loss, and increasing energy Modulating the immune system Inhale through the left nostril as an antidote to anxiety attacks The Healing Code by Alexander Loyd Apply on the forehead for hypothalamus to "reboot to factory settings" The adrenals and the thyroid are controlled by the hypothalamus The hypothalamus is the "CEO of the endocrine system" Brain inflammation is responsible for fatigue, memory loss, pain Immune cells in the brain are different from immune cells in the body Frankincense can turn off inflammatory cascade in the brain (similar to CBD) The most efficient way to apply oils is at the base of the brain -A day in the life of an essential oils expert...1:04:19 Morning exercise, oil pulling - peppermint with coconut oil Enhance circulation with Circulation blend mentioned above Combine with Lymph oil Parasympathetic state optimizes digestion Parasympathetic blend before meals Circadian rhythm blend before bed (in an Epsom salt bath) Your skin is your largest organ For relaxation before bed, combine in a bath (mix in the tub so the oil doesn't float on top): 2 cups of baking soda 1 cup of Epsom salt 3 drops of lavender Any essential oil diffuser will work fine; be sure to clean regularly with vinegar so you're not diffusing mold, and avoid overuse -Compelling research Jodi has discovered since writing her book...1:09:08 Linda Buck research on effects of rose oil on olfactory receptors Stay in the parasympathetic state as much as possible Jodi's free gift "Boost the Brain"  (an entire chapter from her book on the vagus nerve) Ensure the oils you use are organic -And much more! Resources from this episode: - Jodi Cohen: Essential Oils To Boost The Brain And Heal The Body Healing With Essential Oils Vibrant Blue Oils Circulation Blend Parasympathetic Blend Adrenal Blend Circadian Rhythm Blend Peppermint Lavender Frankincense Lymph Oil Free Chapter "Boost the Brain" - Podcasts: The Wizard Of Essential Oils Strikes Again: The Hidden & Magical World Of Little-Known Plant Extracts For Digestion, Relaxation, Libido, Immunity & Much More! with Dr. Nick Berry. Everything You Need To Know About Essential Oils For Fat Loss, Performance, Smart Drugs, Scar Healing, Detoxing And More, With Dr. Sarah Lobisco. The Best Book That Exists For Learning About The Healing Power of Essential Oils And How To Use Them: Soothe Inflammation, Boost Mood, Prevent Autoimmunity & Much More, With Dr. Eric Zielinski. Psychoactive Sleep Edibles, Essential Oil Wizardry, Cosmic Orgasms & More With Dr. Nick Berry BioGeometry Protection Of Your Home, Plant Medicine, Parenting, Stacking Rocks, Stages Of Human Consciousness & More With Paul Chek. It’s All In Your Mouth: How Your Teeth Are Impacting Your Immune System, Sleep, Performance, Inflammation & Much More (& What You Can Do About It With Holistic Dentistry), With Dr. Dominik Nischwitz Is Charcoal Toothpaste OK, 8 Crucial Mouth Beauty & Oral Health Tips, Peptides For Oral Care, The Invisible Dental Flow In Your Mouth & Much More With Nadine Artemis. 403: Teeth Care Tactics, How To Time Your Protein For Muscle Gain, Biohacking Night Shift Work & Much More! - Books: The Cure In the Cupboard By Cass Ingram Hidden Messages In Water By Masaru Emoto Chemistry Of Essential Oils Made Simple By David Stewart The Healing Code By Alexander Loyd - Other resources: FUM Pen Essential Oil Diffuser Oil Of Oregano Master Cleanse Fractionated Coconut Oils Oil Pulling Coconut Oil Thieves Oil Magnesium Bath Salt Baking Soda Datis Kharrazian Kevin Tracey Terry Wahls Dr. Christine Schaffer Of Immanence Health Linda Buck Research On Olfactory Receptors Vagus Nerve Infection Hypothesis How Essential Oils Detoxify The Pineal Gland 3 Essential Oil Blends To Mend Cell Receptors Episode sponsors: -The Boundless Cookbook: Coming soon! Optimize your physical and mental performance with nutritious and delicious Greenfield family recipes. This is your roadmap to a culinary journey that includes ancient food and wild game preparation tactics, biohacked smoothies, meat rubs, cocktails, desserts, and beyond—without any restrictive diet, limited ingredients, or tasteless “health foods!” -Kion Lean: Support for normal blood sugar levels and healthy energy metabolism, even after large, carb-rich meals. Ben Greenfield Fitness listeners, receive a 20% discount off your entire order when you use discount code BGF20. -Joovv: After using the Joovv for close to 2 years, it's the only light therapy device I'd ever recommend. Give it a try: you won't be disappointed. For a limited time, Joovv wants to hook you up with an exclusive discount on your first order. Just apply code BEN to your qualifying order.  -Lucy Nicotine Gum: If you are looking for a cleaner and tastier alternative to other nicotine products, then this product is for you. The gum comes in three flavors - Wintergreen, Cinnamon, and Pomegranate - and the lozenges in cherry ice. To save 20% on any order, just use discount code BEN20. -Seed Daily Synbiotic: A formulation of 24 unique strains, each of which included at their clinically verified dose, to deliver systemic benefits in the body. Save 15% off your order when you use discount code BEN15. Do you have questions, thoughts, or feedback for Jodi or me? Leave your comments below and one of us will reply!